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Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

Jefferson Lab Hands-on Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These are some of the hands-on activities used in Jefferson Lab's BEAMS program. In BEAMS, classes of 6th, 7th and 8th grade students are exposed to the Lab's scientific environment. For five consecutive days during school hours, classes of 6th grade students and their teachers participate in these science and math activities conducted with Jefferson Lab staff.

Education, Thomas J.

2

Hands-On Activities and Their Influence on Students' Interest  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the influence of hands-on activities on students' interest. We researched whether students with experience in specific hands-on activities show higher interest in these activities than students without experience. Furthermore, the relationship between the quality of the hands-on experience and interest in the respective…

Holstermann, Nina; Grube, Dietmar; Bogeholz, Susanne

2010-01-01

3

Software to Enhance Hands-On Laboratory Experimentation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This presentation from MATEC explains the transition from using software to getting hands-on experience in a lab. The laboratory setting in technology related courses is an integral part of the learning experience for the student. It takes the theory that is being learned in the lecture and applies that theory. The text books that are used in the lecture include a copy of either Multi Sim or Electronic Workbench. The software gives the student the ability to "build" the circuits that are under study without the hardware that is found in the lab. The students at Grambling State University are not utilizing the software in the beginning level classes. The students must start utilizing the software earlier in the educational career. To accomplish this, the students are starting to complete the lab assignments with software before going to the lab. By doing this, the students will know what to expect before starting lab. This can and hopefully will remove some confusion that the beginner level circuit student has when constructing a circuit. The next step to improving and enhancing the laboratory experience for the student is to add a computer system to each laboratory station. Each system will contain software and hardware that will connect the test instruments to the computer and perform a multitude of analysis functions. The software that has stimulated some interest is MatLab. MatLab includes curriculum for some of the following: digital signal processing, digital image processing, digital filters, signals and systems, speech processing, computer-controlled systems, applied digital signal processing, dynamic modeling of engineering systems, and continuous-time linear systems. In conclusion, the learning invention for this laboratory is to bring together the lecture and lab through the implementation of software and hardware. This was part of the Learning Invention Labs that MATEC held. Visit the MATEC.org homepage for more information.

Flinders, Shirley

2013-01-01

4

Process and Learning Outcomes from Remotely-Operated, Simulated, and Hands-on Student Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A large-scale, multi-year, randomized study compared learning activities and outcomes for hands-on, remotely-operated, and simulation-based educational laboratories in an undergraduate engineering course. Students (N = 458) worked in small-group lab teams to perform two experiments involving stress on a cantilever beam. Each team conducted the…

Corter, James E.; Esche, Sven K.; Chassapis, Constantin; Ma, Jing; Nickerson, Jeffrey V.

2011-01-01

5

Thinking with Hands-On Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal for library media specialists and teachers is to lead students to use technology to communicate, in a powerful and meaningful way, and to creatively display what they have learned. With these ideas in mind, this article details several projects using Microsoft PowerPoint XP. The activities, with simplified instructions, can be adapted to…

Conover, Patricia Ross

2009-01-01

6

Hands-On Classroom Photolithography Laboratory Module to Explore Nanotechnology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nanotechnology is an area of significant interest and can be used as a motivator for students in subject areas including physics, chemistry, and life sciences. A 5X reducer system and associated lesson plan was used to provide students a hands-on exposure to the basic principles of photolithography and microscale circuit fabrication.

Stelick, Scott J.; Alger, William H.; Laufer, Jesse S.; Waldron, Anna M.; Batt, Carl A.

2005-01-01

7

Communicate science: an example of food related hands-on laboratory approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV's Educational and Outreach Laboratory) organized activity with kids to convey scientific knowledge and to promote research on Earth Science, focusing on volcanic and seismic hazard. The combination of games and learning in educational activity can be a valuable tool for study of complex phenomena. Hands-on activity may help in engage kids in a learning process through direct participation that significantly improves the learning performance of children. Making learning fun motivate audience to pay attention on and stay focused on the subject. We present the experience of the hand-on laboratory "Laboratorio goloso per bambini curiosi di scienza (a delicious hands-on laboratory for kids curious about science)", performed in Frascati during the 2013 European Researchers' Night, promoted by the European Commission, as part of the program organized by the Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica in the framework of Associazione Frascati Scienza (http://www.frascatiscienza.it/). The hand-on activity were designed for primary schools to create enjoyable and unusual tools for learning Earth Science. During this activity kids are involved with something related to everyday life, such as food, through manipulation, construction and implementation of simple experiments related to Earth dynamics. Children become familiar with scientific concepts such as composition of the Earth, plates tectonic, earthquakes and seismic waves propagation and experience the effect of earthquakes on buildings, exploring their important implications for seismic hazard. During the activity, composed of several steps, participants were able to learn about Earth inner structure, fragile lithosphere, waves propagations, impact of waves on building ecc.., dealing with eggs, cookies, honey, sugar, polenta, flour, chocolate, candies, liquorice sticks, bread, pudding and sweets. The activity was successful as more than 500 kids of different ages participated with great enthusiasm, as well as they parents, and gave the chance to explore and manipulate even complex scientific arguments without getting the feeling of having doing this.

D'Addezio, Giuliana; Marsili, Antonella; Vallocchia, Massimiliano

2014-05-01

8

Fun with Hands-on Science Activities for Elementary Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains hands-on activities in science that make use of balloons and are fun and stimulating as well as challenging. By actively participating in these activities, students can develop science process and critical thinking skills as well as technical and measuring skills. Topics include Air as Matter, Pressure, Chemical Change,…

Barry, Dana M.

9

Exploring Planets in the Classroom: Hands-On Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by the Hawaii Space Grant Consortium, the Exploring Planets in the Classroom: Hands-On Activities Web site offers 25 science activities for students. Categories include an introduction to the solar system, planetary properties, volcanology, impact craters, dynamic earth, gradation, gravity forces and rockets, the moon, remote sensing, and Mars. Just one example of the many quality activities shows students how to build an accelerometer to measure g-forces.

1996-01-01

10

Curriculum Materials: Hands-On Activities from The Water Sourcebook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These curriculum materials are from The Water Sourcebook series, a popular set of hands-on water environment activities. The activities, arranged by grade level, range from construction of a big book about water in the life of a fish for younger students to the exploration of the physics of artesian flow for older learners. Topics include the water cycle, conservation, consumption, contamination, treatment, landfills, rivers, flow dynamics, and detecting radon. Correlations to other subject areas are indicated. Several of the activities are available in Spanish. There are also links to information and a poster about careers in the water environment field.

11

Technology and engineering education students' perceptions of hands-on and hands-off activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technology and engineering education students responded to a survey regarding hands?on and hands?off activities. First, the students listed hands?on and hands?off activities and what characterized the two types of activities. Activities such as building or assembling something as well as working manually with tools were viewed as hands?on. Passive activities such as listening or watching were perceived as hands?off. Then,

David M. Sianez; Madeleine A. Fugère; Carter A. Lennon

2010-01-01

12

Do Predators Always Win? Starfish versus Limpets: A Hands-On Activity Examining Predator-Prey Interactions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article we propose a hands-on experimental activity about predator-prey interactions that can be performed both in a research laboratory and in the classroom. The activity, which engages students in a real scientific experiment, can be explored not only to improve students' understanding about the diversity of anti-predator behaviors but…

Faria, Claudia; Boaventura, Diana; Galvao, Cecilia; Chagas, Isabel

2011-01-01

13

Examining the Multi-Sensory Characteristics of Hands-On Science Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research in science education demonstrates the importance and effectiveness of the hands-on approach in student learning. Activity- oriented instruction offers multi-modal opportunities for learning science. However, there is very little research on the sensory nature of hands-on science learning. How do science educators describe lab activities

Klemm, E. Barbara; Plourde, Lee A.

14

Hands-on Activities That Simulate Polar Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article highlights science lessons and activities that can help elementary students gain an understanding of the tools and technology involved in polar research. Suggestions for literacy integration are provided, and activities are aligned to national standards.

Fries-Gaither, Jessica

15

Art Activities for All Ages. Hands-On Africa.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book explores the art heritage of Sub-Saharan Africa with projects (n=40) and activities (n=15) featuring African animals. Artifacts from museums and private collections have inspired the activity choices in the book, and an effort has been made to present fresh and new ideas, not always found in most activity books on diversity. As with all…

Merrill, Yvonne Y.

16

Science Action Labs Part 3: Puzzlers. An Innovative Collection of Hands-On Science Activities and Labs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains hands-on science laboratory activities for grades 4 through 9 that use discrepant events to challenge students. All of the "puzzlers" are based upon science principles and include directions for building gadgets that explain the "puzzlers." Topics covered include: volume conservation, magnetic phenomena, optical illusions,…

Shevick, Ed

17

Do Hands-On, Technology-Based Activities Enhance Learning by Reinforcing Cognitive Knowledge and Retention?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The geodesic dome concept was presented to 25 eighth graders through reading and a hands-on group assignment and to 25 via reading and lecture. Pre/posttest results showed that organized hands-on activities increased learning and retention of technological concepts. (SK)

Korwin, Anthony R.; Jones, Ronald E.

1990-01-01

18

Flower Bulb Science: Activities for the Hands-on Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learn about The Bulb Project, a website for educators full of activities that demonstrate the value and cross-curricular opportunities of growing flower bulbs for the classroom. These activities encourage students to become more ecologically aware, allow for community involvement, and increase student awareness of the environment. Share your ideas as well on this site developed at Cornell University. This seminar features our experts from the Cornell University Department of Horticulture: Marcia Eames-Sheavly of the Garden-Based Learning Program and Craig Cramer, Communications Specialist, with special guest and site developer Elly Cramer from the National Science Digital Library.

Payo, Robert

19

Small Wonders. Hands-On Science Activities for Young Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children are natural scientists and are constantly questioning and challenging the world around them. This book is designed to help preschool and primary teachers see the science in common things. It is a book of manipulative activities that are designed to nurture a child's natural curiosity as well as integrate science with other areas.…

Perdue, Peggy K.

20

Hands On Physical Science Activities for Middle Schools. First Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book was written on the premise that learning science should be fun and rewarding. The teacher may use it as the foundation for an extended middle school curriculum spanning more than one year or to supplement an existing curriculum with individual sections or exercises from the book. The activities have been organized and designed in a…

Levy, Salvator S.

21

One Key LOGO and Hands-On Activity Cards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed to assist primary school teachers who wish to implement LOGO and One-Key LOGO (OKL) in their schools, this document consists of a LOGO resource manual and 92 color-coded activity cards designed to guide a pre-reader or primary child through a series of problem solving steps. After a brief introduction, which contains computer terminology…

Friesen, Chuck; And Others

22

Hands-On and Minds-On Modeling Activities to Improve Students' Conceptions of Microscopic Friction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this paper we discuss the development and validation of hands-on and minds-on modeling activities geared towards improving students' understanding of microscopic friction. We will also present our investigation on the relative effectiveness of the use of the developed instructional material with two lecture formatsâtraditional and videotaped lectures. Results imply that through a series of carefully designed hands-on and minds-on modeling activities, it is possible to facilitate the refinement of students' ideas of microscopic friction.

Corpuz, Edgar D.; Rebello, N. S.

2009-07-06

23

Does the Lack of Hands-On Experience in a Remotely Delivered Laboratory Course Affect Student Learning?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators question whether performing a laboratory experiment as an observer (non-hands-on), such as conducted in a distance education context, can be as effective a learning tool as personally performing the experiment in a laboratory environment. The present paper investigates this issue by comparing the performance of distance education…

Abdel-Salam, Tarek; Kauffman, Paul J.; Crossman, Gary

2006-01-01

24

Work in progress — Enhancing students learning through instructional videos during hands-on laboratories on renewable energy sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the University of California Santa Cruz, a renewable energy sources course is a theory based course that includes six hands-on laboratory experiments. The course is designed for engineering and non-engineering undergraduate students and does not require any advanced mathematics or physics background. Each laboratory experiment introduces a miniature version of an energy conversion device that mimics the insights and

Oxana Pantchenko; Shehba Shahab; Daniel Tate; Philippe Matteini; Michael Isaacson; Ali Shakouri

2011-01-01

25

The Art and Science Connection. Hands-On Activities for Primary Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most people think that the artist and the scientist live in two totally different worlds. However, art and science are only two different ways of understanding and knowing the world. To help primary students make a connection between art and science, a collection of hands-on activities have been developed. By engaging in these activities that…

Tolley, Kimberley

26

The Art and Science Connection: Hands-on Activities for Intermediate Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most people think that the artist and the scientist live in two totally different worlds. However, art and science are only two different ways of understanding and knowing the world. To help intermediate students make a connection between art and science, a collection of hands-on activities have been developed. By engaging in these activities that…

Tolley, Kimberley

27

Towards Achieving Hands-On Project Based Learning beyond Laboratories and into the Dorm Rooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been a lot of emphasis placed on providing hands-on project based learning in engineering education A lot of these initiatives have also been successful in creating an environment where the student goes beyond theory and incorporates real-world signals in the experiments. However, there is still a major gap in being able to sustain this kind of excitement being

Shekhar Sharad; Tom Robbins

2010-01-01

28

Teaching the Common Core Math Standards with Hands-On Activities, Grades 6-8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics have been formulated to provide students with instruction that will help them acquire a thorough knowledge of math at their grade level, which will in turn enable them to move on to higher mathematics with competence and confidence. "Hands-on Activities for Teaching the Common Core Math…

Muschla, Judith A.; Muschla, Gary Robert; Muschla, Erin

2012-01-01

29

Hands-on-CERN  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of the Hands-On CERN project is to increase understanding of the most fundamental processes inside matter, and to explain modern research about particle collisions. The site includes many lab activities, interactive resources, and background information for teachers and learners. CERN is the European Organization for Nuclear Research. It's primary function is to provide the particle accelerators and other infrastructure needed for high-energy physics research. Its laboratory houses the LHC (Large Hadron Collider).

2011-09-13

30

Inquiry-Based, Hands-on In-class Astronomy Activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, we have restructured our introductory astronomy course to include hands-on inquiry-based in-class group activities. These activities utilize a learning cycle approach to cover specific astronomical concepts that traditionally resist conceptual change, such as phases of the moon and seasons, or that students have difficulty mastering, such as Hubble's law and the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Each group activity is designed to be completed during one 50-minute class period and utilize hands-on equipment whenever possible. In this poster, we will discuss the design and implementation of these group activities into our introductory astronomy course, as well as results of evaluation of the successfulness of these activities at promoting conceptual understanding and reasoning skills.

Lindell, Rebecca; Foster, T.

2006-12-01

31

Hands-On CFD Educational Interface for Engineering Courses and Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of an effective curriculum for students to learn com- putational fluid dynamics (CFD) in introductory and intermedi- ate undergraduate and introductory graduate level courses\\/ laboratories. The curriculum is designed for use at different uni- versities with different courses\\/laboratories, learning objectives, applications, conditions, and exercise notes. The common objec- tive is to teach

FREDERICK STERN; TAO XING; DONALD B. YARBROUGH; ALRIC ROTHMAYER; GANESH RAJAGOPALAN

2006-01-01

32

Designing Blended Inquiry Learning in a Laboratory Context: A Study of Incorporating Hands-On and Virtual Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on the development of a methodology that integrates virtual and hands-on inquiry in a freshman introductory biology course. Using a two time x two order-condition design, an effective combination (blend) of the two environments was evaluated with 39 freshman biology participants. The quantitative results documented no…

Toth, Eva Erdosne; Morrow, Becky L.; Ludvico, Lisa R.

2009-01-01

33

Partnership with informal education learning centers to develop hands-on activities for research outreach efforts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Outreach informed by scientific research plays an important role in fostering interest in science by making science and scientists accessible, fun, and interesting. Developing an interest in science in young, elementary-aged students through outreach is a rewarding endeavor for researchers, in that audiences are usually receptive, requirements for broader impacts are met, and bonds are formed between researchers and members of their local and surrounding communities. Promoting such interest among young students is imperative not only for an individual researcher's own self interest, but also for the strength of American science and innovation moving forward, and is the responsibility of the current generation of scientists. Developing genuine and successful inquiry-based, hands-on activities for elementary-aged students is outside the expertise of many researchers. Partnering with an informal education learning center (i.e. science museum or after-school program) provides researchers with the expertise they might be lacking in such endeavors. Here, we present a series of polar-, engineering- and microbiology-themed hands-on activities that have been developed by researchers at a government lab in partnership with a local science museum. Through a series of workshops, the science education staff at the museum provided researchers with background and instruction on inquiry and hands-on activities, and then collaborated with the researchers to develop activities which were later demonstrated at the museum to museum-goers. Education staff provided feedback about the presentation of the activities for further refinement. The program provided an opportunity for researchers to develop fun, on-target and age-appropriate science activities for elementary-aged students, an audience for outreach, and enabled general public audiences the chance to interact with researchers and scientists in an informal setting.

Courville, Z.; Haynes, R.; DeFrancis, G.; Koh, S.; Ringelberg, D.

2012-12-01

34

Informal Activities with Lasers, Lights, and Lenses: The Hands-On Optics Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hands-On Optics project began as a follow-up to the 2001 NSF planning grant "Optics Education -- A Blueprint for the 21st Century", which described the value of informal science programs in addressing the disconnect between the ubiquity of optics in everyday life and the noticeable absence of optics education in K-12 curricula and in informal science education programs. Key partners in the project are NOAO, SPIE-The International Society for Optical Engineering, and the Optical Society of America (OSA). The informal instructional materials created by the project are distributed through science centers nationwide and through the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement Program (MESA) in a number of states, including Arizona, California, Washington, and Maryland. A key part of the project is the involvement, modeled after Project ASTRO, of optics professionals currently engaged in outreach activities and programs. Optics professionals (termed optics resource volunteers) are teamed with MESA and science center educators in implementing the program. These hands-on, high-interest, standards-connected activities and materials provide 6, three-hour-long optics activity modules that can be used in a variety of informal settings. We will describe the techniques used at NOAO to train educators, parents, and optics professionals who will work with the HOO activities as well as the different approaches needed for different informal education programs, ranging from Saturday programs, after-school programs, and science center programs. NOAO is developing the six modules and associated kits as well as competitions that have broad appeal to 12-year olds. Hands-On Optics: Making an Impact with Light (HOO) is a collaborative NSF-funded four-year informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.

2005-12-01

35

Hands-on program of IBM-PC training at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Since December 1983, the Laboratory has offered introductory courses of IBM-PC training. A comprehensive needs assessment was conducted and a nine-course module of classes was designed and implemented. Forty classes were completed in the one-year period. The target group includes the novice computer user in the scientific, management, administrative, and secretarial personnel groups. The development, needs assessment, course implementation and design, course evaluations, and future direction of computer training will be discussed. Lab-automation, robotics, design of the lab and office and the impact of computer on society will be discussed briefly.

Lier, R.H.

1985-01-01

36

Effects of Combined Hands-on Laboratory and Computer Modeling on Student Learning of Gas Laws: A Quasi-Experimental Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on current theories of chemistry learning, this study intends to test a hypothesis that computer modeling enhanced hands-on\\u000a chemistry laboratories are more effective than hands-on laboratories or computer modeling laboratories alone in facilitating\\u000a high school students' understanding of chemistry concepts. Thirty-three high school chemistry students from a private all-girl\\u000a high school in northeastern United States were divided into two

Xiufeng Liu

2006-01-01

37

Hands-On Astrophysics, 680 Hands at a Time: Lab Activities in Big Classes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In brief: it is possible to have students do experiments in very large lecture classes. Evaluations show it works. Hands-on science, while traditional in many other disciplines, has not played a large role in astronomy teaching, though many of the concepts we deal with such as heat and pressure can be explored with simple experiments. 340 students in a large lecture class did an experiment with drink bottles, ice, warm water, and baggies to explore the dependence of pressure on temperature. They worked together in approximately 100 groups, working through a teaching sequence which included both a classic demonstration done by the instructor and a hands-on activity where they did the experiment themselves. This activity was carried out in a rather challenging setting: a large lecture room with fixed seats and no plumbing. Handling and disposing of the materials was only modestly more challenging than teaching a regular class. Student evaluations and student performance on exam questions demonstrated that the activity was successful. This research was part of DISCUS (Delaware Innovative Science/Math Collaborative for Undergraduate Success), an initiative supported by the Delaware Department of Public Instruction and the National Science Foundation (DUE-9553787).

Shipman, H.

1996-12-01

38

Hands-on Activities versus Worksheets in Reinforcing Physical Science Principles: Effects on Student Achievement and Attitude.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A group of 132 agricultural science students were divided into an experimental group who completed hands-on activities on Ohm's Law and incline plane and a control group who completed worksheets. There were no significant differences in immediate or follow-up measures of achievement. Hands-on students had significantly more positive attitudes. (SK)

Johnson, Donald M.; Wardlow, George W.; Franklin, Timothy D.

1997-01-01

39

Integrating Experiment, Modeling and Design using a Hands on Hydraulic Positioning Laboratory for Mechanical Control Systems Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of a laboratory intensive curriculum, Mechanical Engineering students at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo are required to take a senior level class in Mechanical Control Systems. In addition to three one-hour lectures, students attend a weekly three hour laboratory session where course concepts are reinforced through hands-on modeling and experimentation. This paper describes a newly implemented and innovative laboratory experience which is centered on a hydraulic position control system. Often experiments in Mechanical Controls are heavily influenced by non-linearities such as friction or backlash which cause inexperienced students to lose confidence in linear system modeling as an effective analysis and design tool. A hydraulic system was chosen for this laboratory due to excellent correlation between experimental results and the linear modeling techniques taught in the course. This laboratory experience is designed to integrate linear system modeling techniques, experimentation and data collection, control system design, and design verification through physical testing using a variety of hardware and software tools. The main objectives of the laboratory are to give the students practice and confidence in advanced control system modeling, experience with precision hydraulic positioning systems, practice in designing Proportional-Integral (PI) controllers, exposure to digital control systems and experience and physical understanding of the sometimes dramatic condition of instability. The methodology includes a unique procedure that uses root locus concepts and asks the students to drive the system to instability to determine system parameters. The paper describes the laboratory experience in detail and gives some example results and an assessment of student learning.

Birdsong, Charles; Owen, Frank; Ridgely, John; Widmann, James

2009-08-11

40

Hands-on Activities Tie Science Ed Standards to Space Weather on Windows to the Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Windows to the Universe project includes a large web site with extensive user traffic as well as program of professional development workshops for teachers. In the past 5 years we have conducted 18 workshops dedicated exclusively to space weather and magnetism serving 573 total attendees. This talk describes our pedagogical approach of blending hands-on activities, covering basic concepts of magnetism, with visually- rich presentations of space weather topics in order to encourage teachers to incorporate space weather themes into their classroom teaching. Basic understanding of physical science themes of magnetism, electricity, forces, and motion are well represented in science education standards. Hands-on activities touching upon these themes simultaneously fulfill a teacher's need to cover topics in the standards and prepare students to comprehend more abstract representations of more complex systems relevant to space weather. Simply put, a student who has traced field lines around a bar magnet using a simple magnetometer is much better equipped to comprehend portrayals (images and animations) of complex magnetic fields associated with space weather phenomena. Thus, one of our main approaches to space weather education has been to encourage students to explore basic physical science concepts (as outlined in education standards) via hands-on activities and then to link those simple principles to more complex and visually captivating representations of space weather phenomena. We employ two other approaches to making the connections between standards-based themes that teachers must cover and concepts that are key to the study of space weather. The first is to tap heavily into "societal impacts" elements of education standards. Space weather presents numerous instances in which phenomena of scientific interest - such as radiation hazards to spacecraft and astronauts, communications disruptions, and surges in electrical power systems - have implications for modern society. The second is to point out space weather "case studies" in which key principles from various scientific disciplines come to bear. Radiation danger associated with space weather provides one such case, bringing together knowledge of energy, forces, and motion from the physical sciences with concepts like mutation, cell repair, and cancer from the life sciences. The aurora present another rich case, combining ideas of spectroscopy and energy transitions in atoms with the chemistry of Earth's atmosphere and Earth science concepts of atmospheric structure.

Russell, R. M.; Johnson, R. M.

2008-12-01

41

Hands-On, Demonstration, and Videotape Laboratories for Non-Science Majors in a Food Science Course: Achievement, Attitude, and Efficiency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student achievement, attitude, and instructional efficiency were determined for hands-on and for live and videotape demonstration laboratories for nonscience majors. Each of 3 laboratory sections experienced 3 different teaching methods for one 4-wk unit. No significant difference in achievement was found among the laboratory methods. An attitude…

Johnson, H. L.; Trout, B. L.; Brekke, C. J.; Luedecke, L. O.

2004-01-01

42

Computer Assisted Fluid Power Instruction: A Comparison of Hands-On and Computer-Simulated Laboratory Experiences for Post-Secondary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of utilizing a combination of lecture and computer resources to train personnel to assume roles as hydraulic system technicians and specialists in the fluid power industry. This study compared computer simulated laboratory instruction to traditional hands-on laboratory instruction,…

Wilson, Scott B.

2005-01-01

43

A Strategy for Incorporating Hands-On GC-MS into the General Chemistry Lecture and Laboratory Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes strategies to introduce students in a first year chemistry course to the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and provides students with hands-on experiences in its use. (ASK)

Reeves, Perry C.; Pamplin, Kim L.

2001-01-01

44

Quantum Mechanics for Everyone: Hands-On Activities Integrated with Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains a hands-on approach to teaching quantum mechanics that challenges the belief shared by many physics instructors that quantum mechanics is a very abstract subject that cannot be understood until students have learned much of the classical physics. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

Zollman, Dean A.; Rebello, N. Sanjay; Hogg, Kirsten

2002-01-01

45

Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

2009-01-01

46

Square Wheels and Other Easy-To-Build Hands-On Science Activities. An Exploratorium Science Snackbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book, part of The Exploratorium science "snackbook" series, explains science with a hands-on approach. Activities include: (1) "3-D Shadow"; (2) "Bits and Bytes"; (3) "Circuit Workbench"; (4) "Diamagnetic Repulsion"; (5) "Film Can Racer"; (6) "Fractal Patterns"; (7) "Hoop Nightmares"; (8) "Hydraulic Arm"; (9) "Hyperbolic Slot"; (10) "Light…

Rathjen, Don; Doherty, Paul

47

Hands-On Calculus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper we discuss manipulatives and hands-on investigations for Calculus involving volume, arc length, and surface area to motivate and develop formulae which can then be verified using techniques of integration. Pre-service teachers in calculus courses using these activities experience a classroom in which active learning is encouraged and…

Sutherland, Melissa

2006-01-01

48

Hands-on Herps.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a hands-on activity to help primary, intermediate, and advanced students learn about and compare the general characteristics of reptiles and amphibians. Suggests "herp stations" to provide experiences. Details materials, background and procedures necessary for using this activity. (CW)

Science Activities, 1987

1987-01-01

49

Access to hands-on mathematics measurement activities using robots controlled via speech generating devices: three case studies.  

PubMed

Abstract Purpose: To examine how using a robot controlled via a speech generating device (SGD) influences the ways students with physical and communication limitations can demonstrate their knowledge in math measurement activities. Method: Three children with severe physical disabilities and complex communication needs used the robot and SGD system to perform four math measurement lessons in comparing, sorting and ordering objects. The performance of the participants was measured and the process of using the system was described in terms of manipulation and communication events. Stakeholder opinions were solicited regarding robot use. Results: Robot use revealed some gaps in the procedural knowledge of the participants. Access to both the robot and SGD was shown to provide several benefits. Stakeholders thought the intervention was important and feasible for a classroom environment. Conclusions: The participants were able to participate actively in the hands-on and communicative measurement activities and thus meet the demands of current math instruction methods. Implications for Rehabilitation Current mathematics pedagogy encourages doing hands-on activities while communicating about concepts. Adapted Lego robots enabled children with severe physical disabilities to perform hands-on length measurement activities. Controlling the robots from speech generating devices (SGD) enabled the children, who also had complex communication needs, to reflect and report on results during the activities. By using the robots combined with SGDs, children both exhibited their knowledge of and experienced the concepts of mathematical measurements. PMID:23957389

Adams, Kim; Cook, Al

2014-07-01

50

Hands-on assistance improves already successful pollution prevention services of the toxics use reduction institute’s laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an attempt to improve the adoption rate of the work conducted at the Toxics Use Reduction Institute Lab, a more comprehensive on-site follow-up assistance program was implemented in 2006. The effort was piloted for trichloroethylene replacement in Rhode Island in conjunction with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 1.Through hands-on workshops and on-site assistance efforts, the TURI Lab project was

Jason P. Marshall

2011-01-01

51

Blended inquiry with hands-on and virtual laboratories: the role of perceptual features during knowledge construction  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the characteristics of virtual and hands-on inquiry environments for the development of blended learning in a popular domain of bio-nanotechnology: the separation of different-sized DNA fragments using gel-electrophoresis, also known as DNA-fingerprinting. Since the latest scientific developments in nano- and micro-scale tools are based on molecular movement in electric fields, gel electrophoresis is an excellent model for

Eva Erdosne Toth; Lisa R. Ludvico; Becky L. Morrow

2012-01-01

52

Hands-On Astrophysics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hands-On Astrophysics is a flexible set of hands-on educational materials, activities, and investigations. These materials are based on the AAVSO's unique electronic database of variable star measurements. By carrying out all aspects of the research process, students can develop and integrate skills in science, math, computing, and other areas. Units include Planets and Stars, Introducing the Sky, Observing Variable Stars, The Message of Light and Analysis of Variable Stars. Units are available for download in PDF format, including teacher guides.

2011-01-04

53

Hands-On Hydrology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

2004-01-01

54

Learning ion solid interactions hands-on: An activity based, inquiry oriented, graduate course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental work, using state of the art instrumentation, is integrated with lectures in a "real life", learning by discovery approach, in the Ion-Solid Interactions graduate/undergraduate course offered by the Department of Physics of the University of Central Florida. The lecture component of the course covers the underlying physical principles, and related scientific and technological applications, associated with the interaction of energetic ions with matter. In the experimental section the students form small groups and perform a variety of projects, experimental and computational, as part of a participative, inquiry oriented, learning process. In the most recent offering of the class, the students deposited a compound semiconductor thin film by dual-gun sputtering deposition, where each group aimed at a different stoichiometry of the same compound (Zn 1- xS xO y). Then they analyzed the composition using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, measured electrical transport properties using Hall effect and conductivity measurements, and determined the band gap using spectrophotometry. Finally the groups shared their results and each wrote a 'journal-like' technical article describing the entire work. In a different assignment, each group also developed a Monte Carlo computer program ('TRIM-like') to simulate the penetration of ions into a solid, in ion implantation, calculating the stopping cross-sections with approximate models, taught in class, which can be analytically solved. The combination of classroom/laboratory activities is very well received by the students. They gain real life experience operating state of the art equipment, and working in teams, while performing research-like projects, and simultaneously they learn the theoretical foundations of the discipline.

Braunstein, Gabriel

2005-12-01

55

Hands-On Life Science Activities for Middle Schools. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book provides 50 enrichment activities for the science curriculum that provide concrete connections with important world events. Each activity is self-contained and provides everything the student needs to gain a basic understanding of a concept or to work through a project. The activities include innovative and traditional projects for both…

Newman, Barbara; Kramer, Stephanie

56

A Hands-On Activity to Introduce the Effects of Transmission by an Invasive Species  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This activity engages students to better understand the impact of transmission by invasive species. Using dice, poker chips, and paper plates, an entire class mimics the spread of an invasive species within a geographic region. The activity can be modified and conducted at the K-16 levels.

May, Barbara Jean

2013-01-01

57

Hands-On Meteorology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hands-On Meteorology is a collection of interactive concept models and active learning materials for meteorology instruction. The concept models illustrate conceptually difficult processes in atmospheric science. Users change parameters in the concept models and examine the outcomes of such changes. Concept models allow for student note keeping and data export. Active learning exercises are provided as guided instruction to the concept models and to assist teachers in developing lessons. Active learning exercises are also available for meteorology topics that currently do not have a concept model.

Charlevoix, Donna

2002-01-01

58

Give Me Some Skin: A Hands-On Science Activity Integrating Racial Sensitivity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What's the largest, fastest growing, organ in the human body? It's the tough, elastic, flexible, and waterproof covering that helps protect other organs and body parts from such things as germs, heat, cold, and sunlight--skin, of course! This life science activity engages middle school students in an exploration of the structure, function, and variety of skin. They "construct" skin layer by layer using simple materials such as felt, foam padding, yarn, and vinyl in various skin tones. This activity provides an opportunity to discuss racial diversity and to show students that skin color is, quite literally, only skin deep.

Houtz, Lynne E.; Quinn, Thomas H.

2003-02-01

59

Hands-On Experiences of Undergraduate Students in Automatics and Robotics Using a Virtual and Remote Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Automatics and Robotics subjects are always greatly improved when classroom teaching is supported by adequate laboratory courses and experiments following the "learning by doing" paradigm, which provides students a deep understanding of theoretical lessons. However, expensive equipment and limited time prevent teachers having sufficient…

Jara, Carlos A.; Candelas, Francisco A.; Puente, Santiago T.; Torres, Fernando

2011-01-01

60

The Lifecycle of a Mineral Deposit: A Teache's Guide for Hands-On Mineral Education Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This teacher's guide provides an introduction to the process of finding or exploring for a mineral deposit, extracting or mining the resource, recovering it, and reclaiming the mined area (sometimes called 'beneficiation' or 'life cycle'). Topics include what a mineral deposit is; how they are identified and measured, how the minerals are extracted; and how the mining site is reclaimed. There is also discussion of how minerals and mineral resources are processed and how they are used in everyday life. The guide includes ten activities that educate students on basic geologic concepts; the processes of finding, identifying, and extracting the resources from a mineral deposit; and the uses of minerals.

61

The Effect of a Computer Simulation Activity versus a Hands-on Activity on Product Creativity in Technology Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A hands-on group of seventh graders in technology education (n=29) used Legos and another group (n=29) used Gryphon Bricks simulation software for problem solving. Analysis of teacher ratings of solutions revealed no differences in creativity, originality, or usefulness of the products. (Contains 34 references.) (SK)

Michael, Kurt Y.

2001-01-01

62

Manipulatives-based laboratory for majors biology - a hands-on approach to understanding respiration and photosynthesis.  

PubMed

The first course in our year-long introductory series for Biology majors encompasses four learning units: biological molecules and cells, metabolism, genetics, and evolution. Of these, the metabolism unit, which includes respiration and photosynthesis, has shown the lowest student exam scores, least interest, and lowest laboratory ratings. Consequently, we hypothesized that modeling metabolic processes in the laboratory would improve student content learning during this course unit. Specifically, we developed manipulatives-based laboratory exercises that combined paper cutouts, movable blocks, and large diagrams of the cell. In particular, our novel use of connecting LEGO blocks allowed students to move model electrons and phosphates between molecules and within defined spaces of the cell. We assessed student learning using both formal (content indicators and attitude surveys) and informal (the identification of misconceptions or discussions with students) approaches. On the metabolism unit content exam, student performance improved by 46% over pretest scores and by the end of the course, the majority of students rated metabolism as their most-improved (43%) and favorite (33%) subject as compared with other unit topics. The majority of students rated manipulatives-based labs as very helpful, as compared to non-manipulatives-based labs. In this report, we will demonstrate that students made learning gains across all content areas, but most notably in the unit that covered respiration and photosynthesis. PMID:23653756

Boomer, Sarah M; Latham, Kristin L

2011-01-01

63

Learning Chemistry in Laboratory Settings: A Hands-On Introductory Chemistry Curriculum for Non-Science Majors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report describes a curriculum reform project conducted at Spokane Community College (Washington), which has extensive vocational programs and a high percentage of non-traditional students. The purpose of the project was to develop and test a series of student Learning Activity Packets (LAPs), which introduce fundamental chemistry concepts by…

Wang, M. Rachel

64

The healthy heart race: a short-duration, hands-on activity in cardiovascular physiology for museums and science festivals.  

PubMed

The "Healthy Heart Race" activity provides a hands-on demonstration of cardiovascular function suitable for lay audiences. It was field tested during the United States of America Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in October 2010. The basic equipment for the activity consisted of lengths of plastic tubing, a hand pump, collection containers, clamps, and simulated blood prepared by tinting water with red food coloring. Student participants were first asked to experience the effort required to pump through an unaltered tube. A presenter then applied a strong clamp that pinched each tube downstream from the pump, and students were asked to pump against the increased resistance. The students' observations were then used as the basis for discussions of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease with the presenters. Distribution of informative postcards during the 2 days of the festival indicated that at least 2,500 students completed the Healthy Heart Race activity. Our experiences to date suggest that the Healthy Heart Race activity can be accomplished effectively in the high-volume, high-distraction environment of a science fair or museum. PMID:21908837

Pressley, Thomas A; Limson, Melvin; Byse, Miranda; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

2011-09-01

65

Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

Brame, Ray; And Others

66

An educational device for a hands-on activity to visualize the effect of atherosclerosis on blood flow.  

PubMed

An educational device was created to develop a hands-on activity to illustrate how atherosclerosis can dramatically reduce blood flow in human vessels. The device was conceived, designed, and built at the University of Coimbra, in response to a request from the Exploratório Infante D. Henrique Science Centre Museum, where it is presently installed. The device was designed to allow lay audience to operate it, including school-age youngsters. The two blood flow reduction mechanisms that can be visualized are 1) thickening of the artery wall and 2) hardening of the artery wall. The main objective is to promote the understanding of atherosclerotic cardiovascular physiology by simple and direct experiments. This original educational interactive device was constructed using, in the conceptual and design stages of the project, a Newtonian theoretical flow model based on Poiseuille's equation. This device is driven by human force and provides a visualization of the effect of atherosclerosis on flow. The main aspects relating to its design and construction are described here to explain and disseminate this approach. Throughout more than 4 yr of real operation, this educational device proved to be a simple and attractive way of understanding atherosclerosis, especially among young people. PMID:24292922

de Almeida, J P P G L; de Lima, J L M P

2013-12-01

67

A Year of Hands-on Science: Exciting Theme Units with More Than 100 Activities, Projects, and Experiments To Make Science Come Alive.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains 18 themed teaching units with 2 themes per chapter, organized seasonally around the traditional school year. Each theme includes natural connections and hands-on science activities that correspond to what children are already observing in their world. Each chapter begins with highlights of the month and a reproducible "Science…

Kepler, Lynne; Novelli, Joan, Ed.

68

Hands-On Research School in Africa  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A UNESCO/ICTP-sponsored ``Hands-On Research in Complex Systems'' school was held 1-12 August 2010 in Cameroon for young science faculty in Africa (see handsonresearch.org). Fifty participants from 17 African countries were selected from a pool of more than three hundred applicants. The goal of the school was for the participants to learn to use modern inexpensive instrumentation (such as webcams) and computational techniques to study diverse phenomena in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. The hands-on laboratory sessions were led by 12 senior faculty (most from the US); each faculty member brought a graduate student to assist with the teaching. In addition to the laboratory and computational activities, the participants also learned peer instruction teaching methods, developed oral communication skills in interactive sessions, and learned how to do simple inexpensive classroom demonstrations. This talk will show pictures from the Cameroon Hands-On School and will present plans for similar schools in developing countries in Asia, Latin America, and the Mideast.

Swinney, Harry L.

2010-10-01

69

Are all hands-on activities equally effective? Effect of using plastic models, organ dissections, and virtual dissections on student learning and perceptions.  

PubMed

This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or plastic models). Each group received a 15-min lecture followed by a 45-min activity with one of the treatments. Immediately after the lesson and then 2 mo later, students were tested on anatomy and physiology knowledge and completed an attitude survey. Students who used plastic models achieved significantly higher overall scores on both the initial and followup exams than students who performed organ or virtual dissections. On the initial exam, students in the plastic model and organ dissection treatments scored higher on anatomy questions than students who performed virtual dissections. Students in the plastic model group scored higher than students who performed organ dissections on physiology questions. On the followup exam, when asked anatomy questions, students in the plastic model group scored higher than dissection students and virtual dissection students. On attitude surveys, organ dissections had higher perceived value and were requested for inclusion in curricula twice as often as any other activity. Students who performed organ dissections were more likely than the other treatment groups to agree with the statement that "science is fun," suggesting that organ dissections may promote positive attitudes toward science. The findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of multiple types of hands-on activities in anatomy laboratory courses. PMID:24585474

Lombardi, Sara A; Hicks, Reimi E; Thompson, Katerina V; Marbach-Ad, Gili

2014-03-01

70

Hands-on Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14 Formal and Informal Education Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Activities developed by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. Educators may choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum from activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to exploring the solar system. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help

J. S. Allen; K. W. Tobola

2004-01-01

71

Engaging Students in Early Exploration of Nanoscience Topics Using Hands-On Activities and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manuscript reports on efforts to introduce beginning college students to the modern nanoscience field. These include: implementing selected experiments into sequencing core first-year and second-year chemistry laboratory courses; providing students with a first research experience; and engaging them in service learning and outreach programs…

Furlan, Ping Y.

2009-01-01

72

Exploring the Solar System Activities Outline: Hands-On Planetary Science for Formal Education K-14 and Informal Settings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Activities by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. The wealth of activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to the exploring the solar system allows educators to choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. With these NASA developed activities students experience recent mission information about our solar system such as Mars geology and the search for life using Mars meteorites and robotic data. The Johnson Space Center ARES Education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic outline useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the outline annotation is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. Within formal education at the primary level some of the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest and arouse curiosity. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered are appropriate for the upper levels of high school and early college in that they require students to use and analyze data.

Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Lindstrom, M. L.

2003-01-01

73

Hands-on equals minds-on? A test of linkage between laboratory experience and measured achievement in an introductory college biology course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated the specific contribution of laboratory experience to student performance on achievement tests in an introductory college biology course. This required pre-medical student course (900 students) was separated by the biology department into a lecture course and a laboratory course, creating the study groups. The topics selected for treatment were in the field of molecular biology, including restriction enzyme manipulation and plasmid mapping of DNA sequences. Random samples (30 per group) of students enrolled in the lecture course and laboratory course, lecture course only, or laboratory course only were post-tested and second post-tested for objective test achievement in the topical field after laboratory participation. Student self-reported essays on topical concept gains from laboratory experience were categorized and analyzed in relation to achievement outcomes. A significant difference (F = 5.47, df = 2,87, alpha = .05) was present within the group by test achievement scores. Analysis showed no significant difference in test scores over time for the laboratory and lecture and laboratory only groups. There was a significant decline in test scores for the lecture only group over time. Analysis of 509 student self-reported essays showed approximately 18.5% reporting no abstract comprehension gain from the specific laboratory experience they chose to report. Approximately 8.3% of the essays reported increased confusion of topical concepts after participating in the laboratory exercise. The balance of the students (73.3%) reported increased topical concept understanding after laboratory exercise participation. The results suggest the importance of laboratory participation for long-term concept retention and the benefit of post-laboratory experience reflection time before objective testing. Direct instruction without laboratory experience appears to yield gains which are short term in nature. Student self-reports suggested cognitive gains from laboratory experience may be based in student initiated questioning during and after the laboratory experience. This is compatible with a constructivist explanation of student schema development.

Racich, Leo Peter 3rd

74

Hands-on Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14 Formal and Informal Education Settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction: Activities developed by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. Educators may choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum from activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to exploring the solar system. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. The web sites for the activities contain current information so students experience recent mission information such as data from Mars rovers or the status of Stardust sample return. The Johnson Space Center Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic syllabus useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the syllabus is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting, educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. In both the informal and the primary education levels the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest, arouse curiosity and easily take the participants from pre-awareness to the awareness stage. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered may easily be adapted for the upper levels of high school and early college, as they require students to use and analyze data. Syllabus Format: The Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities starts with a variety of solar system scale activities that fit different settings and equipment. The early solar system formation activities are focused on asteroids, meteorites and planet formation. The theme of how and why we explore our solar system encompasses activities that engage the language and creative arts. Further activities highlight the Sun and planetary geology. A key aspect of the usefulness of the syllabus is that it provides easy access to solar system content, activities, related links and the thematic context for the classroom teacher or group leader. Conclusion: The Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities is a concentrated resource of activities and links that allows educators to comfortably and inexpensively share the excitement and science of solar system exploration with students and members of the public. Additional Information: Some of the activities included in the Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities are in the following NASA developed guides. http://ares.jsc.nasa.gov/Education/index.html

Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.

2004-12-01

75

Increasing Higher Level Thinking Skills in Science of Gifted Students in Grades 1-4 through "Hands-On" Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This practicum was designed to increase higher level thinking skills of gifted students in primary school. The project sought to retrain students from recalling science information from the textbook to a more challenging and active form of learning through individual projects and small group and large group activities. Students were given…

Dindial, Myrna J.

76

It's More Fun than It Sounds--Enhancing Science Concepts through Hands-on Activities for Young Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To teach young children, teachers choose topics in science that children are curious about. Children's inquisitive nature is reflected through the activities as they make repetitive sounds to find the cause and effect relationship. Teachers can make best use of those invaluable moments by incorporating those activities into science lessons on…

Guha, Smita

2012-01-01

77

Enhancing laboratory activities in nuclear medicine education.  

PubMed

Hands-on or active learning is important in nuclear medicine education. As more curricula start to require greater standards and as distance education expands, the effective use of laboratories in nuclear medicine education remains important in physics, instrumentation, and imaging but is often overlooked or underutilized. Laboratory exercises are a unique opportunity for nuclear medicine educators to facilitate students' critical thinking and problem-solving skills in a manner that often cannot occur in lectures or during online education. Given the lack of current laboratory tools and publications, there exists a requirement for nuclear medicine educators to develop, enhance, and monitor educational tools for laboratory exercises. Expanding technologies, variations in imaging and measurement systems, and the need to ensure that the taught technology is relevant to nuclear medicine students are issues faced by nuclear medicine educators. This article, based on principles of instructional design, focuses on the components and development of effective and enhanced nuclear medicine laboratories in our current educational environment. PMID:19914977

Grantham, Vesper; Martin, Chris; Schmitz, Casey

2009-12-01

78

Hands-on Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents activities that teach elementary students how light works by having them make rainbows. A primary-/intermediate- level activity involves conducting a rainbow color survey, and a student page provides a copy of the rainbow color survey. A primary-level activity has students create rainbows using water and a mirror. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1996-01-01

79

Laboratory Activities for Introductory Astronomy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents sample laboratory activities designed for use in astronomy teaching, including naked eye observations, instrument construction, student projects, and cloudy weather activities. Appended are bibliographies of journal articles and reference books and lists of films, laboratory manuals, and distributors of apparatus and teaching aids. (CC)

Kruglak, Haym

1973-01-01

80

Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

81

Bringing Hands-on Activities and Real Scientists to Students: Bishop Museum's X-treme Science Exhibit, Holoholo Science Program, and Planned Science Learning Center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bishop Museum developed the "X-treme Science: Exploring Oceans, Volcanoes, and Outer Space" museum exhibit in conjunction with NASA as part of their goal to increase educational outreach. A key element of the exhibit was the inclusion of real scientists describing what they do, and fostering the interaction between scientists and students. Highlights of the exhibit were interviews with local (Hawaii-based) scientists involved in current ocean, volcano, and space research. These interviews were based on questions that students provided, and were available during the exhibit at interactive kiosks. Lesson plans were developed by local teachers and scientists, and provided online to enhance the exhibit. However, one limitation of the museum exhibit was that not all students in the state could visit, or spend enough time with it. To serve more remote schools, and to provide for additional enrichment for those who did attend, the education department at Bishop Museum developed a traveling program with the X-treme Science exhibit as the basis. The Holoholo (Hawaiian for "fun outing") Science program brings a scientist into the classroom with a hands-on scientific inquiry activity. The activity is usually a simplified version of a problem that the scientist actually deals with. The students explore the activity, reach conclusions, and discuss their results. They are then given the opportunity to question the scientist about the activity and about what the scientist does. This allows students to understand that science is not something mystical, but rather something attainable. A key element of Holoholo remains the active participation of real-life scientists in the experience. The scientists who have participated in the program have had overwhelmingly positive experiences. Bishop Museum is developing a science learning center, with the objective of meeting local and national science standards using inquiry based science. The unifying theme of all three of these projects is involving students with active scientists who are accessible to them. AGU scientists are vital to realizing this goal.

Hills, D. J.; Fullerton, K.; Hoddick, C.; Ali, N.; Mosher, M. K.

2002-12-01

82

Diving into Science. Hands-On Water-Related Experiments. Grades 2-4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains hands-on ocean-related laboratory activities. Major chapter hearings are: (1) "Water Experiments" (dealing with the physical nature of water and listing 10 activities); (2) "Ocean-Going Vessels" (studying the principles of boats, with three experiments); (3) "Experiments Using Shells" (containing four activities); (4) "Sand…

Perdue, Peggy K.

83

A Hands-On Introduction to Microcomputers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides specific directions and guidelines for the computer program "YOU Program ME." Explains how this introductory hands-on activity can teach the concept of programming and can introduce the BASIC language. Background information and student activity sheets are included. (ML)

Watson, James; Watson, Nancy

1987-01-01

84

Hands-on Science. Exploring Magnification.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents hands-on science activities using inexpensive, hand-held microscopes and slides made from simple, readily available materials. The article describes how to introduce students to microscopes and presents directions for using the microscopes and making slides. A student page investigates fingerprints with microscopes. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1993-01-01

85

Remote versus hands-on labs: a comparative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advocates of hands-on laboratories and advocates of simulation have debated for years. Proponents of hands-on laboratories argue that student engineers need to be exposed to the physical experiences-and the uncertainties-of real environments. Advocates of simulation argue that physical labs are wasteful-they tie up badly needed space, and consume student's time in menial set-up and tear-down procedures. Now remote laboratories have

James E. Corter; Jeffrey V. Nickerson; Sven K. Esche; Constantin Chassapis

2004-01-01

86

Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

1985-01-01

87

Research and Development. Laboratory Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research and Development is a laboratory-oriented course that includes the appropriate common essential elements for industrial technology education plus concepts and skills related to research and development. This guide provides teachers of the course with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an…

Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

88

Hands-on Digital Tech  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditionally, only the best-funded schools could afford to offer students the kinds of hands-on science experiences that "real life" scientists perform. However, with the advent of digital technologies and portable, affordable handheld computing devices, real world investigations--that also address science standards--are now broadly accessible to…

Tuttle, Harry Grover

2007-01-01

89

Hands-On Nuclear Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nuclear science is an important topic in terms of its application to power generation, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national defense. Unfortunately, the subatomic domain is far removed from daily experience, and few learning aids are available to teachers. What follows describes a low-tech, hands-on method to teach important concepts in…

Whittaker, Jeff

2013-01-01

90

Transforming a Traditional Hands-On Activity into an Enquiry Activity to Foster More In-Depth Understanding of the Concept of Density  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditional methods used to teach the concept of density that employ solid objects of different masses and volumes can be supplemented by enquiry activities in which students vary the mass-to-volume ratio of the same object to test ideas about density and flotation. A simple substance, Blu-Tack, is an ideal material to use in this case. The…

Lee, Yeung Chung; Kwok, Ping Wai

2010-01-01

91

Active SWIR laboratory testing methodology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active Short Wave InfraRed (SWIR) imaging presents unique challenges to laboratory testing. It is always important to have laboratory testing that will directly relate to field performance. This paper will present the modeling and corresponding laboratory testing that was developed for these types of systems. The paper will present the modeling that was used to derive the lab metric used for verification testing of the system and provide details into the design of the lab equipment that was necessary to ensure accurate lab testing. The Noise Limited Resolution (NLR) test, first developed for low light imaging systems in the 1960s, serves as the basic lab metric for the evaluation of the active SWIR system. This test serves well for a quick test (go-no go) and is used to evaluate this system during production testing. The test derivation will be described and shown how it relates to the modeling results. The test equipment developed by Santa Barbara InfraRed (SBIR) for this application allows for accurate uniform radiance levels from an integrating sphere for both 1.06um and 1.57um imaging applications. The source has the ability to directly mimic any laser system and can provide pulsed laser source radiation from 20 nanoseconds to 500 nanoseconds resulting in levels from 0.4 to 85 nJ/cm2/sr, peak radiance levels. The light source can be triggered to replicate a laser return at any range from 100m to 100,000m. Additionally, the source provides the ability to output Mid Wave IR (MWIR) illumination through the use of a small extended area IR source in the integrating sphere. This is useful for boresighting the active SWIR sensor with other sensors such as Forward Looking IR (FLIR).

Webb, Curtis M.; White, Steve; Rich, Brian

2013-06-01

92

Hands-On Nuclear Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear science is an important topic in terms of its application to power generation, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national defense. Unfortunately, the subatomic domain is far removed from daily experience, and few learning aids are available to teachers. What follows describes a low-tech, hands-on method to teach important concepts in nuclear physics, including the quark model, anti-matter, nuclear binding energy, stability, the nuclear shell model, and the importance of symmetry, by making use of neodymium disc magnets.

Whittaker, Jeff

2013-03-01

93

European Hands-on Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hands-on Universe is a project born at UC@Berkeley. A project devoted to enrich the teaching of Astronomy within the classroom environment with a different approach, more connected to the new technologies. Its main goals are not only to promote the use of such technologies but also to reawaken on students the taste for STEM (Science, technologies, engineering and math) related issues and also to increase their scientific culture. Eight countries in Europe decided to adopt the method and, funded by MINERVA, formed the European Hands-on Universe. Several resources were produced and a data reduction software developed http://www.euhou.net/.Other European countries are interested and should join this coordinated effort in the near future. At an international level there are 20 countries using this approach. There are plans to develop scientific cooperation among these countries. Pilot scientific research projects in schools are being tested in EU-HOU schools, Russia and USA. There is also a game being developed to be used as a new tool for teaching scientific content in the classroom environment. An effort to develop an international network of scientific / educational collaboration is the next step.

Doran, Rosa; Ferlet, Roger; Gómez de Castro, Ana I.; Hill, Robert; Horellou, Cathy; Mankiewicz, Lech; Melchior, Anne-Laure; Metaxa, Margarita; Zanazzi, Alessandra

2007-08-01

94

The European Hands-On Universe project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The EU-HOU project aims at participating in solving the major challenge of inspiring and exciting students toward science and technology. By adopting inquiry-based science education (IBSE) techniques and new technologies, EU-HOU is promoting more attractive and innovative hands-on activities on-line and in the classroom, with astronomy and space science as the over-arching theme. The expertise of EU-HOU in producing IBSE resources and in training secondary science school teachers has been awarded a silver medal of the European Commission.

Ferlet, Roger

95

Introducing Basic Molecular Biology to Turkish Rural and Urban Primary School Children via Hands-on PCR and Gel Electrophoresis Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study includes the results of a 2-day education project titled "Molecular Biology Laboratory Summer School, MoBiLYO." The project was held at a University Research Center by scientists from Department of Pharmacology and graduate students. The project was composed of introductory lectures, model construction, DNA isolation,…

Selli, Cigdem; Yildirim, Gokce; Kaymak, Aysegul; Karacicek, Bilge; Ogut, Deniz; Gungor, Turkan; Erem, Erdem; Ege, Mehmet; Bümen, Nilay; Tosun, Metiner

2014-01-01

96

The impact of a hands-on approach to learning visible spectrometry upon students' performance, motivation, and attitudes.  

PubMed

In this paper, the effect of introducing visible spectrometry concepts through hands-on laboratory work upon student learning within four vocational programs are discussed. All together, 118 students, average 18.6 years old, participated in the study. The results showed no correlation between students' motivational components (intrinsic, regulated, and controlled), chemistry self-concept and their achievement on an experiential knowledge test and knowledge gained from this hands-on approach. Statistically significant differences were found for academic achievement among students in a biotechnology technical program (School 1), food processing program (School 2), laboratory biomedicine program (School 3), and a biotechnology general program (School 4). Differences in academic achievement are further reflected in students' perception of particular knowledge gained through their hands-on experiences and in their expressed attitude toward different didactical characteristics. All students, regardless of their study program, highly evaluated the relaxed atmosphere that contributed to their self-confidence in completing their laboratory activities. PMID:23841355

Vrtacnik, Margareta; Gros, Natasa

2013-01-01

97

A Hands-On Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

SUNY Cobleskill offers a two-year program in fish and wildlife management. The goal of the program is to train technicians to work with professional fish and wildlife biologists in the field and in the laboratories of both public and private fish and wildlife management programs. (Author/BW)

Ginsburg, Alan

1980-01-01

98

Hands-On Earth Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of activities from the Ohio Geological Survey features a variety of activities for younger students. These activities use common materials to illustrate geologic topics such as crystal growth, plate tectonics, fossilization, rocks and minerals, and others. There are also games and puzzles, models of the Earth-Moon system and the Sun, and activities on geologic time, Ohio geology, soil liquefaction, and others.

99

Hands-on mathematics: two cases from ancient Chinese mathematics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In modern mathematical teaching, it has become increasingly emphasized that mathematical knowledge should be taught by problem-solving, hands-on activities, and interactive learning experiences. Comparing the ideas of modern mathematical education with the development of ancient Chinese mathematics, we find that the history of mathematics in ancient China is an abundant resource for materials to demonstrate mathematics by hands-on manipulation. In this article I shall present two cases that embody this idea of a hands-on approach in ancient Chinese mathematics, at the same time offering an opportunity to show how to utilize materials from the history of Chinese math in modern mathematical education.

Wang, Youjun

2009-05-01

100

Hands-On Physics Activities with Real-Life Applications: Easy-to-Use Labs and Demonstrations for Grades 8-12  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This comprehensive collection of nearly 200 investigations, mini-labs, and other activities uses everyday examples to make physics concepts easy to understand by providing interaction between interaction between students and their world in a way that encourages scientific reasoning. Topics covered include measurement, motion, force, pressure, energy and momentum, waves, light, and electromagnetism.

Cunningham, James

2007-09-20

101

Are All Hands-On Activities Equally Effective? Effect of Using Plastic Models, Organ Dissections, and Virtual Dissections on Student Learning and Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or…

Lombardi, Sara A.; Hicks, Reimi E.; Thompson, Katerina V.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

2014-01-01

102

Population Growth, Energy Use, and Pollution: Understanding the Driving Forces of Global Change. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since the beginning of the scientific revolution in the 1700s, the absolute scale of the human economy has increased many times over, and, with it, the impact on the natural environment. This learning module's activities introduce the student to linkages among population growth, energy use, level of economic and technological development and their…

Kuby, Michael

103

Dig In! Hands-On Soil Investigtions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Give students the dirt on soil with a practical book that brings new meaning to the term "hands-on." Using these 12 activities and two original stories as guides, kids will soon be up to their elbows in the study of soil formation, habitats and land use, animals that depend on soil, plants that grow in soil, soil science, and soil conservation. Each teacher-tested lesson plan offers helpful background, assessment methods, and suggestions for further exploration. This book also contains SciLinks --Internet links, housed on an NSTA web site, that we promise to keep up-to-date and relevant to your teaching for as long as the book stays in print!

Service, Natural R.; Press, Nsta; Usda

2001-01-01

104

Patterning for Nanotechnology Laboratory Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This set of resources created and presented by the Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK) Center present a foundation in patterning for nanotechnology. The website includes an overview document and a series of activities for download. The activities are: Pattern Transfer: Photolithography Practice, Pattern Transfer: Microcontact Printing, Multiple Level Pattern Transfer: Photolithography and E-Beam Lithography. Discussion questions are included with each activity. This and all other valuable resources from the NACK Center require a fast, easy, free log-in.

2011-10-11

105

Activities of the optoelectronics laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This is the second annual report of the Optoelectronics Laboratory, a new and independently responsible operational unit within Helsinki University of Technology. Presently, basic research is carried out in the field of optical properties of semiconductor epilayers, quantum wells, and superlattices using photoreflectance and other modulation techniques. Applied research is done on liquid phase epitaxy of compound semiconductors, on semiconductor lasers, on the direct recording of synchrotron X-ray topographs with an electronic semiconductor camera, on the studies of internal and external gettering of silicon wafers in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process and on applied superconductivity, to mention a few.

Collan, H.; Tuomi, T.

106

Diffusion Activities in College Laboratory Manuals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many have called for reform of the science curriculum to incorporate the process of inquiry: this has been shown to improve student understanding of biological concepts. Laboratory activities provide excellent opportunities to incorporate inquiry in to the curriculum. This study used a modified version of the Laboratory Task Analysis Instrument…

Tweedy, Maryanne E.; Hoese, William J.

2005-01-01

107

Handwashing Laboratory Activities: Bowl Technique  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lab (Activity #2 on page), learners compare bacteria growth on two petri dishes containing nutrient agar. Learners touch the doors, faucets, etc. in bathroom and then immerse their hands in 100 ml sterile water. They place 0.5 ml of this "dirty" water into one petri dish. They repeat this process again but wash their hands before immersing them in 100 ml sterile water. Learners incubate the plates for 24-48 hours and then score the results based on the bacteria growth they observe. Use this activity to emphasize the importance of hand-washing and the effectiveness of soap to disinfect.

Christine L. Case, Ed D.

2009-01-01

108

An Active-Learning Laboratory on Immunizations  

PubMed Central

Objective. To implement and evaluate an active-learning laboratory activity to teach pharmacy students about influenza, pneumococcal, and shingles vaccines. Design. The laboratory session was divided into 6 immunization stations: 3 stations on influenza including a pediatrics station, and 1 station each for pneumococcal, shingles, and anaphylaxis. Assessment. Although 118 of 123 (95.9%) students had completed an immunization training certificate prior to attending the laboratory, the average score on a pre-assessment to measure immunization knowledge and confidence was 56%. The post-assessment score was 87.4%. Students’ confidence improved by 18.7% to 51.2% in each of the 5 areas assessed. Most respondents rated the activity overall as good or excellent on a post-activity evaluation. Conclusion. An active-learning approach to teaching immunizations allowed students to gain knowledge in simulated real-world experiences and reinforced key concepts on influenza, pneumococcal, and shingles vaccines.

Mawyer, Tonya M.; Stevens, J. Tyler; Morgan, Laura A.; Harpe, Spencer E.

2012-01-01

109

Hands-on Science. Why Do Mittens Work?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents hands-on, experiential science activities that use mittens to teach elementary students about classification and insulation. The first involves children sorting mittens. The second has them find out for themselves why mittens keep their hands warm. Across-the-curriculum activities are also described. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1996-01-01

110

Hands-On Homework for Introductory Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The author and colleagues have designed an Exploration Center to supplement lecture-oriented teaching in large introductory physics courses. At the center, students perform hands-on homework problems derived from lecture demonstrations. The style of explo

Singh, Chandralekha

2002-10-01

111

Hands-On Current Electricity: A Professional Development Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Hands-on Current Electricity" gives K-8 teachers the opportunity to experience inquiry learning about current electricity by (1) experimenting with current electricity through a variety of activities, (2) discovering preconceived mental models of electricity used to understand their observations, (3) creating new mental models that have greater…

Gibbons, Patrick C.; McMahon, Ann P.; Wiegers, John F.

2003-01-01

112

Dig In! Hands-On Soil Investigtions (e-book)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Give students the dirt on soil with a practical book that brings new meaning to the term "hands-on." Using these 12 activities and two original stories as guides, kids will soon be up to their elbows in the study of soil formation, habitats and land use,

Service, Natural R.; Usda

2009-07-06

113

Hands-On Mathematics: Two Cases from Ancient Chinese Mathematics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In modern mathematical teaching, it has become increasingly emphasized that mathematical knowledge should be taught by problem-solving, hands-on activities, and interactive learning experiences. Comparing the ideas of modern mathematical education with the development of ancient Chinese mathematics, we find that the history of mathematics in…

Wang, Youjun

2009-01-01

114

A Hands-On Approach to Maglev for Gifted Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses how Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) can be taught to gifted students in grades 4-9 using hands-on activities that align to the National Science Standards. Principles of magnetic levitation, advantages of magnetic levitation, construction of a Maglev project, testing and evaluation of vehicles, and presentation of the unit are…

Budd, Raymond T.

2003-01-01

115

Hands-on learning opportunities at the Ocean Technology Foundation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ocean Technology Foundation (OTF) promotes education and outreach as an important part of its mission, which is to foster excellence in ocean exploration, marine research and education with an emphasis on underwater activities. Among their programs, OTF creates hands on learning opportunities for students and people interested in marine science, technology and education. This paper will describe opportunities and

Jenna Carlson

2005-01-01

116

Not-So-Messy Hands-On Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents four elementary hands-on science activities that highlight animal adaptation (how birds' beaks are adapted to suit their habitats), the water cycle (how nature cleans rainwater that seeps into the ground), aquatic ecosystems (changes over time in an aquatic habitat), and animal habitats (all living beings' need for food, water, shelter,…

Bryan, Denise; Denty, Amy

2002-01-01

117

Integrating Statistics with a Microbiology Laboratory Activity  

PubMed Central

Statistics is an important tool for microbiologists but is virtually absent from undergraduate laboratory activities. The variables in a stringent protocol, the antibiotic disk diffusion assay described by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, were examined by the authors as a means for introducing hypothesis testing and the application of elementary statistical tools. After several experiments, a lab activity was developed where students examine the effect of cell concentration on antibiotic activity and analyze data with the t test. They also collect data independently from the same samples and compare their measurements using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The outcome of the activity, including an assessment tool, indicated that students learned the appropriate use of the t test and ANOVA, gained an appreciation for standardized protocols, and enjoyed the experience.

LOROWITZ, WILLIAM; SAXTON, ELIZABETH; SONDOSSI, MOHAMMAD; NAKAOKA, KAREN

2005-01-01

118

Hand-on "Cosmos Picture Book"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors have designed and produced a hand-on "Cosmos Picture Book" as teaching material in astronomy, and demonstrated it at a public event, The Geo-Carnival for Children, held in Osaka in 2007. The aim of this picture book is to introduce the cosmos to children. This picture book was also used in the university class.

Sumitomo, Naoko; Shibata, Takeru; Mizoguchi, Saori; Nishiyama, Shinji; Fukue, Jun

2008-12-01

119

Hands-on: Lessons for ESL adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this synthesis I offer hands-on lessons that provide materials to meet the needs of adults who speak little or no English. In the chapters preceding the lessons I explain my personal struggle to learn English. Following that, I review the theories of educators and linguists which are applicable to learning English and language acquisition. The educators, Lev Vygotsky, Paolo

Linda Jeffrey

2005-01-01

120

Reading, Science, and Hands On Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the different ways in which science can be taught, including reading of subject matter from a basal textbook and a hands-on approach in ongoing science lessons and units of study. The paper first points out that in 1996 the National Science Teachers Association came out with a set of standards for teachers to emphasize in…

Ediger, Marlow

121

Outcomes Assessment in a Hands-On Manufacturing Processes Course  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Industry has consistently identified lack of experience in manufacturing processes as one of the key competency gaps among new engineering graduates. This paper will discuss a laboratory based Manufacturing Processes course that provides hands-on manufacturing experience to students. In addition to standard theoretical concepts, the course uses team-based projects that help students gain hands-on experience with selected manufacturing processes. The projects start with simple components that can be made on a single machine such as a lathe or a mill, and progress to the manufacture and assembly of a fully functional mechanism. This approach introduces students to the issues involved in putting together a non-trivial assembly. Multiple evaluation tools including surveys, focus-groups, and actual observations, were used to determine the effectiveness of the approach used. The results indicate that this is an effective way of addressing industry concerns.

Ssemakula, Mukasa

2009-09-16

122

Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV’s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV’s). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV’s and UAV’s. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

2005-03-01

123

Mobile robotics activities in DOE laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV"s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV's). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV's and UAV's. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

Lujan, Ron; Harbour, Jerry; Feddema, John; Bailey, Sharon; Barhen, Jacob; Reister, David

2005-05-01

124

Manipulatives: A Hands-On Approach to Math  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many of us can remember back to a time in America when all that teachers expected us to do with our hands in the classroom was to fold them. But now that the power and effectiveness of hands-on instruction has been proven in a wide range of subject areas--particularly math--those days are over. Whether using traditional activities, such as…

DeGeorge, Barbara; Santoro, Anne Marie

2004-01-01

125

Integrating Laboratory Activity into a Junior High School Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a wind power system laboratory activity and an outline for evaluating student performance in this activity. The work described here was to design and implement the laboratory to assist teachers in achieving the teaching objective of this activity. The laboratory teaching activities introduce energy sources, wind energy…

Shyr, Wen-Jye

2010-01-01

126

Hands-On Equations 1 Lite  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this iOS app students use the Hands-On Equations method to balance equations and solve for one variable. This app includes three lessons, each with a short one to two minute video, two example problems, and ten exercises. At the first level students solve an equation that is already set up on the scale, in the second level students must set up the equation on the scale before solving, and in the third lesson students must take this one step forward and eliminate variables as they solve.

Borenson, Henry

2013-06-19

127

Laboratory-tutorial activities for teaching probability  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We report on the development of studentsâ ideas of probability and probability density in a University of Maine laboratory-based general education physics course called Intuitive Quantum Physics. Students in the course are generally math phobic with unfavorable expectations about the nature of physics and their ability to do it. We describe a set of activities used to teach concepts of probability and probability density. Rudimentary knowledge of mechanics is needed for one activity, but otherwise the material requires no additional preparation. Extensions of the activities include relating probability density to potential energy graphs for certain âtouchstoneâ examples. Students have difficulties learning the target concepts, such as comparing the ratio of time in a region to total time in all regions. Instead, they often focus on edge effects, pattern match to previously studied situations, reason about necessary but incomplete macroscopic elements of the system, use the gamblerâs fallacy, and use expectations about ensemble results rather than expectation values to predict future events. We map the development of their thinking to provide examples of problems rather than evidence of a curriculumâs success.

Wittmann, Michael C.; Morgan, Jeffrey; Feeley, Roger

2007-06-26

128

SciTech Hands-On Museum: Experiment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Experiment page of the Aurora, Illinois SciTech Hands-On Museum includes several quality science educational activities. The first is a lesson plan that lets kids explore what evaporation is and shows it taking place. The Excite an Atom activity includes an interactive model of a Hydrogen atom that allows students to choose various energy states to see how the atom reacts and then returns to the ground state and emits a photon. Additional features of the site include science fair project ideas and other helpful science links, making it a valuable resource especially for grade school science teachers.

129

NRCL-70, Review of the Activities of the Laboratories 1970.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Included are descriptions of activities of each of the 12 laboratories in the National Research Council of Canada, including background information and a summary of the studies (research) and results. The 12 laboratories in the NRCL are the following: Atlantic Regional Laboratory, Biochemistry Laboratory, Division of Biology, Division of Building…

National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

130

Hands-on lessons in ergonomics for youth  

SciTech Connect

Ergonomics risk factors apply to everybody. Numerous adults have experienced disabling injuries related to use of computers and other forms of technology. Now children are using technology even more than adults. Increasingly ergonomics risk factors are being recognized as present in the world of children. Outreach to schools and the surrounding community by employers may help protect the future work force. A growing body of researchers believe that children can benefit from the early introduction of ergonomics awareness and preventative measures. While individual representatives of the educational system may embrace the concept of introducing ergonomics into the classroom, a number of barriers can prevent implementation of integrated programs. Some of the barriers to introducing ergonomics in schools have been absence of a tie to educational standards, the existing demands on teaching hours, and the absence of easily executable lesson plans. Ergonomics is rarely included in teacher training and professional ergonomics expertise is needed for the development of a class-based program. As part of Strategic Vision plan for 2025, a National Laboratory identified community outreach and the future workforces as key areas for initiatives. A series of hands-on interactive modules have been developed by professional ergonomics specialists. They are being tested with elementary, middle and high school students. Where possible, the content has been tied to the educational standards in the State of California in the USA. Currently the modules include grip strength, effective breathing, optimal keyboard and mouse positions, optimizing chairs, posture and movement, backpack safety and safe lifting. Each module takes the students through a related activity or experience. An individual worksheet asks them questions about the experience and guides them to consider implications in their activities of daily living. A module on hearing is under development. The goal is to have a toolkit that teachers can use in classrooms with minimal training. The kit will come with lesson plans, including background material, key points, questions and answers, possible homework assignments and references. It will include instructions and worksheets for students as well as the materials needed for each module. A pre- and posttest will be administered to test the awareness and understanding of the principles introduced in through the modules. This interactive session will offer the opportunity to for attendees to participate in some of the modules that have been developed to provide experiential demonstration of ergonomics principles. Attendees will experience ergonomics in action and be able to evaluate the applicability of the process in their own area in the world of ergonomics. The session will consist of 20 minutes introduction, 40 minutes working with the toolkit, finally another 30 minutes for questions or discussion for a total time of 90 minutes.

Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

2005-09-29

131

Incorporation of Hands-on Experiments in an Introductory Structural Analysis Course.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A new teaching laboratory was developed for the junior course in CE-ArchE 217 Structural Analysis I. The primary objective of the laboratory was to give students hands-on experiences and build their understanding of structural analysis and their applicati...

A. Ayoub A. Belarbi J. J. Myers T. Hrynyk W. Schonberg

2007-01-01

132

Calculator Controlled Robots: Hands-On Math and Science Discovery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This curriculum includes ten missions and three exploration extensions that provide activities for up to a semester and focus largely on the space exploration theme. It is designed to engage students in hands-on inquiry based learning. It addresses science and technology standards, and specifically focuses on math content and process standards. Although other models will work, the curriculum is geared towards using a Texas Instruments (IT) 83 or 84 series graphing calculator with a Norland research calculator robot. The curriculum can be used in math, science, technology, or after school classes. Students create programs in TI-BASIC to run their robots. Missions are sequentially built on the knowledge of previous activities. Step-by-step programming instructions are provided in the first missions, gradually leading students to create their own programs in later missions. Students use and apply math and science concepts to direct their robots through a variety of challenges. In addition to the detailed activities, teachers are given opportunities to draw on their studentsâ hands-on experience to reach a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts. Several open-ended questions and extension activities are included to encourage potential scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and computer programmers to explore their fields.

Tuchscherer, Tyson

2006-08-01

133

Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory: Technical Activities, 1996.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report summarizes the research and services provided by the Chemical Science and Technology laboratory of the National Institute of Standards and Technology for Fiscal Year 1995. The report includes: a general overview of the laboratory's activities, ...

H. G. Semerjian W. F. Koch

1996-01-01

134

The Role of Laboratory Activities in High School Physics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This position paper of the AAPT Committee on Physics in High Schools describes the importance of laboratories in helping students achieve content knowledge. Learning goals for laboratory activities and teaching conditions for learning are discussed.

2008-04-27

135

Hands-On Herpetology: Exploring Ecology and Conservation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Plentiful, diverse, and readily available, these animals--known in science as "herps"--are also perfect for teaching students about biology, ecology, and conservation, including problems affecting both amphibians and reptiles. This highly readable resource melds rigorous science content with science research. Its five sections cover the animals' biology and handling procedures (including safety tips), provide background information for teachers, offer twenty-one indoor/outdoor activities, and broach critical conservation issues. Hands-On Herpetology: Exploring Ecology and Conservation is ideal for middle and high school teachers, volunteer leaders in 4-H and other clubs, and nature center staff who want to mix serious issues with amazing science.

Krasny, Marianne E.; Schneider, Rebecca L.; Morreale, Stephen J.

2001-01-01

136

Essential Laboratory Activities Guide. Secondary Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide was developed for use in junior and senior high schools in Duval County, Jacksonville, Florida, for the purpose of identifying those secondary science laboratory experiences which are essential to the development of science content knowledge and competency in handling science laboratory equipment and consumables. The guide…

Duval County Schools, Jacksonville, FL.

137

Elementary education majors experience hands-on learning in introductory biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This study describes how the active, hands-on learning opportunity for preservice teachers with its emphasis on both content and performance-based assessment was implemented in an introductory biology course for elementary education majors

PhD Barbara E. Goodman (University of South Dakota School of Medicine Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences); Elizabeth M. Freeburg (University of South Dakota Department of Biology); Katherine Rasmussen (University of South Dakota Department of Biology); Di Meng (University of South Dakota Department of Biology)

2006-12-01

138

Science 101: How can hands-on science teach long-lasting understanding?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Hands-on science activities have long been touted as a great way to motivate students who otherwise might not be all that interested in science. This article discusses the art of tapping into successful discovery learning through structured inquiry.

Robertson, William C.

2006-01-01

139

[The metrological support of medical laboratory activity].  

PubMed

The article discusses the methodological approaches in implementing of regulations of the Federal law FZ-102 "On the support of unity of measurements in the area of laboratory medicine "from the positions of GOSTK ISO 9001-2008 "The systems of quality management. Requirements" and GOST K ISO 15189-2009 "medical laboratories. The particular requirements to quality and competence". The application of GOSTK ISO 18113.1-5 "The medicine items for diagnostic in vitro. Information provided by manufacturer (marking)" neatly assigns the responsibility for support of metrological correctness of laboratory measurements. PMID:23808011

Émanuél', A V; Suvorov, V I; Evseenko, O V

2013-02-01

140

Miniaturization and globalization of clinical laboratory activities.  

PubMed

Clinical laboratories provide an invaluable service to millions of people around the world in the form of quality diagnostic care. Within the clinical laboratory industry the impetus for change has come from technological development (miniaturization, nanotechnology, and their collective effect on point-of-care testing; POCT) and the increasingly global nature of laboratory services. Potential technological gains in POCT include: the development of bio-sensors, microarrays, genetics and proteomics testing, and enhanced web connectivity. In globalization, prospective opportunities lie in: medical tourism, the migration of healthcare workers, cross-border delivery of testing, and the establishment of accredited laboratories in previously unexplored markets. Accompanying these impressive opportunities are equally imposing challenges. Difficulty transitioning from research to clinical use, poor infrastructure in developing countries, cultural differences and national barriers to global trade are only a few examples. Dealing with the issues presented by globalization and the impact of developing technology on POCT, and on the clinical laboratory services industry in general, will be a daunting task. Despite such concerns, with appropriate countermeasures it will be possible to address the challenges posed. Future laboratory success will be largely dependent on one's ability to adapt in this perpetually shifting landscape. PMID:21175379

Melo, Murilo R; Clark, Samantha; Barrio, Daniel

2011-04-01

141

Potentiometric Determination of CO2 Concentration in the Gaseous Phase: Applications in Different Laboratory Activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four simple experiments are described, in two laboratory sessions of 3 hours each. They provide high school students of a combined science course with the opportunity to review and integrate many topics while participating in a hands-on activity that resembles real industrial problems. The first lab comprises the calibration of a CO2 potentiometric detector with gas mixtures. The CO2 and CO2-free air required for the gaseous samples are produced in the lab by an inexpensive and simple apparatus. In the second lab, the CO2 potentiometric device is used to measure CO2uptake and release during different metabolic processes. The variation of CO2 production will be also estimated while changing the air/fuel proportion in a Bunsen burner.

Cortón, Eduardo; Kocmur, Santiago; Haim, Liliana; Galagovsky, Lydia

2000-09-01

142

A MASSive Laboratory Tour. An Interactive Mass Spectrometry Outreach Activity for Children  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is imperative to fascinate young children at an early stage in their education for the analytical sciences. The exposure of the public to mass spectrometry presently increases rapidly through the common media. Outreach activities can take advantage of this exposure and employ mass spectrometry as an exquisite example of an analytical science in which children can be fascinated. The presented teaching modules introduce children to mass spectrometry and give them the opportunity to experience a modern research laboratory. The modules are highly adaptable and can be applied to young children from the age of 6 to 14 y. In an interactive tour, the students explore three major scientific concepts related to mass spectrometry; the building blocks of matter, charged particle manipulation by electrostatic fields, and analyte identification by mass analysis. Also, the students carry out a mass spectrometry experiment and learn to interpret the resulting mass spectra. The multistage, inquiry-based tour contains flexible methods, which teach the students current-day research techniques and possible applications to real research topics. Besides the scientific concepts, laboratory safety and hygiene are stressed and the students are enthused for the analytical sciences by participating in "hands-on" work. The presented modules have repeatedly been successfully employed during laboratory open days. They are also found to be extremely suitable for (early) high school science classes during laboratory visit-focused field trips.

Jungmann, Julia H.; Mascini, Nadine E.; Kiss, Andras; Smith, Donald F.; Klinkert, Ivo; Eijkel, Gert B.; Duursma, Marc C.; Cillero Pastor, Berta; Chughtai, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Heeren, Ron M. A.

2013-07-01

143

Laboratory-Tutorial Activities for Teaching Probability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report on the development of students' ideas of probability and probability density in a University of Maine laboratory-based general education physics course called "Intuitive Quantum Physics". Students in the course are generally math phobic with unfavorable expectations about the nature of physics and their ability to do it. We describe a…

Wittmann, Michael C.; Morgan, Jeffrey T.; Feeley, Roger E.

2006-01-01

144

Enhancing Active Learning in the Student Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We previously examined how three approaches to directing students in a laboratory setting impacted their ability to repair a faulty mental model in respiratory physiology (Modell, HI, Michael JA, Adamson T, Goldberg J, Horwitz BA, Bruce DS, Hudson ML, Whitescarver SA, and Williams S. Adv Physiol Educ 23: 82?90, 2000). This study addresses issues…

Modell, Harold I.; Michael, Joel A.; Adamson, Tom; Horwitz, Barbara

2004-01-01

145

Hands-On Whole Science. What Rots?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents activities on the science of garbage to help elementary students learn to save the earth. A rotting experiment teaches students what happens to apple slices sealed in plastic or buried in damp soil. Other activities include reading stories on the subject and conducting classroom composting or toxic materials projects. (SM)

Markle, Sandra

1991-01-01

146

Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well

2010-01-01

147

Cognitive Influences of Students' Alternative Conceptions within a Hands-On Gene Technology Module  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a German out-of-school laboratory, 293 medium-achieving 10th-grade students participated in a lesson unit about gene technology. They were divided into two groups (I-1, I-2), both of which followed the same hands-on lesson procedure. Students within I-2 were additionally confronted with alternative conceptions to central issues of the specific…

Franke, Gaitano; Bogner, Franz X.

2011-01-01

148

A “hands-on” approach to speech science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of laboratory activities to supplement lectures is based on the knowledge that students learn best when they are able to manipulate the material under study, and that understanding of the physical universe requires problem-solving. The goal of this project was to develop public domain software and laboratory materials for instructional programs in speech and hearing science. The results

J. Anthony Seikel; David G. Drumright; Margery M. Whites; Paula J. Seikel

1995-01-01

149

Hands-on Science. How Fireflies Communicate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One creative way that elementary science educators can teach their students about animal communication is to give them glow sticks and a set of cards with descriptions of what different firefly flash signals mean. The paper describes such a project and presents related activities. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1995-01-01

150

Hands-On Science, 680 Hands at a Time: Shrinking the Large Lecture with a Collapsing Can Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains how hands-on science activities can be done in a class designed as a lecture setting. Uses the collapsing can activity to demonstrate the birth of a black hole. Evaluates student responses to the hands-on approach. (YDS)

Shipman, Harry L.

2001-01-01

151

Nematocidal activity of nitazoxanide in laboratory models  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nematocidal activity of a broad-spectrum antiparasitic agent, nitazoxanide [( N-(5-nitrothiazol-2-?l)salicylamide; NTZ], was evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo models using Caenorhabditis elegans, Heligmosomoides polygyrus and Trichinella spiralis. In vitro, NTZ (100 µM) exhibited a low activity against C. elegans and had no effect on embryonation and hatching of H. polygyrus eggs. At concentrations of 100 and 50 µM, the

F. Fonseca-Salamanca; M. M. Martínez-Grueiro; A. R. Martínez-Fernández

2003-01-01

152

Calculator-Controlled Robots: Hands-On Mathematics and Science Discovery  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Calculator Controlled Robots activities are designed to engage students in hands-on inquiry-based missions. These activities address National science and technology standards, as well as specifically focusing on mathematics content and process standards. There are ten missions and three exploration extensions that provide activities for up to…

Tuchscherer, Tyson

2010-01-01

153

Electricity/Electronics Systems. Laboratory Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This electricity/electronics guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 35 modules on the following topics: electrical…

Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

154

Practical aspects of operating a neutron activation analysis laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This book is intended to advise in everyday practical problems related to operating a neutron activation analysis (NAA) laboratory. It gives answers to questions like ''what to use NAA for'', ''how to find relevant research problems'', ''how to find users...

1990-01-01

155

A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

Stambuk, Boris U.

2000-01-01

156

An Inquiry Laboratory Activity for Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The "cookbook " style approach to studying biochemical reactions mediated by enzymes is changed to an inquiry approach. Cooperative teams are each given two questions about the types of living materials that contain the enzymes that break down hydrogen peroxide, and under what conditions the enzyme works best. They write hypotheses and design and conduct experiments to test these hypotheses. The activity provides students the opportunity to engage in meaningful scientific inquiry because they must truly understand the problem in order to attempt to solve it, to construct meaning in performing experiments, to practice observational skills, and to communicate in writing and in reporting orally to the class on their group results.

Nancy Contolini (Brookfield High School REV)

1994-07-30

157

The Effect of Hands-on '"Energy-Saving House" Learning Activities on Elementary School Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior Regarding Energy Saving and Carbon-Emissions Reduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Energy saving and carbon-emissions reduction (ESCER) are widely regarded as important issues for progress towards ensuring sustainable forms of economic development. This Taiwanese study focuses on the effects of a series of educational activities about ESCER on students' knowledge, attitudes and behavior. Sixty fifth-grade students from two…

Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Kuen-Yi; Guu, Yunn-Horng; Chang, Liang-Te; Lai, Chih-Chien

2013-01-01

158

Using the Laboratory to Enhance Student Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Typical hands-on, cookbook laboratory experiences do an extremely poor job of making apparent and playing off students' prior ideas, engendering deep reflection, and promoting understanding of complex content. This chapter addresses how to transform traditional laboratory activities into experiences that are more congruent with how people learn, the National Science Education Standards, and the nature of science.

Clough, Michael P.

2002-01-01

159

Hands-On Science: Is It an Acid or a Base? These Colorful Tests Tell All!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two hands-on science activities for K-6 students teach them how to determine if something is an acid or a base. The activities require acid/base indicator juice, testing strips, and a base solution. A recipe for making them in the classroom using red cabbage and baking soda is provided. (SM)

VanCleave, Janice

1998-01-01

160

Close view of statue showing her right hand on the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Close view of statue showing her right hand on the hilt of a sword - U.S. Capitol, Statue of Freedom, Intersection of North, South, & East Capitol Streets & Capitol Mall, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

161

Introductory Oceanography Taught as a Laboratory Science--An Experiment That Worked.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a college level introductory oceanography course that incorporates a hands-on laboratory component. The activities include the determination of density and buoyancy, light transmission in sea water, and wave refraction. (MA)

Anderson, Franz E.

1979-01-01

162

Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities, and 2001 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

How can we improve our ability to predict the weather? How is the Earth's climate changing? What can the atmospheres of other planets teach us about our own? The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer these and other scientific questions. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. Vigorous research is central to NASA's exploration of the frontiers of knowledge. NASA scientists play a key role in conceiving new space missions, providing mission requirements., and carrying out research to explore the behavior of planetary systems, including, notably, the Earth's. Our Laboratory's scientists also supply outside scientists with technical assistance and scientific data to further investigations not immediately addressed by NASA itself. The Laboratory for Atmospheres is a vital participant in NASA's research program. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Sciences Directorate based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The Directorate itself comprises the Global Change Data Center; the Earth and Space Data Computing Division; three laboratories: the Laboratory for Atmospheres, the Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, and the Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes; and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York, New York. In this report, you will find a statement of our philosophy and a description of our role in NASA's mission. You'll also find a broad description of our research and a summary of our scientists' major accomplishments in 2001. The report also presents useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community. For your convenience, we have published a version of this report on the Internet. Our Web site includes links to additional information about the Laboratory's Offices and Branches. You can find us on the World Wide Web at http://atmospheres.gsfc.nasa.gov.

Hoegy, Walter R.; Cote, Charles, E.

2002-01-01

163

Hands-on and Online: Scientific Explorations through Distance Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Laboratory experiments are often considered the defining characteristic of science courses. Such activities provide students with real-world contexts for applying scientific concepts, while also allowing them to develop scientific ways of thinking and promoting an interest in science. In recent years, an increasing number of campuses have moved…

Mawn, Mary V.; Carrico, Pauline; Charuk, Ken; Stote, Kim S.; Lawrence, Betty

2011-01-01

164

Hands-On Science and Literacy Activities about Solar Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article features science lesson plans to teach elementary students about the sun's energy, the relationship between light and heat, albedo, and the absorption of different surfaces. National standards and literacy integrations are provided for each lesson.

Fries-Gaither, Jessica

165

Earth Science Hands-On Learning Activities and Lesson Plans  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of animations, demonstration projects, paper models, and other teaching tools is designed to aid in the understanding of geologic processes. Topics include sea-floor spreading and subduction, earthquakes, seismology, magnetometers, volcanoes, and wave types. Links are provided to other sites containing paper models (i.e., volcano, trilobite, nautiloid) and other geology and natural hazard information. The earthquake lesson plan includes guidelines for teacher preparation, an "in-class inquiry," and a quiz.

Lahr, John

166

What Is Hands-on Science, and Where Can I Find It?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interactive science and technology centers are described that emphasize "hands-on" science. Examined are the outreach programs offered by many centers which include traveling exhibitions and published resource materials. Examples of follow-up activities to a center visit are included. (KR)

Quin, Melanie

1990-01-01

167

Enhancing Hands-On Science Experiences with Informational Texts: Learning about Pine Cones  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hands-on explorations can be extended through interactions with informational texts, enhancing both science learning and literacy development. In this article, the author describes a primary-grade science activity that begins with students examining pine cones and sharing their experiences and observations with peers. The students then generate…

Yopp, Ruth Helen

2006-01-01

168

Paper Table Hands-on Challenge: Explore Structures with PBS's "Design Squad"[TM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Build a table that's sturdy enough to hold a heavy weight! The catch? Students can only use eight sheets of newspaper, one piece of cardboard, and masking tape. This article describes "Paper Table," a hands-on activity from "Design Squad," in which kids investigate structures while following the steps of the engineering design process. Teachers…

Feinberg, Lauren

2010-01-01

169

Build a Band Hands-on Challenge: Investigate Sound with PBS's "Design Squad Nation"[TM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes "Build a Band" hands-on activity from "Design Squad Nation," which allows kids to use simple materials to build a four-stringed instrument, then tune it and play a song. Kids explore frequency, pitch, and sound energy while following the steps of the engineering design process. By weaving "Design Squad Nation" episodes,…

Feinberg, Lauren

2010-01-01

170

Building Communities Through Role Models, Mentors, and Hands-on-Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes afterschool science program, implemented by a group of women engineers, to provide 18 African American middle-school female students with hands-on science activities related to the manufacture and design of automobiles. Women engineers served as mentors and role models. Program had positive influence on students' attitudes towards math,…

Ferreira, Maria

2001-01-01

171

The Hands-On and Far-Out Physics Team: It Starts Out Walking.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Hands-On and Far-Out Physics project is part of the Center for Technology, Environment, and Communication (C-TEC), a project-based learning community at Piner High School in Santa Rosa (California). This article introduces the project team, discusses member activities, presents a walking-speed experiment, and describes a Mars Colony course…

Albrecht, Bob; Firedrake, George

1998-01-01

172

Illustrating Probability in Genetics with Hands-On Learning: Making the Math Real  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Probability is an essential tool for understanding heredity and modern genetics, yet many students have difficulty with this topic due to the abstract and quantitative nature of the subject. To facilitate student learning of probability in genetics, we have developed a set of hands-on, cooperative activities that allow students to determine…

Pierce, Benjamin A.; Honeycutt, Brenda B.

2007-01-01

173

Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

Ellis, Linda K.

2000-01-01

174

Teacher's Resource Guide on Acidic Precipitation with Laboratory Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this teacher's resource guide is to help science teachers incorporate the topic of acidic precipitation into their curricula. A survey of recent junior high school science textbooks found a maximum of one paragraph devoted to the subject; in addition, none of these books had any related laboratory activities. It was on the basis of…

Barrow, Lloyd H.

175

Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities, and 1999 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer questions related to climate, and climate change and other scientific questions about our planet and its neighbors. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. In this report,there is a statement of the labs philosophy and a description of it's role in NASA's mission. A broad description of the research and a summary of the scientists' major accomplishments in 1999 is also included. The report also presents useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community.

Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

176

Environmental Measurements Laboratory fiscal year 1998: Accomplishments and technical activities  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) is government-owned, government-operated, and programmatically under the DOE Office of Environmental Management. The Laboratory is administered by the Chicago Operations Office. EML provides program management, technical assistance and data quality assurance for measurements of radiation and radioactivity relating to environmental restoration, global nuclear nonproliferation, and other priority issues for the Department of Energy, as well as for other government, national, and international organizations. This report presents the technical activities and accomplishments of EML for Fiscal Year 1998.

Erickson, M.D.

1999-01-01

177

Maintaining and Expanding the Hands-On Optics Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hands-On Optics (HOO) was funded by the National Science Foundation Informal Science Education program to bring optics education to traditionally underserved middle school students. We developed a series of six optics modules each covering a different topic in optics. During the four-year grant, we brought the program to the Mathematics, Science and Engineering Achievement (MESA) programs in seven states as well as 8 major science centers. We continue to support our established sites as well as expand our program. One of our expansion efforts involves continuing our partnership with the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE). We have been working closely with SPIE to present workshops for student chapter leaders at SPIE meetings. The student chapter leaders use HOO materials in their outreach activities. SPIE has teamed with us to bring HOO to Europe. We have received a grant from the Science Foundation of Arizona to expand HOO in Arizona. This program builds on our successful programs at the South Tucson Boys and Girls Club as well as the Sells Boys and Girls Club by expanding HOO to other sites around the state with an emphasis on rural locations such as Bisbee, Safford, Prescott Valley and the Tohon O'odham Nation. We have been working with a variety of Boys and Girls Clubs around the state. Several programs are underway and we hope to add more sites in the coming year. We continue to host local events at Kitt Peak National Observatory as well as special events for the community and students in the Tucson area. Our events include science nights at local schools, optics festivals and competitions, career days and teacher fairs. We will describe the current state of the program as well as lessons learned as we expand the program in a variety of settings.

Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, R. T.; Walker, C. E.

2008-05-01

178

Hands-On Sports Medicine Training for Residents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development of a hands-on sports medicine training program for residents at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. Education strategies include clinical teaching, on-the-field education, experiential learning, and didactic instruction. Programs focusing exclusively on sports medicine are needed because the number of…

Tanji, Jeffrey L.

1989-01-01

179

Enhancing Lean Manufacturing Learning Experience through Hands-On Simulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Finding appropriate interactive exercises to increase students' learning in technical topic courses is always challenging to educators. In this study, several paper plane hands-on simulation exercises were developed, used, and tested in a lean manufacturing course for beginning college students. A pretest and posttest was used to assess the…

Elbadawi, Isam; McWilliams, Douglas L.; Tetteh, Edem G.

2010-01-01

180

Hands on CERN: A Well-Used Physics Education Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Hands on CERN" education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages…

Johansson, K. E.

2006-01-01

181

Hands-On Reciprocal Teaching: A Comprehension Technique  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reciprocal teaching is a researched-based technique that utilizes the comprehension strategies of predicting, clarifying, questioning, and summarizing. This article provides methods of incorporating characters, props, and visual and hands-on tools to encourage and motivate students to learn through reciprocal teaching. Teachers are given…

Stricklin, Kelley

2011-01-01

182

CIT Vet Students Learn with Their Hands on the Animals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes Crownpoint Institute of Technology's (CIT's) (New Mexico) veterinary technology program. CIT veterinary students earn veterinary associate's degrees and job skills while working with their hands on the animals. Discusses CIT's hopes of becoming a national leader in elk management and its focus on delivering technology and modern skills…

Cournoyer, David

2000-01-01

183

Increasing Awareness about Antibiotic Use and Resistance: A Hands-On Project for High School Students  

PubMed Central

Background Health-promoting education is essential to foster an informed society able to make decisions about socio-scientific issues based on scientifically sustained criteria. Antibiotic resistance is currently a major public health issue. Considering that irrational antibiotic use has been associated with the development and widespread of antibiotic resistant bacteria, educational interventions to promote prudent antibiotic consumption are required. Methodology/Principal Findings This study focuses on the outcomes of an interventional program implemented at the University of Porto, Portugal, to promote awareness about antibiotic resistance at high school levels (15–17 year old). The project Microbiology recipes: antibiotics à la carte articulates a set of wet and dry lab activities designed to promote the participants’ understanding of concepts and processes underlying antibiotics’ production and activity, such as the notion of mechanisms of action of antibiotics. Following a mix-method approach based on a pre?/post design, the effectiveness of this project was assessed by gathering data from surveys, direct observation and analysis of artifacts of 42 high school students (aged 15 and 16 years). The results indicate that the participants developed a more comprehensive picture of antibiotic resistance. The project was shown to promote more sophisticated conceptualizations of bacteria and antibiotics, increased awareness about the perils of antibiotic resistance, and enhanced consciousness towards measures that can be undertaken to mitigate the problem. The participants regarded their experiences as enjoyable and useful, and believed that the project contributed to improve their understanding and raise their interest about the issues discussed. Furthermore, there were also improvements in their procedural skills concerning the laboratory techniques performed. Conclusions/Significance This study evidences the possibility of increasing high school students’ awareness about the consequences of antibiotic resistance and the importance of judicious antibiotic use. The findings inform about the educational benefits of incorporating hands-on activities in science education programs.

Fonseca, Maria Joao; Santos, Catarina L.; Costa, Patricio; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

2012-01-01

184

Teaching genetics using hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based methods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Teaching genetics can be challenging because of the difficulty of the content and misconceptions students might hold. This thesis focused on using hands-on model activities, problem solving, and inquiry-based teaching/learning methods in order to increase student understanding in an introductory biology class in the area of genetics. Various activities using these three methods were implemented into the classes to address any misconceptions and increase student learning of the difficult concepts. The activities that were implemented were shown to be successful based on pre-post assessment score comparison. The students were assessed on the subjects of inheritance patterns, meiosis, and protein synthesis and demonstrated growth in all of the areas. It was found that hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based activities were more successful in learning concepts in genetics and the students were more engaged than tradition styles of lecture.

Hoppe, Stephanie Ann

185

Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology  

SciTech Connect

One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

2004-02-15

186

Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands- on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands-on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College T. C. Kenna, S. Pfirman, B. J. Mailloux, M. Stute, R. Kelsey, and P. Bower By adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program (SEA semester) to the typical college format of classes, we are improving the technical and quantitative skills of undergraduate women and minorities in environmental science and improving their critical thinking and problem-solving by exposing our students to open-ended real-world environmental issues. Our approach uses the Hudson River Estuary as a natural laboratory. In a series of hands-on inquiry-based activities, students use advanced equipment to collect data and samples. Each class session introduces new analytical and data analysis techniques. All classes have the connecting theme of the river. Working with real data is open-ended. Our major findings as indicated by surveys as well as journaling throughout the semester are that the field- based experience significantly contributed to student learning and engagement. Journaling responses indicated that nearly all students discussed the importance and excitement of an authentic research experience. Some students were frustrated with data irregularities, uncertainty in methods and data, and the general challenge of a curriculum with inherent ambiguity. The majority were satisfied with the aims of the course to provide an integrative experience. All students demonstrated transfer of learned skills. This project has had a significant impact on our undergraduate female students: several students have pursued senior thesis projects stemming from grant activities, stating that the field activities were the highlight of their semester. Some students love the experience and want more. Others decide that they want to pursue a different career. All learn how science is conducted and have a better foundation to understand concepts such as sampling, uncertainty, and variability, which are important to many fields. Many of the hands-on curricular activities have been adapted and used with a variety of student, teacher, and faculty groups. Faculty participants in our River Summer program (www.riversummer.org) see earth system science in a way that would be hard to replicate without the hands-on experience. Faculty participants are encouraged to adapt our activities to their own classroom. We are in the process of assembling many of our hands-on field-based activities as fully exportable curricular elements to further increase impacts.

Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Mailloux, B. J.; Martin, S.; Kelsey, R.; Bower, P.

2008-12-01

187

Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities and 2000 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

How can we improve our ability to predict the weather - tomorrow, next week, and into the future? How is the Earth's climate changing? What causes such change? And what are its costs? What can the atmospheres of distant planets teach us about our own planet and its evolution? The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer these and other scientific questions about our planet and its neighbors. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. Vigorous research is central to NASA's exploration of the frontiers of knowledge. NASA scientists play a key role in conceiving new space programs, providing mission requirements, and carrying out research to explore the behavior of planetary systems, including, notably, the Earth's. The Laboratory for the Atmospheres is a vital participant in NASA's research program. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. In this report, you'll find a statement of our philosophy and a description of our role in NASA's mission. You'll also find a broad description of our research and a summary of our scientists' major accomplishments in 2000. The report also present useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community.

Hoegy, Walter R. (Editor); Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

188

78 FR 6128 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories...collection requirement concerning the Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories...following information collection: Title: Accreditation of Commercial Testing...

2013-01-29

189

DOSE PROFILE MODELING OF IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY’S ACTIVE NEUTRON INTERROGATION TEST FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A new research and development laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for DT fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 108 neutrons per second), DD fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (up to 2 x 106 neutrons per second), and 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.7 x 107 neutrons per second, 30 micrograms). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8 m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for 252Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield wall and entrance maze and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults.

D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. M. Zabriskie; J. Wharton; A. J. Caffrey

2009-06-01

190

Hands-on Learning Science Units for Elementary School  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This series of easy-to-implement science lessons for grades kindergarten through five is aimed at educators and undergraduates or other volunteers who regularly work with teachers in the classroom. They were developed for a Williams College Outreach Program that places undergraduates in local classrooms as science assistants and teaches them to use a hands-on approach to expose children to the thought processes of scientific discovery.

Wendy E. Raymond (Williams College;); Kate Dempsey (Williams College ;); Ari Wilder (Williams College ;); Patricia Bitteker (Williams College Outreach Program;); Corrine Benn (Williams College Outreach Program;); Sarah Madden (Williams College Outreach Program;)

2010-05-28

191

Practical hands-on program in laser/optics technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Practical hands on program philosophy and ideas will be discussed. This program was planned and carried out in three Taiwan technical colleges as well as one junior college in USA and in a four year university BS degree program. The products and successes from this program and curriculum will be discussed in detail. What are the best topics and opportunity areas in optics and photonics to meet the broader social and industrial needs will be discussed.

Chou, Shen-Yuan; Liu, WaiMin

2000-06-01

192

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2002. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All Fy 2002 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2003. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2002 was $7 million. The actual allocation totaled $6.7 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

FOX,K.J.

2002-12-31

193

Hands-On Solid Modeling Experiences in a Course Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper focuses on the hands-on experience of 3-D solid modeling technique and prototyping employed in product design and realization process. Engineering Graphics and CAD/CAM are two of the core courses in the Manufacturing Engineering program. Computer aided design and drafting, as well as solid modeling of parts, are strongly emphasized in the Engineering Graphics curriculum which is taught in the sophomore year. In continuation, both manual and computer aided CNC programming are covered in the CAD/CAM curriculum taught in the junior year. Computer Aided Reverse Engineering of cork opener, gear puller, cell phone case, and cell phone cover were the selected course projects taken by students in the CAD/CAM course. One of the main objectives of the curse project was for the students to extend their knowledge in design process and gain a hands-on experience in the field of solid modeling and product realization. A caliper and a micrometer were used to measure the main dimensions of the parts, and a solid modeling program was used for creating the parts model and assembly as well. This paper describes hands-on solid modeling and prototyping experiences of manufacturing engineering students regarding product realization process at our program.

Ansari, Jahangir

2010-07-29

194

Engaging First-Year Undergraduates in Hands-On Research Experiences: The Upper Green River Barcode of Life Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To improve retention and engagement, first-year college science majors enrolled in University Experience orientation courses participated in a hands-on laboratory research experience: a DNA barcoding project to facilitate species identification. Students collected arthropods and hypothesized morphology-based species identifications. Then they…

Marcus, Jeffrey M.; Hughes, Tia M.; McElroy, Douglas M.; Wyatt, Robert E.

2010-01-01

195

Hands on workshops as an effective means of learning advanced technologies including genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics  

PubMed Central

Genomics and proteomics have emerged as key technologies in biomedical research, resulting in a surge of interest in training by investigators keen to incorporate these technologies into their research. At least two types of training can be envisioned in order to produce meaningful results, quality publications, and successful grant applications: 1) immediate, short-term, training workshops, and 2) long-term graduate education or visiting scientist programs. We aimed to fill the former need by providing a comprehensive hands-on training course in genomics, proteomics, and informatics in a coherent, experimentally-based framework. This was accomplished through a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 10-day Genomics and Proteomics Hands On Workshop held at National Jewish Health (NJH) and the University of Colorado School of Medicine (UCD). The course content included: comprehensive lectures and laboratories in mass spectrometry and genomics technologies, extensive hands-on experience with instrumentation and software, video demonstrations, optional workshops, on-line sessions, invited keynote speakers, and local and national guest faculty. Here we describe the detailed curriculum and present the results of short- and long-term evaluations from course attendees. Our educational program consistently received positive reviews from participants and had a substantial impact on grant writing and review, manuscript submissions, and publications.

Reisdorph, Nichole; Stearman, Robert; Kechris, Katerina; Phang, Tzu Lip; Reisdorph, Richard; Prenni, Jessica; Erle, David J.; Coldren, Christopher; Schey, Kevin; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Geraci, Mark

2014-01-01

196

A History of Classified Activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The facilities that became Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were created in 1943 during the United States' super-secret World War II project to construct an atomic bomb (the Manhattan Project). During World War II and for several years thereafter, essentially all ORNL activities were classified. Now, in 2000, essentially all ORNL activities are unclassified. The major purpose of this report is to provide a brief history of ORNL's major classified activities from 1943 until the present (September 2000). This report is expected to be useful to the ORNL Classification Officer and to ORNL's Authorized Derivative Classifiers and Authorized Derivative Declassifiers in their classification review of ORNL documents, especially those documents that date from the 1940s and 1950s.

Quist, A.S.

2001-01-30

197

Status of optical model activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An update will be given of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory aimed at developing optical model potentials for applied calculations. Recent work on a coupled-channels potential for neutron reactions on {sup 241,243}Am and spherical neutron potential updates for {sup 56}Fe and {sup 59}Co will be presented, together with examples of their application in nuclear reaction calculations with the GNASH code system. New potentials utilized in evaluations at Livermore for {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N and {sup 16}O are described and additional potentials from earlier analyses at Los Alamos of Ti, V, and Ni data are made available for possible inclusion in the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL) for nuclear model calculations of nuclear data. Specific activities directed at development of the optical potential segment of the RIPL will be summarized.

Young, P.G.

1995-12-01

198

Invention activities as preparation for learning laboratory data handling skills  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undergraduate physics laboratories are often driven by a mix of goals, and usually enough of them to cause cognitive overload for the student. Our recent findings align well with studies indicating that students often exit a physics lab without having properly learned how to handle real data. The value of having students explore the underlying structure of a problem before being able to solve it has been shown as an effective way to ready students for learning. Borrowing on findings from the fields of education and cognitive psychology, we use ``invention activities'' to precede direct instruction and bolster learning. In this talk I will show some of what we have learned about students' data handling skills, explain how an invention activity works, and share some observations of successful transfer.

Day, James

2012-10-01

199

In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

1997-11-01

200

Teaching radio astrophysics the hand-on way  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy and space sciences have always been instrumental in attracting young students to physical sciences. While the lectures/demonstrations and exhibitions pertaining to space sci-ences capture the imagination of young students, these alone are not sufficient to induce them to join scientific research. In countries like India, where a large number of students take to physical sciences for under-graduate education, complex sociological factors are key issues in translating this large body of students to potential researchers. While lectures and exhibition lead to an increase in scientific awareness for these students, these do not give a feel for scien-tific research and bridge the gap between high school/college science education and high end research. In this context, a hands-on approach to astronomy education, in science research environments or closely connected to scientific institutions, offers a promising alternative. This approach has been used in optical astronomy, where inexpensive small telescopes are available, often coupling a vast network of amateur astronomy clubs to leading astronomy institutes. The non-visual and relatively more technical nature of radio astronomy has limited a similar approach in past for connecting students to space sciences using radio waveband. The tech-nological explosion in communication industry and radio connectivity in the last decade along with an expansion in engineering education makes this possible now using a hands-on approach in teaching radio astrophysics. In this presentation, the sociological factors affecting the student choice are discussed followed by a review of the efforts to bridge the above mentioned gap by various groups in the world in the last decade with a view to enumerate the best practices in a hands-on approach. A program using this approach at National Center for Radio Astrophysics is described, where the students are exposed to simple hands-on radio astronomy experiments such as spectral line observations of neutral hydrogen from Milky Way and solar flux moni-toring. Such experiments are also useful to familiarize the students with astronomy jargon, which many times becomes an impediment in connecting them with research. This program also aims to develop low cost radio telescopes with involvement of engineering students and the presentation aims at sharing the experience in this program. Future possibilities bridging the gap between the research institutions, such as ours, and the student population at large are also discussed.

Joshi, Bhal Chandra

201

Hands-on statistics’—empirical introduction to measurement uncertainty  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We would like to share with you our ongoing experiences with ‘hands-on statistics’ lessons we have recently carried out. We have developed a new experimental path for teaching young students using fundamental concepts of ‘statistics’: uncertainty of the measurement, the uncertainty of the mean, the mean itself, etc. The methods themselves need no special skills in mathematics, only the use of a takoyaki setup is needed for the experiments. This equipment we have found makes the lesson far more interesting for the students and has allowed us to work successfully for many years, even with children from elementary schools starting from the age of 10.

Wibig, Tadeusz; Dam-o, Punsiri

2013-03-01

202

MSLICE Science Activity Planner for the Mars Science Laboratory Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

MSLICE (Mars Science Laboratory InterfaCE) is the tool used by scientists and engineers on the Mars Science Laboratory rover mission to visualize the data returned by the rover and collaboratively plan its activities. It enables users to efficiently and effectively search all mission data to find applicable products (e.g., images, targets, activity plans, sequences, etc.), view and plan the traverse of the rover in HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) images, visualize data acquired by the rover, and develop, model, and validate the activities the rover will perform. MSLICE enables users to securely contribute to the mission s activity planning process from their home institutions using off-the-shelf laptop computers. This software has made use of several plug-ins (software components) developed for previous missions [e.g., Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix Mars Lander (PHX)] and other technology tasks. It has a simple, intuitive, and powerful search capability. For any given mission, there is a huge amount of data and associated metadata that is generated. To help users sort through this information, MSLICE s search interface is provided in a similar fashion as major Internet search engines. With regard to the HiRISE visualization of the rover s traverse, this view is a map of the mission that allows scientists to easily gauge where the rover has been and where it is likely to go. The map also provides the ability to correct or adjust the known position of the rover through the overlaying of images acquired from the rover on top of the HiRISE image. A user can then correct the rover s position by collocating the visible features in the overlays with the same features in the underlying HiRISE image. MSLICE users can also rapidly search all mission data for images that contain a point specified by the user in another image or panoramic mosaic. MSLICE allows the creation of targets, which provides a way for scientists to collaboratively name features on the surface of Mars. These targets can also be used to convey instrument-pointing information to the activity plan. The software allows users to develop a plan of what they would like the rover to accomplish for a given time period. When developing the plan, the user can input constraints between activities or groups of activities. MSLICE will enforce said constraints and ensure that all mission flight rules are satisfied.

Powell, Mark W.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Fox, Jason M.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Kurien, James A.; McCurdy, Michael P.; Pyrzak, Guy; Aghevli, Arash; Bachmann, Andrew G.

2009-01-01

203

Educational Activities At The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) at the University of Texas at Austin performs a wide variety of educational activities for students at various levels. Regular on-site courses in the areas of health physics, radiochemistry, and reactor operations are offered for university credit. Along with on-site courses, access to the reactor facility via a remote console connection allows students in an off-site classroom to conduct experiments via a ``virtual'' control console. In addition to the regularly scheduled courses, other programs, such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Summer Nuclear Engineering Institute and Office of Naval Research partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, provide access to the facility for students from other universities both domestic and foreign. And NETL hosts professional development programs such as training programs for Nuclear Regulatory Commission personnel and International Atomic Energy Agency fellowships.

Tipping, Tracy N.

2011-06-01

204

Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

2011-11-01

205

Low-Speed Active Flow Control Laboratory Developed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The future of aviation propulsion systems is increasingly focused on the application of control technologies to significantly enhance the performance of a new generation of air vehicles. Active flow control refers to a set of technologies that manipulate the flow of air and combustion gases deep within the confines of an engine to dynamically alter its performance during flight. By employing active flow control, designers can create engines that are significantly lighter, are more fuel efficient, and produce lower emissions. In addition, the operating range of an engine can be extended, yielding safer transportation systems. The realization of these future propulsion systems requires the collaborative development of many base technologies to achieve intelligent, embedded control at the engine locations where it will be most effective. NASA Glenn Research Center s Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch has developed a state-of-the-art low-speed Active Flow Control Laboratory in which emerging technologies can be integrated and explored in a flexible, low-cost environment. The facility allows the most promising developments to be prescreened and optimized before being tested on higher fidelity platforms, thereby reducing the cost of experimentation and improving research effectiveness.

Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.

2005-01-01

206

Chemical Science and Technolotgy Laboratory 1999 Technical Activities Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As the Nation's Reference Measurement Laboratory for chemical, biomolecular, and chemical engineering, the mission of Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory (CSTL) is to provide the chemical measurement infrastructure to enhance U.S. industry's produc...

2000-01-01

207

Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, Technical Activities 2000.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory (CSTL) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is the United States reference laboratory for chemical measurements, entrusted with developing, maintaining, advancing, and enabling the che...

2001-01-01

208

ENVIRONMENTAL-NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY ACTIVITIES AT ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY - WEST  

Microsoft Academic Search

Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) has a full suite of nuclear facilities including two large hot cell facilities, analytical chemistry laboratory, sodium processing facilities, two operating reactors, electron microscopy laboratory and various support facilities. ANL-W is located on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, but is operated by University of Chicago under the Department of Energy Chicago Operations office. Although

R. W. Benedict; S. P. Henslee; S. E. Aumeier; D. B. Barber; S. D. Lee

209

A comparison of the effectiveness of hands-on and computer-mediated instruction for learning solubility and solutions at the middle school level  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research in science education has provided evidence that textbook-oriented instruction falls short of achieving desired educational outcomes. In the 1960s, educational reform movements advocated involving students in laboratory experiments with the belief that such hands-on tasks would necessarily lead to learning. In the mid-1980s, the introduction of computers in education provided an alternative to hands-on instruction, but comparisons between

Laura J. Moin

2003-01-01

210

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987  

SciTech Connect

During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

1988-12-31

211

Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

none,

1993-12-23

212

Telescope Construction: A Hands-On Approach to Astronomy Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on a popular semester-long telescope making course offered at Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, GA. The program is tailored for junior / senior level high school students and incorporates the current educational performance standards for the state of Georgia. This course steps out of the traditional classroom environment and allows students to explore optics and astronomical concepts by constructing their own telescopes. Student telescopes follow the classic six-inch f/8 Newtonian reflector design, which has proven to be a good compromise between portability and aperture. Participants meet for a few hours, twice weekly, to build their telescopes. Over the course of the semester, raw one-inch thick Pyrex mirror blanks are ground, polished, and figured by hand into precision telescope objectives. Along the way, students are introduced to the Ronchi and Foucault methods for testing optics and once figured, completed mirrors are then chemically silvered. A plywood Dobsonian-style base is built and eventually mated with an optical tube made from a standard eight-inch concrete form tube or sonotube. An evening of star testing the optics and observation is planned at the end of the semester to insure the proper operation of each telescope. In summary, we believe that a hands-on approach to the understanding and use of optical telescopes is a great way not only to instill enthusiasm among students for the night sky, but may perhaps inspire the next generation of professional telescope makers.

Sarrazine, Angela R.; Albin, E.

2009-01-01

213

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and

2007-01-01

214

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another

2002-01-01

215

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million.

J. P. Looney; K. Fox

2008-01-01

216

Development of a laboratory demonstration model active cleaning device  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A laboratory demonstration model of a device for removing contaminant films from optical surfaces in space was developed. The development of a plasma tube, which would produce the desired cleaning effects under high vacuum conditions, represented the major problem in the program. This plasma tube development is discussed, and the resulting laboratory demonstration-model device is described.

Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

1975-01-01

217

Rotating Fluids : Hands-on Demonstrations for Graduate and General Education Courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rotating tables are useful to demonstrate a variety of geophysical flow phenomena about ocean-atmosphere flows. We discuss a small budget (less than \\$4k) effort at UMass Dartmouth that posed the construction and demonstration of a rotating table designed by two students involved in a senior design project in Mechanical Engineering. With suggestions from Jack Whitehead and Keith Bradley at WHOI, Peter Cornillon at URI and Bud Brown at MIT, the students took the table from concept to a working version. The table (60cm in diameter) features a color video camera in the rotating frame of reference and has a dedicated computer to record experiments. It is being used for laboratory demonstrations in general education courses as well as for hands-on projects in a graduate course in Physics and Oceanography.

Luebke, C.; Emmanuel, G.; Tandon, A.; El-Wakil, K.

2004-12-01

218

Harvesting of Lunar Iron: Competitive Hands-on Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Electromagnets can be used to harvest free iron from lunar soil, known as regolith. Iron is important to the US plans for a lunar outpost. It does not rust in space, making it an excellent construction material. Circumpolar railroad tracks would allow a slowly-moving train to follow the sun, making agriculture possible, and enabling continuous operation of factories producing solar cells and oxygen for life support and propulsion. Designing an iron harvesting apparatus for the unique lunar environment requires that students re-think tacit assumptions about how things work. Within the context of a 33-student summer program, two college interns supervised nine high school upperclassmen in an eight week project to design, test, and evaluate a lunar iron harvester. Under the guidance of high school teachers, a research engineer outlined the constraints and parameters for the project. The college interns developed performance metrics, and the teachers established the framework for the competition. Three teams of three students developed their designs, which were reviewed by professional engineers prior to fabrication. A separate team performed research on the properties of lunar soil and prepared a test bed containing 150 kg of simulated regolith. One team identified a novel means to multiply electromagnet force using a recently-issued patent, creating great excitement between the teams and spurring them all to excel. Electromagnets were fabricated in the Packer Engineering shop, then operated by the students in a standardized competition format. Wearing proper protective gear, each team tested their device to determine the amount of free iron extracted from the regolith simulant. Performance was measured in mass of iron harvested per device mass, yielding surprising results, and powerful insights for the students. Results were published in a local newspaper. In this paper, we describe how this hands-on project fits within an overarching philosophy for engineering education within a paid summer intern program.

Beatty, Matthew; Schubert, Peter

2009-08-21

219

Hands-On Educational Programs and Projects at SICSA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) has a long history of projects that involve the design of space structures, including habitats for low-Earth orbit (LEO) and planetary applications. Some of these projects are supported by corporate sponsors, such as a space tourism research, planning and design study conducted for the owner of national U.S. hotel chain. Some have been undertaken in support of programs sponsored by the State Government of Texas, including current commercial spaceport development planning for the Texas Aerospace Commission and three counties that represent candidate spaceport sites. Other projects have been supported by NASA and the Texas Aerospace Consortium, including the design and development of SICSA's "Space Habitation Laboratory", a space station module sized environmental simulator facility which has been featured in the "NASA Select" television broadcast series. This presentation will highlight representative projects. SICSA is internationally recognized for its leadership in the field of space architecture. Many program graduates have embarked upon productive and rewarding careers with aerospace organizations throughout the world. NASA has awarded certificates of appreciation to SICSA for significant achievements contributing to its advanced design initiatives. SICSA and its work have been featured in numerous popular magazines, professional publications, and public media broadcasts in many countries. SICSA applies a very comprehensive scope of activities to the practice of space architecture. Important roles include mission planning conceptualization of orbital and planetary structures and assembly processes, and design of habitats to optimize human safety, adaptation and productivity. SICSA sponsors educational programs for upper division undergraduate students and graduate students with interests in space and experimental architecture. Many fourth year participants continue in the SICSA program throughout their remaining undergraduate studies, and are joined by other new fifth year students. Selected graduate applicants holding a professional degree in architecture from accredited colleges and universities can earn a Master of Architecture degree with a specialization in space and experimental architecture upon completion of 32 credit hours of study which includes two six-hour design studios. Accepted graduate students seeking a Master of Architecture degree who do not hold a professional architecture degree may enter SICSA studios during the final year of their minimum 72 credit hours of study. Subject to necessary University of Houston and Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approvals, SICSA and the College of Architecture propose to expand their graduate education role to add a Master of Science in Space Architecture degree program. This new program is primarily being planned in response to known interests of non-architect professionals from NASA and aerospace corporations who wish to pursue advanced space architecture research and design studies. The program will be also available to working professionals holding an undergraduate architectural degree.

Bell, L.

2002-01-01

220

Environmental Measurements Laboratory, Fiscal Year 1999: Accomplishments and Technical Activities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) is a federal technical resource with a distinguished 50-year reputation in low-level environmental radiation and radioactivity measurements. It is government-owned, government-operated, reporting programmati...

M. D. Erickson

2000-01-01

221

On-site laboratory support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory environmental restoration field activities  

SciTech Connect

A remedial investigation/feasibility study has been undertaken at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Bechtel National, Inc. and partners CH2M Hill, Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, and PEER Consultants are contracted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, performing this work for ORNL`s Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. An on-site Close Support Laboratory (CSL) established at the ER Field Operations Facility has evolved into a laboratory where quality analytical screening results can be provided rapidly (e.g., within 24 hours of sampling). CSL capabilities include three basic areas: radiochemistry, chromatography, and wet chemistry. Radiochemical analyses include gamma spectroscopy, tritium and carbon-14 screens using liquid scintillation analysis, and gross alpha and beta counting. Cerenkov counting and crown-ether-based separation are the two rapid methods used for radiostrontium determination in water samples. By extending count times where appropriate, method detection limits can match those achieved by off-site contract laboratories. Volatile organic compounds are detected by means of gas chromatography using either headspace or purge and trap sample introduction (based on EPA 601/602). Ionic content of water samples is determined using ion chromatography and alkalinity measurement. Ion chromatography is used to quantify both anions (based on EPA 300) and cations. Wet chemistry procedures performed at the CSL include alkalinity, pH (water and soil), soil resistivity, and dissolved/suspended solids. Besides environmental samples, the CSL routinely screens health and safety and waste management samples. The cost savings of the CSL are both direct and indirect.

Burn, J.L.E. [Bechtel Environmental, Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

1995-07-01

222

The Urban Environmental Laboratory: A Step in the Right Direction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the philosophy, facility features, and program offerings at Brown University's environmental education center. The Urban Environmental Laboratory (UEL) is an integrated instruction, residential, demonstration project for students and the public community. Conservation technologies, active learning, and hands-on experience characterize…

Dolin, Eric Jay

1985-01-01

223

Vectors and Fomites: An Investigative Laboratory for Undergraduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory model system for introductory microbiology students that involves hands-on studies of bacteria vectored in soil nematodes. Describes a series of experiments designed to demonstrate vector-fomite transmission, bacterial survival, and disinfectant activity. Introduces the concept of genetically engineered microorganisms and the…

Adamo, Joseph A.; Gealt, Michael A.

1996-01-01

224

The effects of hands-on-science instruction on the science achievement of middle school students  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Student achievement in the Twenty First Century demands a new rigor in student science knowledge, since advances in science and technology require students to think and act like scientists. As a result, students must acquire proficient levels of knowledge and skills to support a knowledge base that is expanding exponentially with new scientific advances. This study examined the effects of hands-on-science instruction on the science achievement of middle school students. More specifically, this study was concerned with the influence of hands-on science instruction versus traditional science instruction on the science test scores of middle school students. The subjects in this study were one hundred and twenty sixth-grade students in six classes. Instruction involved lecture/discussion and hands-on activities carried out for a three week period. Specifically, the study ascertained the influence of the variables gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the science test scores of middle school students. Additionally, this study assessed the effect of the variables gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the attitudes of sixth grade students toward science. The two instruments used to collect data for this study were the Prentice Hall unit ecosystem test and the Scientific Work Experience Programs for Teachers Study (SWEPT) student's attitude survey. Moreover, the data for the study was treated using the One-Way Analysis of Covariance and the One-Way Analysis of Variance. The following findings were made based on the results: (1) A statistically significant difference existed in the science performance of middle school students exposed to hands-on science instruction. These students had significantly higher scores than the science performance of middle school students exposed to traditional instruction. (2) A statistically significant difference did not exist between the science scores of male and female middle school students. (3) A statistically significant difference did not exist between the science scores of African American and non-African American middle school students. (4) A statistically significant difference existed in the socioeconomic status of students who were not provided with assisted lunches. Students with unassisted lunches had significantly higher science scores than those middle school students who were provided with assisted lunches. (5) A statistically significant difference was not found in the attitude scores of middle school students who were exposed to hands-on or traditional science instruction. (6) A statistically significant difference was not found in the observed attitude scores of middle school students who were exposed to either hands-on or traditional science instruction by their socioeconomic status. (7) A statistically significant difference was not found in the observed attitude scores of male and female students. (8) A statistically significant difference was not found in the observed attitude scores of African American and non African American students.

Wiggins, Felita

225

Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.  

SciTech Connect

As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

(Office of The Director)

2012-04-25

226

Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.  

SciTech Connect

As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

(Office of The Director)

2012-04-25

227

A Low-Cost Hands-On Laboratory to Introduce Lithography Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A lithography lab course has been developed that is applicable to students from the middle-school level up to college students. It can also be inserted into electronics technology or similar courses in two- and four-year colleges, or used to demonstrate applications of polymers in chemistry classes. Some of these techniques would enable research…

Jalali, M.; Marti, J. J.; Kirchhoff, A. L.; Lawrenz, F.; Campbell, S. A.

2012-01-01

228

Laboratory Technician: Zane Kraft  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a PDF interview, PowerPoint slide set, and webpage biography of a laboratory technician, detailing the career information for someone who enjoys the hands-on experimentation of working with samples in the lab.

2012-05-02

229

Hands-On Whole Science: A Leaf Sampler.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents two elementary school activities to help students learn about autumn. The activities use autumn leaves to teach that each type of tree has its own distinctive type of leaf. One activity involves tracing, drawing, and writing about leaves; the other involves making a quilt using leaf designs. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1991-01-01

230

Manufacturing Enterprise Simulation as the Foundation Course and Synergistic Focus of Advanced Course Hands-On Application  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper describes the effective utilization and benefits of a hands-on laboratory-based production enterprise simulation course as the introductory foundation for subsequent IT or IET program major courses. Using the Georgia Southern University B.S.-Manufacturing degree programs nationally recognized enterprise course as a model, the following key outcome-oriented benefits will be presented: "big picture" understanding of the industrial enterprise as a system; provision of a common base of experience which provides motivating synergy of upper-division course content; and a functioning production operation providing the capability to apply time studies, plant layout, lean concepts, tool design, ergonomics, automation and related studies in a tangible, hands-on basis to enhance major courses.

Waldrop, Phil

2009-09-07

231

Students' Hands-on Experimental Work vs Lecture Demonstration in Teaching Elementary School Chemistry.  

PubMed

Science educators have suggested many benefits that accrue from engaging students in experimental activities, therefore, experimental work has a long and distinctive role in chemistry curriculum since. The presented empirical study focuses on the valuation of effectiveness of different forms of experimental work - students' hands-on experimental work vs teacher's lecture demonstration - from the viewpoint of the quality of content knowledge acquisition and knowledge retention in teaching primary school chemistry. 106 primary school students (age 14-15 years) participated in the study. The data was collected via pre- and post- test protocol and two delayed post tests. Additionally 16 students selected from the sample were interviewed. The results indicate that students' content knowledge gained through teacher's demonstration of experiment is better and better knowledge retention takes place in comparison to students' knowledge gained through students' hands-on experimental work. However, most of the inteviewed students stated that they prefered conducting of experiments by themselves in comparison to observation of teacher's demonstration. PMID:24061141

Logar, Ana; Ferk-Savec, Vesna

2011-12-01

232

Bring the Poles to Your Classroom & Community Through Linked Hands-on Learning & IPY Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two major legacies of the 4th International Polar Year (IPY 2007-9) are a newly galvanized educational community and an immense volume of polar data collected by the global science community. The tremendous new polar datasets represent a unique opportunity to communicate the nature of the changing poles to student and public audiences through this polar savvy educational community if effective approaches to link data and understanding are employed. We have developed a strategy for polar education that leverages the IPY data resources, linked with the polar education hands-on ‘manipulatives’ (materials that students can manipulate in a dynamic manner). This linked approach leverages the fundamental inquiry based learning but recognizes that particularly in the polar sciences the size of the earth, the remoteness of the poles and the scale of its processes make it difficult for students to explore in a hands-on manner. The linking of polar hands-on ‘manipulatives’ with IPY data provides a bridge between the tangible and the global. Alone manipulative activities can be beneficial in their ability to help students visualize a process or behavior, but without a strong link back to the Earth through data or evidence the understanding of the process is not transferred from the classroom model to the full scale Earth. The use of activities or models is beneficial in connecting the learner to the polar process(es), while the IPY data provides a unique opportunity to ground the polar manipulative experiments in real data. This linked strategy emerged from a series of NSF sponsored IPY Polar Fairs at major science museums that reached in excess of 12,000 people. The design of the fairs was that polar scientists developed activities linking low cost hands-on manipulatives to scientific evidence/data that was displayed in posters, images, and video clips. The participating scientists walked the ‘audience’ through the hands-on manipulative, then discussed their evidence while provided the reasoning. Adjusting this linked manipulative/data approach to the community of teachers will provide a very tangible education outcome to this community from IPY. Our linked manipulative-data strategy ensures polar processes are demonstrated, measured then matched with IPY data sets so that when examined in a guided exploration will provide the student the tools to generate the reasoning. This linked strategy is a powerful way to engage students in Earth science, and provide them with an entry to the wealth of professionally collected data sets that are available from both IPY and the broader science community, all while aligning with National Science Standards. We will demonstrate this approach, and show how the linked manipulative-data approach can be effectively used in community and school events to reach a wider audience.

Turrin, M.; Bell, R. E.; Kastens, K. A.; Pfirman, S. L.

2009-12-01

233

Magnetic Braking Revisited: Activities for the Undergraduate Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper revisits the demonstration of Lenz by dropping magnets down a non-magnetic tube. Recent publications are reviewed and ideas for undergraduate laboratory investigations are suggested. Finally, an example of matching theory to observation is presented. (Contains 4 tables, 5 figures and 3 footnotes.)

Ireson, Gren; Twidle, John

2008-01-01

234

Current research activities in astrodynamics at the Naval Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Applied mathematics research in astrodynamics at the Naval Research Laboratory is reviewed with reference to the current and future Navy needs in space. The general areas discussed include: autonomous navigation, orbit theory, large flexible space structures, and algebraic manipulations on computers.

K. T. Alfriend; R. R. Dasenbrock; B. Kaufman; F. L. Markley

1981-01-01

235

Fostering Elementary School Students' Understanding of Simple Electricity by Combining Simulation and Laboratory Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer simulations and laboratory activities have been traditionally treated as substitute or competing methods in science teaching. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate if it would be more beneficial to combine simulation and laboratory activities than to use them separately in teaching the concepts of simple electricity. Based…

Jaakkola, T.; Nurmi, S.

2008-01-01

236

Using Filmed Models to Prompt Children's Laboratory Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two groups of fourth graders performed a science activity. The treatment group first watched a filmed explanation of the activity by selected students from the class; the control group did not watch the film. The treatment group generated significantly more positive behaviors and less negative behaviors in the activity. (MLH)

DeTure, Linda R.; Koran, John J., Jr.

1975-01-01

237

Assessment of the teaching of evolution by natural selection through a hands-on simulation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Given the expense, time and considerable teacher effort required to perform hands-on activities in the classroom, their consequences for student learning need to be evaluated. This study takes one example of student-active learning, students collecting and analyzing their own data, and asks whether the physical act of collecting data increases studentsÃÂ learning of natural selection and affects their enjoyment of science activities. On both pre- and post-tests the number of correct responses on multiple choice questions was low in both treatments, although the number of equivocal responses did increase over time. Essay question responses were generally poor and similar across pre- and post-tests in both groups; however, after the simulation, students in the activity group showed a more sophisticated understanding of the inheritance of adaptive traits. Overall, the generally poor performance indicates that the three weeks designated for students to learn evolution as an isolated topic within the Philadelphia curriculum is probably not an adequate amount of time and should be expanded. Our strongest finding is that participation in the simulation activity caused students to have a much more positive assessment of science activities. We propose that teachers should take advantage of this and purposefully choose activities that will engender positive attitudes towards science while teaching content knowledge.

Spindler, Lori H.

2011-08-24

238

A Real-Time and Hands-On Research Course in Protein Purification and Characterization: Purification and Crystal Growth of Human Inosine Triphosphate Pyrophosphatase  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new lecture/laboratory course to offer advanced biochemical training for undergraduate and early graduate students has been developed in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. This unique course offers students an opportunity to work hands-on with modern instrumentation not normally found in a predominately…

Kreiling, Jodi L.; Brader, Kerry; Kolar, Carol; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.

2011-01-01

239

Real-time development of data acquisition and analysis software for hands-on physiology education in neuroscience: G-PRIME  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on the real-time creation of an application for hands-on neurophysiology in an advanced undergraduate teaching laboratory. Enabled by the rapid software development tools included in the Matlab technical computing environment (The Mathworks, Natick, MA), a team, consisting of a neurophysiology educator and a biophysicist trained as an electrical engineer, interfaced to a course of approximately 15 students from

Gus K. Lott III; Bruce R. Johnson; Robert H. Bonow; Bruce R. Land; R. R. Hoy

2009-01-01

240

The Effects of Hands-On versus Remediation-Based Biology Preparatory Course Curricula on Performance in Follow-up Biology Courses at the Community College Level.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this investigation was to compare two different methodological techniques of a biology preparatory course in order to determine which curriculum's methodologies were most effective in preparing biology students for follow-up biology courses as measured by course grades. One was based upon laboratory hands-on experiences and the…

Biermann, Carol A.; Sarinsky, Gary B.

241

Student Understanding of Chromatography: A Hands-On Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This exercise sets up a collaborative activity that challenges students to develop a chromatographic solvent with the appropriate polarity to separate leaf chlorophyll and anthocyanin pigments by TLC. The suggested activity has been tested with both high-school advanced-chemistry students and with undergraduate students in an introductory biochemistry class. It includes a demonstration introducing the basic principles of partitioning and differential distribution based on solubility. For the student activity, the materials to be used are leaves of the variegated Coleus plant, plastic-backed silica TLC plates, 2-propanol, acetone, and methanol. Students may work collaboratively within a set of boundary parameters to optimize the chromatographic solvent through a series of rapid iterations of chromatography. Students can also use these chromatography systems to carry out independent projects.

Curtright, Robert D.; Emry, Randy; Markwell*, John

1999-02-01

242

Waste characterization activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive and hazardous wastes are generated at many national laboratories, military sites, fuel fabrication and enrichment plants, reactors, and many other facilities. At all of these sites, wastes must be separated, categorized, possibly treated, and packed into containers for shipment to waste-storage or disposal sites. Prior to treatment, storage or, shipment, the containers must be characterized to determine the ultimate disposition of the contained waste. Comprehensive and accurate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and nondestructive assay (NDA) methods can be used to characterize most waste containers in a safe and cost-effective manner without opening them. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is investigating and developing the application of x-ray and {gamma}-ray methods to nonintrusively characterize waste containers and/or items. X-ray NDE methods are being investigated to determine whether they can be used to identify hazardous and nonconforming materials. A {gamma}-ray NDA method is used to identify the radioactive sources within a container and to accurately quantify their strength. In this paper we describe five waste characterization projects being conducted at LLNL that apply both the NDE and NDA methods and present results.

Roberson, G.P.; Martz, H.E.; Haskins, J.J. [and others

1995-06-28

243

Activities of gravimetric laboratory at Jozefoslaw Observatory (Poland)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gravimetric laboratory in the Jozefoslaw Astronomical - Geodetic Observatory is unique station in Poland where are conducted "quasi-permanent" absolute gravity measurements and tidal observations. First AG observation has been performed in nineties. Those investigations were performed using ballistic (symmetric) gravimeter ZZG, constructed in Poland. Since 2005 AG model FG5 has been installed and is using to measures absolute g values with one month delay. At the tidal laboratory the tidal gravity measurements have also been performed since 2002 using LC&R ET-26 gravimeter. In our Observatory is also installed GNSS station and additional devices to monitoring environmental effects. The poster presents results of determinations of the gravity and geophysical phenomena appeared in non-tidal frequency bands. This elaboration also deals with the results of six years cycle of AG data. It presents result of modeling of the environmental parameters (seasonal loading effects induced by air pressure and ocean, ground water and soil moisture changes and the rainfall as well) to the gravity changes. Main focus will be placed on local hydrological influence connected with variation of ground water level and local soil moisture changes (measured by Theta Probe sensor).

Olszak, Tomasz; Barlik, Marcin; Pachuta, Andrzej; Próchniewicz, Dominik

2013-04-01

244

Hands-on workshops as an effective means of learning advanced technologies including genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics.  

PubMed

Genomics and proteomics have emerged as key technologies in biomedical research, resulting in a surge of interest in training by investigators keen to incorporate these technologies into their research. At least two types of training can be envisioned in order to produce meaningful results, quality publications and successful grant applications: (1) immediate short-term training workshops and (2) long-term graduate education or visiting scientist programs. We aimed to fill the former need by providing a comprehensive hands-on training course in genomics, proteomics and informatics in a coherent, experimentally-based framework. This was accomplished through a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 10-day Genomics and Proteomics Hands-on Workshop held at National Jewish Health (NJH) and the University of Colorado School of Medicine (UCD). The course content included comprehensive lectures and laboratories in mass spectrometry and genomics technologies, extensive hands-on experience with instrumentation and software, video demonstrations, optional workshops, online sessions, invited keynote speakers, and local and national guest faculty. Here we describe the detailed curriculum and present the results of short- and long-term evaluations from course attendees. Our educational program consistently received positive reviews from participants and had a substantial impact on grant writing and review, manuscript submissions and publications. PMID:24316330

Reisdorph, Nichole; Stearman, Robert; Kechris, Katerina; Phang, Tzu Lip; Reisdorph, Richard; Prenni, Jessica; Erle, David J; Coldren, Christopher; Schey, Kevin; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Geraci, Mark

2013-12-01

245

Discovering Fossils--A Hands-on Lab.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes fossil investigations developed and provided by the Falls of the Ohio State Park near Louisville, Kentucky. The Devonian shale beds contain representatives of over 600 species including corals, sponges, brachiopods, mollusks, and echinoderms. Rather than focusing on identification, the activities emphasize the past ecological…

Goldstein, Alan

2002-01-01

246

Instrumental and Organizational Aspects of a Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Contents: Introduction; Principles of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis; Big Samples Neutron Irradiation System; Carbonfiber Autonomous Facility for Irradiation and Analysis; Detectors for I.N.A.A; Process Improvement by Quality Assurance; Total Qu...

P. Bode

1996-01-01

247

Using Microcomputers in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Activation Energy Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a computer program, "Activation Energy," which is designed for use in physical chemistry classes and can be modified for kinetic experiments. Provides suggestions for instruction, sample program listings, and information on the availability of the program package. (ML)

Touvelle, Michele; Venugopalan, Mundiyath

1986-01-01

248

Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

1996-10-01

249

Student Activities in Meteorology: SAM. Version 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The task of providing hands-on as well as minds-on activities for students in science is one of concern to many scientists and educators. In an effort to inspire student interest in science and technology, scientists from the Forecast Systems Laboratory, a laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Environmental…

Meier, Beverly L.; Passarelli, Elisa

250

Evaluation of the Virtual Physiology of Exercise Laboratory Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Virtual Physiology of Exercise Laboratory (VPEL) program was created to simulate the test design, data collection, and analysis phases of selected exercise physiology laboratories. The VPEL program consists of four modules: 1) cardiovascular, 2) maximal O2 consumption (VO2max), 3) lactate and ventilatory thresholds, and 4) respiratory exchange ratio. The purpose of this investigation was to compare student learning from the VPEL program with that from traditional "hands-on" exercise physiology laboratory activities. Student participants from the spring 2009 Integrated Fitness Programming course were randomly assigned to either experimental group 1 or group 2. Group 1 completed a hands-on version of a typical VO2max laboratory activity, whereas group 2 completed the VPEL VO2max module. Both groups then completed the same assessment to evaluate their understanding of VO2max laboratory concepts. Group 1 then completed the VPEL lactate and ventilatory threshold module, whereas group 2 completed a hands-on version of that same activity. Both groups then completed the same assessment to evaluate their understanding of lactate and ventilatory threshold laboratory concepts. Mean VO2max assessment scores were 86.39 ñ 4.13 and 85.64 ñ 6.72 and mean lactate and ventilatory threshold assessment scores were 85.50 ñ 8.05 and 86.15 ñ 6.45 for groups 1 and 2, respectively. These findings lend additional support to the following conclusion of similar investigations (2, 4, 6): that virtual laboratories instruct students as effectively as hands-on laboratories.

2009-12-01

251

Geoelectrical signatures of microbial activity: A laboratory tank investigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments in a 2D static tank (dimensions 145 cm x 85 cm x 6 cm) were performed to assess the effectiveness of various geo-electrical methods (induced polarization [IP], resistivity [R], self potential [SP], electrodic potential [El]) to monitor microbial activity. The tank was filled with coarse sand and saturated with water from the river Lagan (Belfast, UK) diluted with tap water (20:80 ratio). The river water was used to 'seed' microbial activity in the tank. We created 2 separate zones of activity by applying a layer of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) and a layer of Oxygen Release Compound (ORC) at the bottom and the middle of the tank respectively. This design aimed to simulate conditions at the oxic - anoxic interface commonly found in contaminated groundwaters. We recorded IP and R signals using a network of 32 electrodes on one side of the tank; the same electrodes were used for El measurements; we recorded the SP signals with 9 Petiau electrodes located at the top of the tank. El measurements provide us with detailed information on the spatial and temporal Eh evolution in the tank, as a result of microbial activity (indirect evidence), whereas the SP measurements are related directly to the microbial activity (direct evidence); IP and R measurements were aimed to provide additional insight on microbial induced fluid conductivity / porosity / mineralization processes expected to occur under our experimental conditions. The combination of El and SP measurements is shown to be a powerful approach for remote monitoring of microbial activity in the subsurface; the methods supplement each other to more accurately describe the microbial evolution. Furthermore , the interpretation of the subsurface conditions are improved when constrained by the fluid conductivity and mineralization changes inferred by the IP and R measurements. The results of this work suggest that a combination of different geo-electrical methods enhance the subsurface monitoring of microbial activity.

Reid, R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Doherty, R.; Binley, A.

2008-05-01

252

A Matched-Pairs Study of Interactive Computer Laboratory Activities in a Liberal Arts Math Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper details the culmination of a large, multi-year study on the effects of an interactive computer laboratory component in a large liberal arts math course at a state university. After several semesters of piloting these laboratory activities in the course, one of two sections, taught by the same senior instructor, was randomly selected to…

Butler, Frederick; Butler, Melanie

2011-01-01

253

The Population Game: A Socially Significant Laboratory Activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A game-like activity using dice-like cubes can bring population growth home to all students, scientists, and nonscientists alike, while demonstrating many aspects of probability and uncertainty that are too often ignored in the physics curriculum. The activity can proceed at a variety of levels of sophistication and complication, from a simple demonstration of exponential growth through an elaborate modeling of life expectancy, advanced versus primitive societies, family planning, birth rate, and population momentum. Variations can demonstrate radioactive decay, resource depletion, and the approach of a thermodynamic system to statistical equilibrium.

Hobson, Art

2003-04-01

254

Student Content Knowledge Increases after Participation in a Hands-on Biotechnology Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Implementing biotechnology education through hands-on teaching methods should be considered by secondary biology teachers. This study is an experimental research design to examine increased student content knowledge in biotechnology after a hands-on biotechnology intervention. The teachers from both school groups participated in, Project Crawfish,…

Bigler, Amber M.; Hanegan, Nikki L.

2011-01-01

255

Pacific Northwest Laboratory monthly activities report, August 1967  

Microsoft Academic Search

This monthly activity report summarizes work done by the staff of Battelle-Northwest in support of the Division of Production and assistance programs directed by the Hanford Plant. The report is divided into four sections: direct AEC sponsored programs; assistance to Douglas United Nuclear; assistance to Isochem; and technical assistance to the Hanford Plant. The work is wide ranging, from environmental

1967-01-01

256

NDE activities and technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NDE, Photometrics, and Optical Data Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico provides nondestructive evaluation (NDE) support for all phases of research and development at Sandia. Present facilities and personnel provide radiography, acoustic monitoring, ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography, shearography/ESPI, infrared imaging, high speed and ultra-high speed photometrics, and image processing. Although the department includes photometrics and optical data reduction as well as NDE, I will refer to the NDE department from now on for simplicity. The NDE department has worked on technology transfer to organizations inside and outside the weapons complex. This work has been performed in all the Sandia business sectors: defense programs, energy and environment, and work for others. The technology transfer has been in the form of testing for product improvement such as validation of aircraft inspection equipment, consultation such as detecting lathe bearing slip for a major machine tool manufacturer, and products such as an acoustic sand detector for the oil and gas industry.

Shurtleff, W. W.

1993-11-01

257

NDE activities and technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The NDE, Photometrics, and Optical Data Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (S provides nondestructive evaluation (NDE) support for all phases of research and development at Sandia. Present facilities and personnel provide radiography, acoustic monitoring, ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography, shearography/ESPI, infrared imaging, high speed and ultra-high speed photometrics, and image processing. Although the department includes photometrics and optical data reduction as well as NDE, I will refer to the NDE department from now on for simplicity. The NDE department has worked on technology transfer to organizations inside and outside the weapons complex. This work has been performed in all the Sandia business sectors: Defense Programs, Energy and Environment, and Work for Others. The technology transfer has been in the form of testing for product improvement such as validation of aircraft inspection equipment, consultation such as detecting lathe bearing slip for a major machine tool manufacturer, and products such as an acoustic sand detector for the oil and gas industry.

Shurtleff, W.W.

1993-12-31

258

Comparison of field and laboratory H 2 S adsorption capacity of activated carbon  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison study on fixed-bed H2S adsorption capacity of a commercial activated carbon both in the laboratory and in the field was conducted. Pure H2S gas at an inlet concentration of 10 000 ppm was used for the laboratory test, while the field activated carbon was subjected to adsorption of sewage gas with H2S concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 28

Lawrence C. C. Koe; N. C. Tan

1990-01-01

259

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Data Loading Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 6.0 and Version 7.0. In general, the data transfer procedures for version 6 and 7 are the same, but where deviations exist, the differences are noted. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

2006-07-01

260

Classes Azur Astro Espace International Hands-on Space Experience  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Created in 1994 in the wake of the closure of the Space Camp of Patrick Baudry in Cannes, Classes Azur Astro Espace (AAE) provide a world's unique combination of space and astronomy courses, as given by active and retired professionals of two of the best space and astronomical facilities extant: Alcatel Space in Cannes and Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA) in Nice, Grasse and Caussols. Fifteen space modules, of 30 to 60 minutes each, have been established, giving simple and clear explanations on launchers, satellites, their applications, their development, together with an historical background. Basic experiments are included, such as an unique small catapult to explain gravity, or more classical water rockets. The basic AAE sojourn extends over 3 days: one day for space (including a visit of Alcatel Space, the biggest satellite manufacturer outside the US and Russia), one day for astronomy (including a visit of the biggest observatory in Europe) and one day à-la-carte (Côte d'Azur offers much, such as the Oceanographic Museum in Monaco). More and more groups are adding a fourth day, with a visit to the nice old village of Perinaldo in Italy, where famous astronomer Cassini was born. Lycée de Cachan, near Paris, even takes 12-day sojourns every year. The public has been extremely wide, from age 5 to 70, from students to enthusiasts. Coming initially all over from France, participants now include since 2001 German and Italian pupils and teachers. In 2001 also, ESA came in the shape of a Space Camp. ISU's Master of Space Studies participates to a shortened version of AAE every even-year. Up to the end of 2001, 62 classes with 2,025 participants from 20 countries had thus come to enjoy space education on Côte d'Azur. Such success is due in no small part to the very attractive price and flexibility of these activities, notably thanks to the support of ESA, CNES, Rectorat d'Académie de Nice, Conseil Général des Alpes-Maritimes, Ville de Cannes, AAAF, TDF, Alcatel Space and OCA.

Jung, P.

2002-01-01

261

Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

1999-01-08

262

Activities of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 1 January - 31 December 1983  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are many facets to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, for JPL is an organization of multiple responsibilities and broad scope, of diverse talents and great enterprise. The Laboratory's philosophy, mission, and goals have been shaped by its ties to the California Institute of Technology (JPL's parent organization) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (JPL's principal sponsor). JPL's activities for NASA in planetary, Earth, and space sciences currently account for almost 75 percent of the Laboratory's overall effort. JPL Research activities in the following areas are discussed: (1) deep space exploration; (2) telecommunications systems; (3) Earth observations; (4) advanced technology; (5) defense programs; and (6) energy and technology applications.

1984-01-01

263

Improving chemical education from high school to college using a more hands-on approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, various alternative teaching methods and activities for chemical education are developed, presented, and evaluated. In the first study, an original hands-on activity using LEGO® blocks to model ionic chemical formulas is presented together with quantitative and qualitative data regarding its educational effectiveness. Students explore cation to anion ratios using LEGO® blocks to represent trivalent, divalent and monovalent cations and anions. High school chemistry students who participated in the LEGO® lab showed significantly higher post-test scores than other students. The second study grows out of the creation of a computational lab module that is shown to significantly increase student learning in the subject of molecular orbital theory in first semester college General Chemistry. The third and final study presented is a course redesign project for college CHEM 1100, Preparation for General Chemistry. In this project the classroom is “flipped”. Students watch video lectures at home, and spend class time working with peers and the instructor on problem solving activities. The results presented here are one of the first quantitative studies showing the effectiveness of “flipping the classroom”. Students who were taught using the Reverse-Instruction (RI) method had significantly higher success in both the Preparation for General Chemistry course and traditionally taught General Chemistry I the following semester.

Ruddick, Kristie Winfield

264

STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science and technology are widely recognized as major drivers of innovation and industry (e.g. Rising above the Gathering Storm, 2006). While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement and public understanding of STEM disciplines. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. Designed spaces, like libraries, allow lifelong, life-wide, and life-deep learning to take place though the research basis for learning in libraries is not as developed as other informal settings like science centers. The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national education project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. The overarching goal of the project is to reach underserved youth and their families with informal STEM learning experiences. This project will deepen our knowledge of informal/lifelong learning that takes place in libraries and establish a learning model that can be compared to the more established free-choice learning model for science centers and museums. The project includes the development of two STEM hands-on exhibits on topics that are of interest to library staff and their patrons: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. In addition, the project will produce resources and inquiry-based activities that libraries can use to enrich the exhibit experience. Additional resources will be provided through partnerships with relevant professional science and technology organizations (e.g. American Geophysical Union; National Academy of Engineering) that will provide speakers for host library events and webinars. Online and in-person workshops will be conducted for library staff with a focus on increasing content knowledge and improving facilitation expertise. This presentation will report on strategic planning activities for STAR-Net, a Community of Practice model, and the evaluation/research components of this national education program.

Dusenbery, P.

2010-12-01

265

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988  

SciTech Connect

For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1996-01-01

266

Neutron activation analysis of alternative waste forms at the Savannah River Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A remotely controlled system for neutron activation of candidate high-level waste (HLW) isolation forms was built by the Savannah River Laboratory at a Savannah River Plant reactor. With this system, samples can be irradiated for up to 24 hours and transferred through pneumatic tubing to a shielded repository unitl their activity is low enough for them to be handled in

1981-01-01

267

The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

2010-01-01

268

Using Laboratory Chemicals to Imitate Illicit Drugs in a Forensic Chemistry Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This forensic chemistry activity utilizes presumptive forensic testing procedures and laboratory chemicals that produce screening results similar to controlled substances. For obvious reasons, obtaining heavily regulated controlled substances to create an undergraduate student activity is not practical for most educational institutions. We were…

Hasan, Shawn; Bromfield-Lee, Deborah; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Cintron-Maldonado, Jose A.

2008-01-01

269

Attitude Toward Informal Science and Math: a Survey of Boys and Girls Participating in Hands-On Science and Math (funtivities)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents results from two studies conducted as part of the evaluation activities of the FUNTIVITIES project, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project to increase girls' and women's interest and comfort level in science and math. The first study was conducted to develop instruments and to assess the impact of informal activities on attitudes toward hands-on science, math, and

Yalem Teshome; Nancy Maushak; Krishna Athreya

2001-01-01

270

Use of purified fibrinogen concentrate for dysfibrinogenemia and importance of laboratory fibrinogen activity measurement.  

PubMed

We report a patient with dysfibrinogenemia treated with purified fibrinogen concentrate who had discrepant post-treatment laboratory values. The patient had mild bleeding symptoms and was diagnosed with dysfibrinogenemia based on fibrinogen activity of 51?mg/dl and antigen of 240?mg/dl. He was treated for an adenoidectomy with purified fibrinogen concentrate (RiaSTAP®) at a dose of 70?mg/kg. A discrepancy in post-treatment fibrinogen activity was observed between the hospital and reference laboratories. Investigation revealed differences in laboratory assay and calibration methods. Fibrinogen concentrate may be a treatment option for patients with dysfibrinogenemia, but accurate laboratory technique is critical for fibrinogen measurement. PMID:23129109

Franzblau, Emily B; Punzalan, Rowena C; Friedman, Kenneth D; Roy, Angshumoy; Bilen, Ozlem; Flood, Veronica H

2013-03-01

271

DOSE PROFILE MODELING OF IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORYS ACTIVE NEUTRON INTERROGATION TEST FACILITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new research and development laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for DT fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 108 neutrons per second), DD fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (up to 2 x 106 neutrons per second), and 252Cf spontaneous fission

D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. M. Zabriskie; J. Wharton; A. J. Caffrey

2009-01-01

272

Graphing Techniques for Materials Laboratory Using Excel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Engineering technology curricula stress hands on training and laboratory practices in most of the technical courses. Laboratory reports should include analytical as well as graphical evaluation of experimental data. Experience shows that many students nei...

N. K. Kundu

1994-01-01

273

Basic neuron model electrical equivalent circuit: an undergraduate laboratory exercise.  

PubMed

We developed a hands-on laboratory exercise for undergraduate students in which they can build and manipulate a neuron equivalent circuit. This exercise uses electrical circuit components that resemble neuron components and are easy to construct. We describe the methods for creating the equivalent circuit and how to observe different neuron properties through altering the structure of the equivalent circuit. We explain how this hands-on laboratory activity allows for the better understanding of this fundamental neuroscience concept. At the conclusion of this laboratory exercise, undergraduate students will be able to apply the principles of Ohm's law, cable theory with regards to neurons, and understand the functions of resistance and capacitance in a neuron. PMID:24319391

Dabrowski, Katie M; Castaño, Diego J; Tartar, Jaime L

2013-01-01

274

Photonic games: hands-on challenges to spark teenagers' interest in light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It often takes one single event to interest teenagers in a topic that will become a passion or a career. It is in this spirit that the SPIE and OSA Student Chapters at Université Laval created the Photonic Games three years ago, to kindle an interest in teenagers towards studies and careers in optics. The activity, offered each year to more than a hundred grade 11 students, is divided in two parts. First, we offer a hands-on workshop in their classrooms about reflection, refraction, dispersion, birefringence and polarization. A few days later, all the students come to the Centre d'optique, photonique et laser (COPL) at Université Laval for a day of competition where a volunteer physics student accompanies each team of four students. Challenges are various to promote the qualities that make great scientists: creativity, teamwork, knowledge, inquisitiveness, self-confidence and perseverance. The first two editions of the Photonic Games have proven to be beneficial for the students, teachers and volunteers, and we endeavor to improve it as we construct on our experience with the past editions to fine-tune and improve the Photonic Games concept.

Poulin-Girard, A.-S.; Thériault, G.; April, A.; Bassene, S.; Dehez, H.; Desbiens, A.; Goubert, G.; Lemieux, H.; Lévesque, J.; Roy, B.; Zambon, V.

2010-08-01

275

Audit of Compliance with Standards Governing Combined DNA Index System Activities at the Tucson Police Department Crime Laboratory Tucson, Arizona.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General (OIG), Audit Division, has completed an audit of compliance with standards governing Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) activities at the Tucson Police Department Crime Laboratory (Laboratory). The ...

2011-01-01

276

Compliance With Standards Governing Combined DNA Index System Activities at the Arkansas State Crime Laboratory Little Rock, Arkansas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Justice Office of the Inspector General, Audit Division, has completed an audit of compliance with standards governing Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) activities at the Arkansas State Crime Laboratory (Laboratory). The Federal Bureau o...

2010-01-01

277

NDE environmental, safety and health activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

There has been a dramatic increase in environmental protection concerns over the last few decades. This has resulted in an extensive Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES H) effort within the Department of Energy and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Laboratory has made a number of Lab-wide commitments to assure that it's environmental policy is properly implemented: The Laboratory will comply fully with local, county, state, and federal regulations and DOE orders; all employees will be trained to understand their environmental obligations and the potential impacts of their activities on the environment; waste minimization will be a part of every new and ongoing project that produces hazardous, mixed, or radioactive waste; and the laboratory will cooperate fully with regulators and communicate openly with the community on environmental issues. The numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations concerning safety, health and the environment affect all aspects of the Laboratory's operations, from the office to the laboratory. Some of the principal regulations controlling the Laboratory's operations are listed in this paper. 2 tabs.

Fritts, W.T.

1990-10-01

278

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with general information such as installation instructions, starting and stopping the program, and some pointers on how to get around inside the program. Next, database concepts and structure are discussed. Following that discussion are nine sections, one for each of the menu options on the SAPHIRE main menu, wherein the purpose and general capabilities for each option are furnished. Next, the capabilities and limitations of the software are provided.

C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

2008-08-01

279

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for ansforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with general information such as installation instructions, starting and stopping the program, and some pointers on how to get around inside the program. Next, database concepts and structure are discussed. Following that discussion are nine sections, one for each of the menu options on the SAPHIRE main menu, wherein the purpose and general capabilities for each option are furnished. Next, the capabilities and limitations of the software are provided.

C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

2006-07-01

280

Biotechnology for Non-biology Majors: An Activity Using a Commercial Biotechnology Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an inexpensive activity to stimulate student interest in biotechnology that was developed in partnership with a biotechnology company. Focuses on the use of DNA by a commercial laboratory; describing the analysis procedure; important uses of DNA technology in modern society; and ethical, social, and legal issues related to biotechnology.…

Wray, Francis P.; Fox, Mary C.; Huether, Carl A.; Schurdak, Eric R.

2001-01-01

281

Educational Set-Up for Microwave Laboratory Activities Using Virtual Instruments and Real Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a virtual educational laboratory to be used for experimental activities in the framework of Telecommunications Engineering courses. The proposed approach is based on a set of software interfaces, named virtual instruments (VIs) and developed with LabVIEW™ environment, which are able to emulate hardware instruments. The aim of the project is to allow the students to perform experimental

A. N. D'Andrea; F. Giannetti; G. Manara; M. Michelini; P. Nepa

2007-01-01

282

Promoting Science Outdoor Activities for Elementary School Children: Contributions from a Research Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of the study were to analyse the promotion of scientific literacy through practical research activities and to identify children's conceptions about scientists and how they do science. Elementary school children were engaged in two scientific experiments in a marine biology research laboratory. A total of 136 students answered a…

Boaventura, Diana; Faria, Claudia; Chagas, Isabel; Galvao, Cecilia

2013-01-01

283

On the Effectiveness of Active-Engagement Microcomputer-Based Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on the results of substituting one-hour active-engagement tutorials using microcomputer based laboratory (MBL) equipment for traditional problem-solving recitations in introductory calculus-based mechanics classes for engineering students at the University of Maryland. The results of two specific tutorials--one on the concept of…

Redish, Edward F.; Saul, Jeffery M.; Steinberg, Richard N.

284

Thermal Field Indicator for Identifying Active Faults and its Instability From Laboratory Experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between the thermal filed and strain field during deformation of faults is the physical basis to clarify whether satellite infrared information and the ground temperature field can be used to study fault activity. This study attempts to discuss these problems by experiments in the laboratory. The two-direction servo-control system was used to load on the samples with compressional

J. Ma; L. Liu; P. Liu; S. Ma

2007-01-01

285

An Activation Energy Experiment for a Second-Order Reaction in a Single Laboratory Period.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes modification of a chemical reaction to a single 4 1/2-hour laboratory period. Reaction kinetics between 2, 4-initrochlorobenzene and piperidine to form 2, 4-dinitrophenyl-piperidine and piperidinium hydrochloride are followed conductometrically at three temperatures to obtain data to calculate activation parameters. (Author/JN)

Barile, Raymond C.; Michiels, Leo P.

1983-01-01

286

``IT'S ALL IN MOTION" -- A Hands-On Astronomy Workshop For Teachers of Grades 4-8  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe the implementation and results of a four day hands-on astronomy workshop for in-service teachers of grades 4-8. This project, funded by a 1998-1999 IDEAS grant through the Space Telescope Science Institute, included 20 teacher participants from northern New Jersey. We used the workshop's unifying theme -- ``It's All in Motion!" -- to present to the teachers fundamental astrophysical concepts, relevant math and computer skills, and astronomy activities for their classrooms. We learned that there is a great need for this type of training, especially in New Jersey where there are new core curriculum standards and a newly mandated test in science for students in 4th and 8th grades. While the teachers learned content at different rates, the hands-on format gave them confidence to try some of these activities in their classes, especially among under-represented minorities. The most effective activities included human sundials, Sunspotters to measure the rotation of the Earth in 2 minutes, craters in the sand, group mini-reports from posters, speed calculations, physics and astronomy songs, the Ophiuchus Sculpture, a planetarium visit (especially needed in our urban area where the light pollution is severe), and Internet guided sites (See http://www.csam.montclair.edu/ west/ideasresources.html).

West, M. L.; Liu, C.; Conod, K.

1999-12-01

287

An Inquiry-Based Biochemistry Laboratory Structure Emphasizing Competency in the Scientific Process: A Guided Approach with an Electronic Notebook Format  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The laboratory setting is an exciting and gratifying place to teach because you can actively engage the students in the learning process through hands-on activities; it is a dynamic environment amenable to collaborative work, critical thinking, problem-solving and discovery. The guided inquiry-based approach described here guides the students…

Hall, Mona L.; Vardar-Ulu, Didem

2014-01-01

288

Characterization of the protease activity of detergents: laboratory practicals for studying the protease profile and activity of various commercial detergents.  

PubMed

Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body fluids, and food soils. This article describes two easy and cheap laboratory exercises to study the presence, profile, and basic enzymology of detergent proteases. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the detergent protease activity of various commercial detergents using the N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide method and the bovine serum albumin degradation capacity. Students are also required to elucidate the enzymatic subtype of detergent proteases by studying the inhibitory potential of several types of protease inhibitors revealed by the same experimental methodology. Additionally, the results of the exercises can be used to provide additional insights on elementary enzymology by studying the influence of several important parameters on protease activity such as temperature (in this article) and the influence of pH and effects of surfactants and oxidizers (proposed). Students also develop laboratory skills, problem-solving capacities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are mainly designed for an advanced undergraduate project in the biochemistry and biotechnology sciences. Globally, these laboratory practicals show students the biotechnological applications of proteases in the detergent industry and also reinforce important enzymology concepts. PMID:21774056

Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

2011-07-01

289

MIPS to the "4", Mathematics Improves Promotes Students. A Program of Mathematics for the Elementary Math Laboratory. Limited Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is a guide for the reinforcement of the elementary mathematics laboratory program. It uses a hands-on and activity approach with maximum involvement of the students. Reinforcement strategies for the first three phases (concrete, semiconcrete, and semiabstract) of each mathematics concept are suggested. Also included are specific job…

Wichita Unified School District 259, KS.

290

Quality assurance guidance for laboratory assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of several guidance documents developed to support the EM (DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management) Analytical Services program. Its purpose is to introduce assessment plates that can be used to conduct performance assessments of an organization`s or project`s ability to meet quality goals for analytical laboratory activities. These assessment plates are provided as non-prescriptive guidance to EM-support organizations responsible for collection of environmental data for remediation and waste management programs at DOE facilities. The assessments evaluate objectively all components of the analytical laboratory process to determine their proper selection and use.

Not Available

1994-05-01

291

Bioelectrical impedance analysis as a laboratory activity: At the interface of physics and the body  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a novel laboratory activity on RC circuits aimed at introductory physics students in life-science majors. The activity teaches principles of RC circuits by connecting ac-circuit concepts to bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) using a custom-designed educational BIA device. The activity shows how a BIA device works and how current, voltage, and impedance measurements relate to bioelectrical characteristics of the human body. From this, useful observations can be made including body water, fat-free mass, and body fat percentage. The laboratory is engaging to pre-health and life-science students, as well as engineering students who are given the opportunity to observe electrical components and construction of a commonly used biomedical device. Electrical concepts investigated include alternating current, electrical potential, resistance, capacitance, impedance, frequency, phase shift, device design, and the use of such topics in biomedical analysis.

Mylott, Elliot; Kutschera, Ellynne; Widenhorn, Ralf

2014-05-01

292

Implementation of the 2013 Astro-Science Workshop, a Hands-on High Altitude Ballooning Program at the Adler Planetarium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the past 7 years, high school students participating in the Astro-Science Workshop at the Adler Planetarium have been able to access the extreme environment of near space (approximately 30 km altitude) using high altitude balloons. Taking a hands-on approach the program has allowed students to design, build, and launch their own experiments with programming based at the Adler Planetarium. During flight, payloads are subjected to temperatures of around -65° C, atmospheric pressure of only 1% that at sea level, and cosmic radiation levels more than 60 times the surface background. In some ways, conditions at these altitudes are much like those at the surface of Mars, providing students with the opportunity to build and operate real-world analogs of interplanetary probes. We have found that this hands-on, student-driven research-based program is enhanced by implementing classroom and lab activities as well as by incorporating instruction and collaboration with research professionals currently active in the field of astronomy. We present the steps taken to implement the 2013 Astro-Science Workshop at the Adler Planetarium with a focus on daily instruction and operations planning and launch preparation.

Ratliff, Gayle; Martynowycz, M. W.; Hammergren, M.

2014-01-01

293

Introducing Hands-on, Experiential Learning Experiences in an Urban Environmental Science Program at a Minority Serving Institution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

STEM education at New Jersey City University increasingly focuses on experiential, student-centered learning. The Department of Geoscience/Geography plays a significant role in developing and implementing a new Urban Environmental Science Program. The program aims at graduating highly skilled, demographically diverse students (14 % African-American and 18% Hispanic) to be employed in high-growth Earth and Environmental Science career paths, both at a technical (e.g. B.S.) as well as an educational (K-12 grade) (e.g. B.A) level. The core program, including the Earth and Environmental Science curricula is guided by partners (e.g. USDA-NRCS). The program is highly interdisciplinary and 'hands-on', focusing upon the high-tech practical skills and knowledge demanded of science professionals in the 21st century. The focus of the curriculum is on improving environmental quality in northern NJ, centering upon our urban community in Jersey City and Hudson County. Our Department is moving towards a more earth system science approach to learning. Most of our courses (e.g., Earth Surface Processes, Sedimentology/Stratigraphy, Earth Materials, Essential Methods, Historical Geology) have hands-on laboratory and/or field components. Although some of our other courses do not have formal laboratory components, research modules of many such courses (Geochemistry, Urban Environmental Issues and Policy and Environmental Geology) involve strong field or laboratory studies. The department has a wide range of analytical and laboratory capacities including a portable XRF, bench-top XRD and ICP-MS. In spring 2013, Dr. Duzgoren-Aydin was awarded $277K in Higher Education Equipment Leasing Fund monies from the University in order to establish an Environmental Teaching and Research Laboratory. The addition of these funds will make it possible for the department to increase its instrumentation capacity by adding a mercury analyzer, Ion Chromatography and C-N-S analyzer, as well as updating several laboratory facilities. Furthermore, authors have applied to the NSF-TUES grant program to purchase a particle size analyzer. Currently, the grant is pending. We have defined 4 curricular goals to enhance student learning by providing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and research experiences. 1- Develop technical/analytical knowledge and skills by using advanced analytical instrumentation; 2- Improve quantitative reasoning skills to assess the quality of data; 3- Have comprehensive educational training to improve problem solving skills; and 4- use their quantitative reasoning (Goal # 2) and problem solving skills (Goal #3) to evaluate real-world geological and environmental problems. We also give special emphasis to expected measurable outcomes for individual courses. An external evaluator will assess the effectiveness of integrating advance instrumentation into the Earth and Environmental Science curricula. We will work closely with the evaluator to ensure successful implementation of the learning objectives. Examples from the impacted courses will be presented.

Duzgoren-Aydin, N. S.; Freile, D.

2013-12-01

294

Immersive, hands-on, team-based geophysical education at the University of Texas Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a unique and intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring/summer semester intersession. Now entering its seventh year, the course transitions students from a classroom environment through real-world, hands-on field acquisition, on to team-oriented data interpretation, culminating in a professional presentation before academic and industry employer representatives. The course is available to graduate students and select upper-division undergraduates, preparing them for direct entry into the geoscience workforce or for further academic study. Geophysical techniques used include high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, data processing, and laboratory analysis of sediments. Industry-standard equipment, methods, software packages, and visualization techniques are used throughout the course, putting students ahead of many of their peers in this respect. The course begins with a 3-day classroom introduction to the field area geology, geophysical methods, and computing resources used. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of hands-on field and lab work aboard two research vessels: UTIG's 22-foot, aluminum hulled Lake Itasca; and NOAA's 82-foot high-speed catamaran R/V Manta. The smaller vessel handles primarily shallow, inshore targets using multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and grab sampling. The larger vessel is used both inshore and offshore for multichannel seismic, CHIRP profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. Field areas to date have included Galveston and Port Aransas, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, with further work in Grand Isle scheduled for 2014. In the field, students work in teams of three, participating in survey design, instrument set-up, field deployment, data acquisition optimization, quality control, data archival, log-keeping, real-time data processing, laboratory sediment analysis, and even boat-handling. Teams are rotated through the two vessels and the onshore field laboratory to ensure that each student has hands-on experience with each aspect of the process. Although all students work on all data areas in the field, after returning from the field each team is assigned a particular region or geologic problem to interpret. Each team prepares and presents a formal presentation to UTIG researchers and industry representatives, explaining and defending their interpretations. This unique approach to hands-on field training, real-world science, and project-based teamwork helps prepare students for direct entry into the workforce, giving them a leg up on competitors for positions. This course has an impressive success ratio to show, with many students receiving job offers directly as a result of their participation in the course.

Saustrup, S.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Reece, R.

2013-12-01

295

A Laboratory Experiment Investigating Different Aspects of Catalase Activity in an Inquiry - Based Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The action of the enzyme catalase on aqueous hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen gas is a well-established demonstration (1-3). Catalase is typically obtained by aqueous extraction of a potato, and the potato extract is mixed together with 3% hydrogen peroxide. The oxygen that is produced can be collected over water. Variations on the procedure can demonstrate the dependence of catalytic activity on temperature or the presence of inhibitors (1, 2). The University of Colorado at Denver has used a version of this procedure as a laboratory in its second-semester course for nonmajors. Recently, students have been allowed to expand upon the procedures prescribed in the laboratory handout in an open-ended project format. We explored some of these variations in detail, and the results provided here offer ideas, centered around this laboratory, for open-ended projects that can be used in an inquiry-based approach.

Kimbrough, Doris R.; Magoun, Mary Ann; Langfur, Meg

1997-02-01

296

Developing Physics Concepts through Hands-On Problem Solving: A Perspective on a Technological Project Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a contest featuring hands-on projects, college students were required to design a simple crawling worm using planning, self-monitoring and self-evaluation processes to solve contradictive problems. To enhance the efficiency of problem solving, one needs to practice meta-cognition based on an application of related scientific concepts. The…

Hong, Jon-Chao; Chen, Mei-Yung; Wong, Ashley; Hsu, Tsui-Fang; Peng, Chih-Chi

2012-01-01

297

Nine Performance Procedure Competencies with Which to Analyze, Organize, and Develop Hands-On Performance Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains a number of processes and criteria levels with which the progressive test writer should be familiar in order to measure more than cognitive success. These processes allow test writers to examine existing paper and pencil examinations in order to sound out implications for performance testing. Hands-on performance testing is…

Alvir, Howard P.

298

Hands-on experiments in dynamic systems and control for applied education in robotics and automation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A common set of equipment is widely used in an undergraduate engineering curriculum to provide hands-on experiences for fundamental theories in machine science that provide the underpinnings to automation and robotics. Theories taught in the classroom are coordinated with physical devices used in the courses to reinforce theoretical concepts and further stimulate studentspsila interest and learning. The extent and scope

DANIEL J. COX

2008-01-01

299

Hands-on Verification of Mechanics Training: A Cost-Effectiveness Study of Videodisc Simulation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports the results of a study on the feasibility of training smog check mechanics in California via hands-on verification of mechanics' ability to inspect and repair vehicles. The reviews of the research literature that compare the learning effectiveness of different delivery media tend to support the position that in learning, the…

Maher, Thomas G.

300

The Carroll County Elementary Science Program: A Hands on Approach. A 1985 SESE Exemplar Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes the background and development, provides an overview, and discusses the evaluation of the Carroll County, Maryland, elementary school science program emphasizing a hands-on approach to science. It uses locally developed materials designed at each grade level and focuses on process skills instead of concepts. The program…

Dunkleberger, Gary E.

301

Hands-On Teaching through a Student Field Project in Applied Geophysics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Proffit Mountain project, part of a senior-level class in applied geophysics that provides students with hands-on experience in applying principles and techniques learned in class. Students conduct magnetic, gravity, and radiometric studies over a diabase body which intrudes rhyolite at Proffitt Mountain in southeast Missouri.…

Klasner, John Samuel; Crockett, Jeffrey Jon; Horton, Kimberly Beth; Poe, Michele Daun; Wollert, Matthew Todd

1992-01-01

302

DefEX: Hands-On Cyber Defense Exercise for Undergraduate Students.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

DefEX incorporates a set of hands-on cyber security exercises aimed at developing problem-solving proficiency, teamwork, and cyber defense skills in undergraduate students. The exercises include Code-Level and System-Level Hardening, Static and Dynamic Re...

B. A. Kropa S. M. Glumich

2011-01-01

303

International Space Station: 6-8 Hands-on Science and Math Lesson Plans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These lesson plans, designed for grades 6-8, have been developed to provide a guide to hands-on experience in science and math. They focus on an International Space Station and are designed for use with students working in groups. The three lesson plans highlighting the importance of the scientific method are: (1) International Space Station…

Armstrong, Pat

304

Hands-on learning of computer programming in introductory stage using a model railway layout  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research aims to develop a new methodology and its supporting technologies for learning about computation and programming in the introductory stage through a hands-on playing experience with toys. This allows a beginner to acquire the concepts and knowledge of computation and programming by playing with a model railway set.

Haruo NOMA; Nobuji TETSUTANI; Hirokazu SASAMOTO; Yuichi ITOH; Yoshifumi KITAMURA; Fumio KISHINO

2004-01-01

305

Understanding the Effects of Cognitive Dissonance during Interpretation: Implications for "Hands-On" Programming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a field experiment that was designed to test the effects of three different interpretive programs on students' attitudes toward live, nonpoisonous snakes. One of the treatments measured the effectiveness of using "hands-on" interpretive techniques. Direct contact with snakes improved students' attitudes but only slightly. Females'…

Morgan, Mark

1996-01-01

306

Hands-On Parent Support in Positive Guidance: Early Childhood Professionals as Mentors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports findings from a follow-up study involving mothers and early childhood professionals who completed participation in a 12-week, hands-on parent education program in the United States. In this program, mothers learned about positive guidance in a weekly seminar, and additionally practised implementing positive guidance in an early…

McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Saunders, Rachel

2012-01-01

307

Students Doing Chemistry: A Hand-On Experience for K-12  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A hands-on, minds-on inquiry chemistry experiment was developed for use in K-12 schools that enables students to combine the chemicals of their choice and observe the results. The chemistry involved is water based and builds upon acid-base, double displacement, and iodometric detection of starch reactions. Chemicals readily available in the…

Selco, Jodye I.; Bruno, Mary; Chan, Sue

2012-01-01

308

Embedding Hands-On Experience with ERP Systems into University Courses: Aligning Academic and Industry Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are widely used by many of the top recruiters of computer science and business school graduates, providing significant business benefits when implemented effectively. While ERP concepts are taught within Universities from a theoretical point of vie w, few students have any hands-on experience of using an ERP system when they graduate. As a result, there

Mark Stevenson

309

Hands-On Science Mysteries for Grades 3-6: Standards-Based Inquiry Investigations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "Hands-On Science Mysteries for Grades 3-6," the authors connect science to real-world situations by investigating actual mysteries and phenomena, such as the strange heads on Easter Island, the ghost ship "Mary Celeste," and the "Dancing Stones" of Death Valley. The labs are designed to encourage the development of science inquiry, in which…

Taris, James Robert; Taris, Louis James

2006-01-01

310

A hands-on approach to green design in an introductory engineering class  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few engineering schools offer students an opportunity to learn about the environmental implications of engineering design until late in the curriculum, if at all. However, such implications are becoming increasingly important and complex. Here, the authors describe how they have successfully implemented a hands-on group project for the first-year engineering education course which acquaints students with the concepts of green

Rebecca L. Lankey; Cliff I. Davidson

1997-01-01

311

Validating Hands-On Science Assessments through an Investigation of Response Processes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many current efforts to develop large-scale science assessments involve hands-on tasks because of their presumed power to elicit and measure scientific reasoning skills. An analysis of the processes in which students engage while responding to such assessment is needed in order to discover the specific forms of reasoning that tasks elicit. This…

Hamilton, Laura S.

312

Performance Assessments in Science: Hands-On Tasks and Scoring Guides.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1992, RAND received a grant from the National Science Foundation to study the technical quality of performance assessments in science and to evaluate their feasibility for use in large-scale testing programs. The specific goals of the project were to assess the reliability and validity of hands-on science testing and to investigate the cost and…

Stecher, Brian M.; Klein, Stephen P.

313

International Space Station: K-5 Hands-on Science and Math Lesson Plans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Space Station is already capturing the imaginations of American students, encouraging them to pursue careers in the sciences. The idea of living and working in space continues to spark this renewed interest. The material in this guide was developed to provide hands-on experiences in science and math in the context of an International Space…

Boeing Co., Huntsville, AL.

314

Three Simple Hands-On Soil Exercises Extension Professionals Can Incorporate into Natural Sciences Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of healthy soil and of conveying the importance of soils starts by conveying a few basic concepts of soil science cannot be overstated. This article provides three hands-on exercises Extension professionals can add to natural resources or Master Gardener education curricula. These natural sciences exercises are easy to prepare for…

Kleinschmidt, Andy

2011-01-01

315

Visualizing the Transition State: A Hands-On Approach to the Arrhenius Equation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An exercise is presented in which the kinetics of the irreversible "reaction" of pennies in the heads-up state to pennies in the tails-up state is simulated by a hands-on, Monte Carlo approach. In addition, the exercise incorporates a second simulation in which the irreversible "reaction" of dice with a red face uppermost to a blue face uppermost…

Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Swanson, Matthew S.; Sayers, Deborah K.

2007-01-01

316

Comparison of laboratory-scale thermophilic biofilm and activated sludge processes integrated with a mesophilic activated sludge process  

Microsoft Academic Search

A combined thermophilic–mesophilic wastewater treatment was studied using a laboratory-scale thermophilic activated sludge process (ASP) followed by mesophilic ASP or a thermophilic suspended carrier biofilm process (SCBP) followed by mesophilic ASP, both systems treating diluted molasses (dilution factor 1:500 corresponding GF\\/A-filtered COD (CODfilt) of 1900±190 mgl?1). With hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 12–18 h the thermophilic ASP and thermophilic SCBP

J. Suvilampi; A. Lehtomäki; J. Rintala

2003-01-01

317

Survival and catabolic activity of natural and genetically engineered bacteria in a laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The survival of selected naturally occurring and genetically engineered bacteria in a fully functional laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit (ASU) was investigated. The effect of the presence of 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) on the survival of Pseudomonas putida UWC1, with or without a chimeric plasmid, pD10, which encodes 3CB catabolism, was determined. P. putida UWC1(pD10) did not enhance 3CB breakdown in the ASU, even

N. C. McClure; J. C. Fry; A. J. Weightman

1991-01-01

318

Assessment in the hands-on science classroom: A qualitative study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Black and Wiliam (1998b) pointed out, "Learning is driven by what teachers and pupils do in the classroom" (p. 139). Their analogy of the classroom as a "black box" created the impetus for this study. The study was designed to peer inside this black box in an effort to identify and examine how third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade school teachers use assessment during hands-on science classroom instruction. The overarching question as it relates to the hands-on classroom assessment is: What are the connections among teachers' assessment methods, feedback to students, and students' responses to the feedback? This study was not an evaluation of the effects or outcomes attributed to the use of classroom assessments. Instead, the researcher sought to identify and describe classroom assessment practices, teacher to student feedback, and the interplay among teachers and their students in the context of hands-on science instruction. Classroom observations, semistructured teachers' interviews, and document analysis were used to identify and describe the methods of assessment used by teachers in hands-on science classrooms. A descriptive report of five themes derived from classroom observations. The interviews provided insight into local teachers' opinions and their use of hands-on science instruction and assessment. An interpretive synthesis of the overall findings from the study determined that the role of assessment in science education continues to be an evaluative instrument for the teachers rather than a tool for learning. The participant teachers reported that assessment's fundamental purpose was to document student performance. Evidence suggests that professional development will be essential for teachers to understand and use formative assessment in their classrooms. Equally important, if assessment is to be used to help students achieve, then teachers must help students use the information from the assessments to alter and advance learning.

Standefer, Katherine

319

Metacognitive activity in the physics student laboratory: Is increased metacognition necessarily better?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this study natural-in-action metacognitive activity during the student laboratory in university physics is explored, with an aim towards quantifying the amount of metacognition used by the students. The study investigates whether quantifying natural-in-action metacognition is possible and valuable for examining teaching and learning in these contexts. Video recordings of student groups working during three types of introductory physics laboratories were transcribed and then coded using a coding scheme developed from related research on mathematical problem solving. This scheme identifies a groupâs general behaviour and metacognitive activity. The study recognizes that reliably identifying metacognition is challenging, and steps are taken to improve reliability. Results suggest that a greater amount of metacognition does not appear to improve studentsâ success in the laboratoryâwhat appears to matter is whether the metacognition causes students to change behaviour. This study indicates that it is important to consider the outcome of metacognition, not just the amount.

Kung, Rebecca L.; Linder, Cedric J.

2012-05-28

320

Hands on what? The relative effectiveness of physical versus virtual materials in an engineering design project by middle school children  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hands-on activities play an important, but controversial, role in early science education. In this study we attempt to clarify some of the issues surrounding the controversy by calling attention to distinctions between: (a) type of instruction (direct or discovery); (b) type of knowledge to be acquired (domain-general or domain-specific); and (c) type of materials that are used (physical or virtual). We then describe an empirical study that investigates the relative effectiveness of the physical-virtual dimension. In the present study, seventh and eighth grade students assembled and tested mousetrap cars with the goal of designing a car that would go the farthest. Children were assigned to four different conditions, depending on whether they manipulated physical or virtual materials, and whether they had a fixed number of cars they could construct or a fixed amount of time in which to construct them. All four conditions were equally effective in producing significant gains in learners' knowledge about causal factors, in their ability to design optimal cars, and in their confidence in their knowledge. Girls' performance, knowledge, and effort were equal to boys' in all conditions, but girls' confidence remained below boys' throughout. Given the fact that, on several different measures, children were able to learn as well with virtual as with physical materials, the inherent pragmatic advantages of virtual materials in science may make them the preferred instructional medium in many hands-on contexts.

Klahr, David; Triona, Lara M.; Williams, Cameron

2007-01-01

321

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Intergrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Summary Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. However, INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users, who constitute a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events and quantify associated consequential outcome frequencies. Specifically, for nuclear power plant applications, SAPHIRE can identify important contributors to core damage (Level 1 PRA) and containment failure during a severe accident which lead to releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA where the reactor is at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, it can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming an internal events model to a model for external events, such as flooding and fire analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to the public and environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE also includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM is a special user interface linked to SAPHIRE that automates the SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events (for example, to calculate a conditional core damage probability) very efficiently and expeditiously. This report provides an overview of the functions available in SAPHIRE and presents general instructions for using the software. Section 1 presents SAPHIRE’s historical evolution and summarizes its capabilities. Section 2 presents instructions for installing and using the code. Section 3 explains the database structure used in SAPHIRE and discusses database concepts. Section 4 explains how PRA data (event frequencies, human error probabilities, etc.) can be generated and manipulated using “change sets.” Section 5 deals with fault tree operations, including constructing, editing, solving, and displaying results. Section 6 presents operations associated with event trees, including rule application for event tree linking, partitioning, and editing sequences. Section 7 presents how accident sequences are generated, solved, quantified, and analyzed. Section 8 discusses the functions available for performing end state analysis. Section 9 explains how to modify data stored in a SAPHIRE database. Section 10 illustrates how to generate and customize reports. Section 11 covers SAPHIRE utility options to perform routine functions such as defining constant values, recovering databases, and loading data from external sources. Section 12 provides an overview of GEM’s features and capabilities. Finally, Section 13 summarizes SAPHIRE’s quality assurance process.

C. L. Smith

2008-08-01

322

Standard target calibration of broad-band active sonar systems in a laboratory tank  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-frequency, scientific active sonar systems are frequently calibrated using standard target spheres. Spot frequency calibration accuracies (using carefully optimized sphere diameters) of 0.1 dB have been previously established as theoretically and technically feasible. The premise of this work is that a tungsten-carbide sphere may be used to calibrate an arbitrary sonar system in a laboratory water tank. In order to

A. Islas-Cital; P. R. Atkins; K. Y. Foo

2010-01-01

323

Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

Ratzel, A.C. III

1998-09-01

324

Brain Activity during Episodic Retrieval of Autobiographical and Laboratory Events: An fMRI Study using a Novel Photo Paradigm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Functional neuroimaging studies of episodic memory retrieval generally measure brain activity while participants remember items encountered in the laboratory (controlled laboratory condition) or events from their own life (open autobiographical condition). Differences in activation between these conditions may reflect differences in retrieval processes, memory remoteness, emotional content, retrieval success, self-referential processing, visual\\/spatial memory, and recollection. To clarify the nature of

Roberto Cabeza; Steve E. Prince; Sander M. Daselaar; Daniel L. Greenberg; Matthew Budde; Florin Dolcos; Kevin S. LaBar; David C. Rubin

2004-01-01

325

75 FR 1799 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Laboratories and Approval...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...of Commercial Laboratories and Approval...Reduction Act: Accreditation of Commercial Laboratories and Approval...electronic, mechanical, or other technological...information. Title: Accreditation of Commercial Laboratories and...

2010-01-13

326

78 FR 21145 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commercial Testing Laboratories and Approval...Reduction Act: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories and Approval...electronic, mechanical, or other...Title: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories and...

2013-04-09

327

Art Activities about Vikings, Woodland Indians and Early Colonists. Hands-On America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the first book in a series that features folk art and everyday crafts for each century in the history of the United States. The book covers the period from 1598-1697. Based on museum and private collection artifacts, the book's objects are interpreted in paper and other accessible materials creating quality art projects for the camp,…

Merrill, Yvonne Y.

328

"Gone" into Solution: Assessing the Effect of Hands-On Activity on Students' Comprehension of Solubility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Solubility is challenging for many general chemistry students, and the interactions of aqueous species are difficult to conceptualize. Derived from the pedagogies of Johnstone, Bloom, and Piaget, our primary research questions probe whether students' conceptual understandings of solubility could be enhanced by participation in a concept-building,…

Bruck, Laura B.; Bruck, Aaron D.; Phelps, Amy J.

2010-01-01

329

Hands-On Activities and Challenge Tests in Agricultural and Environmental Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many agricultural and environmental problems are interrelated and overlapping. Several agencies, including nonprofit organizations, have developed programs to educate schoolchildren about agricultural and environmental issues; however, programs that integrate both agricultural and environmental learning, especially among middle and high school…

Poudel, D. D.; Vincent, L. M.; Anzalone, C.; Huner, J.; Wollard, D.; Clement, T.; DeRamus, A.; Blakewood, G.

2005-01-01

330

Laboratory Exercise A Guided Inquiry Experiment for the Measurement of Activation Energies in the Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A laboratory experiment for undergraduate biophysical chemistry is described, in which the acid concen- tration and temperature dependences of the decarboxylation of pyrrole-2-carboxylate are measured using a continuous ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometric assay. Data collection and analysis are structured using principles of guided inquiry. Data leading to the calculation of multiple rate constants at varying temper- atures and acid concentrations can

Kelly M. Hutchinson; Stacey Lowery Bretz; Howard D. Mettee; Jeffrey A. Smiley

331

Multi-stage learning aids applied to hands-on software training.  

PubMed

Delivering hands-on tutorials on bioinformatics software and web applications is a challenging didactic scenario. The main reason is that trainees have heterogeneous backgrounds, different previous knowledge and vary in learning speed. In this article, we demonstrate how multi-stage learning aids can be used to allow all trainees to progress at a similar speed. In this technique, the trainees can utilize cards with hints and answers to guide themselves self-dependently through a complex task. We have successfully conducted a tutorial for the molecular viewer PyMOL using two sets of learning aid cards. The trainees responded positively, were able to complete the task, and the trainer had spare time to respond to individual questions. This encourages us to conclude that multi-stage learning aids overcome many disadvantages of established forms of hands-on software training. PMID:20656749

Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Pleus, Alexandra; Upmeier zu Belzen, Annette

2010-11-01

332

Promoting ergonomics in Algeria: activities of "the research and training laboratory" in the University of Oran.  

PubMed

The growing need in Algeria to develop ergonomics knowledge and practice in industry was behind the initiative to develop a training and research project within the ergonomics laboratory at Oran University. Since 2005 the laboratory team is running an academic option master in work design and ergonomics. The evaluation of the academic master in 2010 revealed the acute need of the local industry for professional competences in ergonomic and work psychology. A professional training master program in "ergonomics & work psychology" was then developed in partnership with local industry, five European Universities and six Universities from three Maghreb countries. Research projects were initiated around the two training programs, in conjunction with a number of ergonomics dissemination and promotion activities. Preliminary results of the project are presented and discussed in relation to the local context, and in the light of similar cases in Industrially Developing Countries. PMID:22316785

Mebarki, Bouhafs; El-Bachir, Tebboune Cheikh

2012-01-01

333

Development of new laboratory tools for assessment of granulation behavior during bulk active pharmaceutical ingredient drying.  

PubMed

Approximately 30% of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) experience agglomeration, granulation, and breakage during agitated drying. Currently, there is no small-scale bench tool to help assess and observe granulation behavior of APIs in the laboratory and subsequently lead to the development of a robust drying method. As a result, more conservative drying methods are usually used at scale and much longer drying times are needed. In this work, we build on work reported in the literature and demonstrate that a mixer torque rheometer (MTR) can be a useful small-scale tool to flag potentially problematic granulation behavior of APIs under different conditions. The results from the MTR were confirmed using a second new tool involving the use of an acoustic mixer to verify and observe the granulation behavior on a small scale. We also show consistency between the data collected at the laboratory and the pilot plant scales. PMID:24338750

Zhang, Siyan; Lamberto, David J

2014-01-01

334

Teaching Introductory, Calculus-based Physics in an Interactive, Hands-On, Computer-Rich Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the past several years, we have been exploring the use of computers and the results of physics education research in teaching introductory physics to our engineering and science students at North Carolina State University. Students have the opportunity to learn physics using Socratic dialogs, self-directed computer simulations, peer-teaching in collaborative homework groups, and hands-on experimentation. New textbooks, Excel spreadsheet

John S. Risley

1996-01-01

335

Creating a Hands-On Robot Environment for Teaching Assembly Language Programming  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Real-world computer applications and assembly language programming are often taught with abstract exercises. To provide hands-on, real-world experience early, we introduce robots into our assembly language class. This paper describes the creation of a bridge from assembly language to a publicly available simulator, programming exercises, and a reconfigurable maze environment compatible with the simulator. This, with other open-source software, provides a complete development environment at no cost to the student.

Rababaah, Haroun R.; Wolfer, James

2010-01-01

336

From Concept-to-Flight: An Active Active Fluid Loop Based Thermal Control System for Mars Science Laboratory Rover  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, which was launched on November 26, 2011, incorporates a novel active thermal control system to keep the sensitive electronics and science instruments at safe operating and survival temperatures. While the diurnal temperature variations on the Mars surface range from -120 C to +30 C, the sensitive equipment are kept within -40 C to +50 C. The active thermal control system is based on a single-phase mechanically pumped fluid loop (MPFL) system which removes or recovers excess waste heat and manages it to maintain the sensitive equipment inside the rover at safe temperatures. This paper will describe the entire process of developing this active thermal control system for the MSL rover from concept to flight implementation. The development of the rover thermal control system during its architecture, design, fabrication, integration, testing, and launch is described.

Birur, Gajanana C.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bame, David; Karlmann, Paul; Mastropietro, A. J.; Liu, Yuanming; Miller, Jennifer; Pauken, Michael; Lyra, Jacqueline

2012-01-01

337

HANDS-ON UNIVERSE: A High-School Astrophysics Research Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hands-on Universe (HOU) project is a technology transfer program which makes leading edge astrophysics research tools and network technologies available to high school students, and more recently, the museum public. The (HOU) program allows users to request astronomical images in real time from the Leuschner Observatory, the U.C. Berkeley Astronomy Department's professional grade telescopes, over telecommunication linkages. After the CCD-images are taken the user can download them onto a PC-computer and then view and analyze the data by a powerful image processing package provided by the Hands-on Universe group. One of the goals of this project is to link participants and scientists by micro-computers and electronic networks in genuinely collaborative "apprenticeship" style interactions. The HOU program includes the development of astronomy based science curriculum units for use in high school classrooms. In these curricula the user friendly image request, image processing and data transfer software are applied in a way which is very close or even identical to how research is performed presently. The Hands-on Universe group is also engaged in the development of an astrophysics based museum exhibit and a HOU program for planetariums.

Pennypacker, C.; Arsem, E.; Gabi, S.

1993-05-01

338

Comparing hands-on and video training for postpartum hemorrhage management.  

PubMed

The objective was to compare two teaching methods for postpartum hemorrhage management: interactive hands-on training and non-interactive video training. In a controlled intervention study at a secondary health care center in Kenya, the two training methods, based on the Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics curriculum, were evaluated utilizing structured observation of a standardized scenario before and after training. Both intervention groups significantly increased in performance scores after receiving hands-on training: 40% (95% CI 29.5-47.0) and video training: 34.5% (95% CI 25.0-42.0); likewise, pass rates improved significantly. No significant differences in performance score or pass rates were found between the two methods. The findings indicate that postpartum hemorrhage management training by mobile media might be just as effective as conventional hands-on training and a feasible way to overcome the outreach gap in sub-Saharan Africa's rural areas, where peripheral health facilities are generally difficult to reach with conventional training programs. PMID:24754607

Nilsson, Cecilia; Sørensen, Bjarke Lund; Sørensen, Jette Led

2014-05-01

339

A simulator application of a 'hands-on throttle and stick' concept to a transport pilot/autopilot interface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents the initial experiences garnered in applying a multifunction control strategy, based on the U.S. Air Force's 'Hands-On Throttle-and-Stick' concept for fighter aircraft to a transport aircraft simulator. The multifunction control strategy involves the activation of various flight system/subsystem operations (such as guidance and control, communication, and navigation functions) by use of menu displays and throttle and stick switches. The initial application of this multifunction control (MFC) concept was developed around a pilot/autopilot interface, contrasting a conventional, dedicated autopilot interface to an MFC implementation. The simulator characteristics and autopilot functions, as well as the conventional interface and MFC hardware/software, which were utilized in the application, are described herein. Initial pilot reaction and suggested improvements to this particular implementation are discussed. The paper terminates with a glance at plans for improvements and future applications based on the outcome of this initial study.

Busquets, A. M.; Parrish, R. V.; Hogge, T. W.

1984-01-01

340

Laboratory demonstration model: Active cleaning technique device. [for removal of contaminants from an optical surface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technique which utilizes exposure to a plasma to remove contaminants from a surface was incorporated into a laboratory model which demonstrates active cleaning by both plasma cleaning and ion sputtering modes of operation. The development phase is reported and includes discussion of the plasma tube configuration, device design, and performance tests. A general description of the active cleaning device is provided which includes information on the main power/plasma discharge sensors, and the power, gas supply, and ion accelerator systems. Development of the active cleaning species at high vacuum conditions is described and results indicate that plasma cleaning occurs in the region of a visible plume which extends from the end of the plasma tube. Recommendations are made for research to determine the plasma cleaning mechanism and the plasma species responsible for the cleaning, as well limitations on the type of contaminants that can be removed.

Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

1974-01-01

341

Electrocardiograhic findings resulting in inappropriate cardiac catheterization laboratory activation for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction  

PubMed Central

Background Prompt reperfusion has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) with a goal of culprit vessel patency in <90 minutes. This requires a coordinated approach between the emergency medical services (EMS), emergency department (ED) and interventional cardiology. The urgency of this process can contribute to inappropriate cardiac catheterization laboratory (CCL) activations. Objectives One of the major determinants of inappropriate activations has been misinterpretation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in the patient with acute chest pain. Methods We report the ECG findings for all CCL activations over an 18-month period after the inception of a STEMI program at our institution. Results There were a total of 139 activations with 77 having a STEMI diagnosis confirmed and 62 activations where there was no STEMI. The inappropriate activations resulted from a combination of atypical symptoms and misinterpretation of the ECG (45% due to anterior ST-segment elevation) on patient presentation. The electrocardiographic abnormalities were particularly problematic in African-Americans with left ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusions In this single-center, prospective observational study, nearly half of the inappropriate STEMI activations were due to the misinterpretation of anterior ST-segment elevation and this finding was commonly seen in African-Americans with left ventricular hypertrophy.

Shamim, Shariq; McCrary, Justin; Wayne, Lori; Gratton, Matthew

2014-01-01

342

Gaining a Better Understanding of Estuarine Circulation and Improving Data Visualization Skills Through a Hands-on Contouring Exercise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The creation and accurate interpretation of graphs is becoming a lost art among students. The availability of numerous graphing software programs makes the act of graphing data easy but does not necessarily aide students in interpreting complex visual data. This is especially true for contour maps; which have become a critical skill in the earth sciences and everyday life. In multiple classes, we have incorporated a large-scale, hands-on, contouring exercise of temperature, salinity, and density data collected in the Hudson River Estuary. The exercise allows students to learn first-hand how to plot, analyze, and present three dimensional data. As part of a day-long sampling expedition aboard an 80' research vessel, students deploy a water profiling instrument (Seabird CTD). Data are collected along a transect between the Verrazano and George Washington Bridges. The data are then processed and binned at 0.5 meter intervals. The processed data is then used during a later laboratory period for the contouring exercise. In class, students work in groups of 2 to 4 people and are provided with the data, a set of contouring instructions, a piece of large (3' x 3') graph paper, a ruler, and a set of colored markers. We then let the groups work together to determine the details of the graphs. Important steps along the way are talking to the students about X and Y scales, interpolation, and choices of contour intervals and colors. Frustration and bottlenecks are common at the beginning when students are unsure how to even begin with the raw data. At some point during the exercise, students start to understand the contour concept and each group usually produces a finished contour map in an hour or so. Interestingly, the groups take pride in the coloring portion of the contouring as it indicates successful interpretation of the data. The exercise concludes with each group presenting and discussing their contour plot. In almost every case, the hands-on graphing has improved the "students" visualization skills. Contouring has been incorporated into the River Summer (www.riversumer.org, http://www.riversumer.org/) program and our Environmental Measurements laboratory course. This has resulted in the exercise being utilized with undergraduates, high-school teachers, graduate students, and college faculty. We are in the process of making this curricular module available online to educators.

Mailloux, B. J.; Kenna, T. C.

2008-12-01

343

Behavioral and Activity Assessment of Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus) after Tail Biopsy under Isoflurane Anesthesia  

PubMed Central

Contemporary laboratory animal guidance suggests that tail biopsy of laboratory mice can be performed before 21 d of age without anesthesia, whereas older mice must receive anesthesia before biopsy. Our objective was to determine whether administration of isoflurane anesthesia before tail biopsy produced a measurable effect on the behavior of mice (n = 196). We evaluated C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice at 21 to 24 (weaning), 28 to 31 (delayed weaning), and 42 to 45 (adult) d of age. Mice were observed at the time of biopsy and then twice within the first hour after a sham or tail biopsy. Anxiety-like responses were assessed by using an elevated plus-maze. Activity was evaluated remotely for 120 min. Isoflurane did not diminish acute responses to tail biopsy in mice 31 d or younger compared with sham-biopsied animals but had a significant effect in C57BL/6 biopsied adult mice. In addition, mice of all ages and strains that received anesthesia, regardless of biopsy, spent more time in the enclosed maze arms and had decreased activity up to 5 h after isoflurane exposure. Although tail biopsy should be performed in young mice to avoid transection of distal mature vertebrae, our experimental paradigm indicates that isoflurane anesthesia does not appreciably enhance wellbeing over that of mice biopsied without anesthesia at weaning ages. The influence of inhaled isoflurane was demonstrable and indicated that acute and prolonged alterations in anxiety and activity must be considered when interpreting the impact of anesthesia on tail biopsy across various ages and strains of laboratory mice.

Hankenson, F Claire; Braden-Weiss, Gillian C; Blendy, Julie A

2011-01-01

344

Current research activities at the NASA-sponsored Illinois Computing Laboratory of Aerospace Systems and Software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Illinois Computing Laboratory of Aerospace Systems and Software (ICLASS) was established to: (1) pursue research in the areas of aerospace computing systems, software and applications of critical importance to NASA, and (2) to develop and maintain close contacts between researchers at ICLASS and at various NASA centers to stimulate interaction and cooperation, and facilitate technology transfer. Current ICLASS activities are in the areas of parallel architectures and algorithms, reliable and fault tolerant computing, real time systems, distributed systems, software engineering and artificial intelligence.

Smith, Kathryn A.

1994-01-01

345

Active vibration control with model correction on a flexible laboratory grid structure  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents experimental and computational comparisons of three active damping control laws applied to a complex laboratory structure. Two reduced structural models were used with one model being corrected on the basis of measured mode shapes and frequencies. Three control laws were investigated, a time-invariant linear quadratic regulator with state estimation and two direct rate feedback control laws. Experimental results for all designs were obtained with digital implementation. It was found that model correction improved the agreement between analytical and experimental results. The best agreement was obtained with the simplest direct rate feedback control.

Schamel, George C., II; Haftka, Raphael T.

1991-01-01

346

Cognitive Achievement and Motivation in Hands-On and Teacher-Centred Science Classes: Does an Additional Hands-On Consolidation Phase (Concept Mapping) Optimise Cognitive Learning at Work Stations?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our study monitored the cognitive and motivational effects within different educational instruction schemes: On the one hand, teacher-centred versus hands-on instruction; on the other hand, hands-on instruction with and without a knowledge consolidation phase (concept mapping). All the instructions dealt with the same content. For all…

Gerstner, Sabine; Bogner, Franz X.

2010-01-01

347

Activity rhythms and masking response in the diurnal fat sand rat under laboratory conditions.  

PubMed

Daily rhythms are heavily influenced by light in two major ways. One is through photic entrainment of a circadian clock, and the other is through a more direct process, referred to as masking. Whereas entraining effects of photic stimuli are quite similar in nocturnal and diurnal species, masking is very different. Laboratory conditions differ greatly from what is experienced by individuals in their natural habitat, and several studies have shown that activity patterns can greatly differ between laboratory environment and natural condition. This is especially prevalent in diurnal rodents. We studied the daily rhythms and masking response in the fat sand rat (Psammomys obesus), a diurnal desert rodent, and activity rhythms of Tristram's jird (Meriones tristrami), a nocturnal member of the same subfamily (Gerbillinae). We found that most sand rats kept on a 12?h:12?h light-dark (LD) cycles at two light intensities (500 and 1000?lux) have a nocturnal phase preferences of general activity and higher body temperature during the dark phase. In most individuals, activity was not as stable that of the nocturnal Tritram's jirds, which showed a clear and stable nocturnal activity pattern under the same conditions. Sand rats responded to a 6-h phase advance and 6-h phase delay as expected, and, under constant conditions, all tested animals free ran. In contrast with the nocturnal phase preference, fat sand rats did not show a masking response to light pulses during the dark phase or to a dark pulse during the light phase. They did, however, have a significant preference to the light phase under a 3.5?h:3.5?h LD schedule. Currently, we could not identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for the temporal niche switch in this species. However, our results provide us with a valuable tool for further studies of the circadian system of diurnal species, and will hopefully lead us to understanding diurnality, its mechanisms, causes, and consequences. PMID:23926956

Barak, Orly; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga

2013-11-01

348

A laboratory system for examining the influence of light on diel activity of stream macro-invertebrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

I describe a laboratory system for investigating the role of light as a proximate cue for diel changes in locomotor activity and vertical location on the substrate of stream macro-invertebrates. The system consisted of computer- controlled halogen lamps positioned over a laboratory stream in which video-recordings were made of Stenonema modestum mayfly nymphs located on the undersides of unglazed tile

Annette L. Schloss

2002-01-01

349

Activation of Wnt Signaling Using Lithium Chloride: Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Laboratory Exercises  

PubMed Central

Abstract Zebrafish provide researchers and students alike with an excellent model of vertebrate nervous system development due to a high degree of conserved developmental mechanisms and transparent embryos that develop in synchrony. In these laboratory exercises, undergraduate students explore cell biological concepts while performing hypothesis-driven novel research utilizing methodologies such as immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, image analysis, pharmacology, and basic statistics. In the first block of exercises, students perform anti-acetylated tubulin (anti-AT) immunofluorescence, identify spinal tracts and neuronal subtypes, and perform conventional and confocal microscopy. Building on knowledge acquired in the first block of exercises, during the second block, students subsequently perform pharmacological activation of Wnt signaling through lithium chloride treatments, and assess nervous system integrity through anti-AT immunofluorescence. Students perform various quantitative methods and apply statistics to determine outcomes of Wnt activation. In their final laboratory report, students contextualize their results with foundations of molecular mechanisms of nervous system development. In sum, these exercises offer undergraduate students a model of independent research at the graduate level.

Ross, Andrew William

2012-01-01

350

Field and Laboratory Investigations of Enhanced Biological Activity Influencing Groundwater Velocity and Electromagnetic Wave Propagation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field observations of groundwater velocity using point velocity probes (PVPs) and aquifer dielectric properties using ground penetrating radar (GPR) were made in a bioremediating, gasoline contaminated aquifer to which dissolved oxygen was introduced using Oxygen Release Compound (ORC®). PVPs are sensitive to changes in groundwater flow; whereas GPR is sensitive to changes in the dielectric and geoelectric properties of the pore- fluid and aquifer material. Therefore, the two methods provided complimentary and independent evidence for pore-scale changes associated with enhanced biological activity. Following the addition of ORC, PVP and GPR measured velocities nearest the ORC wells changed in a consistent manner throughout the experiment. GPR velocities measured further down-gradient, outside the influence of the ORC, did not indicate the same trend. Results from geochemical and flow modeling, combined with gas and biomass measurements, show that PVP and GPR velocity changes were not artifacts of seasonally fluctuating hydraulic gradient or temperature. Rather, the changes appear to be caused by factors related to elevated levels biological activity in the aquifer. Preliminary geophysical laboratory testing in a large sandbox reactor previously identified consistent trends with field GPR data that mirrored the field observations. A new, more detailed, laboratory experiment using GPR and PVPs was initiated to 1) confirm with confidence the phenomena observed in the field and the preliminary lab tank experiment, and 2) to gain additional understanding of the mechanisms responsible for PVP and GPR responses. At the time of writing, the results of the detailed experiment are pending.

Schillig, P. C.; Devlin, J. F.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Patterson, E.; Roberts, J. A.; McGlashan, M. A.

2007-12-01

351

A System for Implanting Laboratory Mice with Light-Activated Microtransponders  

PubMed Central

The mouse is the most commonly used laboratory animal, accounting for up to 80% of all mammals used in research studies. Because rodents generally are group-housed, an efficient system of uniquely identifying individual animals for use in research studies, breeding, and proper colony management is required. Several temporary and permanent methods (for example, ear punching and toe clipping) are available for labeling research mice and other small animals, each with advantages and disadvantages. This report describes a new radiofrequency identification tagging method that uses 500-µm, light-activated microtransponders implanted subcutaneously into the ear or tail of mice. The preferred location for implanting is in the side of the tail, because implantation at this site was simple to perform and was associated with shorter implantation times (average, 53 versus 325 s) and a higher success rate (98% versus 50%) compared with the ear. The main benefits of using light-activated microtransponders over other identification methods, including other radiofrequency identification tags, is their small size, which minimizes stress to the animals during implantation and low cost due to their one-piece (monolithic) design. In addition, the implantation procedure uses a custom-designed 21-gauge needle injector and does not require anesthetization of the mice. We conclude that this method allows improved identification and management of laboratory mice.

Gruda, Maryann C; Pinto, Amanda; Craelius, Aaron; Davidowitz, Hanan; Kopacka, Wesley M; Li, Ji; Qian, Jay; Rodriguez, Efrain; Kuspiel, Edward; Mandecki, Wlodek

2010-01-01

352

Activities of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) Laboratories in Seibersdorf and Vienna. Biennial Report 1983-1984.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents the activities of the IAEA Laboratories in Seibersdorf and Vienna during the period 1983-1984, with emphasis on the research and development of mass rearing systems for insect control programmes applying the sterile insect technique an...

1985-01-01

353

Review of Matters Relating to U.S. Army Laboratories and Research Activities in the San Francisco Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This review was conducted in response to a congressional inquiry concerning activities at (1) the Letterman Army Institute of Research (LAIR), located adjacent to the Letterman Army Medical Center (LAMC) in San Francisco, and (2) the LAMC Area Laboratory,...

1981-01-01

354

Effects of activity and energy budget balancing algorithm on laboratory performance of a fish bioenergetics model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We evaluated the performance of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush that were fed ad libitum in laboratory tanks under regimes of low activity and high activity. In addition, we compared model performance under two different model algorithms: (1) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t and (2) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t + 1. Results indicated that the model significantly underestimated consumption for both inactive and active lake trout when algorithm 1 was used and that the degree of underestimation was similar for the two activity levels. In contrast, model performance substantially improved when using algorithm 2, as no detectable bias was found in model predictions of consumption for inactive fish and only a slight degree of overestimation was detected for active fish. The energy budget was accurately balanced by using algorithm 2 but not by using algorithm 1. Based on the results of this study, we recommend the use of algorithm 2 to estimate food consumption by fish in the field. Our study results highlight the importance of accurately accounting for changes in fish energy density when balancing the energy budget; furthermore, these results have implications for the science of evaluating fish bioenergetics model performance and for more accurate estimation of food consumption by fish in the field when fish energy density undergoes relatively rapid changes.

Madenjian, Charles P.; David, Solomon R.; Pothoven, Steven A.

2012-01-01

355

Twenty-first century skills for students: hands-on learning after school builds school and life success.  

PubMed

At the core of the movement for twenty-first century skills are students. The growing efforts to increase programs leveraging out-of-school time are focused on giving American youth everything they need to compete in this increasingly complex world. The author is one of many students who have been well served by initiatives imparting twenty-first century skills during after-school hours. Now a senior at Boston Latin School, the author has been helped along the way by Citizen Schools, an after-school education program focused on hands-on learning apprenticeships and homework help. While enrolled in the program as a middle school student, the author took part in projects that exemplified hands-on, inquiry-based learning that helped her develop twenty-first century skills. For example, along with dozens of other students, she advanced her data analysis skills by analyzing statistics about Boston Public high schools, which also helped her select and enroll in one of the city's premier exam schools. Also, she and her peers worked with corporate attorneys who served as writing coaches and whose expertise the author drew from in producing a published essay and greatly improving her writing skills. The author now finds that the public speaking, leadership, organizational, social, and management abilities she built through her participation in Citizen Schools are a great asset to her in high school. The confidence with which she tackles her responsibilities can also be traced back to her experiences in the program. As she looks toward college, the author reflects and realizes that being actively involved in a quality after-school program put her on track for a successful future. PMID:17017266

Cabral, Leide

2006-01-01

356

Laboratory aspects of von Willebrand disease: test repertoire and options for activity assays and genetic analysis.  

PubMed

The deficiency or abnormal function of von Willebrand factor (VWF) causes von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most frequent inherited bleeding disorder. The laboratory diagnosis of VWD can be difficult as the disease is heterogeneous and an array of assays is required to describe the phenotype. Basic classification of quantitative (type 1 and 3) and qualitative (type 2) VWD variants requires determination of VWF antigenic (VWF:Ag) levels and assaying of VWF ristocetin cofactor (VWF:RCo) activity, determining the capacity of VWF to interact with the platelet GPIb-receptor. Knowing the VWF:RCo activity is essential for identifying, subtyping and monitoring VWD, but the assay is poorly standardized and many protocols do not fulfil the clinical need in all situations. This has led to the development of novel activity assays, independent of ristocetin, with enhanced assay characteristics. Results from the first independent clinical evaluations are promising, showing that they are reliable and suitable for VWD diagnosis. The qualitative type 2 VWF deficiency can be further divided into four different subtypes (A, B, M and N) using specific assays that explore other activities or the size distribution of VWF multimers. These methods are discussed herein. However, in a number of patients it may be difficult to correctly classify the VWD phenotype and genetic analysis may provide the best option to clarify the disorder, through mutation identification. PMID:24762278

Castaman, G; Hillarp, A; Goodeve, A

2014-05-01

357

Characterization of the Activity and Stability of Amylase from Saliva and Detergent: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Activity and Stability of Amylase from Saliva and Various Commercial Detergents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents two integrated laboratory exercises intended to show students the role of [alpha]-amylases (AAMYs) in saliva and detergents. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the enzymatic activity of amylase from saliva and different detergents using the Phadebas test (quantitative) and the Lugol test…

Valls, Cristina; Rojas, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

2012-01-01

358

Hands-on-Science: Using Education Research to Construct Learner-Centered Classes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research into the process of learning, and learning astronomy, can be informative for the development of a course. Students are better able to incorporate and make sense of new ideas when they are aware of their own prior knowledge (Resnick et al. 1989; Confrey 1990), have the opportunity to develop explanations from their own experience in their own words (McDermott 1991; Prather et al. 2004), and benefit from peer instruction (Mazur 1997; Green 2003). Students in astronomy courses often have difficulty understanding many different concepts as a result of difficulties with spatial reasoning and a sense of scale. The Hands-on-Science program at UT Austin incorporates these research-based results into four guided-inquiry, integrated science courses (50 students each). They are aimed at pre-service K–5 teachers but are open to other majors as well. We find that Hands-on-Science students not only attain more favorable changes in attitude towards science, but they also outperform students in traditional lecture courses in content gains. Workshop Outcomes: Participants experienced a research-based, guided-inquiry lesson about the motion of objects in the sky and discussed the research methodology for assessing students in such a course.

Ludwig, R. R.; Chimonidou, A.; Kopp, S.

2014-07-01

359

Micron Accuracy Deployment Experiments (MADE): A space station laboratory for actively controlled precision deployable structures technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Micron Accuracy Deployment Experiments (MADE) facility will be an orbiting laboratory for engineering research on precision deployable structures. Such technology is crucial to the deployment of large science instruments such as the Space Interferometer Mission and the Next Generation Space Telescope, as well as other spacecraft requiring large deployed optics. For these missions, very lightweight instruments must be deployed on orbit and their dimensional stability must be actively controlled to nanometers of resolution-a technology not yet demonstrated on any spacecraft. Data from ground tests of prototype precision deployable structures indicate that, not only is this level of stability difficult to achieve on deployable structures in 1-g, but the governing microdynamics should change substantially in 0-g. The MADE facility will provide a laboratory for investigating the effects of 0-g on the microdynamics of precision deployable structures, and for developing low-cost, reliable, precision deployable instruments. The MADE facility is currently under development for the Engineering Research and Technology program at the NASA Johnson Space Center. This paper discusses the motivation, objectives, system configuration and science protocols for the MADE facility.

Peterson, Lee D.; Lake, Mark S.; Hardaway, Lisa R.

1999-01-01

360

[Clinical genetics in The Netherlands. I. Organization, activities and laboratory diagnosis].  

PubMed

There are seven centres for clinical genetics in the Netherlands. In 1996, some 63,000 persons (patients and possible carriers of hereditary diseases) were tested. In centres for clinical genetics chromosomal studies, biochemical diagnostics of hereditary metabolic diseases and DNA diagnostics are integrated with genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. The borders between the three different forms of laboratory testing for congenital anomalies and hereditary diseases gradually diminish. The variations of the numbers of laboratory examinations, genetic advices and prenatal diagnoses over the last ten years show that there is no correlation between these activities and the method of funding. Owing to the low prevalence of the diseases involved, the total number of DNA diagnoses for monogenic diseases will not increase significantly. However, once genetic risk factors of diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, asthma, rheumatism, some psychiatric disorders and Alzheimer dementia will have been mapped, DNA diagnostics will greatly expand and will have implications in a broad area of medicine. PMID:9554157

Galjaard, H

1997-12-01

361

Methodological proposal for occupational health and safety actions in research laboratories with nanotechnologies activities.  

PubMed

Nanotechnologies is a multidisciplinary set of techniques to manipulate matter on nanoscale level, more precisely particles below 100 nm whose characteristic due to small size is essentially different from those found in macro form materials. Regarding to these new properties of the materials there are knowledge gaps about the effects of these particles on human organism and the environment. Although it still being considered emerging technology it is growing increasingly fast as well as the number of products using nanotechnologies in some production level and so the number of researchers involved with the subject. Given this scenario and based on literature related, a comprehensive methodology for health and safety at work for researching laboratories with activities in nanotechnologies was developed, based on ILO structure guidelines for safety and health at work system on which a number of nanospecific recommendations were added to. The work intends to offer food for thought on controlling risks associated to nanotechnologies. PMID:22317200

Andrade, Luís Renato Balbão; Amaral, Fernando Gonçalves

2012-01-01

362

On the effectiveness of active-engagement microcomputer-based laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One hour active-engagement tutorials using microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) equipment were substituted for traditional problem-solving recitations in introductory calculus-based mechanics classes for engineering students at the University of Maryland. The results of two specific tutorials, one on the concept of instantaneous velocity and one on Newton's third law were probed by using standard multiple-choice questions and a free-response final exam question. A comparison of the results of 11 lecture classes taught by six different teachers with and without tutorials shows that the MBL tutorials resulted in a significant improvement compared to the traditional recitations when measured by carefully designed multiple-choice problems. The free-response question showed that, although the tutorial students did somewhat better in recognizing and applying the concepts, there is still room for improvement.

Redish, Edward F.; Saul, Jeffery M.; Steinberg, Richard N.

1997-01-01

363

Implementation of the six grumbly priorities during decommissioning activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning work continues to play an important role in the long-term activities of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Recent completion of the SPERT IV waste tank project marked the 25th facility to be decommissioned at the INEL. These facilities have either been totally removed and the area restored to a natural condition, or the buildings decontaminated and returned to further use, The long-term goal for the INEL decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program is to complete decommissioning of its surplus facilities in a safe, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner. The INEL D&D program was established in late 1977 and has remained active since that time. The types of facilities decommissioned to date range from concrete storage pads to complex reactor and fuel-reprocessing facilities. Disassembly techniques have ranged from plasma torches, to headache balls, to linear-shaped high explosives. Late last year, Thomas P. Grumbly, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), issued six priorities to guide the implementation of environmental management activities at DOE sites.

Perry, E.F. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mikkola, A.W. [Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-12-31

364

Recent upgrade of the in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of a delayed- and a prompt-gamma neutron activation (DGNA and PGNA) system and an inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. The total body contents of several basic elements, including potassium, calcium, chlorine, sodium, and phosphorus are measured at the DGNA system; total body carbon is measured at the INS system; and the nitrogen-tohydrogen ratio is measured at the PGNA system. Based on the elemental composition, body compartments, such as total body fat and total body protein can be computed with additional independently measured parameters, such as total body water, body size, and body weight. Information on elemental and compartmental body composition obtained through neutron activation analysis is useful, if not essential, for research on growth, malnutrition, aging diseases, such as osteoporosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in which the progression of the illness is closely related to changes in major body compartments, such as bone, adipose tissue, and muscle. The DGNA system has been modified and upgraded several times since it was first built. Recently, all three systems underwent major upgrades. This upgrading and some preliminary studies carried out with the modified facilities are reported here.

Ma, R.; Dilmanian, F.A..; Rarback, H.; Meron, M.; Kamen, Y.; Yasumura, S.; Weber, D.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stamatelatos, I.E. [Ioannina Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics; Lidofsky, L.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Nuclear Engineering; Pierson, R.N. Jr. [Saint Luke`s-Roosevelt Body Composition Unit, New York, NY (United States)

1993-10-01

365

A Comprehensive Approach to Partnering Scientists with Education and Outreach Activities at a National Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the establishment of an Office of Education and Outreach (EO) in 2000 and the adoption of a five-year EO strategic plan in 2001, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) committed to augment the involvement of AGU scientists and their partners in education and public outreach activities that represent the full spectrum of research in the atmospheric and related sciences. In 2002, a comprehensive program is underway which invites scientists from UCAR, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and UCAR Office of Programs (UOP) into partnership with EO through volunteer orientation workshops, program specific training, skill-building in pedagogy, access to classroom resources, and program and instructor evaluation. Scientists contribute in one or several of the following roles: program partners who bridge research to education through collaborative grant proposals; science content advisors for publications, web sites, exhibits, and informal science events; science mentors for high school and undergraduate students; NCAR Mesa Laboratory tour guides; scientists in the schools; science education ambassadors to local and national community events; science speakers for EO programs, conferences, and meetings of local organization; and science wizards offering demonstrations at public events for children and families. This new EO initiative seeks to match the expertise and specific interests of scientists with appropriate activities, while also serving as a communications conduit through which ideas for new activities and resources can be seeded and eventually developed into viable, fully funded programs.

Foster, S. Q.

2002-12-01

366

Genetics Concepts and Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These lessons demonstrate how a good understanding of mitosis, meiosis and fertilization and a basic understanding of the roles of DNA and proteins can provide the basis for understanding genetics. Important genetics concepts for students to learn are summarized and multiple learning activities are suggested to help students understand Punnett squares, pedigrees, dominant/recessive alleles, X-linked recessive alleles, incomplete dominance, co-dominance, test crosses, independent assortment, genetic linkage, polygenic inheritance, etc. This overview provides links to suggested activities which include hands-on simulation and laboratory activities, analysis of class data, review games and discussion activities and questions.

Waldron, Ingrid

367

Hands-On Science Reform, Science Achievement, and the Elusive Goal of "science for All" in a Diverse Elementary School District  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Given the emphasis on "science for all" in national reform documents, this study analyzed student science achievement scores in hands-on reform versus traditional classrooms for 3,667 students in Grades 3 to 6 by gender, ethnicity, free or reduced lunch status, parent education, and level of English proficiency to determine whether these subgroups performed better or worse in reform classrooms. Teachers in reform classrooms used exemplary hands-on science kits and attended 1-day in-service training per kit. Teachers in traditional classrooms used the regular activity-based science curriculum with textbook. Gender differences favoring boys appeared in both types of classrooms, but were larger in the reform classrooms. Boys from lower socioeconomic levels performed better in reform classrooms, but limited-English-proficient boys performed worse. Parent education was significantly related to higher achievement for boys only in reform classrooms. For girls this relation was significant only in traditional classrooms. White girls performed significantly worse in reform classroom, but there were no differences for Asian and Hispanic girls. Implications for adapting hands-on science reform to meet student needs are discussed.

Echevarria, Marissa

368

Evaluation Report on the Activities of the Appalachia Educational Laboratory Regional Exchange. October, 1976 to November, 1977.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report covers the activities of the Appalachia Educational Laboratory (AEL) Regional Exchange (Rx) from October 1976 to November 1977, the first 14 months of the Rx existence. Four different activities are described and are briefly evaluated: (1) the Advisory Committee; (2) the subcontracts with eight state departments of education to improve…

Love, George H.; And Others

369

Activities for Preschoolers--A Laboratory Manual for Use by Child-Care Teacher-Aide Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory manual for use by child care and teacher aide students is arranged by topic according to the months and holidays of the school year. Suggested activities, songs, fingerplays, and poems are included for each topic, along with a list of related resource books. Many of the activities and songs include a number in parentheses following…

Constantine, Jean

370

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory?s Book of Minimum Detectable Activity for Direct Measurement of Internally Deposited Radionuclides in Radiation Workers  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintains an in vivo measurement program designed to identify and evaluate the activity of radionuclides deposited in the body. Two types of systems are primarily used for the routine monitoring of radiation workers, the lung counting system and the scanning bed whole body counting system. The lung counting system is comprised of two Canberra ACTII detector sets. Each ACTII set contains two planar germanium detectors with carbon composite end windows optimized to measure low energy photon emitting radionuclides. The ACTII detectors are placed on the upper torso over the lungs for the direct measurement of internally deposited radionuclides in the lungs that emit low energy photons. A correction for the thickness of the chest wall is applied to the efficiency. Because the thickness of the chest wall is a key factor in the measurement of low energy photon emitting radionuclides in the lung, the minimum detectable activity is a function of the chest wall thickness. The scanning bed whole body counting system is comprised of a thin air mattress on top of a carbon fiber bed that slowly scans over four high purity germanium detectors. The scanning system is designed to minimize variations in detected activity due to radionuclide distribution in the body. The scanning bed detection system is typically used for the measurement of internally deposited radionuclides that emit photons above 100 to 200 keV. MDAs have been generated for radionuclides that provide energies above 80 keV since the lowest calibration energy for the system is approximately 86 keV. The following charts and table provide best determination of minimum detectable activity using human subjects as controls for the background contributions. A wide variety of radionuclides are used throughout the laboratory and the following pages represent several of the radionuclides that have been encountered at the Whole Body and Spectroscopy Laboratories within Hazards Control.

Hickman, D P

2008-10-08

371

The APSU 0.5m Telescope - A Hands-On Learning Environment for Secondary Teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physical science teachers with hands-on experience are critical to secondary education learning. In "Before It’s Too Late," the U.S. Department of Education (2000) estimated "about 56% of high school students taking physical science are taught by out-of-field teachers." In Tennessee, the problem is even greater, while the demand is increasing. This project aims to address the shortage of well-prepared physics and astronomy teachers. Austin Peay State University has recently installed a 0.5m telescope with imaging and rudimentary spectroscopic capability. We are committed to working with the College of Education to bring secondary teachers in training and practicing secondary teachers to the telescope to experience basic operations and conduct small research projects. This is done via classes and summer workshops. We describe the program setup, expectations for the participants, learning outcomes, and the evaluation process.

Allyn Smith, J.; Buckner, S. L.; Pirkle, S. F.

2012-05-01

372

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Tutorial  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of computer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessment (PRAs). This volume is the tutorial manual for the SAPHIRE system. In this document, a series of lessons are provided that guide the user through basic steps common to most analyses preformed with SAPHIRE. The tutorial is divided into two major sections covering both basic and advanced features. The section covering basic topics contains lessons that lead the reader through development of a probabilistic hypothetical problem involving a vehicle accident, highlighting the program’s most fundamental features. The advanced features section contains additional lessons that expand on fundamental analysis features of SAPHIRE and provide insights into more complex analysis techniques. Together, these two elements provide an overview into the operation and capabilities of the SAPHIRE software.

C. L. Smith; S. T. Beck; S. T. Wood

2008-08-01

373

Exploring the Solar System in the Classroom: A Hands-On Approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report discusses the development and implementation of several educational products for K-16 teachers and students. Specifically, I received support for: (A) three K-12 Teacher workshops, Exploring the Solar System in the Classroom: A Hands-On Approach, and minimal Support to finish two computer-based tutorials. (B) Contact Light: An Interactive CD-ROM, and (C) Another Look at Taurus Littrow: An Interactive GIS Database. Each of these projects directly supports NASA's Strategic Plan to: "Involve the education community in our endeavors to inspire America's students, create learning opportunities, enlighten inquisitive minds", and, to "communicate widely the content, relevancy, and excitement of NASA's missions and discoveries to inspire and to increase understanding and the broad application of science and technology." Attachment: Appendix A. And also article: "Aristarchus plateau: as potential lunar base site."

Coombs, Cassandra R.

2000-01-01

374

Survival and catabolic activity of natural and genetically engineered bacteria in a laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit  

SciTech Connect

The survival of selected naturally occurring and genetically engineered bacteria in a fully functional laboratory-scale activated-sludge unit (ASU) was investigated. The effect of the presence of 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) on the survival of Pseudomonas putida UWC1, with or without a chimeric plasmid, pD10, which encodes 3CB catabolism, was determined. P. putida UWC1(pD10) did not enhance 3CB breakdown in the ASU, even following inoculation at a high concentration (3 x 10(8) CFU/ml). The emergence of a natural, 3CB-degrading population appeared to have a detrimental effect on the survival of strain UWC1 in the ASU. The fate of two 3CB-utilizing bacteria, derived from activated-sludge microflora, was studied in experiments in which these strains were inoculated into the ASU. Both strains, AS2, an unmanipulated natural isolate which flocculated readily in liquid media, and P. putida ASR2.8, a transconjugant containing the recombinant plasmid pD10, survived for long periods in the ASU and enhanced 3CB breakdown at 15 degrees C. The results reported in this paper illustrate the importance of choosing strains which are well adapted to environmental conditions if the use of microbial inoculants for the breakdown of target pollutants is to be successful.

McClure, N.C.; Fry, J.C.; Weightman, A.J. (Univ. of Wales College of Cardiff (Wales))

1991-02-01

375

"RealTime Physics": Active Learning Labs Transforming the Introductory Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer-based tools that enable students to collect, display and analyse data in real time have catalysed the design of a laboratory curriculum that allows students to master a coherent body of physics concepts while acquiring traditional laboratory skills. This paper describes "RealTime Physics", a sequenced introductory laboratory curriculum…

Sokoloff, David R.; Laws, Priscilla W.; Thornton, Ronald K.

2007-01-01

376

Hands-On Astrophysics: Variable Stars in Math, Science, and Computer Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hands-On Astrophysics (HOA): Variable Stars in Math, Science, and Computer Education, is a project recently developed by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) with funds from the National Science Foundation. HOA uses the unique methods and the international database of the AAVSO to develop and integrate students' math and science skills through variable star observation and analysis. It can provide an understanding of basic astronomy concepts, as well as interdisciplinary connections. Most of all, it motivates the user by exposing them to the excitement of doing real science with real data. Project materials include: a database of 600,000 variable star observations; VSTAR (a data plotting and analysis program), and other user friendly software; 31 slides and 14 prints of five constellations; 45 variable star finder charts; an instructional videotape in three 15-minute segments; and a 560-page student's and teacher's manual. These materials support the National Standards for Science and Math education by directly involving the students in the scientific process. Hands-On Astrophysics is designed to be flexible. It is organized so that it can be used at many levels, in many contexts: for classroom use from high school to college level, or for individual projects. In addition, communication and support can be found through the AAVSO home page on the World Wide Web: http://www.aavso.org. The HOA materials can be ordered through this web site or from the AAVSO, 25 Birch Street Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. We gratefully acknowledge the education grant ESI-9154091 from the National Science Foundation which funded the development of this project.

Mattei, J. A.; Percy, J. R.

1999-12-01

377

Space Outreach Hands-On Student Space Experiment Outreach Programs University among the Stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Space OutreachTM is a non-profit space education organization, spin-off of ITA, incorporated on July 17, 2001 to enable students to participate in real Space endeavors. More than 3,000 students and 50 teachers nationally and internationally have been involved in flying experiments in ITA's payloads on the Space Shuttle. Now Space OutreachTM has the task of implementing the space education program on a larger scale. Key features will include real time student involvement in actual Space missions and tutorial and educational tools on-line. By encouraging "thinking out of the box", the mission is to motivate students to learn math, science and other subjects in a multi- disciplinary, international framework using space research as a tool and help them to develop their own educational methodology with a Space-oriented perspective applied to Earth problems. Seminars will be given at schools and ground control kits will be utilized to facilitate the space education "hands-on" experience, guaranteeing a permanent link among school programs, research centers, the scientific world and the general public and society. Space OutreachTM is currently engaged in the program "University Among the Stars", as an international hands-on interactive space education structure that will encompass grades K1 through 12 and university and postgraduate students to encourage students to consider careers related to space. The program will be focused on microgravity sciences. Phase I (the pilot program) will allow for up to 30 separate schools to conduct microgravity experiments on the Space Shuttle. The experiments in Phase II would be flown on the International Space Station and include over 50 schools. The experiments in Phase III would be an expansion of Phase II and include real-time downlinks to the Internet showing the experiment in orbit. The aim of this paper is to provide details on the "University Among the Stars" interactive space education program, highlighting some of the student experiments conducted.

de, C.

2002-01-01

378

A laboratory system for examining the influence of light on diel activity of stream macro-invertebrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

I describe a laboratory system for investigating the role of light as a proximate cue for diel changes in locomotor activity and vertical location on the substrate of stream macro-invertebrates. The system consisted of computer-controlled halogen lamps positioned over a laboratory stream in which video-recordings were made of Stenonema modestum mayfly nymphs located on the undersides of unglazed tile substrates.

Annette L. Schloss

2002-01-01

379

The ‘Butner Study’ Redux: A Report of the Incidence of Hands-on Child Victimization by Child Pornography Offenders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study compared two groups of child pornography offenders participating in a voluntary treatment program: men whose known\\u000a sexual offense history at the time of judicial sentencing involved the possession, receipt, or distribution of child abuse\\u000a images, but did not include any “hands-on” sexual abuse; and men convicted of similar offenses who had documented histories\\u000a of hands-on sexual offending against

Michael L. Bourke; Andres E. Hernandez

2009-01-01

380

Diurnal activity rhythms of the subterranean termite Anacanthotermes vagans (Hagen) under laboratory and field conditions of the Kuwait desert  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Daily foraging activity of Anacanthotermes vagans was tested using toilet paper rolls as bait. The highest activity was recorded at midnight and during the hours of the early morning in both summer and winter seasons. In spring the time of highest activity was reversed to take place at midday, afternoon and early evening. Aktograph records in the laboratory demonstrated that individual workers are active most of the day and not naturally entrianed by photoperiods. Daily activity of groups of 10 workers was not statistically different from that of individual workers.

Absuhama, Faysal T.; Al Houty, Wasmia A.

1989-03-01

381

Comparison of laboratory-scale thermophilic biofilm and activated sludge processes integrated with a mesophilic activated sludge process.  

PubMed

A combined thermophilic-mesophilic wastewater treatment was studied using a laboratory-scale thermophilic activated sludge process (ASP) followed by mesophilic ASP or a thermophilic suspended carrier biofilm process (SCBP) followed by mesophilic ASP, both systems treating diluted molasses (dilution factor 1:500 corresponding GF/A-filtered COD (COD(filt)) of 1900+/-190 mgl(-1)). With hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 12-18 h the thermophilic ASP and thermophilic SCBP removed 60+/-13% and 62+/-7% of COD(filt), respectively, with HRT of 8 h the removals were 48+/-1% and 69+/-4%. The sludge volume index (SVI) was notably lower in the thermophilic SCBP (measured from suspended sludge) than in the thermophilic ASP. Under the lowest HRT the mesophilic ASP gave better performance (as SVI, COD(filt), and COD(tot) removals) after the thermophilic SCBP than after the thermophilic ASP. Measured sludge yields were low (less than 0.1 kg suspended solids (SS) kg COD(filt removed)(-1)) in all processes. Both thermophilic treatments removed 80-85% of soluble COD (COD(sol)) whereas suspended COD (COD(susp)) and colloidal COD (COD(col)) were increased. Both mesophilic post-treatments removed all COD(col) and most of the COD(susp) from the thermophilic effluents. In conclusion, combined thermophilic-mesophilic treatment appeared to be easily operable and produced high effluent quality. PMID:12618042

Suvilampi, J; Lehtomäki, A; Rintala, J

2003-07-01

382

The plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft: Applications of laboratory simulations and active in situ experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attempts to gain an understanding of spacecraft plasma dynamics via experimental investigation of the interaction between artificially synthesized, collisionless, flowing plasmas and laboratory test bodies date back to the early 1960's. In the past 25 years, a number of researchers have succeeded in simulating certain limited aspects of the complex spacecraft-space plasma interaction reasonably well. Theoretical treatments have also provided limited models of the phenomena. Several active experiments were recently conducted from the space shuttle that specifically attempted to observe the Orbiter-ionospheric interaction. These experiments have contributed greatly to an appreciation for the complexity of spacecraft-space plasma interaction but, so far, have answered few questions. Therefore, even though the plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft is fundamental to space technology, it remains largely an open issue. A brief overview is provided of the primary results from previous ground-based experimental investigations and the preliminary results of investigations conducted on the STS-3 and Spacelab 2 missions. In addition, several, as yet unexplained, aspects of the spacecraft-space plasma interaction are suggested for future research.

Stone, N. H.; Samir, Uri

1986-01-01

383

Production of fission and activation product isotopes at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot-Cell Facility has recently changed from support of defense and other programs to support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) isotope production and distribution program (IPDP). SNL`s primary role, in support of IPDP, is ensuring a reliable supply of {sup 99}Mo to the U.S. health care system. SNL will also play a role to complement the isotope production of other DOE reactor facilities such as High-Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the High-Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven, New York, and the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. The unique characteristics that the SNL facilities offer to the IPDP facility capability are simplicity, multiple irradiation locations, ready irradiation space access, and co-located hot-cell facilities capable of processing a short decay fission product stream. The SNL {sup 99}Mo effort is characterized elsewhere, and this paper is intended to describe the production of additional isotopes that can be produced for medical and other uses that should start soon after the {sup 99}Mo capability has been established. Isotope production in the SNL facilities is through fission or by neutron activation.

Coats, R.L. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-01

384

Production of fission and activation product isotopes at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF) has recently changed from support of Defense and other programs to support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP). SNL`s primary role, in support of IPDP, is ensuring a reliable supply of {sup 99}Mo to the US health care system. SNL will also play a role of complementing the isotope production of other DOE Reactor facilities such as High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven, New York, ad Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in Idaho. The unique characteristics that the SNL facilities offer to the IPDP facility capability are simplicity, multiple irradiation locations, ready irradiation space access and co-located hot cell facilities capable of processing a short decay fission product stream. The SNL {sup 99}Mo effort is characterized elsewhere and this paper is intended to describe the production of additional isotopes for that can be produced medical and other uses planned to start soon after the {sup 99}Mo capability has been established. Isotope production in the SNL facilities is through fission or by neutron activation.

Coats, R.L.

1997-08-01

385

Current radar-responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking and Combat ID application. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company for the United States Departments of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Ormesher, Richard C.; Plummer, Kenneth W.; Wells, Lars M.

2004-08-01

386

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Technical Reference  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. Herein information is provided on the principles used in the construction and operation of Version 6.0 and 7.0 of the SAPHIRE system. This report summarizes the fundamental mathematical concepts of sets and logic, fault trees, and probability. This volume then describes the algorithms used to construct a fault tree and to obtain the minimal cut sets. It gives the formulas used to obtain the probability of the top event from the minimal cut sets, and the formulas for probabilities that apply for various assumptions concerning reparability and mission time. It defines the measures of basic event importance that SAPHIRE can calculate. This volume gives an overview of uncertainty analysis using simple Monte Carlo sampling or Latin Hypercube sampling, and states the algorithms used by this program to generate random basic event probabilities from various distributions. Also covered are enhance capabilities such as seismic analysis, cut set "recovery," end state manipulation, and use of "compound events."

C. L. Smith; W. J. Galyean; S. T. Beck

2008-08-01

387

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Technical Reference Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. Herein information is provided on the principles used in the construction and operation of Version 6.0 and 7.0 of the SAPHIRE system. This report summarizes the fundamental mathematical concepts of sets and logic, fault trees, and probability. This volume then describes the algorithms used to construct a fault tree and to obtain the minimal cut sets. It gives the formulas used to obtain the probability of the top event from the minimal cut sets, and the formulas for probabilities that apply for various assumptions concerning reparability and mission time. It defines the measures of basic event importance that SAPHIRE can calculate. This volume gives an overview of uncertainty analysis using simple Monte Carlo sampling or Latin Hypercube sampling, and states the algorithms used by this program to generate random basic event probabilities from various distributions. Also covered are enhance capabilities such as seismic analysis, cut set "recovery," end state manipulation, and use of "compound events."

C. L. Smith; W. J. Galyean; S. T. Beck

2006-07-01

388

Modeling Lunar Phases in the Classroom: A Hands-On Interactive Lesson  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using Power-Point technology and hands-on materials, a 45 minute lesson has been created to allow students to explore the cause of lunar phases. Students work in cooperative pairs to model the different phases of the moon. In addition, this lesson does not require a bright light source. Using a partially painted Styrofoam ball, a small cup of Play-dough, a simple, protractor, and a data collection sheet, students observe the lunar phases and measure the angle between the sun and the moon. Students place the moon model in eight different positions simulating its orbit around the earth and record the observed changes. The Power-Point presentation contains three segments. The first section allows the teacher to determine the students’ level of prior knowledge about the moon and to uncover possible misconceptions. The second section facilitates the students’ learning by displaying the proper alignment of the model and the proper viewing position for the students. Finally, the presentation culminates in a review of what the students have just observed. This lesson has been created to meet Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) for 4th grade science regarding the cause of lunar phases. Teacher and student responses to this lesson have been extremely positive.

Sarrazine, Angela R.

2007-12-01

389

Teachers Touch the Sky: A one-week hands on workshop in astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Teachers Touch the Sky (TTS) is a one week, inquiry-based hands-on workshop in astronomy for teachers in grades 3-10. In its seventh year, TTS was developed under the NASA IDEAS program, and it is now supported by an E/PO Planetary Geology supplement. Offering a comfortable approach to science, the workshop shows the teachers how to enable their students to become "mini-investigators". The week offers a combination of lectures by JPL scientists and engineers and experiments that the teachers practice for classroom use. Many of the experiments are derived from the Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) series developed by the Lawrence Hall of Science of the University of California at Berkeley. This year the themes of the workshop were expanded to include two topics of current interest: Water on Mars and Astrobiology. We make use of returning Master Teachers to assist the participants in curriculum development. The teachers perform a 4-page evaluation of the workshop which ranks their knowledge and confidence levels before and after the workshop. We improve the workshop in subsequent years based on the results of the evaluation. Their average scores in all categories increased about 35 percent. The overall score for the workshop was 4.9 on a scale of 1 to 5.

Buratti, B. J.; Hillier, J. D.; Medin, Z.

2000-10-01

390

Systems analysis programs for hands-on integrated reliability evaluations (SAPHIRE), Version 5.0  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of several microcomputer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), primarily for nuclear power plants. The Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM) is a special application tool designed for evaluation of operational occurrences using the Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) program methods. GEM provides the capability for an analyst to quickly and easily perform conditional core damage probability (CCDP) calculations. The analyst can then use the CCDP calculations to determine if the occurrence of an initiating event or a condition adversely impacts safety. It uses models and data developed in the SAPHIRE specially for the ASP program. GEM requires more data than that normally provided in SAPHIRE and will not perform properly with other models or data bases. This is the first release of GEM and the developers of GEM welcome user comments and feedback that will generate ideas for improvements to future versions. GEM is designated as version 5.0 to track GEM codes along with the other SAPHIRE codes as the GEM relies on the same, shared database structure.

Russell, K.D.; Kvarfordt, K.J.; Hoffman, C.L. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1995-10-01

391

Time and Frequency Activities at the Lithuanian National Time Standard Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Since June 2001, the Lithuanian National Time and Frequency Standard Laboratory has been responsible for the maintenance and dissemination of the national time scale UTC (LT), as well as for units of time and frequency. The Laboratory is equipped with two...

R. Miskinis

2007-01-01

392

A Coastal Environment Field and Laboratory Activity for an Undergraduate Geomorphology Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A field and laboratory exercise for an undergraduate geomorphology class is described that focuses on the beach. The project requires one day of fieldwork and two laboratory sessions. In the field, students measure water surface fluctuations (waves) with a pressure sensor, survey beach profiles, collect sediment samples, and observe the beach…

Ellis, Jean T.; Rindfleisch, Paul R.

2006-01-01

393

Early Earth Science Activities in the Sanford Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake  

Microsoft Academic Search

On July 10, 2007, the former Homestake Mine, Lead, South Dakota, was selected as the development site for the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory, to become the Sanford Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake. Work on refurbishment and certification of the Ross Shaft began in August 2007 to effect pumping of water that had reached the 5000 level

J. S. Wang; S. D. Glaser; J. R. Moore; K. Hart; G. King; T. Regan; S. S. Bang; R. K. Sani; W. M. Roggenthen

2007-01-01

394

Is the Mussel Test a good Indicator of Antifouling Activity? A Comparison Between Laboratory and Field Assays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current antifouling technologies rely on metal-based paints, but due to their toxicity, an expected worldwide ban of organotin-containing paints is now prompting the quest for safe and effective alternatives. One of these is antifouling coatings whose active components are natu- rally occurring compounds in marine organisms. A number of laboratory bioassays has been designed to search for antifouling compounds. However,

RENATO C

395

Sympathetic Activity in Patients With Panic Disorder at Rest, Under Laboratory Mental Stress, and During Panic Attacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

patients and control subjects at rest, as was whole-body epinephrine secretion. Epinephrine spillover from the heart was elevated in patients with panic disorder (P=.01). Responses to laboratory mental stress were almost iden- tical in patient and control groups. During panic at- tacks, there were marked increases in epinephrine se- cretion and large increases in the sympathetic activity in muscle in

Dominic J. C. Wilkinson; Jane M. Thompson; Gavin W. Lambert; Garry L. Jennings; Rosemary G. Schwarz; Don Jefferys; Andrea G. Turner; Murray D. Esler

1998-01-01

396

PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades K-1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

397

PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 4-6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

398

LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDIES TO EVALUATE RISKS TO LARVAL FISH FROM PHOTO-ACTIVATED TOXICITY OF PAHS  

EPA Science Inventory

Hazard from photo-activation of PAHs has been well documented in aquatic organisms. Far less certain is the degree to which risk actually occurs in the field. This presentation outlines a series of laboratory and field experiments conducted to better understand the dosimetry and ...

399

Using Laboratory Activities Enhanced with Concept Cartoons to Support Progression in Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities enhanced with concept cartoons. The purpose of the intervention was to enhance students' understanding of acid-base chemistry for eight grade students' from two classes in a Turkish primary school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent…

Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Burhan, Yasemin; Naseriazar, Akbar; Demircioglu, Hulya

2012-01-01

400

Nitric oxide production is increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis but does not correlate with laboratory parameters of disease activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: To investigate whether nitric oxide (NO) production correlates with laboratory parameters of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we measured serum nitrates and nitrites (NOx) concentrations, rheumatoid factor (RF), C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and serum iron markers in 115 RA patients. Methods: Serum NOx concentrations were determined after reduction of nitrates to nitrites using

Jong Weon Choi

2003-01-01

401

AN OVERVIEW OF HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. EPA'S NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY  

EPA Science Inventory

The computational modeling of human exposure to environmental pollutants is one of the primary activities of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). Assessment of human exposures is a critical part of the overall risk assessm...

402

Teaching PCR Through Inquiry in an Undergraduate Biology Laboratory Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of an inquiry-based laboratory unit on the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). This unit was designed and taught for the undergraduate Eukaryotic Genetics Laboratory class (Bio105L) at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Our activity utilizes an authentic molecular biology research question to teach the underlying molecular mechanisms and experimental technique of PCR, as well as fundamental scientific process skills such as planning experiments, making predictions and interpreting data. In particular, the activity prompts students to use PCR to determine which gene has been deleted in a region of the Drosophila genome. During this activity, students also gained technical experience in common molecular biology techniques, learned about additional applications of PCR and used a hands-on approach to model each step of PCR.

Dorighi, K. M.; Betancourt, J.; Sapp, J.; Quan, T. K.; Lee, J.

2010-12-01

403

Partnering with Pueblos: Involving American Indians in environmental restoration activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Many communities in the area surrounding Los Alamos are very concerned about the environmental impact past and current Laboratory operations have on their communities. Their main concerns are contamination of water, soil and air as well as the hazardous and radioactive wastes stored at the Laboratory site. Environmental surveillance results show that contamination may have migrated off-site through the canyons of the Pajarito Plateau to the Rio Grande. San Ildefonso Pueblo and Cochiti Pueblo are located downstream from the canyons that drain the Los Alamos town site and Laboratory lands. Several other pueblos are also located downstream from the Laboratory. The Pueblos located upstream from the laboratory indicated that contamination of air and worry about the contamination of the animals they hunt for food is a more important concern to them. There are many canyons that drain the areas where Los Alamos and Laboratory property are located. To be able to characterize those canyons that are known or suspected to have received contamination, the ER Project needs to prepare RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) work plans for approval by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Once EPA approves the work plant, characterization activities can start for the specific areas identified in the work plan.

Shaner, M.H.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

1995-02-01

404

Active shield technology for space craft protection revisited in new laboratory results and analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energetic ions in the solar wind plasma are a known hazard to both spacecraft electronics and to astronaut's health. Of primary concern is the exposure to keV--MeV protons on manned space flights to the Moon and Mars that extend over long periods of time. Attempts to protect the spacecraft include active shields that are reminiscent of Star Trek "deflector" shields. Here we describe a new experiment to test the shielding concept of a dipole-like magnetic field and plasma, surrounding the spacecraft forming a "mini magnetosphere". Initial laboratory experiments have been conducted to determine the effectiveness of a magnetized plasma barrier to be able to expel an impacting, low beta, supersonic flowing energetic plasma representing the Solar Wind. Optical and Langmuir probe data of the plasma density, the plasma flow velocity, and the intensity of the dipole field clearly show the creation of a narrow transport barrier region and diamagnetic cavity virtually devoid of energetic plasma particles. This demonstrates the potential viability of being able to create a small "hole" in a Solar Wind plasma, of the order of the ion Larmor orbit width, in which an inhabited spacecraft could reside in relative safety. The experimental results have been quantitatively compared to a 3D particle-in-cell ‘hybrid' code simulation that uses kinetic ions and fluid electrons, showing good qualitative agreement and excellent quantitative agreement. Together the results demonstrate the pivotal role of particle kinetics in determining generic plasma transport barriers. [1] [1] R Bamford et al., "The interaction of a flowing plasma with a dipole magnetic field: measurements and modelling of a diamagnetic cavity relevant to spacecraft protection." 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 124025 (11pp) doi: 10.1088/0741-3335/50/12/124025

Bamford, R.; Gibson, K. J.; Thornton, A. T.; Bradford, J.; Bingham, R.; Gargate, L.; Silva, L. O.; Fonseca, R. A.; Hapgood, M.; Norberg, C.; Todd, T.; Stamper, R.

2009-04-01

405

Real-time development of data acquisition and analysis software for hands-on physiology education in neuroscience: G-PRIME.  

PubMed

We report on the real-time creation of an application for hands-on neurophysiology in an advanced undergraduate teaching laboratory. Enabled by the rapid software development tools included in the Matlab technical computing environment (The Mathworks, Natick, MA), a team, consisting of a neurophysiology educator and a biophysicist trained as an electrical engineer, interfaced to a course of approximately 15 students from engineering and biology backgrounds. The result is the powerful freeware data acquisition and analysis environment, "g-PRIME." The software was developed from week to week in response to curriculum demands, and student feedback. The program evolved from a simple software oscilloscope, enabling RC circuit analysis, to a suite of tools supporting analysis of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission analysis in invertebrate model systems. The program has subsequently expanded in application to university courses, research, and high school projects in the US and abroad as free courseware. PMID:19964767

Lott, Gus K; Johnson, Bruce R; Bonow, Robert H; Land, Bruce R; Hoy, Ronald R

2009-01-01

406

The effect of perineal control with hands-on and hand-poised methods on perineal trauma and delivery outcome  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the two methods of delivery, “hands-on” vs. “hands poised”, on perineal trauma and delivery outcome in primiparous women referred to Shariati Hospital of Isfahan during 2007-2008. METHODS: In a clinical trial study, 100 low risk primiparous pregnant women were randomly assigned to two hands-on and hand-poised (hands-off) groups. In the hands-on group, this method was used to control fetal head in the second stage of labor. It means that the fingers of one hand supported fetal occiput and the other hand applied slight pressure on the head to control the delivery of the head during the crowning process. In the hands-poised group, midwife observed the parturient woman and do not touch perineum during the second labor stage while fetal head was delivering. Then, the two groups were compared in terms of perineal trauma, as well as neonatal and delivery outcome. RESULTS: Demographic characteristics of all studied women were similar in two groups. The rate of episiotomy was higher in hands-on group (84% vs. 40%, p = 0.001). The rate of postpartum hemorrhage (4th stage) was higher in hands-on group (12% vs. 4%, p = 0.04). The rate of mild and moderate postpartum pain in hands-on group was higher than hands-off group (70% vs. 58% and 29% vs. 10%, p < 0.001) but sever pain was not different in two groups. CONCLUSIONS: It seems that hands-poised method is associated with less perineal trauma, particularly regarding the lower need for episiotomy and postpartum hemorrhage.

Foroughipour, Azam; Firuzeh, Farah; Ghahiri, Ataolah; Norbakhsh, Vajihe; Heidari, Tayebeh

2011-01-01

407

Activity and Feeding Behavior of the Summer Flounder 'Paralichthys dentatus' Under Controlled Laboratory Conditions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A group of five to six adult summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus (Linnaeus), held under controlled laboratory conditions in a large, experimental, seawater tank, exhibited three general behavior patterns: (1) resting, (2) swimming, and (3) feeding. Whi...

B. L. Olla C. E. Samet A. L. Studholme

1972-01-01

408

Life-History Schedules in Daphnia magna: An Ecological Activity for Multiple Laboratory Sessions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is a manual for instructing a laboratory exercise in population ecology, in which students explore the concepts of population biology, survivorship curves, and life history tables by conducting experiments with Daphnia magna.

Robert E. Sorensen (Purdue University;)

1996-01-01

409

Active learning: A small group histology laboratory exercise in a whole class setting utilizing virtual slides and peer education.  

PubMed

Histology laboratory instruction is moving away from the sole use of the traditional combination of light microscopes and glass slides in favor of virtual microscopy and virtual slides. At the same time, medical curricula are changing so as to reduce scheduled time for basic science instruction as well as focusing on student-centered learning approaches such as small group active learning and peer-instruction. It is important that medical schools resist the temptation to respond to this conjunction of events by turning histology into a self-study activity. This article describes a lymphoid histology laboratory exercise, occurring in a specially equipped Learning Studio housing an entire medical class that utilizes virtual slides in the context of small group active learning and peer instruction. PMID:22730160

Bloodgood, Robert A

2012-01-01

410

Students as Signal Sources in the Biomedical Engineering Laboratory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Laboratory courses are used throughout Biomedical Engineering curriculum to give students hands-on, practical experience in scientific, computing and engineering methods. Interest in student-driven, inquiry-based labs has resulted in the availability of n...

A. J. Macy

2001-01-01

411

Affordable Hands-On DNA Sequencing and Genotyping: An Exercise for Teaching DNA Analysis to Undergraduates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this report, we describe a 5-week laboratory exercise for undergraduate biology and biochemistry students in which students learn to sequence DNA and to genotype their DNA for selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Students use miniaturized DNA sequencing gels that require approximately 8 min to run. The students perform G, A, T, C…

Shah, Kushani; Thomas, Shelby; Stein, Arnold

2013-01-01

412

Characterization of the activity and stability of amylase from saliva and detergent: laboratory practicals for studying the activity and stability of amylase from saliva and various commercial detergents.  

PubMed

This article presents two integrated laboratory exercises intended to show students the role of ?-amylases (AAMYs) in saliva and detergents. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the enzymatic activity of amylase from saliva and different detergents using the Phadebas test (quantitative) and the Lugol test (qualitative) under different conditions (e.g. variations in temperature and alkalinity). This work also proposes the study of enzyme stability in the presence of several surfactants and oxidizing agents using the same technical approach. The proposed laboratory exercises promote the understanding of the physiological function of this enzyme and the biotechnological applications of AAMYs in the detergent industry. The exercises also promote the understanding that the enzymatic stability and performance are dependent on the organism of origin, and if necessary, these properties could be modified by genetic engineering. In addition, this article reinforces the development of laboratory skills, problem-solving capabilities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are proposed primarily as an undergraduate project for advanced students in the biochemical and biotechnological sciences. These laboratory practicals are complementary to the previously published BAMBED article (Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education Vol. 39, No. 4, pp. 280-290, 2011) on detergent proteases. PMID:22807429

Valls, Cristina; Rojas, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

2012-07-01

413

A Hands-on Exercise in Building Darcy Tubes to Improve Student Understanding of Groundwater Flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Teaching undergraduate students about sustainability typically includes discussions of water resources and the flow of groundwater in aquifers. Understanding the flow of groundwater is a fundamental step for students, but one that can easily get mired in equations (e.g., Darcy's Law). In an effort to transform Darcy's Law, which describes flow of fluid through a porous medium, from an abstract concept to a hands-on experiment, I had undergraduate students build working "Darcy tubes" and calculate hydraulic conductivity during a three-hour lab period. At the beginning of the lab period, I presented the students with the materials: three pairs of plastic soda bottles with straight sides, glass tubing, pantyhose (for screens), rubber hosing, sieved sand in three grain sizes (1-2 mm, 0.5-1.0 mm, and 0.25-0.5 mm), and various types of tape and adhesive. After we discussed the basic design of a Darcy tube (inlet and outlet, with two piezometers), the students went to work. Real-time problem-solving was an integral (and exciting) part of the exercise. Within two hours, they had built three Darcy tubes, each filled with a different sand size. The students determined the cross-sectional area of each tube (A) and the distance between the two piezometers (L). We then ran the experiments, using tinted water so that we could more easily tell when the sand in the tubes was saturated. We measured discharge (Q) through the tube and marked the height of the water in each piezometer to calculate difference in hydraulic head (?h). With the data we had collected, the students were able to calculate hydraulic conductivity (K) using a simple form of Darcy's Law: Q = -KA (?h/L). Despite the simplicity of the Darcy tubes, the students' K values were reasonable for the sediment types that we used. Student comments on the Darcy tube exercise were overwhelmingly positive. The Darcy tubes could be used in a subsequent lab period for exploration of more advanced concepts, such as breakthrough of contaminants (add water of a different color and collect outflow samples at timed intervals).; One of the Darcy tubes built by undergraduate students.

Smith, J. A.

2012-12-01

414

The Chemical Engineering behind How Carbonated Beverages Go Flat: A Hands-On Experiment for Freshmen Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A hands-on project was developed to educate new chemical engineering students about the types of problems chemical engineers solve and to improve student enthusiasm for studying chemical engineering. In this project, students studied the phenomenon of carbonated beverages going flat. The project was implemented in 2003 and 2004 at Kansas State…

Hohn, Keith L.

2007-01-01

415

Fifth Graders' Science Inquiry Abilities: A Comparative Study of Students in Hands-On and Textbook Curricula  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A large number of American elementary school students are now studying science using the hands-on inquiry curricula developed in the 1990s: Insights; Full Option Science System (FOSS); and Science and Technology for Children (STC). A goal of these programs, echoed in the "National Science Education Standards," is that children should gain…

Pine, Jerome; Aschbacher, Pamela; Roth, Ellen; Jones, Melanie; McPhee, Cameron; Martin, Catherine; Phelps, Scott; Kyle, Tara; Foley, Brian

2006-01-01

416

Fifth graders' science inquiry abilities: A comparative study of students in hands-on and textbook curricula  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A large number of American elementary school students are now studying science using the hands-on inquiry curricula developed in the 1990s: Insights; Full Option Science System (FOSS); and Science and Technology for Children (STC). A goal of these programs, echoed in the National Science Education Standards, is that children should gain abilities to do scientific inquiry and understanding about scientific inquiry. We have studied the degree to which students can do inquiries by using four hands-on performance assessments, which required one or three class periods. To be fair, the assessments avoided content that is studied in depth in the hands-on programs. For a sample of about 1000 fifth grade students, we compared the performance of students in hands-on curricula with an equal number of students with textbook curricula. The students were from 41 classrooms in nine school districts. The results show little or no curricular effect. There was a strong dependence on students' cognitive ability, as measured with a standard multiple-choice instrument. There was no significant difference between boys and girls. Also, there was no difference on a multiple-choice test, which used items released from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). It is not completely clear whether the lack of difference on the performance assessments was a consequence of the assessments, the curricula, and/or the teaching.

Pine, Jerome; Aschbacher, Pamela; Roth, Ellen; Jones, Melanie; McPhee, Cameron; Martin, Catherine; Phelps, Scott; Kyle, Tara; Foley, Brian

2006-05-01

417

Fifth graders' science inquiry abilities: A comparative study of students in hands-on and textbook curricula  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large number of American elementary school students are now studying science using the hands-on inquiry curricula developed in the 1990s: Insights; Full Option Science System (FOSS); and Science and Technology for Children (STC). A goal of these programs, echoed in the National Science Education Standards, is that children should gain abilities to do scientific inquiry and understanding about scientific

Jerome Pine; Pamela Aschbacher; Ellen Roth; Melanie Jones; Cameron McPhee; Catherine Martin; Scott Phelps; Tara Kyle; Brian Foley

2006-01-01

418

Exploding Balloons, Deformed Balls, Strange Reflections and Breaking Rods: Slow Motion Analysis of Selected Hands-On Experiments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A selection of hands-on experiments from different fields of physics, which happen too fast for the eye or video cameras to properly observe and analyse the phenomena, is presented. They are recorded and analysed using modern high speed cameras. Two types of cameras were used: the first were rather inexpensive consumer products such as Casio…

Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

2011-01-01

419

Maternal Knowledge and Behaviors regarding Discipline: The Effectiveness of a Hands-On Education Program in Positive Guidance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined which method is most effective in supporting parents to use positive guidance techniques, a lecture-based only parent training series or a lecture-based plus hands-on parent training series. Maternal characteristics of depression, stress level, and attitudes towards positive guidance were explored as possible moderators. In…

Saunders, Rachel; McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Jacobvitz, Deborah; Hazen-Swann, Nancy; Burton, Rosalinda

2013-01-01

420

Fifth graders' science inquiry abilities: A comparative study of students in hands-on and textbook curricula  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A large number of American elementary school students are now studying science using the hands-on inquiry curricula developed in the 1990s: Insights; Full Option Science System (FOSS); and Science and Technology for Children (STC). A goal of these programs, echoed in the National Science Education Standards, is that children should gain abilities to do scientific inquiry and understanding about scientific inquiry. We have studied the degree to which students can do inquiries by using four hands-on performance assessments, which required one or three class periods. To be fair, the assessments avoided content that is studied in depth in the hands-on programs. For a sample of about 1000 fifth grade students, we compared the performance of students in hands-on curricula with an equal number of students with textbook curricula. The students were from 41 classrooms in nine school districts. The results show little or no curricular effect. There was a strong dependence on students' cognitive ability, as measured with a standard multiple-choice instrument. There was no significant difference between boys and girls. Also, there was no difference on a multiple-choice test, which used items released from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). It is not completely clear whether the lack of difference on the performance assessments was a consequence of the assessments, the curricula, and/or the teaching.

Pine, Jerome; Aschbacher, Pamela; Roth, Ellen; Jones, Melanie; Mcphee, Cameron; Martin, Catherine

2006-06-08

421

Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology: Real-Time, Hands-On, and Safe Experiments for K-12 Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What students and teachers often ask is, how are nano-sized materials made when they are so small? One answer is through the process of self-assembly in which molecules, polymers, and nanoparticles connect to form larger objects of a defined structure and shape. Two hands-on experiments are presented in which students prepare capsules in real time…

Bagaria, Hitesh G.; Dean, Michelle R.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Wong, Michael S.

2011-01-01

422

Hands-On Science: A Teacher's Guide to Student-Built Experiments and "The Exploratorium Science Snackbook."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet was written to help teachers climb out of their textbooks and join their students in discovering science for themselves. It features articles by elementary, middle, and high school teachers who have adapted hands-on science for their classrooms, and now teach science using interactive materials from "The Exploratorium Science…

Doherty, Paul; Brown, Ruth, Ed.

423

Research and Teaching: Assessment Results Following Inquiry and Traditional Physics Laboratory Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Preservice elementary teachers in a conceptual physics course were given multiple resources to use during several inquiry activities in order to investigate how materials were chosen, used, and valued. These students performed significantly better on assessment items related to the inquiry physics activities than on items related to traditional activities, regardless of the level of success on the inquiry activities.

Bryant, Richard

2006-07-01

424

Imploding Soda Cans: From Demonstration to Guided-Inquiry Laboratory Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A guided-inquiry exercise conducted in both the lecture and laboratory components of a college introductory chemistry course for non-science majors is described. The exercise gave students the opportunity to independently determine the relationship between the temperature of water in an aluminum soda can and the intensity of implosion upon placing…

Eichler, Jack F.

2009-01-01

425

Building and Fire Research Laboratory: Activities, Accomplishments and Recognitions 2000-2001.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of the Building and Fire Research Laboratory is to meet the measurement and standards needs of the building and fire safety communities. To meet the needs of these communities BFRL is focusing on four goals. (1) Advanced Construction Technology: ...

2002-01-01

426

Research activity in the laboratory for inertial confinement fusion in ENEA – Frascati  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on the use of nuclear fusion for energy production is carried out at ENEA mainly in the Frascati Research Center with laboratories dedicated to the study of magnetic confinement (Tokamak FTU) and inertial confinement (ABC). This paper summarizes the on going experimental programs and diagnostic development related to the studies of laser produced plasmas.

De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Consoli, F.; Cristofari, G.; Di Giorgio, G.

2014-04-01

427

Fostering environmental literacy through the use of hands-on science, place-based education, and role-played case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this project was to develop environmental literacy in freshmen taking high school biology, using hands-on science labs, place-based education, and a role-played case study. Students participated in hands-on labs that allowed them to quantitatively describe the effects of pollution and eutrophication. Students also participated in an all-day field trip at Bay City State Park, where they studied ecological concepts in "place". The unit culminated in a role-played case study in which students were assigned roles, researched them, and attempted to solve the problem of the eutrophication of Saginaw Bay in a town hall meeting. To evaluate student learning, students were given a pretest and posttest that covered ecological topics taught during unit activities. The analysis of these assessments using a paired T-test showed that the teaching methods successfully increased student understanding of ecological topics, and an increase in environmental literacy. Additional subjective data, including conversations with students, and analysis of student writing during the unit, support that student environmental literacy increased during the unit. However, it was shown that environmental literacy is not something to be obtained in one unit, or even one year. It is a lifelong process to which a strong science foundation should be provided in science classes, from the primary level to the secondary level and beyond.

Cooper, Benjamin Paul

428

Building Formal and Informal Partnerships Through a Land-Based, Hands-on Research Expedition for Earth and Ocean Science Teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific Ocean drilling has a rich legacy which is largely responsible for our current understating of the complex linkages among the different parts of the Earth System. Relaying these understandings to Earth and ocean educators is a challenge that the Joint Oceanographic Institutes (JOI) Alliances has undertaken through sponsorship of the School of Rock (SOR). Building on the successful ocean-going, hands-on SOR (Leckie et al. 2006), the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) - United States Implementing Organization (USIO) piloted a land-based, hands-on research expedition for Earth and ocean science teachers, the School of Rock Expedition II (SOR II). During this seven-day workshop, 18 educators from across the United States were hosted at the IODP Gulf Coast Repository at Texas A&M University where they were mentored and taught by scientists who are actively engaged in IODP research, shipboard technical staff, SOR I veteran teachers, and science educators. Teachers participated in a series of research experiences similar to those that take place on a scientific drilling research vessel or in a post-cruise research lab. These experiences allowed educators to increase their knowledge of IODP and scientific methods as demonstrated by the entire ocean drilling program (proposals, drilling, lab analysis, data acquisition, and post-cruise research). This case study describes the formal and informal partnerships developed through the SOR II with an emphasis on identifying and nurturing informal partnerships.

Slough, S.; Prouhet, T.; Peart, L.; Leckie, M.; St. John, K.; Karz-Cooper, S.; Klaus, A.; Petronotis, K.; Firth, J.; Guerin, G.; Buckholtz, C.; Crowder, L.; Peng, C.

2007-12-01

429

Identifying types of physical activity with a single accelerometer: evaluating laboratory-trained algorithms in daily life.  

PubMed

Accurate identification of physical activity types has been achieved in laboratory conditions using single-site accelerometers and classification algorithms. This methodology is then applied to free-living subjects to determine activity behavior. This study is aimed at analyzing the reproducibility of the accuracy of laboratory-trained classification algorithms in free-living subjects during daily life. A support vector machine (SVM), a feed-forward neural network (NN), and a decision tree (DT) were trained with data collected by a waist-mounted accelerometer during a laboratory trial. The reproducibility of the classification performance was tested on data collected in daily life using a multiple-site accelerometer augmented with an activity diary for 20 healthy subjects (age: 30 ± 9; BMI: 23.0 ± 2.6 kg/m(2)). Leave-one-subject-out cross validation of the training data showed accuracies of 95.1 ± 4.3%, 91.4 ± 6.7%, and 92.2 ± 6.6% for the SVM, NN, and DT, respectively. All algorithms showed a significantly decreased accuracy in daily life as compared to the reference truth represented by the IDEEA and diary classifications (75.6 ± 10.4%, 74.8 ± 9.7%, and 72.2 ± 10.3%; p < 0.05). In conclusion, cross validation of training data overestimates the accuracy of the classification algorithms in daily life. PMID:21712150

Gyllensten, Illapha Cuba; Bonomi, Alberto G

2011-09-01

430

Forest Watch: A K-12 Outreach Program to Engage Pre-College Students in Authentic, Hands-On Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Forest Watch Program is a K-12 hands-on science outreach program developed at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) in 1991. The program has engaged students and their teachers in assisting researchers at UNH in the assessment of the state-of-health of white pine (Pinus strobus), a known bio-indicator species for exposure to elevated levels of ground-level ozone. Students are introduced to the scientific method while participating in an authentic on-going research program. The program was designed in partnership with participating teachers, and thus the field and classroom activities meet specific New England state science and mathematics curricula standards for K-12 education. Student participation in Forest Watch has resulted in an improved understanding and characterization of inter-annual white pine response to changes in air quality across the region over the past two decades. Forest Watch, students participate in three types of activities: 1. the analysis of remote sensing data (Landsat TM) provided for their local area using MultiSpec freeware. Through image processing, students learn the concepts of spatial and spectral resolution; how to identify landcover features; how plants interact with visible and infrared energy; and how to use this information to determine vegetation types and identify vegetation conditions. 2. students select 5 white pine trees to be permanently tagged near their school within a 30x30 meter (pixel sized sampling plot - the spatial resolution of the TM dataset), followed by collection and analysis of needle samples, and a suite of forest plot biometric measurements such as tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH), and canopy closure and ground cover. 3. the students send a set of their needle samples to UNH for spectral analysis of key reflectance features such as the Red Edge Inflection Point (REIP), the TM 5/4 moisture stress index, and the NIR 3/1. Over 250 schools from all six New England states have participated in the program over the past 19 years. Combining student-derived data plus the reflectance indices and other spectral measures, allows UNH researchers to characterize annual variations in tree state-of-health and relate it to the previous summer’s ozone levels. Results from annual student-provided data between 1991 and 2008 suggest that regional air quality and the state-of-health of white pine have improved since 1991. This improvement in white pine health corresponds with improved regional air quality, in part due to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment.

Gagnon, M. T.; Rock, B. N.

2009-12-01

431

Rapid-Cycling Brassicas (RCB's) in Hands-on Teaching of Plant Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One of the seminal papers written by Dr. Paul H. Williams, introducing Wisconsin Fast Plants. This article explains the taxonomy of Brassicas and how how Williams created the Brassica rapa commonly known as Wisconsin Fast Plants. Published by The Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) in 1982. Williams also discusses how to grow Fast Plants as it was understood at the time (further research and development have influenced growing procedures since this early time, and these are reflected in the current offerings of information on the Fast Plants website).

Williams, Paul H.

432

Evaluation of Natural Compounds for Antimicrobial Activity in the Introductory Microbiology Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an experiment that provides students with an opportunity to investigate folk medicine and herbal cures and their accompanying claims. Involves isolating some active compounds from plant materials and demonstrating their antibacterial activity. (JRH)

Finer, Kim R.

1997-01-01

433

Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-09-01

434

REMOTE HANDLED TRANSURANIC (RH-TRU) SLUDGE CONSOLIDATION ACTIVITIES AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) System collects aqueous radioactive waste solutions in large underground storage tanks from various programmatic sources for on- site neutralization, concentration, and storage. Due to the nature of the concentrated, highly alkaline LLLW, remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) sludge accumulated in the system as precipitants settled out of the LLLW. To support treatment of

B. D. Oakley; K. P. Guay; G. L. Riner; K. M. Billingsley; Bechtel Jacobs

435

Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01

436

The laboratory experience in introductory physics courses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The last two decades or so have witnessed intense efforts to improve the teaching and learning of physics. Scholarly studies have provided the grounding for many projects which reform the structure of introductory courses. A number of these innovations, however, are resource intensive, or depend on the ability to introduce changes in areas which are beyond the control of the faculty (e.g., scheduling), thus inhibiting their implementation. An alternative strategy that overcomes these obstacles is to modify the nature of the laboratory experience (a component that practically nobody disputes is an essential part of the introductory course), to provide hands-on learning opportunities that differ from the traditional ``follow-this-recipe-to-verify-this-law'' approach. I have chosen to implement a variety of activities that support the overall objectives of the course: developing conceptual understanding and transferable skills, and providing practice in the ways scientists actually do science. Given the audience in this two-semester, algebra-based course, mostly biology majors and pre-professionals (health-related careers, such as medicine, physical therapy, and veterinary), these goals were identified as the most important and lasting contribution that a physics course can make to the students intellectual development. I offer here examples of the types of hands on activities that I have implemented, organized for the sake of this presentation in four rather loose categories, depending on which subset of the course objectives the activities mostly address: self-designed lab activities, discussion of demo-type activities, building concepts from simple to complex, and out-of-lab physical phenomena.

di Stefano, Maria C.

1997-03-01

437

What's the Matter with Food?: A Hands-On Action Research Study on the Effect of Using Food Preparation To Teach Students with Autism about the Three States of Matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This investigation studied the effectiveness of using food preparation to teach students with Autism about the three states of matter. A hands-on learning approach was used within the home and careers classroom. One class of five students, three boys and two girls, all diagnosed with Autism, participated in a five day academic unit about the three phases of matter: solid, liquid, and gas. The class received hands-on learning science instruction using food through various differentiated activities. Results indicate that students express focus when using food to learn. In addition, this study acknowledges that hands-on learning in science enhances the learning process of students with Autism. One of the main reasons is that students enjoy learning when this teaching style is used in the classroom, and students that enjoy what they are learning are more likely to be engaged and motivated to learn. After using this approach, all the students in the study increased their scores from the pre-assessments to the post-assessments. Students expressed through actions and words that they enjoyed using hands-on experiences to learn in the classroom. Implications for practice indicate that a variety of manipulatives are needed to teach students with Autism. Future research would help uncover additional information about student motivation and learning in the home and careers classroom.

Diller, Nicole

438

Hands-On Science: Cool Ways to Teach about Warm-Blooded Animals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents three activities for teaching elementary students about the built-in mechanisms that help warm-blooded animals maintain constant internal body temperatures. The activities help students understand why humans sweat, why dogs pant, and why blubber keeps whales warm in frigid water. (SM)

VanCleave, Janice

1998-01-01

439

Teacher Behavior Does Make a Difference in Hands-On Science Classrooms.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes findings of seven studies dealing with how teacher behavior affects student performance in activity-centered science classrooms at the elementary and junior high school levels. Concludes that activity-centered classrooms encourage student creativity in problem solving, student independence, and help low ability students overcome initial…

Shymansky, James A.; Penick, John E.

1981-01-01

440

Hands-On Whole Science. Shining Science: Shed Some Light on the Science of Summer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents summer science activities for elementary students which focus on sunlight and other natural and artificial light sources (e.g., fire, flashlights, and fireflies). Related activities which involve language arts, art, and math are included. A reproducible page teaches children Morse Code using a flashlight. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1992-01-01

441

Using instrumental neutron activation analysis for geochemical analyses of terrestrial impact structures: current analytical procedures at the university of vienna geochemistry activation analysis laboratory.  

PubMed

The Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis Gamma Spectroscopy Laboratory at the Department of Lithospheric Research, University of Vienna, has been upgraded in the year 2006. This paper describes the sample preparation, new instrumentation and data evaluation for hundreds of rock samples of two terrestrial impact structures. The measurement and data evaluation are done by using Genie 2000 and a custom-made batch software for the used analysis sequences. PMID:19481467

Mader, Dieter; Koeberl, Christian

2009-12-01

442

Activity, aggression, and habitat use of ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) and round goby (Apollonia melanostoma) under laboratory conditions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Potential negative ecological interactions between ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus and round goby Apollonia melanostoma (formerly Neogobius melanostomus) might affect the colonization dynamics of these invasive species where they are sympatric in the Great Lakes. In order to determine the potential for ecological interactions between these species, we examined the activity, aggression, and habitat use of round gobies and ruffe in single species and mixed species laboratory experiments. Trials included conditions in which food was concentrated (in light or darkness) or scattered. Results showed that ruffe were more active than gobies, particularly when food was scattered. Activity of both species was significantly lower during darkness. Round gobies were significantly more aggressive than ruffe, and total aggression was lower in mixed species trials. Habitat use by ruffe and round gobies overlapped considerably, but we observed significant differences between species in their use of specific habitats that depended on experimental conditions. Overall, ruffe used open habitats more often than did round gobies, primarily when food was scattered. Round gobies used rocks significantly more frequently than did ruffe, but their use of rock habitat decreased during dark conditions. Ruffe were found more often in plant habitats and less often near the wall of the pool in trials during daylight with concentrated food. Activity and habitat use of ruffe and round goby did not significantly differ between single and mixed species trials. Overall, we found little evidence for negative ecological interactions between ruffe and round goby in these laboratory experiments.

Savino, J. F.; Riley, S. C.; Holuszko, M. J.

2007-01-01

443

Developing the Next Generation of International Safeguards and Nonproliferation Experts: Highlights of Select Activities at the National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

With many safeguards experts in the United States at or near retirement age, and with the growing and evolving mission of international safeguards, attracting and educating a new generation of safeguards experts is an important element of maintaining a credible and capable international safeguards system. The United States National Laboratories, with their rich experience in addressing the technical and policy challenges of international safeguards, are an important resource for attracting, educating, and training future safeguards experts. This presentation highlights some of the safeguards education and professional development activities underway at the National Laboratories. These include university outreach, summer courses, internships, mid-career transition, knowledge retention, and other projects. The presentation concludes with thoughts on the challenge of interdisciplinary education and the recruitment of individuals with the right balance of skills and backgrounds are recruited to meet tomorrow's needs.

Reed, J; Mathews, C; Kirk, B; Lynch, P; Doyle, J; Meek, E; Pepper, S; Metcalf, R

2010-03-31

444

Combining Open-Source with Research to Re-engineer a Hands-on Introductory NLP Course  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe our first attempts to re-engineer the curriculum of our introductory NLP course by using two important building blocks: (1) Access to an easy-to-learn programming lan- guage and framework to build hands-on pro- gramming assignments with real-world data and corpora and, (2) Incorporation of interest- ing ideas from recent NLP research publica- tions into assignment and examination prob- lems.

Nitin Madnani; Bonnie J. Dorr

2008-01-01

445

Laboratory Animal Management Assistant (LAMA): a LIMS for active research colonies.  

PubMed

Laboratory Animal Management Assistant (LAMA) is an internet-based system for tracking large laboratory mouse colonies. It has a user-friendly interface with powerful search capabilities that ease day-to-day tasks such as tracking breeding cages and weaning litters. LAMA was originally developed to manage hundreds of new mouse strains generated by a large functional genomics program, the Pleiades Promoter Project ( http://www.pleiades.org ). The software system has proven to be highly flexible, suitable for diverse management approaches to mouse colonies. It allows custom tagging and grouping of animals, simplifying project-specific handling and access to data. Finally, LAMA was developed in close collaboration with mouse technicians to ease the transition from paper- or Excel-based management systems to computerized tracking, allowing data export in a popular spreadsheet format and automatic printing of cage cards. LAMA is an open-access software tool, freely available to the research community at http://launchpad.net/mousedb . PMID:20411264

Milisavljevic, Marko; Hearty, Taryn; Wong, Tony Y T; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Wasserman, Wyeth W

2010-06-01

446

Ground Truth Studies - A hands-on environmental science program for students, grades K-12  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper discusses the background and the objectives of the Ground Truth Studies (GTSs), an activity-based teaching program which integrates local environmental studies with global change topics, utilizing remotely sensed earth imagery. Special attention is given to the five key concepts around which the GTS programs are organized, the pilot program, the initial pilot study evaluation, and the GTS Handbook. The GTS Handbook contains a primer on global change and remote sensing, aerial and satellite images, student activities, glossary, and an appendix of reference material. Also described is a K-12 teacher training model. International participation in the program is to be initiated during the 1992-1993 school year.

Katzenberger, John; Chappell, Charles R.

1992-01-01

447

Kick Stick Hands-on Challenge: Discover Circuits with PBS's "Design Squad Nation"[TM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the "Kick Stick" activity from Design Squad Nation, in which kids turn a wooden paint stirrer and circuit into a motorized, spinning arm--then use it to kick a Ping-Pong[R] ball across the floor. Teachers can enrich their students' exploration of circuits and emphasize the engineering design process with "Design Squad…

Feinberg, Lauren

2011-01-01

448

Ocean Acidification: Hands-On Experiments to Explore the Causes and Consequences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ocean acidification is one of the most serious environmental issues facing the planet (e.g., Doney 2006; Guinotte and Fabry 2009). It is caused by excess carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. Human activities such as burning fossil fuels put CO2 and oth

Bruno, Barbara C.; Achilles, Kate; Tice, Kimberly A.; Puniwai, Noelani

2011-02-01

449

Monitoring Animal Activity Rhythms in the Laboratory: Four Easily Assembled Devices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of actographs for studying animal activity is discussed. Described are running recorders for rodents, perching and feeding recorders for birds, and tilting box recorders for studying the movement of reptiles, amphibians, and arthropods. (CW)

Merritt, Sheridan V.

1989-01-01

450

Electrical Processes for the Treatment of Medium-Active Liquid Wastes: A Laboratory-Scale Evaluation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A wide range of electrochemical separation processes have been evaluated through the literature and experimental studies for potential application to the treatment of medium-active liquid wastes. Of the 10 processes considered, electro-osmosis and electro...

A. D. Turner W. R. Bowen N. J. Bridger K. T. Harrison

1984-01-01

451

Pacific Northwest Laboratory Monthly Activities Report March 1966 On AEC Division of Reactor Development and Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report has the following sections: Summary of Activities; Civilian Power Reactors; Applied and Reactor Physics; Reactor Fuels and Materials; Engineering Development; Plutonium Recycle Program; Advanced Systems; and Nuclear Safety.

S. L. Fawcett

1966-01-01

452

Pacific Northwest Laboratory Monthly Activities Report APRIL 1966 on AEC Division of Reactor Development and Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report has the following sections: Summary of Activities; Civilian Power Reactors; Applied and Reactor Physics; Reactor Fuels and Materials; Engineering Development; Plutonium Recycle Program; Advanced Systems; and Nuclear Safety.

S. L. Fawcett

1966-01-01

453

Building the Body: Active Learning Laboratories that Emphasize Practical Aspects of Anatomy and Integration with Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the development of active learning techniques to review anatomy material in the context of radiology. Explanations of how the curriculum was designed to integrate knowledge and reemphasize concepts in different contexts is explained.

Kitt Shaffer (Boston University Radiology)

2010-04-23

454

Laboratory Evaporation of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this strea...

C. A. Nash C. L. Crawford D. J. Adamson D. J. McCabe W. R. Wilmarth

2014-01-01

455

Activation of the Z-petawatt laser at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To enhance radiographic capabilities on its Z-Accelerator, Sandia National Laboratories is incorporating a petawatt laser system into the existing Z-Backlighter laser facility. A chirped-pulse laser has been constructed to seed the large Beamlet type Nd:Phosphate glass slab amplifiers. This seed laser consists of an optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) system joined to a Nd:Phosphate glass rod amplifier in order to achieve multi-Joule operation. After injection into the main slab amplifiers up to 500 J of chirped pulse energy is achieved. Two compressor options are available for this output: a lower energy compressor for 100TW (50 J/500 fs) operation and a higher energy compressor for 1PW (500 J/500 fs) operation. While the higher energy compressor is under construction, the 100 TW system is now operational and can achieve focal intensities up to 1019 W/cm2.

Schwarz, J.; Rambo, P.; Geissel, M.; Edens, A.; Smith, I.; Brambrink, E.; Kimmel, M.; Atherton, B.

2008-05-01

456

Development of a laboratory model of activated charcoal-nitrogen adsorption cryocooler  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of a laboratory model of a charcoal-nitrogen adsorption cryocooler is described. The results on characterization of various components of this cooler and performance of the ensemble are presented. Four compressor cells are operated 90° out of phase to generate 0.0364 g/s (1.75 slpm) of nitrogen at a pressure of 5.2 MPa. The cycle time per compressor was 8 min, equally apportioned between heating and cooling. The high pressure gas is pre-cooled to 193 K and expanded through a J-T/heat exchanger assembly. A cold tip temperature of 124 K is obtained at a parasitic heat load of 0.36 W.

Prakash, M. Jose; Prasad, Madhu; Rastogi, S. C.; Akkimaradi, B. S.; Gupta, P. P.; Narayanamurthy, H.; Srinivasan, K.

2000-01-01

457

Near-field performance assessment for a low-activity waste glass disposal system: laboratory testing to modeling results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reactive chemical transport simulations of glass corrosion and radionuclide release from a low-activity waste (LAW) disposal system were conducted out to times in excess of 20 000 yr with the subsurface transport over reactive multiphases (STORM) code. Time and spatial dependence of glass corrosion rate, secondary phase formation, pH, and radionuclide concentration were evaluated. The results show low release rates overall for the LAW glasses such that performance objectives for the site will be met by a factor of 20 or more. Parameterization of the computer model was accomplished by combining direct laboratory measurements, literature data (principally thermodynamic data), and parameter estimation methods.

McGrail, B. P.; Bacon, D. H.; Icenhower, J. P.; Mann, F. M.; Puigh, R. J.; Schaef, H. T.; Mattigod, S. V.

2001-09-01

458

The serum complement system: a simplified laboratory exercise to measure the activity of an important component of the immune system  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The immune system is a vital physiological component that affords animals protection from disease and is composed of innate and adaptive mechanisms that rely on cellular and dissolved components. The serum complement system is a series of dissolved proteins that protect against a variety of pathogens. The activity of complement in serum can be determined by its ability to lyse red blood cells in vitro. Here, we describe a modification of a standard complement hemolysis assay that makes an interesting and informative laboratory exercise suitable for a variety of courses including physiology.

Kimberley A Radziwon (Stonehill College Biology); Gregory D Maniero (Stonehill College Biology)

2008-12-01

459

Molluscicidal activities of six species of Bignoniaceae from north-eastern Brazil, as measured against Biomphalaria glabrata under laboratory conditions.  

PubMed

The molluscicidal profile and brine-shrimp bio-activity of the ethanolic extracts of plants from the Bignoniaceae family were determined. The six extracts investigated were of the stems of Melloa quadrivalvis and Tabebuia aurea, and whole plants of Adenocalymma comosum, Arrabidaea parviflora, Cuspidaria argentea and Clytostoma binatum. When tested in the laboratory, with Biomphalaria glabrata as the test snail, all six extracts gave median lethal concentrations (9-54 microg/ml) that fell well below the upper threshold, of 100 mug/ml, set for a potential molluscicide by the World Health Organization. PMID:17524251

Silva, T M S; Da Silva, T G; Martins, R M; Maia, G L A; Cabral, A G S; Camara, C A; Agra, M F; Barbosa-Filho, J M

2007-06-01

460

Molluscan cellulolytic activity responses to zinc exposure in laboratory and field stream comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in cellulolytic activity of Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) and snails (Mudalia dilatata) were monitored throughout 30-d exposures to constant additions (0.0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.50, and 1.0 mg l?1) of zinc (Zn). All exposures of 0.05 mg Zn 1?1 or greater significantly reduced enzyme activity (exo- and endocellulase) in both molluscs as early as 10 d following exposures\\u000a in outdoor

J. L. Grudzien; S. E. Belanger; D. S. Cherry; J. Cairns

1994-01-01

461

Secondary science teachers' use of laboratory activities: Linking epistemological beliefs, goals, and practices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this study was to explore how science teachers' epistemological beliefs and teaching goals are related to their use of lab activities. Research questions include (a) What are the teachers' epistemological beliefs pertaining to lab activities? (b) Why do the science teachers use lab activities? (c) How are the teachers' epistemological beliefs and instructional goals related to teaching actions? Two major aspects of epistemologies guided this study: ontological aspect (certainty/diversity of truth) and relational aspect (relationship between the knower and the known). The ontological aspect addresses whether one views knowledge as one certain truth or as tentative multiple truths. The relational aspect addresses whether one views him/herself as a rece