Sample records for hands-on laboratory activities

  1. Jefferson Lab Hands-on Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility - Office of Science Education

    These are some of the hands-on activities used in Jefferson Lab's BEAMS program. In BEAMS, classes of 6th, 7th and 8th grade students are exposed to the Lab's scientific environment. For five consecutive days during school hours, classes of 6th grade students and their teachers participate in these science and math activities conducted with Jefferson Lab staff.

  2. Hands-on Activities for Teaching Biology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ingrid Waldron

    These hands-on, minds-on activities engage students in experiments or simulation activities and incorporate multiple questions designed to foster student understanding of important concepts in the life sciences. Topics covered include biological molecules, diffusion, metabolism, cell division, genetics, molecular biology, evolution, diversity, human physiology and design and interpretation of experiments. These activities were designed for teaching high school or middle school students, but many of these activities can also be used in non-major introductory college biology classes. To accommodate limited budgets, most of these activities can be carried out with minimum equipment and expense for supplies. Additional minds-on activities for teaching biology, including discussion activities, are available at http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/bioactivities. Most of the activities are described in student handouts and teacher notes; the student handouts are available as Word files for teachers to customize for their students.

  3. Hands-On Activities and Their Influence on Students' Interest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstermann, Nina; Grube, Dietmar; Bogeholz, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of hands-on activities on students' interest. We researched whether students with experience in specific hands-on activities show higher interest in these activities than students without experience. Furthermore, the relationship between the quality of the hands-on experience and interest in the respective…

  4. Hands-on Activities and Their Influence on Students' Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstermann, Nina; Grube, Dietmar; Bögeholz, Susanne

    2010-11-01

    This study investigates the influence of hands-on activities on students’ interest. We researched whether students with experience in specific hands-on activities show higher interest in these activities than students without experience. Furthermore, the relationship between the quality of the hands-on experience and interest in the respective activity was examined. In total, 28 typical hands-on activities of biology education were considered. The activities were divided into the categories experimentation, dissection, work with microscopes, and classification. A total of 141 students from the 11th grade completed questionnaires on interest in the hands-on activities, their experience with each activity, and the quality of the respective experience. Students’ interest in experimenting, working with microscopes, dissecting and classifying tends to benefit from performing hands-on activities. However, findings indicated that the performance of various hands-on activities can influence students’ interest differently. For seven hands-on activities, we identified a positive effect of hands-on experience on interest, while in one case, practical work appeared to have influenced students’ interest negatively. However, for most hands-on activities, no effect of experience on interest was found. The quality of hands-on experiences showed positive correlations with interest in the respective hands-on activities. Therefore, this paper argues in favour of designing biology lessons that allow for experiences with hands-on activities that also interest students. Our findings underline the necessity of investigating the effects of various hands-on activities in a differentiated manner.

  5. Knowledge Retention for Computer Simulations: A study comparing virtual and hands-on laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croom, John R., III

    The use of virtual laboratories has the potential to change physics education. These low-cost, interactive computer activities interest students, allow for easy setup, and give educators a way to teach laboratory based online classes. This study investigated whether virtual laboratories could replace traditional hands-on laboratories and whether students could retain the same long-term knowledge in virtual laboratories as compared to hands-on laboratories. This study is a quantitative quasi-experiment that used a multiple posttest design to determine if students using virtual laboratories would retain the same knowledge as students who performed hands-on laboratories after 9 weeks. The study was composed of 336 students from 14 school districts. Students had their performances on the laboratories and their retention of the laboratories compared to a series of factors that might have affected their retention using a pretest and two posttests, which were compared using a t test. The results showed no significant difference in short-term learning between the hands-on laboratory groups and virtual laboratory groups. There was, however, a significant difference (p = .005) between the groups in long-term retention; students in the hands-on laboratory groups retained more information than those in the virtual laboratory groups. These results suggest that long-term learning is enhanced when a laboratory contains a hands-on component. Finally, the results showed that both groups of students felt their particular laboratory style was superior to the alternative method. The findings of this study can be used to improve the integration of virtual laboratories into science curriculum.

  6. Hands-on astronomy activities for the elementary school

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, T.E.; Horne, J.C. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We held a series of astronomy workshops for local school teachers using astronomy activities from a course we give for Elementary Education majors. The school teachers provide us with feedback about successes and failures. Then we try the revised activities in the classroom. Via this in-service and pre-service feedback, the astronomy laboratory activities in the course have been completely revised over the last three years. The activities we use are almost entirely hands-on. The activities include use of log book (or journal) for describing outside-of-class observations of sunsets, phases of the moon, portable sundial, and the somewhat unique method we use to teach the constellations. In addition, all laboratory activity records are kept in the log book. Laboratory activities cover the use of fists to measure degrees, constellations, phases of the moon, relative distances and size of planets, Invent an Alien, lenses, images and telescopes, and the making of a comet. In our poster, based roughly on the theme of the seasons, we will describe a portable, multi-user sundial, length of the day display using newspaper data, two temperature/season activities, and a model demonstration of why the sundial shadows behave as they do.

  7. Thinking with Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conover, Patricia Ross

    2009-01-01

    The goal for library media specialists and teachers is to lead students to use technology to communicate, in a powerful and meaningful way, and to creatively display what they have learned. With these ideas in mind, this article details several projects using Microsoft PowerPoint XP. The activities, with simplified instructions, can be adapted to…

  8. Fun with Hands-on Science Activities for Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana M.

    This document contains hands-on activities in science that make use of balloons and are fun and stimulating as well as challenging. By actively participating in these activities, students can develop science process and critical thinking skills as well as technical and measuring skills. Topics include Air as Matter, Pressure, Chemical Change,…

  9. Hands-On Environmental Education Activities for K-6 Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Donald G.; Eshbaugh, Stephen H.

    This environmental education workbook is aimed at helping kindergarten through 6th-grade teachers and contains hands-on activities directly targeted toward a particular age group, with equal distribution to each grade. Subject area descriptions and several multicultural activities are also included. Each activity lists the title, subject taught,…

  10. Hands-On Science Activities for Your Classroom

    E-print Network

    Hands-On Science Activities for Your Classroom from the WSU Fairmount Center for Science for a few days to kits that comprise a whole unit and can be kept in the classroom for up to eight weeks. Each kit contains enough materials for an entire classroom to participate. There is no charge to use

  11. Hands-on Training through the University of Florida Living Extension IPM Field Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    Hands-on Training through the University of Florida Living Extension IPM Field Laboratory C. Saft was developed into a "Living Extension IPM Field Laboratory" to provide a hands-on, whole farm approach to teaching Integrated Pest Management (IPM). A 25 member, multi-disciplinary team of UF faculty

  12. Curriculum Materials: Hands-On Activities from The Water Sourcebook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These curriculum materials are from The Water Sourcebook series, a popular set of hands-on water environment activities. The activities, arranged by grade level, range from construction of a big book about water in the life of a fish for younger students to the exploration of the physics of artesian flow for older learners. Topics include the water cycle, conservation, consumption, contamination, treatment, landfills, rivers, flow dynamics, and detecting radon. Correlations to other subject areas are indicated. Several of the activities are available in Spanish. There are also links to information and a poster about careers in the water environment field.

  13. Casting Castings: A Classroom Hands-on Activity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Johnson, Craig

    This learning activity will provide a useful technique for students to learn casting concepts. The class will be allowed a hands-on experience with casting. Students will make their own fishing sinkers. The lesson plan document includes step by step instructions for the lesson along with photographs.This activity would be appropriate for high school and college level students. The lesson should take about one hour of class time. This document will serve as a framework for instructors and may be downloaded in PDF format.

  14. Technology and Engineering Education Students' Perceptions of Hands-On and Hands-Off Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sianez, David M.; Fugere, Madeleine A.; Lennon, Carter A.

    2010-01-01

    Technology and engineering education students responded to a survey regarding hands-on and hands-off activities. First, the students listed hands-on and hands-off activities and what characterized the two types of activities. Activities such as building or assembling something as well as working manually with tools were viewed as hands-on. Passive…

  15. A Hands-on Laboratory based Approach to Undergraduate Robotics Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kuldeep S. Rawat; Gholam H. Massiha

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the teaching experience gathered along four years, including the choices of robotics platform, simulator, typical experiments and projects we have conducted for students. We also discuss our efforts and plans to develop a hands-on laboratory course for the education in Robotics and Automation. The course is designed to the multidisciplinary and can be offered for engineering and

  16. Investigating Plants: Hands-On, Low-Cost Laboratory Exercises in Plant Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Thomas R.; Johnson, Marty

    This manual describes 14 hands-on exercises for middle school introductory biology courses that are designed to allow all students to be involved in self-discoveries about life and plant life in particular. The exercises were developed to supplement normal classroom activities by allowing students to initiate ongoing projects to investigate the…

  17. Study of hands-on activities in mathematics and science methods courses via interactive instructional television

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kay Esther Axtell Dean

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if student teachers who received training in mathematics and science methods courses via interactive instructional television received instruction on hands-on activities. Furthermore, the study focused on whether the student teachers used the hands-on activities in the classrooms in which they performed their student teaching. This assessment was done by comparing syllabi for

  18. Examining the Multi-Sensory Characteristics of Hands-On Science Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemm, E. Barbara; Plourde, Lee A.

    Research in science education demonstrates the importance and effectiveness of the hands-on approach in student learning. Activity- oriented instruction offers multi-modal opportunities for learning science. However, there is very little research on the sensory nature of hands-on science learning. How do science educators describe lab activities

  19. Science Action Labs Part 3: Puzzlers. An Innovative Collection of Hands-On Science Activities and Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevick, Ed

    This book contains hands-on science laboratory activities for grades 4 through 9 that use discrepant events to challenge students. All of the "puzzlers" are based upon science principles and include directions for building gadgets that explain the "puzzlers." Topics covered include: volume conservation, magnetic phenomena, optical illusions,…

  20. Hands-On Experience with a Turbojet Engine in the Thermal Science Laboratory Course

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Saad, Messiha

    Thermal Science laboratory is the third course in the sequence of four mechanical engineering laboratories offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering at North Carolina A&T State University. The course is one credit hour, meeting once a week for two hours. The course includes selected experiments on heat transfer and thermodynamics. In an effort to give students a combination of theoretical background and hands-on experience, a new experiment on gas turbine engine was introduced. This paper describes the experiences the students gained in this experiment. During this laboratory the students actually learned how to operate a turbojet engine, collected and analyzed the output data including thrust and efficiency, and related the experimental result to the theory learned in the thermodynamics course. This experiment complemented the thermal science laboratory course and fully integrated some aspects of thermodynamics and enhanced the students learning process.

  1. Hands-On Environmental Science Activities. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutscher, Eugene

    The ability of students to go beyond facts and to think critically, while at the same time enjoying and valuing the learning process, is fundamental to science and environmentalism. This book provides enrichment activities for the science curriculum that provide concrete connections with important world events. Each activity is self-contained and…

  2. Study of hands-on activities in mathematics and science methods courses via interactive instructional television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axtell Dean, Kay Esther

    The purpose of the study was to determine if student teachers who received training in mathematics and science methods courses via interactive instructional television received instruction on hands-on activities. Furthermore, the study focused on whether the student teachers used the hands-on activities in the classrooms in which they performed their student teaching. This assessment was done by comparing syllabi for the mathematics and science methods courses; viewing videos from the interactive instructional television mathematics and science methods courses; observation of the student teachers in the classroom; interviews with the faculty teaching the methods courses, student teachers, cooperating teachers, and university supervisors; and surveying the student teachers, coordinating teachers, and university supervisors with a questionnaire. The study shows that if the methods course instructor models hands-on activities by including them in the interactive instructional televisions broadcast, then student teachers are more likely to use hands-on activities in the classroom.

  3. Hands-on experience with active appearance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thodberg, Hans H.

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the performance of active appearance models (AAMs) in reconstruction and interpretation of bones in hand radiographs. AAM is a generative approach that unifies image segmentation and image understanding. Initial locations for the AAM search are generated by an exhaustive filtering method. A series of AAMs for smaller groups of bones are used. It is found that AAM successful reconstructs 99% of metacarpals, proximal and medial phalanges and the distal 3 cm of radius and ulna. The rms accuracy is better than 240 microns (point-to-curve). The generative property is used (1) to define a measure of fit that allows the models to self-evaluate and chose between the multiple found solutions, (2) to overcome obstacles in the image in the form of rings by predicting the missing part, and (3) to detect anomalies, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis. The shape scores are used as biometrics to check the identity of patients in a longitudinal study. The conclusion is that AAM provides a highly efficient and unified framework for various tasks in diagnosis and assessment of bone related disorders.

  4. Pi in the Sky: Hands-on Mathematical Activities for Teaching Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pethoud, Robert

    This book of activities was designed to provide students with the opportunity to create mental models of concepts in astronomy while using simple, homemade tools. In addition, these sequential, hands-on activities are to help students see how scientific knowledge is obtained. The introduction describes the rationale for the book and describes the…

  5. The Art and Science Connection. Hands-On Activities for Primary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolley, Kimberley

    Most people think that the artist and the scientist live in two totally different worlds. However, art and science are only two different ways of understanding and knowing the world. To help primary students make a connection between art and science, a collection of hands-on activities have been developed. By engaging in these activities that…

  6. The Art and Science Connection: Hands-on Activities for Intermediate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolley, Kimberley

    Most people think that the artist and the scientist live in two totally different worlds. However, art and science are only two different ways of understanding and knowing the world. To help intermediate students make a connection between art and science, a collection of hands-on activities have been developed. By engaging in these activities that…

  7. Do Hands-On Activities Increase Student Understanding?: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaff, Thomas J.; Weinberg, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the design, implementation, and assessment of four hands-on activities in an introductory college statistics course. In the activities, students investigated the ideas of the central limit theorem, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Five assessments were administered to the students, one at the beginning and end…

  8. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) ecological and physical science study center: A hands-on science program for K-12 students

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In our tenth year of educational service and outreach, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Ecological and Physical Science Study Center (EPSSC) provides hands-on, inquiry-based science activities for area students and teachers. Established in 1984, the EPSSC now hosts over 20,000 student visits. Designed to foster a positive attitude towards science, each unit includes activities which reinforce the science concept being explored. Outdoor science units provide field experience at the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park and outreach programs are offered on-site in area schools. Other programs are offered as extensions of the EPSSC core programs, including on-site student science camps, all-girl programs, outreach science camps, student competitions, teacher in-service presentations and teacher workshops.

  9. Quantum mechanics for everyone: Hands-on activities integrated with technology

    E-print Network

    Zollman, Dean

    Quantum mechanics for everyone: Hands-on activities integrated with technology Dean A. Zollman,a) N 2001; accepted 15 November 2001 Quantum mechanics is frequently taught toward the end of the first year of physics if it is taught at all. Many physics instructors believe that quantum mechanics is a very abstract

  10. Of Heart & Kidneys: Hands-On Activities for Demonstrating Organ Function & Repair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in teaching organ development and disease is deconstructing a complex choreography of molecular and cellular changes over time into a linear stepwise process for students. As an entry toward learning developmental concepts, I propose two inexpensive hands-on activities to help facilitate learning of (1) how to identify defects in…

  11. At-risk children's use of reflection and revision in hands-on experimental activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosino, Anthony J., Jr.

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of incorporating opportunities for reflection and revision in hands-on science instruction which emphasized experimentation using model rockets. The participants were low achieving sixth grade summer school students (n = 23) designated as at-risk for school failure by their district. The group was asked a series of interview questions based on work by Schauble et al. (1995) relating to experimentation. The interviews took place over three distinct time points corresponding to a "hands-on only" condition, a "hands-on with reflection and revision" condition and a "hands-on with repeated reflection and revision" condition. A Friedman's Two-Way Analysis of Variance by Ranks indicate students score low at first with traditional hands-on instruction but improve significantly with opportunities to reflect and revise their experiments. In addition, a sociocultural analysis was conducted during the summer school session to assess the model rocket activity as an apprenticeship, as guided participation and as participatory appropriation using a framework established by Rogoff (1994). Finally, a survey (the Classroom Environment Survey) was administered to the students measuring five constructs consistent with a constructivist classroom: participation, autonomy, relevance, commitment to learning and disruptions to learning. Analysis indicate students in the summer school model rocket intervention experienced a greater sense of constructivist principles during the activity than a similar comparison group utilizing reform minded instruction but not including opportunities for reflection and revision cycles. This research provides important evidence that, like scientists, students in school can learn effectively from extended practice in a varied context. Importantly, the data indicate that hands-on instruction is best utilized when opportunities for reflection and revision are made explicit. Implications are discussed related to designing instruction, the incorporation of computer supported scaffolding and implications for future research.

  12. Providing Equity for Freshman Women Entering Engineering Via Role Model Lecture-Discussions, Hands-On Laboratory and Career Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBold, William K.; And Others

    A model program for freshman women in engineering has been developed at Purdue University. The program focuses on an experimental course that provides beginning engineering women and men with hands-on laboratory experiences, discussions of contemporary societal problems including environment, energy and productivity by various role model…

  13. Lab Safety and Bioterrorism Readiness Curricula Using Active Learning and Hands-on Strategies as Continuing Education for Medical Technologists

    PubMed Central

    Fiester, Steven; Redfearn, James; Helfinstine, Shannon; Meilander, Tracey; Woolverton, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Frequent reports of laboratory- (and hospital-) acquired infection suggest a deficiency in safety training or lack of compliance. To assess the need for continuing education (CE) addressing this problem, an original education needs assessment survey was designed and administered to medical technologists (med-techs) in Northeast Ohio. Survey results were used to design a learner-centered training curriculum (for example, Lab Safety and Bioterrorism Readiness trainings) that engaged med-techs in active learning, integrative peer-to-peer teaching, and hands-on exercises in order to improve microbiology safety knowledge and associated laboratory techniques. The Lab Safety training was delivered six times and the Bioterrorism Readiness training was delivered five times. Pre/posttesting revealed significant gains in knowledge and techniques specific to laboratory safety, security, risk assessment, and bioterrorism readiness amongst the majority of med-techs completing the CE trainings. The majority of participants felt that the hands-on exercises met their needs and that their personal laboratory practices would change as a result of the training course, as measured by attitudinal surveys. We conclude that active learning techniques and peer education significantly enhance microbiology learning amongst participating med-techs. PMID:23914281

  14. Georgia tech information security center hands-on network security laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randal T. Abler; Didier Contis; Julian B. Grizzard; Henry L. Owen

    2006-01-01

    An undergraduate internetwork, security-teaching laboratory, which includes both defensive and offensive security laboratory experimentation, is described. This laboratory is oriented toward an introductory internetworking security class and is intended to complement more theoretical network security classes while sparking student interest. The laboratory is unique in that it uses an isolated laboratory network that provides a simple model of the Internet,

  15. Effectiveness of Hands-on and Minds-on Activities on Students' Achievement and Attitudes towards Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ates, Ozlem; Eryilmaz, Ali

    2011-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the effectiveness of hands-on and minds-on activities on ninth grade students' achievement in and attitudes towards simple electric circuits. The study was conducted with 130 students, 70 of which were assigned as experimental group and instructed by hands-on/minds-on activities, while the 60 were assigned as…

  16. Partnership with informal education learning centers to develop hands-on activities for research outreach efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courville, Z.; Haynes, R.; DeFrancis, G.; Koh, S.; Ringelberg, D.

    2012-12-01

    Outreach informed by scientific research plays an important role in fostering interest in science by making science and scientists accessible, fun, and interesting. Developing an interest in science in young, elementary-aged students through outreach is a rewarding endeavor for researchers, in that audiences are usually receptive, requirements for broader impacts are met, and bonds are formed between researchers and members of their local and surrounding communities. Promoting such interest among young students is imperative not only for an individual researcher's own self interest, but also for the strength of American science and innovation moving forward, and is the responsibility of the current generation of scientists. Developing genuine and successful inquiry-based, hands-on activities for elementary-aged students is outside the expertise of many researchers. Partnering with an informal education learning center (i.e. science museum or after-school program) provides researchers with the expertise they might be lacking in such endeavors. Here, we present a series of polar-, engineering- and microbiology-themed hands-on activities that have been developed by researchers at a government lab in partnership with a local science museum. Through a series of workshops, the science education staff at the museum provided researchers with background and instruction on inquiry and hands-on activities, and then collaborated with the researchers to develop activities which were later demonstrated at the museum to museum-goers. Education staff provided feedback about the presentation of the activities for further refinement. The program provided an opportunity for researchers to develop fun, on-target and age-appropriate science activities for elementary-aged students, an audience for outreach, and enabled general public audiences the chance to interact with researchers and scientists in an informal setting.

  17. Alignment of Hands-on STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-06-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in activities such as an after-school robotics program. Both groups are compared and contrasted with a third group of high school students admitted at the eleventh grade to an academy of mathematics and science. All students were assessed using the same science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) dispositions instrument. Findings indicate that the after-school group whose participants self-selected STEM engagement activities, and the self-selected academy of mathematics and science group, each had highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to those of STEM professionals, while a subset of the middle school whole-classroom energy monitoring group that reported high interest in STEM as a career, also possessed highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to the STEM Professionals group. The authors conclude that several different kinds of hands-on STEM engagement activities are likely to foster or maintain positive STEM dispositions at the middle school and high school levels, and that these highly positive levels of dispositions can be viewed as a target toward which projects seeking to interest mainstream secondary students in STEM majors in college and STEM careers, can hope to aspire. Gender findings regarding STEM dispositions are also reported for these groups.

  18. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  19. Development of Pupils' Transfer Skills by Means of Hands On Activities with Artisan Materials in Natural Sciences Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciascai, Liliana; Chicinas, Luminita

    2008-01-01

    Hands on activities with artisan materials used in order to realize different practical devices helpful in learning process are one of the most frequently used activity in science classes. Usually, the main strength of these activities are: a deeper learning, an increased motivation of pupils for actively learning and development of practical…

  20. Science Hands-on Teaching-Learning Activities of Elementary School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harty, Harold; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examines the influence of the use of hands-on materials in elementary school science instruction from a survey of 301 school principals. The rationale for the survey, questions used, and responses are provided. Lists 12 references. (YP)

  1. Rain Forest: The Latest Information and Hands-on Activities To Explore Animals, Plants, and Geography. Grades 2-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Robin

    This book contains information and activities to help make the study of rainforests an exciting exploration for teachers and students. Students explore the animals, plants, and geography of the rainforest by completing hands-on activities from various disciplines. This book contains five units: (1) "Living Layers"; (2) "Animals, Animals, Animals";…

  2. The Healthy Heart Race: A Short-Duration, Hands-on Activity in Cardiovascular Physiology for Museums and Science Festivals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressley, Thomas A.; Limson, Melvin; Byse, Miranda; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2011-01-01

    The "Healthy Heart Race" activity provides a hands-on demonstration of cardiovascular function suitable for lay audiences. It was field tested during the United States of America Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in October 2010. The basic equipment for the activity consisted of lengths of plastic tubing, a hand pump,…

  3. Student Responses to a Hands-On Kinesthetic Lecture Activity for Learning about the Oxygen Carrying Capacity of Blood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breckler, Jennifer; Yu, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a new hands-on, or "kinesthetic," activity for use in a physiology lecture hall to help students comprehend an important concept in cardiopulmonary physiology known as oxygen carrying capacity. One impetus for designing this activity was to address the needs of students who have a preference for kinesthetic learning and to…

  4. Computer Assisted Fluid Power Instruction: A Comparison of Hands-On and Computer-Simulated Laboratory Experiences for Post-Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Scott B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of utilizing a combination of lecture and computer resources to train personnel to assume roles as hydraulic system technicians and specialists in the fluid power industry. This study compared computer simulated laboratory instruction to traditional hands-on laboratory instruction,…

  5. An Educational Device for a Hands-on Activity to Visualize the Effect of Atherosclerosis on Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Almeida, J. P. P. G. L.; de Lima, J. L. M. P.

    2013-01-01

    An educational device was created to develop a hands-on activity to illustrate how atherosclerosis can dramatically reduce blood flow in human vessels. The device was conceived, designed, and built at the University of Coimbra, in response to a request from the Exploratorio Infante D. Henrique Science Centre Museum, where it is presently…

  6. Quantum Mechanics for Everyone: Hands-On Activities Integrated with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zollman, Dean A.; Rebello, N. Sanjay; Hogg, Kirsten

    2002-01-01

    Explains a hands-on approach to teaching quantum mechanics that challenges the belief shared by many physics instructors that quantum mechanics is a very abstract subject that cannot be understood until students have learned much of the classical physics. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

  7. A Strategy for Incorporating Hands-On GC-MS into the General Chemistry Lecture and Laboratory Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Perry C.; Pamplin, Kim L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes strategies to introduce students in a first year chemistry course to the gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC-MS) and provides students with hands-on experiences in its use. (ASK)

  8. Hands-on Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity to help primary, intermediate, and advanced students learn about and compare the general characteristics of reptiles and amphibians. Suggests "herp stations" to provide experiences. Details materials, background and procedures necessary for using this activity. (CW)

  9. The mobile GeoBus outreach project: hands-on Earth and Mars activities for secondary schools in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ruth; Pike, Charlotte; Roper, Kathryn

    2015-04-01

    GeoBus (www.geobus.org.uk) is an educational outreach project that was developed in 2012 by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of St Andrews, and it is sponsored jointly by industry and the UK Research Councils (NERC and EPSRC). The aims of GeoBus are to support the teaching of Earth Science in secondary schools by providing teaching resources that are not readily available to educators, to inspire young learners by incorporating new science research outcomes in teaching activities, and to provide a bridge between industry, higher education institutions, research councils and schools. Since its launch, GeoBus has visited over 160 different schools across the length and breadth of Scotland. Just under 35,000 pupils have been involved in practical hands-on Earth science learning activities since the project began in 2012, including many in remote and disadvantaged regions. The resources that GeoBus brings to schools include all the materials and equipment needed to run 50 - 80 minute workshops, and half- or whole-day Enterprise Challenges and field excursions. Workshops are aimed at a class of up to 30 pupils and topics include minerals, rocks, fossils, geological time, natural resources, climate change, volcanoes, earthquakes, and geological mapping. As with all GeoBus activities, the inclusion of equipment and technology otherwise unavailable to schools substantially increases the engagement of pupils in workshops. Field excursions are increasingly popular, as many teachers have little or no field trainng and feel unable to lead this type of activity. The excursions comprise half or full day sessions for up to 30 pupils and are tailored to cover the local geology or geomorphology. Enterprise Challenge are half or full day sessions for up to 100 pupils. Topics include "Journey to Mars", "Scotland's Rocks", "Drilling for Oil", and "Renewable Energy". Both of the energy Enterprise Challenges were designed to incorporates ideas and datasets from Maersk Oil Ltd, Centrica Upstream Research and Shell. Pupils are assigned roles (geologists, geophysicists and engineers) and work in teams on the datasets provided. Journey to Mars involves pupils learning about remote sensing techniques, the technology that the Mars Science Laboratory carries, and use NASA data to explore how we search for signs of water and life on Mars. These challenges develop geological and research skills, team working, spatial (3D) and mathematical skills, and provide insight on career opportunities in Earth and space sciences. In order to keep all GeoBus materials as current and engaging as possible, university academics from different disciplines, students and industry professionals are all involved in developing its resources.

  10. Student responses to a hands-on kinesthetic lecture activity for learning about the oxygen carrying capacity of blood

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jennifer Breckler (San Francisco State University Biology)

    2011-03-01

    This article describes a new hands-on, or Â?kinesthetic,Â? activity for use in a physiology lecture hall to help students comprehend an important concept in cardiopulmonary physiology known as oxygen carrying capacity. One impetus for designing this activity was to address the needs of students who have a preference for kinesthetic learning and to help increase their understanding and engagement during lecture. This activity uses simple inexpensive materials, provides an effective model for demonstrating related pathophysiology, and helps promote active learning. The activity protocol and its implementation are described here in detail. We also report data obtained from student surveys and assessment tools to determine the effectiveness of the activity on student conceptual learning and perceptions. A brief multiple-choice pretest showed that although students had already been introduced to the relevant concepts in lecture, they had not yet mastered these concepts before performing the activity. Two postactivity assessments showed that student performance was significantly improved on the posttest compared with the pretest and that information was largely retained at the end of the course. Survey data showed that one-half of the students stated kinesthetic learning as among their learning preferences, yet nearly all students enjoyed and were engaged in this hands-on kinesthetic activity regardless of their preferences. Most students would recommend it to their peers and expressed a desire for more kinesthetic learning opportunities in the lecture curriculum.

  11. Hands-On Hydrology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

    2004-01-01

    A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

  12. Hands-on Humidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  13. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  14. Hands-On Life Science Activities for Middle Schools. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Barbara; Kramer, Stephanie

    This book provides 50 enrichment activities for the science curriculum that provide concrete connections with important world events. Each activity is self-contained and provides everything the student needs to gain a basic understanding of a concept or to work through a project. The activities include innovative and traditional projects for both…

  15. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  16. Planet Chemistry. Hands-on Activities for Kids from All Planets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Michael, Ed.

    This publication issues a challenge to students to collect data in a nationwide analysis of water hardness. Background information on the chemistry of hard water is presented using a cartoon format, and each of the four activities contains an explanation about the chemistry illustrated in the activity. The effect of hard water on soap, the effect…

  17. A Hands-On Activity to Introduce the Effects of Transmission by an Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Barbara Jean

    2013-01-01

    This activity engages students to better understand the impact of transmission by invasive species. Using dice, poker chips, and paper plates, an entire class mimics the spread of an invasive species within a geographic region. The activity can be modified and conducted at the K-16 levels.

  18. How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activities that Relate Mendelian Genetics to Cell Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Heather R.; Gibson, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity designed to connect Mendelian laws with the physical processes of cell division. Included are materials production, procedures and worksheets for the meiosis-mitosis game and a genetics game. (CW)

  19. Archive: Flower Bulb Science: Activities for the Hands-on Science Classroom, February 7, 2008

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1900-01-01

    This Web Seminar, developed in collaboration with the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) took place on Thursday, February 7, 2008, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time. In this program, the presenters discussed various activities examples and applications of how teachers can use flower bulbs in their teaching. The topics presented included experiments and observations in growing bulbs out of season, altering bulb growing variables, and learning extensions associated with the activities and experiments.

  20. Hands-On and Minds-On Modeling Activities to Improve Students' Conceptions of Microscopic Friction

    E-print Network

    Zollman, Dean

    scaffolded the construction of productive associations. In terms of the sequencing of the activities, Karplus' Learning Cycle [5] was adopted. Students were engaged in exploration, concept construction and application and sketching of the different surfaces at the atomic level. In this modeling cycle, students' prior ideas about

  1. The Lifecycle of a Mineral Deposit: A Teache's Guide for Hands-On Mineral Education Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This teacher's guide provides an introduction to the process of finding or exploring for a mineral deposit, extracting or mining the resource, recovering it, and reclaiming the mined area (sometimes called 'beneficiation' or 'life cycle'). Topics include what a mineral deposit is; how they are identified and measured, how the minerals are extracted; and how the mining site is reclaimed. There is also discussion of how minerals and mineral resources are processed and how they are used in everyday life. The guide includes ten activities that educate students on basic geologic concepts; the processes of finding, identifying, and extracting the resources from a mineral deposit; and the uses of minerals.

  2. Hands-On Activities: A New Instructional Method for a Fluid Mechanics Course---Never Underestimate the Teaching Power of Jell-O RTM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Lynn Alwine

    Background In order to eliminate the fear-factor associated with learning FluidMechanics, a new instructional method was created. The new method is neatly packaged into hands-on activities (as defined in this dissertation) in order to ease implementation and dissemination into an engineering class. Because of variations in learning and teaching styles of students and lecturers [34], the hands-on activities are designed to help the lecturer communicate key concepts to a wider spectrum of students. Typically engineering lectures are biased towards intuitive, verbal, reflective and sequential learners whereas few engineering students fall into these categories. [35] The hands-on activities are meant to bridge the communication gap resulting in a positive educational experience. Purpose In order to assess the impact of the new instructional method, a new engineering education experimental design was created. Engineering Education research is very interdisciplinary in nature and therefore requires cooperation from multiple Colleges including, but not limited to, Engineering, Education, and Science (Statistics). Design/Method Two groups of engineering students were allocated to test the hypothesis, "Does being exposed to hands-on activities (a new instructional method) in a section of MAE 308 - Fluid Mechanics result in higher student achievement?" Comparison of the quiz results between the control group and experimental group assessed the effectiveness of the hands-on activities. The problems within each quiz correlated to a level of Bloom's Taxonomy. A comparison of the results on the problems assessed which level of Bloom's were impacted. NHST was performed to determine statistical significance while the effect size was calculated to determine practical significance. Results The hands-on activities have a positive effect on learning. 3.30% more students per class perform better on each problem on each quiz. The hands-on activity, Rainbow Layer Cake, was a superstar proving statistically significant (p < 0.05) and meaningful with a 1.35 effect size. Thus showing that an activity was more effective at teaching a new concept than lecturing alone. Students in the experimental group performed better on problems designed to test Bloom's levels of understanding, analyzing and evaluating (levels 2, 4, and 5). Conclusions The hands-on activities are effective and should be developed for more concepts within all engineering courses. They are valuable tools to aid with teaching and can be easily implemented and disseminated to help make the engineering educational experience more positive.

  3. Hands-On Universe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hands-On Universe (HOU) is an educational program that enables students to investigate the Universe while applying tools and concepts from science, math, and technology. Using the Internet, HOU participants around the world request observations from an automated telescope, download images from a large image archive, and analyze them with the aid of image processing software. Student resources include a tutorial on finding asteroids in a pair of images and an astronomical tool to find constellations of stars. Teacher resources include a middle school solar system curriculum and teacher courses. There are also activities such as creating a model of the Moon, a star finder, and a flip-book animation of Jupiter.

  4. Simple Protocol for Secondary School Hands-On Activity: Electrophoresis of Pre-Stained Nucleic Acids on Agar-Agar Borate Gels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britos, Leticia; Goyenola, Guillermo; Orono, Silvia Umpierrez

    2004-01-01

    An extremely simple, inexpensive, and safe method is presented, which emulates nucleic acids isolation and electrophoretic analysis as performed in a research environment, in the context of a secondary school hands-on activity. The protocol is amenable to an interdisciplinary approach, taking into consideration the electrical and chemical…

  5. Are all hands-on activities equally effective? Effect of using plastic models, organ dissections, and virtual dissections on student learning and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Sara A; Hicks, Reimi E; Thompson, Katerina V; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or plastic models). Each group received a 15-min lecture followed by a 45-min activity with one of the treatments. Immediately after the lesson and then 2 mo later, students were tested on anatomy and physiology knowledge and completed an attitude survey. Students who used plastic models achieved significantly higher overall scores on both the initial and followup exams than students who performed organ or virtual dissections. On the initial exam, students in the plastic model and organ dissection treatments scored higher on anatomy questions than students who performed virtual dissections. Students in the plastic model group scored higher than students who performed organ dissections on physiology questions. On the followup exam, when asked anatomy questions, students in the plastic model group scored higher than dissection students and virtual dissection students. On attitude surveys, organ dissections had higher perceived value and were requested for inclusion in curricula twice as often as any other activity. Students who performed organ dissections were more likely than the other treatment groups to agree with the statement that "science is fun," suggesting that organ dissections may promote positive attitudes toward science. The findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of multiple types of hands-on activities in anatomy laboratory courses. PMID:24585474

  6. The Universe at Your Fingertips 2.0 DVD-ROM: A Collection of Hands-on Activities, Resource Guides, Informational Articles, and Videos for Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, A.; Kruse, B.; Gurton, S.; Schmitt, A. H.; Proudfit, L.; Schatz, D.

    2012-08-01

    A new edition of the ASP's key educational publication The Universe at Your Fingertips has been issued in DVD-ROM format, containing 133 classroom-tested, hands-on activities (organized by subject), 43 articles with background information about topics in astronomy, 9 articles on teaching and learning space science in the 21st century, 17 guides to the best published and web resources on key topics, 12 short instructional videos, and a host of images.

  7. Enhancing laboratory activities in nuclear medicine education.

    PubMed

    Grantham, Vesper; Martin, Chris; Schmitz, Casey

    2009-12-01

    Hands-on or active learning is important in nuclear medicine education. As more curricula start to require greater standards and as distance education expands, the effective use of laboratories in nuclear medicine education remains important in physics, instrumentation, and imaging but is often overlooked or underutilized. Laboratory exercises are a unique opportunity for nuclear medicine educators to facilitate students' critical thinking and problem-solving skills in a manner that often cannot occur in lectures or during online education. Given the lack of current laboratory tools and publications, there exists a requirement for nuclear medicine educators to develop, enhance, and monitor educational tools for laboratory exercises. Expanding technologies, variations in imaging and measurement systems, and the need to ensure that the taught technology is relevant to nuclear medicine students are issues faced by nuclear medicine educators. This article, based on principles of instructional design, focuses on the components and development of effective and enhanced nuclear medicine laboratories in our current educational environment. PMID:19914977

  8. The Amazing Animal Activity Book: Dozens of Hands-on Projects That Teach across the Curriculum. Grades 1-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Robin

    The activities in this book are designed to encourage children's scientific curiosity as well as their creativity. Activities include puppet making, word scrambles, matching exercises, crossword and jigsaw puzzles, mobiles, games, mini books, coloring activities, Venn diagrams, and plays. These activities are intended as a foundation for children…

  9. Active Vision Laboratory Robot Navigation

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    Active Vision Laboratory Robot Navigation by Active Stereo Vision Joss Knight D.Phil First Year the previous system, in particular in the area of autonomy. The current system requires pre­knowledge of camera

  10. Active Vision Laboratory Robot Navigation

    E-print Network

    Oxford, University of

    Active Vision Laboratory Robot Navigation by Active Stereo Vision Joss Knight D.Phil First Year, in particular in the area of autonomy. The current system requires pre-knowledge of camera calibration, head

  11. Engaging Students in Early Exploration of Nanoscience Topics Using Hands-On Activities and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlan, Ping Y.

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript reports on efforts to introduce beginning college students to the modern nanoscience field. These include: implementing selected experiments into sequencing core first-year and second-year chemistry laboratory courses; providing students with a first research experience; and engaging them in service learning and outreach programs…

  12. Exploring the Solar System Activities Outline: Hands-On Planetary Science for Formal Education K-14 and Informal Settings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Lindstrom, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    Activities by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. The wealth of activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to the exploring the solar system allows educators to choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. With these NASA developed activities students experience recent mission information about our solar system such as Mars geology and the search for life using Mars meteorites and robotic data. The Johnson Space Center ARES Education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic outline useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the outline annotation is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. Within formal education at the primary level some of the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest and arouse curiosity. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered are appropriate for the upper levels of high school and early college in that they require students to use and analyze data.

  13. Hands-on Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14 Formal and Informal Education Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.

    2004-12-01

    Introduction: Activities developed by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. Educators may choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum from activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to exploring the solar system. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. The web sites for the activities contain current information so students experience recent mission information such as data from Mars rovers or the status of Stardust sample return. The Johnson Space Center Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic syllabus useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the syllabus is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting, educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. In both the informal and the primary education levels the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest, arouse curiosity and easily take the participants from pre-awareness to the awareness stage. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered may easily be adapted for the upper levels of high school and early college, as they require students to use and analyze data. Syllabus Format: The Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities starts with a variety of solar system scale activities that fit different settings and equipment. The early solar system formation activities are focused on asteroids, meteorites and planet formation. The theme of how and why we explore our solar system encompasses activities that engage the language and creative arts. Further activities highlight the Sun and planetary geology. A key aspect of the usefulness of the syllabus is that it provides easy access to solar system content, activities, related links and the thematic context for the classroom teacher or group leader. Conclusion: The Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities is a concentrated resource of activities and links that allows educators to comfortably and inexpensively share the excitement and science of solar system exploration with students and members of the public. Additional Information: Some of the activities included in the Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities are in the following NASA developed guides. http://ares.jsc.nasa.gov/Education/index.html

  14. Hands-On Mathematics and Science Activities for Students in Grades K-8: A Guide for Teachers, Tutors, and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quality Education for Minorities Network, Washington, DC.

    This guide is a resource for K-8 teachers, college student tutors, parents, and others engaged in learning activities to help primary, elementary, and middle school students learn mathematics and science. It presents a collection of activities adapted from printed and electronic sources which help motivate student interest in mathematics and…

  15. Hands on CERN

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The project Hands-on-CERN was developed at Stockholm University to educate high school students and teachers about the fundamental processes inside matter and the current research dealing with particle collisions. At the Standard Model link, users can learn about the interactions of particle physics, transformation rules, the future of elementary particle physics, and much more. Through the use of interactive animations, students can learn about hadron decays, Feymann diagrams, and elementary particles. Although particular components of the website may be difficult to locate, by going through the tutorial step-by-step initially, users should eliminate this problem and reap the benefits of this very educational website.

  16. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  17. Hands-on Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that teach elementary students how light works by having them make rainbows. A primary-/intermediate- level activity involves conducting a rainbow color survey, and a student page provides a copy of the rainbow color survey. A primary-level activity has students create rainbows using water and a mirror. (SM)

  18. Neuroscience Laboratory and Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellamy, Mary Louise Ed.; Frame, Kathy Ed.

    This publication is part of a larger project involving partnerships between high school biology teachers and neuroscientists. It contains neuroscience laboratories and classroom activities, most of which provide opportunities for students to design and conduct their own experiments. Each lab contains directions for both teachers and students and…

  19. Hands-On Thunderstorms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Mark H.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces activities published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that can be used to explain the physical properties of a thunderstorm. Activities include cloud formation and the first step of thunderstorm development, cycle of a thunderstorm, the nature of lightning, ice in a thunderstorm, and tornado warning. Lists…

  20. A Category-Based Video Analysis of Students' Activities in an Out-of-School Hands-on Gene Technology Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.; Klautke, Siegfried

    2008-01-01

    Our research objectives focused on monitoring (i) students' activities during experimental teaching phases in an out-of-school gene technology laboratory, and (ii) potential relationships with variables such as work group size and cognitive achievement. Altogether, we videotaped 20 work groups of A-level 12th graders (n = 67) by continuous…

  1. Hands-on Science. Exploring Magnification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1993-01-01

    Presents hands-on science activities using inexpensive, hand-held microscopes and slides made from simple, readily available materials. The article describes how to introduce students to microscopes and presents directions for using the microscopes and making slides. A student page investigates fingerprints with microscopes. (SM)

  2. Hands-on Digital Tech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Harry Grover

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, only the best-funded schools could afford to offer students the kinds of hands-on science experiences that "real life" scientists perform. However, with the advent of digital technologies and portable, affordable handheld computing devices, real world investigations--that also address science standards--are now broadly accessible to…

  3. Hands-On Nuclear Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science is an important topic in terms of its application to power generation, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national defense. Unfortunately, the subatomic domain is far removed from daily experience, and few learning aids are available to teachers. What follows describes a low-tech, hands-on method to teach important concepts in…

  4. Clockwork: Hands On For Habitat

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Vox Bandicoot.

    Clockwork is "a self directed, theatre-based education package about biological diversity." Produced by Vox Bandicoot in collaboration with the Biodiversity Group (Environment Australia), the Clockwork site offers four sections: Midnight, an introduction to and philosophy of biological diversity, Mainspring, a hands-on lesson in critical concepts about threatened species and habitats, Big Hand and Little Hand, curriculum support material for classroom teachers, and Cog and Spindle, general science and ecological background about Australia. Though depth of content varies, environmental educators will be interested in this fresh and creative approach.

  5. Introducing Basic Molecular Biology to Turkish Rural and Urban Primary School Children via Hands-on PCR and Gel Electrophoresis Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selli, Cigdem; Yildirim, Gokce; Kaymak, Aysegul; Karacicek, Bilge; Ogut, Deniz; Gungor, Turkan; Erem, Erdem; Ege, Mehmet; Bümen, Nilay; Tosun, Metiner

    2014-01-01

    This study includes the results of a 2-day education project titled "Molecular Biology Laboratory Summer School, MoBiLYO." The project was held at a University Research Center by scientists from Department of Pharmacology and graduate students. The project was composed of introductory lectures, model construction, DNA isolation,…

  6. Activity Promotion Laboratory Department of Kinesiology

    E-print Network

    1 Activity Promotion Laboratory Department of Kinesiology After-School Activity Program Parent of an after-school program on physical activity and fitness. Periodically, children and parents holidays or teacher work- days when Pitt County Schools are closed. #12;3 Daily schedule: 3:00pm-3:30pm

  7. Activity Promotion Laboratory Department of Kinesiology

    E-print Network

    1 Activity Promotion Laboratory Department of Kinesiology After-School Activity Program Parent of an after-school program on physical activity and fitness. Periodically, children and parents holidays or teacher work- days when Pitt County Schools are closed. #12;3 Daily schedule: 3:00-3:30 pm

  8. Patterning for Nanotechnology Laboratory Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This set of resources created and presented by the Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK) Center present a foundation in patterning for nanotechnology. The website includes an overview document and a series of activities for download. The activities are: Pattern Transfer: Photolithography Practice, Pattern Transfer: Microcontact Printing, Multiple Level Pattern Transfer: Photolithography and E-Beam Lithography. Discussion questions are included with each activity. This and all other valuable resources from the NACK Center require a fast, easy, free log-in.

  9. Materials Modification in Nanotechnology: Laboratory Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This page from the Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK) Center presents a series of laboratory activities on materials modification in nanotechnology. An overview of the activities is provided. The laboratory exercises cover microfluidics, furnace oxidation, ion implantation simulation, siction and doping. All are available for download in .DOC file format. This and all other valuable resources from the NACK Center require a fast, easy, free log-in.

  10. Database activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Trahern, C.G.

    1995-12-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-disciplinary lab in the DOE system of research laboratories. Database activities are correspondingly diverse within the restrictions imposed by the dominant relational database paradigm. The authors discuss related activities and tools used in RHIC and in the other major projects at BNL. The others are the Protein Data Bank being maintained by the Chemistry department, and a Geographical Information System (GIS)--a Superfund sponsored environmental monitoring project under development in the Office of Environmental Restoration.

  11. Handwashing Laboratory Activities: Bowl Technique

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this lab (Activity #2 on page), learners compare bacteria growth on two petri dishes containing nutrient agar. Learners touch the doors, faucets, etc. in bathroom and then immerse their hands in 100 ml sterile water. They place 0.5 ml of this "dirty" water into one petri dish. They repeat this process again but wash their hands before immersing them in 100 ml sterile water. Learners incubate the plates for 24-48 hours and then score the results based on the bacteria growth they observe. Use this activity to emphasize the importance of hand-washing and the effectiveness of soap to disinfect.

  12. Hands-on physics displays for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerlof, Carl W.

    2014-07-01

    Initiated by Frank Oppenheimer in 1969, the Exploratorium in San Francisco has been the model for hands-on science museums throughout the world. The key idea has been to bring people with all levels of scientific background in contact with interesting and attractive exhibits that require the active participation of the visitor. Unfortunately, many science museums are now forced to cater primarily to very young audiences, often 8 years old or less, with predictable constraints on the intellectual depth of their exhibits. To counter this trend, the author has constructed several hands-on displays for the University of Michigan Physics Department that demonstrate: (1) magnetic levitation of pyrolytic graphite, (2) the varied magnetic induction effects in aluminum, copper and air, (3) chaotic motion of a double pendulum, (4) conservation of energy and momentum in a steel ball magnetic accelerator, (5) the diffraction pattern of red and green laser pointer beams created by CDs and DVDs, (6) a magnetic analog of the refraction of light at a dielectric boundary and (7) optical rotation of light in an aqueous fructose solution. Each of these exhibits can be constructed for something like $1000 or less and are robust enough to withstand unsupervised public use. The dynamic behavior of these exhibits will be shown in accompanying video sequences. The following story has a history that goes back quite a few years. In the late 70's, I was spending time at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center accompanied by my family that included our two grade school children. Needless to say, we much enjoyed weekend excursions to all sorts of interesting sites in the Bay Area, especially the Exploratorium, an unusual science museum created by Frank Oppenheimer that opened in 1969. The notion that exhibits would be designed specifically for "hands-on" interactions was at that time quite revolutionary. This idea captivated a number of people everywhere including a friend in Ann Arbor, Cynthia Yao. With a core group of a few dozen people, Cynthia convinced the City of Ann Arbor to allow free use of an old firehouse. The Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum opened its doors to the public in 1982 and remains a thriving institution to this day.

  13. Are All Hands-On Activities Equally Effective? Effect of Using Plastic Models, Organ Dissections, and Virtual Dissections on Student Learning and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Sara A.; Hicks, Reimi E.; Thompson, Katerina V.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or…

  14. Think Locally, Act Globally! Linking Local and Global Communities through Democracy and Environment. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowler, Lorraine

    Designed so that it can be adapted to a wide range of student abilities and institutional settings, this learning module on the human dimensions of global change seeks to: actively engage students in problem solving, challenge them to think critically, invite them to participate in the process of scientific inquiry, and involve them in cooperative…

  15. Introducing basic molecular biology to Turkish rural and urban primary school children via hands-on PCR and gel electrophoresis activities.

    PubMed

    Selli, Cigdem; Y?ld?r?m, Gokce; Kaymak, Aysegul; Karacicek, Bilge; Ogut, Deniz; Gungor, Turkan; Erem, Erdem; Ege, Mehmet; Bümen, Nilay; Tosun, Metiner

    2014-01-01

    This study includes the results of a 2-day education project titled "Molecular Biology Laboratory Summer School, MoBiLYO." The project was held at a University Research Center by scientists from Department of Pharmacology and graduate students. The project was composed of introductory lectures, model construction, DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and gel electrophoresis. The participants were 13-year-old eighth-graders attending primary schools affiliated with Ministry of National Education in urban and rural areas of Izmir, Turkey. The purpose of this study was to introduce basic molecular biology concepts through individually performed experiments such as PCR and gel electrophoresis integrated with creative drama. The students were assessed at the beginning and the end of each project day via mini-tests, experimental and presentation skills evaluation forms. Data showed that students' knowledge about DNA structure and basic molecular biology techniques significantly increased. On the basis of experimental and presentational skills, there was no significant difference between kids from urban and rural schools or between public and boarding public schools, whereas the average score of girls was significantly higher than that of boys. In conclusion, individually performed experiments integrated with creative drama significantly increased students' perception of complex experimental procedures on basic molecular biology concepts. Data suggests that integration of these concepts into the science and technology curriculum of Turkish primary education may support the recruitment of future scientists who can handle rapidly developing genomic techniques that will affect our everyday life. PMID:24474053

  16. A New Two-Step Approach for Hands-On Teaching of Gene Technology: Effects on Students' Activities During Experimentation in an Outreach Gene Technology Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2011-08-01

    Emphasis on improving higher level biology education continues. A new two-step approach to the experimental phases within an outreach gene technology lab, derived from cognitive load theory, is presented. We compared our approach using a quasi-experimental design with the conventional one-step mode. The difference consisted of additional focused discussions combined with students writing down their ideas (step one) prior to starting any experimental procedure (step two). We monitored students' activities during the experimental phases by continuously videotaping 20 work groups within each approach ( N = 131). Subsequent classification of students' activities yielded 10 categories (with well-fitting intra- and inter-observer scores with respect to reliability). Based on the students' individual time budgets, we evaluated students' roles during experimentation from their prevalent activities (by independently using two cluster analysis methods). Independently of the approach, two common clusters emerged, which we labeled as `all-rounders' and as `passive students', and two clusters specific to each approach: `observers' as well as `high-experimenters' were identified only within the one-step approach whereas under the two-step conditions `managers' and `scribes' were identified. Potential changes in group-leadership style during experimentation are discussed, and conclusions for optimizing science teaching are drawn.

  17. Identifying and Reaching the Hands-On Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackett, Gary

    2006-01-01

    The following research is the result of frustrations involving teaching carpentry students who display little interest in learning within a classroom environment; however, often the same students excel in a laboratory (kinesthetic/hands-on) situation. Learning style surveys were given and nearly ninety percent of the students within this program…

  18. Sandia National Laboratories Education Outreach Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, William R. Jr.

    1999-08-26

    The US Department of Energy and its national laboratories are a major employer of scientists and engineers and consequently have a strong interest in the development and training of a qualified pool of employment candidates. For many years the DOE and its national laboratories have supported education activities devoted to increasing the number and quality of science and engineering graduates. This is part of the DOE mission because of the critical national need for scientists and engineers and the recognized deficiencies in the education system for science and mathematics training. Though funding support for such activities has waxed and waned, strong education programs have survived in spite of budget pressures. This paper reviews a few of the education programs presently supported at Sandia by the Science and Technology Outreach Department. The US DOE Defense Programs Office and Sandia National Laboratories provide financial support for these education activities.

  19. Hands-On Earth Science

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This collection of activities from the Ohio Geological Survey features a variety of activities for younger students. These activities use common materials to illustrate geologic topics such as crystal growth, plate tectonics, fossilization, rocks and minerals, and others. There are also games and puzzles, models of the Earth-Moon system and the Sun, and activities on geologic time, Ohio geology, soil liquefaction, and others.

  20. Dig In! Hands-On Soil Investigtions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Natural Resources Conservation Service

    2001-01-01

    Give students the dirt on soil with a practical book that brings new meaning to the term "hands-on." Using these 12 activities and two original stories as guides, kids will soon be up to their elbows in the study of soil formation, habitats and land use, animals that depend on soil, plants that grow in soil, soil science, and soil conservation. Each teacher-tested lesson plan offers helpful background, assessment methods, and suggestions for further exploration. This book also contains SciLinks --Internet links, housed on an NSTA web site, that we promise to keep up-to-date and relevant to your teaching for as long as the book stays in print!

  1. Thermal Cameras in School Laboratory Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Jesper; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Hedberg, David; Schönborn, Konrad J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal cameras offer real-time visual access to otherwise invisible thermal phenomena, which are conceptually demanding for learners during traditional teaching. We present three studies of students' conduction of laboratory activities that employ thermal cameras to teach challenging thermal concepts in grades 4, 7 and 10-12. Visualization of…

  2. Empowering Families in Hands-On Science Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shymansky, James A.; Yore, Larry D.; Hand, Brian M.

    This paper presents the results of the Science Parent, Activities, and Literature (Science PALs) project. This project aims to promote parent involvement in children's hands-on science education by using take-home, literature-based inquiry, problem solving, and design activities that connect school and home. Parents are the most effective source…

  3. Science Fun: Hands-On Science with Dr. Zed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penrose, Gordon

    This book presents 65 simple, safe, and intriguing hands-on science activities. In doing these simple experiments, children can make a variety of discoveries that will surprise them. It includes many activities from discovering how people see color and what makes people's hair stand on end, to creating a tornado in a jar or a propeller-driven boat…

  4. Hands-on Science. Why Do Mittens Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1996-01-01

    This article presents hands-on, experiential science activities that use mittens to teach elementary students about classification and insulation. The first involves children sorting mittens. The second has them find out for themselves why mittens keep their hands warm. Across-the-curriculum activities are also described. (SM)

  5. Hands-On Science. Bright Ideas for Teaching About Shadows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1997-01-01

    Presents an elementary level hands-on science activity designed to teach students about shadows. The activity helps students draw conclusions about shadows by experimenting with different materials and determining which will make a shadow. A sidebar explains what a shadow is and offers further resources. (SM)

  6. Hands-On Science: Science Start-ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Article discusses the four elements of good elementary science programs and offers ideas for creative hands-on science and across-the-curriculum activities (e.g., a please touch science center, curriculum planning chart, and getting to know you water activity). It notes science-related events and describes four science reference books. (SM)

  7. Hands-On Whole Science. Pass the Beetles, Please.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Several hands-on whole science activities help elementary students learn about animals' diets and how they affect other animals. One activity involves identifying animals as carnivores, herbivores, or omnivores. Another has students construct food chains. Two across-the-curriculum ideas involve naming carnivores and preparing imaginary menus for…

  8. Thermal cameras in school laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Jesper; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Hedberg, David; Schönborn, Konrad J.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal cameras offer real-time visual access to otherwise invisible thermal phenomena, which are conceptually demanding for learners during traditional teaching. We present three studies of students’ conduction of laboratory activities that employ thermal cameras to teach challenging thermal concepts in grades 4, 7 and 10–12. Visualization of heat-related phenomena in combination with predict-observe-explain experiments offers students and teachers a pedagogically powerful means for unveiling abstract yet fundamental physics concepts.

  9. Integrating Laboratory Activity Into a Junior High School Classroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Jye Shyr

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a wind power system laboratory activity and an outline for evaluating student performance in this activity. The work described here was to design and implement the laboratory to assist teachers in achieving the teaching objective of this activity. The laboratory teaching activities introduce energy sources, wind energy technology, electricity storage, and wind power system testing. The wind

  10. Integrating Laboratory Activity into a Junior High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyr, Wen-Jye

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a wind power system laboratory activity and an outline for evaluating student performance in this activity. The work described here was to design and implement the laboratory to assist teachers in achieving the teaching objective of this activity. The laboratory teaching activities introduce energy sources, wind energy…

  11. Branson Health Department Norovirus "Hands On" Training

    E-print Network

    of the Industry Training Scenarios included in the comprehensive hospitality industry training CD-ROM - AvailableBranson Health Department Norovirus "Hands On" Training Scenario #5 The Big Dipper (Water Park

  12. Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

    2005-03-01

    This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV’s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV’s). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV’s and UAV’s. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

  13. Hands-On Science, 680 Hands at a Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Harry L. Shipman

    2001-02-01

    This article explains how students can do hands-on science in a large lecture theater with seats bolted to the floor. It specifically describes the logistics of doing a collapsing can activity in such a large class to demonstrate the birth of a black hole

  14. A Hands-On Approach to Maglev for Gifted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Raymond T.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) can be taught to gifted students in grades 4-9 using hands-on activities that align to the National Science Standards. Principles of magnetic levitation, advantages of magnetic levitation, construction of a Maglev project, testing and evaluation of vehicles, and presentation of the unit are…

  15. Hands-On Optics in an Informal Setting: Science Camps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruta, C.; Walker, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Dokter, E.

    2008-06-01

    To expose young children to optical phenomena that build scientific literacy, Hands-On Optics camps provide an ideal way to encourage interest in optics before career choices are developed. Here, we provide an outline of our pedagogical approach for the camps, specific optics activities, strategies for cooperative learning and what worked best in the camp setting.

  16. Hands-On Experiences with Buoyant-Less Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slisko, Josip; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of weightlessness is known to students thanks to videos of amazing things astronauts do in spaceships orbiting the Earth. In this article we propose two hands-on activities which give students opportunities to infer by themselves the absence of buoyant force in a gravity accelerated system. The system is a free-falling or vertically…

  17. Hands-on Learning CU architectural engineering students learn their trade

    E-print Network

    Hands-on Learning CU architectural engineering students learn their trade through hands-on work and architectural plans of the Integrated Teaching and Learning Laboratory to learn about the different types and equipment, budgeting and financing, planning, and project management. This discipline involves organizing

  18. NPS Hosts Young Scientists, Engineers for Hands-on Internships Article By: Amanda Stein

    E-print Network

    with students in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields the opportunity to do hands-on laboratory work on focused research projects of national interest," noted Jim Newman, a professor in the Space Systems Academic Group (SSAG

  19. TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 Evaluating Sample Laboratory Report from Laboratory Manual

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 Page 101 Evaluating Sample Laboratory Report from Laboratory Manual: 45 minutes. #12;TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 (continued) Page 102 #12;TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 (continued) Page 103 #12;TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 (continued) Page 104 #12;TA Orientation

  20. An Analysis of Laboratory Activities: Project Physics and PSSC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunetta, Vincent N.; Tamir, Pinchas

    1981-01-01

    This report reviews some goals for laboratory activities in contemporary science teaching, discusses an investigation that analyzed and compared laboratory activities from two major physics guides, and discusses the implications of the goals and analysis for physics teaching. Six major deficiencies in the two laboratory handbooks are identified.…

  1. Hands-on optics and photonics outreach in Riga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesina, Natalija; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-07-01

    A long-term exposition focused on optics and photonics was created in Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy at University of Latvia in 2010. Considering unpopularity of science in Latvia and lack of broadly accessible hands-on outreach activities for school children, as well as rapid development of advanced photonic technologies, this exposition was meant to involve more students to the natural sciences and modern technologies. Exposition covers 10 topics of optics - colors, diffraction, interference, polarization, reflection, liquid crystals, gas discharge, lasers, fluorescence, infrared and ultraviolet radiation. Students' visits are organized as an exciting adventure, which differs from ordinary school lessons. The visit mainly includes own actions with hands-on exhibits, lecturer's explanations about the most difficult topics and some demonstrations shown by the lecturer. The main accent is made on hands-on experiments due to the fact that students, who had performed hands-on experiments, will be emboldened to choose their career in the field of science and technologies. The exposition now is running and is part of Riga Photonics Center. Nearly 300 students from the 8th till 12th grades visited it during academic years 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 and their generally positive feedback has been analyzed.

  2. Vendor neutral hands-on labs using open-source products for wireless networks courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hetal Jasani

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an undergraduate computer information technology special topic course in mobile and wireless networks is presented which is developed based on many hands-on lab activities. In learning the concepts of wireless networks via hands-on labs, students get ample opportunities to understand the underlying principles and concepts of wireless networks. These hands-on labs are chosen to provide sufficient challenges

  3. Hands-on Virtual Clay Adeline Pihuit

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hands-on Virtual Clay Adeline Pihuit University of Grenoble and INRIA Paul G. Kry McGill University virtual hand that is modeling soft virtual clay. During interaction, the user is provided both passive of sculpting virtual clay as naturally as he would do it with his hands. Generally, he must deal

  4. Perspectives of Hands-On Science Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haury, David L.; Rillero, Peter

    This book presents answers to frequently asked questions about hands-on approaches to science teaching and learning. The questions were formulated by speaking with teachers and teacher educators. Variations of the questions are frequently asked by both experienced and novice teachers. A wide range of answers are presented in a triangulated…

  5. Reading, Science, and Hands On Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    This paper discusses the different ways in which science can be taught, including reading of subject matter from a basal textbook and a hands-on approach in ongoing science lessons and units of study. The paper first points out that in 1996 the National Science Teachers Association came out with a set of standards for teachers to emphasize in…

  6. Hands-On Training for Deckhands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Carl

    1992-01-01

    Describes riverboat deckhand training program operated by East Mississippi Community College and local river towing companies. Residential program trains deckhands using actual towing equipment, including boat and "quarters barge" with classroom. Describes trainees' rigorous workday, including classes, hands-on drills, and physical training.…

  7. An undergraduate laboratory activity demonstrating bacteriophage specificity.

    PubMed

    Allen, Mary E; Gyure, Ruth A

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophage are among the most diverse and numerous microbes inhabiting our planet. Yet many laboratory activities fail to engage students in meaningful exploration of their diversity, unique characteristics, and abundance. In this curriculum activity students use a standard plaque assay to enumerate bacteriophage particles from a natural sample and use the scientific method to address questions about host specificity and diversity. A raw primary sewage sample is enriched for bacteriophage using hosts in the family Enterobacteriaceae. Students hypothesize about host specificity and use quantitative data (serial dilution and plaque assay) to test their hypotheses. Combined class data also help them answer questions about phage diversity. The exercise was field tested with a class of 47 students using pre- and posttests. For all learning outcomes posttest scores were higher than pretest scores at or below p = 0.01. Average individualized learning gain (G) was also calculated for each learning outcome. Students' use of scientific language in reference to bacteriophage and host interaction significantly improved (p = 0.002; G = 0.50). Improved means of expression helped students construct better hypotheses on phage host specificity (G = 0.31, p = 0.01) and to explain the plaque assay method (G = 0.33, p = 0.002). At the end of the exercise students also demonstrated improved knowledge and understanding of phage specificity as related to phage therapy in humans (p < 0.001; G = 51). PMID:23858357

  8. The Hands-On Universe Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Ferlet; Carlton Pennypacker; G. Monsen; J. Refling; K. Govil

    1995-01-01

    Hands-On Universe (HOU) is a slowly but steadily growing international endeavor that teaches students and teachers modern\\u000a astronomy through the acquisition, measurement, and analysis of real images from either the International Virtual Observatory\\u000a or a developing network of small robotic telescopes. This intrinsically global effort shares data, teachers, scientists, students,\\u000a telescope sites, lesson plans, teacher training strategies, software, collaborative tools,

  9. Special Science Section: How to Make Hands-on Science Work for You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne; Pollina, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Presents ideas from elementary school teachers who have made hands-on science an integral part of their classrooms. Includes suggestions for overcoming obstacles to hands-on science, innovative teaching techniques that encourage girls to excel in science and math, model activities to win parent/teacher support, and a list of eight "sensational"…

  10. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  11. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles R. Farrar; Scott W. Doebling; George H. James; Todd Simmermacher

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  12. A MASSive Laboratory Tour. An Interactive Mass Spectrometry Outreach Activity for Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Julia H.; Mascini, Nadine E.; Kiss, Andras; Smith, Donald F.; Klinkert, Ivo; Eijkel, Gert B.; Duursma, Marc C.; Cillero Pastor, Berta; Chughtai, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2013-07-01

    It is imperative to fascinate young children at an early stage in their education for the analytical sciences. The exposure of the public to mass spectrometry presently increases rapidly through the common media. Outreach activities can take advantage of this exposure and employ mass spectrometry as an exquisite example of an analytical science in which children can be fascinated. The presented teaching modules introduce children to mass spectrometry and give them the opportunity to experience a modern research laboratory. The modules are highly adaptable and can be applied to young children from the age of 6 to 14 y. In an interactive tour, the students explore three major scientific concepts related to mass spectrometry; the building blocks of matter, charged particle manipulation by electrostatic fields, and analyte identification by mass analysis. Also, the students carry out a mass spectrometry experiment and learn to interpret the resulting mass spectra. The multistage, inquiry-based tour contains flexible methods, which teach the students current-day research techniques and possible applications to real research topics. Besides the scientific concepts, laboratory safety and hygiene are stressed and the students are enthused for the analytical sciences by participating in "hands-on" work. The presented modules have repeatedly been successfully employed during laboratory open days. They are also found to be extremely suitable for (early) high school science classes during laboratory visit-focused field trips.

  13. SciTech Hands-On Museum: Experiment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Experiment page of the Aurora, Illinois SciTech Hands-On Museum includes several quality science educational activities. The first is a lesson plan that lets kids explore what evaporation is and shows it taking place. The Excite an Atom activity includes an interactive model of a Hydrogen atom that allows students to choose various energy states to see how the atom reacts and then returns to the ground state and emits a photon. Additional features of the site include science fair project ideas and other helpful science links, making it a valuable resource especially for grade school science teachers.

  14. Hands-On Equations 1 Lite

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Henry Borenson

    2013-06-19

    In this iOS app students use the Hands-On Equations method to balance equations and solve for one variable. This app includes three lessons, each with a short one to two minute video, two example problems, and ten exercises. At the first level students solve an equation that is already set up on the scale, in the second level students must set up the equation on the scale before solving, and in the third lesson students must take this one step forward and eliminate variables as they solve.

  15. Hands-on lessons in ergonomics for youth

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2005-09-29

    Ergonomics risk factors apply to everybody. Numerous adults have experienced disabling injuries related to use of computers and other forms of technology. Now children are using technology even more than adults. Increasingly ergonomics risk factors are being recognized as present in the world of children. Outreach to schools and the surrounding community by employers may help protect the future work force. A growing body of researchers believe that children can benefit from the early introduction of ergonomics awareness and preventative measures. While individual representatives of the educational system may embrace the concept of introducing ergonomics into the classroom, a number of barriers can prevent implementation of integrated programs. Some of the barriers to introducing ergonomics in schools have been absence of a tie to educational standards, the existing demands on teaching hours, and the absence of easily executable lesson plans. Ergonomics is rarely included in teacher training and professional ergonomics expertise is needed for the development of a class-based program. As part of Strategic Vision plan for 2025, a National Laboratory identified community outreach and the future workforces as key areas for initiatives. A series of hands-on interactive modules have been developed by professional ergonomics specialists. They are being tested with elementary, middle and high school students. Where possible, the content has been tied to the educational standards in the State of California in the USA. Currently the modules include grip strength, effective breathing, optimal keyboard and mouse positions, optimizing chairs, posture and movement, backpack safety and safe lifting. Each module takes the students through a related activity or experience. An individual worksheet asks them questions about the experience and guides them to consider implications in their activities of daily living. A module on hearing is under development. The goal is to have a toolkit that teachers can use in classrooms with minimal training. The kit will come with lesson plans, including background material, key points, questions and answers, possible homework assignments and references. It will include instructions and worksheets for students as well as the materials needed for each module. A pre- and posttest will be administered to test the awareness and understanding of the principles introduced in through the modules. This interactive session will offer the opportunity to for attendees to participate in some of the modules that have been developed to provide experiential demonstration of ergonomics principles. Attendees will experience ergonomics in action and be able to evaluate the applicability of the process in their own area in the world of ergonomics. The session will consist of 20 minutes introduction, 40 minutes working with the toolkit, finally another 30 minutes for questions or discussion for a total time of 90 minutes.

  16. Calculator Controlled Robots: Hands-On Math and Science Discovery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tyson Tuchscherer

    This curriculum includes ten missions and three exploration extensions that provide activities for up to a semester and focus largely on the space exploration theme. It is designed to engage students in hands-on inquiry based learning. It addresses science and technology standards, and specifically focuses on math content and process standards. Although other models will work, the curriculum is geared towards using a Texas Instruments (IT) 83 or 84 series graphing calculator with a Norland research calculator robot. The curriculum can be used in math, science, technology, or after school classes. Students create programs in TI-BASIC to run their robots. Missions are sequentially built on the knowledge of previous activities. Step-by-step programming instructions are provided in the first missions, gradually leading students to create their own programs in later missions. Students use and apply math and science concepts to direct their robots through a variety of challenges. In addition to the detailed activities, teachers are given opportunities to draw on their students’ hands-on experience to reach a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts. Several open-ended questions and extension activities are included to encourage potential scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and computer programmers to explore their fields.

  17. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report

    E-print Network

    1. Awards ­ ARL HQ 2. US Climate Reference Network (USCRN) Air Resources Laboratory - Headquarters 3 lab-wide IT efforts. 2. US Climate Reference Network (USCRN). With the August installation of the 114th USCRN site in Coos Bay, Oregon, the original deployment plan has been fulfilled. Effort will now

  18. Enhancing Active Learning in the Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modell, Harold I.; Michael, Joel A.; Adamson, Tom; Horwitz, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    We previously examined how three approaches to directing students in a laboratory setting impacted their ability to repair a faulty mental model in respiratory physiology (Modell, HI, Michael JA, Adamson T, Goldberg J, Horwitz BA, Bruce DS, Hudson ML, Whitescarver SA, and Williams S. Adv Physiol Educ 23: 82?90, 2000). This study addresses issues…

  19. Elementary education majors experience hands-on learning in introductory biology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Barbara E. Goodman (University of South Dakota School of Medicine Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences)

    2006-12-01

    This study describes how the active, hands-on learning opportunity for preservice teachers with its emphasis on both content and performance-based assessment was implemented in an introductory biology course for elementary education majors

  20. Hands-On Herpetology: Exploring Ecology and Conservation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Marianne E. Krasny

    2001-01-01

    Plentiful, diverse, and readily available, these animals--known in science as "herps"--are also perfect for teaching students about biology, ecology, and conservation, including problems affecting both amphibians and reptiles. This highly readable resource melds rigorous science content with science research. Its five sections cover the animals' biology and handling procedures (including safety tips), provide background information for teachers, offer twenty-one indoor/outdoor activities, and broach critical conservation issues. Hands-On Herpetology: Exploring Ecology and Conservation is ideal for middle and high school teachers, volunteer leaders in 4-H and other clubs, and nature center staff who want to mix serious issues with amazing science.

  1. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  2. Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory Page 1 Technical Activities Report

    E-print Network

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory Page 1 Technical Activities Report Physical & Chemical Properties Division TABLE OF CONTENTS I. PHYSICAL & CHEMICAL PROPERTIES DIVISION (838.................................................................................................9 1. The NIST WebBook: NIST Chemical Reference Data for Industry

  3. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report

    E-print Network

    /Nevada Test Site (NTS) Lightning Detection Network 25. Other Activities ARL 3rd Quarter Publications List #12 well correlated to a current commerciallyavailable version in tests using ATDD's wind tunnel. Plans

  4. Nematocidal activity of nitazoxanide in laboratory models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Fonseca-Salamanca; M. M. Martínez-Grueiro; A. R. Martínez-Fernández

    2003-01-01

    The nematocidal activity of a broad-spectrum antiparasitic agent, nitazoxanide [( N-(5-nitrothiazol-2-?l)salicylamide; NTZ], was evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo models using Caenorhabditis elegans, Heligmosomoides polygyrus and Trichinella spiralis. In vitro, NTZ (100 µM) exhibited a low activity against C. elegans and had no effect on embryonation and hatching of H. polygyrus eggs. At concentrations of 100 and 50 µM, the

  5. The Hands-On Universe Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlet, Roger; Pennypacker, Carlton R.

    2006-01-01

    Hands-On Universe (HOU) is a slowly but steadily growing international endeavor that teaches students and teachers modern astronomy through the acquisition, measurement, and analysis of real images from either the International Virtual Observatory or a developing network of small robotic telescopes. This intrinsically global effort shares data, teachers, scientists, students, telescope sites, lesson plans, teacher training strategies, software, collaborative tools, and other resources. Such resources can be spread both ubiquitously and effectively through modern web-based technologies and traditional means. Astronomy has proven to be a superb mechanism to engender and support worldwide collaboration and cooperation; global HOU currently has embraced collaborators from six continents, and is endeavoring to build telescope resources in Antarctica. HOUer's want to work together and find more and more reasons — as the technology becomes congruent — to be optimistic about the future. An underlying raison d'être of HOU is that students can effectively learn science by actually doing science in "real-world" situations — skills of data analysis, experiment planning, collaboration and cooperation. Such skills are necessary for the future well being of students all over the world.

  6. Information and Communication Technologies in Hands-On Science: Emerging Trends Across Three Nations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald Knezek; Hiromitsu Muta; Joke Voogt; Rhonda Christensen; David Moore; John Southworth; Marie Tada; Greg Jones

    2000-01-01

    This article introduces a framework for classifying information and communication technologies (ICT) in hands-on science activities in K-12 education. Exemplary projects from the USA and the Netherlands demonstrate the potential of the use of ICT. Examples from Japan illustrate how developments in hands-on science in the western world have influenced Japan's educational policy at the national level, leading toward systematically

  7. Prelaboratory activities to enhance the laboratory learning experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glennys O'Brien; Melanie Cameron

    First Year Chemistry at the University of Wollongong (UOW) includes compulsory practical classes run weekly for 10 weeks of each semester and completion of a prelaboratory activity is required to enter the laboratory for the weekly class. A Flash animation based prelaboratory program for First Year Chemistry is being developed and the Prelabs are administered via eLearning (VISTA). Prelaboratory activities

  8. Hands-On Science, 680 Hands at a Time: Shrinking the Large Lecture with a Collapsing Can Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Harry L.

    2001-01-01

    Explains how hands-on science activities can be done in a class designed as a lecture setting. Uses the collapsing can activity to demonstrate the birth of a black hole. Evaluates student responses to the hands-on approach. (YDS)

  9. Introductory Oceanography Taught as a Laboratory Science--An Experiment That Worked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Franz E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a college level introductory oceanography course that incorporates a hands-on laboratory component. The activities include the determination of density and buoyancy, light transmission in sea water, and wave refraction. (MA)

  10. Cognitive Influences of Students' Alternative Conceptions within a Hands-On Gene Technology Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franke, Gaitano; Bogner, Franz X.

    2011-01-01

    In a German out-of-school laboratory, 293 medium-achieving 10th-grade students participated in a lesson unit about gene technology. They were divided into two groups (I-1, I-2), both of which followed the same hands-on lesson procedure. Students within I-2 were additionally confronted with alternative conceptions to central issues of the specific…

  11. Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on

    E-print Network

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on opportunities for research in ocean renewable energy, remotely operated vehicles, ocean mapping, ocean acoustics, and coastal processes. The Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory is equipped with state

  12. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) GEM Manual

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Smith; J. Schroeder; S. T. Beck

    2008-01-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is

  13. An Inquiry Laboratory Activity for Biology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nancy Contolini (Brookfield High School REV)

    1994-07-30

    The "cookbook " style approach to studying biochemical reactions mediated by enzymes is changed to an inquiry approach. Cooperative teams are each given two questions about the types of living materials that contain the enzymes that break down hydrogen peroxide, and under what conditions the enzyme works best. They write hypotheses and design and conduct experiments to test these hypotheses. The activity provides students the opportunity to engage in meaningful scientific inquiry because they must truly understand the problem in order to attempt to solve it, to construct meaning in performing experiments, to practice observational skills, and to communicate in writing and in reporting orally to the class on their group results.

  14. Across the Curriculum: Hands-on Science [and] Math in Action [and] Social Studies Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleve, Janice; Burns, Marilyn; Lindquist, Tarry

    1997-01-01

    Three articles present elementary science, mathematics, and social studies activities. A hands-on science activity introduces students to microscopic water creatures. A math in action game has students build logic and number-sense skills. A social studies activity has students weave story cloths into conflict resolution. (SM)

  15. Calculator-Controlled Robots: Hands-On Mathematics and Science Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchscherer, Tyson

    2010-01-01

    The Calculator Controlled Robots activities are designed to engage students in hands-on inquiry-based missions. These activities address National science and technology standards, as well as specifically focusing on mathematics content and process standards. There are ten missions and three exploration extensions that provide activities for up to…

  16. Hands-on Science. Delve Into the Secret Life of Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    1998-01-01

    Three hands-on science activities teach students about plant processes that they normally cannot detect. A K-3 activity has students explore how the presence of water affects plant motion. Two grade 4-6 activities let students see the path water takes through leaves and has students investigate how and why water travels through plants. (SM)

  17. Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities, and 2001 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; Cote, Charles, E.

    2002-01-01

    How can we improve our ability to predict the weather? How is the Earth's climate changing? What can the atmospheres of other planets teach us about our own? The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer these and other scientific questions. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. Vigorous research is central to NASA's exploration of the frontiers of knowledge. NASA scientists play a key role in conceiving new space missions, providing mission requirements., and carrying out research to explore the behavior of planetary systems, including, notably, the Earth's. Our Laboratory's scientists also supply outside scientists with technical assistance and scientific data to further investigations not immediately addressed by NASA itself. The Laboratory for Atmospheres is a vital participant in NASA's research program. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Sciences Directorate based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The Directorate itself comprises the Global Change Data Center; the Earth and Space Data Computing Division; three laboratories: the Laboratory for Atmospheres, the Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, and the Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes; and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York, New York. In this report, you will find a statement of our philosophy and a description of our role in NASA's mission. You'll also find a broad description of our research and a summary of our scientists' major accomplishments in 2001. The report also presents useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community. For your convenience, we have published a version of this report on the Internet. Our Web site includes links to additional information about the Laboratory's Offices and Branches. You can find us on the World Wide Web at http://atmospheres.gsfc.nasa.gov.

  18. HANDS ON. Newsletter for Cultural Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Margie, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    A potpourri of activities from teachers working with elementary and middle school-aged children is featured in this journal issue. Regular features include an introductory letter, an article on elementary school activities, project updates, reviews, and announcements. The articles are as follows: (1) "Yesterday is local history to fourth graders"…

  19. Hands On Math Using Colored Rods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana Malloy

    Students enjoy learning by doing and by manipulating objects. This paper describes classroom activities using rods with various lengths and different colors. The activities included are: (1) preparation of rods; (2) elementary addition and subtraction; (3) fractions; (4) concept of greater than, less than, and equals; (5) simple division and…

  20. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts with limited management filtering to encourage the creativity of individual researchers. The competition is open to all BNL staff in programmatic, scientific, engineering, and technical support areas. Researchers submit their project proposals to the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning. A portion of the LDRD budget is held for the Strategic LDRD (S-LDRD) category. Projects in this category focus on innovative R&D activities that support the strategic agenda of the Laboratory. The Laboratory Director entertains requests or articulates the need for S-LDRD funds at any time. Strategic LDRD Proposals also undergo rigorous peer review; the approach to review is tailored to the size and scope of the proposal. These Projects are driven by special opportunities, including: (1) Research project(s) in support of Laboratory strategic initiatives as defined and articulated by the Director; (2) Research project(s) in support of a Laboratory strategic hire; (3) Evolution of Program Development activities into research and development activities; and (4) ALD proposal(s) to the Director to support unique research opportunities. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred fronl the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. To be one of the premier DOE National Laboratories, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and d

  1. Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

  2. Flat panel display development activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    DiBello, E.G.; Worobey, W.; Burchett, S.; Hareland, W.; Felter, T.; Mays, B.

    1994-12-31

    The flat panel display development activities underway at Sandia National Laboratories are described. Research is being conducted in the areas of glass substrates, phosphors, large area processes, and electron emissions. Projects are focused on improving process yield, developing large area processes, and using modeling techniques to predict design performance.

  3. Active Dipole Development at the Naval Research Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C. Hicks; W. C. Erickson; K. P. Stewart; C. A. Gross; N. E. Kassim; B. Corey; E. Kratzenberg

    2001-01-01

    The Remote Sensing Division of the Naval Research Laboratory is engaged in a program to develop active antenna technology. We are presently collaborating with Bill Erickson (U. of Tasmania), Brian Corey and Eric Kratzenberg (Haystack Observatory) and engineers at ASTRON in this endeavor. Our focus at NRL\\/RSD is the development of low-frequency antennas for the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) radio

  4. Educational Activities At The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tracy N. Tipping

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) at the University of Texas at Austin performs a wide variety of educational activities for students at various levels. Regular on-site courses in the areas of health physics, radiochemistry, and reactor operations are offered for university credit. Along with on-site courses, access to the reactor facility via a remote console connection allows students in

  5. CMOS Active Pixel Sensor Developments at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guy Woodhouse; Nicholas Waltham; Marcus French; Mark Prydderch; Quentin Morrissey; Renato Turchetta; Andy Marshall; James King

    This paper reports on an on-going research programme at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) to develop science-grade CMOS Active Pixel Sensors for space science missions in which compactness, low-mass, low-power, and greater radiation tolerance are advantageous.

  6. Hands-on Science. How Fireflies Communicate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1995-01-01

    One creative way that elementary science educators can teach their students about animal communication is to give them glow sticks and a set of cards with descriptions of what different firefly flash signals mean. The paper describes such a project and presents related activities. (SM)

  7. Make Science Matter. Hands on Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Presents class activities to help elementary students learn about changes in the state of matter by making ice cream. In addition to making observations on the changes of state, students can practice measuring and identifying the properties (e.g., color, size, and shape). (SM)

  8. A low-cost, hands-on module to characterize antimicrobial compounds using an interdisciplinary, biophysical approach.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Karishma S; Kessel, Ashley; Ratnayeke, Nalin; Gordon, Vernita D

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hands-on experimental module that combines biology experiments with a physics-based analytical model in order to characterize antimicrobial compounds. To understand antibiotic resistance, participants perform a disc diffusion assay to test the antimicrobial activity of different compounds and then apply a diffusion-based analytical model to gain insights into the behavior of the active antimicrobial component. In our experience, this module was robust, reproducible, and cost-effective, suggesting that it could be implemented in diverse settings such as undergraduate research, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) camps, school programs, and laboratory training workshops. By providing valuable interdisciplinary research experience in science outreach and education initiatives, this module addresses the paucity of structured training or education programs that integrate diverse scientific fields. Its low-cost requirements make it especially suitable for use in resource-limited settings. PMID:25602254

  9. A Low-Cost, Hands-on Module to Characterize Antimicrobial Compounds Using an Interdisciplinary, Biophysical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Karishma S.; Kessel, Ashley; Ratnayeke, Nalin; Gordon, Vernita D.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hands-on experimental module that combines biology experiments with a physics-based analytical model in order to characterize antimicrobial compounds. To understand antibiotic resistance, participants perform a disc diffusion assay to test the antimicrobial activity of different compounds and then apply a diffusion-based analytical model to gain insights into the behavior of the active antimicrobial component. In our experience, this module was robust, reproducible, and cost-effective, suggesting that it could be implemented in diverse settings such as undergraduate research, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) camps, school programs, and laboratory training workshops. By providing valuable interdisciplinary research experience in science outreach and education initiatives, this module addresses the paucity of structured training or education programs that integrate diverse scientific fields. Its low-cost requirements make it especially suitable for use in resource-limited settings. PMID:25602254

  10. Hands-On Approaches to Science Teaching: Questions and Answers from the Field and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haury, David L.; Rillero, Peter

    As the nation pursues the goal of becoming first in the world in science achievement among students, many are advocating an instructional approach that emphasizes activities and learning by doing. Instructional approaches in science education that involve activity and direct experience have become collectively known as hands-on science. This…

  11. S'COOL Lesson: Cloud in a Bottle (Hands-on Version)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    In this lesson plan, students participate in a hands-on activity using a plastic bottle and other simple ingredients to learn the three factors required for cloud formation. Detailed Procedure and materials, vocabulary linked to an on-line glossary, and teacher notes are provided. This activity is related to the NASA CERES Students Cloud Observations Online (S'COOL) project.

  12. Hands-on education system using water rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Rikio; Nebylov, Alexander V.

    2007-12-01

    Trial of hands-on education of rocket technology for university students using water rocket, which consists of structural study, propulsion system study, aerodynamic study, stability study, and flight trajectory study, has been performed. Integrating each subject into a group of tasks, a hands-on education system of aerospace technology will become feasible. Advantage of the system is that students can verify the theory by hands-on practice. Development of recovery mechanism for water rocket will be a good subject of hands-on innovative design. Although the system has been developed mostly for university students, it can easily be converted to hands-on education system for school children and high school students.

  13. Developing hands-on ergonomics lessons for youth

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2006-02-22

    By the time students are ready to enter the workforce they have been exposed to up to 20 years of ergonomics risk factors. As technology evolves, it provides more opportunities for intensive repetitive motion and with computers, cell phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and electronic games. The average student engages in fewer active physical activities, sit stationary in mismatched furniture in schools for hours and carry heavy backpacks. While long-term effects remain to be identified, increasingly ergonomists and others concerned with musculoskeletal health and wellness, see a need for early ergonomics education. This interactive session provides a hands-on approach to introducing ergonomics to students. Although different approaches may effectively introduce ergonomics at even early stages of development, this program was designed for youth at the middle to high school age. Attendees will participate in four activities designed to introduce ergonomics at an experiential level. The modules focus on grip strength, effective breathing, optimizing your chair, and backpack safety. The workshop will include presentation and worksheets designed for use by teachers with minimal ergonomics training. Feedback from the participants will be sought for further refining the usability and safety of the training package.

  14. Hands-on-Entropy, Energy Balance with Biological Relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology textbooks is important contribution of the entropy in driving fundamental biological processes towards equilibrium. From diffusion to cell-membrane formation, to electrostatic binding in protein folding, to the functioning of nerve cells, entropic effects often act to counterbalance deterministic forces such as electrostatic attraction and in so doing, allow for effective molecular signaling. A small group of biology, biophysics and computer science faculty have worked together for the past five years to develop curricular modules (based on SCALEUP pedagogy). This has enabled students to create models of stochastic and deterministic processes. Our students are first-year engineering and science students in the calculus-based physics course and they are not expected to know biology beyond the high-school level. In our class, they learn to reduce complex biological processes and structures in order model them mathematically to account for both deterministic and probabilistic processes. The students test these models in simulations and in laboratory experiments that are biologically relevant such as diffusion, ionic transport, and ligand-receptor binding. Moreover, the students confront random forces and traditional forces in problems, simulations, and in laboratory exploration throughout the year-long course as they move from traditional kinematics through thermodynamics to electrostatic interactions. This talk will present a number of these exercises, with particular focus on the hands-on experiments done by the students, and will give examples of the tangible material that our students work with throughout the two-semester sequence of their course on introductory physics with a bio focus. Supported by NSF DUE.

  15. 78 FR 6128 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ...Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories...collection requirement concerning the Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories...following information collection: Title: Accreditation of Commercial Testing...

  16. Simulated Medication Therapy Management Activities in a Pharmacotherapy Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Joshua M.; Trapskin, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To measure the impact of medication therapy management (MTM) learning activities on students’ confidence and intention to provide MTM using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Design. An MTM curriculum combining lecture instruction and active-learning strategies was incorporated into a required pharmacotherapy laboratory course. Assessment. A validated survey instrument was developed to evaluate student confidence and intent to engage in MTM services using the domains comprising the Theory of Planned Behavior. Confidence scores improved significantly from baseline for all items (p < 0.00), including identification of billable services, documentation, and electronic billing. Mean scores improved significantly for all Theory of Planned Behavior items within the constructs of perceived behavioral control and subjective norms (p < 0.05). At baseline, 42% of students agreed or strongly agreed that they had knowledge and skills to provide MTM. This percentage increased to 82% following completion of the laboratory activities. Conclusion. Implementation of simulated MTM activities in a pharmacotherapy laboratory significantly increased knowledge scores, confidence measures, and scores on Theory of Planned Behavior constructs related to perceived behavioral control and subjective norms. Despite these improvements, intention to engage in future MTM services remained unchanged. PMID:21829269

  17. PBL, Hands-On/ Digital resources in Geology, (Teaching/ Learning)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Rosa; Santos, Cátia; Carvalho, Sara

    2015-04-01

    The present study reports the elaboration, application and evaluation of a problem-based learning (PBL) program that aims to evaluate the effectiveness in students learning the Rock Cycle theme. Prior research on both PBL and Rock Cycle was conducted within the context of science education so as to elaborate and construct the intervention program. Findings from these studies indicated both the PBL methodology and Rock Cycle as helpful for teachers and students. PBL methodology has been adopted in this study since it is logically incorporated in a constructivism philosophy application and it was expected that this approach would assist students towards achieving a specific set of competencies. PBL is a student-centered method based on the principle of using problems as the starting point for the acquisition of new knowledge. Problems are based on complex real-world situations. All information needed to solve the problem is initially not given. Students will identify, find, and use appropriate resources to complete the exercise. They work permanently in small groups, developing self-directed activities and increasing participation in discussions. Teacher based guidance allows students to be fully engaged in knowledge building. That way, the learning process is active, integrated, cumulative, and connected. Theme "Rock Cycle" was introduced using a problematic situation, which outlined the geological processes highlighted in "Foz do Douro" the next coastline of the school where the study was developed. The questions proposed by the students were solved, using strategies that involved the use of hands-on activities and virtual labs in Geology. The systematization of the selected theme was performed in a field excursion, implemented according to the organizational model of Nir Orion, to The "Foz do Douro" metamorphic complex. In the evaluation of the learning process, data were obtained on students' development of knowledge and competencies through the application of several instruments such as small questionnaires (Hot Potatoes), Gowin V, scientific report, a grid to evaluate group work and a grid to evaluate the development of competencies. This study intended to evaluate the success of a PBL intervention program when trying to improve students' outcomes. The positive impact obtained allowed us to advance some conclusions and instructional implications regarding teaching Rock Cycle through PBL and different digital and hands-on resources, obtained, especially in the students' questionnaires and Gowin V, allowed us to verify that students did learn about Rock Cycle and developed collaborative work skills.

  18. A comparison of the effectiveness of hands-on and computer-mediated instruction for learning solubility and solutions at the middle school level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moin, Laura J.

    Previous research in science education has provided evidence that textbook-oriented instruction falls short of achieving desired educational outcomes. In the 1960s, educational reform movements advocated involving students in laboratory experiments with the belief that such hands-on tasks would necessarily lead to learning. In the mid-1980s, the introduction of computers in education provided an alternative to hands-on instruction, but comparisons between hands-on (HO) and computer-mediation (CM) have been scarce and contradictory. Recently, researchers have speculated about the potential benefits of HO versus CM instruction for individuals of different abilities; but few empirical studies have addressed this issue. This research compares immediate and delayed achievement (measured as concept understanding, problem solving, and total learning) and conversations of small groups of students (blocked as high, medium, and low achievers) under each condition. Statistical analysis (2 x 3 randomized block design, Two-Way ANOVA: Instruction method x Prior achievement level) revealed a disordinal interaction between treatment and achievement level: computer instruction resulted in more learning gains for low achievers and hands-on instruction was more effective for high achievers. Hands-on students struggled with procedural demands and obtained less accurate experimental results, making data more difficult to interpret. In contrast, for high achievers, unreliable experimental results seemed to have engendered more discussion among peers and elicited more explanations, which likely led to greater learning gains. In the computer condition, students were relieved of the manipulative demands of real objects, which helped low achievers concentrate on the conceptual aspects of the lesson. The computer facilitated completion of the "experiments" more quickly and hence allowed low achieving students more time to engage with practice tasks, an activity closely monitored and supported by the classroom teacher. My findings have important implications in science education. First, there is no method that works best for all students. Second, these findings may assist the design of school support and gifted programs.

  19. Close view of statue showing her right hand on the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close view of statue showing her right hand on the hilt of a sword - U.S. Capitol, Statue of Freedom, Intersection of North, South, & East Capitol Streets & Capitol Mall, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. Hands-On Fractals and the Unexpected in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluchoff, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a hands-on project in which unusual fractal images are produced using only a photocopy machine and office supplies. The resulting images are an example of the contraction mapping principle.

  1. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) GEM Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; J. Schroeder; S. T. Beck

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. Using the SAPHIRE analysis engine and relational database is a complementary program called GEM. GEM has been designed to simplify using existing PRA analysis for activities such as the NRC’s Accident Sequence Precursor program. In this report, the theoretical framework behind GEM-type calculations are discussed in addition to providing guidance and examples for performing evaluations when using the GEM software. As part of this analysis framework, the two types of GEM analysis are outlined, specifically initiating event (where an initiator occurs) and condition (where a component is failed for some length of time) assessments.

  2. Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities and 2000 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, Walter R. (Editor); Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    How can we improve our ability to predict the weather - tomorrow, next week, and into the future? How is the Earth's climate changing? What causes such change? And what are its costs? What can the atmospheres of distant planets teach us about our own planet and its evolution? The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer these and other scientific questions about our planet and its neighbors. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. Vigorous research is central to NASA's exploration of the frontiers of knowledge. NASA scientists play a key role in conceiving new space programs, providing mission requirements, and carrying out research to explore the behavior of planetary systems, including, notably, the Earth's. The Laboratory for the Atmospheres is a vital participant in NASA's research program. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. In this report, you'll find a statement of our philosophy and a description of our role in NASA's mission. You'll also find a broad description of our research and a summary of our scientists' major accomplishments in 2000. The report also present useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community.

  3. Paper Table Hands-on Challenge: Explore Structures with PBS's "Design Squad"[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    Build a table that's sturdy enough to hold a heavy weight! The catch? Students can only use eight sheets of newspaper, one piece of cardboard, and masking tape. This article describes "Paper Table," a hands-on activity from "Design Squad," in which kids investigate structures while following the steps of the engineering design process. Teachers…

  4. Enhancing Hands-On Science Experiences with Informational Texts: Learning about Pine Cones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, Ruth Helen

    2006-01-01

    Hands-on explorations can be extended through interactions with informational texts, enhancing both science learning and literacy development. In this article, the author describes a primary-grade science activity that begins with students examining pine cones and sharing their experiences and observations with peers. The students then generate…

  5. Connecting Students to Sustainability through Hands-on Learning in the High School Science Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Orzali, Joe

    This paper from Joe Orzali examines the topic of introducing high school students to sustainability concepts through hands-on learning activities. The paper looks into the importance of teaching student sustainability, and includes a background of typical high school science curriculum and how it could be improved. Methods for incorporating sustainability into high school science classes are then explored.

  6. An Evaluation of Two Hands-On Lab Styles for Plant Biodiversity in Undergraduate Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basey, John M.; Maines, Anastasia P.; Francis, Clinton D.; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice…

  7. Build a Band Hands-on Challenge: Investigate Sound with PBS's "Design Squad Nation"[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    This article describes "Build a Band" hands-on activity from "Design Squad Nation," which allows kids to use simple materials to build a four-stringed instrument, then tune it and play a song. Kids explore frequency, pitch, and sound energy while following the steps of the engineering design process. By weaving "Design Squad Nation" episodes,…

  8. Illustrating Probability in Genetics with Hands-On Learning: Making the Math Real

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Benjamin A.; Honeycutt, Brenda B.

    2007-01-01

    Probability is an essential tool for understanding heredity and modern genetics, yet many students have difficulty with this topic due to the abstract and quantitative nature of the subject. To facilitate student learning of probability in genetics, we have developed a set of hands-on, cooperative activities that allow students to determine…

  9. Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Office of the Director

    2010-04-09

    I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In addition to meeting all reporting requirements during fiscal year 2009, our LDRD Office continues to enhance its electronic systems to streamline the LDRD management process. You will see from the following individual project reports that Argonne's researchers have once again done a superb job pursuing projects at the forefront of their respective fields and have contributed significantly to the advancement of Argonne's strategic thrusts. This work has not only attracted follow-on sponsorship in many cases, but is also proving to be a valuable basis upon which to continue realignment of our strategic portfolio to better match the Laboratory's Strategic Plan.

  10. A History of Classified Activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Quist, A.S.

    2001-01-30

    The facilities that became Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) were created in 1943 during the United States' super-secret World War II project to construct an atomic bomb (the Manhattan Project). During World War II and for several years thereafter, essentially all ORNL activities were classified. Now, in 2000, essentially all ORNL activities are unclassified. The major purpose of this report is to provide a brief history of ORNL's major classified activities from 1943 until the present (September 2000). This report is expected to be useful to the ORNL Classification Officer and to ORNL's Authorized Derivative Classifiers and Authorized Derivative Declassifiers in their classification review of ORNL documents, especially those documents that date from the 1940s and 1950s.

  11. Explorations in Algebra: Hands-On Lab Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Barbara J.; Matsumoto, Annette N.; Zenigami, Fay

    This book is a compatible instructional component to any algebra textbook and was developed by University of Hawaii under the Dwight D. Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Education Improvement Act. The tasks align with the content and instructional approach used in daily classes that emphasize standards-based teaching and learning. The tasks…

  12. DOSE PROFILE MODELING OF IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY’S ACTIVE NEUTRON INTERROGATION TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury; J. M. Zabriskie; J. Wharton; A. J. Caffrey

    2009-06-01

    A new research and development laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for DT fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 108 neutrons per second), DD fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (up to 2 x 106 neutrons per second), and 252Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.7 x 107 neutrons per second, 30 micrograms). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8 m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for 252Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield wall and entrance maze and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults.

  13. Active control rotor model testing at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A description of the model helicopter rotor tests currently in progress at Princeton's Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory is presented. The tests are designed to provide data for rotor dynamic modeling for use with active control system design. The model rotor to be used incoporates the capability for Individual Blade Control (IBC) or Higher Harmonic Control through the use of a standard swashplate on a three bladed hub. Sample results from the first series of tests are presented, along with the methodology used for state and parameter identification. Finally, pending experiments and possible research directions using this model and test facility are outlined.

  14. School of Rock: An Ocean-going, Hands-on Research Expedition for Earth and Ocean Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peart, L.; Niemitz, M.; Klaus, A.; Leckie, M.; Houpt, D.; Hamlin, B.; Crowder, L.; Firth, J.; Weiss, P.; Peng, C.; Slough, S.

    2005-12-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) - United States Implementing Organization (USIO) took advantage of a 16-day break between scientific operations to carry out a seagoing pilot educator workshop on board the JOIDES Resolution during a transit from Victoria, B.C., Canada, to Acapulco, Mexico. During this workshop, 10 educators from all across the United States were mentored and taught by scientists who are actively engaged in IODP research, the USIO Education Director, and staff. In addition, shipboard technical staff provided guidance and content related to hands-on laboratory activities. The pilot program provided the educators with an opportunity to participate in a seagoing experience on a scientific drilling research vessel and conduct a series of research activities similar to those that take place during regular scientific drilling expeditions. The workshop allowed educators to increase their knowledge of IODP and scientific methods as borne out through ocean drilling (proposals, drilling, lab analysis, data acquisition, postcruise activities) as well as knowledge of mid-ocean ridges, composition and structure of the oceanic crust, seafloor spreading, paleoceanography, paleomagnetism, and sedimentology. The workshop participants translated the scientific results into useful teaching resources by developing a suite of new discovery-based activities related to ocean drilling research that will undergo classroom testing by workshop participants. Over the school year the educators will help disseminate IODP science education by conducting at least two teacher workshops based on this seagoing experience, enhanced scientific knowledge gained from participating in the workshop, and the new activities developed en route.

  15. Teaching genetics using hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Stephanie Ann

    Teaching genetics can be challenging because of the difficulty of the content and misconceptions students might hold. This thesis focused on using hands-on model activities, problem solving, and inquiry-based teaching/learning methods in order to increase student understanding in an introductory biology class in the area of genetics. Various activities using these three methods were implemented into the classes to address any misconceptions and increase student learning of the difficult concepts. The activities that were implemented were shown to be successful based on pre-post assessment score comparison. The students were assessed on the subjects of inheritance patterns, meiosis, and protein synthesis and demonstrated growth in all of the areas. It was found that hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based activities were more successful in learning concepts in genetics and the students were more engaged than tradition styles of lecture.

  16. Invention activities as preparation for learning laboratory data handling skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James

    2012-10-01

    Undergraduate physics laboratories are often driven by a mix of goals, and usually enough of them to cause cognitive overload for the student. Our recent findings align well with studies indicating that students often exit a physics lab without having properly learned how to handle real data. The value of having students explore the underlying structure of a problem before being able to solve it has been shown as an effective way to ready students for learning. Borrowing on findings from the fields of education and cognitive psychology, we use ``invention activities'' to precede direct instruction and bolster learning. In this talk I will show some of what we have learned about students' data handling skills, explain how an invention activity works, and share some observations of successful transfer.

  17. Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

    2004-02-15

    One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

  18. MSLICE Science Activity Planner for the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Fox, Jason M.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Kurien, James A.; McCurdy, Michael P.; Pyrzak, Guy; Aghevli, Arash; Bachmann, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01

    MSLICE (Mars Science Laboratory InterfaCE) is the tool used by scientists and engineers on the Mars Science Laboratory rover mission to visualize the data returned by the rover and collaboratively plan its activities. It enables users to efficiently and effectively search all mission data to find applicable products (e.g., images, targets, activity plans, sequences, etc.), view and plan the traverse of the rover in HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) images, visualize data acquired by the rover, and develop, model, and validate the activities the rover will perform. MSLICE enables users to securely contribute to the mission s activity planning process from their home institutions using off-the-shelf laptop computers. This software has made use of several plug-ins (software components) developed for previous missions [e.g., Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix Mars Lander (PHX)] and other technology tasks. It has a simple, intuitive, and powerful search capability. For any given mission, there is a huge amount of data and associated metadata that is generated. To help users sort through this information, MSLICE s search interface is provided in a similar fashion as major Internet search engines. With regard to the HiRISE visualization of the rover s traverse, this view is a map of the mission that allows scientists to easily gauge where the rover has been and where it is likely to go. The map also provides the ability to correct or adjust the known position of the rover through the overlaying of images acquired from the rover on top of the HiRISE image. A user can then correct the rover s position by collocating the visible features in the overlays with the same features in the underlying HiRISE image. MSLICE users can also rapidly search all mission data for images that contain a point specified by the user in another image or panoramic mosaic. MSLICE allows the creation of targets, which provides a way for scientists to collaboratively name features on the surface of Mars. These targets can also be used to convey instrument-pointing information to the activity plan. The software allows users to develop a plan of what they would like the rover to accomplish for a given time period. When developing the plan, the user can input constraints between activities or groups of activities. MSLICE will enforce said constraints and ensure that all mission flight rules are satisfied.

  19. Maintaining and Expanding the Hands-On Optics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, R. T.; Walker, C. E.

    2008-05-01

    Hands-On Optics (HOO) was funded by the National Science Foundation Informal Science Education program to bring optics education to traditionally underserved middle school students. We developed a series of six optics modules each covering a different topic in optics. During the four-year grant, we brought the program to the Mathematics, Science and Engineering Achievement (MESA) programs in seven states as well as 8 major science centers. We continue to support our established sites as well as expand our program. One of our expansion efforts involves continuing our partnership with the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE). We have been working closely with SPIE to present workshops for student chapter leaders at SPIE meetings. The student chapter leaders use HOO materials in their outreach activities. SPIE has teamed with us to bring HOO to Europe. We have received a grant from the Science Foundation of Arizona to expand HOO in Arizona. This program builds on our successful programs at the South Tucson Boys and Girls Club as well as the Sells Boys and Girls Club by expanding HOO to other sites around the state with an emphasis on rural locations such as Bisbee, Safford, Prescott Valley and the Tohon O'odham Nation. We have been working with a variety of Boys and Girls Clubs around the state. Several programs are underway and we hope to add more sites in the coming year. We continue to host local events at Kitt Peak National Observatory as well as special events for the community and students in the Tucson area. Our events include science nights at local schools, optics festivals and competitions, career days and teacher fairs. We will describe the current state of the program as well as lessons learned as we expand the program in a variety of settings.

  20. Hands-on Space Exploration through High Altitude Ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammergren, Mark; Gyuk, G.

    2010-01-01

    The Adler Planetarium's "Far Horizons" high-altitude ballooning effort serves as the focus for a diverse set of educational activities, including middle school summer camps, a high school summer program (the Astro-Science Workshop), school-year internships for high school students, summer internships for undergraduates, a NSF-funded graduate fellowship, and a thriving public volunteer program. The relatively low costs of both the reusable hardware (less than $1000) and expendable supplies (around $150 per launch) allow us to mount frequent missions throughout the year - and make such a program ideal for replication at institutions of any size. The rapid development schedule for each individual mission permits the cradle-to-grave involvement of short-term participants, making it easy to draw in a wide audience. Students are involved literally in a hands-on manner in all aspects of the construction, launch, tracking, and recovery of simple experimental payloads, which typically include sensors for temperature, pressure, light intensity, and radiation. Stunning imagery provided by onboard cameras can attract significant media interest, which can bring outreach efforts to a very broad audience. Future plans include the design and construction of CubeSats - decimeter-sized picosatellites carried to orbit as secondary payloads. Our first satellite will be a relatively simple Earth-imager, built from commercial, off-the-shelf components. As in the ballooning program, students and volunteers will be involved in all stages of this effort. Once operational, imagery and other data from the satellite will be incorporated into a museum exhibit that will allow visitors to submit target requests. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0525995.

  1. Hands-on Projects in an Early Design Course

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bannerot, Richard

    This paper presents an overview of both team and individual projects over a five-year period from 2002 to 2006 in an early mechanical engineering design course. All ten, semester-long team projects are hands-on and require the design, fabrication and testing of an artifact. Of the six individual projects described: two are experimental; one requires reverse engineering; one is hands-on; and two are related to design evaluation and the design process. Example results are given for two of the team projects and two of the individual projects. Student surveys indicate that engineering students enjoy working on these projects and learn from the experience.

  2. Back to the future with hands-on science: students' perceptions of learning anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Amy Nicole Burne; McAllister, Margaret

    2008-09-01

    This article examines student perceptions of learning related to anatomy and physiology in a bachelor of nursing program. One strategy to teach the sciences is simulated learning, a technology that offers exciting potential. Virtual environments for laboratory learning may offer numerous benefits: teachers can convey information to a larger group of students, reducing the need for small laboratory classes; less equipment is required, thus containing ongoing costs; and students can learn in their own time and place. However, simulated learning may also diminish access to the teacher-student relationship and the opportunity for guided practice and guided linking of theory with practice. Without this hands-on experience, there is a risk that students will not engage as effectively, and thus conceptual learning and the development of critical thinking skills are diminished. However, student perceptions of these learning experiences are largely unknown. Thus, this study examined students' perceptions of anatomy and physiology laboratory experiences and the importance they placed on hands-on experience in laboratory settings. PMID:18792709

  3. Hands on CERN: A Well-Used Physics Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The "Hands on CERN" education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages…

  4. CIT Vet Students Learn with Their Hands on the Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cournoyer, David

    2000-01-01

    Describes Crownpoint Institute of Technology's (CIT's) (New Mexico) veterinary technology program. CIT veterinary students earn veterinary associate's degrees and job skills while working with their hands on the animals. Discusses CIT's hopes of becoming a national leader in elk management and its focus on delivering technology and modern skills…

  5. Enhancing Lean Manufacturing Learning Experience through Hands-On Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbadawi, Isam; McWilliams, Douglas L.; Tetteh, Edem G.

    2010-01-01

    Finding appropriate interactive exercises to increase students' learning in technical topic courses is always challenging to educators. In this study, several paper plane hands-on simulation exercises were developed, used, and tested in a lean manufacturing course for beginning college students. A pretest and posttest was used to assess the…

  6. Hands-on Artificial Intelligence Education Using LEGO Mindstorms

    E-print Network

    Schafer, J. Ben

    Hands-on Artificial Intelligence Education Using LEGO Mindstorms: Lessons Learned J. Ben Schafer offered in conjunction with the more traditional 3-credit AI course. This lab, using the LEGO Mindstorms in conjunction with the more traditional 3-credit AI course. This lab, using the LEGO Mindstorms robotics

  7. Materials for Enabling Hands-On Robotics and STEM Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maja J Matari; Nathan Koenig; David Feil-Seifer

    2007-01-01

    We describe our approach to enabling hands-on experiential robotics for all ages through the introduction of a robot pro - gramming workbook and robot test-bed. We describe the vi- sion and motivation for the project, and then the details of t he robot hardware, software, and the accompanying workbook and textbook materials. Together, these resources are aimed at providing free,

  8. Hands-On Science. Trace Water to Its Source.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1993-01-01

    A hands-on science project on watersheds helps elementary students understand the water cycle. The unit, which focuses on the fact that all living things need water and that watersheds are sources of water for rivers and streams, teaches students to observe, make inferences, predict, and draw conclusions. (SM)

  9. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  10. Educational Activities At The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipping, Tracy N.

    2011-06-01

    The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) at the University of Texas at Austin performs a wide variety of educational activities for students at various levels. Regular on-site courses in the areas of health physics, radiochemistry, and reactor operations are offered for university credit. Along with on-site courses, access to the reactor facility via a remote console connection allows students in an off-site classroom to conduct experiments via a "virtual" control console. In addition to the regularly scheduled courses, other programs, such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Summer Nuclear Engineering Institute and Office of Naval Research partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, provide access to the facility for students from other universities both domestic and foreign. And NETL hosts professional development programs such as training programs for Nuclear Regulatory Commission personnel and International Atomic Energy Agency fellowships.

  11. 78 FR 21145 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ...Information Collection Activities: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories...with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Accreditation of Commercial Testing Laboratories...other forms of information. Title: Accreditation of Commercial Testing...

  12. Planaria Laboratory Activity - Teacher - The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2009-01-01

    This PDF file is for the teacher to use during the laboratory activity. Please also see the PDF file for use by students and the presentation for use by the teacher, also in the Planaria Laboratory Activity collection. This lab activity may be used in conjunction with the rest of the The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research curriculum.

  13. Planaria Laboratory Activity - Student - The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2009-01-01

    This PDF file is for a student to use during the laboratory activity. Please also see the PDF file and presentation for use by the teacher, also in the Planaria Laboratory Activity collection. This lab activity may be used in conjunction with the rest of the The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research curriculum.

  14. Planaria Laboratory Activity - Presentation - The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2009-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation is for the teacher to use during the laboratory activity. Please also see the PDF files for use by students and the teacher, also in the Planaria Laboratory Activity collection. This lab activity may be used in conjunction with the rest of the The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research curriculum.

  15. Hands-on force spectroscopy: weird springs and protein folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Manfred

    2008-05-01

    A force spectroscopy model experiment is presented using a low-cost tensile apparatus described earlier. Force-extension measurements of twisted rubber bands are obtained. They exhibit a complex nonlinear elastic behaviour that resembles atomic force spectroscopy investigations of molecules of titin, a muscle protein. The model experiments open up intriguing possibilities to stimulate insight into entropy-driven self-organization of soft biological matter at the nanometre scale and into protein folding by hands-on experience and analogical transfer.

  16. Hands-On Solid Modeling Experiences in a Course Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ansari, Jahangir

    This paper focuses on the hands-on experience of 3-D solid modeling technique and prototyping employed in product design and realization process. Engineering Graphics and CAD/CAM are two of the core courses in the Manufacturing Engineering program. Computer aided design and drafting, as well as solid modeling of parts, are strongly emphasized in the Engineering Graphics curriculum which is taught in the sophomore year. In continuation, both manual and computer aided CNC programming are covered in the CAD/CAM curriculum taught in the junior year. Computer Aided Reverse Engineering of cork opener, gear puller, cell phone case, and cell phone cover were the selected course projects taken by students in the CAD/CAM course. One of the main objectives of the curse project was for the students to extend their knowledge in design process and gain a hands-on experience in the field of solid modeling and product realization. A caliper and a micrometer were used to measure the main dimensions of the parts, and a solid modeling program was used for creating the parts model and assembly as well. This paper describes hands-on solid modeling and prototyping experiences of manufacturing engineering students regarding product realization process at our program.

  17. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-08-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  18. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-12-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  19. An Analysis of Laboratory Activities in Two Modern Science Curricula: Project Physics and PSSC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunetta, Vincent N.; Tamir, Pinchas

    In evaluating whether the laboratory guides for Project Physics and for PSSC are consistent with the goals of their designers in demonstrating the interplay between experiment and theory in the development of physics, a system was developed for analyzing physics laboratory investigations, and the laboratory activities in the "PSSC Physics…

  20. Safety Teams: An Approach to Engage Students in Laboratory Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaimo, Peter J.; Langenhan, Joseph M.; Tanner, Martha J.; Ferrenberg, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    We developed and implemented a yearlong safety program into our organic chemistry lab courses that aims to enhance student attitudes toward safety and to ensure students learn to recognize, demonstrate, and assess safe laboratory practices. This active, collaborative program involves the use of student "safety teams" and includes hands-on safety…

  1. The Urban Environmental Laboratory: A Step in the Right Direction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolin, Eric Jay

    1985-01-01

    Describes the philosophy, facility features, and program offerings at Brown University's environmental education center. The Urban Environmental Laboratory (UEL) is an integrated instruction, residential, demonstration project for students and the public community. Conservation technologies, active learning, and hands-on experience characterize…

  2. Argonne National Laboratory has been actively involved in the development

    E-print Network

    Kemner, Ken

    1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established its first independent battery test facility at Argonne and named it the National Battery Test Laboratory (NBTL), for the purpose of conducting test group and three battery R&D groups. The battery test laboratory changed its name

  3. Development of a laboratory demonstration model active cleaning device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A laboratory demonstration model of a device for removing contaminant films from optical surfaces in space was developed. The development of a plasma tube, which would produce the desired cleaning effects under high vacuum conditions, represented the major problem in the program. This plasma tube development is discussed, and the resulting laboratory demonstration-model device is described.

  4. TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a. How to Grade Student Laboratory Reports

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a. How to Grade Student Laboratory Reports Page 145 How to Grade along closely. #12;TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a (continued) #12;TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a (continued) #12;TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a (continued) #12;TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a (continued

  5. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1993-12-23

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  6. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  7. Educational Science Kits All ages need the opportunity to explore science in a hands-on environment. Educational

    E-print Network

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    time through the movement of the sun and moon, experimenting with the variables that influence movement of the sun and stars, moon phases, and eclipses. Each of the 4 units in this Sequence contains 4 science using the Sun-Earth-Moon system as the focus. Through models, hands-on activities, and readings

  8. On-site laboratory support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory environmental restoration field activities

    SciTech Connect

    Burn, J.L.E. [Bechtel Environmental, Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

    1995-07-01

    A remedial investigation/feasibility study has been undertaken at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Bechtel National, Inc. and partners CH2M Hill, Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, and PEER Consultants are contracted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, performing this work for ORNL`s Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. An on-site Close Support Laboratory (CSL) established at the ER Field Operations Facility has evolved into a laboratory where quality analytical screening results can be provided rapidly (e.g., within 24 hours of sampling). CSL capabilities include three basic areas: radiochemistry, chromatography, and wet chemistry. Radiochemical analyses include gamma spectroscopy, tritium and carbon-14 screens using liquid scintillation analysis, and gross alpha and beta counting. Cerenkov counting and crown-ether-based separation are the two rapid methods used for radiostrontium determination in water samples. By extending count times where appropriate, method detection limits can match those achieved by off-site contract laboratories. Volatile organic compounds are detected by means of gas chromatography using either headspace or purge and trap sample introduction (based on EPA 601/602). Ionic content of water samples is determined using ion chromatography and alkalinity measurement. Ion chromatography is used to quantify both anions (based on EPA 300) and cations. Wet chemistry procedures performed at the CSL include alkalinity, pH (water and soil), soil resistivity, and dissolved/suspended solids. Besides environmental samples, the CSL routinely screens health and safety and waste management samples. The cost savings of the CSL are both direct and indirect.

  9. Becoming Familiar with other Disciplines Through Hands-on Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Transitioning to a new discipline can be challenging because of the need to quickly assimilate new skills and knowledge that others brought up in the field took years to develop. While reading and taking classes help to add knowledge, hands-on experience is key to developing your new skill set. Fieldwork is one obvious way to gain experience. Fieldwork provides intimate knowledge of your new found discipline, which is one component of your skill set. However, fieldwork is normally for a short period of time and very focused, which does not quickly provide the second component of your skill set, that is, insight into how your discipline fits in the big picture of solving problems. Academic workshops and internships can help provide the additional experience to bring any young researcher into this higher level of understanding. As a specific example, I'll talk about a summer workshop I recently attended called CIDER (Cooperative Institute for Dynamic Earth Research), which is open for students to apply for every year. This workshop provided the opportunity to learn a working knowledge of other disciplines in geology, and helped to expand my view of geophysics' place in solving real problems. The workshop is a month long, the first two weeks of which were lectures and tutorials of every discipline represented. The second two weeks consisted of new research on projects that were proposed by the attendees. The attendees select which of those projects to participate in, and join a team to work vigorously for two weeks. Teams may continue work after the CIDER workshop for presentations at AGU (as in my case) and has potential for publication later. Why this workshop succeeds in advancing young researchers' understanding is that different disciplines work side by side on their research project. Students need to be made aware of this workshop, and other workshops and internships like it, to provide this added hands-on experience.

  10. Active experiments in space, laboratory experiments and numerical simulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. M. Podgornyi

    1982-01-01

    Important trends in laboratory, numerical, and space experiments are outlined. Particular attention is given to the experiments of Baum and Bratenahl (1980) on current sheets and reconnection. Experimental studies dealing with critical ionization velocity and electric double layers are described. Attention is also given to experiments on electron beams in the earth's magnetosphere and plasma injection to the magnetosphere.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  12. Laboratory Technician: Zane Kraft

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-05-02

    This is a PDF interview, PowerPoint slide set, and webpage biography of a laboratory technician, detailing the career information for someone who enjoys the hands-on experimentation of working with samples in the lab.

  13. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

  14. Mann Child Policy Externships Designed to give students hands-on experience working with

    E-print Network

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Mann Child Policy Externships Designed to give students hands-on experience working Mann Child Policy Externships. These externships provide practical hands- on experience working organization's mission and work. · Provide a valuable learning experience to tomorrow's child policy leaders

  15. Hands-on online : towards experiential product design education with online resources

    E-print Network

    Ramos, Joshua D

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study investigates the potential for teaching experiential, hands-on product design online. Specifically, the work is a first attempt to elucidate differences in outcomes between residential, hands-on educational ...

  16. NanoLab: a Hands-On Introduction to Nanoscience for Scientists and Engineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew; Bumm, Lloyd

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a sophomore level laboratory course in nanotechnology. We have taken this hands-on approach to introduce students to the concepts used in nanotechnology much earlier than they would see them in the standard curriculum. Although sophomore level students do not generally have the background to understand the full theoretical explanation of all the phenomena, they do take with them a basic understanding that can serve as a framework for appreciating the broader issues when they encounter them in later courses. Topics we have covered are: crystal structure, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, electron microprobe, spectrophotometry, extinction, light scattering (Rayleigh & Mie), microfluidics, scanned probe microscopy, and thin-film growth. A report of our experience will be presented.

  17. Hands-on Astronomy in the Classroom: Good Teaching Ideas for Middle School, High School and Introductory College Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, D.; Fraknoi, A.; Bennett, M.

    1998-05-01

    This workshop is designed to assist middle and high school teachers and astronomers who work with them or who teach introductory college courses in doing hands-on activities on astronomical topics. We will show the pioneering video, "A Private Universe ," on how students learn (and don't learn) science, and then discuss ways of aligning work in the classroomwith the way students learn best. Applying these ideas, we will work through several hands-on or inquiry-based activities that can be used directly in the classroom at the 7th - 13th (introductory college) grade level. Sample activities will make use of filters and Hubble Space Telescope slides, Doppler balls, Refraction/Reflection, spectra, etc. Participants will receive a thick package of materials, including instructions for several excellent classroom activities and resources to enhance their teaching of astronomy. Registration is required; see the AAS Education WWW page or email aased@aas.org.

  18. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory . . . . . . . . Pre Outreach Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    E-print Network

    Weston, Ken

    Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Molecular Motion FCAT Sample Questions questions would you ask them? If you were a scientist, what would you like to discover about molecules? 3 questions, at any time. The class can return to the K-W-L chart after completing the activities. As students

  19. An Intensive Hands-on Course Designed to Teach Molecular Biology Techniques to Physiology Graduate Students

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Andrea D. Weston (University of Western Ontario Department of Physiology)

    2002-03-01

    To address a growing need to make research trainees in physiology comfortable with the tools of molecular biology, we have developed a laboratory-intensive course designed for graduate students. This course is offered to a small group of students over a three-week period and is organized such that comprehensive background lectures are coupled with extensive hands-on experience. The course is divided into seven modules, each organized by a faculty member who has particular expertise in the area covered by that module. The modules focus on basic methods such as cDNA subcloning, sequencing, gene transfer, polymerase chain reaction, and protein and RNA expression analysis. Each module begins with a lecture that introduces the technique in detail by providing a historical perspective, describing both the uses and limitations of that technique, and comparing the method with others that yield similar information. Most of the lectures are followed by a laboratory session during which students follow protocols that were carefully designed to avoid pitfalls. Throughout these laboratory sessions, students are given an appreciation of the importance of proper technique and accuracy. Communication among the students, faculty, and the assistant coordinator is focused on when and why each procedure would be used, the importance of each step in the procedure, and approaches to troubleshooting. The course ends with an exam that is designed to test the studentsÂ? general understanding of each module and their ability to apply the various techniques to physiological questions.

  20. A laboratory study of the activities of dried rumen microorganisms 

    E-print Network

    Harbers, Leniel Henry

    1958-01-01

    the yrslncubatlon time vas Iengthened, the values in Table 4 are all insignificantly lov ln comparison vith those obtained by the use of' fresh rumen liquid as an inoculum. The use of dry milk solids or cellulose as protective agents during the lyoyhlllsatlon... for the cellulose digestion experiments. cPrepared in the laboratory. TAELE 4 ~ EPPES OP PHEINOUBATION WITH OABBO3GNETHYL -ELLULO. "&E ON ~ ~ ~ELLULOGE DIGEETION HY DRIED RZfZN ~P. PGANIGK~ Lyophiliaed remen liquid ?O l. l 0. $ Presh rumen fluid (control...

  1. Waste characterization activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G.P.; Martz, H.E.; Haskins, J.J. [and others

    1995-06-28

    Radioactive and hazardous wastes are generated at many national laboratories, military sites, fuel fabrication and enrichment plants, reactors, and many other facilities. At all of these sites, wastes must be separated, categorized, possibly treated, and packed into containers for shipment to waste-storage or disposal sites. Prior to treatment, storage or, shipment, the containers must be characterized to determine the ultimate disposition of the contained waste. Comprehensive and accurate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and nondestructive assay (NDA) methods can be used to characterize most waste containers in a safe and cost-effective manner without opening them. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is investigating and developing the application of x-ray and {gamma}-ray methods to nonintrusively characterize waste containers and/or items. X-ray NDE methods are being investigated to determine whether they can be used to identify hazardous and nonconforming materials. A {gamma}-ray NDA method is used to identify the radioactive sources within a container and to accurately quantify their strength. In this paper we describe five waste characterization projects being conducted at LLNL that apply both the NDE and NDA methods and present results.

  2. Hands-On Educational Programs and Projects at SICSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) has a long history of projects that involve the design of space structures, including habitats for low-Earth orbit (LEO) and planetary applications. Some of these projects are supported by corporate sponsors, such as a space tourism research, planning and design study conducted for the owner of national U.S. hotel chain. Some have been undertaken in support of programs sponsored by the State Government of Texas, including current commercial spaceport development planning for the Texas Aerospace Commission and three counties that represent candidate spaceport sites. Other projects have been supported by NASA and the Texas Aerospace Consortium, including the design and development of SICSA's "Space Habitation Laboratory", a space station module sized environmental simulator facility which has been featured in the "NASA Select" television broadcast series. This presentation will highlight representative projects. SICSA is internationally recognized for its leadership in the field of space architecture. Many program graduates have embarked upon productive and rewarding careers with aerospace organizations throughout the world. NASA has awarded certificates of appreciation to SICSA for significant achievements contributing to its advanced design initiatives. SICSA and its work have been featured in numerous popular magazines, professional publications, and public media broadcasts in many countries. SICSA applies a very comprehensive scope of activities to the practice of space architecture. Important roles include mission planning conceptualization of orbital and planetary structures and assembly processes, and design of habitats to optimize human safety, adaptation and productivity. SICSA sponsors educational programs for upper division undergraduate students and graduate students with interests in space and experimental architecture. Many fourth year participants continue in the SICSA program throughout their remaining undergraduate studies, and are joined by other new fifth year students. Selected graduate applicants holding a professional degree in architecture from accredited colleges and universities can earn a Master of Architecture degree with a specialization in space and experimental architecture upon completion of 32 credit hours of study which includes two six-hour design studios. Accepted graduate students seeking a Master of Architecture degree who do not hold a professional architecture degree may enter SICSA studios during the final year of their minimum 72 credit hours of study. Subject to necessary University of Houston and Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approvals, SICSA and the College of Architecture propose to expand their graduate education role to add a Master of Science in Space Architecture degree program. This new program is primarily being planned in response to known interests of non-architect professionals from NASA and aerospace corporations who wish to pursue advanced space architecture research and design studies. The program will be also available to working professionals holding an undergraduate architectural degree.

  3. Manufacturing Enterprise Simulation as the Foundation Course and Synergistic Focus of Advanced Course Hands-On Application

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Waldrop, Phil

    This paper describes the effective utilization and benefits of a hands-on laboratory-based production enterprise simulation course as the introductory foundation for subsequent IT or IET program major courses. Using the Georgia Southern University B.S.-Manufacturing degree programs nationally recognized enterprise course as a model, the following key outcome-oriented benefits will be presented: "big picture" understanding of the industrial enterprise as a system; provision of a common base of experience which provides motivating synergy of upper-division course content; and a functioning production operation providing the capability to apply time studies, plant layout, lean concepts, tool design, ergonomics, automation and related studies in a tangible, hands-on basis to enhance major courses.

  4. Cable condition monitoring research activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobus, M.J.; Zigler, G.L.; Bustard, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is currently conducting long-term aging research on representative samples of nuclear power plant cables. The objectives of the program are to determine the suitability of these cables for extended life (beyond 40 year design basis) and to assess various cable condition monitoring techniques for predicting remaining cable life. The cables are being aged for long times at relatively mild exposure conditions with various condition monitoring techniques to be employed during the aging process. Following the aging process, the cables will be exposed to a sequential accident profile consisting of high dose rate irradiation followed by a simulated design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) steam exposure. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Bumps in the Night. Hands-on Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Presents elementary school science activities with a Halloween orientation. One activity teaches students to appreciate and understand bats. A second activity has students group and classify monsters by individual characteristics. Activities for integrating science across the curriculum include creating monster myths, conducting surveys of…

  6. Harvesting of Lunar Iron: Competitive Hands-on Learning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Beatty, Matthew

    Electromagnets can be used to harvest free iron from lunar soil, known as regolith. Iron is important to the US plans for a lunar outpost. It does not rust in space, making it an excellent construction material. Circumpolar railroad tracks would allow a slowly-moving train to follow the sun, making agriculture possible, and enabling continuous operation of factories producing solar cells and oxygen for life support and propulsion. Designing an iron harvesting apparatus for the unique lunar environment requires that students re-think tacit assumptions about how things work. Within the context of a 33-student summer program, two college interns supervised nine high school upperclassmen in an eight week project to design, test, and evaluate a lunar iron harvester. Under the guidance of high school teachers, a research engineer outlined the constraints and parameters for the project. The college interns developed performance metrics, and the teachers established the framework for the competition. Three teams of three students developed their designs, which were reviewed by professional engineers prior to fabrication. A separate team performed research on the properties of lunar soil and prepared a test bed containing 150 kg of simulated regolith. One team identified a novel means to multiply electromagnet force using a recently-issued patent, creating great excitement between the teams and spurring them all to excel. Electromagnets were fabricated in the Packer Engineering shop, then operated by the students in a standardized competition format. Wearing proper protective gear, each team tested their device to determine the amount of free iron extracted from the regolith simulant. Performance was measured in mass of iron harvested per device mass, yielding surprising results, and powerful insights for the students. Results were published in a local newspaper. In this paper, we describe how this hands-on project fits within an overarching philosophy for engineering education within a paid summer intern program.

  7. Bring the Poles to Your Classroom & Community Through Linked Hands-on Learning & IPY Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, M.; Bell, R. E.; Kastens, K. A.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Two major legacies of the 4th International Polar Year (IPY 2007-9) are a newly galvanized educational community and an immense volume of polar data collected by the global science community. The tremendous new polar datasets represent a unique opportunity to communicate the nature of the changing poles to student and public audiences through this polar savvy educational community if effective approaches to link data and understanding are employed. We have developed a strategy for polar education that leverages the IPY data resources, linked with the polar education hands-on ‘manipulatives’ (materials that students can manipulate in a dynamic manner). This linked approach leverages the fundamental inquiry based learning but recognizes that particularly in the polar sciences the size of the earth, the remoteness of the poles and the scale of its processes make it difficult for students to explore in a hands-on manner. The linking of polar hands-on ‘manipulatives’ with IPY data provides a bridge between the tangible and the global. Alone manipulative activities can be beneficial in their ability to help students visualize a process or behavior, but without a strong link back to the Earth through data or evidence the understanding of the process is not transferred from the classroom model to the full scale Earth. The use of activities or models is beneficial in connecting the learner to the polar process(es), while the IPY data provides a unique opportunity to ground the polar manipulative experiments in real data. This linked strategy emerged from a series of NSF sponsored IPY Polar Fairs at major science museums that reached in excess of 12,000 people. The design of the fairs was that polar scientists developed activities linking low cost hands-on manipulatives to scientific evidence/data that was displayed in posters, images, and video clips. The participating scientists walked the ‘audience’ through the hands-on manipulative, then discussed their evidence while provided the reasoning. Adjusting this linked manipulative/data approach to the community of teachers will provide a very tangible education outcome to this community from IPY. Our linked manipulative-data strategy ensures polar processes are demonstrated, measured then matched with IPY data sets so that when examined in a guided exploration will provide the student the tools to generate the reasoning. This linked strategy is a powerful way to engage students in Earth science, and provide them with an entry to the wealth of professionally collected data sets that are available from both IPY and the broader science community, all while aligning with National Science Standards. We will demonstrate this approach, and show how the linked manipulative-data approach can be effectively used in community and school events to reach a wider audience.

  8. Hands-On TAROT: Intercontinental Use of the TAROT for Education and Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boër, M.; Thiébaut, C.; Klotz, A.; Buchholtz, G.; Melchior, A.-L.; Pennypaker, C.; Isaac, M.; Ebisuzaki, T.

    The TAROT telescope has for primary goal the search for the prompt optical counterpart of cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts. It is a completely autonomous 25cm telescope installed near Nice (France), able to point to any location of the sky within 1-2 seconds. The control, scheduling, and data processing activities are completely automated. In addition to its un-manned modes, we added recently the possibility to control the telescope remotely, as a request of the ``Hands-On Universe'' (HOU) program of using automatic telescopes for education and public outreach. To this purpose we developed a simple control interface. A webcam was installed to visualize the telescope. Access to the data is possible through a web interface. The images can be processed by the HOU software, a program specially suited for use within the classroom. We used these feature during the open days of the University of California Berkeley and the Astronomy Festival of Fleurance (France). We plan regular use for an astronomy course of the Museum of Tokyo, as well as for French schools. Not only does Hands-On TAROT gives the general public access to professional astronomy, it is also a more general tool to demonstrate the use of a complex automated system, the techniques of data processing and automation. Last but not least, through the use of telescopes located in many countries over the globe, a powerful and genuine cooperation between teachers and children from various countries is promoted, with a clear educational goal.

  9. WORK PERMIT FOR MAINTENANCE / CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITIES IN LABORATORIES

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    will be suspended in Authorized Work Zone: From: To: No hazards ever were or are present. All hazards were and cleaned. It is safe to carry out activities. #12; All hazards were decontaminated and cleaned except for: Biological Describe: Chemical Describe: Radioactive Describe: Recommended Precautions for WSU Facility

  10. Laboratory Activities to Support Student Understanding of the Molecular Mechanisms of Mutation & Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubler, Tina; Adams, Patti; Scammell, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of evolution is an important and challenging concept for students to understand. In a previous article, we provided some of the scientific background necessary to teach this topic. This article features a series of laboratory activities demonstrating that molecular events can alter the genomes of organisms. These activities are…

  11. Laboratory evaluation of prallethrin as an active ingredient of DUET® against Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prallethrin, one of the two active ingredients in DUET®, has previously been shown to activate Culex quinquefasciatus females in the laboratory resulting in greater mortality. In this study, formulations of DUET® prepared with and without prallethrin were evaluated in a wind tunnel with unfed and b...

  12. Using Laboratory Chemicals to Imitate Illicit Drugs in a Forensic Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Shawn; Bromfield-Lee, Deborah; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Cintron-Maldonado, Jose A.

    2008-01-01

    This forensic chemistry activity utilizes presumptive forensic testing procedures and laboratory chemicals that produce screening results similar to controlled substances. For obvious reasons, obtaining heavily regulated controlled substances to create an undergraduate student activity is not practical for most educational institutions. We were…

  13. A Real-Time and Hands-On Research Course in Protein Purification and Characterization: Purification and Crystal Growth of Human Inosine Triphosphate Pyrophosphatase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreiling, Jodi L.; Brader, Kerry; Kolar, Carol; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.

    2011-01-01

    A new lecture/laboratory course to offer advanced biochemical training for undergraduate and early graduate students has been developed in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. This unique course offers students an opportunity to work hands-on with modern instrumentation not normally found in a predominately…

  14. Understanding Fluorescence Measurements through a Guided-Inquiry and Discovery Experiment in Advanced Analytical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilczek-Vera, Grazyna; Salin, Eric Dunbar

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on fluorescence spectroscopy suitable for an advanced analytical laboratory is presented. Its conceptual development used a combination of the expository and discovery styles. The "learn-as-you-go" and direct "hands-on" methodology applied ensures an active role for a student in the process of visualization and discovery of concepts.…

  15. NDE activities and technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtleff, W.W.

    1993-12-31

    The NDE, Photometrics, and Optical Data Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (S provides nondestructive evaluation (NDE) support for all phases of research and development at Sandia. Present facilities and personnel provide radiography, acoustic monitoring, ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography, shearography/ESPI, infrared imaging, high speed and ultra-high speed photometrics, and image processing. Although the department includes photometrics and optical data reduction as well as NDE, I will refer to the NDE department from now on for simplicity. The NDE department has worked on technology transfer to organizations inside and outside the weapons complex. This work has been performed in all the Sandia business sectors: Defense Programs, Energy and Environment, and Work for Others. The technology transfer has been in the form of testing for product improvement such as validation of aircraft inspection equipment, consultation such as detecting lathe bearing slip for a major machine tool manufacturer, and products such as an acoustic sand detector for the oil and gas industry.

  16. Hands-On Whole Science: A Leaf Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1991-01-01

    Presents two elementary school activities to help students learn about autumn. The activities use autumn leaves to teach that each type of tree has its own distinctive type of leaf. One activity involves tracing, drawing, and writing about leaves; the other involves making a quilt using leaf designs. (SM)

  17. Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-01-08

    Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

  18. Use of Purified Fibrinogen Concentrate for Dysfibrinogenemia and Importance of Laboratory Fibrinogen Activity Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Franzblau, Emily B.; Punzalan, Rowena C.; Friedman, Kenneth D.; Roy, Angshumoy; Bilen, Ozlem; Flood, Veronica H.

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient with dysfibrinogenemia treated with purified fibrinogen concentrate who had discrepant post-treatment laboratory values. The patient had mild bleeding symptoms and was diagnosed with dysfibrinogenemia based on fibrinogen activity of 51 mg/dL and antigen of 240 mg/dL. He was treated for an adenoidectomy with purified fibrinogen concentrate (RiaSTAP®) at a dose of 70 mg/kg. A discrepancy in post-treatment fibrinogen activity was observed between the hospital and reference laboratories. Investigation revealed differences in laboratory assay and calibration methods. Fibrinogen concentrate may be a treatment option for patients with dysfibrinogenemia, but laboratory technique is critical for fibrinogen measurement. PMID:23129109

  19. Laboratory colonization has not reduced constitutive or induced polysubstrate monooxygenase activity in velvetbean caterpillars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Wheeler; S. J. Yu

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated whether velvetbean caterpillars (Anticarsia gemmatalis) from a laboratory colony had reduced constitutive (basal) and\\/or induced activities of their polysubstrate monooxygenase (PSMO) detoxification enzyme system as a result of long-term rearing (> 100 generations) on artificial diet without introduction of field-collected individuals. Larvae from the laboratory colony and those from a recently collected field strain were fed either a

  20. Comprehensive hands-on training for influenza vaccine manufacturing: a WHO-BARDA-BTEC partnership for global workforce development.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jennifer; Gilleskie, Gary L; Brown, Patty; Burnett, Bruce; Carbonell, Ruben G

    2014-01-01

    The critical need for enhancing influenza pandemic preparedness in many developing nations has led the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), to develop an international influenza vaccine capacity-building program. Among the critical limitations faced by many of these nations is lack of access to training programs for staff supporting operations within vaccine production facilities. With support from BARDA, the Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center (BTEC) at North Carolina State University has addressed this need for training by developing and delivering a comprehensive training program, consisting of three courses: Fundamentals of cGMP Influenza Vaccine Manufacturing, Advanced Upstream Processes for Influenza Vaccine Manufacturing, and Advanced Downstream Processes for Influenza Vaccine Manufacturing. The courses cover process design, transfer, and execution at manufacturing scale, quality systems, and regulations covering both manufacturing and approval of pandemic vaccines. The Fundamentals course focuses on the concepts, equipment, applicable regulations, and procedures commonly used to produce influenza vaccine. The two Advanced courses focus on process design, scale up, validation, and new technologies likely to improve efficiency of vaccine production. All three courses rely on a combination of classroom instruction and hands-on training in BTEC's various laboratories. Each course stands alone, and participants may take one or more of the three courses. Overall participant satisfaction with the courses has been high, and follow-up surveys show that participants actively transferred the knowledge they gained to the workplace. Future plans call for BTEC to continue offering the three courses and to create an online version of several modules of the Fundamentals course. PMID:25132407

  1. How to Make a Field Trip a Hands-On Investigative Laboratory: Learning about Marine Invertebrates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrowes, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    Research has shown that when students are given the opportunity to ask their own questions and design their own experiments, they become more interested in learning the answers. In this article, the author describes an effective method to do a field trip to the beach and gets her students to make observations about marine animals, come up with a…

  2. Dynamic Changes, Cut-Off Points, Sensitivity, and Specificity of Laboratory Data to Differentiate Macrophage Activation Syndrome from Active Disease

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Raheleh; Mirmohammadsadeghi, Arash; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the laboratory data and changes in these data between patients with MAS and patients with flare-up of the autoimmune diseases. Methods. In a prospective study, the static laboratory data and dynamic changes in the selected data in 17 consecutive patients with MAS and 53 patients with active disease of SJIA, PJIA, Kawasaki disease, and SLE were compared. The ROC curve analysis was used to evaluate cut-off points, sensitivity, and specificity of the static and dynamic laboratory data to differentiate between MAS and active disease. Results. In the MAS group, the mean CRP3, ALT, AST, total bilirubin, ferritin, LDH, PT, PTT, and INR were significantly higher and the mean WBC2, PMN2, Lymph2, Hgb1, 2, 3, ESR2, serum albumin, and sodium were significantly lower than in control group. Some of the important cut-off points were PLT2 < 209000/microliter, AST > 38.5, ALT > 38, WBC < 8200 × 103/UL, ferritin > 5277?ng/mL. Conclusion. The dynamic changes in some laboratory data, especially PLT, can differentiate between MAS and active disease. The changes in WBC, PMN, and ESR and the levels of the liver enzymes may also be helpful in the early differentiation. Very high levels of ferritin may also help the diagnosis along with other clinical and laboratory signs.

  3. Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corneau, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2007 I have been a Team Leader for the Tzec Maun Foundation, a non-profit foundation dedicated to providing free, research grade, Internet telescopes to students, teachers and researchers around the world. The name Tzec Maun (pronounced “Teh-Zeck-Moan”) comes from Mayan culture. Tzec Maun was the jovial messenger, laughed at adversity. Based on the challenges students, researchers and professional astronomers face with finances, equipment, and telescope access, the jovial mascot seems to fit. Hundreds of hours performing astronomical outreach as a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador and Astronomical League Master of outreach taught me that the best way to inspirationally teach astronomy and space science (and most subjects) is actually being at the eyepiece. I’m NOT a fan of the traditional planetarium experience as a teaching tool because it inhibits inspiration and the learning experience to a 2-D mat on a faux horizon with artificial representations. Once, a student at my dark sky observatory excitedly commented that the night sky was like a 3-D planetarium. I have hosted several classes at my own personal dark sky observatory, but this resource is impractical for all but a few lucky students. Experience has taught me that the next best thing to being at the eyepiece is to control a remote telescope via the Internet. Tzec Maun’s arsenal of telescopes is all research capable, linked to the Internet and positioned for round-the-clock dark skies. The final conditions described above, mean that I can enter an 8:30am science class, log onto the Tzec Maun telescope Portal and turn over control of an Australian system (where it is night) to a student or teacher. Working as a group, the class can either begin their investigations. My Tzec Maun science team (TARP) is engaged in searching for potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs). PHA work excites student and teacher alike. Teaching from telescopes can unleash powerful attention-getting tools that enable teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

  4. Basic neuron model electrical equivalent circuit: an undergraduate laboratory exercise.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Katie M; Castaño, Diego J; Tartar, Jaime L

    2013-01-01

    We developed a hands-on laboratory exercise for undergraduate students in which they can build and manipulate a neuron equivalent circuit. This exercise uses electrical circuit components that resemble neuron components and are easy to construct. We describe the methods for creating the equivalent circuit and how to observe different neuron properties through altering the structure of the equivalent circuit. We explain how this hands-on laboratory activity allows for the better understanding of this fundamental neuroscience concept. At the conclusion of this laboratory exercise, undergraduate students will be able to apply the principles of Ohm's law, cable theory with regards to neurons, and understand the functions of resistance and capacitance in a neuron. PMID:24319391

  5. Discovering Fossils--A Hands-on Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Describes fossil investigations developed and provided by the Falls of the Ohio State Park near Louisville, Kentucky. The Devonian shale beds contain representatives of over 600 species including corals, sponges, brachiopods, mollusks, and echinoderms. Rather than focusing on identification, the activities emphasize the past ecological…

  6. Hands-on Science: Getting-to-Know-You Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Elementary teachers can use graphing to introduce students to one another. An eye color graphing activity helps students learn more about each other while experimenting with different ways of organizing and displaying information. For follow up, students can apply their graphing knowledge by collecting and displaying data from their families. (SM)

  7. OVERVIEW OF THE CURRENT AND PLANNED ACTIVITIES IN THE FRENCH UNDERGROUND RESEARCH LABORATORY AT BURE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. DELAY

    In November 1999 Andra began building an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) on the border of the Meuse and Haute-Marne departments in eastern France. The research activities of the URL are dedicated to reversible, deep geological disposal of high-activity, long-lived radioactive wastes in an argillaceous host rock. The studies covered four complementary aspects: acquisition of data (waste packages, material behaviour and

  8. Promoting Science Outdoor Activities for Elementary School Children: Contributions from a Research Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boaventura, Diana; Faria, Claudia; Chagas, Isabel; Galvao, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyse the promotion of scientific literacy through practical research activities and to identify children's conceptions about scientists and how they do science. Elementary school children were engaged in two scientific experiments in a marine biology research laboratory. A total of 136 students answered a…

  9. An Activation Energy Experiment for a Second-Order Reaction in a Single Laboratory Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barile, Raymond C.; Michiels, Leo P.

    1983-01-01

    Describes modification of a chemical reaction to a single 4 1/2-hour laboratory period. Reaction kinetics between 2, 4-initrochlorobenzene and piperidine to form 2, 4-dinitrophenyl-piperidine and piperidinium hydrochloride are followed conductometrically at three temperatures to obtain data to calculate activation parameters. (Author/JN)

  10. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory waste management technology development activities. Summary progress report, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.J. (comp.)

    1980-10-01

    Summary reports on the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy-sponsored waste management technology development projects at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory describe progress for calendar year 1979. Activities in airborne, low-level, and transuranic waste management areas are discussed. Work progress on waste assay, treatment, disposal, and environmental monitoring is reviewed.

  11. Hands-On Practice Helps Students Master IT Skills and Succeed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittman, William

    2010-01-01

    Students in information technology (IT) need realistic, hands-on experience to master IT skills. When students have the opportunity to train with a hands-on curriculum and prepare to certify in the IT field, they become more deeply engaged in both their education and their career path. This article discusses LabSim, an IT certification training…

  12. Student Content Knowledge Increases after Participation in a Hands-on Biotechnology Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Amber M.; Hanegan, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Implementing biotechnology education through hands-on teaching methods should be considered by secondary biology teachers. This study is an experimental research design to examine increased student content knowledge in biotechnology after a hands-on biotechnology intervention. The teachers from both school groups participated in, Project Crawfish,…

  13. MIT-EAPS Neutron Activation Analysis and Radiometric Laboratory Contribution to Geosciences: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Pillalamarri, Ila [Department of Earth Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2005-09-08

    The Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Radiometric Laboratory's current system is described. This laboratory has been in continuous operation for the past thirty years. A review is provided about the laboratory's analytical participation in trace element geochemical studies of the earth's upper mantle, trace impurity studies of high purity materials, the provenance study of archaeological glass beads, trace multi-element analyses of standard reference materials, the preparation of synthetic analytical standards for Neutron Activation Analysis, and providing a training course in nuclear analytical techniques for environmental samples. The multi-element analysis by INAA consists of determining elements like the rare earths La, Ce, Nd, Sm Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Yb, Lu, and also As, Ba, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Dy, Fe, Hf, Hg, K, Mn, Na, Ta, Th, U. The projected future of the laboratory is explained in terms of its resources, expertise in high precision analysis of trace impurities for the material selection that is to be used in rare event physics experiments. For example, this 'surface' laboratory can be efficiently interfaced/integrated with a deep underground low background counting facility, especially in the initial stages.

  14. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems.

    PubMed

    Dasios, Athanasios; Gavalas, Damianos; Pantziou, Grammati; Konstantopoulos, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Older adults' preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as micro-level incidents which allows one to infer daily activities like moving, sitting, sleeping, usage of electrical appliances and plumbing components. The prototype is built upon inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware (e.g., various sensors, Arduino microcontrollers, ZigBee-compatible wireless communication modules) and license-free software, thereby ensuring low system deployment costs. The network comprises nodes placed in a house's main rooms or mounted on furniture, one wearable node, one actuator node and a centralized processing element (coordinator). Upon detecting significant deviations from the ordinary activity patterns of individuals and/or sudden falls, the system issues automated alarms which may be forwarded to authorized caregivers via a variety of communication channels. Furthermore, measured environmental parameters and activity incidents may be monitored through standard web interfaces. PMID:26094631

  15. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dasios, Athanasios; Gavalas, Damianos; Pantziou, Grammati; Konstantopoulos, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Older adults’ preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as micro-level incidents which allows one to infer daily activities like moving, sitting, sleeping, usage of electrical appliances and plumbing components. The prototype is built upon inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware (e.g., various sensors, Arduino microcontrollers, ZigBee-compatible wireless communication modules) and license-free software, thereby ensuring low system deployment costs. The network comprises nodes placed in a house’s main rooms or mounted on furniture, one wearable node, one actuator node and a centralized processing element (coordinator). Upon detecting significant deviations from the ordinary activity patterns of individuals and/or sudden falls, the system issues automated alarms which may be forwarded to authorized caregivers via a variety of communication channels. Furthermore, measured environmental parameters and activity incidents may be monitored through standard web interfaces. PMID:26094631

  16. The Role of Hands-On Science Labs in Engaging the Next Generation of Space Explorers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Teresa A. J.

    2002-01-01

    Each country participating on the International Space Station (ISS) recognizes the importance of educating the coming generation about space and its opportunities. In 2001 the St. James School in downtown Houston, Texas was approached with a proposal to renovate an unused classroom and become involved with the "GLOBE" Program and other Internet based international learning resources. This inner-city school willingly agreed to the program based on "hands-on" learning. One month after room conversion and ten computer terminals donated by area businesses connectivity established to the internet the students immediately began using the "Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE)" program and the International Space Station (ISS) Program educational resources. The "GLOBE" program involves numerous scientific and technical agencies studying the Earth, who make it their goal to provide educational resources to an international community of K-12 scientist. This project was conceived as a successor to the "Interactive Elementary Space Museum for the New Millennium" a space museum in a school corridor without the same type of budget. The laboratory is a collaboration, which involved area businesses, volunteers from the NASA/Johnson Space Center ISS Outreach Program, and students. This paper will outline planning and operation of the school science laboratory project from the point of view of the schools interest and involvement and assess its success to date. It will consider the lessons learned by the participating school administrations in the management of the process and discuss some of the issues that can both promote and discourage school participation in such projects.

  17. Bioelectrical impedance analysis as a laboratory activity: At the interface of physics and the body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylott, Elliot; Kutschera, Ellynne; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    We present a novel laboratory activity on RC circuits aimed at introductory physics students in life-science majors. The activity teaches principles of RC circuits by connecting ac-circuit concepts to bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) using a custom-designed educational BIA device. The activity shows how a BIA device works and how current, voltage, and impedance measurements relate to bioelectrical characteristics of the human body. From this, useful observations can be made including body water, fat-free mass, and body fat percentage. The laboratory is engaging to pre-health and life-science students, as well as engineering students who are given the opportunity to observe electrical components and construction of a commonly used biomedical device. Electrical concepts investigated include alternating current, electrical potential, resistance, capacitance, impedance, frequency, phase shift, device design, and the use of such topics in biomedical analysis.

  18. Quality assurance guidance for laboratory assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This document is one of several guidance documents developed to support the EM (DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management) Analytical Services program. Its purpose is to introduce assessment plates that can be used to conduct performance assessments of an organization`s or project`s ability to meet quality goals for analytical laboratory activities. These assessment plates are provided as non-prescriptive guidance to EM-support organizations responsible for collection of environmental data for remediation and waste management programs at DOE facilities. The assessments evaluate objectively all components of the analytical laboratory process to determine their proper selection and use.

  19. STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.

    2010-12-01

    Science and technology are widely recognized as major drivers of innovation and industry (e.g. Rising above the Gathering Storm, 2006). While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement and public understanding of STEM disciplines. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. Designed spaces, like libraries, allow lifelong, life-wide, and life-deep learning to take place though the research basis for learning in libraries is not as developed as other informal settings like science centers. The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national education project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. The overarching goal of the project is to reach underserved youth and their families with informal STEM learning experiences. This project will deepen our knowledge of informal/lifelong learning that takes place in libraries and establish a learning model that can be compared to the more established free-choice learning model for science centers and museums. The project includes the development of two STEM hands-on exhibits on topics that are of interest to library staff and their patrons: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. In addition, the project will produce resources and inquiry-based activities that libraries can use to enrich the exhibit experience. Additional resources will be provided through partnerships with relevant professional science and technology organizations (e.g. American Geophysical Union; National Academy of Engineering) that will provide speakers for host library events and webinars. Online and in-person workshops will be conducted for library staff with a focus on increasing content knowledge and improving facilitation expertise. This presentation will report on strategic planning activities for STAR-Net, a Community of Practice model, and the evaluation/research components of this national education program.

  20. Effects of thematic-based, hands-on science teaching versus a textbook approach for students with disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Cheryl B.

    2005-03-01

    Institutions of higher education, states, and local K-12 districts have been challenged to improve math and science education for our nation's students. In the past few years, there has been renewed interest in inquiry-based, activity-oriented instruction in science for students with disabilities. Yet, there still exists the need for further empirical evidence to support instructional improvements for students with more involved emotional and behavioral disabilities. This study describes a program in which 18 middle school students with serious emotional disturbances were instructed, over the course of 8 weeks, on Matter by two different instructional approaches. Students in one classroom received a traditional textbook approach to science content, whereas students in another classroom received science instruction by a hands-on, thematic approach. Over the course of instruction, data were collected regarding students' behavior and achievement. Results indicate that, overall, students in the hands-on instructional program performed significantly better than the students in the textbook program on two of three measures of science achievement, a hands-on assessment and a short-answer test. The students did not differ on a multiple-choice format test. With regard to behavior, there were no significant differences in behavioral problems found between the two groups of students over the course of the study. Findings are discussed in relation to instructional implications for students with disabilities in the science classroom.

  1. Comparison of laboratory-scale thermophilic biofilm and activated sludge processes integrated with a mesophilic activated sludge process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Suvilampi; A. Lehtomäki; J. Rintala

    2003-01-01

    A combined thermophilic–mesophilic wastewater treatment was studied using a laboratory-scale thermophilic activated sludge process (ASP) followed by mesophilic ASP or a thermophilic suspended carrier biofilm process (SCBP) followed by mesophilic ASP, both systems treating diluted molasses (dilution factor 1:500 corresponding GF\\/A-filtered COD (CODfilt) of 1900±190 mgl?1). With hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 12–18 h the thermophilic ASP and thermophilic SCBP

  2. Science &Language Teaching in Hands-on Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    As announced in the paper presented in Toulouse, a trinational teacher training program addressing school teachers from France, Germany and Italy on teaching foreign languages together with science and history through Space related projects has been implemented and launched successfully. Supported by the French Ministry of Education (Académie de Nice), the bigovernmental French-German Youth Office (Office franco- allemand pour la Jeunesse) and the European Space Agency the first session was held in Cannes in October 2001 and brought together 36 language, science and history teachers, 12 from each country. Through different workshops, presentations and visits this five-day training encounter initiated the participants with Space activities and exploration as well as offering them back-up information on astronomy. It gave them furthermore the opportunity of improving their linguistic skills and of exchanging their teaching experience. The program was highly welcomed by all the participants who will meet this year in Germany for the second session devoted to establishing together bi- or trinational projects for future class encounters based on the same subjects. My paper will deal with the results of the program which have been beyond expectation and will encourage us to continue this pluridisciplinary approach of language &science teaching and extend it to other language combinations.

  3. The Hands-On Optics Project: a demonstration of module 3-magnificent magnifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.

    2014-07-01

    The Hands-On Optics project offers an example of a set of instructional modules that foster active prolonged engagement. Developed by SPIE, OSA, and NOAO through funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the modules were originally designed for afterschool settings and museums. However, because they were based on national standards in mathematics, science, and technology, they were easily adapted for use in classrooms. The philosophy and implementation strategies of the six modules will be described as well as lessons learned in training educators. The modules were implementing with the help of optics industry professionals who served as expert volunteers to assist educators. A key element of the modules was that they were developed around an understanding of optics misconceptions and used culminating activities in each module as a form of authentic assessment. Thus student achievement could be measured by evaluating the actual product created by each student in applying key concepts, tools, and applications together at the end of each module. The program used a progression of disciplinary core concepts to build an integrated sequence and crosscutting ideas and practices to infuse the principles of the modern electro-optical field into the modules. Whenever possible, students were encouraged to experiment and to create, and to pursue inquiry-based approaches. The result was a program that had high appeal to regular as well as gifted students.

  4. Living Extension IPM Field Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Jawitz, James W.

    Living Extension IPM Field Laboratory Your business tag line here. The goal of this project into a living, hands-on IPM teaching laboratory. This laboratory will be used to instruct clientele in whole-farm approaches to adopting IPM systems through various workshops to be held in conjunction with the UF/IFAS Small

  5. Energetic materials research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories supported under DP-10 programs

    SciTech Connect

    Ratzel, A.C. III

    1998-09-01

    This report provides summary descriptions of Energetic Materials (EM) Research and Development activities performed at Sandia National Laboratories and funded through the Department of Energy DP-10 Program Office in FY97 and FY98. The work falls under three major focus areas: EM Chemistry, EM Characterization, and EM Phenomenological Model Development. The research supports the Sandia component mission and also Sandia's overall role as safety steward for the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex.

  6. Genetics Concepts and Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ingrid Waldron

    These lessons demonstrate how a good understanding of mitosis, meiosis and fertilization and a basic understanding of the roles of DNA and proteins can provide the basis for understanding genetics. Important genetics concepts for students to learn are summarized and multiple learning activities are suggested to help students understand Punnett squares, pedigrees, dominant/recessive alleles, X-linked recessive alleles, incomplete dominance, co-dominance, test crosses, independent assortment, genetic linkage, polygenic inheritance, etc. This overview provides links to suggested activities which include hands-on simulation and laboratory activities, analysis of class data, review games and discussion activities and questions.

  7. G. Lemons et al., Using a Hands-on Design Task to Compare the Design Process of Service Learning and Non-Service Learning Engineering Students

    E-print Network

    G. Lemons et al., Using a Hands-on Design Task to Compare the Design Process of Service Learning learning and non-service learning engineering students Gay Lemons Tufts University, Medford, MA, USA gay.lemons not involved in SL activities. This research was driven by the following questions: #12;G. Lemons et al., Using

  8. UnCommon Knowledge: Projects That Help Middle-School-Age Youth Discover the Science and Mathematics in Everyday Life. Volume One: Hands-On Science Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Carolyn S.; Keyes, Marian; Kusimo, Patricia S.; Lunsford, Crystal

    This guide contains hands-on science activities to connect middle-school students to the traditional knowledge of their grandparents and elders. Because girls often lose interest in science at the middle-school level, and because women in some communities (especially in rural areas) are seldom involved in work with an obvious science basis, the…

  9. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  10. Hands-On Universe Teacher Courses and the NASA Kepler Mission Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, A. D.

    2004-12-01

    The NASA Kepler mission has elements that serve a variety of audiences: formal education (elementary, secondary, and colleges), informal education (planetarium shows and museum exhibits), and public outreach (broadcast TV, radio, website, CD-ROM, and toolkit for amateur astronomers). The Kepler Cam program will provide minority colleges with CCD cameras and training systems for ground-based observations of exoplanet transits. Kepler Cam is closely tied with the Hands-On Universe (HOU) project that aims to have high school students actively involved in research projects such as asteroid discovery, supernova searches, cataclysmic variable observations, and studies of the moons of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Last fall (2003), HOU completed an NSF funded study in the relative effectiveness of online and face-to-face professional development courses. The evaluator for the project was TIMSS (Third International Math and Science Study). Findings, based on student performance, indicate that online teacher courses are as effective as face-to-face courses in teacher professional development. Details are in this paper.

  11. An Evaluation of Two Hands-On Lab Styles for Plant Biodiversity in Undergraduate Biology

    PubMed Central

    Maines, Anastasia P.; Francis, Clinton D.; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice exam in the concurrent lecture. Attitudes toward biology and treatments were also assessed. We used linear mixed-effect models to determine impacts of lab style on lower-order cognition (LO) and higher-order cognition (HO) based on Bloom's taxonomy. Relative to the expository treatment, the learning cycle treatment had a positive effect on HO and a negative effect on LO included in lab reports; a positive effect on transfer of LO from the lab report to the quiz; negative impacts on LO quiz performance and on attitudes toward the lab; and a higher degree of perceived difficulty. The learning cycle treatment had no influence on transfer of HO from lab report to quiz or exam; quiz performance on HO questions; exam performance on LO and HO questions; and attitudes toward biology as a science. The importance of LO as a foundation for HO relative to these lab styles is addressed. PMID:25185232

  12. An evaluation of two hands-on lab styles for plant biodiversity in undergraduate biology.

    PubMed

    Basey, John M; Maines, Anastasia P; Francis, Clinton D; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice exam in the concurrent lecture. Attitudes toward biology and treatments were also assessed. We used linear mixed-effect models to determine impacts of lab style on lower-order cognition (LO) and higher-order cognition (HO) based on Bloom's taxonomy. Relative to the expository treatment, the learning cycle treatment had a positive effect on HO and a negative effect on LO included in lab reports; a positive effect on transfer of LO from the lab report to the quiz; negative impacts on LO quiz performance and on attitudes toward the lab; and a higher degree of perceived difficulty. The learning cycle treatment had no influence on transfer of HO from lab report to quiz or exam; quiz performance on HO questions; exam performance on LO and HO questions; and attitudes toward biology as a science. The importance of LO as a foundation for HO relative to these lab styles is addressed. PMID:25185232

  13. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for ansforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with general information such as installation instructions, starting and stopping the program, and some pointers on how to get around inside the program. Next, database concepts and structure are discussed. Following that discussion are nine sections, one for each of the menu options on the SAPHIRE main menu, wherein the purpose and general capabilities for each option are furnished. Next, the capabilities and limitations of the software are provided.

  14. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with general information such as installation instructions, starting and stopping the program, and some pointers on how to get around inside the program. Next, database concepts and structure are discussed. Following that discussion are nine sections, one for each of the menu options on the SAPHIRE main menu, wherein the purpose and general capabilities for each option are furnished. Next, the capabilities and limitations of the software are provided.

  15. Laboratory demonstration model: Active cleaning technique device. [for removal of contaminants from an optical surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The technique which utilizes exposure to a plasma to remove contaminants from a surface was incorporated into a laboratory model which demonstrates active cleaning by both plasma cleaning and ion sputtering modes of operation. The development phase is reported and includes discussion of the plasma tube configuration, device design, and performance tests. A general description of the active cleaning device is provided which includes information on the main power/plasma discharge sensors, and the power, gas supply, and ion accelerator systems. Development of the active cleaning species at high vacuum conditions is described and results indicate that plasma cleaning occurs in the region of a visible plume which extends from the end of the plasma tube. Recommendations are made for research to determine the plasma cleaning mechanism and the plasma species responsible for the cleaning, as well limitations on the type of contaminants that can be removed.

  16. The effects on community college student physics achievement and attitudes about learning physics due to inquiry-based laboratory activities versus cookbook laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nock, George Allen Brittingham

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine the effects on community college student physics conceptual achievement and attitudes about learning physics due to the use of inquiry-based laboratory activities versus cookbook laboratory activities. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to test for differences in mean post-test Force Concept Inventory (FCI) score for two different types of physics lab instruction (IL versus CBL). Results of the ANCOVA, F (1, 35) = 0.761, p < 0.389, supported the null hypothesis that no significant difference was found in the post-test FCI scores of the two groups. An ANCOVA was performed to test for differences in mean post-test Mechanics Baseline Test (MBT) score for two different types of physics lab instruction (IL versus CBL)., however, the covariate and the dependent variable were shown to not be linearly related. Therefore, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare MBT scores. The results of the ANOVA, F (1, 36) = 0.066, p < 0.798, supported the null hypothesis that there was no significant difference in MBT scores of the two groups. A step-wise multiple linear regression was used to analyze the relationships between the FCI post-test score and the type of instruction, FCI pre-test score, and American College Test (ACT) science reasoning sub-scores. The FCI pre-test score and ACT science score were shown to be the best predictors of FCI post-test score. Another step-wise multiple linear regression was used to analyze the relationships between the MBT post-test score and type of instruction, MBT pre-test score, and ACT science reasoning sub-scores. The ACT Science sub-scores were determined to be the best predictor of MBT post-test score. An independent t-test was used to compare the mean lecture test grades for the lab groups taught using inquiry and cookbook methods. The mean lecture test scores of the inquiry-based lab group (M = 81.39, S.D. = 8.15) were found to be significantly higher, t (36) = -2.021, p < 0.0255, than the cookbook lab group (M = 75.74, S.D. = 9.07). A dependent t-test was used to compare the mean difference in Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) percent favorable scores for the lab groups taught using inquiry and cookbook methods. Results of the t-test, t (36) = 0.897, p < 0.376, failed to reject the null hypothesis that the CLASS scores differed by lab instruction type.

  17. Implementation of the 2013 Astro-Science Workshop, a Hands-on High Altitude Ballooning Program at the Adler Planetarium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Gayle; Martynowycz, M. W.; Hammergren, M.

    2014-01-01

    For the past 7 years, high school students participating in the Astro-Science Workshop at the Adler Planetarium have been able to access the extreme environment of near space (approximately 30 km altitude) using high altitude balloons. Taking a hands-on approach the program has allowed students to design, build, and launch their own experiments with programming based at the Adler Planetarium. During flight, payloads are subjected to temperatures of around -65° C, atmospheric pressure of only 1% that at sea level, and cosmic radiation levels more than 60 times the surface background. In some ways, conditions at these altitudes are much like those at the surface of Mars, providing students with the opportunity to build and operate real-world analogs of interplanetary probes. We have found that this hands-on, student-driven research-based program is enhanced by implementing classroom and lab activities as well as by incorporating instruction and collaboration with research professionals currently active in the field of astronomy. We present the steps taken to implement the 2013 Astro-Science Workshop at the Adler Planetarium with a focus on daily instruction and operations planning and launch preparation.

  18. A laboratory batch reactor test for assessing nonspeciated volatile organic compound biodegradation in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Cano, M L; Saterbak, A; van Compernolle, R; Williams, M P; Huot, M E; Rhodes, I A; Allen, C C

    2003-01-01

    The relative rates of biodegradation and stripping and volatilization of nonspeciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in wastewater treated with aerobic activated-sludge processes can be quantified using a newly developed procedure. This method was adapted from the original aerated draft tube reactor test that was developed to measure biodegradation rate constants for specific volatile pollutants of interest. The original batch test has been modified to include solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers for sampling in the gas phase. The experimental procedure using SPME fibers does not require specific identification and quantitation of individual pollutants and can be used to evaluate wastewater with multiple VOCs. To illustrate use of this procedure, laboratory experiments were conducted using biomass and wastewater or effluent from three activated-sludge treatment systems. Each experiment consisted of two trials: a stripping-only trial without biomass and a stripping plus biodegradation trial using biomass from the activated-sludge unit of interest. Data from the two trials were used to quantify the rates of biodegradation by difference. The activated-sludge systems tested were a laboratory diffused-air reactor treating refinery wastewater, a full-scale surface aerated reactor treating a petrochemical wastewater, and a full-scale diffused-air reactor treating a variety of industrial effluents. The biodegradation rate constant data from each laboratory batch experiment were used in model calculations to quantify the fraction emitted (fe) and the fraction biodegraded (fbio) for each system. The fe values ranged from a maximum of 0.01 to a maximum of 0.32, whereas fbio values ranged from a minimum of 0.40 to a minimum 0.95. Two of these systems had been previously tested using a more complicated experimental approach, and the current results were in good agreement with previous results. These results indicate that biodegradation rate constant data from this laboratory method can be successfully used to predict the fate of VOCs in field-scale treatment units, and thus could potentially be used for demonstration of compliance with wastewater VOC emission regulations. PMID:12934828

  19. Current research activities at the NASA-sponsored Illinois Computing Laboratory of Aerospace Systems and Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kathryn A.

    1994-01-01

    The Illinois Computing Laboratory of Aerospace Systems and Software (ICLASS) was established to: (1) pursue research in the areas of aerospace computing systems, software and applications of critical importance to NASA, and (2) to develop and maintain close contacts between researchers at ICLASS and at various NASA centers to stimulate interaction and cooperation, and facilitate technology transfer. Current ICLASS activities are in the areas of parallel architectures and algorithms, reliable and fault tolerant computing, real time systems, distributed systems, software engineering and artificial intelligence.

  20. Immersive, hands-on, team-based geophysical education at the University of Texas Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saustrup, S.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Reece, R.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a unique and intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring/summer semester intersession. Now entering its seventh year, the course transitions students from a classroom environment through real-world, hands-on field acquisition, on to team-oriented data interpretation, culminating in a professional presentation before academic and industry employer representatives. The course is available to graduate students and select upper-division undergraduates, preparing them for direct entry into the geoscience workforce or for further academic study. Geophysical techniques used include high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, data processing, and laboratory analysis of sediments. Industry-standard equipment, methods, software packages, and visualization techniques are used throughout the course, putting students ahead of many of their peers in this respect. The course begins with a 3-day classroom introduction to the field area geology, geophysical methods, and computing resources used. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of hands-on field and lab work aboard two research vessels: UTIG's 22-foot, aluminum hulled Lake Itasca; and NOAA's 82-foot high-speed catamaran R/V Manta. The smaller vessel handles primarily shallow, inshore targets using multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and grab sampling. The larger vessel is used both inshore and offshore for multichannel seismic, CHIRP profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. Field areas to date have included Galveston and Port Aransas, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, with further work in Grand Isle scheduled for 2014. In the field, students work in teams of three, participating in survey design, instrument set-up, field deployment, data acquisition optimization, quality control, data archival, log-keeping, real-time data processing, laboratory sediment analysis, and even boat-handling. Teams are rotated through the two vessels and the onshore field laboratory to ensure that each student has hands-on experience with each aspect of the process. Although all students work on all data areas in the field, after returning from the field each team is assigned a particular region or geologic problem to interpret. Each team prepares and presents a formal presentation to UTIG researchers and industry representatives, explaining and defending their interpretations. This unique approach to hands-on field training, real-world science, and project-based teamwork helps prepare students for direct entry into the workforce, giving them a leg up on competitors for positions. This course has an impressive success ratio to show, with many students receiving job offers directly as a result of their participation in the course.

  1. Assessment of a Virtual Laboratory for Geotechnical Engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Robert Wyatt; Pedro Arduino; Emir Jose Macari

    In the study of engineering science phenomena, there is no substitute for hands-on experience opportunities. However, despite the extent to which laboratories are commonplace in engineering education, many obstacles stand in the way of achieving satisfactory hands-on experience. The cost of laboratories and associated experiments, in terms of time, space, and finances, limits the complexity of experiments that can be

  2. Almahata Sitta meteorite: gamma -activity measurements at Monte dei Cappuccini Laboratory in Torino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taricco, C.; Bhandari, N.; Colombetti, P.; Romero, A.; Vivaldo, G.; Sinha, N.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.

    The asteroid 2008TC3 was telescopically seen prior to entering Earth's atmosphere and was predicted to fall in Sudan on October 7, 2008, as it actually happened. Subsequently, many fragments were collected from the Nubian desert. At Monte dei Cappuccini Laboratory (IFSI, INAF) in Torino, using a selective gamma spectrometer we measured gamma rays from fragment #15, one of the largest retrieved, a ureilite of mass 75 g. Six cosmogenic radionuclides have been measured (46textrm {Sc}, 57textrm {Co}, 54textrm {Mn}, 22textrm {Na}, 60textrm {Co} and 26textrm {Al}). 60Co and 26Al activities allowed us to deduce that the fragment was located at a depth of 41±14 cm inside the 1.5-2 m radius asteroid. Moreover, 22Na activity is slightly greater than expected on the basis of the average cosmic ray flux and this could be ascribed to the prolonged solar minimum preceding the meteorite fall.

  3. MRI-compatible Hands-on Cooperative Control of a Pneumatically Actuated Robot

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Ankur; Wood, Brad; Mazilu, Dumitru; Horvath, Keith A.; Li, Ming

    2011-01-01

    MRI compatible robots are emerging as useful tools for image guided interventions. A shared control between a user and the MRI compatible robot makes it more intuitive instrument especially during setup phases of interventions. We present a MRI compatible, hands-on cooperative system using Innomotion robotic arm. An economic MRI compatible user input sensor was developed and its functionality was tested under typical application conditions. Performance improvement in phantom tasks shows promise of adding hands-on interface in MRI compatible robots. PMID:21423882

  4. Field and Laboratory Investigations of Enhanced Biological Activity Influencing Groundwater Velocity and Electromagnetic Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillig, P. C.; Devlin, J. F.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Patterson, E.; Roberts, J. A.; McGlashan, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    Field observations of groundwater velocity using point velocity probes (PVPs) and aquifer dielectric properties using ground penetrating radar (GPR) were made in a bioremediating, gasoline contaminated aquifer to which dissolved oxygen was introduced using Oxygen Release Compound (ORC®). PVPs are sensitive to changes in groundwater flow; whereas GPR is sensitive to changes in the dielectric and geoelectric properties of the pore- fluid and aquifer material. Therefore, the two methods provided complimentary and independent evidence for pore-scale changes associated with enhanced biological activity. Following the addition of ORC, PVP and GPR measured velocities nearest the ORC wells changed in a consistent manner throughout the experiment. GPR velocities measured further down-gradient, outside the influence of the ORC, did not indicate the same trend. Results from geochemical and flow modeling, combined with gas and biomass measurements, show that PVP and GPR velocity changes were not artifacts of seasonally fluctuating hydraulic gradient or temperature. Rather, the changes appear to be caused by factors related to elevated levels biological activity in the aquifer. Preliminary geophysical laboratory testing in a large sandbox reactor previously identified consistent trends with field GPR data that mirrored the field observations. A new, more detailed, laboratory experiment using GPR and PVPs was initiated to 1) confirm with confidence the phenomena observed in the field and the preliminary lab tank experiment, and 2) to gain additional understanding of the mechanisms responsible for PVP and GPR responses. At the time of writing, the results of the detailed experiment are pending.

  5. A System for Implanting Laboratory Mice with Light-Activated Microtransponders

    PubMed Central

    Gruda, Maryann C; Pinto, Amanda; Craelius, Aaron; Davidowitz, Hanan; Kopacka, Wesley M; Li, Ji; Qian, Jay; Rodriguez, Efrain; Kuspiel, Edward; Mandecki, Wlodek

    2010-01-01

    The mouse is the most commonly used laboratory animal, accounting for up to 80% of all mammals used in research studies. Because rodents generally are group-housed, an efficient system of uniquely identifying individual animals for use in research studies, breeding, and proper colony management is required. Several temporary and permanent methods (for example, ear punching and toe clipping) are available for labeling research mice and other small animals, each with advantages and disadvantages. This report describes a new radiofrequency identification tagging method that uses 500-µm, light-activated microtransponders implanted subcutaneously into the ear or tail of mice. The preferred location for implanting is in the side of the tail, because implantation at this site was simple to perform and was associated with shorter implantation times (average, 53 versus 325 s) and a higher success rate (98% versus 50%) compared with the ear. The main benefits of using light-activated microtransponders over other identification methods, including other radiofrequency identification tags, is their small size, which minimizes stress to the animals during implantation and low cost due to their one-piece (monolithic) design. In addition, the implantation procedure uses a custom-designed 21-gauge needle injector and does not require anesthetization of the mice. We conclude that this method allows improved identification and management of laboratory mice. PMID:21205448

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TEACHING LABORATORY AND SUPPLEMENTARY EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING ACTIVITIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an effort to improve the ability of agriculturally and environmentally oriented graduates to work in interdisciplinary teams to solve problems, an environmental quality teaching laboratory was developed. In this laboratory, virtual, field, and laboratory experiences provide the experiential and ...

  7. International Council for Laboratory Animal Science: International activities. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources annual report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    In late 1987, the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) requested that the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR), National Research Council (NRC), National Academy of Sciences, reestablish US national membership in the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). The ICLAS is the only worldwide organization whose goal is to foster the humane use of animals in medical research and testing. ILAR`s Mission Statement reflects its commitment to producing highly respected documents covering a wide range of scientific issues, including databases in genetic stocks, species specific management guides, guidelines for humane care of animals, and position papers on issues affecting the future of the biological sciences. As such, ILAR is recognized nationally and internationally as an independent, scientific authority in the development of animal sciences in biomedical research.

  8. LINCOLN LABORATORY MILITARY FELLOWS PROGRAM APPLICATION Each year MIT Lincoln Laboratory supports active duty military officers by awarding Lincoln Laboratory Military

    E-print Network

    Reuter, Martin

    (s) of interest: (see detailed descriptions of mission areas) Communications Systems & Cyber Security ISR will perform research at Lincoln Laboratory approximately two days a week during the academic year. Lincoln/she is required to complete a thesis. The thesis topic corresponds with the research they will be doing at Lincoln

  9. 9.02 Brain Laboratory, Spring 2002

    E-print Network

    Miller, Earl

    Consists of a series of hands-on laboratories designed to give students experience with common techniques for conducting neuroscience research. Included are sessions on anatomical, ablation, neurophysiological, and computer ...

  10. Implementing Hands-On Science in the Elementary Schools: A District-Wide Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Kelly S.; Luttrell, H. Dale

    1992-01-01

    Describes a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project in which hands-on science became the predominant mode of instruction in a school district. Explores the effectiveness of the program and its implications for the future and the science supervisor. (KHR)

  11. Integrating Hands-On Undergraduate Research in an Applied Spatial Science Senior Level Capstone Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhavy, David L.; Unger, Daniel R.; Hung, I-Kuai; Douglass, David

    2015-01-01

    A senior within a spatial science Ecological Planning capstone course designed an undergraduate research project to increase his spatial science expertise and to assess the hands-on instruction methodology employed within the Bachelor of Science in Spatial Science program at Stephen F Austin State University. The height of 30 building features…

  12. Short Topic Submission SEED: 25 Hands-on Labs for Information Assurance Education

    E-print Network

    Du, Wenliang "Kevin"

    ­ Short Topic Submission ­ SEED: 25 Hands-on Labs for Information Assurance Education Wenliang Du information assurance courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels. It is also intended for the educators who provide professional training in the information assurance field. Intended Outcome: The audience

  13. Hands On Science with NOAA TITLE: Fins, Tails and Scales: Identifying Great Lakes Fish

    E-print Network

    Hands ­ On Science with NOAA TITLE: Fins, Tails and Scales: Identifying Great Lakes Fish OVERVIEW: Working with a set of illustrated Great Lakes fish cards, students identify distinguishing characteristics an idea for how dichotomous keys are made and to become more familiar with the 10 Great Lakes fish

  14. ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012.

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012. ______ 99-001 DNA Kit purchases. ICE Photochromic T-shirt (colors change in sunlight) ______ 93-002 Adult sizes ___S $_________ ______ 11-002 ICE Gift Certificate ___$25 ___$50 ___$75 ___$100 $_________ Replacement Parts, Manuals, Kit

  15. Visualizing the Transition State: A Hands-On Approach to the Arrhenius Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Swanson, Matthew S.; Sayers, Deborah K.

    2007-01-01

    An exercise is presented in which the kinetics of the irreversible "reaction" of pennies in the heads-up state to pennies in the tails-up state is simulated by a hands-on, Monte Carlo approach. In addition, the exercise incorporates a second simulation in which the irreversible "reaction" of dice with a red face uppermost to a blue face uppermost…

  16. Hands On Science with NOAA TITLE: Ocean Acidification and Dry Ice

    E-print Network

    Hands ­ On Science with NOAA TITLE: Ocean Acidification and Dry Ice OVERVIEW: Participants revolution ocean. 2. In the second container, add the same amount of water and indicator solution IDEAS · Instead of dry ice, bubble smoke from a candle into the indicator solution. · Investigate

  17. The SEED Project: Providing Hands-on Lab Exercises for Computer Security Education

    E-print Network

    Du, Wenliang "Kevin"

    The SEED Project: Providing Hands-on Lab Exercises for Computer Security Education Wenliang Du, the SEED (SEcurity EDucation) project started in 2002 with NSF support. Nine years later, with help from over 20 students, we have developed 30 SEED labs, covering many security topics: vulnerabilities

  18. Hands-on Haptics: Exploring Non-Visual Visualization Using The Sense of Touch

    E-print Network

    Williamson, John

    .2 User Interfaces. (D2.2, H1.2, I3.6). Haptic I/O. INTRODUCTION The explosion of software applicationsHands-on Haptics: Exploring Non-Visual Visualization Using The Sense of Touch Steven Wall employed. Haptic interfaces, such as force feedback and tactile devices, offer the opportunity to present

  19. Mechatronics for the Masses: a Hands-on Project for a Large, Introductory

    E-print Network

    Durfee, William K.

    Mechatronics for the Masses: a Hands-on Project for a Large, Introductory Design Class* WILLIAM K, the triad that comprises mechatronics. Resources, including extensive web-based tutorial information this mechatronics design project possible and a successful learning experience for students. INTRODUCTION

  20. Haptic Interface for Hands-On Instruction in System Dynamics and Embedded Control

    E-print Network

    Gillespie, Brent

    Haptic Interface for Hands-On Instruction in System Dynamics and Embedded Control R. Brent Arbor, MI 48109 jfr@umich.edu Abstract Haptic interface serves as an ideal context and platform-axis haptic interface devices. The iTouch motor is a low-budget, single axis, voice-coil based haptic device

  1. Developing Physics Concepts through Hands-On Problem Solving: A Perspective on a Technological Project Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Chen, Mei-Yung; Wong, Ashley; Hsu, Tsui-Fang; Peng, Chih-Chi

    2012-01-01

    In a contest featuring hands-on projects, college students were required to design a simple crawling worm using planning, self-monitoring and self-evaluation processes to solve contradictive problems. To enhance the efficiency of problem solving, one needs to practice meta-cognition based on an application of related scientific concepts. The…

  2. Understanding the Effects of Cognitive Dissonance during Interpretation: Implications for "Hands-On" Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Describes a field experiment that was designed to test the effects of three different interpretive programs on students' attitudes toward live, nonpoisonous snakes. One of the treatments measured the effectiveness of using "hands-on" interpretive techniques. Direct contact with snakes improved students' attitudes but only slightly. Females'…

  3. Three Simple Hands-On Soil Exercises Extension Professionals Can Incorporate into Natural Sciences Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinschmidt, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The importance of healthy soil and of conveying the importance of soils starts by conveying a few basic concepts of soil science cannot be overstated. This article provides three hands-on exercises Extension professionals can add to natural resources or Master Gardener education curricula. These natural sciences exercises are easy to prepare for…

  4. ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012.

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012. ______ 99-001 DNA-005 Explorations in Materials Science (Teacher Kit) $40 $_________ ______ 97-005X Explorations in Materials Science Components (please fill in; complete list available at http

  5. ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through September 30, 2012.

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through September 30, 2012. ______ 99-005 Explorations in Materials Science (Teacher Kit) $43 $_________ ______ 97-005X Explorations in Materials Science Components (please fill in; complete list available at http

  6. Encouraging Technology and Hands On Science: A School System Model for Systemic Change in Science Education

    E-print Network

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    components to this plan: 1. Using research based inquiry materials- recommended by the National ScienceEncouraging Technology and Hands On Science: A School System Model for Systemic Change in Science Education Danae' Wirth Master Science Teacher, Elkhart Community Schools, Elkhart IN dwirth@elkhart.k12.in

  7. ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through December 31, 2011.

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through December 31, 2011. ______ 99-001 DNA-005 Explorations in Materials Science (Teacher Kit) $40 $_________ ______ 97-005X Explorations in Materials Science, and kit components are available for many ICE kits. Contact the ICE Office or go to http

  8. Students Doing Chemistry: A Hand-On Experience for K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selco, Jodye I.; Bruno, Mary; Chan, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on, minds-on inquiry chemistry experiment was developed for use in K-12 schools that enables students to combine the chemicals of their choice and observe the results. The chemistry involved is water based and builds upon acid-base, double displacement, and iodometric detection of starch reactions. Chemicals readily available in the…

  9. A Successful Engineering Design Education Program Incorporating "Hands-On" and Interaction with Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durfee, William K.

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota developed a new engineering design curriculum to meet the pedagogical needs of undergraduate and graduate engineering students and to excite and retain engineering students of both genders and from all backgrounds. The curriculum is based on a series of guided, hands-on

  10. Hands-On Teaching through a Student Field Project in Applied Geophysics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klasner, John Samuel; Crockett, Jeffrey Jon; Horton, Kimberly Beth; Poe, Michele Daun; Wollert, Matthew Todd

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Proffit Mountain project, part of a senior-level class in applied geophysics that provides students with hands-on experience in applying principles and techniques learned in class. Students conduct magnetic, gravity, and radiometric studies over a diabase body which intrudes rhyolite at Proffitt Mountain in southeast Missouri.…

  11. The Effect of Hands-on Occupation on Recall Memory in Men with Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eakman, Aaron M.; Nelson, David L.

    2001-01-01

    Males with closed head injuries (n=30) participated in a study of their ability to follow simple written and verbal instructions, upper extremity function for a simple meal task, and ability to attend to a task for 30 minutes. Hands-on tasks resulted in greater recall of instructions than verbal training only. (Contains 15 references.) (JOW)

  12. "The Hands-On Model of the Internet": Engaging Diverse Groups of Visitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Based on ethnographic field research at the Miraikan National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Tokyo, this article uses the "Hands-on Model of the Internet" in the Future, Innovation, and Society section of the museum as a case study in the various issues related to effective public engagement in science museums. Museum…

  13. A Hands-on Approach to Teaching Civil Engineering Technology Design Courses: A Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maher M. Murad

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the pedagogical aspects of developing and teaching civil engineering technology design courses using a hands-on approach and the positive impact this has on student learning. The Highway Surveying and Design was selected as a case study. The elective course is offered at the senior level in the Civil Engineering Technology (CET) at the University of Pittsburgh at

  14. A Hands-On Freshman Survey Course to Steer Undergraduates into Microsystems Coursework and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddings, M. A.; Stephenson, J. C.; Harvey, I. R.

    2009-01-01

    Full class loads and inflexible schedules can be a significant obstacle in the implementation of freshman survey courses designed to guide engineering students into emerging research areas such as micro- and nanosystems. A hands-on, interactive course was developed to excite freshmen early in their engineering program to pursue research and…

  15. Lab 04: Package management Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal

    E-print Network

    Walker, Matthew P.

    Lab 04: Package management Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal 2012-02-13, due 2012-02-27 Building a Debian package Debian has a robust binary package management system, and in almost all cases more flexibility: · use a newer version of package which is unavailable in the repositories (hasn't yet

  16. Lecture 04 Part 2: Package management Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal

    E-print Network

    Walker, Matthew P.

    Lecture 04 Part 2: Package management Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal 2012-02-13 Make system and applications OS is itself­ a bunch of packages · saves disk space and memory space because), which is a package system without the central repository to fetch, install, and update from Debian

  17. Performance Assessments in Science: Hands-On Tasks and Scoring Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stecher, Brian M.; Klein, Stephen P.

    In 1992, RAND received a grant from the National Science Foundation to study the technical quality of performance assessments in science and to evaluate their feasibility for use in large-scale testing programs. The specific goals of the project were to assess the reliability and validity of hands-on science testing and to investigate the cost and…

  18. Hands On Science with NOAA TITLE: Plate Tectonics and Lava Lamps

    E-print Network

    Hands ­ On Science with NOAA TITLE: Plate Tectonics and Lava Lamps OVERVIEW: Participants use move. SCIENCE BACKGROUND: Tectonic plates are portions of the Earth's outer crust (the lithosphere). These convection currents cause the tectonic plates to move several centimeters per year relative to each other

  19. Implementation of the six grumbly priorities during decommissioning activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, E.F. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mikkola, A.W. [Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Decommissioning work continues to play an important role in the long-term activities of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Recent completion of the SPERT IV waste tank project marked the 25th facility to be decommissioned at the INEL. These facilities have either been totally removed and the area restored to a natural condition, or the buildings decontaminated and returned to further use, The long-term goal for the INEL decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program is to complete decommissioning of its surplus facilities in a safe, cost-effective, and environmentally sound manner. The INEL D&D program was established in late 1977 and has remained active since that time. The types of facilities decommissioned to date range from concrete storage pads to complex reactor and fuel-reprocessing facilities. Disassembly techniques have ranged from plasma torches, to headache balls, to linear-shaped high explosives. Late last year, Thomas P. Grumbly, Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), issued six priorities to guide the implementation of environmental management activities at DOE sites.

  20. Recent upgrade of the in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Dilmanian, F.A..; Rarback, H.; Meron, M.; Kamen, Y.; Yasumura, S.; Weber, D.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stamatelatos, I.E. [Ioannina Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics; Lidofsky, L.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Nuclear Engineering; Pierson, R.N. Jr. [Saint Luke`s-Roosevelt Body Composition Unit, New York, NY (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of a delayed- and a prompt-gamma neutron activation (DGNA and PGNA) system and an inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. The total body contents of several basic elements, including potassium, calcium, chlorine, sodium, and phosphorus are measured at the DGNA system; total body carbon is measured at the INS system; and the nitrogen-tohydrogen ratio is measured at the PGNA system. Based on the elemental composition, body compartments, such as total body fat and total body protein can be computed with additional independently measured parameters, such as total body water, body size, and body weight. Information on elemental and compartmental body composition obtained through neutron activation analysis is useful, if not essential, for research on growth, malnutrition, aging diseases, such as osteoporosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in which the progression of the illness is closely related to changes in major body compartments, such as bone, adipose tissue, and muscle. The DGNA system has been modified and upgraded several times since it was first built. Recently, all three systems underwent major upgrades. This upgrading and some preliminary studies carried out with the modified facilities are reported here.

  1. A Hands-On Activity to Raise Awareness about Healthy Sun Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    João Fonseca, Maria; Costa, Patrício; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes sunburn and has been consistently associated with increased susceptibility to melanoma and skin ageing. Acknowledging the need to promote healthy sun exposure habits, numerous educational initiatives have been developed to raise public awareness towards this issue. However, studies…

  2. Summer Camp to Engage Students in Nutritional Chemistry Using Popular Culture and Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skluzacek, Joanna M.; Harper, Joshua; Herron, Emily; Bortiatynski, Jacqueline M.

    2010-01-01

    Action Potential Science Experience (APSE) is a five-day summer camp offering science opportunities for K-8 students. The focus of the APSE curriculum is to teach science concepts and methods while challenging the participants to solve an overarching problem from the popular-culture context. The participants in the APSE entitled Burger 'N Fries…

  3. Art Activities about Mesopotamia, Egypt and Islam. Hands-On Ancient People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Yvonne Y.

    This book features objects of the Mesopotamian, the Egyptian, and Islamic cultures. In exploring important contributions in ancient art, the book presents visuals that are interpretations of authentic artifacts, usually in museum collections, or illustrations from archaeological publications and articles. Historical items (n=55+) have been adapted…

  4. Access Nature[TM]: 45 Fun, Hands-On Activities for Everyone!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeras, Bethe Gilbert; Heath, David

    "Access Nature" is an outdoor science curriculum that focuses on habitats. This curriculum targets students ages 6-14 and aims to develop environmental awareness, environmental leadership skills, and outdoor knowledge and skills. Specific adaptations for disabled students are also considered. Contents include: (1) "Introduction to Habitats"; (2)…

  5. The Scanning Theremin Microscope: A Model Scanning Probe Instrument for Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Wasio, Natalie A.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2014-01-01

    A model scanning probe microscope, designed using similar principles of operation to research instruments, is described. Proximity sensing is done using a capacitance probe, and a mechanical linkage is used to scan this probe across surfaces. The signal is transduced as an audio tone using a heterodyne detection circuit analogous to that used in…

  6. Hands-On Activities and Challenge Tests in Agricultural and Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poudel, D. D.; Vincent, L. M.; Anzalone, C.; Huner, J.; Wollard, D.; Clement, T.; DeRamus, A.; Blakewood, G.

    2005-01-01

    Many agricultural and environmental problems are interrelated and overlapping. Several agencies, including nonprofit organizations, have developed programs to educate schoolchildren about agricultural and environmental issues; however, programs that integrate both agricultural and environmental learning, especially among middle and high school…

  7. Cognitive Achievement and Motivation in Hands-on and Teacher-Centred Science Classes: Does an additional hands-on consolidation phase (concept mapping) optimise cognitive learning at work stations?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabine Gerstner; Franz X. Bogner

    2010-01-01

    Our study monitored the cognitive and motivational effects within different educational instruction schemes: On the one hand, teacher?centred versus hands?on instruction; on the other hand, hands?on instruction with and without a knowledge consolidation phase (concept mapping). All the instructions dealt with the same content. For all participants, the hands?on approach as well as the concept mapping adaptation were totally new.

  8. Methodological proposal for occupational health and safety actions in research laboratories with nanotechnologies activities.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Luís Renato Balbão; Amaral, Fernando Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnologies is a multidisciplinary set of techniques to manipulate matter on nanoscale level, more precisely particles below 100 nm whose characteristic due to small size is essentially different from those found in macro form materials. Regarding to these new properties of the materials there are knowledge gaps about the effects of these particles on human organism and the environment. Although it still being considered emerging technology it is growing increasingly fast as well as the number of products using nanotechnologies in some production level and so the number of researchers involved with the subject. Given this scenario and based on literature related, a comprehensive methodology for health and safety at work for researching laboratories with activities in nanotechnologies was developed, based on ILO structure guidelines for safety and health at work system on which a number of nanospecific recommendations were added to. The work intends to offer food for thought on controlling risks associated to nanotechnologies. PMID:22317200

  9. Hands-on distance learning is an effective way to boost physics understanding and skills of inservice teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straley, Joseph

    2007-11-01

    Since 1993 the University of Kentucky has been developing methodologies and resources for boosting in-service teachers' process skills and conceptual understanding of physics through various forms of inquiry based learning. With funding from FIPSE we have developed a set of distance learning courses (``Light'', ``Temperature, Heat, & Energy'', ``Electricity & Magnetism'', ``Force, Motion, & Energy'') to teach physics concepts to rural teachers in grades 4-9. These courses consist of hands-on activities that the teachers can use in their own classrooms, and are based on a materials kit sent to each participant, allowing guided inquiry be the instructional approach. The courses are asynchronous and may be taken by individuals or small groups, for professional development or course credit, and are now being offered to teachers nationwide (see http://www.hovphysics.com). With NSF support we are now studying how much of what a teacher learns in a course transfers to the teacher's students.

  10. A simulator application of a 'hands-on throttle and stick' concept to a transport pilot/autopilot interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, A. M.; Parrish, R. V.; Hogge, T. W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the initial experiences garnered in applying a multifunction control strategy, based on the U.S. Air Force's 'Hands-On Throttle-and-Stick' concept for fighter aircraft to a transport aircraft simulator. The multifunction control strategy involves the activation of various flight system/subsystem operations (such as guidance and control, communication, and navigation functions) by use of menu displays and throttle and stick switches. The initial application of this multifunction control (MFC) concept was developed around a pilot/autopilot interface, contrasting a conventional, dedicated autopilot interface to an MFC implementation. The simulator characteristics and autopilot functions, as well as the conventional interface and MFC hardware/software, which were utilized in the application, are described herein. Initial pilot reaction and suggested improvements to this particular implementation are discussed. The paper terminates with a glance at plans for improvements and future applications based on the outcome of this initial study.

  11. Gaining a Better Understanding of Estuarine Circulation and Improving Data Visualization Skills Through a Hands-on Contouring Exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailloux, B. J.; Kenna, T. C.

    2008-12-01

    The creation and accurate interpretation of graphs is becoming a lost art among students. The availability of numerous graphing software programs makes the act of graphing data easy but does not necessarily aide students in interpreting complex visual data. This is especially true for contour maps; which have become a critical skill in the earth sciences and everyday life. In multiple classes, we have incorporated a large-scale, hands-on, contouring exercise of temperature, salinity, and density data collected in the Hudson River Estuary. The exercise allows students to learn first-hand how to plot, analyze, and present three dimensional data. As part of a day-long sampling expedition aboard an 80' research vessel, students deploy a water profiling instrument (Seabird CTD). Data are collected along a transect between the Verrazano and George Washington Bridges. The data are then processed and binned at 0.5 meter intervals. The processed data is then used during a later laboratory period for the contouring exercise. In class, students work in groups of 2 to 4 people and are provided with the data, a set of contouring instructions, a piece of large (3' x 3') graph paper, a ruler, and a set of colored markers. We then let the groups work together to determine the details of the graphs. Important steps along the way are talking to the students about X and Y scales, interpolation, and choices of contour intervals and colors. Frustration and bottlenecks are common at the beginning when students are unsure how to even begin with the raw data. At some point during the exercise, students start to understand the contour concept and each group usually produces a finished contour map in an hour or so. Interestingly, the groups take pride in the coloring portion of the contouring as it indicates successful interpretation of the data. The exercise concludes with each group presenting and discussing their contour plot. In almost every case, the hands-on graphing has improved the "students" visualization skills. Contouring has been incorporated into the River Summer (www.riversumer.org, http://www.riversumer.org/) program and our Environmental Measurements laboratory course. This has resulted in the exercise being utilized with undergraduates, high-school teachers, graduate students, and college faculty. We are in the process of making this curricular module available online to educators.

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2011 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun Williams; Brenda R. Pace; Hollie K. Gilbert; Christina L. Olson

    2012-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report is intended as a stand-alone document that summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2011. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders, serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work, and meet an agreed upon legal requirement.

  13. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Clayton F. Marler; Christina L. Olson; Brenda R. Pace; Julie Braun Williams

    2011-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2010. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work.

  14. Multi-stage learning aids applied to hands-on software training.

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Rother, Magdalena; Pleus, Alexandra; Upmeier zu Belzen, Annette

    2010-11-01

    Delivering hands-on tutorials on bioinformatics software and web applications is a challenging didactic scenario. The main reason is that trainees have heterogeneous backgrounds, different previous knowledge and vary in learning speed. In this article, we demonstrate how multi-stage learning aids can be used to allow all trainees to progress at a similar speed. In this technique, the trainees can utilize cards with hints and answers to guide themselves self-dependently through a complex task. We have successfully conducted a tutorial for the molecular viewer PyMOL using two sets of learning aid cards. The trainees responded positively, were able to complete the task, and the trainer had spare time to respond to individual questions. This encourages us to conclude that multi-stage learning aids overcome many disadvantages of established forms of hands-on software training. PMID:20656749

  15. Creating a Hands-On Robot Environment for Teaching Assembly Language Programming

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rababaah, Haroun R. A.

    Real-world computer applications and assembly language programming are often taught with abstract exercises. To provide hands-on, real-world experience early, we introduce robots into our assembly language class. This paper describes the creation of a bridge from assembly language to a publicly available simulator, programming exercises, and a reconfigurable maze environment compatible with the simulator. This, with other open-source software, provides a complete development environment at no cost to the student.

  16. "RealTime Physics": Active Learning Labs Transforming the Introductory Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokoloff, David R.; Laws, Priscilla W.; Thornton, Ronald K.

    2007-01-01

    Computer-based tools that enable students to collect, display and analyse data in real time have catalysed the design of a laboratory curriculum that allows students to master a coherent body of physics concepts while acquiring traditional laboratory skills. This paper describes "RealTime Physics", a sequenced introductory laboratory curriculum…

  17. Using a Science Writing Heuristic to Enhance Learning Outcomes from Laboratory Activities in Seventh-Grade Science: Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Brian; Wallace, Carolyn; Yang, Eun-Mi

    2004-01-01

    Science laboratory activities within secondary science have traditionally followed prescriptive outlines both in the structure and reporting of the activity. Building on current understandings of writing to learn science strategies, a Science Writing Heuristic has been developed that encourages students to examine laboratory activities much more…

  18. How Authenticity and Self-Directedness and Student Perceptions Thereof Predict Competence Development in Hands-On Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaled, Anne; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hands-on simulations are increasingly used in vocational oriented curricula to create meaningful, occupation-related learning experiences. However, more insight is required about precisely what characteristics in hands-on simulations enhance outcomes that students need for their future occupation, such as competencies. This study aims to examine…

  19. The Influence of Hands On Physics Experiments on Scientific Process Skills According to Prospective Teachers' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirça, Necati

    2013-01-01

    In this study, relationship between prospective science and technology teachers' experiences in conducting Hands on physics experiments and their physics lab I achievement was investigated. Survey model was utilized and the study was carried out in the 2012 spring semester. Seven Hands on physics experiments were conducted with 28 prospective…

  20. "We're not in Kansas Anymore!" -A Hands-on Introduction to Nanoscience MEMs and Microfabrication

    E-print Network

    Smy, Tom

    "We're not in Kansas Anymore!" - A Hands-on Introduction to Nanoscience MEMs and Microfabrication Microfabrication . . . that's how you make integrated circuits, right? #12;"We're not in Kansas Anymore!" - A Hands're not in Kansas Anymore!" - A Hands-on Introduction to Nanoscience Alignment Clip Used in conjunction

  1. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 2-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  2. Laboratory and field evaluation of biological active substances of plant origin against greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum Westw. (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Taisya D. Chermenskaya; Maria O. Petrova; Elena I. Savelieva

    2009-01-01

    The behavioural responses of greenhouse whitefly to substances of plant origin were investigated in laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The following species of plants were found to provide the most active chemicals to monitor and control greenhouse whitefly – laurel Laurus nobilis L., mullein Verbascum thapsus L., tansy Tanacetum vulgare L., wormwood Artemisia vulgare L.

  3. Using Laboratory Activities Enhanced with Concept Cartoons to Support Progression in Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Burhan, Yasemin; Naseriazar, Akbar; Demircioglu, Hulya

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities enhanced with concept cartoons. The purpose of the intervention was to enhance students' understanding of acid-base chemistry for eight grade students' from two classes in a Turkish primary school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent…

  4. Analyzing the Function of Cartilage Replacements: A Laboratory Activity to Teach High School Students Chemical and Tissue Engineering Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, Julie N.; Emady, Heather N.; Galas, Richards J., Jr.; Zhange, Rong; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; Liu, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    A cartilage tissue engineering laboratory activity was developed as part of the Exciting Discoveries for Girls in Engineering (EDGE) Summer Camp sponsored by the Women In Engineering Program (WIEP) at Purdue University. Our goal was to increase awareness of chemical engineering and tissue engineering in female high school students through a…

  5. AN OVERVIEW OF HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. EPA'S NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computational modeling of human exposure to environmental pollutants is one of the primary activities of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). Assessment of human exposures is a critical part of the overall risk assessm...

  6. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  7. The plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft: Applications of laboratory simulations and active in situ experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N. H.; Samir, Uri

    1986-01-01

    Attempts to gain an understanding of spacecraft plasma dynamics via experimental investigation of the interaction between artificially synthesized, collisionless, flowing plasmas and laboratory test bodies date back to the early 1960's. In the past 25 years, a number of researchers have succeeded in simulating certain limited aspects of the complex spacecraft-space plasma interaction reasonably well. Theoretical treatments have also provided limited models of the phenomena. Several active experiments were recently conducted from the space shuttle that specifically attempted to observe the Orbiter-ionospheric interaction. These experiments have contributed greatly to an appreciation for the complexity of spacecraft-space plasma interaction but, so far, have answered few questions. Therefore, even though the plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft is fundamental to space technology, it remains largely an open issue. A brief overview is provided of the primary results from previous ground-based experimental investigations and the preliminary results of investigations conducted on the STS-3 and Spacelab 2 missions. In addition, several, as yet unexplained, aspects of the spacecraft-space plasma interaction are suggested for future research.

  8. Research productivity and activities of clinical laboratory science faculty: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Waller, K V; Wyatt, D; Karni, K R

    1998-01-01

    A national study was conducted in 1996 to compare clinical laboratory science faculty demographics, scholarly activities, and perceptions of the research environment with corresponding data reported in 1988. Faculty have made progress in earning doctorates (46%), achieving higher ranks (49%), and getting tenured (50%). Relatively few faculty are conducting much of the research, with the greater majority serving as teachers. Research productivity, as evaluated via research publications and presentations, showed that in 1996, full professors and those with doctorates published the most articles and abstracts in refereed journals; they also made more presentations than junior faculty. Faculty in research universities were more productive than those in four-year colleges and universities. The faculty surveyed in 1985 and those surveyed in 1996 perceived their research skills and environments to be almost identical. In both 1985 and 1996, the importance of research for promotion and tenure decisions ranked highest as a characteristic of the environment. Financial resources and time available for research ranked lowest. PMID:9785182

  9. Pension fund activities at Department laboratories managed by the University of California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-18

    The Department of Energy`s (Department) Office of Contractor Human Resource Management, and San Francisco and Albuquerque Field Offices have responsibility for contract administration of the Department`s interest in two separate pension plans covering University of California (University) employees at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The purpose of the audit was to review the Department`s contract administration of its interest in those pension plans.

  10. Partnering with Pueblos: Involving American Indians in environmental restoration activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shaner, M.H.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1995-02-01

    Many communities in the area surrounding Los Alamos are very concerned about the environmental impact past and current Laboratory operations have on their communities. Their main concerns are contamination of water, soil and air as well as the hazardous and radioactive wastes stored at the Laboratory site. Environmental surveillance results show that contamination may have migrated off-site through the canyons of the Pajarito Plateau to the Rio Grande. San Ildefonso Pueblo and Cochiti Pueblo are located downstream from the canyons that drain the Los Alamos town site and Laboratory lands. Several other pueblos are also located downstream from the Laboratory. The Pueblos located upstream from the laboratory indicated that contamination of air and worry about the contamination of the animals they hunt for food is a more important concern to them. There are many canyons that drain the areas where Los Alamos and Laboratory property are located. To be able to characterize those canyons that are known or suspected to have received contamination, the ER Project needs to prepare RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) work plans for approval by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Once EPA approves the work plant, characterization activities can start for the specific areas identified in the work plan.

  11. Current radar-responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Plummer, Kenneth W.; Wells, Lars M.

    2004-08-01

    Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking and Combat ID application. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company for the United States Departments of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Quality Assurance Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; R. Nims; K. J. Kvarfordt; C. Wharton

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The role of the INL in this project is that of software developer and tester. This development takes place using formal software development procedures and is subject to quality assurance (QA) processes. The purpose of this document is to describe how the SAPHIRE software QA is performed for Version 6 and 7, what constitutes its parts, and limitations of those processes.

  13. Hands-On Science Reform, Science Achievement, and the Elusive Goal of "science for All" in a Diverse Elementary School District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarria, Marissa

    Given the emphasis on "science for all" in national reform documents, this study analyzed student science achievement scores in hands-on reform versus traditional classrooms for 3,667 students in Grades 3 to 6 by gender, ethnicity, free or reduced lunch status, parent education, and level of English proficiency to determine whether these subgroups performed better or worse in reform classrooms. Teachers in reform classrooms used exemplary hands-on science kits and attended 1-day in-service training per kit. Teachers in traditional classrooms used the regular activity-based science curriculum with textbook. Gender differences favoring boys appeared in both types of classrooms, but were larger in the reform classrooms. Boys from lower socioeconomic levels performed better in reform classrooms, but limited-English-proficient boys performed worse. Parent education was significantly related to higher achievement for boys only in reform classrooms. For girls this relation was significant only in traditional classrooms. White girls performed significantly worse in reform classroom, but there were no differences for Asian and Hispanic girls. Implications for adapting hands-on science reform to meet student needs are discussed.

  14. AC 2011-457: A COMPARISON OF HANDS-ON VERSUS REMOTE LAB-ORATORY EXPERIENCE FOR INTRODUCTORY MICROPROCESSORS

    E-print Network

    LaMeres, Brock J.

    MICROPROCESSORS COURSES Brock J. LaMeres, Montana State University Brock J. LaMeres is an Assistant Professor Microprocessors Courses Abstract This paper describes an approach to assessing and improving the understanding of microprocessor systems for electrical and computer engineering students by developing measurement

  15. Special Section: Innovative Laboratory Exercises A Real-time and Hands-on Research Course in Protein Purification

    E-print Network

    Borgstahl, Gloria

    in Protein Purification and Characterization*,y, PURIFICATION AND CRYSTAL GROWTH OF HUMAN INOSINE-intensive curriculum as a special summer session. The course content gives a strong background in protein structure/chemistry, purification principles, protocol development, optimization strategies, use and pro- gramming of an automated

  16. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF ADULTICIDAL ACTIVITY OF SIXTEEN INSECT REPELLENTS IN AEROSOL SPRAYS AGAINST THREE MOSQUITO SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen commercial insect repellents (six natural and 10 chemical products) in spray formulations were evaluated in the laboratory for adult knockdown (KD) and mortality of laboratory-reared female Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Anopheles quadrimaculatus. All tested products produced significa...

  17. Early Earth Science Activities in the Sanford Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Wang; S. D. Glaser; J. R. Moore; K. Hart; G. King; T. Regan; S. S. Bang; R. K. Sani; W. M. Roggenthen

    2007-01-01

    On July 10, 2007, the former Homestake Mine, Lead, South Dakota, was selected as the development site for the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory, to become the Sanford Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory at Homestake. Work on refurbishment and certification of the Ross Shaft began in August 2007 to effect pumping of water that had reached the 5000 level

  18. Ancient microbial activity recorded in fracture fillings from granitic rocks (Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden).

    PubMed

    Heim, C; Lausmaa, J; Sjövall, P; Toporski, J; Dieing, T; Simon, K; Hansen, B T; Kronz, A; Arp, G; Reitner, J; Thiel, V

    2012-07-01

    Fracture minerals within the 1.8-Ga-old Äspö Diorite (Sweden) were investigated for fossil traces of subterranean microbial activity. To track the potential organic and inorganic biosignatures, an approach combining complementary analytical techniques of high lateral resolution was applied to drill core material obtained at -450 m depth in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory. This approach included polarization microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe (EMP) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The fracture mineral succession, consisting of fluorite and low-temperature calcite, showed a thin (20-100 ?m), dark amorphous layer lining the boundary between the two phases. Microscopic investigations of the amorphous layer revealed corrosion marks and, in places, branched tubular structures within the fluorite. Geochemical analysis showed significant accumulations of Si, Al, Mg, Fe and the light rare earth elements (REE) in the amorphous layer. In the same area, ToF-SIMS imaging revealed abundant, partly functionalized organic moieties, for example, C(x)H(y)?, C(x)H(y)N?, C(x)H(y)O?. The presence of such functionalized organic compounds was corroborated by Raman imaging showing bands characteristic of C-C, C-N and C-O bonds. According to its organic nature and the abundance of relatively unstable N- and O- heterocompounds, the organic-rich amorphous layer is interpreted to represent the remains of a microbial biofilm that established much later than the initial cooling of the Precambrian host rock. Indeed, ?¹³C, ?¹?O and ??Sr/??Sr isotope data of the fracture minerals and the host rock point to an association with a fracture reactivation event in the most recent geological past. PMID:22506979

  19. Lab-in-a-box @ school: Exiting hands-on experiments in soft matter physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Karin; Brinkmann, Martin; Müller, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Soft materials like liquids and polymers are part of everyday life, yet at school, this topic is rarely touched. Within the priority program SPP 1064 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation, we designed an outreach project that allows pupils (age 14 to 18) to perform hands-on experiments (www.labinabox.de). The experiments allow them e.g. to feel viscosity and viscoelasticity, experience surface tension or see structure formation. We call the modus operandi 'subjective experiments' to contrast them with the scientifically objective experiments, which pupils often describe as being boring. Over a dozen different experiments under the topic 'physics of fluids' are collected in a big box that travels to the school. Three other topics of boxes are available, 'physics of light, 'physics of liquid crystals', and 'physics of adhesion and friction'. Each experiment can be performed by 1-3 pupils within 10 - 20 min. That way, each scholar can perform 6 to 8 different small experiments within one topic. 'Subjective experiments' especially catch the attention of girls without disadvantaging boys. Both are fascinated by the hands-on physics experience and are therefore eager to perform also 'boring' objective experiments. Morover, before/after polls reveal that their interest in physics has greatly advanced. The project can easily be taken over and/or adapted to other topics in the natural sciences. Financial support of the German Science Foundation DFG is acknowledged.

  20. Hands-on-Science: Using Education Research to Construct Learner-Centered Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, R. R.; Chimonidou, A.; Kopp, S.

    2014-07-01

    Research into the process of learning, and learning astronomy, can be informative for the development of a course. Students are better able to incorporate and make sense of new ideas when they are aware of their own prior knowledge (Resnick et al. 1989; Confrey 1990), have the opportunity to develop explanations from their own experience in their own words (McDermott 1991; Prather et al. 2004), and benefit from peer instruction (Mazur 1997; Green 2003). Students in astronomy courses often have difficulty understanding many different concepts as a result of difficulties with spatial reasoning and a sense of scale. The Hands-on-Science program at UT Austin incorporates these research-based results into four guided-inquiry, integrated science courses (50 students each). They are aimed at pre-service K-5 teachers but are open to other majors as well. We find that Hands-on-Science students not only attain more favorable changes in attitude towards science, but they also outperform students in traditional lecture courses in content gains. Workshop Outcomes: Participants experienced a research-based, guided-inquiry lesson about the motion of objects in the sky and discussed the research methodology for assessing students in such a course.

  1. Laboratory Animal Management Assistant (LAMA): a LIMS for active research colonies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marko Milisavljevic; Taryn Hearty; Tony Y. T. Wong; Elodie Portales-Casamar; Elizabeth M. Simpson; Wyeth W. Wasserman

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory Animal Management Assistant (LAMA) is an internet-based system for tracking large laboratory mouse colonies. It\\u000a has a user-friendly interface with powerful search capabilities that ease day-to-day tasks such as tracking breeding cages\\u000a and weaning litters. LAMA was originally developed to manage hundreds of new mouse strains generated by a large functional\\u000a genomics program, the Pleiades Promoter Project (http:\\/\\/www.pleiades.org). The

  2. Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division: Semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1986-December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the research activity of the High Energy Physics Division at the Argonne National Laboratory for the period, July 1986-December 1986. Some of the topics included in this report are: high resolution spectrometers, computational physics, spin physics, string theories, lattice gauge theory, proton decay, symmetry breaking, heavy flavor production, massive lepton pair production, collider physics, field theories, proton sources, and facility development. (LSP)

  3. Statistical analysis of solar activity variations of total electron content derived at Jet Propulsion Laboratory from GPS observations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Libo Liu; Yiding Chen

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed the data series of the total electron content (TEC) derived at Jet Propulsion Laboratory from Global Positioning System (GPS) observations to investigate the solar activity effects of TEC on a global scale. The daily values of the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluxes in 0.1-50 nm wavelengths, 10.7 cm radio flux F10.7, and F10.7P (the average of daily F10.7

  4. Distance Learning and Virtual Laboratory Information Assurance

    E-print Network

    Irvine, Cynthia E.

    Distance Learning and Virtual Laboratory for Information Assurance Michael VanPutte Cynthia E-learning information assurance (IA) laboratory to support hands-on learning. The project brings together two diverse groups. The NPS Center for Information Assurance and INFOSEC Studies and Research (CISR), a Center

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) Configuration and Data Management Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL] [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL] [ORNL; Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL] [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involvement in the Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) research with both government agencies and private companies dates back to 1989. The discussion here will focus on the US Army's current need for an automated WIM system to weigh and determine the center-of-balance for military wheeled vehicles and cargo and the expanded uses of WIM data. ORNL is addressing configuration and data management issues as they relate to deployments for both military and humanitarian activities. The transition from the previous WIM Gen I to the current Gen II system illustrates a configuration and data management solution that ensures data integration, integrity, coherence and cost effectiveness. Currently, Army units use portable and fixed scales, tape measures, and calculators to determine vehicle axle, total weights and center of balance for vehicles prior to being transshipped via railcar, ship, or airlifted. Manually weighing and measuring all vehicles subject to these transshipment operations is time-consuming, labor-intensive, hazardous and is prone to human errors (e.g., misreading scales and tape measures, calculating centers of balance and wheel, axle, and vehicle weights, recording data, and transferring data from manually prepared work sheets into an electronic data base and aggravated by adverse weather conditions). Additionally, in the context of the military, the timeliness, safety, success, and effectiveness of airborne heavy-drop operations can be significantly improved by the use of an automated system to weigh and determine center of balance of vehicles while they are in motion. The lack of a standardized airlift-weighing system for joint service use also creates redundant weighing requirements at the cost of scarce resources and time. This case study can be judiciously expanded into commercial operations related to safety and enforcement. The WIM program will provide a means for the Army to automatically identify/weigh and monitor vehicle characteristics for real-time storage/dissemination to the TC-AIMS II (Transportation Coordinators' - Automated Information for Movement System II) for load planning and for providing asset visibility. The WIM system was developed using COTs products and the Reach Back (WIM-RBC) capability is based on a Web-services architecture implemented through best practices of software design (UML and XML schema). Fielded systems and XML-compliant messages can engage the WIM-RBC to store all measurement data in the repository accessible to authorized users through standard secure protocols.

  6. Hands-on approach during breastfeeding support in a neonatal intensive care unit: a qualitative study of Swedish mothers' experiences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lena Weimers; Kristin Svensson; Louise Dumas; Lars Navér; Vivian Wahlberg

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Assisting mothers to breastfeed is not easy when babies experience difficulties. In a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), nurses often help mothers by using hands-on-breast without their permission. Little is known about how mothers feel about this unusual body touching. To gain more knowledge from mothers who lived through this experience, this hands-on practice was studied in a NICU

  7. Near-Field Performance Assessment for a Low-Activity Waste Glass Disposal System: Laboratory Testing to Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B. Peter; Bacon, Diana H.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Mann, Frederick M.; Puigh, Raymond J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Mattigod, Shas V.

    2001-09-01

    Reactive chemical transport simulations of glass corrosion and radionuclide transport from a low-activity waste disposal system were conducted out to times in excess of 20,000 y with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code. Time and spatial dependence of glass corrosion rate, secondary phase formation, pH, and radionuclide concentration were evaluated. The results show low release rates overall for the low-activity waste glasses such that performance objectives for the site will be met by a factor of 20 or more. Parameterization of the computer model was accomplished by combining direct laboratory measurements, literature data (principally thermodynamic data), and parameter estimation methods.

  8. Acquiring Knowledge of Physics by a Hands-On Approach in Romanian Primary School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niculae, Marcela; Niculae, C. M.; Doncu, Roxana

    2010-01-01

    The present work discusses results of a test concerning the progress of learning Natural Science at the end of the primary cycle in the context of current curriculum in Romania. The test is focused on acquiring knowledge of physics. The test is structured into four items: The first one proposes a virtual experiment for establishing the level of mathematics knowledge of students. As the second and third items the test focuses on the degree of learning through experiments described in the student book. The fourth item tests the acquired knowledge by experiments carried out directly by students. All items have two requirements: a) What happens in the experiment? and b) Explain why. Test was applied to a sample of 138 students from grade 4th. The test shows the imperative need to use a Hands-On approach for Assessing Natural Sciences in primary classes.

  9. Hands-on curriculum teaches biomedical engineering concepts to home-schooled students.

    PubMed

    Sagstetter, Ann M; Nimunkar, Amit J; Tompkins, Willis J

    2009-01-01

    University level outreach has increased over the last decade to stimulate K-12 student interest in engineering related fields. Home schooling students are one of the groups that are valued for engineering admissions due to diligent study habits and high achievement scores. However, home schooled students have inadequate access to science, math, and engineering related resources, which precludes the development of interdisciplinary teaching methods. To address this problem, we have developed a hands-on, STEM based curriculum as a safe and comprehensive supplement to current home schooling curricula. The ultimate goal is to stimulate university-student relations and subsequently increase engineering recruitment opportunities. Our pre and post workshop survey comparisons demonstrate that integrating disciplines, via the manner presented in this study, provides a K-12 student-friendly engineering learning method. PMID:19964872

  10. Exploring the Solar System in the Classroom: A Hands-On Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.

    2000-01-01

    This final report discusses the development and implementation of several educational products for K-16 teachers and students. Specifically, I received support for: (A) three K-12 Teacher workshops, Exploring the Solar System in the Classroom: A Hands-On Approach, and minimal Support to finish two computer-based tutorials. (B) Contact Light: An Interactive CD-ROM, and (C) Another Look at Taurus Littrow: An Interactive GIS Database. Each of these projects directly supports NASA's Strategic Plan to: "Involve the education community in our endeavors to inspire America's students, create learning opportunities, enlighten inquisitive minds", and, to "communicate widely the content, relevancy, and excitement of NASA's missions and discoveries to inspire and to increase understanding and the broad application of science and technology." Attachment: Appendix A. And also article: "Aristarchus plateau: as potential lunar base site."

  11. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; S. T. Beck; S. T. Wood

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of computer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessment (PRAs). This volume is the tutorial manual for the SAPHIRE system. In this document, a series of lessons are provided that guide the user through basic steps common to most analyses preformed with SAPHIRE. The tutorial is divided into two major sections covering both basic and advanced features. The section covering basic topics contains lessons that lead the reader through development of a probabilistic hypothetical problem involving a vehicle accident, highlighting the program’s most fundamental features. The advanced features section contains additional lessons that expand on fundamental analysis features of SAPHIRE and provide insights into more complex analysis techniques. Together, these two elements provide an overview into the operation and capabilities of the SAPHIRE software.

  12. Discover science: Hands-on science workshops for elementary teachers and summer science camps for elementary students

    SciTech Connect

    Gotlib, L. [South Granville High School, Creedmoor, NC (United States); Bibby, E. [Granville County Schools, Oxford, NC (United States); Cullen, B. [North Carolina Science and Math Alliance, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Teams of local mentor teachers (assisted by college students in the NC Teaching Fellows Program) run week-long workshops for elementary teachers (at four sites in 1993, six in 1994). Major funding for the camps is provided through The Glaxo Foundation, supplemented with local funds. The workshops focus on hands-on science (using inexpensive materials) and provide familiarity and experience with the new NC science curriculum and assessment program. The use of local resources is stressed (including visiting scientists and readily available store-bought materials). Each camp has its own theme and provides teachers with a variety of resources to be used with students of all abilities. The mentor teachers then run week-long, all expense paid, non-residential science camps for elementary students (open to all students, but with females and minorities as target groups). Students take part in long-and short-term projects, working individually and in groups. Pre and post participation surveys of all participants were conducted and analyzed, with favorable results for both the student and teacher weeks. Additional activities include parent nights, and follow-up workshops. Eighty-nine teachers and 208 students participated in 1993.

  13. Using a PyMOL activity to reinforce the connection between genotype and phenotype in an undergraduate genetics laboratory.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Alexandra D; Nguyen, Thao K T; Follis, Jack L; Ribes-Zamora, Albert

    2014-01-01

    With the purpose of developing an activity that would help clarify genetic concepts related to the connection between genotype and phenotype and the nature of mutations, we designed a three hour teaching module using the PyMol software. The activity starts with two pre-laboratory assignments, one to learn how to use PyMol and the other to read about a specific protein or protein family. During the laboratory students are given instructions where and how to find additional information on a specific disease and its causal mutations in order to prepare a 10-minute, in-class presentation. Using a post activity, anonymous quiz, we found a statistically significant different grade distribution in students that participated in the PyMol activity relative to a control group. We also found a significant improvement in the student's comprehension when answering questions regarding the nature of mutations and protein structure. This demonstrates the utility of this simulation activity as a vehicle to improve student's understanding of specific key genetic concepts. PMID:25461967

  14. Using a PyMOL Activity to Reinforce the Connection between Genotype and Phenotype in an Undergraduate Genetics Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Alexandra D.; Nguyen, Thao K. T.; Follis, Jack L.; Ribes-Zamora, Albert

    2014-01-01

    With the purpose of developing an activity that would help clarify genetic concepts related to the connection between genotype and phenotype and the nature of mutations, we designed a three hour teaching module using the PyMol software. The activity starts with two pre-laboratory assignments, one to learn how to use PyMol and the other to read about a specific protein or protein family. During the laboratory students are given instructions where and how to find additional information on a specific disease and its causal mutations in order to prepare a 10-minute, in-class presentation. Using a post activity, anonymous quiz, we found a statistically significant different grade distribution in students that participated in the PyMol activity relative to a control group. We also found a significant improvement in the student’s comprehension when answering questions regarding the nature of mutations and protein structure. This demonstrates the utility of this simulation activity as a vehicle to improve student’s understanding of specific key genetic concepts. PMID:25461967

  15. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

  16. The Effect of a Computer Simulation Activity versus a Hands-on Activity on Product Creativity in Technology Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurt Y. Michael

    2001-01-01

    Computer use in the classroom has become a popular method of instruction for many technology educators. This may be due to the fact that software programs have advanced beyond the early days of drill and practice instruction. With the introduction of the graphical user interface, increased processing speed, and affordability, computer use in education has finally come of age. Software

  17. [Surgical stress: clinical-and-laboratory parallels under activation of the natural stress-limiting systems].

    PubMed

    Gvak, G V; Eremenko, V G; Ivanov, E A; Smantser, V A

    2004-01-01

    Three hundred and eighty-seven patients, who were operated on the scheduled basis for different surgical pathologies, were examined. The purpose of the case study was definition of the clinical-and-laboratory parallels related with pronouncement of surgical stress in an advanced variation of neuroleptanalgesia. PMID:15468552

  18. Imploding Soda Cans: From Demonstration to Guided-Inquiry Laboratory Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichler, Jack F.

    2009-01-01

    A guided-inquiry exercise conducted in both the lecture and laboratory components of a college introductory chemistry course for non-science majors is described. The exercise gave students the opportunity to independently determine the relationship between the temperature of water in an aluminum soda can and the intensity of implosion upon placing…

  19. Systems studies department FY78 activity report. Vol. I. Computing and applied mathematics. [Sandia Laboratories, Livermore

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gold

    1979-01-01

    The Systems Studies Department at Sandia Laboratories, Livermore, has two primary responsibilities: to provide computational and mathematical services and to perform ''systems analysis'' studies. The computational services include applied mathematics, numerical analysis, programming, computer graphics, and management information systems, as well as operation, maintenance, and enhancement of the SLL computer center. The systems analysis studies attempt to evaluate the relative

  20. Active Cloud Probing with Los Alamos National Laboratory's Wide Angle Imaging Lidar: Status and Outlook

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. N. Polonsky; A. B. Davis; S. P. Brumby

    Summary We survey recent developments in off-beam cloud lidar and especially the Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By abandoning the single back- scattering assumption of standard (on-beam) lidar in favor of a multiple scattering model and with the appropriate modifications of the instrument, we enable detection robust detection of the cloud boundary opposite

  1. Activity, aggression, and habitat use of ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) and round goby (Apollonia melanostoma) under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, J.F.; Riley, S.C.; Holuszko, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Potential negative ecological interactions between ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus and round goby Apollonia melanostoma (formerly Neogobius melanostomus) might affect the colonization dynamics of these invasive species where they are sympatric in the Great Lakes. In order to determine the potential for ecological interactions between these species, we examined the activity, aggression, and habitat use of round gobies and ruffe in single species and mixed species laboratory experiments. Trials included conditions in which food was concentrated (in light or darkness) or scattered. Results showed that ruffe were more active than gobies, particularly when food was scattered. Activity of both species was significantly lower during darkness. Round gobies were significantly more aggressive than ruffe, and total aggression was lower in mixed species trials. Habitat use by ruffe and round gobies overlapped considerably, but we observed significant differences between species in their use of specific habitats that depended on experimental conditions. Overall, ruffe used open habitats more often than did round gobies, primarily when food was scattered. Round gobies used rocks significantly more frequently than did ruffe, but their use of rock habitat decreased during dark conditions. Ruffe were found more often in plant habitats and less often near the wall of the pool in trials during daylight with concentrated food. Activity and habitat use of ruffe and round goby did not significantly differ between single and mixed species trials. Overall, we found little evidence for negative ecological interactions between ruffe and round goby in these laboratory experiments.

  2. Secondary Science Teachers' Use of Laboratory Activities: Linking Epistemological Beliefs, Goals, and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Nam-Hwa; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how science teachers' epistemological beliefs and teaching goals are related to their use of lab activities. Research questions include: (1) What are the teachers' epistemological beliefs pertaining to lab activities? (2) Why do the science teachers use lab activities? (3) How are the teachers'…

  3. Gross alpha and beta activity analysis in water--a routine laboratory method using liquid scintillation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Ross I

    2004-01-01

    The generally accepted method for gross alpha and beta activity analysis of drinking water in Australia is based on ISO methods; ISO9696, water quality--measurement of gross alpha activity in non-saline water--thick source method, and ISO9697, water quality--measurement of gross beta activity in non-saline water. A liquid scintillation (LSA) based method that requires smaller sample quantities, less sample preparation time and operator intervention, and produces adequate minimum detection levels for local drinking water guidelines has been developed. A synthetic groundwater sample was analysed using the LSA method and compared with results from ISO method techniques used by two independent Australian laboratories. The results show that the LSA method exceeds performance of the ISO methods in measurement accuracy. PMID:15177367

  4. A report on FY06 IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang

    2006-06-01

    Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. IPv6 deployment in government network backbones has been mandated to occur by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories' network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint, work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

  5. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  6. Space Planning and Energy Efficiency in Laboratory Buildings: The Role of Spatial, Activity and Temporal Diversity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Filbert Musau; Koen Steemers

    2007-01-01

    This work investigated the degrees to which energy use in laboratory buildings may be influenced by interior space planning and\\/or the ways space is used. The potential influences of typical open, mixed and closed plan layouts and their space utilisation densities\\/intensities were investigated on a good-practice base case using the TAS, Lightscape and Excel software packages. The peak winter results

  7. Design of a Laboratory for Information Security Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vikram Anantapadmanabhan; Phyllis G. Frankl; Nasir D. Memon; Gleb Naumovich

    2003-01-01

    It has been recognized for some time now that education in informa- tion security is better served by a laboratory component that reinforces principle and theoretical analysis learnt in the class room with a follow- up hands-on component performed in an appropriate laboratory. In this paper we present the design of a highly reconfigurable laboratory for information security education. The

  8. A real-time and hands-on research course in protein purification and characterization: Purification and crystal growth of human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kreiling, Jodi L; Brader, Kerry; Kolar, Carol; Borgstahl, Gloria E O

    2011-01-01

    A new lecture/laboratory course to offer advanced biochemical training for undergraduate and early graduate students has been developed in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. This unique course offers students an opportunity to work hands-on with modern instrumentation not normally found in a predominately undergraduate institution, and to complete an entire research project in a realistic timeframe via a time-intensive curriculum as a special summer session. The course content gives a strong background in protein structure/chemistry, purification principles, protocol development, optimization strategies, use and programming of an automated chromatography instrument, and characterization strategies with an emphasis on X-ray crystallography. The laboratory portion offers students the chance to purify a protein (human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase) from start to finish, program and use an ÄKTA fast protein liquid chromatography instrument, and to grow and analyze their own protein crystals using their purified protein. This innovative laboratory experience gives the participating students the opportunity to complete a miniresearch project in real time and enhances their overall understanding of important biochemical research techniques and the instrumentation involved, fostering a better understanding of the research process all within a classroom setting. Evaluations and feedback concerning this course indicated a positive learning environment, a retention of knowledge and skills, a belief that the skill set learned continues to be useful in current endeavors, and a sense of accomplishment in the completion of an actual research project within the confines of a class setting. PMID:21433250

  9. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Technical Reference

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; W. J. Galyean; S. T. Beck

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. Herein information is provided on the principles used in the construction and operation of Version 6.0 and 7.0 of the SAPHIRE system. This report summarizes the fundamental mathematical concepts of sets and logic, fault trees, and probability. This volume then describes the algorithms used to construct a fault tree and to obtain the minimal cut sets. It gives the formulas used to obtain the probability of the top event from the minimal cut sets, and the formulas for probabilities that apply for various assumptions concerning reparability and mission time. It defines the measures of basic event importance that SAPHIRE can calculate. This volume gives an overview of uncertainty analysis using simple Monte Carlo sampling or Latin Hypercube sampling, and states the algorithms used by this program to generate random basic event probabilities from various distributions. Also covered are enhance capabilities such as seismic analysis, cut set "recovery," end state manipulation, and use of "compound events."

  10. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Technical Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; W. J. Galyean; S. T. Beck

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. Herein information is provided on the principles used in the construction and operation of Version 6.0 and 7.0 of the SAPHIRE system. This report summarizes the fundamental mathematical concepts of sets and logic, fault trees, and probability. This volume then describes the algorithms used to construct a fault tree and to obtain the minimal cut sets. It gives the formulas used to obtain the probability of the top event from the minimal cut sets, and the formulas for probabilities that apply for various assumptions concerning reparability and mission time. It defines the measures of basic event importance that SAPHIRE can calculate. This volume gives an overview of uncertainty analysis using simple Monte Carlo sampling or Latin Hypercube sampling, and states the algorithms used by this program to generate random basic event probabilities from various distributions. Also covered are enhance capabilities such as seismic analysis, cut set "recovery," end state manipulation, and use of "compound events."

  11. Modeling Lunar Phases in the Classroom: A Hands-On Interactive Lesson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazine, Angela R.

    2007-12-01

    Using Power-Point technology and hands-on materials, a 45 minute lesson has been created to allow students to explore the cause of lunar phases. Students work in cooperative pairs to model the different phases of the moon. In addition, this lesson does not require a bright light source. Using a partially painted Styrofoam ball, a small cup of Play-dough, a simple, protractor, and a data collection sheet, students observe the lunar phases and measure the angle between the sun and the moon. Students place the moon model in eight different positions simulating its orbit around the earth and record the observed changes. The Power-Point presentation contains three segments. The first section allows the teacher to determine the students’ level of prior knowledge about the moon and to uncover possible misconceptions. The second section facilitates the students’ learning by displaying the proper alignment of the model and the proper viewing position for the students. Finally, the presentation culminates in a review of what the students have just observed. This lesson has been created to meet Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) for 4th grade science regarding the cause of lunar phases. Teacher and student responses to this lesson have been extremely positive.

  12. The serum complement system: a simplified laboratory exercise to measure the activity of an important component of the immune system

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kimberley A Radziwon (Stonehill College Biology)

    2008-12-01

    The immune system is a vital physiological component that affords animals protection from disease and is composed of innate and adaptive mechanisms that rely on cellular and dissolved components. The serum complement system is a series of dissolved proteins that protect against a variety of pathogens. The activity of complement in serum can be determined by its ability to lyse red blood cells in vitro. Here, we describe a modification of a standard complement hemolysis assay that makes an interesting and informative laboratory exercise suitable for a variety of courses including physiology.

  13. Estimating active carbon for soil quality assessment: A simplified method for laboratory and field use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. R. Islam; M. A. Stine; J. B. Gruver; S. E. Samson-Liebig; R. R. Weil

    2003-01-01

    A simple method of estimating changes in biologically active soil carbon (C) could help evaluate soil quality impacts of alternative management practices. Most reports of permanganate for active C determination use highly concentrated solutions (0.333 M) that are difficult to work with and tend to react with a large fraction of soil C that is not well distinguished from total

  14. Measuring residual activity of topical antimicrobials: is the residual activity of chlorhexidine an artefact of laboratory methods?

    PubMed

    Rutter, J D; Angiulo, K; Macinga, D R

    2014-10-01

    Residual activity of chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) was evaluated by pretreating hands with CHG and then touching Staphylococcus aureus dried on to stainless steel discs. By this method, no reduction in bacteria was observed up to 15 min, suggesting that residual CHG does not offer protection against contamination with transient micro-organisms in clinical practice. PMID:25078726

  15. A report on IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories:FY2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang; Maestas, Joseph H.

    2007-06-01

    Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. As the emerging Internet network protocol, SNL needs to prepare for its eventual deployment in international, national, customer, and local networks. Additionally, the United States Office of Management and Budget has mandated that IPv6 deployment in government network backbones occurs by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution, the Communication & Network Systems, and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

  16. Dynamic active telepathology over National Health Laboratory service network, South Africa: feasibility study using Nikon Coolscope

    PubMed Central

    Banach, Lech; Stepien, Andrzej; Schneider, Johann; Wichrzycka-Lancaster, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Telepathology recently entered a new era with the introduction of digital microscopes combined with Internet technology. The microscope allows viewing real time of whole slide (macro) as well as different chosen fields in four different magnifications. Three Nikon Coolscope were installed in NHLS laboratories in Mthatha, East London and Port Elizabeth. All these microscopes are connected to NHLS server allowing real time viewing of the full slide at any time of the day using Internet browser. Viewing is possible from any PC connected to NHLS Intranet. The challenge was to be able to view slides from other than NHLS computers due to NHLS IT Department network security measures. This was solved by installing NHLS Virtual Private Network server. About 60 cases were viewed by pathologists in Cape Town (Stellenbosh University) and Pretoria (MEDUNSA). All users assessed the system as a helpful tool allowing easy access to cases needing consultation or second opinion. The quality of images was very good. Our experience with Nikon Coolscope is positive. It is an excellent tool for remote small histopathology departments lacking specialists in such areas as dermatopathology, oncology, and haematopathology. Further studies are needed especially in the scope of full utilization of the microscopes installed and impact on laboratory services. PMID:18673517

  17. Mobile laboratory measurements of atmospheric emissions from agriculture, oil, and natural gas activities in northeastern Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilerman, S. J.; Peischl, J.; Neuman, J. A.; Ryerson, T. B.; Wild, R. J.; Perring, A. E.; Brown, S. S.; Aikin, K. C.; Holloway, M.; Roberts, O.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric emissions from agriculture are important to air quality and climate, yet their representation in inventories is incomplete. Increased fertilizer use has lead to increased emissions of nitrogen compounds, which can adversely affect ecosystems and contribute to the formation of fine particulates. Furthermore, extraction and processing of oil and natural gas continues to expand throughout northeastern Colorado; emissions from these operations require ongoing measurement and characterization. This presentation summarizes initial data and analysis from a summer 2014 campaign to study emissions of nitrogen compounds, methane, and other species in northeastern Colorado using a new mobile laboratory. A van was instrumented to measure NH3, N2O, NOx, NOy, CH4, CO, CO2, O3, and bioaerosols with high time resolution. By sampling in close proximity to a variety of emissions sources, the mobile laboratory facilitated accurate source identification and quantification of emissions ratios. Measurements were obtained near agricultural sites, natural gas and oil operations, and other point sources. Additionally, extensive measurements were obtained downwind from urban areas and along roadways. The relationship between ammonia and other trace gases is used to characterize sources and constrain emissions inventories.

  18. Integrating laboratory and field data to quantify the immersion freezing ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, R. C.; Petters, M. D.; Tobo, Y.; Niemand, M.; Möhler, O.; Snider, J. R.; Wang, Z.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Data from both laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements are used to develop an empirical parameterization for the immersion freezing activity of natural mineral dust particles. Measurements made with the Colorado State University (CSU) continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) when processing mineral dust aerosols at a nominal 105% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) are taken as a measure of the immersion freezing nucleation activity of particles. Ice active frozen fractions vs. temperature for dusts representative of Saharan and Asian desert sources were consistent with similar measurements in atmospheric dust plumes for a limited set of comparisons available. The parameterization developed follows the form of one suggested previously for atmospheric particles of non-specific composition in quantifying ice nucleating particle concentrations as functions of temperature and the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.5 ?m diameter. Such an approach does not explicitly account for surface area and time dependencies for ice nucleation, but sufficiently encapsulates the activation properties for potential use in regional and global modeling simulations, and possible application in developing remote sensing retrievals for ice nucleating particles. A calibration factor is introduced to account for the apparent underestimate (by approximately 3, on average) of the immersion freezing fraction of mineral dust particles for CSU CFDC data processed at an RHw of 105% vs. maximum fractions active at higher RHw. Instrumental factors that affect activation behavior vs. RHw in CFDC instruments remain to be fully explored in future studies. Nevertheless, the use of this calibration factor is supported by comparison to ice activation data obtained for the same aerosols from Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics of the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion chamber cloud parcel experiments. Further comparison of the new parameterization, including calibration correction, to predictions of the immersion freezing surface active site density parameterization for mineral dust particles, developed separately from AIDA experimental data alone, shows excellent agreement for data collected in a descent through a Saharan aerosol layer. These studies support the utility of laboratory measurements to obtain atmospherically relevant data on the ice nucleation properties of dust and other particle types, and suggest the suitability of considering all mineral dust as a single type of ice nucleating particle as a useful first-order approximation in numerical modeling investigations.

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Department of Energy (DOE) activities at Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories Site (DOE/SSFL), conducted May 16 through 26, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by an private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with DOE activities at SSFL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at SSFL, and interviews with site personnel. 90 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

  20. Hands-on guide for 3D image creation for geological purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Tisato, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Geological structures in outcrops or hand specimens are inherently three dimensional (3D), and therefore better understandable if viewed in 3D. While 3D models can easily be created, manipulated, and looked at from all sides on the computer screen (e.g., using photogrammetry or laser scanning data), 3D visualizations for publications or conference posters are much more challenging as they have to live in a 2D-world (i.e., on a sheet of paper). Perspective 2D visualizations of 3D models do not fully transmit the "feeling and depth of the third dimension" to the audience; but this feeling is desirable for a better examination and understanding in 3D of the structure under consideration. One of the very few possibilities to generate real 3D images, which work on a 2D display, is by using so-called stereoscopic images. Stereoscopic images are two images of the same object recorded from two slightly offset viewpoints. Special glasses and techniques have to be used to make sure that one image is seen only by one eye, and the other image is seen by the other eye, which together lead to the "3D effect". Geoscientists are often familiar with such 3D images. For example, geomorphologists traditionally view stereographic orthophotos by employing a mirror-steroscope. Nowadays, petroleum-geoscientists examine high-resolution 3D seismic data sets in special 3D visualization rooms. One of the methods for generating and viewing a stereoscopic image, which does not require a high-tech viewing device, is to create a so-called anaglyph. The principle is to overlay two images saturated in red and cyan, respectively. The two images are then viewed through red-cyan-stereoscopic glasses. This method is simple and cost-effective, but has some drawbacks in preserving colors accurately. A similar method is used in 3D movies, where polarized light or shuttering techniques are used to separate the left from the right image, which allows preserving the original colors. The advantage of red-cyan anaglyphs is their simplicity and the possibility to print them on normal paper or project them using a conventional projector. Producing 3D stereoscopic images is much easier than commonly thought. Our hands-on poster provides an easy-to-use guide for producing 3D stereoscopic images. Few simple rules-of-thumb are presented that define how photographs of any scene or object have to be shot to produce good-looking 3D images. We use the free software Stereophotomaker (http://stereo.jpn.org/eng/stphmkr) to produce anaglyphs and provide red-cyan 3D glasses for viewing them. Our hands-on poster is easy to adapt and helps any geologist to present his/her field or hand specimen photographs in a much more fashionable 3D way for future publications or conference posters.

  1. Monitoring Animal Activity Rhythms in the Laboratory: Four Easily Assembled Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Sheridan V.

    1989-01-01

    The use of actographs for studying animal activity is discussed. Described are running recorders for rodents, perching and feeding recorders for birds, and tilting box recorders for studying the movement of reptiles, amphibians, and arthropods. (CW)

  2. Biologically active peptides: from a laboratory bench curiosity to a functional skin care product.

    PubMed

    Lintner, K; Peschard, O

    2000-06-01

    Small, biologically active peptides (short sequences of amino acids) were first described about 40 years ago: TRH, angiotensin, vasopressin, oxytocin, bradykinin. Since then, many more peptides have been isolated from mammalian tissue and organs, and their activity investigated. Essentially, these molecules play a hormonal (messenger) role: released at one point in the body, they act at specific receptor sites at different locations in the organism. Mostly the peptides are transported from the site of release to the site of biological activity through the blood or lymphatic fluid. The use of these molecules in cosmetics does not appear obvious, as the topical application of these highly soluble, fragile and extremely expensive molecules seems inappropriate, and systemic effects (blood transport) are not desired. This paper shows that the obstacles to using highly specific, powerful peptides as 'actives' in cosmetic products can be overcome. Cosmetically interesting activities such as stimulation of collagen synthesis, chemotaxis, anti-stinging effects and others, can be observed and substantiated with chemically modified peptide sequences. Long chain fatty acid conjugates improve skin penetration, specific activity and economic feasibility of these molecules. PMID:18503476

  3. Building Formal and Informal Partnerships Through a Land-Based, Hands-on Research Expedition for Earth and Ocean Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slough, S.; Prouhet, T.; Peart, L.; Leckie, M.; St. John, K.; Karz-Cooper, S.; Klaus, A.; Petronotis, K.; Firth, J.; Guerin, G.; Buckholtz, C.; Crowder, L.; Peng, C.

    2007-12-01

    Scientific Ocean drilling has a rich legacy which is largely responsible for our current understating of the complex linkages among the different parts of the Earth System. Relaying these understandings to Earth and ocean educators is a challenge that the Joint Oceanographic Institutes (JOI) Alliances has undertaken through sponsorship of the School of Rock (SOR). Building on the successful ocean-going, hands-on SOR (Leckie et al. 2006), the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) - United States Implementing Organization (USIO) piloted a land-based, hands-on research expedition for Earth and ocean science teachers, the School of Rock Expedition II (SOR II). During this seven-day workshop, 18 educators from across the United States were hosted at the IODP Gulf Coast Repository at Texas A&M University where they were mentored and taught by scientists who are actively engaged in IODP research, shipboard technical staff, SOR I veteran teachers, and science educators. Teachers participated in a series of research experiences similar to those that take place on a scientific drilling research vessel or in a post-cruise research lab. These experiences allowed educators to increase their knowledge of IODP and scientific methods as demonstrated by the entire ocean drilling program (proposals, drilling, lab analysis, data acquisition, and post-cruise research). This case study describes the formal and informal partnerships developed through the SOR II with an emphasis on identifying and nurturing informal partnerships.

  4. Molecular Biology Concepts and Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ingrid Waldron

    This overview reviews key concepts and learning activities to help students understand how genes influence our traits by molecular processes. Topics covered include basic understanding of the important roles of proteins and DNA; DNA structure, function and replication; the molecular biology of how genes influence traits, including transcription and translation; and the molecular biology of mutations. To help students understand the relevance of these molecular processes, the suggested learning activities link alleles of specific genes to human characteristics such as albinism, sickle cell anemia and muscular dystrophy. This overview provides links to suggested activities which include hands-on laboratory and simulation activities, web-based simulations, discussion activities and a vocabulary review game.

  5. Paleomagnetics Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this website, the California Institute of Technology's Paleomagnetics Laboratory promotes its research of weakly magnetic geologic and biological materials. Users can learn about the facilities such as the biomagnetics lab and the automatic sampler. The website features the laboratory's recent research on many topics including extraterrestrial magnetism, magnetofossils, and historical geomagnetic field behavior. Visitors can find out more about the many laboratory members' research activities through links to their home pages. Researchers can download a selection of the group's publications. Everyone can enjoy the amazing images from recent geologic field trips across the globe.

  6. Development of a laboratory model of activated charcoal-nitrogen adsorption cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, M. Jose; Prasad, Madhu; Rastogi, S. C.; Akkimaradi, B. S.; Gupta, P. P.; Narayanamurthy, H.; Srinivasan, K.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a laboratory model of a charcoal-nitrogen adsorption cryocooler is described. The results on characterization of various components of this cooler and performance of the ensemble are presented. Four compressor cells are operated 90° out of phase to generate 0.0364 g/s (1.75 slpm) of nitrogen at a pressure of 5.2 MPa. The cycle time per compressor was 8 min, equally apportioned between heating and cooling. The high pressure gas is pre-cooled to 193 K and expanded through a J-T/heat exchanger assembly. A cold tip temperature of 124 K is obtained at a parasitic heat load of 0.36 W.

  7. Marks caused by the scavenging activity of Necrobia rufipes (Coleoptera: Cleridae) under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Noelia I; Visciarelli, Elena C; Centeno, Néstor D

    2015-07-01

    Insects are an important group involved in carrion consumption and are thus of forensic interest. In the laboratory we studied the taphonomic marks that Necrobia rufipes (Cleridae) can produce. Pig trotters were exposed to adult beetles at 21 ± 3 °C and 12:12 h day/night cycle. We made observations and took photographs every 4-5 days for 12 months. Marks were noted after a month. We found scratches, pits, holes, and tunnels in several kinds of tissue such as integumental, connective and muscular. This work contributes preliminary data of significant application in biology, ecology, anthropology and forensics. Until now, no study has provided taphonomic information with N. rufipes. PMID:26048510

  8. Hands-On Component-Level Automation Courses for Technology and Engineering Students

    E-print Network

    Allen, Gale

    -level industrial automation at Minnesota State University, Mankato. In each of the past two years, senior students Engineering and Technology. Industry provided strong support for creating the laboratory. The equipment from Connection, Instruction Tags Accelerometer Spectra IP Network, Ethernet Connection Motion Timers, Counters

  9. Assembly of a Vacuum Chamber: A Hands-On Approach to Introduce Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussie`re, Guillaume; Stoodley, Robin; Yajima, Kano; Bagai, Abhimanyu; Popowich, Aleksandra K.; Matthews, Nicholas E.

    2014-01-01

    Although vacuum technology is essential to many aspects of modern physical and analytical chemistry, vacuum experiments are rarely the focus of undergraduate laboratories. We describe an experiment that introduces students to vacuum science and mass spectrometry. The students first assemble a vacuum system, including a mass spectrometer. While…

  10. What's the Matter with Food?: A Hands-On Action Research Study on the Effect of Using Food Preparation To Teach Students with Autism about the Three States of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diller, Nicole

    This investigation studied the effectiveness of using food preparation to teach students with Autism about the three states of matter. A hands-on learning approach was used within the home and careers classroom. One class of five students, three boys and two girls, all diagnosed with Autism, participated in a five day academic unit about the three phases of matter: solid, liquid, and gas. The class received hands-on learning science instruction using food through various differentiated activities. Results indicate that students express focus when using food to learn. In addition, this study acknowledges that hands-on learning in science enhances the learning process of students with Autism. One of the main reasons is that students enjoy learning when this teaching style is used in the classroom, and students that enjoy what they are learning are more likely to be engaged and motivated to learn. After using this approach, all the students in the study increased their scores from the pre-assessments to the post-assessments. Students expressed through actions and words that they enjoyed using hands-on experiences to learn in the classroom. Implications for practice indicate that a variety of manipulatives are needed to teach students with Autism. Future research would help uncover additional information about student motivation and learning in the home and careers classroom.

  11. Effect of Night Laboratories on Learning Objectives for a Nonmajor Astronomy Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Ian C.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Broder, Darren; Finn, Rose A.; Milano, Anthony J.; Newberg, Lee A.; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Whittet, Douglas C. B.

    We tested the effectiveness of hands-on nighttime laboratories that challenged student misconceptions, using a new assessment exam to measure learning in a nonmajor introductory astronomy class at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. We were able to increase learning at the 8.0 sigma level on one of the Moon phase objectives that was addressed in a cloudy night activity. There is weak evidence of some improvement on a broader range of learning objectives. We show evidence that the overall achievement levels of the four sections of the class are correlated with how much clear weather the sections had for observing even though the learning objectives were addressed primarily in activities that did not require clear skies. We describe our first attempt to cycle the students through different activity stations in an effort to handle 18 students at a time in the laboratories, and the lessons we learned from this.

  12. Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology: Real-Time, Hands-On, and Safe Experiments for K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagaria, Hitesh G.; Dean, Michelle R.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Wong, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    What students and teachers often ask is, how are nano-sized materials made when they are so small? One answer is through the process of self-assembly in which molecules, polymers, and nanoparticles connect to form larger objects of a defined structure and shape. Two hands-on experiments are presented in which students prepare capsules in real time…

  13. The Molecular Boat: A Hands-On Experiment to Demonstrate the Forces Applied to Self-assembled Monolayers at Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Salaita, Khalid

    of the silica in a condensation reaction to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) (Fig. 1S). The alterations. Students can work in groups to form the self-assembled monolayers on the glass substratesThe Molecular Boat: A Hands-On Experiment to Demonstrate the Forces Applied to Self- assembled

  14. The Molecular Boat: A Hands-On Experiment To Demonstrate the Forces Applied to Self-Assembled Monolayers at Interfaces

    E-print Network

    Salaita, Khalid

    chemistry and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) control the macroscopic properties of materials chemistry, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are described in detail, but their associated macroscopicThe Molecular Boat: A Hands-On Experiment To Demonstrate the Forces Applied to Self-Assembled

  15. An Experimental Comparison of Two Methods Of Teaching Numerical Control Manual Programming Concepts; Visual Media Versus Hands-On Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biekert, Russell

    Accompanying the rapid changes in technology has been a greater dependence on automation and numerical control, which has resulted in the need to find ways of preparing programers for industrial machines using numerical control. To compare the hands-on equipment method and a visual media method of teaching numerical control, an experimental and a…

  16. The Chemical Engineering behind How Carbonated Beverages Go Flat: A Hands-On Experiment for Freshmen Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohn, Keith L.

    2007-01-01

    A hands-on project was developed to educate new chemical engineering students about the types of problems chemical engineers solve and to improve student enthusiasm for studying chemical engineering. In this project, students studied the phenomenon of carbonated beverages going flat. The project was implemented in 2003 and 2004 at Kansas State…

  17. Fifth graders' science inquiry abilities: A comparative study of students in hands-on and textbook curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pine, Jerome; Aschbacher, Pamela; Roth, Ellen; Jones, Melanie; McPhee, Cameron; Martin, Catherine; Phelps, Scott; Kyle, Tara; Foley, Brian

    2006-05-01

    A large number of American elementary school students are now studying science using the hands-on inquiry curricula developed in the 1990s: Insights; Full Option Science System (FOSS); and Science and Technology for Children (STC). A goal of these programs, echoed in the National Science Education Standards, is that children should gain abilities to do scientific inquiry and understanding about scientific inquiry. We have studied the degree to which students can do inquiries by using four hands-on performance assessments, which required one or three class periods. To be fair, the assessments avoided content that is studied in depth in the hands-on programs. For a sample of about 1000 fifth grade students, we compared the performance of students in hands-on curricula with an equal number of students with textbook curricula. The students were from 41 classrooms in nine school districts. The results show little or no curricular effect. There was a strong dependence on students' cognitive ability, as measured with a standard multiple-choice instrument. There was no significant difference between boys and girls. Also, there was no difference on a multiple-choice test, which used items released from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). It is not completely clear whether the lack of difference on the performance assessments was a consequence of the assessments, the curricula, and/or the teaching.

  18. 15th Biennial University/Government/Industry Microelectronics Symposium, Boise, Idaho, June 30 -July 2, 2003. Hands-On MEMS

    E-print Network

    Frechette, Luc G.

    - July 2, 2003. Hands-On MEMS Luc Frechette1 , Vijay Modi1 , Floyd Miller2 and K. R. Farmer3 1Dept, NJ 07102 Abstract-- We have developed an innovative MEMS education program that combines virtual fabrication with actual testing of classic MEMS devices. This approach is suitable both for large classes

  19. Human Body Explorations: Hands-On Investigations of What Makes Us Tick.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalumuck, Karen E.

    This book presents science activities on the human body with materials that can be purchased in a grocery store or pharmacy. Each activity includes an explorer and facilitator guide. Activities include: (1) "Naked Egg"; (2) "Cellular Soap Opera"; (3) "Acid in Your Stomach"; (4) "How Much Do You C?"; (5) "How Sweet It Is"; (6) "Milk Makes Me…

  20. Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirbel, E. L.

    2002-12-01

    A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking. Because non-science majors are often rather resistant to learning the relevant methodology - and especially to thinking critically - this manual is structured differently. It does not only provide traditional cook-book recipes but also contains several leading questions to make the students realize why they are doing what. The students are encouraged to write full sentences and explain how they reach which conclusions. This poster summarizes the experiences of the laboratory assistants that worked with the instructor and presents how they judge the effectiveness of the laboratories.

  1. Neural activation during anticipated peer evaluation and laboratory meal intake in overweight girls with and without loss of control eating.

    PubMed

    Jarcho, Johanna M; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Nelson, Eric E; Engel, Scott G; Vannucci, Anna; Field, Sara E; Romer, Adrienne L; Hannallah, Louise; Brady, Sheila M; Demidowich, Andrew P; Shomaker, Lauren B; Courville, Amber B; Pine, Daniel S; Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-03-01

    The interpersonal model of loss of control (LOC) eating proposes that socially distressing situations lead to anxious states that trigger excessive food consumption. Self-reports support these links, but the neurobiological underpinnings of these relationships remain unclear. We therefore examined brain regions associated with anxiety in relation to LOC eating and energy intake in the laboratory. Twenty-two overweight and obese (BMIz: 1.9±0.4) adolescent (15.8±1.6y) girls with LOC eating (LOC+, n=10) and without LOC eating (LOC-, n=12) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a simulated peer interaction chatroom paradigm. Immediately after the fMRI scan, girls consumed lunch ad libitum from a 10,934-kcal laboratory buffet meal with the instruction to "let yourself go and eat as much as you want." Pre-specified hypotheses regarding activation of five regions of interest were tested. Analysis of fMRI data revealed a significant group by peer feedback interaction in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), such that LOC+ had less activity following peer rejection (vs. acceptance), while LOC- had increased activity (p<.005). Moreover, functional coupling between vmPFC and striatum for peer rejection (vs. acceptance) interacted with LOC status: coupling was positive for LOC+, but negative in LOC- (p<.005). Activity of fusiform face area (FFA) during negative peer feedback from high-value peers also interacted with LOC status (p<.005). A positive association between FFA activation and intake during the meal was observed among only those with LOC eating. In conclusion, overweight and obese girls with LOC eating may be distinguished by a failure to engage regions of prefrontal cortex implicated in emotion regulation in response to social distress. The relationship between FFA activation and food intake supports the notion that heightened sensitivity to incoming interpersonal cues and perturbations in socio-emotional neural circuits may lead to overeating in order to cope with negative affect elicited by social discomfort in susceptible youth. PMID:25550068

  2. Guarana ( Paullinia cupana): toxic behavioral effects in laboratory animals and antioxidant activity in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Mattei; R. F Dias; E. B Esp??nola; E. A Carlini; S. B. M Barros

    1998-01-01

    The effects on toxic and behavioral levels of guarana (Paullinia cupana) were assessed in rats and mice subsequent to acute and chronic administrations and were compared to those produced by Ginseng (Panax ginseng). Experimental parameters included tests for antioxidant capacity in vitro and measured in vivo, toxicological screening, progress in weight, motor activity, death rate, and histopathological examination of the

  3. MOTOR ACTIVITY IN DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY TESTING: A CROSS-LABORATORY COMPARISON OF CONTROL DATA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Study Test Guideline (OPPTS 870.6300) calls for a battery of functional and neuropathological assessments in offspring during and following maternal exposure. The battery includes measurement of motor activity on post-natal days (PND) ...

  4. Workout at work: laboratory test of psychological and performance outcomes of active workstations.

    PubMed

    Sliter, Michael; Yuan, Zhenyu

    2015-04-01

    With growing concerns over the obesity epidemic in the United States and other developed countries, many organizations have taken steps to incorporate healthy workplace practices. However, most workers are still sedentary throughout the day--a major contributor to individual weight gain. The current study sought to gather preliminary evidence of the efficacy of active workstations, which are a possible intervention that could increase employees' physical activity while they are working. We conducted an experimental study, in which boredom, task satisfaction, stress, arousal, and performance were evaluated and compared across 4 randomly assigned conditions: seated workstation, standing workstation, cycling workstation, and walking workstation. Additionally, body mass index (BMI) and exercise habits were examined as moderators to determine whether differences in these variables would relate to increased benefits in active conditions. The results (n = 180) showed general support for the benefits of walking workstations, whereby participants in the walking condition had higher satisfaction and arousal and experienced less boredom and stress than those in the passive conditions. Cycling workstations, on the other hand, tended to relate to reduced satisfaction and performance when compared with other conditions. The moderators did not impact these relationships, indicating that walking workstations might have psychological benefits to individuals, regardless of BMI and exercise habits. The results of this study are a preliminary step in understanding the work implications of active workstations. PMID:25347682

  5. DARPA dynamic synthesis program: Sandia National Laboratories' program on shock-activated sintering. Second quarterly report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Graham; E. K. Beauchamp; B. Morosin; E. L. Venturini; D. M. Webb

    1982-01-01

    This report describes progress on shock-activated sintering of inorganic powders TiC, TiBâ, AlN and AlâOâ. This report describes progress in recovery fixture development, describes progress in numerical simulation of shock conditions imposed in our explosive shock modification experiments, describes characterization of shock-modified powders, and describes powder consolidation studies.

  6. Student Engagement with Artefacts and Scientific Ideas in a Laboratory and a Concept-Mapping Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamza, Karim Mikael; Wickman, Per-Olof

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a comparative approach to scrutinize the common assumption that certain school science activities are theoretical and therefore particularly suited for engaging students with scientific ideas, whereas others are practical and, thus, not equally conducive to engagement with scientific ideas. We compared two…

  7. Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Möhler; D. G. Georgakopoulos; C. E. Morris; S. Benz; V. Ebert; S. Hunsmann; H. Saathoff; M. Schnaiter; R. Wagner

    2008-01-01

    The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between -5 and -15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of -5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the

  8. Intercomparison Between Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratories for Trace Elements Determination in Lacustrine Sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucretia C. Dinescu; Otilia A. Culicov; Octavian G. Duliu; Marina V. Frontasyeva; Cristiana D. Oprea

    2003-01-01

    An intercomparison concerning the concentrations of 23 major and trace elements in recent lacustrine sediments, as determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis, has been performed by using epithermal neutrons at the Joint institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna, (Russia) and thermal neutrons at the National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest, (Romania). Sc, La, Tb, Yb, Th, Na, Rb, Cs,

  9. Student Reciprocal Peer Teaching as a Method for Active Learning: An Experience in an Electrotechnical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muñoz-García, Miguel A.; Moreda, Guillermo P.; Hernández-Sánchez, Natalia; Valiño, Vanesa

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is one of the most efficient mechanisms for learning, according to the psychology of learning. When students act as teachers for other students, the communication is more fluent and knowledge is transferred easier than in a traditional classroom. This teaching method is referred to in the literature as reciprocal peer teaching. In…

  10. Hands-on earth science with students at schools for the Deaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Earth science teachers at schools for the Deaf face a variety of challenges. This community of students has a wide range of language skills, teaching resources can be limited and often teachers are not trained in geosciences. An NSF CAREER grant provided an opportunity to make a difference to this community and foster earth science learning at 8 schools for the Deaf around the country. We designed hands-on deformational sandboxes for the teachers and provided accompanying curriculum materials. The sandbox is a physical model of crustal deformation that students can manipulate to test hypotheses. The visual nature of the sandbox was well-suited for the spatial grammar of American Sign Language used by these students. Furthermore, language skills were enhanced by scaffolded observation, sketch, annotation, discussion, interpretation assignments. Geoscience training of teachers was strengthened with workshops and three 5-day field trips for teachers and selected students to Utah, western New England and southern California. The field trips provided opportunity for students to work as geoscientists observing, interpreting, discussing and presenting their investigations. Between field trips, we set up videoconferences from the UMass experimental lab with the high school earth science classrooms. These sessions facilitated dialog between students and researchers at UMass. While the project set out to provide geoscience learning opportunities for students at Schools for the Deaf, the long lasting impact was the improved geoscience training of teachers, most of whom had limited post-secondary earth science training. The success of the project also rested on the dedication of the teachers to their students and their willingness to try new approaches and experiences. By tapping into a community of 6 teachers, who already shared curriculum and had fantastic leadership, the project was able to have significant impact and exceed the initial goals. The project has led to a manuscript in Science Teacher on the educational benefits of the deformational sandbox. At the 2009 GSA meeting, we ran a workshop on the deformational sandbox that included teachers from hearing schools. The project also highlights the potential for a cognitive science investigation on learning of 3D geologic concepts by people who use a language with spatial grammar, such as ASL.

  11. Connecting the Public to Natural Hazards Through a Hands-on Museum Exhibit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, S. E.; Rowe, S. M.; Hanshumaker, W.; Farley, M.

    2014-12-01

    Communities along the coast of Oregon, Washington, and northern California live with the threat of potentially devastating subduction zone earthquakes and subsequent tsunami that could happen at any time. Both residents and visitors to the coast need to be aware of the potential impacts such hazards can have on their lives as well as what to do during an earthquake and before a tsunami hits. To raise awareness of both natural hazards and the technologies used to monitor them, UNAVCO designed and installed a museum exhibit on display at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. The objectives for the exhibit are to increase familiarization with the natural hazards of earthquakes and tsunamis in the Cascadia region, to explain the connection between the crust's movement and compression over time with the potential strength of a subduction-zone earthquake, and to inform visitors about high-precision, high-rate GPS technology. The exhibit includes multiple hands-on models and an authentic GPS monitoring station. Additionally, panels explain the science behind the models, potential impacts of a great earthquake to society, and actions visitors can take to practice earthquake safety through the Great ShakeOut earthquake drill. Over the past year that the exhibit has been open to the public, it has been visited by over 100,000 people including students, family and senior groups, and the general public. Anecdotal evidence indicates that two components of the exhibit create the most visitor impact providing visitors with 'ah ha moments': a real-scale tape measure showing the approximate 12 foot distance the coast has compressed over the past 300+ years, and a flexible map illustrating that the coastal areas are compressing the most compared to areas further inland. Through HMSC's NSF-funded Cyberlab automated visitor data collection system, we have been able to document and analyze a variety of visitor characteristics including number of people visiting the various elements of the exhibit, time on exhibit elements, order of visitation, grouping characteristics, and basic use of the exhibit as a learning tool by groups. During this session we will share the successes and challenges of the exhibit and next steps to further raise awareness about natural hazards of the region.

  12. Laboratory-monitored fondaparinux and coagulation activity in association with total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Lauri; Salmela, Birgitta; Leinonen, Jari; Lemponen, Marja; Huhtala, Jukka; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta; Lassila, Riitta

    2014-09-01

    Fondaparinux, indirect factor Xa (FXa) inhibitor, is recommended for thromboprophylaxis for high-risk patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery. We evaluated the prothrombotic state and anticoagulant intensity of fondaparinux (2.5 mg daily) after total hip replacement (THR). Twenty patients underwent THR - seven bilateral and 13 unilateral. Blood samples were collected preoperatively and at 6 h, 8 h (2 h after fondaparinux), 1 day (12-14 h after fondaparinux), and 4 weeks (12-14 h after fondaparinux) postoperatively. Antithrombin (AT), fibrinogen, factor VIII activity, coagulation times, thrombin-AT (TAT) complex, D-dimer, C-reactive protein, prothrombinase-induced clotting time (PiCT) and anti-Xa activity were measured. The latter two were also tested after plasma spiking with fondaparinux 0-1.25 ?g/ml. In spiked prophylactic fondaparinux samples (0-0.25 ?g/ml), PiCT and anti-Xa activity correlated (r = 0.84) better than in the patient samples (r = 0.35). On the first day, anti-Xa activity and PiCT dissociated, and PiCT lost sensitivity for fondaparinux. AT decreased but stayed within the normal range, whereas TAT complex and D-dimer peaked at 6 h as signs of thrombin generation. On the first postoperative day, TAT and D-dimer halved. Bilateral THR associated with higher TAT and D-dimer levels up to 4 weeks. Perioperative FVIII levels were not affected, but were elevated in both groups (range 191-211%) after 4 weeks. Anti-Xa activity detected prophylactic fondaparinux with higher sensitivity than PiCT in vitro, but even more so in vivo. Thus, PiCT is not the method of choice to assess fondaparinux at least in association with THR. THR, bilateral more than unilateral, increased thrombin generation and D-dimer 7-11-fold early after surgery. Factor VIII activity and D-dimer remained elevated even after 4 weeks despite the compliant thromboprophylaxis with fondaparinux. PMID:24732174

  13. Biodegradation of plastics in soil and effects on nitrification activity. A laboratory approach.

    PubMed

    Bettas Ardisson, Giulia; Tosin, Maurizio; Barbale, Marco; Degli-Innocenti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The progressive application of new biodegradable plastics in agriculture calls for improved testing approaches to assure their environmental safety. Full biodegradation (?90%) prevents accumulation in soil, which is the first tier of testing. The application of specific ecotoxicity tests is the second tier of testing needed to show safety for the soil ecosystem. Soil microbial nitrification is widely used as a bioindicator for evaluating the impact of chemicals on soil but it is not applied for evaluating the impact of biodegradable plastics. In this work the International Standard test for biodegradation of plastics in soil (ISO 17556, 2012) was applied both to measure biodegradation and to prepare soil samples needed for a subsequent nitrification test based on another International Standard (ISO 14238, 2012). The plastic mulch film tested in this work showed full biodegradability and no inhibition of the nitrification potential of the soil in comparison with the controls. The laboratory approach suggested in this Technology Report enables (i) to follow the course of biodegradation, (ii) a strict control of variables and environmental conditions, (iii) the application of very high concentrations of test material (to maximize the possible effects). This testing approach could be taken into consideration in improved testing schemes aimed at defining the biodegradability of plastics in soil. PMID:25566223

  14. Leak testing plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory liquid low- level waste system (active tanks)

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.G.; Wise, R.F.; Starr, J.W.; Maresca, J.W. Jr. (Vista Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States))

    1992-06-01

    A leak testing plan for a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is provided in the two volumes that form this document. This plan was prepared in response to the requirements of the Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) between the US Department of Energy and two other agencies, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of this agreement was 1 January 1992. The LLLW system is an interconnected complex of tanks and pipelines. The FFA distinguishes four different categories of tank and pipeline systems within this complex: new systems (Category A), doubly contained systems (Category B), singly contained systems (Category C), and inactive systems (Category D). The FFA's specific requirements for leak testing of the Category C systems is addressed in this plan. The plan also addresses leak testing of the Category B portions of the LLLW system. Leak testing of the Category B components was brought into the plan to supplement the secondary containment design demonstration effort that is under way for these components.

  15. Food and Drug Administration process validation activities to support 99Mo production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, M.J.; Bourcier, S.C.; Talley, D.G.

    1997-07-01

    Prior to 1989 {sup 99}Mo was produced in the US by a single supplier, Cintichem Inc., Tuxedo, NY. Because of problems associated with operating its facility, in 1989 Cintichem elected to decommission the facility rather than incur the costs for repair. The demise of the {sup 99}Mo capability at Cintichem left the US totally reliant upon a single foreign source, Nordion International, located in Ottawa Canada. In 1992 the DOE purchased the Cintichem {sup 99}Mo Production Process and Drug Master File (DMF). In 1994 the DOE funded Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to produce {sup 99}Mo. Although Cintichem produced {sup 99}Mo and {sup 99m}Tc generators for many years, there was no requirement for process validation which is now required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In addition to the validation requirement, the requirements for current Good manufacturing Practices were codified into law. The purpose of this paper is to describe the process validation being conducted at SNL for the qualification of SNL as a supplier of {sup 99}Mo to US pharmaceutical companies.

  16. Atomic and molecular physics and data activities for astrophysics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery, D.J.; Kristic, P.S.; Liu, W.; Schultz, D.R.; Stancil, P.C.

    1998-04-01

    The atomic astrophysics group at ORNL produces, collects, evaluates, and disseminates atomic and molecular data relevant to astrophysics and actively models various astrophysical environments utilizing this information. With the advent of the World Wide Web, these data are also being placed on-line to facilitate their use by end-users. In this brief report, the group`s recent activities in data production and in modeling are highlighted. For example, the authors describe recent calculations of elastic and transport cross sections relevant to ionospheric and heliospheric studies, charge transfer between metal ions and metal atoms and novel supernova nebular spectra modeling, ion-molecule collision data relevant to planetary atmospheres and comets, and data for early universe modeling.

  17. Analysis of traces at ORNL's new high-flux neutron activation laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Ricci; T. H. Handley; F. F. Dyer

    1974-01-01

    \\u000a Résumé  On a récemment installé un nouveau dispositif pour l'analyse par activation neutronique avec un flux thermique de 5X1014 cm?2 sec?1 au réacteur à haut flux du ORNL. Ce flux particulièrement élevé combiné avec un petit ordinateur et un programme adapté à\\u000a la spectrométrie ? avec un détecteur Ge (Li), rend possible une irradiation plus courte, une analyse d'identification plus\\u000a rapide

  18. Survival Potential and Photosynthetic Activity of Lichens Under Mars-Like Conditions: A Laboratory Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Butina, Frederike; Lorek, Andreas; Wernecke, Roland; Ott, Sieglinde

    2010-03-01

    Lichens were repetitively exposed over 22 days to thermophysical Mars-like conditions at low-and mid-latitudes. The simulated parameters and the experimental setup are described. Natural samples of the lichen Xanthoria elegans were used to investigate their ability to survive the applied Mars-like conditions. The effects of atmospheric pressure, CO2 concentration, low temperature, water availability, and light on Mars were also studied. The results of these experiments indicate that - no significant decrease in the vitality of the lichen occurred after exposure to simulated martian conditions, which was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis, and - a 95% CO2 atmosphere with 100% humidity, low pressure (partial pressure of CO2 was 600 Pa), and low temperature has a balancing effect on photosynthetic activity as a function of temperature. This means a starting low photosynthetic activity at high CO2 concentrations with Earth-like pressure has a reduction of 60%. But, if the simulated atmospheric pressure is reduced to Mars-like conditions with the maintenance of the same Mars-like 95% CO2 concentration, the photosynthetic activity increases and again reaches similar values as those exhibited under terrestrial atmospheric pressure and concentration. Based on these results, we presume that, in any region on Mars where liquid water might be available, even for short periods of time, a eukaryotic symbiotic organism would have the ability to survive, at least over weeks, and to temporarily photosynthesize.

  19. Survival potential and photosynthetic activity of lichens under Mars-like conditions: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Butina, Frederike; Lorek, Andreas; Wernecke, Roland; Ott, Sieglinde

    2010-03-01

    Lichens were repetitively exposed over 22 days to thermophysical Mars-like conditions at low-and mid-latitudes. The simulated parameters and the experimental setup are described. Natural samples of the lichen Xanthoria elegans were used to investigate their ability to survive the applied Mars-like conditions. The effects of atmospheric pressure, CO(2) concentration, low temperature, water availability, and light on Mars were also studied. The results of these experiments indicate that no significant decrease in the vitality of the lichen occurred after exposure to simulated martian conditions, which was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis, and a 95% CO(2) atmosphere with 100% humidity, low pressure (partial pressure of CO(2) was 600 Pa), and low temperature has a balancing effect on photosynthetic activity as a function of temperature. This means a starting low photosynthetic activity at high CO(2) concentrations with Earth-like pressure has a reduction of 60%. But, if the simulated atmospheric pressure is reduced to Mars-like conditions with the maintenance of the same Mars-like 95% CO(2) concentration, the photosynthetic activity increases and again reaches similar values as those exhibited under terrestrial atmospheric pressure and concentration. Based on these results, we presume that, in any region on Mars where liquid water might be available, even for short periods of time, a eukaryotic symbiotic organism would have the ability to survive, at least over weeks, and to temporarily photosynthesize. PMID:20402583

  20. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2012 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  1. A Radiation Laboratory Curriculum Development at Western Kentucky University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzilov, Alexander P.; Novikov, Ivan S.; Womble, Phil C.

    2009-03-01

    We present the latest developments for the radiation laboratory curriculum at the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Western Kentucky University. During the last decade, the Applied Physics Institute (API) at WKU accumulated various equipment for radiation experimentation. This includes various neutron sources (computer controlled d-t and d-d neutron generators, and isotopic 252 Cf and PuBe sources), the set of gamma sources with various intensities, gamma detectors with various energy resolutions (NaI, BGO, GSO, LaBr and HPGe) and the 2.5-MeV Van de Graaff particle accelerator. XRF and XRD apparatuses are also available for students and members at the API. This equipment is currently used in numerous scientific and teaching activities. Members of the API also developed a set of laboratory activities for undergraduate students taking classes from the physics curriculum (Nuclear Physics, Atomic Physics, and Radiation Biophysics). Our goal is to develop a set of radiation laboratories, which will strengthen the curriculum of physics, chemistry, geology, biology, and environmental science at WKU. The teaching and research activities are integrated into real-world projects and hands-on activities to engage students. The proposed experiments and their relevance to the modern status of physical science are discussed.

  2. Summary of environmental characterization activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Solid Waste Storage Area Six, FY 1986 through 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.C.; Solomon, D.K.; Dreier, R.B.; Lee, S.Y.; Kelmers, A.D.; Lietzke, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Craig, P.M. [Environmental Consulting Engineers, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1987-09-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Action Program (RAP), has supported characterization activities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA 6) to acquire information necessary for identification and planning of remedial actions that may be warranted, and to facilitate eventual closure of the site. In FY 1986 investigations began in the areas of site hydrology, geochemistry, soils, geology, and geohydrologic model application. This report summarizes work carried out in each of these areas during FY`s 1986 and 1987 and serves as a status report pulling together the large volume of data that has resulted. Characterization efforts are by no means completed; however, a sufficient data base has been generated to begin data interpretation and analysis of site contaminants.

  3. Summary of environmental characterization activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Solid Waste Storage Area Six, FY 1986 through 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.C.; Solomon, D.K.; Dreier, R.B.; Lee, S.Y.; Kelmers, A.D.; Lietzke, D.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Craig, P.M. (Environmental Consulting Engineers, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1987-09-30

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Action Program (RAP), has supported characterization activities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA 6) to acquire information necessary for identification and planning of remedial actions that may be warranted, and to facilitate eventual closure of the site. In FY 1986 investigations began in the areas of site hydrology, geochemistry, soils, geology, and geohydrologic model application. This report summarizes work carried out in each of these areas during FY's 1986 and 1987 and serves as a status report pulling together the large volume of data that has resulted. Characterization efforts are by no means completed; however, a sufficient data base has been generated to begin data interpretation and analysis of site contaminants.

  4. Laboratory evaluation of molluscicidal & mosquito larvicidal activities of leaves of Solanum nigrum L.

    PubMed Central

    Rawani, Anjali; Ghosh, Anupam; Chandra, Goutam

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Indiscriminate use of synthetic pesticides has created serious problem for the aquatic flora and fauna, and also resulted in appearance of pesticide resistance in vector population. This study was designed to evaluate the biocontrol efficacy of aqueous and solvent extracts of mature leaves of Solanum nigrum L., against fresh water snail Lymnaea acuminata f. rufescens (Gray) (an intermediate host of parasites causing fasciolopsiasis) and larvae of Culex vishnui group (Reuben) (vector of Japanese encephalitis). Methods: Aqueous and solvent extracts of fresh, mature, green/shed dried leaves of S. nigrum were tested against adult L. acuminata and larvae of Cx. vishnui group. The lethal concentration was determined and the appropriate lethal concentration at 24 h of benzene extract was also studied on non target organisms such as Daphnia sp, Diplonychus annulatum and Chironomus circumdatus. A qualitative phytochemical analysis was carried out in search of active ingredient and the chemical nature of the active substance was also evaluated by infrared (IR) analysis. Results: In a 72 h bioassay experiment with the aqueous extract, the highest mortality was recorded in 0.5 and 3 per cent extract against larvae of Cx. vishnui group and L. acuminata, respectivela. In the benzene solvent extract, the maximum mortality was recorded at a concentration of 150 ppm against L. acuminata and at 50 ppm against larvae of Cx. vishnui group with LC50 values of 55.45 and 11.59 ppm, respectively at 72 h. The log probit analysis (95% confidence level) recorded lowest value at 72 h of exposure. Qualitative phytochemical analysis reported the presence of some biochemical compounds, such as saponin, flavonoids, steroid and tannin. Among these, the toxic compound was detected by IR analysis having Rf = 0.87 (showed 66.70% and 76.70% mortality of L. acuminata and larvae of Cx. vishnui group, respectively). IR analysis provided preliminary information about the aliphatic amide nature of the active ingredient. Interpretation & conclusions: The study results provide considerable scope in exploiting local indigenous plant resources for molluscicidal and mosquito larvicidal activities. PMID:25297363

  5. Hands-On Science: Cool Ways to Teach about Warm-Blooded Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanCleave, Janice

    1998-01-01

    Presents three activities for teaching elementary students about the built-in mechanisms that help warm-blooded animals maintain constant internal body temperatures. The activities help students understand why humans sweat, why dogs pant, and why blubber keeps whales warm in frigid water. (SM)

  6. Hands-On Whole Science. Shining Science: Shed Some Light on the Science of Summer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Presents summer science activities for elementary students which focus on sunlight and other natural and artificial light sources (e.g., fire, flashlights, and fireflies). Related activities which involve language arts, art, and math are included. A reproducible page teaches children Morse Code using a flashlight. (SM)

  7. Rapid-Cycling Brassicas (RCB's) in Hands-on Teaching of Plant Biology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Williams, Paul H.

    One of the seminal papers written by Dr. Paul H. Williams, introducing Wisconsin Fast Plants. This article explains the taxonomy of Brassicas and how how Williams created the Brassica rapa commonly known as Wisconsin Fast Plants. Published by The Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) in 1982. Williams also discusses how to grow Fast Plants as it was understood at the time (further research and development have influenced growing procedures since this early time, and these are reflected in the current offerings of information on the Fast Plants website).

  8. Laboratory exercises in online information assurance courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bhagyavati

    2006-01-01

    Information assurance courses delivered in an online environment pose challenges to the development of meaningful hands-on exercises for students. This article presents techniques on furnishing laboratory exercises to online students and presents examples of assignments drawn from the author's experiences in teaching online courses for over three years. These assignments have proven successful in enhancing the learning experiences of undergraduate

  9. Bioinformatics and modeling laboratory Spring 2007

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Jonathan

    GENE4220L Bioinformatics and modeling laboratory Spring 2007 Course description: Hands-on look to Microarrays Week 9 Mar 6 Chapter 6.2 Mar 8 Discuss a paper from the literature Mar 12 Spring Break Mar 14 Spring Break Week 10 Mar 20 Chapter 7.1 Mar 22 Chapter 7.2 Week 11 Mar 27 Discuss a paper from

  10. The calls of murine predators activate endogenous analgesia mechanisms in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Hendrie, C A

    1991-03-01

    In view of the suggested role of endogenous analgesia mechanisms as an antipredator defense mechanism, the effects on nociception of exposure to the calls of various murine predatory and nonpredatory species were assessed. Data revealed that the calls of the Tawny Owl, Barn Owl and Common Gull all induced significant analgesia following exposure to 2 min of birdsong. Time course analysis revealed the analgesia induced by the Tawny Owl call to have a duration in excess of 40 min while the Barn Owl and Gull call-induced analgesias were much shorter lasting (approximately 10 min or less). Five mg/kg naloxone was found to attenuate the analgesia induced by the Tawny and Barn Owls but not the Common Gull. Together, these data suggest that brief exposure to the calls of night-hunting, aerial predators activate endogenous opioid-mediated analgesia mechanisms in mice. PMID:1648243

  11. Sculpting behavior : a tangible language for hands-on play and learning

    E-print Network

    Raffle, Hayes Solos, 1974-

    2008-01-01

    For over a century, educators and constructivist theorists have argued that children learn by actively forming and testing -- constructing -- theories about how the world works. Recent efforts in the design of "tangible ...

  12. Teaching a laboratory-intensive online introductory electronics course*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markes, Mark

    2008-03-01

    Most current online courses provide little or no hands-on laboratory content. This talk will describe the development and initial experiences with presenting an introductory online electronics course with significant hands-on laboratory content. The course is delivered using a Linux-based Apache web server, a Darwin Streaming Server, a SMART Board interactive white board, SMART Notebook software and a video camcorder. The laboratory uses primarily the Global Specialties PB-505 trainer and a Tenma 20MHz Oscilloscope that are provided to the students for the duration of the course and then returned. Testing is performed using Course Blackboard course management software.

  13. Hands-on science methods class for pre-service elementary teachers

    SciTech Connect

    Manner, B.M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    If elementary teachers are to be comfortable teaching science, they must have positive pre-service experiences. A science methods class that is activity-based and student-centered, rather than lecture-based and teacher-centered, peaks their interest in science and alleviates their fears. Activities conducted by the students illustrate science concepts or integrate science with children`s literature books such as The Grouchy Ladybug. These activities are conducted by each student with the rest of the class and the professor acting as an elementary class. Each activity is then evaluated as to the science concept, what was done well, and how it could be improved. The students also relate how the activity would be integrated with other subjects such as social studies, art, math, and language arts. Student feedback indicates this method is enjoyable, educational, and valuable in preparing them to teach science. The {open_quotes}oohs{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}I didn`t know that!{close_quotes} during activities are positives, but students have also learned some science, lost most of their science anxiety, and will teach science with the confidence and enthusiasm that was lacking at the beginning of the course.

  14. Forest Watch: A K-12 Outreach Program to Engage Pre-College Students in Authentic, Hands-On Science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. T. Gagnon; B. N. Rock

    2009-01-01

    The Forest Watch Program is a K-12 hands-on science outreach program developed at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) in 1991. The program has engaged students and their teachers in assisting researchers at UNH in the assessment of the state-of-health of white pine (Pinus strobus), a known bio-indicator species for exposure to elevated levels of ground-level ozone. Students are introduced

  15. Cell surface and exopolymer characterization of laboratory stabilized activated sludge from a beverage bottling plant.

    PubMed

    Boyette, S M; Lovett, J M; Gaboda, W G; Soares, J A

    2001-01-01

    Fermentor-stabilized activated sludge from an industrial beverage bottling plant was grown on three different food sources: normal plant wastewater, plant wastewater containing high sucrose concentrations, and a synthetic glucose-based feed stock. Surface charge, hydrophobicity, and exopolysaccharide composition were measured on the stabilized bacterial flocs. Cell surface charge was measured by electrophoretic mobility, dye exchange titration, and a standard colloid titration, while cell hydrophobicity was determined using the bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons (BATH) test. Exopolysaccharide profiles were determined by measuring concentrations of glucose, galactose, mannose, glucuronic, and galacturonic acids in digested exopolymer extractions using HPLC. Changes in the physical surface properties of the bacteria and the chemical composition of the extracted exopolymers were correlated with differences in the three food sources. Cell surface hydrophobicity was similar for cultures grown on different plant wastewaters, while the culture grown on synthetic food produced less floc hydrophobicity. Electrophoretic mobility measurements, charge titrations, and dye exchange titrations showed different total surface charge as well as varying charge availability. Additionally, total surface charge and total exopolysaccharide concentrations appeared less dependent on food source than the food-to-mass ratio. High concentrations of biodegradable food produced dispersed growth and high concentrations of exopolysaccharides that contributed to poor settling. PMID:11381965

  16. OT2_jmartinp_4: The Galactic center as the laboratory to understand nuclear activity in galaxies (GC_JMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Pintado, J.

    2011-09-01

    We propose to use the The Galactic center (GC) a local extragalactic laboratory to understand the chemistry and the heating mechanisms in nearby galactic nuclei. The central 30 pc region around the black hole, Sgr A*, contains all the different type of activity found in extragalactic nuclei, namely, massive stellar clusters creating large photodissociation regions (PDR), shocks, molecular clouds irradiated by strong X-rays (XDRs), and the site of Cosmic Rays (CRs) acceleration as shown by HESS. We plan to map this region with SPIRE in the high spectral resolution mode and with HIFI in selected molecular ions H_3O^+, OH^+, and H_2O^+ claimed to trace XDRs and/or CRs. This unique data set will provide the possibility to understand the origin of the large column densities of this hydrides found in galactic nuclei with different type of activity and the role of the PDR-XDR-CR chemistries in their formation. The SPIRE data cubes will have a huge legacy value providing the full FIR inventory of the atomic and molecular gas across the central 50 pc of the Galaxy. We stress that only the combination of the high spectral resolution of HIFI and the spatial distribution provided the proposed mapping will have the possibility to distinguish which of the different components of the molecular gas along the line of sight correspond to the ones associated with XDRs PDRs and eventually CRs acceleration sites.

  17. A Laboratory of Extremophiles: Iceland Coordination Action for Research Activities on Life in Extreme Environments (CAREX) Field Campaign.

    PubMed

    Marteinsson, Viggó; Vaishampayan, Parag; Kviderova, Jana; Mapelli, Francesca; Medori, Mauro; Calfapietra, Carlo; Aguilera, Angeles; Hamisch, Domenica; Reynisson, Eyjólfur; Magnússon, Sveinn; Marasco, Ramona; Borin, Sara; Calzada, Abigail; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; González-Toril, Elena; Amils, Ricardo; Elster, Josef; Hänsch, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Existence of life in extreme environments has been known for a long time, and their habitants have been investigated by different scientific disciplines for decades. However, reports of multidisciplinary research are uncommon. In this paper, we report an interdisciplinary three-day field campaign conducted in the framework of the Coordination Action for Research Activities on Life in Extreme Environments (CAREX) FP7EU program, with participation of experts in the fields of life and earth sciences. In situ experiments and sampling were performed in a 20 m long hot springs system of different temperature (57 °C to 100 °C) and pH (2 to 4). Abiotic factors were measured to study their influence on the diversity. The CO2 and H2S concentration varied at different sampling locations in the system, but the SO2 remained the same. Four biofilms, mainly composed by four different algae and phototrophic protists, showed differences in photosynthetic activity. Varying temperature of the sampling location affects chlorophyll fluorescence, not only in the microbial mats, but plants (Juncus), indicating selective adaptation to the environmental conditions. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA microarray and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)-based analysis in laboratory showed the presence of a diverse microbial population. Even a short duration (30 h) deployment of a micro colonizer in this hot spring system led to colonization of microorganisms based on ribosomal intergenic spacer (RISA) analysis. Polyphasic analysis of this hot spring system was possible due to the involvement of multidisciplinary approaches. PMID:25371340

  18. FY 1994 annual summary report of the surveillance and maintenance activities for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) Program was initiated to manage former waste management and environmental research sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals. The S and M Program is responsible for managing designated sites/facilities from the end of their operating lives until final disposition or site stabilization. To effectively manage and perform the various S and M Program responsibilities, five summary-level work breakdown structure (WBS) elements have been established: S and M Preliminary Investigations, Special Projects, Routine S and M, Inactive Groundwater Wells, and Project Management. Routine S and M activities were conducted as scheduled throughout fiscal years (FY) 1994 at applicable inactive waste management (WM) and other contaminated areas. Overall, the ER S and M Program maintains 47 facilities, performs vegetation maintenance on approximately 230 acres, maintains 54 inactive tanks, and provides overall site management on over 700 acres. In addition to the routine S and M activities, detailed site inspections were conducted at established frequencies on appropriate sites in the ER S and M Program. This document provides a summary of the FY 1994 ORNL ER S and M Program accomplishments.

  19. Hands-Off and Hands-On Casting Consistency of Amputee below Knee Sockets Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Residual limb shape capturing (Casting) consistency has a great influence on the quality of socket fit. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to establish a reliable reference grid for intercast and intracast shape and volume consistency of two common casting methods, Hands-off and Hands-on. Residual limbs were cast for twelve people with a unilateral below knee amputation and scanned twice for each casting concept. Subsequently, all four volume images of each amputee were semiautomatically segmented and registered to a common coordinate system using the tibia and then the shape and volume differences were calculated. The results show that both casting methods have intra cast volume consistency and there is no significant volume difference between the two methods. Inter- and intracast mean volume differences were not clinically significant based on the volume of one sock criteria. Neither the Hands-off nor the Hands-on method resulted in a consistent residual limb shape as the coefficient of variation of shape differences was high. The resultant shape of the residual limb in the Hands-off casting was variable but the differences were not clinically significant. For the Hands-on casting, shape differences were equal to the maximum acceptable limit for a poor socket fit. PMID:24348164

  20. Hands-off and hands-on casting consistency of amputee below knee sockets using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Safari, Mohammad Reza; Rowe, Philip; McFadyen, Angus; Buis, Arjan

    2013-01-01

    Residual limb shape capturing (Casting) consistency has a great influence on the quality of socket fit. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to establish a reliable reference grid for intercast and intracast shape and volume consistency of two common casting methods, Hands-off and Hands-on. Residual limbs were cast for twelve people with a unilateral below knee amputation and scanned twice for each casting concept. Subsequently, all four volume images of each amputee were semiautomatically segmented and registered to a common coordinate system using the tibia and then the shape and volume differences were calculated. The results show that both casting methods have intra cast volume consistency and there is no significant volume difference between the two methods. Inter- and intracast mean volume differences were not clinically significant based on the volume of one sock criteria. Neither the Hands-off nor the Hands-on method resulted in a consistent residual limb shape as the coefficient of variation of shape differences was high. The resultant shape of the residual limb in the Hands-off casting was variable but the differences were not clinically significant. For the Hands-on casting, shape differences were equal to the maximum acceptable limit for a poor socket fit. PMID:24348164

  1. Determination of In Vitro Activities of Solithromycin at Different pHs and Its Intracellular Activity against Clinical Isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from a Laboratory Collection

    PubMed Central

    Mallegol, Julia; Fernandes, Prabhavathi; Seah, Christine; Guyard, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the activity of solithromycin against 196 clinical gonococcal isolates collected at the Public Health Ontario Laboratories, Toronto, Canada, including isolates with different levels of azithromycin resistance, as well as the role of pH in MIC determinations using pH-adjusted agar plates (pH range, 5.6 to 7.6). In vitro invasion assays were performed using monolayers of HeLa epithelial cells and clinical gonococci displaying different azithromycin MICs; infected cultures were treated with solithromycin, and its intracellular activity was determined by CFU assays after 3 and 20 h of exposure. Solithromycin displayed a MIC50 and MIC90 of 0.0625 and 0.125 ?g/ml, respectively, making its activity at least 4-fold higher than that of azithromycin. Clinical isolates with elevated MICs for azithromycin (MICs of ?2,048 ?g/ml and 4 to 8 ?g/ml) showed solithromycin MIC values of 8 and 0.5 ?g/ml, respectively. In contrast to azithromycin, solithromycin MICs were not significantly affected by acidic pHs, suggesting more stability at lower pH. Moreover, when intracellular Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates were incubated with solithromycin at 4 times, 1 times, and one-fourth of the MIC, the exposure to solithromycin resulted in the progressive loss of viability of most isolates over time. The intracellular activity of solithromycin, combined with the low MICs to this agent, indicates that it may be an attractive option for gonorrhea treatment if clinical trials in development reveal that this drug can be used safely in adult indications, especially when multidrug-resistant clinical isolates are now emerging. PMID:23796936

  2. Antibodies against oxidized phospholipids in laboratory tests exploring lupus anti-coagulant activity

    PubMed Central

    Rolla, R; Vidali, M; Serino, R; Pergolini, P; Albano, E; Bellomo, G

    2007-01-01

    Lupus anti-coagulants (LA) are a variety of anti-phospholipid antibodies characterized by their capacity to interfere with phospholipid-dependent coagulation assays. LA are increasingly recognized as important predictors of thrombosis. However, the antigen specificity of LA is still poorly characterized. Growing evidence indicates that oxidized phospholipids are among the targets of anti-phospholipid antibodies. This prompted us to investigate the role of IgG directed against different oxidized phospholipids in 164 subjects without clotting factor defects that were tested for the presence of LA using a LA-sensitive activate partial thromboplastin time (aPTT-FSL) and a screening/confirmation assay based on diluted Russell's viper venom test (dRVVT-PL). The response to aPTT-FSL was significantly (P < 0·0005) associated with high titres of IgG against oxidized phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol, whereas positivity to dRVVT-PL was associated with the elevation of IgG against oxidized phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine (P < 0·0005) and phosphatidylinositol (P < 0·01). No difference in reactivity against oxidized cardiolipin was evident between the different groups. Positivity to the dRVVT-PL test was also associated significantly (P < 0·005) with the elevation of anti-cardiolipin and anti-?2-glycoprotein-1 IgG. However, stepwise logistic regression demonstrated that IgG recognizing oxidized phosphatidylethanolamine and oxidized phosphatidylcholine were the only independent predictors of the response to dRVVT-PL assay, while IgG recognizing oxidized phosphatidylethanolamine and oxidized phosphatidylinositol were independent predictors of the response to aPTT-FSL test. In conclusion, autoantibodies against defined oxidized phospholipids are independent predictors of LA detection by aPTT-FSL or dRVVT-PL assays and might contribute to the variability often observed in the responses to the functional tests detecting LA. PMID:17488295

  3. Foreshock Activity during Laboratory Friction Tests using Meter-scale Rock Specimens Inferred from two Apparatuses with Different Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakata, H.; Yoshimitsu, N.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Togo, T.; Doi, I.

    2014-12-01

    Foreshock activity has been reported for large earthquakes. The generation mechanism of these foreshocks is one of the most important keys to understand the initiation of large earthquakes. To simulate earthquakes in laboratory, Fukuyama et al. (2014) developed a meter-scale biaxial friction apparatus, using a large shaking table at NIED. Two rectangular parallelepiped gabbro samples were prepared. The upper one fixed to the outside floor of the shaking table was 1.5 m long, 0.5 m high and 0.5 m wide, and the lower one that moved with the shaking table was 0.5 m longer. The original loading apparatus had a long arm between outside floor and the loading frame with two hinges. We renovated the apparatus to have a shorter arm without hinges in order to make the apparatus stiffer. Stick-slip events were observed during the friction tests with both apparatuses. In this study, we analyzed acoustic emission events using continuously recorded elastic waves during the tests with these two apparatus. The foreshock activity was quite high for the less stiff apparatus, and occurrence rate of foreshocks increased toward a main stick-slip event. In contrast, the activity for the stiffer apparatus was much lower. We consider that the difference in stiffness in the lab should correspond to the tectonic setting in nature. For inter-plate earthquakes, foreshocks were reported to be active. Some foreshocks were migrating, and occurrence rate of foreshocks increased toward the main shocks (e.g., Bouchon et al., 2011; Kato et al., 2012; Ruiz et al., 2014). On the other hand, foreshock activities of inland earthquakes were low, and quiescence prior to main shocks was observed. Further, they occurred at the close vicinity of the hypocenter of main shock (e.g., Doi and Kawakata, 2012; 2013). Considering that the loading systems for inter-plate earthquakes are less stiff than those for inland earthquakes, the stiffness of the loading system should control the foreshock activity.

  4. 277:S92, 1999.Advan in Physiol Edu physiology laboratories.

    E-print Network

    Cooper, Robin L.

    277:S92, 1999.Advan in Physiol Edu A M Smith physiology laboratories. A model circulatory system.physiology.orgDownloadedfrom #12;A MODEL CIRCULATORY SYSTEM FOR USE IN UNDERGRADUATE PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORIES Andrew M. Smith experiences in this area. Thus a model circulatory system was developed to give students hands-on experience

  5. A Software Laboratory Environment for Computer-Based Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Barry L.; O'Neal, Micheal B.

    This paper describes a National Science Foundation-sponsored project at Louisiana Technological University to develop computer-based laboratories for "hands-on" introductions to major topics of computer science. The underlying strategy is to develop structured laboratory environments that present abstract concepts through the use of computer…

  6. Effects of insemination and blood-feeding on locomotor activity of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) females under laboratory conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is an arbovirus disease transmitted by two Aedes mosquitoes: Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus. Virgin females of these two species generally show a bimodal and diurnal pattern of activity, with early morning and late afternoon peaks. Although some studies on the flight activity of virgin, inseminated and blood-fed Ae. aegypti females have been carried out under laboratory conditions, little is known about the effects of such physiological states on the locomotor activity of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females. The aim of this study was to analyze, under laboratory conditions, the effects of insemination and blood-feeding on the locomotor activity of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females under LD 12:12, at 25°C. Methods Both Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females were obtained from established laboratory colonies. Control groups were represented by virgin/unfed Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females. Experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions, using an activity monitor that registers individual activity every thirty minutes. Results Virgin/unfed Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females showed a diurnal and bimodal pattern of locomotor activity, with peaks at early morning and late afternoon. Insemination and blood-feeding significantly decreased the locomotor activity of Ae. aegypti females, but inseminated/blood-fed Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus females showed a similar significant decrease on the locomotor activity compared to virgin/unfed females. Conclusions This study is the first demonstration of the effects of insemination and blood-feeding on the locomotor activity of Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females under artificial conditions. Data suggest that Ae. albopictus and Ae. aegypti females respond in different ways to physiological status changes and such divergence between these two dengue vectors, associated with several ecological differences, could be related to the greater dengue vectorial capacity of Ae. aegypti in Americas in comparison to Ae. albopictus. PMID:24990394

  7. Improved Undergraduate Astronomy Laboratories with A Modern Telescope Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milano, Anthony J.; Broder, D.; Finn, R.; Newberg, H.; Weatherwax, A.; Whittet, D.

    2006-12-01

    We are in the middle of a cooperative astronomy education project to improve undergraduate laboratories at RPI (a PhD granting institution) and Siena College (a nearby liberal arts college). We have completed an overhaul of a 40-year-old, 16" B&C telescope on the RPI campus, and have made it available for hundreds of students at both schools, and once per week to the public. We have written an assessment test which was distributed to the students at the beginning and end of the Fall 2006 semester, which will be used as a baseline to determine whether the laboratory activities, which are currently under development, improve student learning in the Fall 2007 semester next year. The studio-style, hands-on, inquiry-based laboratories will be designed to challenge student misconceptions. In order to handle a large number of students using the main telescope and a limited number of smaller telescopes, we will cycle students through concurrent activities. This is enabled by the rapid acquisition and imaging of targets made possible by the upgrade to the control system of our 16" telescope. We demonstrate the productivity of our newly refurbished telescope, show the baseline results of our assessment, and present samples of activities under development. This project is funded by an NSF CCLI grant, 05-11340.

  8. A CMOS active pixel sensor system for laboratory- based x-ray diffraction studies of biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Cook, Emily J.; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Olivo, Alessandro; Royle, Gary J.; Clark, Andy T.; Prydderch, Mark L.; Turchetta, Renato; Speller, Robert D.

    2008-02-01

    X-ray diffraction studies give material-specific information about biological tissue. Ideally, a large area, low noise, wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required for laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies. The goal of this work is to introduce a novel imaging technology, the CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) that has the potential to fulfil all these requirements, and demonstrate its feasibility for coherent scatter imaging. A prototype CMOS APS has been included in an x-ray diffraction demonstration system. An industrial x-ray source with appropriate beam filtration is used to perform angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). Optimization of the experimental set-up is detailed including collimator options and detector operating parameters. Scatter signatures are measured for 11 different materials, covering three medical applications: breast cancer diagnosis, kidney stone identification and bone mineral density calculations. Scatter signatures are also recorded for three mixed samples of known composition. Results are verified using two independent models for predicting the APS scatter signature: (1) a linear systems model of the APS and (2) a linear superposition integral combining known monochromatic scatter signatures with the input polychromatic spectrum used in this case. Cross validation of experimental, modelled and literature results proves that APS are able to record biologically relevant scatter signatures. Coherent scatter signatures are sensitive to multiple materials present in a sample and provide a means to quantify composition. In the future, production of a bespoke APS imager for x-ray diffraction studies could enable simultaneous collection of the transmitted beam and scattered radiation in a laboratory-based coherent scatter system, making clinical transfer of the technique attainable.

  9. A CMOS active pixel sensor system for laboratory- based x-ray diffraction studies of biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Bohndiek, Sarah E; Cook, Emily J; Arvanitis, Costas D; Olivo, Alessandro; Royle, Gary J; Clark, Andy T; Prydderch, Mark L; Turchetta, Renato; Speller, Robert D

    2008-02-01

    X-ray diffraction studies give material-specific information about biological tissue. Ideally, a large area, low noise, wide dynamic range digital x-ray detector is required for laboratory-based x-ray diffraction studies. The goal of this work is to introduce a novel imaging technology, the CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) that has the potential to fulfil all these requirements, and demonstrate its feasibility for coherent scatter imaging. A prototype CMOS APS has been included in an x-ray diffraction demonstration system. An industrial x-ray source with appropriate beam filtration is used to perform angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD). Optimization of the experimental set-up is detailed including collimator options and detector operating parameters. Scatter signatures are measured for 11 different materials, covering three medical applications: breast cancer diagnosis, kidney stone identification and bone mineral density calculations. Scatter signatures are also recorded for three mixed samples of known composition. Results are verified using two independent models for predicting the APS scatter signature: (1) a linear systems model of the APS and (2) a linear superposition integral combining known monochromatic scatter signatures with the input polychromatic spectrum used in this case. Cross validation of experimental, modelled and literature results proves that APS are able to record biologically relevant scatter signatures. Coherent scatter signatures are sensitive to multiple materials present in a sample and provide a means to quantify composition. In the future, production of a bespoke APS imager for x-ray diffraction studies could enable simultaneous collection of the transmitted beam and scattered radiation in a laboratory-based coherent scatter system, making clinical transfer of the technique attainable. PMID:18199908

  10. [Procedure for Latrodectus reproduction in the laboratory setting and the preparation of the first Russian matrix from its venom to manufacture homeopathic remedies with antiparasitic activity].

    PubMed

    Streliaeva, A V; Gasparian, E R; Polzikov, V V; Sagieva, A T; Lazareva, N B; Kurilov, D V; Chebyshev, N V; Sadykov, V M; Zuev, S S; Shcheglova, T A

    2012-01-01

    The investigation was undertaken to study the biology and ecology of Latrodectus, the possibilities of its importation to Russia from other countries, to breed Latrodectus in the laboratory setting, and to design the first homeopathic matrix of Latrodectus to manufacture homeopathic remedies. The authors were the first to devise a method for Latrodectus breeding in the laboratory setting of Moscow and its vicinities. The Latrodectus bred in the laboratory is suitable to manufacture drugs and in captivity they do not lose its biological activity. The authors were the first to prepare a homeopathic Latrodectus matrix for homeopathic medicines, by using the new Russian extragent petroleum. Chromatography mass spectrometry was used to identify more than a hundred chemical compounds in the Russian petroleum. The biological activity of the petroleum Latrodectus matrix for the manufacture of homeopathic remedies was highly competitive with that of the traditional Latrodectus venom matrix made using ethyl alcohol. The homeopathic Latrodectus matrix made using glycerol lost its biological activity because of glycerol. The biological activity of homeopathic matrixes made from Latrodectus inhabiting the USA, Uzbekistan, and the south of Russia and from that bred in the laboratory was studied. The homeopathic matrix made from the Latrodectus living in the Samarkand Region, Republic of Uzbekistan, has the highest biological activity. PMID:22774507

  11. How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activity for Mitosis, Meiosis and the Fundamentals of Heredity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark F.

    1988-01-01

    Described is an exercise which uses inexpensive and easy-to-make materials to demonstrate the basic fundamentals of heredity. Discusses two approaches using a hypothetical insert to demonstrate inheritance, mitosis, meiosis, and genotypic and phenotypic frequencies. (CW)

  12. The life cycle of a mineral deposit: a teacher's guide for hands-on mineral education activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frank, Dave; Galloway, John; Assmus, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This teacher's guide defines what a mineral deposit is and how a mineral deposit is identified and measured, how the mineral resources are extracted, and how the mining site is reclaimed; how minerals and mineral resources are processed; and how we use mineral resources in our every day lives. Included are 10 activitybased learning exercises that educate students on basic geologic concepts; the processes of finding, identifying, and extracting the resources from a mineral deposit; and the uses of minerals. The guide is intended for K through 12 Earth science teachers and students and is designed to meet the National Science Content Standards as defined by the National Research Council (1996). To assist in the understanding of some of the geology and mineral terms, see the Glossary (appendix 1) and Minerals and Their Uses (appendix 2). The process of finding or exploring for a mineral deposit, extracting or mining the resource, recovering the resource, also known as beneficiation, and reclaiming the land mined can be described as the “life cycle” of a mineral deposit. The complete process is time consuming and expensive, requiring the use of modern technology and equipment, and may take many years to complete. Sometimes one entity or company completes the entire process from discovery to reclamation, but often it requires multiple groups with specialized experience working together. Mineral deposits are the source of many important commodities, such as copper and gold, used by our society, but it is important to realize that mineral deposits are a nonrenewable resource. Once mined, they are exhausted, and another source must be found. New mineral deposits are being continuously created by the Earth but may take millions of years to form. Mineral deposits differ from renewable resources, such as agricultural and timber products, which may be replenished within a few months to several years.

  13. Going Beyond the Expected: Hands-On Activities Lead Special Education Class to New Heights of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    A teacher of a special education class of 7- to 10-year-olds took her students outdoors to stimulate their interest in learning. Schoolyard nature study and environmental field trips led to schoolwide presentations and television performances about recycling and conservation. Peer teaching was an important learning strategy. These students…

  14. A mobile laboratory for surface and subsurface imaging in geo-hazard monitoring activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornacchia, Carmela; Bavusi, Massimo; Loperte, Antonio; Pergola, Nicola; Pignatti, Stefano; Ponzo, Felice; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    A new research infrastructure for supporting ground-based remote sensing observations in the different phases of georisk management cycle is presented. This instrumental facility has been designed and realised by TeRN, a public-private consortium on Earth Observations and Natural Risks, in the frame of the project "ImpresAmbiente" funded by Italian Ministry of Research and University. The new infrastructure is equipped with ground-based sensors (hyperspectral cameras, thermal cameras, laser scanning and electromagnetic antennae) able to remotely map physical parameters and/or earth-surface properties (temperature, soil moisture, land cover, etc…) and to illuminate near-surface geological structures (fault, groundwater tables, landslide bodies etc...). Furthermore, the system can be used for non-invasive investigations of architectonic buildings and civil infrastructures (bridges, tunnel, road pavements, etc...) interested by natural and man-made hazards. The hyperspectral cameras can acquire high resolution images of earth-surface and cultural objects. They are operating in the Visible Near InfraRed (0.4÷1.0?m) with 1600 spatial pixel and 3.7nm of spectral sampling and in the Short Wave InfraRed (1.3÷2.5µm) spectral region with 320 spatial pixel and 5nm of spectral sampling. The IR cameras are operating in the Medium Wavelength InfraRed (3÷5µm; 640x512; NETD< 20 mK) and in the Very Long Wavelength InfraRed region (7.7÷11.5 µm; 320x256; NETD<25 mK) with a frame rate higher than 100Hz and are both equipped with a set of optical filters in order to operate in multi-spectral configuration. The technological innovation of ground-based laser scanning equipment has led to an increased resolution performances of surveys with applications in several field, as geology, architecture, environmental monitoring and cultural heritage. As a consequence, laser data can be useful integrated with traditional monitoring techniques. The Laser Scanner is characterized by very high data acquisition repetition rate up to 500.000 pxl/sec with a range resolution of 0.1 mm, vertical and horizontal FoV of 310° and 360° respectively with a resolution of 0.0018°. The system is also equipped with a metric camera allows to georeference the high resolution images acquired. The electromagnetic sensors allow to obtain in near real time high-resolution 2D and 3D subsurface tomographic images. The main components are a fully automatic resistivity meter for DC electrical surveys (resistivity) and Induced Polarization, a Ground Penetrating Radar with antennas covering range for 400 MHz to 1.5 GHz and a gradiometric magnetometric system. All the sensors can be installed on a mobile van and remotely controlled using wi-fi technologies. An all-time network connection capability is guaranteed by a self-configurable satellite link for data communication, which allows to transmit in near-real time experimental data coming from the field surveys and to share other geospatial information. This ICT facility is well suited for emergency response activities during and after catastrophic events. Sensor synergy, multi-temporal and multi-scale resolutions of surface and sub-surface imaging are the key technical features of this instrumental facility. Finally, in this work we shortly present some first preliminary results obtained during the emergence phase of Abruzzo earthquake (Central Italy).

  15. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that used for routine evaluation of feed compatibility studies for the 242-A evaporator. One of the

  16. Hands-on DTS Training July 21-23, 2013, Luxembourg (subject to change)

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    to the workshop, planned experiments, make teams (Selker) 9:15-10:00 Digital IR cameras in ecological system design, plan of action; safety talk; work plans per activity 17:00-19:00 flag installations in field 19 (Pfister) 14:30-16:00 Introduction to fiber optic sensing ­ Part 3: instrumentation (Selker and industrial

  17. Hands-On Minds-On Learning with Electrofiles in Middle Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducharme, Adele; Dixey, Brenda P.

    Using an interactive method to teach middle school students can address the needs of this diverse population. Electrofiles provide opportunities for students to be actively engaged in learning. Students can build content knowledge in electrical circuits by designing an electrofile or they can review other content area knowledge through a variety…

  18. Ocean Acidification: Hands-On Experiments to Explore the Causes and Consequences

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barbara C. Bruno

    2011-02-01

    Ocean acidification is one of the most serious environmental issues facing the planet (e.g., Doney 2006; Guinotte and Fabry 2009). It is caused by excess carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. Human activities such as burning fossil fuels put CO2 and oth

  19. Kick Stick Hands-on Challenge: Discover Circuits with PBS's "Design Squad Nation"[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the "Kick Stick" activity from Design Squad Nation, in which kids turn a wooden paint stirrer and circuit into a motorized, spinning arm--then use it to kick a Ping-Pong[R] ball across the floor. Teachers can enrich their students' exploration of circuits and emphasize the engineering design process with "Design Squad…

  20. Ocean Acidification: Hands-On Experiments to Explore the Causes and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Barbara C.; Tice, Kimberly A.; Puniwai, Noelani; Achilles, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification is one of the most serious environmental issues facing the planet (e.g., Doney 2006; Guinotte and Fabry 2009). It is caused by excess carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) in the atmosphere. Human activities such as burning fossil fuels put CO[subscript 2] and other heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere, which causes the Earth's…