Sample records for hands-on laboratory activities

  1. Hands-on Activities for Teaching Biology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ingrid Waldron

    These hands-on, minds-on activities engage students in experiments or simulation activities and incorporate multiple questions designed to foster student understanding of important concepts in the life sciences. Topics covered include biological molecules, diffusion, metabolism, cell division, genetics, molecular biology, evolution, diversity, human physiology and design and interpretation of experiments. These activities were designed for teaching high school or middle school students, but many of these activities can also be used in non-major introductory college biology classes. To accommodate limited budgets, most of these activities can be carried out with minimum equipment and expense for supplies. Additional minds-on activities for teaching biology, including discussion activities, are available at http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/bioactivities. Most of the activities are described in student handouts and teacher notes; the student handouts are available as Word files for teachers to customize for their students.

  2. Knowledge Retention for Computer Simulations: A study comparing virtual and hands-on laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croom, John R., III

    The use of virtual laboratories has the potential to change physics education. These low-cost, interactive computer activities interest students, allow for easy setup, and give educators a way to teach laboratory based online classes. This study investigated whether virtual laboratories could replace traditional hands-on laboratories and whether students could retain the same long-term knowledge in virtual laboratories as compared to hands-on laboratories. This study is a quantitative quasi-experiment that used a multiple posttest design to determine if students using virtual laboratories would retain the same knowledge as students who performed hands-on laboratories after 9 weeks. The study was composed of 336 students from 14 school districts. Students had their performances on the laboratories and their retention of the laboratories compared to a series of factors that might have affected their retention using a pretest and two posttests, which were compared using a t test. The results showed no significant difference in short-term learning between the hands-on laboratory groups and virtual laboratory groups. There was, however, a significant difference (p = .005) between the groups in long-term retention; students in the hands-on laboratory groups retained more information than those in the virtual laboratory groups. These results suggest that long-term learning is enhanced when a laboratory contains a hands-on component. Finally, the results showed that both groups of students felt their particular laboratory style was superior to the alternative method. The findings of this study can be used to improve the integration of virtual laboratories into science curriculum.

  3. Hands-on astronomy activities for the elementary school

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, T.E.; Horne, J.C. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We held a series of astronomy workshops for local school teachers using astronomy activities from a course we give for Elementary Education majors. The school teachers provide us with feedback about successes and failures. Then we try the revised activities in the classroom. Via this in-service and pre-service feedback, the astronomy laboratory activities in the course have been completely revised over the last three years. The activities we use are almost entirely hands-on. The activities include use of log book (or journal) for describing outside-of-class observations of sunsets, phases of the moon, portable sundial, and the somewhat unique method we use to teach the constellations. In addition, all laboratory activity records are kept in the log book. Laboratory activities cover the use of fists to measure degrees, constellations, phases of the moon, relative distances and size of planets, Invent an Alien, lenses, images and telescopes, and the making of a comet. In our poster, based roughly on the theme of the seasons, we will describe a portable, multi-user sundial, length of the day display using newspaper data, two temperature/season activities, and a model demonstration of why the sundial shadows behave as they do.

  4. Hands on Activity: The Path of Electrons

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-05-02

    A short (approximately 10 minutes) classroom activity to help students visualize the flow of electrons through a circuit. A worksheet with questions and answers is included. The materials needed for this activity are: colored construction paper, markers, candy (optional), two D-size batteries, small light bulb in a light bulb holder (available at hardware stores), and wire to connect the batteries to the light bulb holder

  5. Process and Learning Outcomes from Remotely-Operated, Simulated, and Hands-on Student Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corter, James E.; Esche, Sven K.; Chassapis, Constantin; Ma, Jing; Nickerson, Jeffrey V.

    2011-01-01

    A large-scale, multi-year, randomized study compared learning activities and outcomes for hands-on, remotely-operated, and simulation-based educational laboratories in an undergraduate engineering course. Students (N = 458) worked in small-group lab teams to perform two experiments involving stress on a cantilever beam. Each team conducted the…

  6. Software to Enhance Hands-On Laboratory Experimentation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Flinders, Shirley

    This presentation from MATEC explains the transition from using software to getting hands-on experience in a lab. The laboratory setting in technology related courses is an integral part of the learning experience for the student. It takes the theory that is being learned in the lecture and applies that theory. The text books that are used in the lecture include a copy of either Multi Sim or Electronic Workbench. The software gives the student the ability to "build" the circuits that are under study without the hardware that is found in the lab. The students at Grambling State University are not utilizing the software in the beginning level classes. The students must start utilizing the software earlier in the educational career. To accomplish this, the students are starting to complete the lab assignments with software before going to the lab. By doing this, the students will know what to expect before starting lab. This can and hopefully will remove some confusion that the beginner level circuit student has when constructing a circuit. The next step to improving and enhancing the laboratory experience for the student is to add a computer system to each laboratory station. Each system will contain software and hardware that will connect the test instruments to the computer and perform a multitude of analysis functions. The software that has stimulated some interest is MatLab. MatLab includes curriculum for some of the following: digital signal processing, digital image processing, digital filters, signals and systems, speech processing, computer-controlled systems, applied digital signal processing, dynamic modeling of engineering systems, and continuous-time linear systems. In conclusion, the learning invention for this laboratory is to bring together the lecture and lab through the implementation of software and hardware. This was part of the Learning Invention Labs that MATEC held. Visit the MATEC.org homepage for more information.

  7. Hands-On Environmental Education Activities for K-6 Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Donald G.; Eshbaugh, Stephen H.

    This environmental education workbook is aimed at helping kindergarten through 6th-grade teachers and contains hands-on activities directly targeted toward a particular age group, with equal distribution to each grade. Subject area descriptions and several multicultural activities are also included. Each activity lists the title, subject taught,…

  8. Communicate science: an example of food related hands-on laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana; Marsili, Antonella; Vallocchia, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    The Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV's Educational and Outreach Laboratory) organized activity with kids to convey scientific knowledge and to promote research on Earth Science, focusing on volcanic and seismic hazard. The combination of games and learning in educational activity can be a valuable tool for study of complex phenomena. Hands-on activity may help in engage kids in a learning process through direct participation that significantly improves the learning performance of children. Making learning fun motivate audience to pay attention on and stay focused on the subject. We present the experience of the hand-on laboratory "Laboratorio goloso per bambini curiosi di scienza (a delicious hands-on laboratory for kids curious about science)", performed in Frascati during the 2013 European Researchers' Night, promoted by the European Commission, as part of the program organized by the Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica in the framework of Associazione Frascati Scienza (http://www.frascatiscienza.it/). The hand-on activity were designed for primary schools to create enjoyable and unusual tools for learning Earth Science. During this activity kids are involved with something related to everyday life, such as food, through manipulation, construction and implementation of simple experiments related to Earth dynamics. Children become familiar with scientific concepts such as composition of the Earth, plates tectonic, earthquakes and seismic waves propagation and experience the effect of earthquakes on buildings, exploring their important implications for seismic hazard. During the activity, composed of several steps, participants were able to learn about Earth inner structure, fragile lithosphere, waves propagations, impact of waves on building ecc.., dealing with eggs, cookies, honey, sugar, polenta, flour, chocolate, candies, liquorice sticks, bread, pudding and sweets. The activity was successful as more than 500 kids of different ages participated with great enthusiasm, as well as they parents, and gave the chance to explore and manipulate even complex scientific arguments without getting the feeling of having doing this.

  9. Using Hands-On Activities and Manipulatives in Kindergarten

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SarahPierpoint; Nillas

    2012-01-01

    This is a study exploring how hands-on activities, including the use of physical and virtual manipulatives, facilitate students’ learning. The research was conducted during a student teaching semester in a rural elementary school, specifically in a Kindergarten classroom. There were sixteen students in the classroom, all between the ages of five and six years old. Three major data sources were

  10. Hands-on laboratory Experience in Teaching-Learning Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Walter C.; Burkholder, Timothy

    1990-01-01

    The results of actual student participation, with organized group discussions, which show that laboratory teaching remains the premiere mechanism for teaching and learning organ-system physiology are discussed. Laboratories using a pithed frog, a turtle heart, an anesthetized rabbit, and noninvasive recordings from students during exercise are…

  11. Curriculum Materials: Hands-On Activities from The Water Sourcebook

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These curriculum materials are from The Water Sourcebook series, a popular set of hands-on water environment activities. The activities, arranged by grade level, range from construction of a big book about water in the life of a fish for younger students to the exploration of the physics of artesian flow for older learners. Topics include the water cycle, conservation, consumption, contamination, treatment, landfills, rivers, flow dynamics, and detecting radon. Correlations to other subject areas are indicated. Several of the activities are available in Spanish. There are also links to information and a poster about careers in the water environment field.

  12. Casting Castings: A Classroom Hands-on Activity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Johnson, Craig

    This learning activity will provide a useful technique for students to learn casting concepts. The class will be allowed a hands-on experience with casting. Students will make their own fishing sinkers. The lesson plan document includes step by step instructions for the lesson along with photographs.This activity would be appropriate for high school and college level students. The lesson should take about one hour of class time. This document will serve as a framework for instructors and may be downloaded in PDF format.

  13. Hands-on Lessons and Activities about Plants

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jessica Fries-Gaither

    This article highlights hands-on or multimedia lesson plans about plant structures, growth and development, seed production, and dispersal. Science lessons are paired with suggested literacy lesson plans. All lessons are aligned to national standards.

  14. Hands-on electromagnetics: microstrip circuit and antenna design laboratories at USU

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Furse

    1999-01-01

    New laboratories for microstrip circuit and antenna design have been developed at Utah State University. These laboratories are used to provide hands-on design, fabrication, and testing experience in two senior\\/graduate level design courses-ECE 6130 Microwave Engineering and ECE 6170 Antenna Design. HP\\/EESOF Libra software and other available software is used heavily throughout these courses. New facilities for fabrication and testing

  15. Promoting Female Students' Learning Motivation towards Science by Exercising Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen-jin, Kuo; Chia-ju, Liu; Shi-an, Leou

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design different hands-on science activities and investigate which activities could better promote female students' learning motivation towards science. This study conducted three types of science activities which contains nine hands-on activities, an experience scale and a learning motivation scale for data…

  16. Do Predators Always Win? Starfish versus Limpets: A Hands-On Activity Examining Predator-Prey Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faria, Claudia; Boaventura, Diana; Galvao, Cecilia; Chagas, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    In this article we propose a hands-on experimental activity about predator-prey interactions that can be performed both in a research laboratory and in the classroom. The activity, which engages students in a real scientific experiment, can be explored not only to improve students' understanding about the diversity of anti-predator behaviors but…

  17. Investigating Plants: Hands-On, Low-Cost Laboratory Exercises in Plant Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Thomas R.; Johnson, Marty

    This manual describes 14 hands-on exercises for middle school introductory biology courses that are designed to allow all students to be involved in self-discoveries about life and plant life in particular. The exercises were developed to supplement normal classroom activities by allowing students to initiate ongoing projects to investigate the…

  18. Hands-On Experience with a Turbojet Engine in the Thermal Science Laboratory Course

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Saad, Messiha

    Thermal Science laboratory is the third course in the sequence of four mechanical engineering laboratories offered by the Department of Mechanical Engineering at North Carolina A&T State University. The course is one credit hour, meeting once a week for two hours. The course includes selected experiments on heat transfer and thermodynamics. In an effort to give students a combination of theoretical background and hands-on experience, a new experiment on gas turbine engine was introduced. This paper describes the experiences the students gained in this experiment. During this laboratory the students actually learned how to operate a turbojet engine, collected and analyzed the output data including thrust and efficiency, and related the experimental result to the theory learned in the thermodynamics course. This experiment complemented the thermal science laboratory course and fully integrated some aspects of thermodynamics and enhanced the students learning process.

  19. Science Action Labs Part 3: Puzzlers. An Innovative Collection of Hands-On Science Activities and Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevick, Ed

    This book contains hands-on science laboratory activities for grades 4 through 9 that use discrepant events to challenge students. All of the "puzzlers" are based upon science principles and include directions for building gadgets that explain the "puzzlers." Topics covered include: volume conservation, magnetic phenomena, optical illusions,…

  20. Hands-on Activities That Simulate Polar Science

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jessica Fries-Gaither

    This article highlights science lessons and activities that can help elementary students gain an understanding of the tools and technology involved in polar research. Suggestions for literacy integration are provided, and activities are aligned to national standards.

  1. Hands-On Environmental Science Activities. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutscher, Eugene

    The ability of students to go beyond facts and to think critically, while at the same time enjoying and valuing the learning process, is fundamental to science and environmentalism. This book provides enrichment activities for the science curriculum that provide concrete connections with important world events. Each activity is self-contained and…

  2. Hands-on Activities for understanding Ammonite Sutures

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Clint Cowan

    There is a lot of primary literature on the origin (and purpose) of complex sutures in ammonites. It is still hotly debated what (if any) benefit complex sutures may have imparted to ammonites. But to start this whole topic (which results in an essay on whether changes in sutures represent a passive or driven trend), I use a set of hands-on exercises that are fun and eye-opening: examining cross-sections through modern nautilus shells, making a play-doh model of an ammonite, and using a Hele-Shaw cell experiment to make complex dendritic shapes. I have found over the years, that students (and my faculty colleagues, too) can easily point out sutures to me on the ammonite fossils in our collection, but they really don't know what they're pointing to (they honestly don't!). So, I split my students (I usually have around 30 in my 200-level Paleobiology course) into teams of three, and we do several things (I do this all in one 4-hour lab, but you could easily do these in separate periods). First, they get an ammonite fossil (always a sediment-filled specimen with the mother of pearl phragmacone at least mostly gone so some of the sutures are clearly visible), and a couple of modern nautilus shells cut in half (I purchase these online from seashellcity.com), and some play-doh (little 2-oz different color tubs I get from Kmart). They have to determine, and then build a model (using play-doh), what they're looking at when they're looking at the ammonite fossils, in particular, the sutures (sans sediment). They are allowed to look stuff up online or in their text. Results are amazing. I've had many teams build a very nice ammonite (usually a tube of play-doh, representing just one chamber with two septal walls at either end of the tube) and then they use a pencil to sketch the sutures on the outside of the phragmacone! I tell them to rethink this and then they work on it more... It's really cool when they finally realize that to make a model of the fossil sutures that they're looking at, they need to peel off their play-doh phragmacone to reveal the sutures (which are just the 1D line at the end of a 2D septal plane) (although the actual 1D 2D thing gets interesting when we delve into the fractal nature of the sutures, see below). Also, the modern nautilus shells beautifully show the difference between growth lines and sutures/septa. So I augment my assessment of their understanding by literally having each student individually trace for me (with their finger) what the suture is on one of the nautilus shells, and what a growth line is (the supplier I use polishes off the periostracum to reveal the mother of pearl with obvious growth lines). I have also taken whole Nautilus shells and buffed off a part of the phragmacone to reveal the edge of the septal wall, which is the exact equivalent of a suture in an ammonite). Then, we run a Hele-Shaw experiment to get viscous fingering (which resembles ammonite sutures). I borrowed this hele-shaw design from the Center for Polymer Studies at Boston University (http://polymer.bu.edu/edu/) Exploring Patterns in Nature. It consists of a pair of ~10-inch square glass plates, one with a hole drilled in it (our Shop makes these for me from standard glass). The hole is a size that fits common plastic tubing (outside diameter) which in turn fits a standard small syringe inside the tubing. The experiment works like this: put a 3 to 5 inch long piece of plastic tube in the hole, but make sure it doesn't stick out the other side (not more than flush), and seal this with some sort of removable sealant; let the sealant stiffen, and clean both plates with windex. Then, on the solid plate, put two stacked thin-section cover slips (I use micro glass little slips) at the corners of the plate, then put the hole-plate with tube up, on top of the cover slips (the inside surfaces need to be very clean), then clip the two plates together with binder clips on each corner. This is a Hele-Shaw cell. Then, with the syringe, inject glycerol between the plates, careful not to put too much in that is squirts out the

  3. Flower Bulb Science: Activities for the Hands-on Classroom

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Robert Payo

    Learn about The Bulb Project, a website for educators full of activities that demonstrate the value and cross-curricular opportunities of growing flower bulbs for the classroom. These activities encourage students to become more ecologically aware, allow for community involvement, and increase student awareness of the environment. Share your ideas as well on this site developed at Cornell University. This seminar features our experts from the Cornell University Department of Horticulture: Marcia Eames-Sheavly of the Garden-Based Learning Program and Craig Cramer, Communications Specialist, with special guest and site developer Elly Cramer from the National Science Digital Library.

  4. Hands On Physical Science Activities for Middle Schools. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Salvator S.

    This book was written on the premise that learning science should be fun and rewarding. The teacher may use it as the foundation for an extended middle school curriculum spanning more than one year or to supplement an existing curriculum with individual sections or exercises from the book. The activities have been organized and designed in a…

  5. Teaching Heat Transfer to Engineering Students - a course of computer-based hands-on activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colm O'Sullivan

    2007-01-01

    Modern data acquisition systems enable basic physical phenomena to be studied by means of clear, simple and instructive hands-on experiments. This paper describes a laboratory course on Heat Transfer phenomena designed, inter alia, for training of undergraduate students taking entry level programmes in Civil, Chemical and Process Engineering. The course was designed and developed as part of a Europe wide

  6. Does the Lack of Hands-On Experience in a Remotely Delivered Laboratory Course Affect Student Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel-Salam, Tarek; Kauffman, Paul J.; Crossman, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Educators question whether performing a laboratory experiment as an observer (non-hands-on), such as conducted in a distance education context, can be as effective a learning tool as personally performing the experiment in a laboratory environment. The present paper investigates this issue by comparing the performance of distance education…

  7. The Art and Science Connection. Hands-On Activities for Primary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolley, Kimberley

    Most people think that the artist and the scientist live in two totally different worlds. However, art and science are only two different ways of understanding and knowing the world. To help primary students make a connection between art and science, a collection of hands-on activities have been developed. By engaging in these activities that…

  8. The Art and Science Connection: Hands-on Activities for Intermediate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolley, Kimberley

    Most people think that the artist and the scientist live in two totally different worlds. However, art and science are only two different ways of understanding and knowing the world. To help intermediate students make a connection between art and science, a collection of hands-on activities have been developed. By engaging in these activities that…

  9. Pi in the Sky: Hands-on Mathematical Activities for Teaching Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pethoud, Robert

    This book of activities was designed to provide students with the opportunity to create mental models of concepts in astronomy while using simple, homemade tools. In addition, these sequential, hands-on activities are to help students see how scientific knowledge is obtained. The introduction describes the rationale for the book and describes the…

  10. A Hands-On Activity Incorporating the Threefold Representation on Limiting Reactant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonza´lez-Sa´nchez, Ange´lica M.; Ortiz-Nieves, Edgardo L.; Medina, Zuleikra

    2014-01-01

    Many students share the common belief that the limiting reactant in a chemical reaction is the reactant in the smallest quantity of material. To help students overcome this difficulty a hands-on activity for the limiting reactant concept was developed. The activity incorporates the three levels of representation (macroscopic, submicroscopic, and…

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) ecological and physical science study center: A hands-on science program for K-12 students

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, S.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In our tenth year of educational service and outreach, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Ecological and Physical Science Study Center (EPSSC) provides hands-on, inquiry-based science activities for area students and teachers. Established in 1984, the EPSSC now hosts over 20,000 student visits. Designed to foster a positive attitude towards science, each unit includes activities which reinforce the science concept being explored. Outdoor science units provide field experience at the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park and outreach programs are offered on-site in area schools. Other programs are offered as extensions of the EPSSC core programs, including on-site student science camps, all-girl programs, outreach science camps, student competitions, teacher in-service presentations and teacher workshops.

  12. Of Heart & Kidneys: Hands-On Activities for Demonstrating Organ Function & Repair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kao, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in teaching organ development and disease is deconstructing a complex choreography of molecular and cellular changes over time into a linear stepwise process for students. As an entry toward learning developmental concepts, I propose two inexpensive hands-on activities to help facilitate learning of (1) how to identify defects in…

  13. Hands-on Activities Tie Science Ed Standards to Space Weather on Windows to the Universe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Russell; R. M. Johnson

    2008-01-01

    The Windows to the Universe project includes a large web site with extensive user traffic as well as program of professional development workshops for teachers. In the past 5 years we have conducted 18 workshops dedicated exclusively to space weather and magnetism serving 573 total attendees. This talk describes our pedagogical approach of blending hands-on activities, covering basic concepts of

  14. Teaching the Common Core Math Standards with Hands-On Activities, Grades 6-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muschla, Judith A.; Muschla, Gary Robert; Muschla, Erin

    2012-01-01

    The new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics have been formulated to provide students with instruction that will help them acquire a thorough knowledge of math at their grade level, which will in turn enable them to move on to higher mathematics with competence and confidence. "Hands-on Activities for Teaching the Common Core Math…

  15. Witness to History: Using Hands-On Activities, A Guidebook for High School History Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzler, Suzanne

    This guidebook is intended to help high school students discover the connection between themselves and the people from the past by being engaged in hands-on activities. The guidebook allows students to create artifacts or recreate a process known well to people from times past. The guide is arranged to provide historical background, materials…

  16. Special Section: Innovative Laboratory Exercises A Real-time and Hands-on Research Course in Protein Purification

    E-print Network

    Borgstahl, Gloria

    an opportunity to work hands-on with modern instrumentation not normally found in a predominately undergraduate undergraduate laboratory course is the disconnection between a series of 3-hour mini- aturized experiments and the realistic nature of true bench work. In a typical undergraduate course, the experiments are written

  17. Effects of Combined Hands-on Laboratory and Computer Modeling on Student Learning of Gas Laws: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiufeng

    2006-01-01

    Based on current theories of chemistry learning, this study intends to test a hypothesis that computer modeling enhanced hands-on chemistry laboratories are more effective than hands-on laboratories or computer modeling laboratories alone in facilitating high school students' understanding of chemistry concepts. Thirty-three high school chemistry…

  18. Informal Activities with Lasers, Lights, and Lenses: The Hands-On Optics Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.

    2005-12-01

    The Hands-On Optics project began as a follow-up to the 2001 NSF planning grant "Optics Education -- A Blueprint for the 21st Century", which described the value of informal science programs in addressing the disconnect between the ubiquity of optics in everyday life and the noticeable absence of optics education in K-12 curricula and in informal science education programs. Key partners in the project are NOAO, SPIE-The International Society for Optical Engineering, and the Optical Society of America (OSA). The informal instructional materials created by the project are distributed through science centers nationwide and through the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement Program (MESA) in a number of states, including Arizona, California, Washington, and Maryland. A key part of the project is the involvement, modeled after Project ASTRO, of optics professionals currently engaged in outreach activities and programs. Optics professionals (termed optics resource volunteers) are teamed with MESA and science center educators in implementing the program. These hands-on, high-interest, standards-connected activities and materials provide 6, three-hour-long optics activity modules that can be used in a variety of informal settings. We will describe the techniques used at NOAO to train educators, parents, and optics professionals who will work with the HOO activities as well as the different approaches needed for different informal education programs, ranging from Saturday programs, after-school programs, and science center programs. NOAO is developing the six modules and associated kits as well as competitions that have broad appeal to 12-year olds. Hands-On Optics: Making an Impact with Light (HOO) is a collaborative NSF-funded four-year informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  19. Hands-on Activities versus Worksheets in Reinforcing Physical Science Principles: Effects on Student Achievement and Attitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald M.; Wardlow, George W.; Franklin, Timothy D.

    1997-01-01

    A group of 132 agricultural science students were divided into an experimental group who completed hands-on activities on Ohm's Law and incline plane and a control group who completed worksheets. There were no significant differences in immediate or follow-up measures of achievement. Hands-on students had significantly more positive attitudes. (SK)

  20. Designing Blended Inquiry Learning in a Laboratory Context: A Study of Incorporating Hands-On and Virtual Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toth, Eva Erdosne; Morrow, Becky L.; Ludvico, Lisa R.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the development of a methodology that integrates virtual and hands-on inquiry in a freshman introductory biology course. Using a two time x two order-condition design, an effective combination (blend) of the two environments was evaluated with 39 freshman biology participants. The quantitative results documented no…

  1. Effects of Combined Hands-on Laboratory and Computer Modeling on Student Learning of Gas Laws: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiufeng Liu

    2006-01-01

    Based on current theories of chemistry learning, this study intends to test a hypothesis that computer modeling enhanced hands-on\\u000a chemistry laboratories are more effective than hands-on laboratories or computer modeling laboratories alone in facilitating\\u000a high school students' understanding of chemistry concepts. Thirty-three high school chemistry students from a private all-girl\\u000a high school in northeastern United States were divided into two

  2. Hands-on Activities Tie Science Ed Standards to Space Weather on Windows to the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, R. M.; Johnson, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Windows to the Universe project includes a large web site with extensive user traffic as well as program of professional development workshops for teachers. In the past 5 years we have conducted 18 workshops dedicated exclusively to space weather and magnetism serving 573 total attendees. This talk describes our pedagogical approach of blending hands-on activities, covering basic concepts of magnetism, with visually- rich presentations of space weather topics in order to encourage teachers to incorporate space weather themes into their classroom teaching. Basic understanding of physical science themes of magnetism, electricity, forces, and motion are well represented in science education standards. Hands-on activities touching upon these themes simultaneously fulfill a teacher's need to cover topics in the standards and prepare students to comprehend more abstract representations of more complex systems relevant to space weather. Simply put, a student who has traced field lines around a bar magnet using a simple magnetometer is much better equipped to comprehend portrayals (images and animations) of complex magnetic fields associated with space weather phenomena. Thus, one of our main approaches to space weather education has been to encourage students to explore basic physical science concepts (as outlined in education standards) via hands-on activities and then to link those simple principles to more complex and visually captivating representations of space weather phenomena. We employ two other approaches to making the connections between standards-based themes that teachers must cover and concepts that are key to the study of space weather. The first is to tap heavily into "societal impacts" elements of education standards. Space weather presents numerous instances in which phenomena of scientific interest - such as radiation hazards to spacecraft and astronauts, communications disruptions, and surges in electrical power systems - have implications for modern society. The second is to point out space weather "case studies" in which key principles from various scientific disciplines come to bear. Radiation danger associated with space weather provides one such case, bringing together knowledge of energy, forces, and motion from the physical sciences with concepts like mutation, cell repair, and cancer from the life sciences. The aurora present another rich case, combining ideas of spectroscopy and energy transitions in atoms with the chemistry of Earth's atmosphere and Earth science concepts of atmospheric structure.

  3. Hands-on program of IBM-PC training at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lier, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Since December 1983, the Laboratory has offered introductory courses of IBM-PC training. A comprehensive needs assessment was conducted and a nine-course module of classes was designed and implemented. Forty classes were completed in the one-year period. The target group includes the novice computer user in the scientific, management, administrative, and secretarial personnel groups. The development, needs assessment, course implementation and design, course evaluations, and future direction of computer training will be discussed. Lab-automation, robotics, design of the lab and office and the impact of computer on society will be discussed briefly.

  4. Integrating Experiment, Modeling and Design using a Hands on Hydraulic Positioning Laboratory for Mechanical Control Systems Education

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Birdsong, Charles

    As part of a laboratory intensive curriculum, Mechanical Engineering students at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo are required to take a senior level class in Mechanical Control Systems. In addition to three one-hour lectures, students attend a weekly three hour laboratory session where course concepts are reinforced through hands-on modeling and experimentation. This paper describes a newly implemented and innovative laboratory experience which is centered on a hydraulic position control system. Often experiments in Mechanical Controls are heavily influenced by non-linearities such as friction or backlash which cause inexperienced students to lose confidence in linear system modeling as an effective analysis and design tool. A hydraulic system was chosen for this laboratory due to excellent correlation between experimental results and the linear modeling techniques taught in the course. This laboratory experience is designed to integrate linear system modeling techniques, experimentation and data collection, control system design, and design verification through physical testing using a variety of hardware and software tools. The main objectives of the laboratory are to give the students practice and confidence in advanced control system modeling, experience with precision hydraulic positioning systems, practice in designing Proportional-Integral (PI) controllers, exposure to digital control systems and experience and physical understanding of the sometimes dramatic condition of instability. The methodology includes a unique procedure that uses root locus concepts and asks the students to drive the system to instability to determine system parameters. The paper describes the laboratory experience in detail and gives some example results and an assessment of student learning.

  5. Development of Pupils' Transfer Skills by Means of Hands On Activities with Artisan Materials in Natural Sciences Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciascai, Liliana; Chicinas, Luminita

    2008-01-01

    Hands on activities with artisan materials used in order to realize different practical devices helpful in learning process are one of the most frequently used activity in science classes. Usually, the main strength of these activities are: a deeper learning, an increased motivation of pupils for actively learning and development of practical…

  6. Science Hands-on Teaching-Learning Activities of Elementary School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harty, Harold; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examines the influence of the use of hands-on materials in elementary school science instruction from a survey of 301 school principals. The rationale for the survey, questions used, and responses are provided. Lists 12 references. (YP)

  7. Hands-on Lessons and Activities about the Tundra and Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jessica Fries-Gaither

    This article highlights hands-on or multimedia lesson plans about the tundra and ecosystem concepts. Science lessons are paired with suggested literacy lesson plans. All lessons are aligned to national standards.

  8. Computer Assisted Fluid Power Instruction: A Comparison of Hands-On and Computer-Simulated Laboratory Experiences for Post-Secondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Scott B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of utilizing a combination of lecture and computer resources to train personnel to assume roles as hydraulic system technicians and specialists in the fluid power industry. This study compared computer simulated laboratory instruction to traditional hands-on laboratory instruction,…

  9. The Healthy Heart Race: A Short-Duration, Hands-on Activity in Cardiovascular Physiology for Museums and Science Festivals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressley, Thomas A.; Limson, Melvin; Byse, Miranda; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2011-01-01

    The "Healthy Heart Race" activity provides a hands-on demonstration of cardiovascular function suitable for lay audiences. It was field tested during the United States of America Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in October 2010. The basic equipment for the activity consisted of lengths of plastic tubing, a hand pump,…

  10. Student Responses to a Hands-On Kinesthetic Lecture Activity for Learning about the Oxygen Carrying Capacity of Blood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breckler, Jennifer; Yu, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a new hands-on, or "kinesthetic," activity for use in a physiology lecture hall to help students comprehend an important concept in cardiopulmonary physiology known as oxygen carrying capacity. One impetus for designing this activity was to address the needs of students who have a preference for kinesthetic learning and to…

  11. Hands-On Astrophysics, 680 Hands at a Time: Lab Activities in Big Classes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Shipman

    1996-01-01

    In brief: it is possible to have students do experiments in very large lecture classes. Evaluations show it works. Hands-on science, while traditional in many other disciplines, has not played a large role in astronomy teaching, though many of the concepts we deal with such as heat and pressure can be explored with simple experiments. 340 students in a large

  12. Quantum Mechanics for Everyone: Hands-On Activities Integrated with Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zollman, Dean A.; Rebello, N. Sanjay; Hogg, Kirsten

    2002-01-01

    Explains a hands-on approach to teaching quantum mechanics that challenges the belief shared by many physics instructors that quantum mechanics is a very abstract subject that cannot be understood until students have learned much of the classical physics. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

  13. An Educational Device for a Hands-on Activity to Visualize the Effect of Atherosclerosis on Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Almeida, J. P. P. G. L.; de Lima, J. L. M. P.

    2013-01-01

    An educational device was created to develop a hands-on activity to illustrate how atherosclerosis can dramatically reduce blood flow in human vessels. The device was conceived, designed, and built at the University of Coimbra, in response to a request from the Exploratorio Infante D. Henrique Science Centre Museum, where it is presently…

  14. Square Wheels and Other Easy-To-Build Hands-On Science Activities. An Exploratorium Science Snackbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathjen, Don; Doherty, Paul

    This book, part of The Exploratorium science "snackbook" series, explains science with a hands-on approach. Activities include: (1) "3-D Shadow"; (2) "Bits and Bytes"; (3) "Circuit Workbench"; (4) "Diamagnetic Repulsion"; (5) "Film Can Racer"; (6) "Fractal Patterns"; (7) "Hoop Nightmares"; (8) "Hydraulic Arm"; (9) "Hyperbolic Slot"; (10) "Light…

  15. Hands-On Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we discuss manipulatives and hands-on investigations for Calculus involving volume, arc length, and surface area to motivate and develop formulae which can then be verified using techniques of integration. Pre-service teachers in calculus courses using these activities experience a classroom in which active learning is encouraged and…

  16. Hands-on Herps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Activities, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity to help primary, intermediate, and advanced students learn about and compare the general characteristics of reptiles and amphibians. Suggests "herp stations" to provide experiences. Details materials, background and procedures necessary for using this activity. (CW)

  17. Blended Inquiry with Hands-On and Virtual Laboratories: The Role of Perceptual Features during Knowledge Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toth, Eva Erdosne; Ludvico, Lisa R.; Morrow, Becky L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of virtual and hands-on inquiry environments for the development of blended learning in a popular domain of bio-nanotechnology: the separation of different-sized DNA fragments using gel-electrophoresis, also known as DNA-fingerprinting. Since the latest scientific developments in nano- and micro-scale tools…

  18. Progress of Systematic Hands on Devices for Active Learning Methods by Visualizing ICT Tools in Physics with Milliseconds Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Akizo; Okiharu, Fumiko

    We are developing various systematic hands on devices for progress of active learning (AL) to improve students' conceptual understanding in physics laws. We are promoting AL methods in physics education for getting deeper conceptual understanding by using various ICT-based hands on devices and using visualizing ICT tools with milliseconds resolution. Here we investigate AL modules on collisions of big balloon pendulum with another known mass pendulum to get directly the air mass in the big balloon. We also discuss on Newton's laws of blowgun darts systems by using tapioca straws where we get definite works and energy just proportional to the length of the pipes of connected tapioca straws. These AL plans by using modules of big balloon system and blowgun-darts system are shown to be very effective for deeper conceptual understanding of Newton's Laws in almost frictionless worlds.

  19. Student responses to a hands-on kinesthetic lecture activity for learning about the oxygen carrying capacity of blood

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jennifer Breckler (San Francisco State University Biology)

    2011-03-01

    This article describes a new hands-on, or Â?kinesthetic,Â? activity for use in a physiology lecture hall to help students comprehend an important concept in cardiopulmonary physiology known as oxygen carrying capacity. One impetus for designing this activity was to address the needs of students who have a preference for kinesthetic learning and to help increase their understanding and engagement during lecture. This activity uses simple inexpensive materials, provides an effective model for demonstrating related pathophysiology, and helps promote active learning. The activity protocol and its implementation are described here in detail. We also report data obtained from student surveys and assessment tools to determine the effectiveness of the activity on student conceptual learning and perceptions. A brief multiple-choice pretest showed that although students had already been introduced to the relevant concepts in lecture, they had not yet mastered these concepts before performing the activity. Two postactivity assessments showed that student performance was significantly improved on the posttest compared with the pretest and that information was largely retained at the end of the course. Survey data showed that one-half of the students stated kinesthetic learning as among their learning preferences, yet nearly all students enjoyed and were engaged in this hands-on kinesthetic activity regardless of their preferences. Most students would recommend it to their peers and expressed a desire for more kinesthetic learning opportunities in the lecture curriculum.

  20. Hands-On Astrophysics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hands-On Astrophysics is a flexible set of hands-on educational materials, activities, and investigations. These materials are based on the AAVSO's unique electronic database of variable star measurements. By carrying out all aspects of the research process, students can develop and integrate skills in science, math, computing, and other areas. Units include Planets and Stars, Introducing the Sky, Observing Variable Stars, The Message of Light and Analysis of Variable Stars. Units are available for download in PDF format, including teacher guides.

  1. Hands-On Hydrology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

    2004-01-01

    A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

  2. Hands-on Humidity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankiewicz, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Presents five hands-on activities that allow students to detect, measure, reduce, and eliminate moisture. Students make a humidity detector and a hygrometer, examine the effects of moisture on different substances, calculate the percent of water in a given food, and examine the absorption potential of different desiccants. (MDH)

  3. Hands-On Life Science Activities for Middle Schools. Teacher's Edition. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Barbara; Kramer, Stephanie

    This book provides 50 enrichment activities for the science curriculum that provide concrete connections with important world events. Each activity is self-contained and provides everything the student needs to gain a basic understanding of a concept or to work through a project. The activities include innovative and traditional projects for both…

  4. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  5. A Hands-On Activity to Introduce the Effects of Transmission by an Invasive Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Barbara Jean

    2013-01-01

    This activity engages students to better understand the impact of transmission by invasive species. Using dice, poker chips, and paper plates, an entire class mimics the spread of an invasive species within a geographic region. The activity can be modified and conducted at the K-16 levels.

  6. Planet Chemistry. Hands-on Activities for Kids from All Planets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Michael, Ed.

    This publication issues a challenge to students to collect data in a nationwide analysis of water hardness. Background information on the chemistry of hard water is presented using a cartoon format, and each of the four activities contains an explanation about the chemistry illustrated in the activity. The effect of hard water on soap, the effect…

  7. How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activities that Relate Mendelian Genetics to Cell Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Heather R.; Gibson, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity designed to connect Mendelian laws with the physical processes of cell division. Included are materials production, procedures and worksheets for the meiosis-mitosis game and a genetics game. (CW)

  8. Give Me Some Skin: A Hands-On Science Activity Integrating Racial Sensitivity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lynne E. Houtz

    2003-02-01

    What's the largest, fastest growing, organ in the human body? It's the tough, elastic, flexible, and waterproof covering that helps protect other organs and body parts from such things as germs, heat, cold, and sunlight--skin, of course! This life science activity engages middle school students in an exploration of the structure, function, and variety of skin. They "construct" skin layer by layer using simple materials such as felt, foam padding, yarn, and vinyl in various skin tones. This activity provides an opportunity to discuss racial diversity and to show students that skin color is, quite literally, only skin deep.

  9. The Lifecycle of a Mineral Deposit: A Teache's Guide for Hands-On Mineral Education Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This teacher's guide provides an introduction to the process of finding or exploring for a mineral deposit, extracting or mining the resource, recovering it, and reclaiming the mined area (sometimes called 'beneficiation' or 'life cycle'). Topics include what a mineral deposit is; how they are identified and measured, how the minerals are extracted; and how the mining site is reclaimed. There is also discussion of how minerals and mineral resources are processed and how they are used in everyday life. The guide includes ten activities that educate students on basic geologic concepts; the processes of finding, identifying, and extracting the resources from a mineral deposit; and the uses of minerals.

  10. A DNA Fingerprinting Simulation Laboratory for Biology Students: Hands-on Experimentation To Solve a Mock Forensic Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palladino, Michael A.; Cosentino, Emily

    2001-01-01

    Presents an alternative approach to DNA fingerprinting. Demonstrates how undergraduate students can be involved in many aspects of this type of experiment and how DNA fingerprinting experiments can be incorporated into the laboratory curriculum of courses for majors and nonmajors. (NB)

  11. Hands-On Experiences of Undergraduate Students in Automatics and Robotics Using a Virtual and Remote Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jara, Carlos A.; Candelas, Francisco A.; Puente, Santiago T.; Torres, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Automatics and Robotics subjects are always greatly improved when classroom teaching is supported by adequate laboratory courses and experiments following the "learning by doing" paradigm, which provides students a deep understanding of theoretical lessons. However, expensive equipment and limited time prevent teachers having sufficient…

  12. Manipulatives-based laboratory for majors biology - a hands-on approach to understanding respiration and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Boomer, Sarah M; Latham, Kristin L

    2011-01-01

    The first course in our year-long introductory series for Biology majors encompasses four learning units: biological molecules and cells, metabolism, genetics, and evolution. Of these, the metabolism unit, which includes respiration and photosynthesis, has shown the lowest student exam scores, least interest, and lowest laboratory ratings. Consequently, we hypothesized that modeling metabolic processes in the laboratory would improve student content learning during this course unit. Specifically, we developed manipulatives-based laboratory exercises that combined paper cutouts, movable blocks, and large diagrams of the cell. In particular, our novel use of connecting LEGO blocks allowed students to move model electrons and phosphates between molecules and within defined spaces of the cell. We assessed student learning using both formal (content indicators and attitude surveys) and informal (the identification of misconceptions or discussions with students) approaches. On the metabolism unit content exam, student performance improved by 46% over pretest scores and by the end of the course, the majority of students rated metabolism as their most-improved (43%) and favorite (33%) subject as compared with other unit topics. The majority of students rated manipulatives-based labs as very helpful, as compared to non-manipulatives-based labs. In this report, we will demonstrate that students made learning gains across all content areas, but most notably in the unit that covered respiration and photosynthesis. PMID:23653756

  13. Teaching chemistry and other sciences to blind and low-vision students through hands-on learning experiences in high school science laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supalo, Cary Alan

    2010-11-01

    Students with blindness and low vision (BLV) have traditionally been underrepresented in the sciences as a result of technological and attitudinal barriers to equal access in science laboratory classrooms. The Independent Laboratory Access for the Blind (ILAB) project developed and evaluated a suite of talking and audible hardware/software tools to empower students with BLV to have multisensory, hands-on laboratory learning experiences. This dissertation focuses on the first year of ILAB tool testing in mainstream science laboratory classrooms, and comprises a detailed multi-case study of four students with BLV who were enrolled in high school science classes during 2007--08 alongside sighted students. Participants attended different schools; curricula included chemistry, AP chemistry, and AP physics. The ILAB tools were designed to provide multisensory means for students with BLV to make observations and collect data during standard laboratory lessons on an equivalent basis with their sighted peers. Various qualitative and quantitative data collection instruments were used to determine whether the hands-on experiences facilitated by the ILAB tools had led to increased involvement in laboratory-goal-directed actions, greater peer acceptance in the students' lab groups, improved attitudes toward science, and increased interest in science. Premier among the ILAB tools was the JAWS/Logger Pro software interface, which made audible all information gathered through standard Vernier laboratory probes and visually displayed through Logger Pro. ILAB tools also included a talking balance, a submersible audible light sensor, a scientific talking stopwatch, and a variety of other high-tech and low-tech devices and techniques. While results were mixed, all four participating BLV students seemed to have experienced at least some benefit, with the effect being stronger for some than for others. Not all of the data collection instruments were found to reveal improvements for all of the participating students, but each of the types of data sets provided evidence of benefit for varying subgroups of participants. It is the expectation of the ILAB team that continuing to implement adaptive/assistive technologies for BLV students in science laboratory classrooms will foster enhanced opportunities in science classes and professions.

  14. Shifting Gears. Hands-on Activities for Learning Workplace Skills and English as a Second Language. A Teacher's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Education, Inc., New York, NY.

    This curriculum handbook uses a hands-on approach to teaching basic skills and language for the U.S. workplace to students who are not familiar with many common tools and procedures. Although designed for Southeast Asian refugees, the curriculum can be adapted for use with other groups, including older adults or young people. The handbook consists…

  15. A Year of Hands-on Science: Exciting Theme Units with More Than 100 Activities, Projects, and Experiments To Make Science Come Alive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne; Novelli, Joan, Ed.

    This book contains 18 themed teaching units with 2 themes per chapter, organized seasonally around the traditional school year. Each theme includes natural connections and hands-on science activities that correspond to what children are already observing in their world. Each chapter begins with highlights of the month and a reproducible "Science…

  16. The Use of Cooperative Group Management Software for Hands-On Science Activities To Improve Communication between Students with Disabilities and Their Peers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natal, Dottie

    This report describes the development of an educational software program to assist youth with disabilities in participating in discourse in regular school settings. The software was designed to manage cooperative groups as students engaged in hands-on science activities and was specifically developed for teaching the subject of batteries and…

  17. Simple Protocol for Secondary School Hands-On Activity: Electrophoresis of Pre-Stained Nucleic Acids on Agar-Agar Borate Gels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britos, Leticia; Goyenola, Guillermo; Orono, Silvia Umpierrez

    2004-01-01

    An extremely simple, inexpensive, and safe method is presented, which emulates nucleic acids isolation and electrophoretic analysis as performed in a research environment, in the context of a secondary school hands-on activity. The protocol is amenable to an interdisciplinary approach, taking into consideration the electrical and chemical…

  18. Are all hands-on activities equally effective? Effect of using plastic models, organ dissections, and virtual dissections on student learning and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Sara A; Hicks, Reimi E; Thompson, Katerina V; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or plastic models). Each group received a 15-min lecture followed by a 45-min activity with one of the treatments. Immediately after the lesson and then 2 mo later, students were tested on anatomy and physiology knowledge and completed an attitude survey. Students who used plastic models achieved significantly higher overall scores on both the initial and followup exams than students who performed organ or virtual dissections. On the initial exam, students in the plastic model and organ dissection treatments scored higher on anatomy questions than students who performed virtual dissections. Students in the plastic model group scored higher than students who performed organ dissections on physiology questions. On the followup exam, when asked anatomy questions, students in the plastic model group scored higher than dissection students and virtual dissection students. On attitude surveys, organ dissections had higher perceived value and were requested for inclusion in curricula twice as often as any other activity. Students who performed organ dissections were more likely than the other treatment groups to agree with the statement that "science is fun," suggesting that organ dissections may promote positive attitudes toward science. The findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of multiple types of hands-on activities in anatomy laboratory courses. PMID:24585474

  19. The Universe at Your Fingertips 2.0 DVD-ROM: A Collection of Hands-on Activities, Resource Guides, Informational Articles, and Videos for Teaching Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraknoi, A.; Kruse, B.; Gurton, S.; Schmitt, A. H.; Proudfit, L.; Schatz, D.

    2012-08-01

    A new edition of the ASP's key educational publication The Universe at Your Fingertips has been issued in DVD-ROM format, containing 133 classroom-tested, hands-on activities (organized by subject), 43 articles with background information about topics in astronomy, 9 articles on teaching and learning space science in the 21st century, 17 guides to the best published and web resources on key topics, 12 short instructional videos, and a host of images.

  20. Hands-on Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14 Formal and Informal Education Settings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Allen; K. W. Tobola

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Activities developed by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. Educators may choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum from activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to exploring the solar system. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help

  1. The Amazing Animal Activity Book: Dozens of Hands-on Projects That Teach across the Curriculum. Grades 1-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Robin

    The activities in this book are designed to encourage children's scientific curiosity as well as their creativity. Activities include puppet making, word scrambles, matching exercises, crossword and jigsaw puzzles, mobiles, games, mini books, coloring activities, Venn diagrams, and plays. These activities are intended as a foundation for children…

  2. Engaging Students in Early Exploration of Nanoscience Topics Using Hands-On Activities and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furlan, Ping Y.

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript reports on efforts to introduce beginning college students to the modern nanoscience field. These include: implementing selected experiments into sequencing core first-year and second-year chemistry laboratory courses; providing students with a first research experience; and engaging them in service learning and outreach programs…

  3. Exploring the Solar System Activities Outline: Hands-On Planetary Science for Formal Education K-14 and Informal Settings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Lindstrom, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    Activities by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. The wealth of activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to the exploring the solar system allows educators to choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. With these NASA developed activities students experience recent mission information about our solar system such as Mars geology and the search for life using Mars meteorites and robotic data. The Johnson Space Center ARES Education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic outline useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the outline annotation is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. Within formal education at the primary level some of the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest and arouse curiosity. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered are appropriate for the upper levels of high school and early college in that they require students to use and analyze data.

  4. Hands-on Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14 Formal and Informal Education Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.

    2004-12-01

    Introduction: Activities developed by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. Educators may choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum from activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to exploring the solar system. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. The web sites for the activities contain current information so students experience recent mission information such as data from Mars rovers or the status of Stardust sample return. The Johnson Space Center Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic syllabus useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the syllabus is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting, educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. In both the informal and the primary education levels the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest, arouse curiosity and easily take the participants from pre-awareness to the awareness stage. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered may easily be adapted for the upper levels of high school and early college, as they require students to use and analyze data. Syllabus Format: The Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities starts with a variety of solar system scale activities that fit different settings and equipment. The early solar system formation activities are focused on asteroids, meteorites and planet formation. The theme of how and why we explore our solar system encompasses activities that engage the language and creative arts. Further activities highlight the Sun and planetary geology. A key aspect of the usefulness of the syllabus is that it provides easy access to solar system content, activities, related links and the thematic context for the classroom teacher or group leader. Conclusion: The Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities is a concentrated resource of activities and links that allows educators to comfortably and inexpensively share the excitement and science of solar system exploration with students and members of the public. Additional Information: Some of the activities included in the Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities are in the following NASA developed guides. http://ares.jsc.nasa.gov/Education/index.html

  5. Hands on CERN

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The project Hands-on-CERN was developed at Stockholm University to educate high school students and teachers about the fundamental processes inside matter and the current research dealing with particle collisions. At the Standard Model link, users can learn about the interactions of particle physics, transformation rules, the future of elementary particle physics, and much more. Through the use of interactive animations, students can learn about hadron decays, Feymann diagrams, and elementary particles. Although particular components of the website may be difficult to locate, by going through the tutorial step-by-step initially, users should eliminate this problem and reap the benefits of this very educational website.

  6. Hands-On Mathematics and Science Activities for Students in Grades K-8: A Guide for Teachers, Tutors, and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quality Education for Minorities Network, Washington, DC.

    This guide is a resource for K-8 teachers, college student tutors, parents, and others engaged in learning activities to help primary, elementary, and middle school students learn mathematics and science. It presents a collection of activities adapted from printed and electronic sources which help motivate student interest in mathematics and…

  7. It's More Fun than It Sounds--Enhancing Science Concepts through Hands-on Activities for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guha, Smita

    2012-01-01

    To teach young children, teachers choose topics in science that children are curious about. Children's inquisitive nature is reflected through the activities as they make repetitive sounds to find the cause and effect relationship. Teachers can make best use of those invaluable moments by incorporating those activities into science lessons on…

  8. The Geography of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liverman, Diana; Solem, Michael

    This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module examines the geography of human activities that produce the major…

  9. Hands-On Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoette, V.; Pack, H.; Spuck, T.; Rodriguez, B.; Lohman, R.; Toler, D.; Morin, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Gordon, S.; Marshall, A.; Refling, J.; Asbell-Clarke, J.; Barclay, T.

    1996-12-01

    For the past four years, with support from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Defense, Hands-On Universe (HOU) has developed and piloted an educational program that enables high school students to request their own observations from professional observatories. HOU students download CCD images from automated telescopes to their classroom computers and use the HOU- IP image processing software to visualize and analyze their data. HOU also provides comprehensive curriculum that integrates many of the topics and skills outlined in the national goals for science and math education into open-ended astronomical investigations. Over the next several years HOU will be implemented in undergraduate programs, middle schools, and informal science education centers.

  10. Developing Online Training Materials in Molecular Biology: Enhancing Hands-on Lab Skills

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Boulay; Cynthia Anderson; Alex Parisky; Chris Campbell

    2009-01-01

    A well-accepted form of educational training offered in molecular biology is participation in active research laboratories. However, this approach to learning severely restricts access. Addressing this need, the University of Hawaii launched a project to expand this model to include newly developed online training materials in addition to a hands-on laboratory experience. This paper explores the process of material development

  11. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  12. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  13. Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

  14. Research and Development. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    Research and Development is a laboratory-oriented course that includes the appropriate common essential elements for industrial technology education plus concepts and skills related to research and development. This guide provides teachers of the course with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an…

  15. Hands-On Bulletin Boards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henneman, Dawn

    1984-01-01

    Patterns and directions are given for making bulletin boards that teach language arts and mathematics skills through hands-on student involvement. The boards help teach multiplication tables, word contractions, letter sounds, homonyms, compound words, alphabetization, and other skills. (PP)

  16. The Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Cynthia C.

    1989-01-01

    The Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum in Ann Arbor, Michigan, encourages the natural curiosity of young people to explore, participate, and get involved in exhibits, demonstrations, and activities. Described are the museum's history, exhibits, programs, services, volunteers, resources, and affiliations. (JDD)

  17. Hands-on Science. Exploring Magnification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1993-01-01

    Presents hands-on science activities using inexpensive, hand-held microscopes and slides made from simple, readily available materials. The article describes how to introduce students to microscopes and presents directions for using the microscopes and making slides. A student page investigates fingerprints with microscopes. (SM)

  18. Active SWIR laboratory testing methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Curtis M.; White, Steve; Rich, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Active Short Wave InfraRed (SWIR) imaging presents unique challenges to laboratory testing. It is always important to have laboratory testing that will directly relate to field performance. This paper will present the modeling and corresponding laboratory testing that was developed for these types of systems. The paper will present the modeling that was used to derive the lab metric used for verification testing of the system and provide details into the design of the lab equipment that was necessary to ensure accurate lab testing. The Noise Limited Resolution (NLR) test, first developed for low light imaging systems in the 1960s, serves as the basic lab metric for the evaluation of the active SWIR system. This test serves well for a quick test (go-no go) and is used to evaluate this system during production testing. The test derivation will be described and shown how it relates to the modeling results. The test equipment developed by Santa Barbara InfraRed (SBIR) for this application allows for accurate uniform radiance levels from an integrating sphere for both 1.06um and 1.57um imaging applications. The source has the ability to directly mimic any laser system and can provide pulsed laser source radiation from 20 nanoseconds to 500 nanoseconds resulting in levels from 0.4 to 85 nJ/cm2/sr, peak radiance levels. The light source can be triggered to replicate a laser return at any range from 100m to 100,000m. Additionally, the source provides the ability to output Mid Wave IR (MWIR) illumination through the use of a small extended area IR source in the integrating sphere. This is useful for boresighting the active SWIR sensor with other sensors such as Forward Looking IR (FLIR).

  19. Transforming a traditional hands-on activity into an enquiry activity to foster more in-depth understanding of the concept of density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung Lee, Yeung; Kwok, Ping Wai

    2010-09-01

    Traditional methods used to teach the concept of density that employ solid objects of different masses and volumes can be supplemented by enquiry activities in which students vary the mass-to-volume ratio of the same object to test ideas about density and flotation. A simple substance, Blu-Tack, is an ideal material to use in this case. The activity introduced in this article not only allows students to explore the effect of air on the density and flotation of an object, but also stimulates them to relate a macroscopic property such as density to the microscopic structure of matter.

  20. Hands-On Nuclear Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science is an important topic in terms of its application to power generation, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national defense. Unfortunately, the subatomic domain is far removed from daily experience, and few learning aids are available to teachers. What follows describes a low-tech, hands-on method to teach important concepts in…

  1. Transforming a Traditional Hands-On Activity into an Enquiry Activity to Foster More In-Depth Understanding of the Concept of Density

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung Chung; Kwok, Ping Wai

    2010-01-01

    Traditional methods used to teach the concept of density that employ solid objects of different masses and volumes can be supplemented by enquiry activities in which students vary the mass-to-volume ratio of the same object to test ideas about density and flotation. A simple substance, Blu-Tack, is an ideal material to use in this case. The…

  2. Clockwork: Hands On For Habitat

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Vox Bandicoot.

    Clockwork is "a self directed, theatre-based education package about biological diversity." Produced by Vox Bandicoot in collaboration with the Biodiversity Group (Environment Australia), the Clockwork site offers four sections: Midnight, an introduction to and philosophy of biological diversity, Mainspring, a hands-on lesson in critical concepts about threatened species and habitats, Big Hand and Little Hand, curriculum support material for classroom teachers, and Cog and Spindle, general science and ecological background about Australia. Though depth of content varies, environmental educators will be interested in this fresh and creative approach.

  3. European Hands-on Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa; Ferlet, Roger; Gómez de Castro, Ana I.; Hill, Robert; Horellou, Cathy; Mankiewicz, Lech; Melchior, Anne-Laure; Metaxa, Margarita; Zanazzi, Alessandra

    2007-08-01

    Hands-on Universe is a project born at UC@Berkeley. A project devoted to enrich the teaching of Astronomy within the classroom environment with a different approach, more connected to the new technologies. Its main goals are not only to promote the use of such technologies but also to reawaken on students the taste for STEM (Science, technologies, engineering and math) related issues and also to increase their scientific culture. Eight countries in Europe decided to adopt the method and, funded by MINERVA, formed the European Hands-on Universe. Several resources were produced and a data reduction software developed http://www.euhou.net/.Other European countries are interested and should join this coordinated effort in the near future. At an international level there are 20 countries using this approach. There are plans to develop scientific cooperation among these countries. Pilot scientific research projects in schools are being tested in EU-HOU schools, Russia and USA. There is also a game being developed to be used as a new tool for teaching scientific content in the classroom environment. An effort to develop an international network of scientific / educational collaboration is the next step.

  4. The impact of a hands-on approach to learning visible spectrometry upon students' performance, motivation, and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Vrtacnik, Margareta; Gros, Natasa

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of introducing visible spectrometry concepts through hands-on laboratory work upon student learning within four vocational programs are discussed. All together, 118 students, average 18.6 years old, participated in the study. The results showed no correlation between students' motivational components (intrinsic, regulated, and controlled), chemistry self-concept and their achievement on an experiential knowledge test and knowledge gained from this hands-on approach. Statistically significant differences were found for academic achievement among students in a biotechnology technical program (School 1), food processing program (School 2), laboratory biomedicine program (School 3), and a biotechnology general program (School 4). Differences in academic achievement are further reflected in students' perception of particular knowledge gained through their hands-on experiences and in their expressed attitude toward different didactical characteristics. All students, regardless of their study program, highly evaluated the relaxed atmosphere that contributed to their self-confidence in completing their laboratory activities. PMID:23841355

  5. Acoustics Laboratories: Active Noise Control Demo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1969-12-31

    The Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Department of Mechanical Engineering offers the Active Noise Control Experiment. The page contains an explanation of the experiment and the download file to carry it out. The experiment demonstrates how active noise control cancels a sound wave by sending a single frequency wave to the right computer speaker, which represents the noise to be canceled, and a control wave of equal amplitude and opposite phase to the left speaker to cancel the noise. Although younger kids will most likely need help from teachers or parents to set up or understand the experiment, the very interesting hands-on activity will be enjoyed by nearly every aged student.

  6. Introducing Basic Molecular Biology to Turkish Rural and Urban Primary School Children via Hands-on PCR and Gel Electrophoresis Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selli, Cigdem; Yildirim, Gokce; Kaymak, Aysegul; Karacicek, Bilge; Ogut, Deniz; Gungor, Turkan; Erem, Erdem; Ege, Mehmet; Bümen, Nilay; Tosun, Metiner

    2014-01-01

    This study includes the results of a 2-day education project titled "Molecular Biology Laboratory Summer School, MoBiLYO." The project was held at a University Research Center by scientists from Department of Pharmacology and graduate students. The project was composed of introductory lectures, model construction, DNA isolation,…

  7. Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

  8. Introductory Industrial Technology II. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.

    This guide contains 29 learning modules intended for use by technology teachers and students in grade 8. Each module includes a student laboratory activity and instructor's resource sheet. Each student activity includes the following: activity topic and overview, challenge statement, objectives, vocabulary/concepts reinforced, equipment/supplies,…

  9. Introductory Industrial Technology I. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, Alan L.; And Others

    This guide contains 36 learning modules intended for use by technology teachers and students in grades 7 and 8. Each module includes a student laboratory activity and instructor's resource sheet. Each student activity includes the following: activity topic and overview, challenge statement, objectives, vocabulary/concepts reinforced,…

  10. Database activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Trahern, C.G.

    1995-12-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-disciplinary lab in the DOE system of research laboratories. Database activities are correspondingly diverse within the restrictions imposed by the dominant relational database paradigm. The authors discuss related activities and tools used in RHIC and in the other major projects at BNL. The others are the Protein Data Bank being maintained by the Chemistry department, and a Geographical Information System (GIS)--a Superfund sponsored environmental monitoring project under development in the Office of Environmental Restoration.

  11. Materials Modification in Nanotechnology: Laboratory Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This page from the Nanotechnology Applications and Career Knowledge (NACK) Center presents a series of laboratory activities on materials modification in nanotechnology. An overview of the activities is provided. The laboratory exercises cover microfluidics, furnace oxidation, ion implantation simulation, siction and doping. All are available for download in .DOC file format. This and all other valuable resources from the NACK Center require a fast, easy, free log-in.

  12. Hands-on physics displays for undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerlof, Carl W.

    2014-07-01

    Initiated by Frank Oppenheimer in 1969, the Exploratorium in San Francisco has been the model for hands-on science museums throughout the world. The key idea has been to bring people with all levels of scientific background in contact with interesting and attractive exhibits that require the active participation of the visitor. Unfortunately, many science museums are now forced to cater primarily to very young audiences, often 8 years old or less, with predictable constraints on the intellectual depth of their exhibits. To counter this trend, the author has constructed several hands-on displays for the University of Michigan Physics Department that demonstrate: (1) magnetic levitation of pyrolytic graphite, (2) the varied magnetic induction effects in aluminum, copper and air, (3) chaotic motion of a double pendulum, (4) conservation of energy and momentum in a steel ball magnetic accelerator, (5) the diffraction pattern of red and green laser pointer beams created by CDs and DVDs, (6) a magnetic analog of the refraction of light at a dielectric boundary and (7) optical rotation of light in an aqueous fructose solution. Each of these exhibits can be constructed for something like $1000 or less and are robust enough to withstand unsupervised public use. The dynamic behavior of these exhibits will be shown in accompanying video sequences. The following story has a history that goes back quite a few years. In the late 70's, I was spending time at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center accompanied by my family that included our two grade school children. Needless to say, we much enjoyed weekend excursions to all sorts of interesting sites in the Bay Area, especially the Exploratorium, an unusual science museum created by Frank Oppenheimer that opened in 1969. The notion that exhibits would be designed specifically for "hands-on" interactions was at that time quite revolutionary. This idea captivated a number of people everywhere including a friend in Ann Arbor, Cynthia Yao. With a core group of a few dozen people, Cynthia convinced the City of Ann Arbor to allow free use of an old firehouse. The Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum opened its doors to the public in 1982 and remains a thriving institution to this day.

  13. Handwashing Laboratory Activities: Bowl Technique

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this lab (Activity #2 on page), learners compare bacteria growth on two petri dishes containing nutrient agar. Learners touch the doors, faucets, etc. in bathroom and then immerse their hands in 100 ml sterile water. They place 0.5 ml of this "dirty" water into one petri dish. They repeat this process again but wash their hands before immersing them in 100 ml sterile water. Learners incubate the plates for 24-48 hours and then score the results based on the bacteria growth they observe. Use this activity to emphasize the importance of hand-washing and the effectiveness of soap to disinfect.

  14. Are All Hands-On Activities Equally Effective? Effect of Using Plastic Models, Organ Dissections, and Virtual Dissections on Student Learning and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Sara A.; Hicks, Reimi E.; Thompson, Katerina V.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or…

  15. Introducing basic molecular biology to Turkish rural and urban primary school children via hands-on PCR and gel electrophoresis activities.

    PubMed

    Selli, Cigdem; Y?ld?r?m, Gokce; Kaymak, Aysegul; Karacicek, Bilge; Ogut, Deniz; Gungor, Turkan; Erem, Erdem; Ege, Mehmet; Bümen, Nilay; Tosun, Metiner

    2014-01-01

    This study includes the results of a 2-day education project titled "Molecular Biology Laboratory Summer School, MoBiLYO." The project was held at a University Research Center by scientists from Department of Pharmacology and graduate students. The project was composed of introductory lectures, model construction, DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and gel electrophoresis. The participants were 13-year-old eighth-graders attending primary schools affiliated with Ministry of National Education in urban and rural areas of Izmir, Turkey. The purpose of this study was to introduce basic molecular biology concepts through individually performed experiments such as PCR and gel electrophoresis integrated with creative drama. The students were assessed at the beginning and the end of each project day via mini-tests, experimental and presentation skills evaluation forms. Data showed that students' knowledge about DNA structure and basic molecular biology techniques significantly increased. On the basis of experimental and presentational skills, there was no significant difference between kids from urban and rural schools or between public and boarding public schools, whereas the average score of girls was significantly higher than that of boys. In conclusion, individually performed experiments integrated with creative drama significantly increased students' perception of complex experimental procedures on basic molecular biology concepts. Data suggests that integration of these concepts into the science and technology curriculum of Turkish primary education may support the recruitment of future scientists who can handle rapidly developing genomic techniques that will affect our everyday life. PMID:24474053

  16. A New Two-Step Approach for Hands-On Teaching of Gene Technology: Effects on Students' Activities During Experimentation in an Outreach Gene Technology Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2011-08-01

    Emphasis on improving higher level biology education continues. A new two-step approach to the experimental phases within an outreach gene technology lab, derived from cognitive load theory, is presented. We compared our approach using a quasi-experimental design with the conventional one-step mode. The difference consisted of additional focused discussions combined with students writing down their ideas (step one) prior to starting any experimental procedure (step two). We monitored students' activities during the experimental phases by continuously videotaping 20 work groups within each approach ( N = 131). Subsequent classification of students' activities yielded 10 categories (with well-fitting intra- and inter-observer scores with respect to reliability). Based on the students' individual time budgets, we evaluated students' roles during experimentation from their prevalent activities (by independently using two cluster analysis methods). Independently of the approach, two common clusters emerged, which we labeled as `all-rounders' and as `passive students', and two clusters specific to each approach: `observers' as well as `high-experimenters' were identified only within the one-step approach whereas under the two-step conditions `managers' and `scribes' were identified. Potential changes in group-leadership style during experimentation are discussed, and conclusions for optimizing science teaching are drawn.

  17. Dig In! Hands-On Soil Investigtions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Natural Resources Conservation Service

    2001-01-01

    Give students the dirt on soil with a practical book that brings new meaning to the term "hands-on." Using these 12 activities and two original stories as guides, kids will soon be up to their elbows in the study of soil formation, habitats and land use, animals that depend on soil, plants that grow in soil, soil science, and soil conservation. Each teacher-tested lesson plan offers helpful background, assessment methods, and suggestions for further exploration. This book also contains SciLinks --Internet links, housed on an NSTA web site, that we promise to keep up-to-date and relevant to your teaching for as long as the book stays in print!

  18. Sandia National Laboratories Education Outreach Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Dawes, William R. Jr.

    1999-08-26

    The US Department of Energy and its national laboratories are a major employer of scientists and engineers and consequently have a strong interest in the development and training of a qualified pool of employment candidates. For many years the DOE and its national laboratories have supported education activities devoted to increasing the number and quality of science and engineering graduates. This is part of the DOE mission because of the critical national need for scientists and engineers and the recognized deficiencies in the education system for science and mathematics training. Though funding support for such activities has waxed and waned, strong education programs have survived in spite of budget pressures. This paper reviews a few of the education programs presently supported at Sandia by the Science and Technology Outreach Department. The US DOE Defense Programs Office and Sandia National Laboratories provide financial support for these education activities.

  19. Hands-on Science: Wildcatters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1988-01-01

    A science unit illustrates the concept of scientific predictions by using how geologists predict where to drill for oil as an example. In a related exercise, everyday items such as bricks, sand, and marbles introduce permeability. Other activities demonstrate how to base predictions on established patterns. A reproducible page is provided. (JL)

  20. Activities of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Work accomplished by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) under contract to NASA in 1985 is described. The work took place in the areas of flight projects, space science, geodynamics, materials science, advanced technology, defense and civil programs, telecommunications systems, and institutional activities.

  1. Hands-On Science. Bright Ideas for Teaching About Shadows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1997-01-01

    Presents an elementary level hands-on science activity designed to teach students about shadows. The activity helps students draw conclusions about shadows by experimenting with different materials and determining which will make a shadow. A sidebar explains what a shadow is and offers further resources. (SM)

  2. Hands-On Whole Science. Pass the Beetles, Please.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Several hands-on whole science activities help elementary students learn about animals' diets and how they affect other animals. One activity involves identifying animals as carnivores, herbivores, or omnivores. Another has students construct food chains. Two across-the-curriculum ideas involve naming carnivores and preparing imaginary menus for…

  3. Dig In! Hands-On Soil Investigtions (e-book)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Natural Resources Conservation Service

    2009-07-06

    Give students the dirt on soil with a practical book that brings new meaning to the term "hands-on." Using these 12 activities and two original stories as guides, kids will soon be up to their elbows in the study of soil formation, habitats and land use,

  4. Not-So-Messy Hands-On Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Denise; Denty, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Presents four elementary hands-on science activities that highlight animal adaptation (how birds' beaks are adapted to suit their habitats), the water cycle (how nature cleans rainwater that seeps into the ground), aquatic ecosystems (changes over time in an aquatic habitat), and animal habitats (all living beings' need for food, water, shelter,…

  5. Hands-On Science, 680 Hands at a Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Harry L. Shipman

    2001-02-01

    This article explains how students can do hands-on science in a large lecture theater with seats bolted to the floor. It specifically describes the logistics of doing a collapsing can activity in such a large class to demonstrate the birth of a black hole

  6. Hands-On Experiences with Buoyant-Less Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slisko, Josip; Planinsic, Gorazd

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of weightlessness is known to students thanks to videos of amazing things astronauts do in spaceships orbiting the Earth. In this article we propose two hands-on activities which give students opportunities to infer by themselves the absence of buoyant force in a gravity accelerated system. The system is a free-falling or vertically…

  7. Hands-On Current Electricity: A Professional Development Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Patrick C.; McMahon, Ann P.; Wiegers, John F.

    2003-01-01

    "Hands-on Current Electricity" gives K-8 teachers the opportunity to experience inquiry learning about current electricity by (1) experimenting with current electricity through a variety of activities, (2) discovering preconceived mental models of electricity used to understand their observations, (3) creating new mental models that have greater…

  8. A Hands-On Approach to Maglev for Gifted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Raymond T.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses how Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) can be taught to gifted students in grades 4-9 using hands-on activities that align to the National Science Standards. Principles of magnetic levitation, advantages of magnetic levitation, construction of a Maglev project, testing and evaluation of vehicles, and presentation of the unit are…

  9. Integrating Laboratory Activity into a Junior High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyr, Wen-Jye

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a wind power system laboratory activity and an outline for evaluating student performance in this activity. The work described here was to design and implement the laboratory to assist teachers in achieving the teaching objective of this activity. The laboratory teaching activities introduce energy sources, wind energy…

  10. Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

    2005-03-01

    This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV’s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV’s). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV’s and UAV’s. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

  11. Solar activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Klimas, P.C.; Hasti, D.E.

    1994-03-01

    The use of renewable energy technologies is typically thought of as an integral part of creating and sustaining an environment that maximizes the overall quality of life of the Earth`s present inhabitants and does not leave an undue burden on future generations. Sandia National Laboratories has been a leader in developing and deploying many of these technologies over the last two decades. A common but special aspect of all of these activities is that they are all conducted in cooperation with various types of partners. Some of these partners have an interest in seeing these systems grow in the marketplace, while others are primarily concerned with economic benefits that can come from immediate use of these renewable energy systems. This paper describes solar thermal and photovoltaic technology activities at Sandia that are intended to accelerate the commercialization of these solar systems.

  12. Branson Health Department Norovirus "Hands On" Training

    E-print Network

    of the Industry Training Scenarios included in the comprehensive hospitality industry training CD-ROM - AvailableBranson Health Department Norovirus "Hands On" Training Scenario #5 The Big Dipper (Water Park and another employee. While you are making your rounds to both of these areas a maintenance employee stops you

  13. Extending a Hands-On Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a "hands-on task" called Number Tiles, which is Task 43 in the collection constructed for the Mathematics Task Centre Project, and available at www.blackdouglas.com.au or www.curriculum.edu.au. This task is rich in possibilities and directions. It should be used as a planned curriculum experience at several year levels to…

  14. Hands-On Skills for Caregivers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Press Releases News Archives FCA Blog Contact Us Frequently Asked Questions Professional Inquiry Form Publication Order Form - A A + A You are here Home Hands-On Skills for Caregivers Printer-friendly version When you’re a caregiver, finding time to ...

  15. Hand-on "Cosmos Picture Book"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumitomo, Naoko; Shibata, Takeru; Mizoguchi, Saori; Nishiyama, Shinji; Fukue, Jun

    2008-12-01

    The authors have designed and produced a hand-on "Cosmos Picture Book" as teaching material in astronomy, and demonstrated it at a public event, The Geo-Carnival for Children, held in Osaka in 2007. The aim of this picture book is to introduce the cosmos to children. This picture book was also used in the university class.

  16. Hands-on optics and photonics outreach in Riga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesina, Natalija; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-07-01

    A long-term exposition focused on optics and photonics was created in Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy at University of Latvia in 2010. Considering unpopularity of science in Latvia and lack of broadly accessible hands-on outreach activities for school children, as well as rapid development of advanced photonic technologies, this exposition was meant to involve more students to the natural sciences and modern technologies. Exposition covers 10 topics of optics - colors, diffraction, interference, polarization, reflection, liquid crystals, gas discharge, lasers, fluorescence, infrared and ultraviolet radiation. Students' visits are organized as an exciting adventure, which differs from ordinary school lessons. The visit mainly includes own actions with hands-on exhibits, lecturer's explanations about the most difficult topics and some demonstrations shown by the lecturer. The main accent is made on hands-on experiments due to the fact that students, who had performed hands-on experiments, will be emboldened to choose their career in the field of science and technologies. The exposition now is running and is part of Riga Photonics Center. Nearly 300 students from the 8th till 12th grades visited it during academic years 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 and their generally positive feedback has been analyzed.

  17. NRCL-70, Review of the Activities of the Laboratories 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Included are descriptions of activities of each of the 12 laboratories in the National Research Council of Canada, including background information and a summary of the studies (research) and results. The 12 laboratories in the NRCL are the following: Atlantic Regional Laboratory, Biochemistry Laboratory, Division of Biology, Division of Building…

  18. TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 Evaluating Sample Laboratory Report from Laboratory Manual

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 Page 101 Evaluating Sample Laboratory Report from Laboratory Manual: 45 minutes. #12;TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 (continued) Page 102 #12;TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 (continued) Page 103 #12;TA Orientation 2005 Activity 14 (continued) Page 104 #12;TA Orientation

  19. The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, S. M.; Severson, S.; Armstrong, J. D.; Crossfield, I.; Do, T.; Fitzgerald, M.; Harrington, D.; Hickenbotham, A.; Hunter, J.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, L.; Li, K.; Lu, J.; Maness, H.; Morzinski, K.; Norton, A.; Putnam, N.; Roorda, A.; Rossi, E.; Yelda, S.

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO systems as a research tool. The activities are divided into three stations: Vision Science, Fourier Optics, and the AO Demonstrator. We briefly overview these activities, which are described fully in other articles in these conference proceedings (Putnam et al., Do et al., and Harrington et al., respectively). We devote attention to the unique challenges encountered in the design of these activities, including the marriage of inquiry-like investigation techniques with complex content and the need to tune depth to a graduate- and PhD-level audience. According to before-after surveys conducted in 2008, the vast majority of participants found that all activities were valuable to their careers, although direct experience with integrated, functional AO systems was particularly beneficial.

  20. The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities

    E-print Network

    Ammons, S Mark; Armstrong, J D; Crossfield, Ian; Do, Tuan; Fitzgerald, Mike; Harrington, David; Hickenbotham, Adam; Hunter, Jennifer; Johnson, Jess; Johnson, Luke; Li, Kaccie; Lu, Jessica; Maness, Holly; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Putnam, Nicole; Roorda, Austin; Rossi, Ethan; Yelda, Sylvana

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO sys...

  1. [Tips to activate your laboratory technologists].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    For about two decades, Japanese clinical laboratories have been suffering depression because of the government policy to reduce medical expenditure. Here are my proposals to re-vitalize laboratory science in Japan. (1) Do not keep laboratory technologists stay inside laboratories. Take them out to bedside to show what is going on. Show your technologists' face to medical professionals to experience clinical demand. (2) Invite doctors who cared severely ill patients to your laboratory. Every month my laboratory holds case study meetings using electronic medical records (EMR). Doctors and residents present how laboratory data saved the patient's life. Attending the meeting, laboratory technologists realize how they contributed to improve the patients' destiny. This "case study meeting" with EMR stimulates laboratory technologists to understand they are really one of major players in dramatic story of clinical medicine. (3) Establish a sophisticated industry of biotechnology. Populations of senior citizens are growing in all the developed nations in the world. The healthcare demand is very likely to increase. Because Japan is experiencing "aging society" most drastically, the Japanese could get the first major chance to develop new technologies to improve senior citizens' quality of life. The more government reduce medical expenditure, the less healthcare industry grows up. Without major biotechnology industry, the Japanese have to import expensive technologies from overseas. In conclusion, Japanese society of laboratory medicine, together with related industries should get united to appeal how they can contribute to the nation, in order to obtain appropriate fee, as an investment for future people's health. PMID:19227192

  2. Hands-On Equations 1 Lite

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Henry Borenson

    2013-06-19

    In this iOS app students use the Hands-On Equations method to balance equations and solve for one variable. This app includes three lessons, each with a short one to two minute video, two example problems, and ten exercises. At the first level students solve an equation that is already set up on the scale, in the second level students must set up the equation on the scale before solving, and in the third lesson students must take this one step forward and eliminate variables as they solve.

  3. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  4. SciTech Hands-On Museum: Experiment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Experiment page of the Aurora, Illinois SciTech Hands-On Museum includes several quality science educational activities. The first is a lesson plan that lets kids explore what evaporation is and shows it taking place. The Excite an Atom activity includes an interactive model of a Hydrogen atom that allows students to choose various energy states to see how the atom reacts and then returns to the ground state and emits a photon. Additional features of the site include science fair project ideas and other helpful science links, making it a valuable resource especially for grade school science teachers.

  5. Hands-on lessons in ergonomics for youth

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2005-09-29

    Ergonomics risk factors apply to everybody. Numerous adults have experienced disabling injuries related to use of computers and other forms of technology. Now children are using technology even more than adults. Increasingly ergonomics risk factors are being recognized as present in the world of children. Outreach to schools and the surrounding community by employers may help protect the future work force. A growing body of researchers believe that children can benefit from the early introduction of ergonomics awareness and preventative measures. While individual representatives of the educational system may embrace the concept of introducing ergonomics into the classroom, a number of barriers can prevent implementation of integrated programs. Some of the barriers to introducing ergonomics in schools have been absence of a tie to educational standards, the existing demands on teaching hours, and the absence of easily executable lesson plans. Ergonomics is rarely included in teacher training and professional ergonomics expertise is needed for the development of a class-based program. As part of Strategic Vision plan for 2025, a National Laboratory identified community outreach and the future workforces as key areas for initiatives. A series of hands-on interactive modules have been developed by professional ergonomics specialists. They are being tested with elementary, middle and high school students. Where possible, the content has been tied to the educational standards in the State of California in the USA. Currently the modules include grip strength, effective breathing, optimal keyboard and mouse positions, optimizing chairs, posture and movement, backpack safety and safe lifting. Each module takes the students through a related activity or experience. An individual worksheet asks them questions about the experience and guides them to consider implications in their activities of daily living. A module on hearing is under development. The goal is to have a toolkit that teachers can use in classrooms with minimal training. The kit will come with lesson plans, including background material, key points, questions and answers, possible homework assignments and references. It will include instructions and worksheets for students as well as the materials needed for each module. A pre- and posttest will be administered to test the awareness and understanding of the principles introduced in through the modules. This interactive session will offer the opportunity to for attendees to participate in some of the modules that have been developed to provide experiential demonstration of ergonomics principles. Attendees will experience ergonomics in action and be able to evaluate the applicability of the process in their own area in the world of ergonomics. The session will consist of 20 minutes introduction, 40 minutes working with the toolkit, finally another 30 minutes for questions or discussion for a total time of 90 minutes.

  6. A MASSive Laboratory Tour. An Interactive Mass Spectrometry Outreach Activity for Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungmann, Julia H.; Mascini, Nadine E.; Kiss, Andras; Smith, Donald F.; Klinkert, Ivo; Eijkel, Gert B.; Duursma, Marc C.; Cillero Pastor, Berta; Chughtai, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2013-07-01

    It is imperative to fascinate young children at an early stage in their education for the analytical sciences. The exposure of the public to mass spectrometry presently increases rapidly through the common media. Outreach activities can take advantage of this exposure and employ mass spectrometry as an exquisite example of an analytical science in which children can be fascinated. The presented teaching modules introduce children to mass spectrometry and give them the opportunity to experience a modern research laboratory. The modules are highly adaptable and can be applied to young children from the age of 6 to 14 y. In an interactive tour, the students explore three major scientific concepts related to mass spectrometry; the building blocks of matter, charged particle manipulation by electrostatic fields, and analyte identification by mass analysis. Also, the students carry out a mass spectrometry experiment and learn to interpret the resulting mass spectra. The multistage, inquiry-based tour contains flexible methods, which teach the students current-day research techniques and possible applications to real research topics. Besides the scientific concepts, laboratory safety and hygiene are stressed and the students are enthused for the analytical sciences by participating in "hands-on" work. The presented modules have repeatedly been successfully employed during laboratory open days. They are also found to be extremely suitable for (early) high school science classes during laboratory visit-focused field trips.

  7. Calculator Controlled Robots: Hands-On Math and Science Discovery

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tyson Tuchscherer

    This curriculum includes ten missions and three exploration extensions that provide activities for up to a semester and focus largely on the space exploration theme. It is designed to engage students in hands-on inquiry based learning. It addresses science and technology standards, and specifically focuses on math content and process standards. Although other models will work, the curriculum is geared towards using a Texas Instruments (IT) 83 or 84 series graphing calculator with a Norland research calculator robot. The curriculum can be used in math, science, technology, or after school classes. Students create programs in TI-BASIC to run their robots. Missions are sequentially built on the knowledge of previous activities. Step-by-step programming instructions are provided in the first missions, gradually leading students to create their own programs in later missions. Students use and apply math and science concepts to direct their robots through a variety of challenges. In addition to the detailed activities, teachers are given opportunities to draw on their students’ hands-on experience to reach a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts. Several open-ended questions and extension activities are included to encourage potential scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and computer programmers to explore their fields.

  8. Hands-On Herpetology: Exploring Ecology and Conservation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Marianne E. Krasny

    2001-01-01

    Plentiful, diverse, and readily available, these animals--known in science as "herps"--are also perfect for teaching students about biology, ecology, and conservation, including problems affecting both amphibians and reptiles. This highly readable resource melds rigorous science content with science research. Its five sections cover the animals' biology and handling procedures (including safety tips), provide background information for teachers, offer twenty-one indoor/outdoor activities, and broach critical conservation issues. Hands-On Herpetology: Exploring Ecology and Conservation is ideal for middle and high school teachers, volunteer leaders in 4-H and other clubs, and nature center staff who want to mix serious issues with amazing science.

  9. Elementary education majors experience hands-on learning in introductory biology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PhD Barbara E. Goodman (University of South Dakota School of Medicine Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences)

    2006-12-01

    This study describes how the active, hands-on learning opportunity for preservice teachers with its emphasis on both content and performance-based assessment was implemented in an introductory biology course for elementary education majors

  10. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Monthly Activity Report

    E-print Network

    to Congress on Great Lakes Mercury Contamination. Briefing materials were prepared that synthesized-541-3255. Air Resources Laboratory Headquarters, Silver Spring 3. Mercury Simulation with HYSPLIT. Work. Shaheer Tariq will be a senior next year at Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring and is working

  11. NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report

    E-print Network

    ; IT purchases, and equipment configuration and troubleshooting; property management, and IT inventory laboratory installed atop the North Moody Tower, an 18-story dormitory on the campus of the University University Memorandum of Understanding 19. Outreach Highlights 1. Student Interns. Angelica Betancourt

  12. NDE Activity at Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    1993-01-01

    None, This is a viewgraph outline from an oral presentation. From Intro.: Our speaker will review the NDE technology under development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Emphasis will be given to Ultrasonics and application of sensors to space technology. Further, the efforts of JPL in technology transfer to the industry in the area of NDE will be covered.

  13. Laboratory-Tutorial Activities for Teaching Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittmann, Michael C.; Morgan, Jeffrey T.; Feeley, Roger E.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the development of students' ideas of probability and probability density in a University of Maine laboratory-based general education physics course called "Intuitive Quantum Physics". Students in the course are generally math phobic with unfavorable expectations about the nature of physics and their ability to do it. We describe a…

  14. Engaging First-Year Undergraduates in Hands-On Research Experiences: The Upper Green River Barcode of Life Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Douglas M. McElroy

    2010-01-01

    To improve retention and engagement, first-year college science majors enrolled in University Experience orientation courses participated in a hands-on laboratory research experience: a DNA barcoding project to facilitate species identification. Students

  15. Electricity/Electronics Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This electricity/electronics guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 35 modules on the following topics: electrical…

  16. Hands-On Science, 680 Hands at a Time: Shrinking the Large Lecture with a Collapsing Can Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipman, Harry L.

    2001-01-01

    Explains how hands-on science activities can be done in a class designed as a lecture setting. Uses the collapsing can activity to demonstrate the birth of a black hole. Evaluates student responses to the hands-on approach. (YDS)

  17. Using the Laboratory to Enhance Student Learning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael P. Clough

    2002-01-01

    Typical hands-on, cookbook laboratory experiences do an extremely poor job of making apparent and playing off students' prior ideas, engendering deep reflection, and promoting understanding of complex content. This chapter addresses how to transform traditional laboratory activities into experiences that are more congruent with how people learn, the National Science Education Standards, and the nature of science.

  18. Cognitive Influences of Students' Alternative Conceptions within a Hands-On Gene Technology Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franke, Gaitano; Bogner, Franz X.

    2011-01-01

    In a German out-of-school laboratory, 293 medium-achieving 10th-grade students participated in a lesson unit about gene technology. They were divided into two groups (I-1, I-2), both of which followed the same hands-on lesson procedure. Students within I-2 were additionally confronted with alternative conceptions to central issues of the specific…

  19. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S COMPREHENSIVE HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from nine U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the world-wide web. The data system is called CHAD-Consolidated Human Activity Database-and it is ...

  20. An Inquiry Laboratory Activity for Biology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nancy Contolini (Brookfield High School REV)

    1994-07-30

    The "cookbook " style approach to studying biochemical reactions mediated by enzymes is changed to an inquiry approach. Cooperative teams are each given two questions about the types of living materials that contain the enzymes that break down hydrogen peroxide, and under what conditions the enzyme works best. They write hypotheses and design and conduct experiments to test these hypotheses. The activity provides students the opportunity to engage in meaningful scientific inquiry because they must truly understand the problem in order to attempt to solve it, to construct meaning in performing experiments, to practice observational skills, and to communicate in writing and in reporting orally to the class on their group results.

  1. Hands-On Whole Science. What Rots?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1991-01-01

    Presents activities on the science of garbage to help elementary students learn to save the earth. A rotting experiment teaches students what happens to apple slices sealed in plastic or buried in damp soil. Other activities include reading stories on the subject and conducting classroom composting or toxic materials projects. (SM)

  2. Hands On Math Using Colored Rods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Dana Malloy

    Students enjoy learning by doing and by manipulating objects. This paper describes classroom activities using rods with various lengths and different colors. The activities included are: (1) preparation of rods; (2) elementary addition and subtraction; (3) fractions; (4) concept of greater than, less than, and equals; (5) simple division and…

  3. Calculator-Controlled Robots: Hands-On Mathematics and Science Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchscherer, Tyson

    2010-01-01

    The Calculator Controlled Robots activities are designed to engage students in hands-on inquiry-based missions. These activities address National science and technology standards, as well as specifically focusing on mathematics content and process standards. There are ten missions and three exploration extensions that provide activities for up to…

  4. Introductory Oceanography Taught as a Laboratory Science--An Experiment That Worked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Franz E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a college level introductory oceanography course that incorporates a hands-on laboratory component. The activities include the determination of density and buoyancy, light transmission in sea water, and wave refraction. (MA)

  5. Hands-on optics: an informal science education initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Anthony M.; Pompea, Stephen M.; Arthurs, Eugene G.; Walker, Constance E.; Sparks, Robert T.

    2007-09-01

    The project is collaboration between two scientific societies, the Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). The program is designed to bring science education enrichment to thousands of underrepresented middle school students in more than ten states, including female and minority students, who typically have not been the beneficiaries of science and engineering resources and investments. HOO provides each teacher with up to six activity modules, each containing enough materials for up to 30 students to participate in 6-8 hours of hands-on optics-related activities. Sample activities, developed by education specialists at NOAO, include building kaleidoscopes and telescopes, communicating with a beam of light, and a hit-the-target laser beam challenge. Teachers engage in two days of training and, where possible, are partnered with a local optics professional (drawn from the local rosters of SPIE and OSA members) who volunteers to spend time with the teacher and students as they explore the module activities. Through these activities, students gain experience and understanding of optics principles, as well as learning the basics of inquiry, critical thinking, and problem solving skills involving optics, and how optics interfaces with other disciplines. While the modules were designed for use in informal after- school or weekend sessions, the number of venues has expanded to large and small science centers, Boys and Girls Clubs, Girl Scouts, summer camps, family workshops, and use in the classroom.

  6. Non-unit-producing activities in a large microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Forward, K R; Digout, G L

    1992-09-01

    Workload measurement systems are used as a guide for the deployment of laboratory human resources. However, many aspects of laboratory staff activities, such as education, quality assurance, and research and development, are not classified as unit-producing activities. Using daily diaries, the amount of time spent on non-unit-producing activities (NUPA) was examined in a microbiology laboratory that is comprised of four sections. Sixty-four technical staff recorded the amount of time spent on each NUPA category during a 1-month period. The average time spent on each category was calculated and comparisons for each section were made. Results showed that on average 144 minutes per day is spent on NUPA. The greatest amount of time (44 minutes) was spent on personal time (includes two 15-minute coffee breaks). Education, training, and research and development occupied 32 minutes per day and personnel, statistics, and quality assurance activities totaled 36 minutes each day. The remaining 30 minutes were divided between the categories social, idle, outside, and other. Supervisory staff spent 307 minutes per day on NUPA, whereas bench technologists and support staff spent 109 minutes per day for NUPA. Sectional results varied from 24.1% of work time for virology/immunology to 34.2% of work time for clinical bacteriology. Non-unit-producing activities as well as unit-producing activities should be considered in deploying laboratory staff. PMID:1529962

  7. Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities, and 2001 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, Walter R.; Cote, Charles, E.

    2002-01-01

    How can we improve our ability to predict the weather? How is the Earth's climate changing? What can the atmospheres of other planets teach us about our own? The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer these and other scientific questions. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. Vigorous research is central to NASA's exploration of the frontiers of knowledge. NASA scientists play a key role in conceiving new space missions, providing mission requirements., and carrying out research to explore the behavior of planetary systems, including, notably, the Earth's. Our Laboratory's scientists also supply outside scientists with technical assistance and scientific data to further investigations not immediately addressed by NASA itself. The Laboratory for Atmospheres is a vital participant in NASA's research program. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Sciences Directorate based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The Directorate itself comprises the Global Change Data Center; the Earth and Space Data Computing Division; three laboratories: the Laboratory for Atmospheres, the Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, and the Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes; and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York, New York. In this report, you will find a statement of our philosophy and a description of our role in NASA's mission. You'll also find a broad description of our research and a summary of our scientists' major accomplishments in 2001. The report also presents useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community. For your convenience, we have published a version of this report on the Internet. Our Web site includes links to additional information about the Laboratory's Offices and Branches. You can find us on the World Wide Web at http://atmospheres.gsfc.nasa.gov.

  8. Make Science Matter. Hands on Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Presents class activities to help elementary students learn about changes in the state of matter by making ice cream. In addition to making observations on the changes of state, students can practice measuring and identifying the properties (e.g., color, size, and shape). (SM)

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

    2009-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts with limited management filtering to encourage the creativity of individual researchers. The competition is open to all BNL staff in programmatic, scientific, engineering, and technical support areas. Researchers submit their project proposals to the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning. A portion of the LDRD budget is held for the Strategic LDRD (S-LDRD) category. Projects in this category focus on innovative R&D activities that support the strategic agenda of the Laboratory. The Laboratory Director entertains requests or articulates the need for S-LDRD funds at any time. Strategic LDRD Proposals also undergo rigorous peer review; the approach to review is tailored to the size and scope of the proposal. These Projects are driven by special opportunities, including: (1) Research project(s) in support of Laboratory strategic initiatives as defined and articulated by the Director; (2) Research project(s) in support of a Laboratory strategic hire; (3) Evolution of Program Development activities into research and development activities; and (4) ALD proposal(s) to the Director to support unique research opportunities. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred fronl the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. To be one of the premier DOE National Laboratories, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and d

  10. Farm to School Hands on Chef Training and

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Farm to School Hands on Chef Training and Smarter Lunchrooms Finding it a challenge to meet the new? We have just the thing for you! 4-6 hours* of hands-on training for District Food Service Managers and staff · Training provided by Chef David Bearl, Certified Culinary Educator and Certified Chef de Cuisine

  11. S'COOL Lesson: Cloud in a Bottle (Hands-on Version)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    In this lesson plan, students participate in a hands-on activity using a plastic bottle and other simple ingredients to learn the three factors required for cloud formation. Detailed Procedure and materials, vocabulary linked to an on-line glossary, and teacher notes are provided. This activity is related to the NASA CERES Students Cloud Observations Online (S'COOL) project.

  12. S'COOL Lesson Plan 88: Create a Cloud in a Jar (Hands-on Version)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-04-29

    With this lesson plan, students participate in a hands-on activity using a glass jar and other simple materials to learn the three factors required for cloud formation. Detailed Procedure and Materials, Vocabulary linked to an on-line glossary, and Teacher Notes are provided. This activity is related to the NASA CERES Students Cloud Observations Online (S'COOL) project.

  13. Teacher's Resource Guide on Acidic Precipitation with Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    The purpose of this teacher's resource guide is to help science teachers incorporate the topic of acidic precipitation into their curricula. A survey of recent junior high school science textbooks found a maximum of one paragraph devoted to the subject; in addition, none of these books had any related laboratory activities. It was on the basis of…

  14. Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

  15. Developing hands-on ergonomics lessons for youth

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2006-02-22

    By the time students are ready to enter the workforce they have been exposed to up to 20 years of ergonomics risk factors. As technology evolves, it provides more opportunities for intensive repetitive motion and with computers, cell phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and electronic games. The average student engages in fewer active physical activities, sit stationary in mismatched furniture in schools for hours and carry heavy backpacks. While long-term effects remain to be identified, increasingly ergonomists and others concerned with musculoskeletal health and wellness, see a need for early ergonomics education. This interactive session provides a hands-on approach to introducing ergonomics to students. Although different approaches may effectively introduce ergonomics at even early stages of development, this program was designed for youth at the middle to high school age. Attendees will participate in four activities designed to introduce ergonomics at an experiential level. The modules focus on grip strength, effective breathing, optimizing your chair, and backpack safety. The workshop will include presentation and worksheets designed for use by teachers with minimal ergonomics training. Feedback from the participants will be sought for further refining the usability and safety of the training package.

  16. A Low-Cost, Hands-on Module to Characterize Antimicrobial Compounds Using an Interdisciplinary, Biophysical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Karishma S.; Kessel, Ashley; Ratnayeke, Nalin; Gordon, Vernita D.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a hands-on experimental module that combines biology experiments with a physics-based analytical model in order to characterize antimicrobial compounds. To understand antibiotic resistance, participants perform a disc diffusion assay to test the antimicrobial activity of different compounds and then apply a diffusion-based analytical model to gain insights into the behavior of the active antimicrobial component. In our experience, this module was robust, reproducible, and cost-effective, suggesting that it could be implemented in diverse settings such as undergraduate research, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) camps, school programs, and laboratory training workshops. By providing valuable interdisciplinary research experience in science outreach and education initiatives, this module addresses the paucity of structured training or education programs that integrate diverse scientific fields. Its low-cost requirements make it especially suitable for use in resource-limited settings. PMID:25602254

  17. Environmental Measurements Laboratory fiscal year 1998: Accomplishments and technical activities

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) is government-owned, government-operated, and programmatically under the DOE Office of Environmental Management. The Laboratory is administered by the Chicago Operations Office. EML provides program management, technical assistance and data quality assurance for measurements of radiation and radioactivity relating to environmental restoration, global nuclear nonproliferation, and other priority issues for the Department of Energy, as well as for other government, national, and international organizations. This report presents the technical activities and accomplishments of EML for Fiscal Year 1998.

  18. Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities, and 1999 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer questions related to climate, and climate change and other scientific questions about our planet and its neighbors. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. In this report,there is a statement of the labs philosophy and a description of it's role in NASA's mission. A broad description of the research and a summary of the scientists' major accomplishments in 1999 is also included. The report also presents useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community.

  19. Laboratory activities involving transmissible spongiform encephalopathy causing agents

    PubMed Central

    Leunda, Amaya; Van Vaerenbergh, Bernadette; Baldo, Aline; Roels, Stefan; Herman, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Since the appearance in 1986 of epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a new form of neurological disease in cattle which also affected human beings, many diagnostic and research activities have been performed to develop detection and therapeutic tools. A lot of progress was made in better identifying, understanding and controlling the spread of the disease by appropriate monitoring and control programs in European countries. This paper reviews the recent knowledge on pathogenesis, transmission and persistence outside the host of prion, the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) in mammals with a particular focus on risk (re)assessment and management of biosafety measures to be implemented in diagnostic and research laboratories in Belgium. Also, in response to the need of an increasing number of European diagnostic laboratories stopping TSE diagnosis due to a decreasing number of TSE cases reported in the last years, decontamination procedures and a protocol for decommissioning TSE diagnostic laboratories is proposed. PMID:24055928

  20. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center for Biogeochemical Dynamics "is a source for biogeochemical and ecological data useful for studying environmental processes. These data have been collected on the ground, from aircraft, or by satellite or have been generated by computer models. The extent of data ranges from site-specific to global, and duration's range from days to years." Information can be searched by a wide range of criteria that include key word, timeline, subject, map, and attribute.

  1. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) GEM Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; J. Schroeder; S. T. Beck

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. Using the SAPHIRE analysis engine and relational database is a complementary program called GEM. GEM has been designed to simplify using existing PRA analysis for activities such as the NRC’s Accident Sequence Precursor program. In this report, the theoretical framework behind GEM-type calculations are discussed in addition to providing guidance and examples for performing evaluations when using the GEM software. As part of this analysis framework, the two types of GEM analysis are outlined, specifically initiating event (where an initiator occurs) and condition (where a component is failed for some length of time) assessments.

  2. Build a Band Hands-on Challenge: Investigate Sound with PBS's "Design Squad Nation"[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    This article describes "Build a Band" hands-on activity from "Design Squad Nation," which allows kids to use simple materials to build a four-stringed instrument, then tune it and play a song. Kids explore frequency, pitch, and sound energy while following the steps of the engineering design process. By weaving "Design Squad Nation" episodes,…

  3. Paper Table Hands-on Challenge: Explore Structures with PBS's "Design Squad"[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinberg, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    Build a table that's sturdy enough to hold a heavy weight! The catch? Students can only use eight sheets of newspaper, one piece of cardboard, and masking tape. This article describes "Paper Table," a hands-on activity from "Design Squad," in which kids investigate structures while following the steps of the engineering design process. Teachers…

  4. Tried and True: Traffic control tips for hands-on labs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tricia Hill

    2004-09-01

    The following are some tried and true methods of avoiding materials management and traffic problems associated with hands-on activities. While each class has its own personality and each teacher has his or her own style, these tips can be useful and practical in a variety of settings.

  5. A Hands-On Approach to Teaching Protein Translation & Translocation into the ER

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBonte, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The process of protein translation and translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can often be challenging for introductory college biology students to visualize. To help them understand how proteins become oriented in the ER membrane, I developed a hands-on activity in which students use Play-Doh to simulate the process of protein…

  6. Inquiring into Three Approaches to Hands-On Learning in Elementary and Secondary Science Methods Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Marianne B.; Foley, Kathleen R.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates three approaches to hands-on science learning in two contexts, an elementary science methods class and a secondary science methods class. Focused on an activity on foam. Concludes that when developing models for teaching science methods courses, methods instructors need to share power with prospective teachers. (Author/MM)

  7. Building Communities Through Role Models, Mentors, and Hands-on-Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Maria

    2001-01-01

    Describes afterschool science program, implemented by a group of women engineers, to provide 18 African American middle-school female students with hands-on science activities related to the manufacture and design of automobiles. Women engineers served as mentors and role models. Program had positive influence on students' attitudes towards math,…

  8. Hands-On Science and Literacy Activities about Solar Energy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jessica Fries-Gaither

    This article features science lesson plans to teach elementary students about the sun's energy, the relationship between light and heat, albedo, and the absorption of different surfaces. National standards and literacy integrations are provided for each lesson.

  9. Earth Science Hands-On Learning Activities and Lesson Plans

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Lahr

    This collection of animations, demonstration projects, paper models, and other teaching tools is designed to aid in the understanding of geologic processes. Topics include sea-floor spreading and subduction, earthquakes, seismology, magnetometers, volcanoes, and wave types. Links are provided to other sites containing paper models (i.e., volcano, trilobite, nautiloid) and other geology and natural hazard information. The earthquake lesson plan includes guidelines for teacher preparation, an "in-class inquiry," and a quiz.

  10. Explorations in Algebra: Hands-On Lab Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Barbara J.; Matsumoto, Annette N.; Zenigami, Fay

    This book is a compatible instructional component to any algebra textbook and was developed by University of Hawaii under the Dwight D. Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Education Improvement Act. The tasks align with the content and instructional approach used in daily classes that emphasize standards-based teaching and learning. The tasks…

  11. Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities and 2000 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, Walter R. (Editor); Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    How can we improve our ability to predict the weather - tomorrow, next week, and into the future? How is the Earth's climate changing? What causes such change? And what are its costs? What can the atmospheres of distant planets teach us about our own planet and its evolution? The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer these and other scientific questions about our planet and its neighbors. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. Vigorous research is central to NASA's exploration of the frontiers of knowledge. NASA scientists play a key role in conceiving new space programs, providing mission requirements, and carrying out research to explore the behavior of planetary systems, including, notably, the Earth's. The Laboratory for the Atmospheres is a vital participant in NASA's research program. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. In this report, you'll find a statement of our philosophy and a description of our role in NASA's mission. You'll also find a broad description of our research and a summary of our scientists' major accomplishments in 2000. The report also present useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community.

  12. Elucidating GPR Response to Biological Activity: Field and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoflias, G. P.; Schillig, P. C.; McGlashan, M. A.; Roberts, J. A.; Devlin, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies of the geophysical signatures of biological processes in earth environments have resulted in the emergent field of “biogeophysics”. The ability to monitor remotely and to quantify active biological processes in the subsurface can have transformative implications to a wide range of investigations, including the bioremediation of contaminated sites. Previous studies have demonstrated that ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to detect the products of microbial activity in the subsurface, such as changes in bulk electrical conductivity, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and the formation of biogenic gas. We present field and laboratory experiments that offer insights to the response of GPR signals to microbial activity. In the field, time-lapse borehole radar tomography was used to monitor biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume over a period of two years. A dense grid of fourteen borehole pairs monitoring the bioactive region showed radar wave velocity changes of +/-4% and signal attenuation changes of +/-25%. These GPR observations correlated spatially and temporally to independent measurements of groundwater velocity and geochemical variations that occurred in response to microbial activity. The greatest relative changes in radar wave velocity of propagation and attenuation were observed in the region of enhanced bacterial stimulation where biomass growth was the greatest. Radar wave velocity and attenuation decreased during periods of enhanced biostimulation. Two laboratory experiments were conducted to further assess radar response to biomass growth. The first experiment monitored GPR wave transmission through a water-saturated quartz-sand reactor during the course of enhanced biostimulation. Radar wave velocity initially decreased as a result of bacterial activity and subsequently increased rapidly as biogenic gas formed in the pore space. Radar signal attenuation increased during the course of the experiment as a result of an increase in pore fluid electrical conductivity. The second experiment examined GPR wave transmission through incrementally increasing concentrations of Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200R in a fluid suspension. Recorded GPR waveforms exhibited dispersion as the concentration of suspended cells increased. The radar wave velocity decrease observed in the field and laboratory measurements provide direct evidence of saturated sand bulk dielectric constant increase when biomass forms in the pore space, suggesting biomass dielectric constant being greater than that of pore water. The decrease in radar signal attenuation observed in the field during enhanced biodegradation is in contrast to high GPR attenuation observed in mature hydrocarbon contaminated sites where high conductivity pore fluids do not allow direct assessment of biomass effect on GPR signal attenuation. We conclude that field and laboratory GPR observations of enhanced biological activity in saturated porous media and in fluid suspension offer evidence that GPR can be used to monitor biostimulation in earth environments.

  13. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.

    SciTech Connect

    FOX,K.J.

    2002-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2002. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All Fy 2002 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2003. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2002 was $7 million. The actual allocation totaled $6.7 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

  14. Increasing Awareness about Antibiotic Use and Resistance: A Hands-On Project for High School Students

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Maria Joăo; Santos, Catarina L.; Costa, Patrício; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Background Health-promoting education is essential to foster an informed society able to make decisions about socio-scientific issues based on scientifically sustained criteria. Antibiotic resistance is currently a major public health issue. Considering that irrational antibiotic use has been associated with the development and widespread of antibiotic resistant bacteria, educational interventions to promote prudent antibiotic consumption are required. Methodology/Principal Findings This study focuses on the outcomes of an interventional program implemented at the University of Porto, Portugal, to promote awareness about antibiotic resistance at high school levels (15–17 year old). The project Microbiology recipes: antibiotics ŕ la carte articulates a set of wet and dry lab activities designed to promote the participants’ understanding of concepts and processes underlying antibiotics’ production and activity, such as the notion of mechanisms of action of antibiotics. Following a mix-method approach based on a pre?/post design, the effectiveness of this project was assessed by gathering data from surveys, direct observation and analysis of artifacts of 42 high school students (aged 15 and 16 years). The results indicate that the participants developed a more comprehensive picture of antibiotic resistance. The project was shown to promote more sophisticated conceptualizations of bacteria and antibiotics, increased awareness about the perils of antibiotic resistance, and enhanced consciousness towards measures that can be undertaken to mitigate the problem. The participants regarded their experiences as enjoyable and useful, and believed that the project contributed to improve their understanding and raise their interest about the issues discussed. Furthermore, there were also improvements in their procedural skills concerning the laboratory techniques performed. Conclusions/Significance This study evidences the possibility of increasing high school students’ awareness about the consequences of antibiotic resistance and the importance of judicious antibiotic use. The findings inform about the educational benefits of incorporating hands-on activities in science education programs. PMID:22984544

  15. Teaching genetics using hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Stephanie Ann

    Teaching genetics can be challenging because of the difficulty of the content and misconceptions students might hold. This thesis focused on using hands-on model activities, problem solving, and inquiry-based teaching/learning methods in order to increase student understanding in an introductory biology class in the area of genetics. Various activities using these three methods were implemented into the classes to address any misconceptions and increase student learning of the difficult concepts. The activities that were implemented were shown to be successful based on pre-post assessment score comparison. The students were assessed on the subjects of inheritance patterns, meiosis, and protein synthesis and demonstrated growth in all of the areas. It was found that hands-on models, problem solving, and inquiry-based activities were more successful in learning concepts in genetics and the students were more engaged than tradition styles of lecture.

  16. School of Rock: An Ocean-going, Hands-on Research Expedition for Earth and Ocean Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peart, L.; Niemitz, M.; Klaus, A.; Leckie, M.; Houpt, D.; Hamlin, B.; Crowder, L.; Firth, J.; Weiss, P.; Peng, C.; Slough, S.

    2005-12-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) - United States Implementing Organization (USIO) took advantage of a 16-day break between scientific operations to carry out a seagoing pilot educator workshop on board the JOIDES Resolution during a transit from Victoria, B.C., Canada, to Acapulco, Mexico. During this workshop, 10 educators from all across the United States were mentored and taught by scientists who are actively engaged in IODP research, the USIO Education Director, and staff. In addition, shipboard technical staff provided guidance and content related to hands-on laboratory activities. The pilot program provided the educators with an opportunity to participate in a seagoing experience on a scientific drilling research vessel and conduct a series of research activities similar to those that take place during regular scientific drilling expeditions. The workshop allowed educators to increase their knowledge of IODP and scientific methods as borne out through ocean drilling (proposals, drilling, lab analysis, data acquisition, postcruise activities) as well as knowledge of mid-ocean ridges, composition and structure of the oceanic crust, seafloor spreading, paleoceanography, paleomagnetism, and sedimentology. The workshop participants translated the scientific results into useful teaching resources by developing a suite of new discovery-based activities related to ocean drilling research that will undergo classroom testing by workshop participants. Over the school year the educators will help disseminate IODP science education by conducting at least two teacher workshops based on this seagoing experience, enhanced scientific knowledge gained from participating in the workshop, and the new activities developed en route.

  17. Hands-on Space Exploration through High Altitude Ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammergren, Mark; Gyuk, G.

    2010-01-01

    The Adler Planetarium's "Far Horizons" high-altitude ballooning effort serves as the focus for a diverse set of educational activities, including middle school summer camps, a high school summer program (the Astro-Science Workshop), school-year internships for high school students, summer internships for undergraduates, a NSF-funded graduate fellowship, and a thriving public volunteer program. The relatively low costs of both the reusable hardware (less than $1000) and expendable supplies (around $150 per launch) allow us to mount frequent missions throughout the year - and make such a program ideal for replication at institutions of any size. The rapid development schedule for each individual mission permits the cradle-to-grave involvement of short-term participants, making it easy to draw in a wide audience. Students are involved literally in a hands-on manner in all aspects of the construction, launch, tracking, and recovery of simple experimental payloads, which typically include sensors for temperature, pressure, light intensity, and radiation. Stunning imagery provided by onboard cameras can attract significant media interest, which can bring outreach efforts to a very broad audience. Future plans include the design and construction of CubeSats - decimeter-sized picosatellites carried to orbit as secondary payloads. Our first satellite will be a relatively simple Earth-imager, built from commercial, off-the-shelf components. As in the ballooning program, students and volunteers will be involved in all stages of this effort. Once operational, imagery and other data from the satellite will be incorporated into a museum exhibit that will allow visitors to submit target requests. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0525995.

  18. Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

    2004-02-15

    One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

  19. Invention activities as preparation for learning laboratory data handling skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, James

    2012-10-01

    Undergraduate physics laboratories are often driven by a mix of goals, and usually enough of them to cause cognitive overload for the student. Our recent findings align well with studies indicating that students often exit a physics lab without having properly learned how to handle real data. The value of having students explore the underlying structure of a problem before being able to solve it has been shown as an effective way to ready students for learning. Borrowing on findings from the fields of education and cognitive psychology, we use ``invention activities'' to precede direct instruction and bolster learning. In this talk I will show some of what we have learned about students' data handling skills, explain how an invention activity works, and share some observations of successful transfer.

  20. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  1. The Bohr Model and the Fifth Grade: A New Standards-Based Hands-On Physics Curriculum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff Brock; Russell Springer; Bennett Goldberg

    2004-01-01

    A semester-long, standards-based, hands-on physics curriculum appropriate for the fifth grade was developed. Previously available curricula were successful in using hands-on activities to teach basic fifth-grade physics skills and concepts, but did not attempt to foster understanding of the fundamental underlying physics. We expanded the role of inquiry-based instruction to expose students to the fundamental physics behind electricity, forces, energy,

  2. Teaching DNA Fingerprinting using a Hands-on Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schug, Thatcher

    1998-01-01

    Presents an inexpensive hands-on lesson in DNA fingerprinting that can be completed in a single class period. Involves students in solving a murder in which a drop of blood is fingerprinted and matched with the blood of the murderer. (DDR)

  3. Teaching Hands-On Linux Host Computer Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumba, Rose

    2006-01-01

    In the summer of 2003, a project to augment and improve the teaching of information assurance courses was started at IUP. Thus far, ten hands-on exercises have been developed. The exercises described in this article, and presented in the appendix, are based on actions required to secure a Linux host. Publicly available resources were used to…

  4. Google Earth for Landowners: Insights from Hands-on Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Google Earth is an accessible, user-friendly GIS that can help landowners in their management planning. I offered hands-on Google Earth workshops to landowners to teach skills, including mapmaking, length and area measurement, and database management. Workshop participants were surveyed at least 6 months following workshop completion, and learning…

  5. Hands-On Sports Medicine Training for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a hands-on sports medicine training program for residents at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. Education strategies include clinical teaching, on-the-field education, experiential learning, and didactic instruction. Programs focusing exclusively on sports medicine are needed because the number of…

  6. Enhancing Students' Inferential Reasoning: From Hands-On to "Movies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Pip; Pfannkuch, Maxine; Wild, Chris J.; Regan, Matt; Budgett, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Computer simulations and animations for developing statistical concepts are often not understood by beginners. Hands-on physical simulations that morph into computer simulations are teaching approaches that can build students' concepts. In this paper we review the literature on visual and verbal cognitive processing and on the efficacy of…

  7. MSLICE Science Activity Planner for the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Mark W.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Wallick, Michael N.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Fox, Jason M.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Kurien, James A.; McCurdy, Michael P.; Pyrzak, Guy; Aghevli, Arash; Bachmann, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01

    MSLICE (Mars Science Laboratory InterfaCE) is the tool used by scientists and engineers on the Mars Science Laboratory rover mission to visualize the data returned by the rover and collaboratively plan its activities. It enables users to efficiently and effectively search all mission data to find applicable products (e.g., images, targets, activity plans, sequences, etc.), view and plan the traverse of the rover in HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) images, visualize data acquired by the rover, and develop, model, and validate the activities the rover will perform. MSLICE enables users to securely contribute to the mission s activity planning process from their home institutions using off-the-shelf laptop computers. This software has made use of several plug-ins (software components) developed for previous missions [e.g., Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Phoenix Mars Lander (PHX)] and other technology tasks. It has a simple, intuitive, and powerful search capability. For any given mission, there is a huge amount of data and associated metadata that is generated. To help users sort through this information, MSLICE s search interface is provided in a similar fashion as major Internet search engines. With regard to the HiRISE visualization of the rover s traverse, this view is a map of the mission that allows scientists to easily gauge where the rover has been and where it is likely to go. The map also provides the ability to correct or adjust the known position of the rover through the overlaying of images acquired from the rover on top of the HiRISE image. A user can then correct the rover s position by collocating the visible features in the overlays with the same features in the underlying HiRISE image. MSLICE users can also rapidly search all mission data for images that contain a point specified by the user in another image or panoramic mosaic. MSLICE allows the creation of targets, which provides a way for scientists to collaboratively name features on the surface of Mars. These targets can also be used to convey instrument-pointing information to the activity plan. The software allows users to develop a plan of what they would like the rover to accomplish for a given time period. When developing the plan, the user can input constraints between activities or groups of activities. MSLICE will enforce said constraints and ensure that all mission flight rules are satisfied.

  8. Dose profile modeling of Idaho National Laboratory's active neutron interrogation laboratory.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Seabury, E H; Zabriskie, J M; Wharton, J; Caffrey, A J

    2009-06-01

    A new laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 10(8) n/s), deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (1 x 10(7) n/s), and (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.96 x 10(7) n/s, 30 microg). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for (252)Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield walls and entrance mazes and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults. PMID:19217792

  9. Engaging First-Year Undergraduates in Hands-On Research Experiences: The Upper Green River Barcode of Life Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Jeffrey M.; Hughes, Tia M.; McElroy, Douglas M.; Wyatt, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    To improve retention and engagement, first-year college science majors enrolled in University Experience orientation courses participated in a hands-on laboratory research experience: a DNA barcoding project to facilitate species identification. Students collected arthropods and hypothesized morphology-based species identifications. Then they…

  10. Living WITH the Lab - a freshman curriculum to boost hands-on learning, student confidence and innovation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Hall; Hisham Hegab; James Nelson

    2008-01-01

    A new freshman engineering curriculum has been implemented at Louisiana Tech University to boost hands-on learning, student confidence and innovation. The new curriculum, called living with the Lab, increases experiential learning by moving the ownership and maintenance of laboratory equipment from the university to the students. Each student purchases a robotics kit with a programmable controller, sensors, servos, and software

  11. Robotics laboratory exercises

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Krotkov

    1996-01-01

    The authors report new laboratory exercises in robotic manipulation, computer vision, artificial intelligence, and mechatronics, four areas that are central to any robotics curriculum. The laboratory exercises supply the student with hands-on experience that complements classroom lectures and software development. Through this experience, the student confronts the hard realities of robot systems and learns to deal with them. Such hands-on

  12. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  13. Educational Activities At The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipping, Tracy N.

    2011-06-01

    The Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) at the University of Texas at Austin performs a wide variety of educational activities for students at various levels. Regular on-site courses in the areas of health physics, radiochemistry, and reactor operations are offered for university credit. Along with on-site courses, access to the reactor facility via a remote console connection allows students in an off-site classroom to conduct experiments via a "virtual" control console. In addition to the regularly scheduled courses, other programs, such as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Summer Nuclear Engineering Institute and Office of Naval Research partnerships with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, provide access to the facility for students from other universities both domestic and foreign. And NETL hosts professional development programs such as training programs for Nuclear Regulatory Commission personnel and International Atomic Energy Agency fellowships.

  14. Hands on workshops as an effective means of learning advanced technologies including genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Reisdorph, Nichole; Stearman, Robert; Kechris, Katerina; Phang, Tzu Lip; Reisdorph, Richard; Prenni, Jessica; Erle, David J.; Coldren, Christopher; Schey, Kevin; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Geraci, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Genomics and proteomics have emerged as key technologies in biomedical research, resulting in a surge of interest in training by investigators keen to incorporate these technologies into their research. At least two types of training can be envisioned in order to produce meaningful results, quality publications, and successful grant applications: 1) immediate, short-term, training workshops, and 2) long-term graduate education or visiting scientist programs. We aimed to fill the former need by providing a comprehensive hands-on training course in genomics, proteomics, and informatics in a coherent, experimentally-based framework. This was accomplished through a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 10-day Genomics and Proteomics Hands On Workshop held at National Jewish Health (NJH) and the University of Colorado School of Medicine (UCD). The course content included: comprehensive lectures and laboratories in mass spectrometry and genomics technologies, extensive hands-on experience with instrumentation and software, video demonstrations, optional workshops, on-line sessions, invited keynote speakers, and local and national guest faculty. Here we describe the detailed curriculum and present the results of short- and long-term evaluations from course attendees. Our educational program consistently received positive reviews from participants and had a substantial impact on grant writing and review, manuscript submissions, and publications. PMID:24316330

  15. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-12-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  16. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-08-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  17. Robotic Mission to Mars: Hands-on, minds-on, web-based learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathers, Naomi; Goktogen, Ali; Rankin, John; Anderson, Marion

    2012-11-01

    Problem-based learning has been demonstrated as an effective methodology for developing analytical skills and critical thinking. The use of scenario-based learning incorporates problem-based learning whilst encouraging students to collaborate with their colleagues and dynamically adapt to their environment. This increased interaction stimulates a deeper understanding and the generation of new knowledge. The Victorian Space Science Education Centre (VSSEC) uses scenario-based learning in its Mission to Mars, Mission to the Orbiting Space Laboratory and Primary Expedition to the M.A.R.S. Base programs. These programs utilize methodologies such as hands-on applications, immersive-learning, integrated technologies, critical thinking and mentoring to engage students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and highlight potential career paths in science and engineering. The immersive nature of the programs demands specialist environments such as a simulated Mars environment, Mission Control and Space Laboratory, thus restricting these programs to a physical location and limiting student access to the programs. To move beyond these limitations, VSSEC worked with its university partners to develop a web-based mission that delivered the benefits of scenario-based learning within a school environment. The Robotic Mission to Mars allows students to remotely control a real rover, developed by the Australian Centre for Field Robotics (ACFR), on the VSSEC Mars surface. After completing a pre-mission training program and site selection activity, students take on the roles of scientists and engineers in Mission Control to complete a mission and collect data for further analysis. Mission Control is established using software developed by the ACRI Games Technology Lab at La Trobe University using the principles of serious gaming. The software allows students to control the rover, monitor its systems and collect scientific data for analysis. This program encourages students to work scientifically and explores the interaction between scientists and engineers. This paper presents the development of the program, including the involvement of university students in the development of the rover, the software, and the collation of the scientific data. It also presents the results of the trial phase of this program including the impact on student engagement and learning outcomes.

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  19. Data Grid tutorials with hands-on experience

    E-print Network

    Donno, Flavia; Puccinelli, Roberto; Stockinger, Kurt; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2004-01-01

    Grid technologies are more and more used in scientific as well as in industrial environments but often documentation and the correct usage are either not sufficient or not too well understood. Comprehensive training with hands-on experience helps people first to understand the technology and second to use it in a correct and efficient way. We have organised and run several training sessions in different locations all over the world and provide our experience. The major factors of success are a solid base of theoretical lectures and, more dominantly, a facility that allows for practical Grid exercises during and possibly after tutorial sessions.

  20. Hands-On Optics: An Informal Education Program for Exploring Light and Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.; Peruta, C. C.; Kinder, B. A.; Aceituno, J. C.; Pena, M. A.

    2005-05-01

    Hands-On Optics (HOO) is a collaborative four-year program to create and sustain a unique, national, informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. It will reach underrepresented middle school students in after-school programs and at hands-on science centers nationwide. Project partners with NOAO are SPIE-The International Society for Optical Engineering, the Optical Society of America (OSA), and the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement Program (MESA) of California. This program builds on the 2001 National Science Foundation planning grant (number ESI-0136024), Optics Education - A Blueprint for the 21st Century, undertaken to address the disconnect between the ubiquity of optics in everyday life and the noticeable absence of optics education in K-12 curricula and in informal science education. NOAO - with expertise in teaching optics, developing optics kits, and in science-educator partnerships is designing the HOO instructional materials by adapting well-tested formal education activities on light, color, and optical technology for the informal setting. These hands-on, high-interest, standards-connected activities and materials serve as the basis for 6, three-hour-long optics activity modules that will be used in informal education programs at 23 HOO host sites. NOAO also will train the educators, parents, and optics professionals who will work in teams to lead the HOO activities. A key component of the project will be the optics professionals from the two optical societies who currently are engaged in outreach activities and programs. Optics professionals will serve as resource agents teamed with science center and MESA educators, a model very successfully used by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's Project ASTRO. The six modules and associated challenges and contests address reflection from one or many mirrors, image formation, colors and polarization, ultraviolet and infrared phenomena, and communication over a beam of light. Challenges and contests have also been created to augment the six modules. The Hands On Optics Project is funded by the National Science Foundation ISE program. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  1. Assessing High School Student Learning on Science Outreach Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Courtney L.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hands-on laboratory activities on secondary student learning was examined. Assessment was conducted over a two-year period, with 262 students participating the first year and 264 students the second year. Students took a prequiz, performed a laboratory activity (gas chromatography of alcohols, or photosynthesis and respiration), and…

  2. The Urban Environmental Laboratory: A Step in the Right Direction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolin, Eric Jay

    1985-01-01

    Describes the philosophy, facility features, and program offerings at Brown University's environmental education center. The Urban Environmental Laboratory (UEL) is an integrated instruction, residential, demonstration project for students and the public community. Conservation technologies, active learning, and hands-on experience characterize…

  3. Vectors and Fomites: An Investigative Laboratory for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamo, Joseph A.; Gealt, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a laboratory model system for introductory microbiology students that involves hands-on studies of bacteria vectored in soil nematodes. Describes a series of experiments designed to demonstrate vector-fomite transmission, bacterial survival, and disinfectant activity. Introduces the concept of genetically engineered microorganisms and the…

  4. Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1993-12-23

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

  5. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sara Nottingham

    2010-05-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teachi

  6. TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a. How to Grade Student Laboratory Reports

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a. How to Grade Student Laboratory Reports Page 145 How to Grade along closely. #12;TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a (continued) #12;TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a (continued) #12;TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a (continued) #12;TA Orientation 2004 Activity 15a (continued

  7. Student Activities in Meteorology: SAM. Version 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Beverly L.; Passarelli, Elisa

    The task of providing hands-on as well as minds-on activities for students in science is one of concern to many scientists and educators. In an effort to inspire student interest in science and technology, scientists from the Forecast Systems Laboratory, a laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Environmental…

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Newman,L.

    2007-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of the Strategic Initiatives listed at the LDRD web site. These included support for NSLS-II, RHIC evolving to a quantum chromo dynamics (QCD) lab, nanoscience, translational and biomedical neuroimaging, energy and, computational sciences. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL.

  9. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1995-02-25

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R and D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle; assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five-Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory's LDRD Plan for FY 1994. Project summaries of research in the following areas are included: (1) Advanced Accelerator and Detector Technology; (2) X-ray Techniques for Research in Biological and Physical Science; (3) Nuclear Technology; (4) Materials Science and Technology; (5) Computational Science and Technology; (6) Biological Sciences; (7) Environmental Sciences: (8) Environmental Control and Waste Management Technology; and (9) Novel Concepts in Other Areas.

  10. Key Aspects of the Implementation of Optional Subject "Hands on—discovering of the World" in Teaching Practice of the West-Ba?ka District in Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bošnjak, Marija; Obadovic, Dušanka Ž.

    2010-01-01

    All over the world a number of initiatives have been started which offer new models for improving the quality of science teaching. One of the leading initiatives is Hands on which in 2003, included the introduction of the optional subject "Hands on—discovering of the world" into the first four grades of primary schools in Serbia. Five years after it had been introduced in our educational system, the analysis was carried out in order to determine the extent and the way this subject was taught in primary schools of the West-Backa District. The specially designed questionnaire was conducted on the sample of 137 teachers from 16 schools. The analysis shows that this subject is not present enough in teaching practice. This is the case because parents and pupils are poorly informed and mostly uninterested but also because of the widespread mistake that the subject requires special equipment and laboratories. When we analyzed the experience of teachers, we discovered that they were not familiar enough either with its basic principles or with recommended way of realization mainly because of the fact that most teachers did not attend science seminars nor they used appropriate professional literature. In order to increase the presence of this optional subject in teaching practice and to educate teachers for its more quality presentation, it is necessary for teachers to attend seminars about science teaching and to actively cooperate with science teachers at their schools as well as at related colleges.

  11. Hands-On Herpetology: Exploring Ecology and Conservation (e-book)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    J. Stephen Morreale

    2009-06-09

    Plentiful, diverse, and readily available, these animals--known in science as "herps"--are also perfect for teaching students about biology, ecology, and conservation, including problems affecting both amphibians and reptiles. This highly readable resource melds rigorous science content with science research. Its five sections cover the animals' biology and handling procedures (including safety tips), provide background information for teachers, offer twenty-one indoor/outdoor activities, and broach critical conservation issues. Hands-On Herpetology: Exploring Ecology and Conservation is ideal for middle and high school teachers, volunteer leaders in 4-H and other clubs, and nature center staff who want to mix serious issues with amazing science.

  12. Toward Improving K-Sixth Grade Science Education. A Hands-On Chemistry Course for Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelter, Paul B.; Paulson, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the role of the chemistry teacher impacting elementary science by training elementary teachers. Provides information for a 28-hour hands-on workshop for elementary teachers and lists 47 activities for the teachers. Included topics are food science, observation, liquids, gases, and general chemistry. (MVL)

  13. From Maxwell to Millikan: A Little History and a Little Hands-on with the Photoelectric Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gipps, John

    1993-01-01

    Provides an historical chronology of events related to understanding the photoelectric effect. Focuses on the early history, the mystery of the photoelectric effect, the contributions of Albert Einstein and Robert Millikan to the field, and hands-on activities that demonstrate the phenomenon to students. (DDR)

  14. Hands on What? The Relative Effectiveness of Physical versus Virtual Materials in an Engineering Design Project by Middle School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klahr, David; Triona, Lara M.; Williams, Cameron

    2007-01-01

    "Hands-on" activities play an important, but controversial, role in early science education. In this study we attempt to clarify some of the issues surrounding the controversy by calling attention to distinctions between: (a) type of instruction (direct or discovery); (b) type of knowledge to be acquired (domain-general or domain-specific); and…

  15. Developing and delivering hands-on information assurance exercises: experiences with the cyber defense lab at UMBC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan T. Sherman; Brian O. Roberts; William E. Byrd; Matthew R. Baker; John Simmons

    2004-01-01

    In summer 2003, we developed four new hands-on information assurance educational exercises for use in the UMBC undergraduate and graduate curricula. Exercise topics comprise buffer overflow attacks, vulnerability scanning, password security and policy, and flaws in the wired equivalent privacy (WEP) protocol. During each exercise, each student carries out structured activities using a laptop from a mobile cart that can

  16. Gross Anatomy and Physical Diagnosis: The First 'Hands On' Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theut, Susan K.; Smith, C. Wayne

    1981-01-01

    A patient interaction course designed to provide an introductory experience to the gross anatomy laboratory and to the interview and physical examination settings is described. The patient interaction course is composed of a series of four experiences: anatomy laboratory sessions, interviews, physical examinations, and small group discussions.…

  17. The effect of inquiry-based, hands-on labs on achievement in middle school science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Donna Kaye Green

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to measure the difference in science achievement between students who had been taught with an inquiry-based, hands-on pedagogical approach and those who had not. Improving student academic achievement and standardized test scores is the major objective of teachers, parents, school administrators, government entities, and students themselves. One major barrier to this academic success in Georgia, and the entire United States, has been the paucity of success in middle level science classes. Many studies have been conducted to determine the learning approaches that will best enable students to not only acquire a deeper understanding of science concepts, but to equip them to apply that new knowledge in their daily activities. Inquiry-based, hands-on learning involves students participating in activities that reflect methods of scientific investigation. The effective utilization of the inquiry-based learning approach demands inclusion of learners in a self-directed learning environment, the ability to think critically, and an understanding of how to reflect and reason scientifically. The treatment group using an inquiry-based, hands-on program did score slightly higher on the CRCT. However, the results revealed that there was not a significant difference in student achievement. This study showed that the traditionally instructed control group had slightly higher interest in science than the inquiry-based treatment group. The findings of this research study indicated that the NCLB mandates might need to be altered if there are no significant academic gains that result from the use of inquiry-based strategies.

  18. Magnetic Braking Revisited: Activities for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ireson, Gren; Twidle, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper revisits the demonstration of Lenz by dropping magnets down a non-magnetic tube. Recent publications are reviewed and ideas for undergraduate laboratory investigations are suggested. Finally, an example of matching theory to observation is presented. (Contains 4 tables, 5 figures and 3 footnotes.)

  19. Hands-on online : towards experiential product design education with online resources

    E-print Network

    Ramos, Joshua D

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study investigates the potential for teaching experiential, hands-on product design online. Specifically, the work is a first attempt to elucidate differences in outcomes between residential, hands-on educational ...

  20. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.

    SciTech Connect

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  1. Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    (Office of The Director)

    2012-04-25

    As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

  2. Laboratory Technician: Zane Kraft

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-05-02

    This is a PDF interview, PowerPoint slide set, and webpage biography of a laboratory technician, detailing the career information for someone who enjoys the hands-on experimentation of working with samples in the lab.

  3. Characteristics of Hands-On Simulations with Added Value for Innovative Secondary and Higher Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khaled, Anne; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; van der Wel, Marjan; Mulder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The intentions with which hands-on simulations are used in vocational education are not always clear. Also, pedagogical-didactic approaches in hands-on simulations are not well conceptualised from a learning theory perspective. This makes it difficult to pinpoint the added value that hands-on simulations can have in an innovative vocational…

  4. An Intensive Hands-on Course Designed to Teach Molecular Biology Techniques to Physiology Graduate Students

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Andrea D. Weston (University of Western Ontario Department of Physiology)

    2002-03-01

    To address a growing need to make research trainees in physiology comfortable with the tools of molecular biology, we have developed a laboratory-intensive course designed for graduate students. This course is offered to a small group of students over a three-week period and is organized such that comprehensive background lectures are coupled with extensive hands-on experience. The course is divided into seven modules, each organized by a faculty member who has particular expertise in the area covered by that module. The modules focus on basic methods such as cDNA subcloning, sequencing, gene transfer, polymerase chain reaction, and protein and RNA expression analysis. Each module begins with a lecture that introduces the technique in detail by providing a historical perspective, describing both the uses and limitations of that technique, and comparing the method with others that yield similar information. Most of the lectures are followed by a laboratory session during which students follow protocols that were carefully designed to avoid pitfalls. Throughout these laboratory sessions, students are given an appreciation of the importance of proper technique and accuracy. Communication among the students, faculty, and the assistant coordinator is focused on when and why each procedure would be used, the importance of each step in the procedure, and approaches to troubleshooting. The course ends with an exam that is designed to test the studentsÂ? general understanding of each module and their ability to apply the various techniques to physiological questions.

  5. Hands-On Educational Programs and Projects at SICSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) has a long history of projects that involve the design of space structures, including habitats for low-Earth orbit (LEO) and planetary applications. Some of these projects are supported by corporate sponsors, such as a space tourism research, planning and design study conducted for the owner of national U.S. hotel chain. Some have been undertaken in support of programs sponsored by the State Government of Texas, including current commercial spaceport development planning for the Texas Aerospace Commission and three counties that represent candidate spaceport sites. Other projects have been supported by NASA and the Texas Aerospace Consortium, including the design and development of SICSA's "Space Habitation Laboratory", a space station module sized environmental simulator facility which has been featured in the "NASA Select" television broadcast series. This presentation will highlight representative projects. SICSA is internationally recognized for its leadership in the field of space architecture. Many program graduates have embarked upon productive and rewarding careers with aerospace organizations throughout the world. NASA has awarded certificates of appreciation to SICSA for significant achievements contributing to its advanced design initiatives. SICSA and its work have been featured in numerous popular magazines, professional publications, and public media broadcasts in many countries. SICSA applies a very comprehensive scope of activities to the practice of space architecture. Important roles include mission planning conceptualization of orbital and planetary structures and assembly processes, and design of habitats to optimize human safety, adaptation and productivity. SICSA sponsors educational programs for upper division undergraduate students and graduate students with interests in space and experimental architecture. Many fourth year participants continue in the SICSA program throughout their remaining undergraduate studies, and are joined by other new fifth year students. Selected graduate applicants holding a professional degree in architecture from accredited colleges and universities can earn a Master of Architecture degree with a specialization in space and experimental architecture upon completion of 32 credit hours of study which includes two six-hour design studios. Accepted graduate students seeking a Master of Architecture degree who do not hold a professional architecture degree may enter SICSA studios during the final year of their minimum 72 credit hours of study. Subject to necessary University of Houston and Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approvals, SICSA and the College of Architecture propose to expand their graduate education role to add a Master of Science in Space Architecture degree program. This new program is primarily being planned in response to known interests of non-architect professionals from NASA and aerospace corporations who wish to pursue advanced space architecture research and design studies. The program will be also available to working professionals holding an undergraduate architectural degree.

  6. A Matched-Pairs Study of Interactive Computer Laboratory Activities in a Liberal Arts Math Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Frederick; Butler, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    This paper details the culmination of a large, multi-year study on the effects of an interactive computer laboratory component in a large liberal arts math course at a state university. After several semesters of piloting these laboratory activities in the course, one of two sections, taught by the same senior instructor, was randomly selected to…

  7. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

  8. Laboratory Animal Science Issues in the Design and Conduct of Studies with Endocrine-active Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey I. Everitt; Paul M. D. Foster

    2004-01-01

    The use of rodent models for research and testing on endo- crine-active compounds necessitates an awareness of a number of laboratory animal science issues to standardize bioassay methods and facilitate reproducibility of results between laboratories. These issues are not unique to endo- crine research but are particularly important in this field due to the complexities and interdependencies of the endocrine

  9. Evaluation of the Virtual Physiology of Exercise Laboratory Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2009-12-01

    The Virtual Physiology of Exercise Laboratory (VPEL) program was created to simulate the test design, data collection, and analysis phases of selected exercise physiology laboratories. The VPEL program consists of four modules: 1) cardiovascular, 2) maximal O2 consumption (VO2max), 3) lactate and ventilatory thresholds, and 4) respiratory exchange ratio. The purpose of this investigation was to compare student learning from the VPEL program with that from traditional "hands-on" exercise physiology laboratory activities. Student participants from the spring 2009 Integrated Fitness Programming course were randomly assigned to either experimental group 1 or group 2. Group 1 completed a hands-on version of a typical VO2max laboratory activity, whereas group 2 completed the VPEL VO2max module. Both groups then completed the same assessment to evaluate their understanding of VO2max laboratory concepts. Group 1 then completed the VPEL lactate and ventilatory threshold module, whereas group 2 completed a hands-on version of that same activity. Both groups then completed the same assessment to evaluate their understanding of lactate and ventilatory threshold laboratory concepts. Mean VO2max assessment scores were 86.39 ± 4.13 and 85.64 ± 6.72 and mean lactate and ventilatory threshold assessment scores were 85.50 ± 8.05 and 86.15 ± 6.45 for groups 1 and 2, respectively. These findings lend additional support to the following conclusion of similar investigations (2, 4, 6): that virtual laboratories instruct students as effectively as hands-on laboratories.

  10. Observations on the Nocturnal Activity and Feeding Behavior of Anguilla japonica Glass Eels Under Laboratory Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuo-Zeng Dou; Katsumi Tsukamoto

    2003-01-01

    Glass eels of the temperate anguillid species, Anguilla japonica, clearly showed a nocturnal activity rhythm under laboratory conditions. Light–dark cycle was a determinant factor affecting their photonegative behavior, nocturnal locomotor activity, and feeding behavior. Under natural light conditions, glass eels remained in shelters with little daytime feeding, but came out to forage during darkness. They moved and foraged actively in

  11. Characteristics of activated carbon for controlling gasoline vapor emissions: laboratory evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Manos; W. C. Kelly; M. Samfield

    1977-01-01

    The application of activated carbon for control of gasoline vapor emissions resulting from service station operations was investigated under laboratory conditions. Cyclic tests were conducted on five activated carbon materials at various combinations of temperature, humidity, fuel volatility and container shape to determine working capacity characteristics. Regeneration of the carbon was effected by air purging and vacuum stripping. Activated carbon

  12. Assessment Results Following Inquiry and Traditional Physics Laboratory Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Joel Arthur

    2006-01-01

    Preservice elementary teachers in a conceptual physics course were given multiple resources to use during several inquiry activities in order to investigate how materials were chosen, used, and valued. These students performed significantly better on assessment items related to the inquiry physics activities than on items related to traditional…

  13. Harvesting of Lunar Iron: Competitive Hands-on Learning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Beatty, Matthew

    Electromagnets can be used to harvest free iron from lunar soil, known as regolith. Iron is important to the US plans for a lunar outpost. It does not rust in space, making it an excellent construction material. Circumpolar railroad tracks would allow a slowly-moving train to follow the sun, making agriculture possible, and enabling continuous operation of factories producing solar cells and oxygen for life support and propulsion. Designing an iron harvesting apparatus for the unique lunar environment requires that students re-think tacit assumptions about how things work. Within the context of a 33-student summer program, two college interns supervised nine high school upperclassmen in an eight week project to design, test, and evaluate a lunar iron harvester. Under the guidance of high school teachers, a research engineer outlined the constraints and parameters for the project. The college interns developed performance metrics, and the teachers established the framework for the competition. Three teams of three students developed their designs, which were reviewed by professional engineers prior to fabrication. A separate team performed research on the properties of lunar soil and prepared a test bed containing 150 kg of simulated regolith. One team identified a novel means to multiply electromagnet force using a recently-issued patent, creating great excitement between the teams and spurring them all to excel. Electromagnets were fabricated in the Packer Engineering shop, then operated by the students in a standardized competition format. Wearing proper protective gear, each team tested their device to determine the amount of free iron extracted from the regolith simulant. Performance was measured in mass of iron harvested per device mass, yielding surprising results, and powerful insights for the students. Results were published in a local newspaper. In this paper, we describe how this hands-on project fits within an overarching philosophy for engineering education within a paid summer intern program.

  14. Manufacturing Enterprise Simulation as the Foundation Course and Synergistic Focus of Advanced Course Hands-On Application

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Waldrop, Phil

    This paper describes the effective utilization and benefits of a hands-on laboratory-based production enterprise simulation course as the introductory foundation for subsequent IT or IET program major courses. Using the Georgia Southern University B.S.-Manufacturing degree programs nationally recognized enterprise course as a model, the following key outcome-oriented benefits will be presented: "big picture" understanding of the industrial enterprise as a system; provision of a common base of experience which provides motivating synergy of upper-division course content; and a functioning production operation providing the capability to apply time studies, plant layout, lean concepts, tool design, ergonomics, automation and related studies in a tangible, hands-on basis to enhance major courses.

  15. Bumps in the Night. Hands-on Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1992-01-01

    Presents elementary school science activities with a Halloween orientation. One activity teaches students to appreciate and understand bats. A second activity has students group and classify monsters by individual characteristics. Activities for integrating science across the curriculum include creating monster myths, conducting surveys of…

  16. Waste characterization activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, G.P.; Martz, H.E.; Haskins, J.J. [and others

    1995-06-28

    Radioactive and hazardous wastes are generated at many national laboratories, military sites, fuel fabrication and enrichment plants, reactors, and many other facilities. At all of these sites, wastes must be separated, categorized, possibly treated, and packed into containers for shipment to waste-storage or disposal sites. Prior to treatment, storage or, shipment, the containers must be characterized to determine the ultimate disposition of the contained waste. Comprehensive and accurate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and nondestructive assay (NDA) methods can be used to characterize most waste containers in a safe and cost-effective manner without opening them. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is investigating and developing the application of x-ray and {gamma}-ray methods to nonintrusively characterize waste containers and/or items. X-ray NDE methods are being investigated to determine whether they can be used to identify hazardous and nonconforming materials. A {gamma}-ray NDA method is used to identify the radioactive sources within a container and to accurately quantify their strength. In this paper we describe five waste characterization projects being conducted at LLNL that apply both the NDE and NDA methods and present results.

  17. PAL(TM) 2.0 Human Anatomy Software Tool Use in Community College Traditional and Online Anatomy Laboratory Classes: Student-Perceived Learning Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuyatt, Brian Lee

    2012-01-01

    Human anatomy courses, with laboratory, are curricular requirements in graduate medical, undergraduate nursing, and all allied health science programs. Anatomy laboratory courses engage students in hands-on activities, including human cadaver or mammalian dissection, supported by photos from textbooks, detailed plastic models or human anatomical…

  18. Bring the Poles to Your Classroom & Community Through Linked Hands-on Learning & IPY Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, M.; Bell, R. E.; Kastens, K. A.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Two major legacies of the 4th International Polar Year (IPY 2007-9) are a newly galvanized educational community and an immense volume of polar data collected by the global science community. The tremendous new polar datasets represent a unique opportunity to communicate the nature of the changing poles to student and public audiences through this polar savvy educational community if effective approaches to link data and understanding are employed. We have developed a strategy for polar education that leverages the IPY data resources, linked with the polar education hands-on ‘manipulatives’ (materials that students can manipulate in a dynamic manner). This linked approach leverages the fundamental inquiry based learning but recognizes that particularly in the polar sciences the size of the earth, the remoteness of the poles and the scale of its processes make it difficult for students to explore in a hands-on manner. The linking of polar hands-on ‘manipulatives’ with IPY data provides a bridge between the tangible and the global. Alone manipulative activities can be beneficial in their ability to help students visualize a process or behavior, but without a strong link back to the Earth through data or evidence the understanding of the process is not transferred from the classroom model to the full scale Earth. The use of activities or models is beneficial in connecting the learner to the polar process(es), while the IPY data provides a unique opportunity to ground the polar manipulative experiments in real data. This linked strategy emerged from a series of NSF sponsored IPY Polar Fairs at major science museums that reached in excess of 12,000 people. The design of the fairs was that polar scientists developed activities linking low cost hands-on manipulatives to scientific evidence/data that was displayed in posters, images, and video clips. The participating scientists walked the ‘audience’ through the hands-on manipulative, then discussed their evidence while provided the reasoning. Adjusting this linked manipulative/data approach to the community of teachers will provide a very tangible education outcome to this community from IPY. Our linked manipulative-data strategy ensures polar processes are demonstrated, measured then matched with IPY data sets so that when examined in a guided exploration will provide the student the tools to generate the reasoning. This linked strategy is a powerful way to engage students in Earth science, and provide them with an entry to the wealth of professionally collected data sets that are available from both IPY and the broader science community, all while aligning with National Science Standards. We will demonstrate this approach, and show how the linked manipulative-data approach can be effectively used in community and school events to reach a wider audience.

  19. Activities of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 1 January - 31 December 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    There are many facets to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, for JPL is an organization of multiple responsibilities and broad scope, of diverse talents and great enterprise. The Laboratory's philosophy, mission, and goals have been shaped by its ties to the California Institute of Technology (JPL's parent organization) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (JPL's principal sponsor). JPL's activities for NASA in planetary, Earth, and space sciences currently account for almost 75 percent of the Laboratory's overall effort. JPL Research activities in the following areas are discussed: (1) deep space exploration; (2) telecommunications systems; (3) Earth observations; (4) advanced technology; (5) defense programs; and (6) energy and technology applications.

  20. Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

    1996-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

  1. Hands-On Whole Science: A Leaf Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1991-01-01

    Presents two elementary school activities to help students learn about autumn. The activities use autumn leaves to teach that each type of tree has its own distinctive type of leaf. One activity involves tracing, drawing, and writing about leaves; the other involves making a quilt using leaf designs. (SM)

  2. The Effects of Hands-On versus Remediation-Based Biology Preparatory Course Curricula on Performance in Follow-up Biology Courses at the Community College Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biermann, Carol A.; Sarinsky, Gary B.

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare two different methodological techniques of a biology preparatory course in order to determine which curriculum's methodologies were most effective in preparing biology students for follow-up biology courses as measured by course grades. One was based upon laboratory hands-on experiences and the…

  3. A Real-Time and Hands-On Research Course in Protein Purification and Characterization: Purification and Crystal Growth of Human Inosine Triphosphate Pyrophosphatase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreiling, Jodi L.; Brader, Kerry; Kolar, Carol; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.

    2011-01-01

    A new lecture/laboratory course to offer advanced biochemical training for undergraduate and early graduate students has been developed in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. This unique course offers students an opportunity to work hands-on with modern instrumentation not normally found in a predominately…

  4. NDE activities and technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtleff, W.W.

    1993-12-31

    The NDE, Photometrics, and Optical Data Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (S provides nondestructive evaluation (NDE) support for all phases of research and development at Sandia. Present facilities and personnel provide radiography, acoustic monitoring, ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography, shearography/ESPI, infrared imaging, high speed and ultra-high speed photometrics, and image processing. Although the department includes photometrics and optical data reduction as well as NDE, I will refer to the NDE department from now on for simplicity. The NDE department has worked on technology transfer to organizations inside and outside the weapons complex. This work has been performed in all the Sandia business sectors: Defense Programs, Energy and Environment, and Work for Others. The technology transfer has been in the form of testing for product improvement such as validation of aircraft inspection equipment, consultation such as detecting lathe bearing slip for a major machine tool manufacturer, and products such as an acoustic sand detector for the oil and gas industry.

  5. How to Make a Field Trip a Hands-On Investigative Laboratory: Learning about Marine Invertebrates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrowes, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    Research has shown that when students are given the opportunity to ask their own questions and design their own experiments, they become more interested in learning the answers. In this article, the author describes an effective method to do a field trip to the beach and gets her students to make observations about marine animals, come up with a…

  6. Hands-On Laboratory Simulation of Evolution: An Investigation of Mutation, Natural Selection, & Speciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrand, Terri J.; Govedich, Fredric R.; Bain, Bonnie A.

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary theory is the foundation of the biological sciences, yet conveying it to General Biology students often presents a challenge, especially at larger institutions where student numbers in foundation courses can exceed several hundred per lecture section. We present a pedagogically sound exercise that utilizes a series of simple and…

  7. Circadian Rhythm of Outside-Nest Activity in Wild (WWCPS), Albino and Pigmented Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stryjek, Rafa?; Modli?ska, Klaudia; Turlejski, Krzysztof; Pisula, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    The domestication process of the laboratory rat has been going on for several hundred generations in stable environmental conditions, which may have affected their physiological and behavioural functions, including their circadian system. Rats tested in our ethological experiments were laboratory-bred wild Norway rats (WWCPS), two strains of pigmented laboratory rats (Brown Norway and Long Evans), and two strains of albino rats (Sprague-Dawley and Wistar). Rats were placed in purpose-built enclosures and their cycle of activity (time spent actively outside the nest) has been studied for one week in standard light conditions and for the next one in round-the-clock darkness. The analysis of circadian pattern of outside-nest activity revealed differences between wild, pigmented laboratory, and albino laboratory strains. During daytime, albino rats showed lower activity than pigmented rats, greater decrease in activity when the light was turned on and greater increase in activity when the light was switched off, than pigmented rats. Moreover albino rats presented higher activity during the night than wild rats. The magnitude of the change in activity between daytime and nighttime was also more pronounced in albino rats. Additionaly, they slept outside the nest more often during the night than during the day. These results can be interpreted in accordance with the proposition that intense light is an aversive stimulus for albino rats, due to lack of pigment in their iris and choroid, which reduces their ability to adapt to light. Pigmented laboratory rats were more active during lights on, not only in comparison to the albino, but also to the wild rats. Since the difference seems to be independent of light intensity, it is likely to be a result of the domestication process. Cosinor analysis revealed a high rhythmicity of circadian cycles in all groups. PMID:23762462

  8. Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corneau, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    Since 2007 I have been a Team Leader for the Tzec Maun Foundation, a non-profit foundation dedicated to providing free, research grade, Internet telescopes to students, teachers and researchers around the world. The name Tzec Maun (pronounced “Teh-Zeck-Moan”) comes from Mayan culture. Tzec Maun was the jovial messenger, laughed at adversity. Based on the challenges students, researchers and professional astronomers face with finances, equipment, and telescope access, the jovial mascot seems to fit. Hundreds of hours performing astronomical outreach as a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador and Astronomical League Master of outreach taught me that the best way to inspirationally teach astronomy and space science (and most subjects) is actually being at the eyepiece. I’m NOT a fan of the traditional planetarium experience as a teaching tool because it inhibits inspiration and the learning experience to a 2-D mat on a faux horizon with artificial representations. Once, a student at my dark sky observatory excitedly commented that the night sky was like a 3-D planetarium. I have hosted several classes at my own personal dark sky observatory, but this resource is impractical for all but a few lucky students. Experience has taught me that the next best thing to being at the eyepiece is to control a remote telescope via the Internet. Tzec Maun’s arsenal of telescopes is all research capable, linked to the Internet and positioned for round-the-clock dark skies. The final conditions described above, mean that I can enter an 8:30am science class, log onto the Tzec Maun telescope Portal and turn over control of an Australian system (where it is night) to a student or teacher. Working as a group, the class can either begin their investigations. My Tzec Maun science team (TARP) is engaged in searching for potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs). PHA work excites student and teacher alike. Teaching from telescopes can unleash powerful attention-getting tools that enable teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

  9. Using Laboratory Chemicals to Imitate Illicit Drugs in a Forensic Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Shawn; Bromfield-Lee, Deborah; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Cintron-Maldonado, Jose A.

    2008-01-01

    This forensic chemistry activity utilizes presumptive forensic testing procedures and laboratory chemicals that produce screening results similar to controlled substances. For obvious reasons, obtaining heavily regulated controlled substances to create an undergraduate student activity is not practical for most educational institutions. We were…

  10. Laboratory Activities to Support Student Understanding of the Molecular Mechanisms of Mutation & Natural Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubler, Tina; Adams, Patti; Scammell, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of evolution is an important and challenging concept for students to understand. In a previous article, we provided some of the scientific background necessary to teach this topic. This article features a series of laboratory activities demonstrating that molecular events can alter the genomes of organisms. These activities are…

  11. The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teaching techniques. Mean scores from written exams, practical exams, and final course evaluations…

  12. Writing Activities Embedded in Bioscience Laboratory Courses to Change Students' Attitudes and Enhance Their Scientific Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Susan E.; Woods, Kyra J.; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2011-01-01

    We introduced writing activities into a project style third year undergraduate biomolecular science laboratory to assist the students to produce a final report in the form of a journal article. To encourage writing while the experimental work was proceeding, the embedded writing activities required ongoing analysis of experimental data. After…

  13. A LABORATORY REFERENCE VACCINE TO TITRATE IMMUNOGENIC ACTIVITY OF ANTIBRUCELLA VACCINES IN MICE

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    A LABORATORY REFERENCE VACCINE TO TITRATE IMMUNOGENIC ACTIVITY OF ANTIBRUCELLA VACCINES IN MICE'expression de l'activité par rapport à un système unitaire. Titration of immunogenic activity of anti-Bru- cella reference vaccine. We describe here prepara- tion and titration of this vaccine. Materials and Methods

  14. Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-01-08

    Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

  15. Hands-On Whole Science. The Fitness Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1991-01-01

    Presents suggestions for teaching children the science of physical fitness along with cross-curricular activities that help them stay in shape. Activities include making a fitness log to keep track of newly learned daily exercises, teaching about the Appalachian Trail then calculating and walking the equivalent distance, and charting family…

  16. An Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Laboratory Exercise on Cellular Respiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholer, Anne-Marie; Hatton, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This study is an analysis of the effectiveness of a faculty-designed laboratory experience about a difficult topic, cellular respiration. The activity involves a hands-on model of the cellular-respiration process, making use of wooden ball-and-stick chemistry models and small toy trucks on a table top model of the mitochondrion. Students…

  17. Can an Inquiry Approach Improve College Student Learning in a Teaching Laboratory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rissing, Steven W.; Cogan, John G.

    2009-01-01

    We present an inquiry-based, hands-on laboratory exercise on enzyme activity for an introductory college biology course for science majors. We measure student performance on a series of objective and subjective questions before and after completion of this exercise; we also measure performance of a similar cohort of students before and after…

  18. A hands-on paradigm for EAP education: undergraduates, pre-college students, and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xiaobo; Kim, Drew; Goodman, Erik; Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    2007-04-01

    Electroactive polymers (EAPs) are receiving increasing interest from researchers due to their unique capabilities and numerous potential applications in biomimetic robots, smart structures, biomedical devices, and micro/nanomanipulation. Since these materials are relatively new, it is imperative to educate students and the general public to raise their awareness of EAP potentials and produce the talent pool needed for continuing, rapid advances in the field of EAPs. In this paper we describe our concerted effort in teaching EAP to undergraduates, grade school students, and the general public, through hands-on research and learning on EAP-based biomimetic robots. Two integrated activities are highlighted: A senior Capstone design program on EAP robots, and the subsequent programs that use these developed robots to reach out to pre-college students. A robotic fish and a sociable robot enabled by ionic polymer-metal composite materials are used as examples throughout the paper.

  19. Hands on what? The relative effectiveness of physical versus virtual materials in an engineering design project by middle school children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Klahr; Lara M. Triona; Cameron Williams

    2007-01-01

    Hands-on activities play an important, but controversial, role in early science education. In this study we attempt to clarify some of the issues surrounding the controversy by calling attention to distinctions between: (a) type of instruction (direct or discovery); (b) type of knowledge to be acquired (domain-general or domain-specific); and (c) type of materials that are used (physical or virtual).

  20. Hands on What? The Relative Effectiveness of Physical Versus Virtual Materials in an Engineering Design Project by Middle School Children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Klahr; Lara M. Triona; Cameron Williams

    2006-01-01

    Hands-on'' activities play an important, but controversial, role in early science education. In this study we attempt to clarify some of the issues surrounding the controversy by calling attention to distinctions between: (a) type of instruction (direct or discovery); (b) type of knowledge to be acquired (domain-general or domain-specific); and (c) type of materials that are used (physical or virtual).

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  2. Cultural Earth Science in Hawai`i: Hands-on Place-Based Investigations that Merge Traditional Knowledge with Earth Science Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxey, L.; Dias, R. K.; Legaspi, E.

    2011-12-01

    During the summer of 2011, the M?lama Ke Ahupua`a (to care of our watershed) GEARUP summer program provided 25 under-served and under-represented minority public high school students (Hawaiian, part-Hawaiian, Filipino, Pacific Islanders) from Farrington High School (Kalihi, Honolulu) with a hands-on place-based multidiscipline course located within Manoa Valley (Ahupua`a O Kona) with the objective of engaging participants in scientific environmental investigations while exploring Hawaii's linkages between traditional knowledge, culture and science. The 4-week field program enabled students to collect samples along the perennial Manoa Stream and conduct water quality assessments throughout the Manoa watershed. Students collected science quality data from eight different sampling stations by means of field- and laboratory-based quantitative water quality testing equipment and GPS/GIS technology. While earning Hawaii DOE academic credits, students were able to document changes along the stream as related to pollution and urbanization. While conducting the various scientific investigations, students also participated in cultural fieldtrips and activities that highlighted the linkages between historical sustainable watershed uses by native Hawaiian communities, and their connections with natural earth processes. Additionally, students also participated in environmental service-learning projects that highlight the Hawaiian values of laulima (teamwork), m?lama (to care for), and imi `ike (to seek knowledge). By contextualizing and merging hands-on place-based earth science inquiry with native Hawaiian traditional knowledge, students experienced the natural-cultural significance of their ahupua`a (watershed). This highlighted the advantages for promoting environmental literacy and geoscience education to under-served and under-represented minority populations in Hawaii from a rich native Hawaiian cultural framework.

  3. Hands-On Addition and Subtraction with the Three Pigs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartek, Mary Marron

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities using the Three Pigs to increase students' understanding of addition and subtraction. Argues that addition and subtraction are something that students can view and participate in when using the Three Pigs instead of just the manipulation of numbers. (ASK)

  4. Discovering Fossils--A Hands-on Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Describes fossil investigations developed and provided by the Falls of the Ohio State Park near Louisville, Kentucky. The Devonian shale beds contain representatives of over 600 species including corals, sponges, brachiopods, mollusks, and echinoderms. Rather than focusing on identification, the activities emphasize the past ecological…

  5. Chaos in the Kitchen: A Hands-On Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe-Dale, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines a class activity where students prepare croissants to get an intuitive feeling for the nature of a strange attractor. In particular during the preparation of the pastry dough, students investigate the effects of stretching and folding. These physical processes force trajectories (in this case the pastry dough) to remain…

  6. Basic Neuron Model Electrical Equivalent Circuit: An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowski, Katie M.; Castańo, Diego J.; Tartar, Jaime L.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a hands-on laboratory exercise for undergraduate students in which they can build and manipulate a neuron equivalent circuit. This exercise uses electrical circuit components that resemble neuron components and are easy to construct. We describe the methods for creating the equivalent circuit and how to observe different neuron properties through altering the structure of the equivalent circuit. We explain how this hands-on laboratory activity allows for the better understanding of this fundamental neuroscience concept. At the conclusion of this laboratory exercise, undergraduate students will be able to apply the principles of Ohm’s law, cable theory with regards to neurons, and understand the functions of resistance and capacitance in a neuron. PMID:24319391

  7. The Bohr Model and the Fifth Grade: A New Standards-Based Hands-On Physics Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Jeff; Springer, Russell; Goldberg, Bennett

    2004-03-01

    A semester-long, standards-based, hands-on physics curriculum appropriate for the fifth grade was developed. Previously available curricula were successful in using hands-on activities to teach basic fifth-grade physics skills and concepts, but did not attempt to foster understanding of the fundamental underlying physics. We expanded the role of inquiry-based instruction to expose students to the fundamental physics behind electricity, forces, energy, light and sound. Central to the course, the Bohr model of the atom was used as a key tool both to motivate exploration of these topics as well as to develop basic conceptual understanding of fundamental ideas in quantum and electromagnetic physics. The curriculum was designed to be compatible with both district and state-mandated standards in a high-stakes test environment. This work was supported by NSF grant DGE-0231909.

  8. Hands-on versus Remediation: Alternative Strategies for a Community College Biology Preparatory Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biermann, Carol A.; Sarinsky, Gary B.

    1993-01-01

    Compares the success of two approaches to biology courses for underprepared community college students, one involving a hands-on approach emphasizing practice in basic scientific skills and the other involving a remediation-based approach focusing on basic vocabulary, reading, library, and math skills. Suggests that the hands-on approach provided…

  9. Experience IBM SOA software at no cost Get hands-on experience in the

    E-print Network

    Experience IBM SOA software at no cost Get hands-on experience in the IBM SOA Sandbox Highlights, the SOA Sandbox is an excellent resource for education on SOA and real-world experience using IBM SOA software. The SOA Sandbox serves as a hands-on environment where you can learn how to leverage IBM

  10. Student Content Knowledge Increases after Participation in a Hands-on Biotechnology Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Amber M.; Hanegan, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Implementing biotechnology education through hands-on teaching methods should be considered by secondary biology teachers. This study is an experimental research design to examine increased student content knowledge in biotechnology after a hands-on biotechnology intervention. The teachers from both school groups participated in, Project Crawfish,…

  11. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Data Loading Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 6.0 and Version 7.0. In general, the data transfer procedures for version 6 and 7 are the same, but where deviations exist, the differences are noted. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

  12. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Data Loading Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 6.0 and Version 7.0. In general, the data transfer procedures for version 6 and 7 are the same, but where deviations exist, the differences are noted. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

  13. Attitude Toward Informal Science and Math: a Survey of Boys and Girls Participating in Hands-On Science and Math (funtivities)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yalem Teshome; Nancy Maushak; Krishna Athreya

    2001-01-01

    This article presents results from two studies conducted as part of the evaluation activities of the FUNTIVITIES project, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project to increase girls' and women's interest and comfort level in science and math. The first study was conducted to develop instruments and to assess the impact of informal activities on attitudes toward hands-on science, math, and

  14. The Efficacy of Online MBL Activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Slykhuis; John C. Park

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this study was twofold: one, to determine if students could increase their physics content knowledge through the completion of an online hands-on Microcomputer- Based Laboratory (MBL) unit on motion; and two to determine if the demonstrated learning gains were equivalent to those of students who completed the same MBL activities in a more traditional classroom setting with

  15. Hands-On, Minds-On: A Truly Hands-On, Minds-On Middle School Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynes, Gary; Oshita, Steven

    1998-01-01

    Describes Team Science, a child-centered, activity-based science program for middle school students that evolved over a 25-year period. Three key components for success include educational philosophy, teaching and modeling respect, and a quality science program. Philosophy stresses maintaining natural curiosity and developing skills for lifelong…

  16. The Role of Hands-On Science Labs in Engaging the Next Generation of Space Explorers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Teresa A. J.

    2002-01-01

    Each country participating on the International Space Station (ISS) recognizes the importance of educating the coming generation about space and its opportunities. In 2001 the St. James School in downtown Houston, Texas was approached with a proposal to renovate an unused classroom and become involved with the "GLOBE" Program and other Internet based international learning resources. This inner-city school willingly agreed to the program based on "hands-on" learning. One month after room conversion and ten computer terminals donated by area businesses connectivity established to the internet the students immediately began using the "Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE)" program and the International Space Station (ISS) Program educational resources. The "GLOBE" program involves numerous scientific and technical agencies studying the Earth, who make it their goal to provide educational resources to an international community of K-12 scientist. This project was conceived as a successor to the "Interactive Elementary Space Museum for the New Millennium" a space museum in a school corridor without the same type of budget. The laboratory is a collaboration, which involved area businesses, volunteers from the NASA/Johnson Space Center ISS Outreach Program, and students. This paper will outline planning and operation of the school science laboratory project from the point of view of the schools interest and involvement and assess its success to date. It will consider the lessons learned by the participating school administrations in the management of the process and discuss some of the issues that can both promote and discourage school participation in such projects.

  17. Improving chemical education from high school to college using a more hands-on approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddick, Kristie Winfield

    In this work, various alternative teaching methods and activities for chemical education are developed, presented, and evaluated. In the first study, an original hands-on activity using LEGO® blocks to model ionic chemical formulas is presented together with quantitative and qualitative data regarding its educational effectiveness. Students explore cation to anion ratios using LEGO® blocks to represent trivalent, divalent and monovalent cations and anions. High school chemistry students who participated in the LEGO® lab showed significantly higher post-test scores than other students. The second study grows out of the creation of a computational lab module that is shown to significantly increase student learning in the subject of molecular orbital theory in first semester college General Chemistry. The third and final study presented is a course redesign project for college CHEM 1100, Preparation for General Chemistry. In this project the classroom is “flipped”. Students watch video lectures at home, and spend class time working with peers and the instructor on problem solving activities. The results presented here are one of the first quantitative studies showing the effectiveness of “flipping the classroom”. Students who were taught using the Reverse-Instruction (RI) method had significantly higher success in both the Preparation for General Chemistry course and traditionally taught General Chemistry I the following semester.

  18. A Novel Laboratory Activity for Teaching about the Evolution of Multicellularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, William C.; Raney, Allison; Westreich, Sam; Cotner, Sehoya

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of complexity remains one of the most challenging topics in biology to teach effectively. We present a novel laboratory activity, modeled on a recent experimental breakthrough, in which students experimentally evolve simple multicellularity using single-celled yeast ("Saccharomyces cerevisiae"). By simply selecting for…

  19. 3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although…

  20. An Activation Energy Experiment for a Second-Order Reaction in a Single Laboratory Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barile, Raymond C.; Michiels, Leo P.

    1983-01-01

    Describes modification of a chemical reaction to a single 4 1/2-hour laboratory period. Reaction kinetics between 2, 4-initrochlorobenzene and piperidine to form 2, 4-dinitrophenyl-piperidine and piperidinium hydrochloride are followed conductometrically at three temperatures to obtain data to calculate activation parameters. (Author/JN)

  1. On the Effectiveness of Active-Engagement Microcomputer-Based Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redish, Edward F.; Saul, Jeffery M.; Steinberg, Richard N.

    This paper reports on the results of substituting one-hour active-engagement tutorials using microcomputer based laboratory (MBL) equipment for traditional problem-solving recitations in introductory calculus-based mechanics classes for engineering students at the University of Maryland. The results of two specific tutorials--one on the concept of…

  2. Promoting Science Outdoor Activities for Elementary School Children: Contributions from a Research Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boaventura, Diana; Faria, Claudia; Chagas, Isabel; Galvao, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to analyse the promotion of scientific literacy through practical research activities and to identify children's conceptions about scientists and how they do science. Elementary school children were engaged in two scientific experiments in a marine biology research laboratory. A total of 136 students answered a…

  3. Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory waste management technology development activities. Summary progress report, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.J. (comp.)

    1980-10-01

    Summary reports on the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy-sponsored waste management technology development projects at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory describe progress for calendar year 1979. Activities in airborne, low-level, and transuranic waste management areas are discussed. Work progress on waste assay, treatment, disposal, and environmental monitoring is reviewed.

  4. Classes Azur Astro Espace International Hands-on Space Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, P.

    2002-01-01

    Created in 1994 in the wake of the closure of the Space Camp of Patrick Baudry in Cannes, Classes Azur Astro Espace (AAE) provide a world's unique combination of space and astronomy courses, as given by active and retired professionals of two of the best space and astronomical facilities extant: Alcatel Space in Cannes and Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA) in Nice, Grasse and Caussols. Fifteen space modules, of 30 to 60 minutes each, have been established, giving simple and clear explanations on launchers, satellites, their applications, their development, together with an historical background. Basic experiments are included, such as an unique small catapult to explain gravity, or more classical water rockets. The basic AAE sojourn extends over 3 days: one day for space (including a visit of Alcatel Space, the biggest satellite manufacturer outside the US and Russia), one day for astronomy (including a visit of the biggest observatory in Europe) and one day ŕ-la-carte (Côte d'Azur offers much, such as the Oceanographic Museum in Monaco). More and more groups are adding a fourth day, with a visit to the nice old village of Perinaldo in Italy, where famous astronomer Cassini was born. Lycée de Cachan, near Paris, even takes 12-day sojourns every year. The public has been extremely wide, from age 5 to 70, from students to enthusiasts. Coming initially all over from France, participants now include since 2001 German and Italian pupils and teachers. In 2001 also, ESA came in the shape of a Space Camp. ISU's Master of Space Studies participates to a shortened version of AAE every even-year. Up to the end of 2001, 62 classes with 2,025 participants from 20 countries had thus come to enjoy space education on Côte d'Azur. Such success is due in no small part to the very attractive price and flexibility of these activities, notably thanks to the support of ESA, CNES, Rectorat d'Académie de Nice, Conseil Général des Alpes-Maritimes, Ville de Cannes, AAAF, TDF, Alcatel Space and OCA.

  5. STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.

    2010-12-01

    Science and technology are widely recognized as major drivers of innovation and industry (e.g. Rising above the Gathering Storm, 2006). While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement and public understanding of STEM disciplines. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. Designed spaces, like libraries, allow lifelong, life-wide, and life-deep learning to take place though the research basis for learning in libraries is not as developed as other informal settings like science centers. The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national education project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. The overarching goal of the project is to reach underserved youth and their families with informal STEM learning experiences. This project will deepen our knowledge of informal/lifelong learning that takes place in libraries and establish a learning model that can be compared to the more established free-choice learning model for science centers and museums. The project includes the development of two STEM hands-on exhibits on topics that are of interest to library staff and their patrons: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. In addition, the project will produce resources and inquiry-based activities that libraries can use to enrich the exhibit experience. Additional resources will be provided through partnerships with relevant professional science and technology organizations (e.g. American Geophysical Union; National Academy of Engineering) that will provide speakers for host library events and webinars. Online and in-person workshops will be conducted for library staff with a focus on increasing content knowledge and improving facilitation expertise. This presentation will report on strategic planning activities for STAR-Net, a Community of Practice model, and the evaluation/research components of this national education program.

  6. Effects of thematic-based, hands-on science teaching versus a textbook approach for students with disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Cheryl B.

    2005-03-01

    Institutions of higher education, states, and local K-12 districts have been challenged to improve math and science education for our nation's students. In the past few years, there has been renewed interest in inquiry-based, activity-oriented instruction in science for students with disabilities. Yet, there still exists the need for further empirical evidence to support instructional improvements for students with more involved emotional and behavioral disabilities. This study describes a program in which 18 middle school students with serious emotional disturbances were instructed, over the course of 8 weeks, on Matter by two different instructional approaches. Students in one classroom received a traditional textbook approach to science content, whereas students in another classroom received science instruction by a hands-on, thematic approach. Over the course of instruction, data were collected regarding students' behavior and achievement. Results indicate that, overall, students in the hands-on instructional program performed significantly better than the students in the textbook program on two of three measures of science achievement, a hands-on assessment and a short-answer test. The students did not differ on a multiple-choice format test. With regard to behavior, there were no significant differences in behavioral problems found between the two groups of students over the course of the study. Findings are discussed in relation to instructional implications for students with disabilities in the science classroom.

  7. Laboratory assessment of the effect of heavy rubber glove thickness and sizing on effort, performance and comfort

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Wells; S. Hunt; K. Hurley; P. Rosati

    2010-01-01

    Powerline maintainers often work hands-on with live electrical circuits wearing rubber gloves of considerable thickness. The gloves interfere with touch, object manipulation and extra effort is required during manual work. A laboratory study was performed with twenty naďve participants to document the effort required to use gloves of different sizes and thicknesses. The electrical activity (EMG) of seven forearm muscles

  8. The Hands-On Optics Project: a demonstration of module 3-magnificent magnifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.

    2014-07-01

    The Hands-On Optics project offers an example of a set of instructional modules that foster active prolonged engagement. Developed by SPIE, OSA, and NOAO through funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the modules were originally designed for afterschool settings and museums. However, because they were based on national standards in mathematics, science, and technology, they were easily adapted for use in classrooms. The philosophy and implementation strategies of the six modules will be described as well as lessons learned in training educators. The modules were implementing with the help of optics industry professionals who served as expert volunteers to assist educators. A key element of the modules was that they were developed around an understanding of optics misconceptions and used culminating activities in each module as a form of authentic assessment. Thus student achievement could be measured by evaluating the actual product created by each student in applying key concepts, tools, and applications together at the end of each module. The program used a progression of disciplinary core concepts to build an integrated sequence and crosscutting ideas and practices to infuse the principles of the modern electro-optical field into the modules. Whenever possible, students were encouraged to experiment and to create, and to pursue inquiry-based approaches. The result was a program that had high appeal to regular as well as gifted students.

  9. Bioelectrical impedance analysis as a laboratory activity: At the interface of physics and the body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylott, Elliot; Kutschera, Ellynne; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    We present a novel laboratory activity on RC circuits aimed at introductory physics students in life-science majors. The activity teaches principles of RC circuits by connecting ac-circuit concepts to bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) using a custom-designed educational BIA device. The activity shows how a BIA device works and how current, voltage, and impedance measurements relate to bioelectrical characteristics of the human body. From this, useful observations can be made including body water, fat-free mass, and body fat percentage. The laboratory is engaging to pre-health and life-science students, as well as engineering students who are given the opportunity to observe electrical components and construction of a commonly used biomedical device. Electrical concepts investigated include alternating current, electrical potential, resistance, capacitance, impedance, frequency, phase shift, device design, and the use of such topics in biomedical analysis.

  10. Hands-On Analysis and Illustration: Interactive Exploratory Visualization of Vector Fields

    E-print Network

    Hands-On Analysis and Illustration: Interactive Exploratory Visualization of Vector Fields Tobias-designed glyphs. Keywords: Interactive exploratory visualization, vec- tor field visualization & illustration ex- ploration possibilities that go beyond simple parameter changes of automated glyph placement

  11. Student Reciprocal Peer Teaching as a Method for Active Learning: An Experience in an Electrotechnical Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muńoz-García, Miguel A.; Moreda, Guillermo P.; Hernández-Sánchez, Natalia; Valińo, Vanesa

    2012-10-01

    Active learning is one of the most efficient mechanisms for learning, according to the psychology of learning. When students act as teachers for other students, the communication is more fluent and knowledge is transferred easier than in a traditional classroom. This teaching method is referred to in the literature as reciprocal peer teaching. In this study, the method is applied to laboratory sessions of a higher education institution course, and the students who act as teachers are referred to as "laboratory monitors." A particular way to select the monitors and its impact in the final marks is proposed. A total of 181 students participated in the experiment, experiences with laboratory monitors are discussed, and methods for motivating and training laboratory monitors and regular students are proposed. The types of laboratory sessions that can be led by classmates are discussed. This work is related to the changes in teaching methods in the Spanish higher education system, prompted by the Bologna Process for the construction of the European Higher Education Area

  12. Women in Engineering; Hands-On Classes Jumpstart a Career; Lasers and Photonics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The ATETV project delivers web-based videos to connect students to careers in advanced technology. This episode of ATETV examines women in technical fields including engineering and lasers / photonics and how hands-on classwork can lead to more success after graduation. The video can be viewed whole or in three segments: "Women in Technology: Engineering," "Hands-On Classes Jumpstart a Career," and "Women Study Lasers and Photonics." The running time for the full episode is 8:53.

  13. Photonic games: hands-on challenges to spark teenagers' interest in light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin-Girard, A.-S.; Thériault, G.; April, A.; Bassene, S.; Dehez, H.; Desbiens, A.; Goubert, G.; Lemieux, H.; Lévesque, J.; Roy, B.; Zambon, V.

    2010-08-01

    It often takes one single event to interest teenagers in a topic that will become a passion or a career. It is in this spirit that the SPIE and OSA Student Chapters at Université Laval created the Photonic Games three years ago, to kindle an interest in teenagers towards studies and careers in optics. The activity, offered each year to more than a hundred grade 11 students, is divided in two parts. First, we offer a hands-on workshop in their classrooms about reflection, refraction, dispersion, birefringence and polarization. A few days later, all the students come to the Centre d'optique, photonique et laser (COPL) at Université Laval for a day of competition where a volunteer physics student accompanies each team of four students. Challenges are various to promote the qualities that make great scientists: creativity, teamwork, knowledge, inquisitiveness, self-confidence and perseverance. The first two editions of the Photonic Games have proven to be beneficial for the students, teachers and volunteers, and we endeavor to improve it as we construct on our experience with the past editions to fine-tune and improve the Photonic Games concept.

  14. UnCommon Knowledge: Projects That Help Middle-School-Age Youth Discover the Science and Mathematics in Everyday Life. Volume One: Hands-On Science Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Carolyn S.; Keyes, Marian; Kusimo, Patricia S.; Lunsford, Crystal

    This guide contains hands-on science activities to connect middle-school students to the traditional knowledge of their grandparents and elders. Because girls often lose interest in science at the middle-school level, and because women in some communities (especially in rural areas) are seldom involved in work with an obvious science basis, the…

  15. G. Lemons et al., Using a Hands-on Design Task to Compare the Design Process of Service Learning and Non-Service Learning Engineering Students

    E-print Network

    G. Lemons et al., Using a Hands-on Design Task to Compare the Design Process of Service Learning learning and non-service learning engineering students Gay Lemons Tufts University, Medford, MA, USA gay.lemons not involved in SL activities. This research was driven by the following questions: #12;G. Lemons et al., Using

  16. Copper sulphate reduces the metabolic activity of Gammarus fossarum in laboratory and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Lara; von Fumetti, Stefanie; Nagel, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The specialised fauna of freshwater springs is affected by contamination of the water with xenobiotics from human activities in the surrounding landscape. We assessed the effects of exposure to toxins in laboratory and field experiments by using copper sulphate as a model substance and Gammarus fossarum Koch, 1836, as the model organism. This amphipod is a common representative of the European spring fauna and copper is a widespread contaminant, mainly from agricultural practice. The experiments were conducted in test chambers placed in flow channels and directly in a spring. The gammarids were fed with conditioned beech leaf discs, which had been exposed to a 0.8mgCu/L solution for 96h. The feeding activity of the amphipods was quantified on the level of the organism; and the respiratory electron transport system (ETS) assay was conducted in order to determine changes on the cellular level in the test organisms. The results show that the feeding activity, when the leaf discs were contaminated with copper, was not significantly different from the control. The ETS activity of the gammarids, which had been feeding on the copper contaminated leaf discs was however significantly reduced. The results followed the same pattern for gammarids from both the laboratory and the spring. By conducting the experiments not only in a laboratory but also directly in a spring in the field, we took a crucial step towards a more realistic approach when examining environmental pollutants on an organism. Our findings demonstrate the importance of conducting experiments out in the field, in natural conditions, as well as in the laboratory. PMID:25704832

  17. Human factors activities in teleoperator development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Herndon, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing advanced teleoperator systems for maintenance of future nuclear reprocessing facilities. Remote maintenance systems developed by the CFRP emphasize man-in-the-loop teleoperation. Consequently, human factors issues which affect teleoperator performance must be addressed. This papers surveys research and development activities carried out by the human factors group within the Remote Control Engineering Task of the CFRP.

  18. Standard target calibration of broad-band active sonar systems in a laboratory tank

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Islas-Cital; P. R. Atkins; K. Y. Foo

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency, scientific active sonar systems are frequently calibrated using standard target spheres. Spot frequency calibration accuracies (using carefully optimized sphere diameters) of 0.1 dB have been previously established as theoretically and technically feasible. The premise of this work is that a tungsten-carbide sphere may be used to calibrate an arbitrary sonar system in a laboratory water tank. In order to

  19. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for ansforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with general information such as installation instructions, starting and stopping the program, and some pointers on how to get around inside the program. Next, database concepts and structure are discussed. Following that discussion are nine sections, one for each of the menu options on the SAPHIRE main menu, wherein the purpose and general capabilities for each option are furnished. Next, the capabilities and limitations of the software are provided.

  20. Activities of the Japanese space weather forecast center at Communications Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Watari, Shinichi; Tomita, Fumihiko

    2002-12-01

    The International Space Environment Service (ISES) is an international organization for space weather forecasts and belongs to the International Union of Radio Science (URSI). There are eleven ISES forecast centers in the world, and Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) runs the Japanese one. We make forecasts on the space environment and deliver them over the phones and through the Internet. Our forecasts could be useful for human activities in space. Currently solar activity is near maximum phase of the solar cycle 23. We report the several large disturbances of space environment occurred in 2001, during which low-latitude auroras were observed several times in Japan. PMID:12793730

  1. From Concept-to-Flight: An Active Active Fluid Loop Based Thermal Control System for Mars Science Laboratory Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gajanana C.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bame, David; Karlmann, Paul; Mastropietro, A. J.; Liu, Yuanming; Miller, Jennifer; Pauken, Michael; Lyra, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, which was launched on November 26, 2011, incorporates a novel active thermal control system to keep the sensitive electronics and science instruments at safe operating and survival temperatures. While the diurnal temperature variations on the Mars surface range from -120 C to +30 C, the sensitive equipment are kept within -40 C to +50 C. The active thermal control system is based on a single-phase mechanically pumped fluid loop (MPFL) system which removes or recovers excess waste heat and manages it to maintain the sensitive equipment inside the rover at safe temperatures. This paper will describe the entire process of developing this active thermal control system for the MSL rover from concept to flight implementation. The development of the rover thermal control system during its architecture, design, fabrication, integration, testing, and launch is described.

  2. Genetics Concepts and Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ingrid Waldron

    These lessons demonstrate how a good understanding of mitosis, meiosis and fertilization and a basic understanding of the roles of DNA and proteins can provide the basis for understanding genetics. Important genetics concepts for students to learn are summarized and multiple learning activities are suggested to help students understand Punnett squares, pedigrees, dominant/recessive alleles, X-linked recessive alleles, incomplete dominance, co-dominance, test crosses, independent assortment, genetic linkage, polygenic inheritance, etc. This overview provides links to suggested activities which include hands-on simulation and laboratory activities, analysis of class data, review games and discussion activities and questions.

  3. DIVERSE ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE COUNTER UTILITY AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Dewberry, R; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-01-08

    In this paper we describe use of the Aquila active well neutron coincidence counter for nuclear material assays of {sup 235}U in multiple analytical techniques at Savannah River Site (SRS), at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and at Argonne West National Laboratory (AWNL). The uses include as a portable passive neutron counter for field measurements searching for evidence of {sup 252}Cf deposits and storage; as a portable active neutron counter using an external activation source for field measurements searching for trace {sup 235}U deposits and holdup; for verification measurements of U-Al reactor fuel elements; for verification measurements of uranium metal; and for verification measurements of process waste of impure uranium in a challenging cement matrix. The wide variety of uses described demonstrate utility of the technique for neutron coincidence verification measurements over the dynamic ranges of 100 g-5000 g for U metal, 200 g-1300 g for U-Al, and 8 g-35 g for process waste. In addition to demonstrating use of the instrument in both the passive and active modes, we also demonstrate its use in both the fast and thermal neutron modes.

  4. Implementation of the 2013 Astro-Science Workshop, a Hands-on High Altitude Ballooning Program at the Adler Planetarium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Gayle; Martynowycz, M. W.; Hammergren, M.

    2014-01-01

    For the past 7 years, high school students participating in the Astro-Science Workshop at the Adler Planetarium have been able to access the extreme environment of near space (approximately 30 km altitude) using high altitude balloons. Taking a hands-on approach the program has allowed students to design, build, and launch their own experiments with programming based at the Adler Planetarium. During flight, payloads are subjected to temperatures of around -65° C, atmospheric pressure of only 1% that at sea level, and cosmic radiation levels more than 60 times the surface background. In some ways, conditions at these altitudes are much like those at the surface of Mars, providing students with the opportunity to build and operate real-world analogs of interplanetary probes. We have found that this hands-on, student-driven research-based program is enhanced by implementing classroom and lab activities as well as by incorporating instruction and collaboration with research professionals currently active in the field of astronomy. We present the steps taken to implement the 2013 Astro-Science Workshop at the Adler Planetarium with a focus on daily instruction and operations planning and launch preparation.

  5. An overview of environmental surveillance of waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, T.H.; Chew, E.W.; Hedahl, T.G.; Mann, L.J.; Pointer, T.F.; Wiersma, G.B.

    1986-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), in southeastern Idaho, is a principal center for nuclear energy development for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Navy. Fifty-two reactors have been built at the INEL, with 15 still operable. Extensive environmental surveillance is conducted at the INEL by DOE's Radiological Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), EG&G Idaho, Inc., and Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). Surveillance of waste management facilities radiation is integrated with the overall INEL Site surveillance program. Air, warer, soil, biota, and environmental radiation are monitored or sampled routinely at INEL. Results to date indicate very small or no impacts from INEL on the surrounding environment. Environmental surveillance activities are currently underway to address key environmental issues at the INEL.

  6. Laboratory investigation on the different activation mechanisms for aluminum and zinc anodes in sea water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    basir, Ali. EL.; Elazhari, Omar A.; Shartel, K.; Esmal, M.

    2013-12-01

    Cathodic protection (CP) is one practical and economical corrosion control option used to protect steel structures. The common sacrificial anodes used for CP system are aluminum (AL), and zinc (Zn) and their alloys. These three metals and their alloys can provide the starting basis for steel protection in sea water environment. actually many sacrificial anodes (SA) activation processes are widely used to improve the performance protection of steel . Based on the finding and the analysis of the results the aluminum and its alloys should be activated by the activation element rather than by cold working. However, activating the zinc and its alloys provides some improvement in the anode performance and could be considered as a reliable activation mechanism similar to the activation by alloying addition to zinc of similar purity. Finally, this paper discusses the use of cold working as a new activation mechanism, by using extensive laboratory investigation under simulated environmental conditions, and anode current capacity, polarization corrosion rates and protection ability were determined and discussed for this study.

  7. Immersive, hands-on, team-based geophysical education at the University of Texas Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saustrup, S.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Reece, R.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a unique and intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring/summer semester intersession. Now entering its seventh year, the course transitions students from a classroom environment through real-world, hands-on field acquisition, on to team-oriented data interpretation, culminating in a professional presentation before academic and industry employer representatives. The course is available to graduate students and select upper-division undergraduates, preparing them for direct entry into the geoscience workforce or for further academic study. Geophysical techniques used include high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, data processing, and laboratory analysis of sediments. Industry-standard equipment, methods, software packages, and visualization techniques are used throughout the course, putting students ahead of many of their peers in this respect. The course begins with a 3-day classroom introduction to the field area geology, geophysical methods, and computing resources used. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of hands-on field and lab work aboard two research vessels: UTIG's 22-foot, aluminum hulled Lake Itasca; and NOAA's 82-foot high-speed catamaran R/V Manta. The smaller vessel handles primarily shallow, inshore targets using multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and grab sampling. The larger vessel is used both inshore and offshore for multichannel seismic, CHIRP profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. Field areas to date have included Galveston and Port Aransas, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, with further work in Grand Isle scheduled for 2014. In the field, students work in teams of three, participating in survey design, instrument set-up, field deployment, data acquisition optimization, quality control, data archival, log-keeping, real-time data processing, laboratory sediment analysis, and even boat-handling. Teams are rotated through the two vessels and the onshore field laboratory to ensure that each student has hands-on experience with each aspect of the process. Although all students work on all data areas in the field, after returning from the field each team is assigned a particular region or geologic problem to interpret. Each team prepares and presents a formal presentation to UTIG researchers and industry representatives, explaining and defending their interpretations. This unique approach to hands-on field training, real-world science, and project-based teamwork helps prepare students for direct entry into the workforce, giving them a leg up on competitors for positions. This course has an impressive success ratio to show, with many students receiving job offers directly as a result of their participation in the course.

  8. The effects on community college student physics achievement and attitudes about learning physics due to inquiry-based laboratory activities versus cookbook laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nock, George Allen Brittingham

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine the effects on community college student physics conceptual achievement and attitudes about learning physics due to the use of inquiry-based laboratory activities versus cookbook laboratory activities. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to test for differences in mean post-test Force Concept Inventory (FCI) score for two different types of physics lab instruction (IL versus CBL). Results of the ANCOVA, F (1, 35) = 0.761, p < 0.389, supported the null hypothesis that no significant difference was found in the post-test FCI scores of the two groups. An ANCOVA was performed to test for differences in mean post-test Mechanics Baseline Test (MBT) score for two different types of physics lab instruction (IL versus CBL)., however, the covariate and the dependent variable were shown to not be linearly related. Therefore, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare MBT scores. The results of the ANOVA, F (1, 36) = 0.066, p < 0.798, supported the null hypothesis that there was no significant difference in MBT scores of the two groups. A step-wise multiple linear regression was used to analyze the relationships between the FCI post-test score and the type of instruction, FCI pre-test score, and American College Test (ACT) science reasoning sub-scores. The FCI pre-test score and ACT science score were shown to be the best predictors of FCI post-test score. Another step-wise multiple linear regression was used to analyze the relationships between the MBT post-test score and type of instruction, MBT pre-test score, and ACT science reasoning sub-scores. The ACT Science sub-scores were determined to be the best predictor of MBT post-test score. An independent t-test was used to compare the mean lecture test grades for the lab groups taught using inquiry and cookbook methods. The mean lecture test scores of the inquiry-based lab group (M = 81.39, S.D. = 8.15) were found to be significantly higher, t (36) = -2.021, p < 0.0255, than the cookbook lab group (M = 75.74, S.D. = 9.07). A dependent t-test was used to compare the mean difference in Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) percent favorable scores for the lab groups taught using inquiry and cookbook methods. Results of the t-test, t (36) = 0.897, p < 0.376, failed to reject the null hypothesis that the CLASS scores differed by lab instruction type.

  9. MRI-compatible Hands-on Cooperative Control of a Pneumatically Actuated Robot.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Ankur; Wood, Brad; Mazilu, Dumitru; Horvath, Keith A; Li, Ming

    2009-07-01

    MRI compatible robots are emerging as useful tools for image guided interventions. A shared control between a user and the MRI compatible robot makes it more intuitive instrument especially during setup phases of interventions. We present a MRI compatible, hands-on cooperative system using Innomotion robotic arm. An economic MRI compatible user input sensor was developed and its functionality was tested under typical application conditions. Performance improvement in phantom tasks shows promise of adding hands-on interface in MRI compatible robots. PMID:21423882

  10. A College-Level Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activity on Transiting Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, N. J.; Medling, A. M.; Strubbe, L. E.; Moth, P.; Montgomery, R. M.; Raschke, L. M.; Hunter, L.; Goza, B. K.

    2010-12-01

    We have designed an inquiry-based laboratory activity on transiting extrasolar planets for an introductory college-level astronomy class. The activity was designed with the intent of simultaneously teaching science process skills and factual content about transits and light curves. In the activity, groups of two to four students each formulate a specific science question and design and carry out an investigation using a table-top model of a star and orbiting planet. Each group then presents their findings to other students in their class. In a final presentation, the instructors integrate students' findings with a summary of how measured light curves indicate properties of planetary systems. The activity debuted at Hartnell College in November 2009 and has also been adapted for a lecture-based astronomy course at U.C. Santa Cruz. We present the results of student surveys before and after the astronomy course at Hartnell and discuss how well our activity promotes students' confidence and identity as scientists, relative to traditional lab activities.

  11. Current research activities at the NASA-sponsored Illinois Computing Laboratory of Aerospace Systems and Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Kathryn A.

    1994-01-01

    The Illinois Computing Laboratory of Aerospace Systems and Software (ICLASS) was established to: (1) pursue research in the areas of aerospace computing systems, software and applications of critical importance to NASA, and (2) to develop and maintain close contacts between researchers at ICLASS and at various NASA centers to stimulate interaction and cooperation, and facilitate technology transfer. Current ICLASS activities are in the areas of parallel architectures and algorithms, reliable and fault tolerant computing, real time systems, distributed systems, software engineering and artificial intelligence.

  12. Characterization of the Activity and Stability of Amylase from Saliva and Detergent: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Activity and Stability of Amylase from Saliva and Various Commercial Detergents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valls, Cristina; Rojas, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2012-01-01

    This article presents two integrated laboratory exercises intended to show students the role of [alpha]-amylases (AAMYs) in saliva and detergents. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the enzymatic activity of amylase from saliva and different detergents using the Phadebas test (quantitative) and the Lugol test…

  13. PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY This publication highlights activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for fiscal year 1996 --1 October

    E-print Network

    at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for fiscal year 1996 -- 1 October 1995 through 30 September 1996, and additional information on administrative support, see the PPPL fiscal year 1996 Annual Report. About PPPL by Princeton University under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy. The fiscal year 1996 budget

  14. Hands on what? The relative effectiveness of physical versus virtual materials in an engineering design project by middle school children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahr, David; Triona, Lara M.; Williams, Cameron

    2007-01-01

    Hands-on activities play an important, but controversial, role in early science education. In this study we attempt to clarify some of the issues surrounding the controversy by calling attention to distinctions between: (a) type of instruction (direct or discovery); (b) type of knowledge to be acquired (domain-general or domain-specific); and (c) type of materials that are used (physical or virtual). We then describe an empirical study that investigates the relative effectiveness of the physical-virtual dimension. In the present study, seventh and eighth grade students assembled and tested mousetrap cars with the goal of designing a car that would go the farthest. Children were assigned to four different conditions, depending on whether they manipulated physical or virtual materials, and whether they had a fixed number of cars they could construct or a fixed amount of time in which to construct them. All four conditions were equally effective in producing significant gains in learners' knowledge about causal factors, in their ability to design optimal cars, and in their confidence in their knowledge. Girls' performance, knowledge, and effort were equal to boys' in all conditions, but girls' confidence remained below boys' throughout. Given the fact that, on several different measures, children were able to learn as well with virtual as with physical materials, the inherent pragmatic advantages of virtual materials in science may make them the preferred instructional medium in many hands-on contexts.

  15. Safeguards Implementation: Establishment of Indonesian Safeguards Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shipwash, Jacqueline L [ORNL] [ORNL; Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Smith, Steven E [ORNL] [ORNL; Solodov, Alexander A [ORNL] [ORNL; Suharyanta, Suharyanta [ORNL] [ORNL; Sunaryadi, Dedi [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Under the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP), U.S. National Laboratories support the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to ''collaborate with international partners to strengthen international safeguards at all stages of nuclear development.'' This engagement in safeguards implementation cooperation is the basis for the security and safeguards arrangement with the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (BAPETEN) and includes strengthening of the State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC). There are many components in a robust SSAC. While INSEP carries on its program in a holistic approach, it is more effective and efficient to address individual components, rather than the entire system at one time, with the objective of strengthening the system as a whole. Nuclear material accountancy is one of these components. Nuclear material accountancy necessitates that a State periodically take an inventory of its material and record changes. To better perform these activities, BAPETEN requested assistance with establishing a safeguards laboratory where its staff could perform independent material characterization, maintain nondestructive assay equipment, and facilitate hands-on training of BAPETEN safeguards inspectors. In compliance with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guidelines and safety series documents, INSEP and BAPETEN opened the BAPETEN Safeguards Laboratory in February 2010 to provide these competencies. BAPETEN showcased these new capabilities in July 2010 at the IAEA-sponsored Regional Workshop on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control at Facilities where hands-on activities were held at BAPETEN's Headquarters in Jakarta using the equipment supplied by INSEP. Discussions have begun on the establishment of a security and safeguards laboratory at the BAPETEN Training Center located in Cisarua. This paper describes the many steps involved with the Safeguards Laboratory Implementation Plan from its drafting in August 2007 to the completion of the laboratory in February 2010.

  16. Effects of activity and energy budget balancing algorithm on laboratory performance of a fish bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; David, Solomon R.; Pothoven, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush that were fed ad libitum in laboratory tanks under regimes of low activity and high activity. In addition, we compared model performance under two different model algorithms: (1) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t and (2) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t + 1. Results indicated that the model significantly underestimated consumption for both inactive and active lake trout when algorithm 1 was used and that the degree of underestimation was similar for the two activity levels. In contrast, model performance substantially improved when using algorithm 2, as no detectable bias was found in model predictions of consumption for inactive fish and only a slight degree of overestimation was detected for active fish. The energy budget was accurately balanced by using algorithm 2 but not by using algorithm 1. Based on the results of this study, we recommend the use of algorithm 2 to estimate food consumption by fish in the field. Our study results highlight the importance of accurately accounting for changes in fish energy density when balancing the energy budget; furthermore, these results have implications for the science of evaluating fish bioenergetics model performance and for more accurate estimation of food consumption by fish in the field when fish energy density undergoes relatively rapid changes.

  17. Hands-on Verification of Mechanics Training: A Cost-Effectiveness Study of Videodisc Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Thomas G.

    This document reports the results of a study on the feasibility of training smog check mechanics in California via hands-on verification of mechanics' ability to inspect and repair vehicles. The reviews of the research literature that compare the learning effectiveness of different delivery media tend to support the position that in learning, the…

  18. Hands On Science with NOAA TITLE: Ocean Motion: Wind driven currents

    E-print Network

    The Pacific Garbage Patch http://marinedebris.noaa.gov/info/patch.html Major Ocean Currents http://www.srh.noaa.gov/jetstream/oceanHands ­ On Science with NOAA TITLE: Ocean Motion: Wind driven currents OVERVIEW: Model the flow of ocean surface currents by blowing air across a tub of rheoscopic fluid and water, with clay structures

  19. Hands-On Teaching through a Student Field Project in Applied Geophysics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klasner, John Samuel; Crockett, Jeffrey Jon; Horton, Kimberly Beth; Poe, Michele Daun; Wollert, Matthew Todd

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Proffit Mountain project, part of a senior-level class in applied geophysics that provides students with hands-on experience in applying principles and techniques learned in class. Students conduct magnetic, gravity, and radiometric studies over a diabase body which intrudes rhyolite at Proffitt Mountain in southeast Missouri.…

  20. Understanding the Effects of Cognitive Dissonance during Interpretation: Implications for "Hands-On" Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Describes a field experiment that was designed to test the effects of three different interpretive programs on students' attitudes toward live, nonpoisonous snakes. One of the treatments measured the effectiveness of using "hands-on" interpretive techniques. Direct contact with snakes improved students' attitudes but only slightly. Females'…

  1. The Microprocessor as a Microcosm: A Hands-On Approach to VLSI Design Education

    E-print Network

    Harris, David Money

    The Microprocessor as a Microcosm: A Hands-On Approach to VLSI Design Education David Harris David_Harris@hmc.edu November 2002 Harvey Mudd College Claremont, CA #12;Microprocessor as Microcosm David Harris Page 2 of 19 Conclusion #12;Microprocessor as Microcosm David Harris Page 3 of 19 Introduction Changing face of Very Large

  2. Improved Student Learning of Microprocessor Systems Through Hands-On and Online Experience

    E-print Network

    LaMeres, Brock J.

    Improved Student Learning of Microprocessor Systems Through Hands-On and Online Experience Dr is presented to assess and improve the understanding of microprocessor systems for electrical and computer assessed the level of understanding of microprocessor systems on a control group using five learning

  3. Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on

    E-print Network

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    -of-the-art testing facilities for underwater/ocean engineering, including a 20-foot-deep engineering tank, and a 100Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on opportunities for research in ocean renewable energy, remotely operated vehicles, ocean mapping, ocean acoustics

  4. ENGINEERING NOW No. 35 2010 College of Engineering Hands-on, Minds-on

    E-print Network

    history of success for our undergraduates. The "Hands-on, Minds-on" philosophy is a prevalent part of the classroom environment at Virginia Tech, and can be witnessed first-hand in the Ware Lab, an entire building. 1, 2009, edition. Other coverage appeared in The New York Times, USA Today, Popular Science, Fox

  5. Hands-On Science Mysteries for Grades 3-6: Standards-Based Inquiry Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taris, James Robert; Taris, Louis James

    2006-01-01

    In "Hands-On Science Mysteries for Grades 3-6," the authors connect science to real-world situations by investigating actual mysteries and phenomena, such as the strange heads on Easter Island, the ghost ship "Mary Celeste," and the "Dancing Stones" of Death Valley. The labs are designed to encourage the development of science inquiry, in which…

  6. The CERN MasterClass! Teachers and Students Experiencing Hands On Science

    E-print Network

    Ohta, Shigemi

    The CERN MasterClass! Teachers and Students Experiencing Hands On Science Helio Takai Physics surface reaches a minimum value, called the breakdown voltage, a shock will travel from you to the doorknob. Storm clouds can also build up extra charge, which must go somewhere. Often times it will either

  7. Students Doing Chemistry: A Hand-On Experience for K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selco, Jodye I.; Bruno, Mary; Chan, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on, minds-on inquiry chemistry experiment was developed for use in K-12 schools that enables students to combine the chemicals of their choice and observe the results. The chemistry involved is water based and builds upon acid-base, double displacement, and iodometric detection of starch reactions. Chemicals readily available in the…

  8. Gain hands-on experience in process control using control station

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Doug Cooper; Robert Rice; Jeff Arbogast

    2004-01-01

    Training simulators enhance learning by integrating the theoretical abstraction of textbooks with the tactile nature of the lab. The primary objective of training simulators is education. They motivate, help with visualization, and provide hands-on practice and experience. This paper explores the use of training simulators for process control education. The methods used and experiences gained in developing Control Station, a

  9. Pipes, streams, and the user environment Hands-On Unix System Administration DeCal

    E-print Network

    Walker, Matthew P.

    Pipes, streams, and the user environment Hands-On Unix System Administration DeCal Lab 2 -- 10, lecture13, lecture26 with a wild- card expression. 3 Streams, redirection, and pipes 11. What is /dev to get a feel for what it does first. 3 #12;3.1 Named pipes 14. Name one difference between named pipes

  10. International Space Station: 6-8 Hands-on Science and Math Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Pat

    These lesson plans, designed for grades 6-8, have been developed to provide a guide to hands-on experience in science and math. They focus on an International Space Station and are designed for use with students working in groups. The three lesson plans highlighting the importance of the scientific method are: (1) International Space Station…

  11. Developing Physics Concepts through Hands-On Problem Solving: A Perspective on a Technological Project Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Chen, Mei-Yung; Wong, Ashley; Hsu, Tsui-Fang; Peng, Chih-Chi

    2012-01-01

    In a contest featuring hands-on projects, college students were required to design a simple crawling worm using planning, self-monitoring and self-evaluation processes to solve contradictive problems. To enhance the efficiency of problem solving, one needs to practice meta-cognition based on an application of related scientific concepts. The…

  12. A Mechanical Apparatus for Hands-On Experience with the Morse Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everest, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    A simple pulley apparatus is described that gives the student hands-on experience with the Morse potential. Students develop an internalized sense of what a covalent bond would feel like if atoms in a molecule could be manipulated by hand. This kinesthetic learning enhances the student's understanding and intuition of several chemical phenomena.…

  13. Introduction to Density Functional Theory: Calculations by Hand on the Helium Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baseden, Kyle A.; Tye, Jesse W.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a type of electronic structure calculation that has rapidly gained popularity. In this article, we provide a step-by-step demonstration of a DFT calculation by hand on the helium atom using Slater's X-Alpha exchange functional on a single Gaussian-type orbital to represent the atomic wave function. This DFT…

  14. International Space Station: K-5 Hands-on Science and Math Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeing Co., Huntsville, AL.

    The Space Station is already capturing the imaginations of American students, encouraging them to pursue careers in the sciences. The idea of living and working in space continues to spark this renewed interest. The material in this guide was developed to provide hands-on experiences in science and math in the context of an International Space…

  15. Hands-on Summer Camp to Attract K-12 Students to Engineering Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Muhittin; Ren, Jianhong; Custer, Sheryl; Coleman, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    This paper explains the organization and execution of a summer engineering outreach camp designed to attract and motivate high school students as well as increase their awareness of various engineering fields. The camp curriculum included hands-on, competitive design-oriented engineering projects from several disciplines: the electrical,…

  16. Visualizing the Transition State: A Hands-On Approach to the Arrhenius Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Swanson, Matthew S.; Sayers, Deborah K.

    2007-01-01

    An exercise is presented in which the kinetics of the irreversible "reaction" of pennies in the heads-up state to pennies in the tails-up state is simulated by a hands-on, Monte Carlo approach. In addition, the exercise incorporates a second simulation in which the irreversible "reaction" of dice with a red face uppermost to a blue face uppermost…

  17. Hands On Cooking: Towards an Attentive Kitchen Jeremy S. Bradbury, Jeffrey S. Shell, Craig B. Knowles

    E-print Network

    Bradbury, Jeremy S.

    Hands On Cooking: Towards an Attentive Kitchen Jeremy S. Bradbury, Jeffrey S. Shell, Craig B of this system in an Attentive Kitchen. Keywords Attentive User Interfaces, Gaze, Eye Tracking, Speech, Context-aware, Information Appliance, Sensors. INTRODUCTION For a person not skilled in the culinary arts, the use

  18. Scientific visualization hands-on session: discrete surfaces Pascal Frey, Chantal Oberson Ausoni

    E-print Network

    Frey, Pascal

    Scientific visualization hands-on session: discrete surfaces Pascal Frey, Chantal Oberson Ausoni reconstruction of a portion of a surface associated with a triangle T or a collection of triangles. Then, we on S and : (1) the only information available about S is the list of triangles composing the triangulation

  19. The Effect of Hands-on Occupation on Recall Memory in Men with Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eakman, Aaron M.; Nelson, David L.

    2001-01-01

    Males with closed head injuries (n=30) participated in a study of their ability to follow simple written and verbal instructions, upper extremity function for a simple meal task, and ability to attend to a task for 30 minutes. Hands-on tasks resulted in greater recall of instructions than verbal training only. (Contains 15 references.) (JOW)

  20. A Hands-On Freshman Survey Course to Steer Undergraduates into Microsystems Coursework and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddings, M. A.; Stephenson, J. C.; Harvey, I. R.

    2009-01-01

    Full class loads and inflexible schedules can be a significant obstacle in the implementation of freshman survey courses designed to guide engineering students into emerging research areas such as micro- and nanosystems. A hands-on, interactive course was developed to excite freshmen early in their engineering program to pursue research and…

  1. ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through September 30, 2012.

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through September 30, 2012. ______ 99 Kit purchases. ICE Photochromic T-shirt (colors change in sunlight) ______ 93-002 Adult sizes ___S $_________ ______ 11-002 ICE Gift Certificate ___$25 ___$50 ___$75 ___$100 $_________ Replacement Parts, Manuals, Kit

  2. ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through December 31, 2011.

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through December 31, 2011. ______ 99-001 DNA on Solid-State Model Kit purchases. ICE Photochromic T-shirt (colors change in sunlight) ______ 93 $_________ ______ 11-002 ICE Gift Certificate ___$25 ___$50 ___$75 ___$100 $_________ Replacement parts, manuals

  3. ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012.

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012. ______ 99-001 DNA on Solid-State Model Kit purchases. ICE Photochromic T-shirt (colors change in sunlight) ______ 93 $_________ ______ 11-002 ICE Gift Certificate ___$25 ___$50 ___$75 ___$100 $_________ Replacement Parts, Manuals, Kit

  4. ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012.

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012. ______ 99-001 DNA Kit purchases. ICE Photochromic T-shirt (colors change in sunlight) ______ 93-002 Adult sizes ___S $_________ ______ 11-002 ICE Gift Certificate ___$25 ___$50 ___$75 ___$100 $_________ Replacement Parts, Manuals, Kit

  5. Hands-On Summer Camp to Attract K-12 Students to Engineering Fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Muhittin Yilmaz; Jianhong Ren; Sheryl Custer; Joyce Coleman

    2010-01-01

    This paper explains the organization and execution of a summer engineering outreach camp designed to attract and motivate high school students as well as increase their awareness of various engineering fields. The camp curriculum included hands-on, competitive design-oriented engineering projects from several disciplines: the electrical, environmental, mechanical, civil, and chemical engineering fields. The camp also provided additional information on financial

  6. Performance Assessments in Science: Hands-On Tasks and Scoring Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stecher, Brian M.; Klein, Stephen P.

    In 1992, RAND received a grant from the National Science Foundation to study the technical quality of performance assessments in science and to evaluate their feasibility for use in large-scale testing programs. The specific goals of the project were to assess the reliability and validity of hands-on science testing and to investigate the cost and…

  7. Three Simple Hands-On Soil Exercises Extension Professionals Can Incorporate into Natural Sciences Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinschmidt, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The importance of healthy soil and of conveying the importance of soils starts by conveying a few basic concepts of soil science cannot be overstated. This article provides three hands-on exercises Extension professionals can add to natural resources or Master Gardener education curricula. These natural sciences exercises are easy to prepare for…

  8. The SEED Project: Providing Hands-on Lab Exercises for Computer Security Education

    E-print Network

    Du, Wenliang "Kevin"

    environment are available online at: http://www.cis.syr.edu/~wedu/ seed/. This article describes the SEED labsThe SEED Project: Providing Hands-on Lab Exercises for Computer Security Education Wenliang Du Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, USA Email

  9. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Intergrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Summary Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. However, INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users, who constitute a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events and quantify associated consequential outcome frequencies. Specifically, for nuclear power plant applications, SAPHIRE can identify important contributors to core damage (Level 1 PRA) and containment failure during a severe accident which lead to releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA where the reactor is at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, it can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming an internal events model to a model for external events, such as flooding and fire analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to the public and environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE also includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM is a special user interface linked to SAPHIRE that automates the SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events (for example, to calculate a conditional core damage probability) very efficiently and expeditiously. This report provides an overview of the functions available in SAPHIRE and presents general instructions for using the software. Section 1 presents SAPHIRE’s historical evolution and summarizes its capabilities. Section 2 presents instructions for installing and using the code. Section 3 explains the database structure used in SAPHIRE and discusses database concepts. Section 4 explains how PRA data (event frequencies, human error probabilities, etc.) can be generated and manipulated using “change sets.” Section 5 deals with fault tree operations, including constructing, editing, solving, and displaying results. Section 6 presents operations associated with event trees, including rule application for event tree linking, partitioning, and editing sequences. Section 7 presents how accident sequences are generated, solved, quantified, and analyzed. Section 8 discusses the functions available for performing end state analysis. Section 9 explains how to modify data stored in a SAPHIRE database. Section 10 illustrates how to generate and customize reports. Section 11 covers SAPHIRE utility options to perform routine functions such as defining constant values, recovering databases, and loading data from external sources. Section 12 provides an overview of GEM’s features and capabilities. Finally, Section 13 summarizes SAPHIRE’s quality assurance process.

  10. Assessment in the hands-on science classroom: A qualitative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Standefer, Katherine

    Black and Wiliam (1998b) pointed out, "Learning is driven by what teachers and pupils do in the classroom" (p. 139). Their analogy of the classroom as a "black box" created the impetus for this study. The study was designed to peer inside this black box in an effort to identify and examine how third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade school teachers use assessment during hands-on science classroom instruction. The overarching question as it relates to the hands-on classroom assessment is: What are the connections among teachers' assessment methods, feedback to students, and students' responses to the feedback? This study was not an evaluation of the effects or outcomes attributed to the use of classroom assessments. Instead, the researcher sought to identify and describe classroom assessment practices, teacher to student feedback, and the interplay among teachers and their students in the context of hands-on science instruction. Classroom observations, semistructured teachers' interviews, and document analysis were used to identify and describe the methods of assessment used by teachers in hands-on science classrooms. A descriptive report of five themes derived from classroom observations. The interviews provided insight into local teachers' opinions and their use of hands-on science instruction and assessment. An interpretive synthesis of the overall findings from the study determined that the role of assessment in science education continues to be an evaluative instrument for the teachers rather than a tool for learning. The participant teachers reported that assessment's fundamental purpose was to document student performance. Evidence suggests that professional development will be essential for teachers to understand and use formative assessment in their classrooms. Equally important, if assessment is to be used to help students achieve, then teachers must help students use the information from the assessments to alter and advance learning.

  11. International Council for Laboratory Animal Science: International activities. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources annual report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    In late 1987, the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) requested that the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR), National Research Council (NRC), National Academy of Sciences, reestablish US national membership in the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). The ICLAS is the only worldwide organization whose goal is to foster the humane use of animals in medical research and testing. ILAR`s Mission Statement reflects its commitment to producing highly respected documents covering a wide range of scientific issues, including databases in genetic stocks, species specific management guides, guidelines for humane care of animals, and position papers on issues affecting the future of the biological sciences. As such, ILAR is recognized nationally and internationally as an independent, scientific authority in the development of animal sciences in biomedical research.

  12. 9.02 Brain Laboratory, Spring 2002

    E-print Network

    Miller, Earl

    Consists of a series of hands-on laboratories designed to give students experience with common techniques for conducting neuroscience research. Included are sessions on anatomical, ablation, neurophysiological, and computer ...

  13. Laboratory aspects of von Willebrand disease: test repertoire and options for activity assays and genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Castaman, G; Hillarp, A; Goodeve, A

    2014-05-01

    The deficiency or abnormal function of von Willebrand factor (VWF) causes von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most frequent inherited bleeding disorder. The laboratory diagnosis of VWD can be difficult as the disease is heterogeneous and an array of assays is required to describe the phenotype. Basic classification of quantitative (type 1 and 3) and qualitative (type 2) VWD variants requires determination of VWF antigenic (VWF:Ag) levels and assaying of VWF ristocetin cofactor (VWF:RCo) activity, determining the capacity of VWF to interact with the platelet GPIb-receptor. Knowing the VWF:RCo activity is essential for identifying, subtyping and monitoring VWD, but the assay is poorly standardized and many protocols do not fulfil the clinical need in all situations. This has led to the development of novel activity assays, independent of ristocetin, with enhanced assay characteristics. Results from the first independent clinical evaluations are promising, showing that they are reliable and suitable for VWD diagnosis. The qualitative type 2 VWF deficiency can be further divided into four different subtypes (A, B, M and N) using specific assays that explore other activities or the size distribution of VWF multimers. These methods are discussed herein. However, in a number of patients it may be difficult to correctly classify the VWD phenotype and genetic analysis may provide the best option to clarify the disorder, through mutation identification. PMID:24762278

  14. SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

    2012-02-13

    Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

  15. FREE Hands-on Science Night for Kids and Their Families Remote Sensing of Active

    E-print Network

    Sikes, Derek S.

    ), and christine butcher, Education and Outreach Assistant July 7 Physics: It's as sweet as chocolate emmA m Professor of Art and Curator of Fine Arts, University of Alaska Museum of the North July 28 Cultural Sharing: Storyknifing, Yup'ik Dance, and Making a Yup'ik Fish Camp Doll Jerry liPKA, dorA AndreW-ihrKe and evelyn y

  16. Hands-On Activities and Challenge Tests in Agricultural and Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poudel, D. D.; Vincent, L. M.; Anzalone, C.; Huner, J.; Wollard, D.; Clement, T.; DeRamus, A.; Blakewood, G.

    2005-01-01

    Many agricultural and environmental problems are interrelated and overlapping. Several agencies, including nonprofit organizations, have developed programs to educate schoolchildren about agricultural and environmental issues; however, programs that integrate both agricultural and environmental learning, especially among middle and high school…

  17. A Hands-On Activity to Raise Awareness about Healthy Sun Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joăo Fonseca, Maria; Costa, Patrício; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes sunburn and has been consistently associated with increased susceptibility to melanoma and skin ageing. Acknowledging the need to promote healthy sun exposure habits, numerous educational initiatives have been developed to raise public awareness towards this issue. However, studies…

  18. Quantum mechanics for everyone: Hands-on activities integrated with technology

    E-print Network

    Zollman, Dean

    target group to include undergraduate science and engineer- ing students, medical students, advanced. INTRODUCTION For the past several years the Physics Education Research Group at Kansas State University has been conducting re- search on student learning of contemporary topics in physics and developing

  19. Summer Camp to Engage Students in Nutritional Chemistry Using Popular Culture and Hands-On Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skluzacek, Joanna M.; Harper, Joshua; Herron, Emily; Bortiatynski, Jacqueline M.

    2010-01-01

    Action Potential Science Experience (APSE) is a five-day summer camp offering science opportunities for K-8 students. The focus of the APSE curriculum is to teach science concepts and methods while challenging the participants to solve an overarching problem from the popular-culture context. The participants in the APSE entitled Burger 'N Fries…

  20. Activities for Preschoolers--A Laboratory Manual for Use by Child-Care Teacher-Aide Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantine, Jean

    This laboratory manual for use by child care and teacher aide students is arranged by topic according to the months and holidays of the school year. Suggested activities, songs, fingerplays, and poems are included for each topic, along with a list of related resource books. Many of the activities and songs include a number in parentheses following…

  1. Modeling the effects of temperature and moisture on soil enzyme activity: Linking laboratory assays to continuous field data

    E-print Network

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    Modeling the effects of temperature and moisture on soil enzyme activity: Linking laboratory assays the effects of temperature and moisture on in situ b-glucosidase enzyme activity, recognizing that other Keywords: b-glucosidase Moisture threshold Temperature sensitivity In situ conditions Drought Enzyme assay

  2. A simulator application of a 'hands-on throttle and stick' concept to a transport pilot/autopilot interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, A. M.; Parrish, R. V.; Hogge, T. W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the initial experiences garnered in applying a multifunction control strategy, based on the U.S. Air Force's 'Hands-On Throttle-and-Stick' concept for fighter aircraft to a transport aircraft simulator. The multifunction control strategy involves the activation of various flight system/subsystem operations (such as guidance and control, communication, and navigation functions) by use of menu displays and throttle and stick switches. The initial application of this multifunction control (MFC) concept was developed around a pilot/autopilot interface, contrasting a conventional, dedicated autopilot interface to an MFC implementation. The simulator characteristics and autopilot functions, as well as the conventional interface and MFC hardware/software, which were utilized in the application, are described herein. Initial pilot reaction and suggested improvements to this particular implementation are discussed. The paper terminates with a glance at plans for improvements and future applications based on the outcome of this initial study.

  3. Soil Activation and Groundwater Contamination at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, D.E.P.G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Chek Beng, Ng P.E. [New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Albany, NY (United States); Penny, G. [Federal Project Director, United States Department of Energy - Brookhaven Site Office, Upton, NY (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In November 1999, tritium (H-3) was detected in the groundwater near one of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) accelerator experiments at concentrations above the 20,000 pico curie per liter (pCi/L) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). Sodium-22 (Na-22) was also detected in the groundwater, but at concentrations well below the 400 pCi/L MCL. An investigation into the source of the contamination revealed that the tritium and sodium-22 originated from activated soil shielding located adjacent to the g-2 target building where approximately five percent of the beam was inadvertently striking one of the beam-line magnets. Rainwater was able to infiltrate the activated soils and carry the tritium and sodium-22 into the groundwater. The highest tritium level detected in groundwater during the 1999 investigation was nearly 1.8 million pCi/L. To prevent additional rainwater infiltration into the activated soil shielding, a concrete cap was constructed over the soil shielding in December 1999. Other corrective actions included refocusing the beam and improved beam loss monitoring to reduce additional soil activation, storm-water management improvements, and additional groundwater monitoring. From 2001 through 2004, three high concentration zones (or slugs) of tritium were observed passing through the groundwater monitoring well network immediately down-gradient of the source area, with a maximum observed concentration of 3.4 million pCi/L. Some of the tritium that was previously leached from the activated soil was trapped in the vadose (unsaturated) zone soils directly above the water table after then cap was installed. A portion of this residual tritium was later mobilized into the groundwater during periods of high groundwater table elevations, which can occur following heavy seasonal rainfall. Monitoring results for the past two years indicate that the amount of tritium being released from the vadose zone is decreasing, with tritium concentrations consistently below 100,000 pCi/L. The tritium plume is currently 550 meters long, and is located entirely in the central portion of the BNL site. The plume has not impacted any of the Laboratory's drinking water supply wells. Contaminant transport modeling suggests that the tritium plume will attenuate entirely in the central portion of the BNL site by years 2010-2015. (authors)

  4. Automatic identification of physical activity types and sedentary behaviors from triaxial accelerometer: laboratory-based calibrations are not enough.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Thomas; Maire, Aurélia; Dugas, Julien; Ataya, Abbas; Villars, Clément; Gris, Florence; Perrin, Emilie; Caritu, Yanis; Doron, Maeva; Blanc, Stéphane; Jallon, Pierre; Simon, Chantal

    2015-03-15

    "Objective" methods to monitor physical activity and sedentary patterns in free-living conditions are necessary to further our understanding of their impacts on health. In recent years, many software solutions capable of automatically identifying activity types from portable accelerometry data have been developed, with promising results in controlled conditions, but virtually no reports on field tests. An automatic classification algorithm initially developed using laboratory-acquired data (59 subjects engaging in a set of 24 standardized activities) to discriminate between 8 activity classes (lying, slouching, sitting, standing, walking, running, and cycling) was applied to data collected in the field. Twenty volunteers equipped with a hip-worn triaxial accelerometer performed at their own pace an activity set that included, among others, activities such as walking the streets, running, cycling, and taking the bus. Performances of the laboratory-calibrated classification algorithm were compared with those of an alternative version of the same model including field-collected data in the learning set. Despite good results in laboratory conditions, the performances of the laboratory-calibrated algorithm (assessed by confusion matrices) decreased for several activities when applied to free-living data. Recalibrating the algorithm with data closer to real-life conditions and from an independent group of subjects proved useful, especially for the detection of sedentary behaviors while in transports, thereby improving the detection of overall sitting (sensitivity: laboratory model = 24.9%; recalibrated model = 95.7%). Automatic identification methods should be developed using data acquired in free-living conditions rather than data from standardized laboratory activity sets only, and their limits carefully tested before they are used in field studies. PMID:25593289

  5. Recent upgrade of the in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Dilmanian, F.A..; Rarback, H.; Meron, M.; Kamen, Y.; Yasumura, S.; Weber, D.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stamatelatos, I.E. [Ioannina Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics; Lidofsky, L.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Nuclear Engineering; Pierson, R.N. Jr. [Saint Luke`s-Roosevelt Body Composition Unit, New York, NY (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of a delayed- and a prompt-gamma neutron activation (DGNA and PGNA) system and an inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. The total body contents of several basic elements, including potassium, calcium, chlorine, sodium, and phosphorus are measured at the DGNA system; total body carbon is measured at the INS system; and the nitrogen-tohydrogen ratio is measured at the PGNA system. Based on the elemental composition, body compartments, such as total body fat and total body protein can be computed with additional independently measured parameters, such as total body water, body size, and body weight. Information on elemental and compartmental body composition obtained through neutron activation analysis is useful, if not essential, for research on growth, malnutrition, aging diseases, such as osteoporosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in which the progression of the illness is closely related to changes in major body compartments, such as bone, adipose tissue, and muscle. The DGNA system has been modified and upgraded several times since it was first built. Recently, all three systems underwent major upgrades. This upgrading and some preliminary studies carried out with the modified facilities are reported here.

  6. A Comprehensive Approach to Partnering Scientists with Education and Outreach Activities at a National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S. Q.

    2002-12-01

    With the establishment of an Office of Education and Outreach (EO) in 2000 and the adoption of a five-year EO strategic plan in 2001, the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) committed to augment the involvement of AGU scientists and their partners in education and public outreach activities that represent the full spectrum of research in the atmospheric and related sciences. In 2002, a comprehensive program is underway which invites scientists from UCAR, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and UCAR Office of Programs (UOP) into partnership with EO through volunteer orientation workshops, program specific training, skill-building in pedagogy, access to classroom resources, and program and instructor evaluation. Scientists contribute in one or several of the following roles: program partners who bridge research to education through collaborative grant proposals; science content advisors for publications, web sites, exhibits, and informal science events; science mentors for high school and undergraduate students; NCAR Mesa Laboratory tour guides; scientists in the schools; science education ambassadors to local and national community events; science speakers for EO programs, conferences, and meetings of local organization; and science wizards offering demonstrations at public events for children and families. This new EO initiative seeks to match the expertise and specific interests of scientists with appropriate activities, while also serving as a communications conduit through which ideas for new activities and resources can be seeded and eventually developed into viable, fully funded programs.

  7. Design of an active helicopter control experiment at the Princeton Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marraffa, Andrew M.; Mckillip, R. M., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In an effort to develop an active control technique for reducing helicopter vibrations stemming from the main rotor system, a helicopter model was designed and tested at the Princeton Rotorcraft Dynamics Laboratory (PRDL). A description of this facility, including its latest data acquisition upgrade, are given. The design procedures for the test model and its Froude scaled rotor system are also discussed. The approach for performing active control is based on the idea that rotor states can be identified by instrumenting the rotor blades. Using this knowledge, Individual Blade Control (IBC) or Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) pitch input commands may be used to impact on rotor dynamics in such a way as to reduce rotor vibrations. Discussed here is an instrumentation configuration utilizing miniature accelerometers to measure and estimate first and second out-of-plane bending mode positions and velocities. To verify this technique, the model was tested, and resulting data were used to estimate rotor states as well as flap and bending coefficients, procedures for which are discussed. Overall results show that a cost- and time-effective method for building a useful test model for future active control experiments was developed. With some fine-tuning or slight adjustments in sensor configuration, prospects for obtaining good state estimates look promising.

  8. Surface-active substances in a laboratory simulated Titan's organic haze: Prebiotic microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagota, Seema; Kawai, Jun; Deamer, David; McKay, Christopher; Khare, Bishun; Beeler, David

    2014-11-01

    Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, is a key planetary body for astrobiological studies due to its active organic chemistry, hydrocarbon lakes and possible subsurface water-ammonia liquids. We have investigated the physicochemical properties of organic compounds synthesized in a simulated Titan atmosphere. A laboratory analog of Titan's aerosols, called tholin, was produced by irradiation of a nitrogen/methane gas mixture. The primary aim was to determine whether tholin represent possible sources of surface-active substances that could have been involved in the formation of prebiotic structures. A tholin sample was extracted with chloroform-methanol and the chloroform soluble material was separated by two-dimensional thin layer chromatography. Fluorescence excited by UV light was used to identify the major components on the plates. After being scraped from the TLC plate, the components were eluted as specific fractions and investigated by surface chemical methods, FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Fractions 1 and 2 were strongly fluorescent and surface active, producing films at air-water interfaces. When exposed to aqueous phases, components in fraction 1 form spherical microstructures resembling prebionts. The prebionts are precursor structures that might have evolved into the first living cells.

  9. Analytical laboratory for the JET Active Gas Handling system - inactive commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Lasser, R.; Grieveson, B.; Hemmerich, J.L.; Stagg, R.; Walker, K. [JET Joint Undertaking, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1995-10-01

    The Analytical Laboratory (AN) of the JET Active Gas Handling System (AGHS) is a central facility of the AGHS connected via small bore tubes to the other AGHS sub-systems. It offers various techniques such as gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, ionisation chambers, katharometers and calorimetry, to characterise the various gas samples. The detection ranges of the gas chromatograph for the six hydrogen molecules, helium, nitrogen and oxygen are from about 100ppm to 100% and for methane, higher hydrocarbons, CO and CO{sub 2} from about 10ppm to 100% with a thermal conductivity detector and a flame ionisation detector, respectively. Similar detection ranges can be achieved with the quadrupole and omegatron mass spectrometers. In addition tritiated hydrogen and hydrocarbons will be detected with flow proportional counter detectors and ionisation chambers down to the low ppm range. Inactive commissioning results will be presented. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  10. The standoff aerosol active signature testbed (SAAST) at MIT Lincoln Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jonathan M.; Aldridge, John C.

    2005-11-01

    Standoff LIDAR detection of BW agents depends on accurate knowledge of the infrared and ultraviolet optical elastic scatter (ES) and ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF) signatures of bio-agents and interferents. MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST) for measuring ES cross sections from BW simulants and interferents at all angles including 180ş (direct backscatter). Measurements of interest include the dependence of the ES and UVF signatures on several spore production parameters including growth medium, sporulation protocol, washing protocol, fluidizing additives, and degree of aggregation. Using SAAST, we have made measurements of the ES signature of Bacillus globigii (atropheaus, Bg) spores grown under different growth methods. We have also investigated one common interferent (Arizona Test Dust). Future samples will include pollen and diesel exhaust. This paper presents the details of the SAAST apparatus along with the results of recent measurements.

  11. Creating a Hands-On Robot Environment for Teaching Assembly Language Programming

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rababaah, Haroun R. A.

    Real-world computer applications and assembly language programming are often taught with abstract exercises. To provide hands-on, real-world experience early, we introduce robots into our assembly language class. This paper describes the creation of a bridge from assembly language to a publicly available simulator, programming exercises, and a reconfigurable maze environment compatible with the simulator. This, with other open-source software, provides a complete development environment at no cost to the student.

  12. Attitudes of undergraduate majors in elementary education toward mathematics through a hands-on manipulative approach.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Haitham M

    2002-02-01

    Using a manipulative approach in a mathematics course, this study was designed to assess attitudes toward mathematics of undergraduates in elementary education. A 20-item attitude rating administered as pre- and posttest to 95 students (7 men and 88 women) was used to assess the effect of the hands-on approach. A dependent t test indicated a statistically significant but very small change in their ratings. PMID:11883589

  13. Half a Million Hands: On the Road with the Little Shop of Physics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian Jones

    2009-01-01

    Can students learn science concepts by exploring and experimenting in an open-ended unstructured environment? Ever since our first school visit in the early 1990s, the focus of the Little Shop of Physics (http:\\/\\/littleshop.physics.colostate.edu) has been to present an open-ended, hands-on physics experience for K-12 students. Our projects are built and our programs are presented by a dedicated group of undergraduate

  14. http://kt.ijs.si/petra_kralj/dmkd.html Hand on Weka

    E-print Network

    Novak, Petra Kralj

    http://kt.ijs.si/petra_kralj/dmkd.html Hand on Weka 2014/11/11 Petra Kralj Novak Petra.Kralj.Novak@ijs.si #12;http://kt.ijs.si/petra_kralj/dmkd.html Data Mining Tools · Weka http://www.taverna.org.uk/ · Rapid Miner http://rapid-i.com/content/view/181/196/ · ClowdFlows http://clowdflows.org/ #12;http://kt.ijs.si/petra_kralj/dmkd.html

  15. Laboratory assessment of the molluscicidal and cercariacidal activities of Balanites aegyptiaca

    PubMed Central

    Molla, Eshetu; Giday, Mirutse; Erko, Berhanu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the molluscicidal and cercariacidal activities of aqueous extracts of Balanites aegyptiaca (B. aegyptiaca) against Ethiopian Biomphalaria pfeifferi (B. pfeifferi), Lymnaea natalensis (L. natalensis) and Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni) cercariae. Methods Extracts of seeds, endocarp, mesocarp, and fruit of B. aegyptiaca were tested for their activities against adult B. pfeifferi and L. natalensis. The cercariacidal activity of the seeds of the plant was also evaluated against S. mansoni. Bioassays were carried out following the methods recommended by WHO. Snail mortalities were compared between each plant part and snail species, and LC50 and LC90 values for the plant parts tested were computed. The cercariacidal activity of the plant was assessed by exposing the mice to the cercariae pre-exposed to aqueous extract of B. aegyptiaca seeds. Results For the molluscicidal activities of seeds, endocarp, mesocarp and whole fruit, the LC50 values against B. pfeifferi were 56.32, 77.53, 65.51 and 66.63 mg/L, respectively, while the respective LC90 values were 77.70, 120.04, 89.50 and 97.55 mg/L. Similarly, the LC50 values for the seeds, endocarp, mesocarp and whole fruit against L. natalensis were 80.33, 92.61, 83.52 and 87.84 mg/L, respectively, while the respective LC90 values were 102.30, 138.21, 115.42 and 127.69 mg/L. B. pfeifferi were found to be more susceptible to B. aegyptiaca than L. natalensis. S. mansoni cercariae exposed to 15 mg/L of extract of seeds were incapable of infecting mice. The mean egg load of tissue was reduced in mice infected with the cercariae exposed to 5 and 10 mg/L of the extract. Conclusions The aqueous extracts of different parts of B. aegyptiaca exhibited reasonable molluscicidal activity against B. pfeifferi and L. natalensis, as well as cercariacidal activity against S. mansoni cercariae. However, comprehensive laboratory evaluation is recommended prior to field tests of the plant parts since their impact on other aquatic biota is not known. PMID:23905025

  16. 76 FR 9025 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Good Laboratory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ...Collection; Comment Request; Good Laboratory Practice Regulations...solicits comments on the good laboratory practice...DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on...ADDRESSES: Submit electronic comments on the collection...technology. [[Page 9026

  17. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollie K. Gilbert; Clayton F. Marler; Christina L. Olson; Brenda R. Pace; Julie Braun Williams

    2011-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2010. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work.

  18. Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2011 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun Williams; Brenda R. Pace; Hollie K. Gilbert; Christina L. Olson

    2012-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report is intended as a stand-alone document that summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2011. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders, serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work, and meet an agreed upon legal requirement.

  19. Patterns of phenoloxidase activity in insecticide resistant and susceptible mosquitoes differ between laboratory-selected and wild-caught individuals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insecticide resistance has the potential to alter vector immune competence and consequently affect the transmission of diseases. Methods Using both laboratory isogenic strains and field-caught Culex pipiens mosquitoes, we investigated the effects of insecticide resistance on an important component of the mosquito immune system: the phenoloxidase (PO) activity. As infection risk varies dramatically with the age and sex of mosquitoes, allocation to PO immunity was quantified across different stages of the mosquito life cycle. Results Our results were consistent in showing that larvae have a higher PO activity than adults, females have a higher PO activity than males, and PO activity declines with adult age. We obtained, however, a marked discrepancy between laboratory and field-collected mosquitoes on the effect of insecticide resistance on PO activity. In the laboratory selected strains we found evidence of strong interactions between insecticide resistance and the age and sex of mosquitoes. In particular, 7 and 14 day old esterase-resistant adult females and acetylcholine-esterase resistant males had significantly higher PO activities than their susceptible counterparts. No such effects were, however, apparent in field-caught mosquitoes. Conclusions Combined, the field and laboratory-based approaches employed in this study provide a powerful test of the effect of insecticide resistance on PO-mediated immunity. The use of laboratory-selected insecticide-resistant strains is still the most widely used method to investigate the pleiotropic effects of insecticide resistance. Our results suggest that the outcome of these laboratory-selected mosquitoes must be interpreted with caution and, whenever possible, compared with mosquitoes captured from the field. PMID:24499651

  20. Twenty-first century skills for students: hands-on learning after school builds school and life success.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Leide

    2006-01-01

    At the core of the movement for twenty-first century skills are students. The growing efforts to increase programs leveraging out-of-school time are focused on giving American youth everything they need to compete in this increasingly complex world. The author is one of many students who have been well served by initiatives imparting twenty-first century skills during after-school hours. Now a senior at Boston Latin School, the author has been helped along the way by Citizen Schools, an after-school education program focused on hands-on learning apprenticeships and homework help. While enrolled in the program as a middle school student, the author took part in projects that exemplified hands-on, inquiry-based learning that helped her develop twenty-first century skills. For example, along with dozens of other students, she advanced her data analysis skills by analyzing statistics about Boston Public high schools, which also helped her select and enroll in one of the city's premier exam schools. Also, she and her peers worked with corporate attorneys who served as writing coaches and whose expertise the author drew from in producing a published essay and greatly improving her writing skills. The author now finds that the public speaking, leadership, organizational, social, and management abilities she built through her participation in Citizen Schools are a great asset to her in high school. The confidence with which she tackles her responsibilities can also be traced back to her experiences in the program. As she looks toward college, the author reflects and realizes that being actively involved in a quality after-school program put her on track for a successful future. PMID:17017266

  1. AC 2010-415: IMPROVED STUDENT LEARNING OF MICROPROCESSOR SYSTEMS THROUGH HANDS-ON AND ONLINE EXPERIENCE

    E-print Network

    LaMeres, Brock J.

    AC 2010-415: IMPROVED STUDENT LEARNING OF MICROPROCESSOR SYSTEMS THROUGH HANDS-ON AND ONLINE of Microprocessor Systems Through Hands-On and Online Experience Abstract This paper describes an approach to assess and improve the understanding of microprocessor systems for electrical and computer engineering students

  2. The Influence of Hands On Physics Experiments on Scientific Process Skills According to Prospective Teachers' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirça, Necati

    2013-01-01

    In this study, relationship between prospective science and technology teachers' experiences in conducting Hands on physics experiments and their physics lab I achievement was investigated. Survey model was utilized and the study was carried out in the 2012 spring semester. Seven Hands on physics experiments were conducted with 28 prospective…

  3. Remote Atomic Force Microscopy of Microscopic Organisms: Technological Innovations for Hands-On Science with Middle and High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. G.; Andre, T.; Kubasko, D.; Bokinsky, A.; Tretter, T.; Negishi, A.; Taylor, R.; Superfine, R.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined hands-on experiences in the context of an investigation of viruses and explored how and why hands-on experiences may be effective. We sought to understand whether or not touching and manipulating materials and objects could lead to a deeper, more effective type of knowing than that we obtain from sight or sound alone. Four…

  4. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON EDUCATION, VOL. 33, NO. I . FEBRUARY 1990 161 A Hands-on Microwave Laboratory Course Using

    E-print Network

    York, Robert A.

    package called Puff, was co-developed by Richard Compton and David Rutledge [11. Puff runs on an IBM PC in June 1987, Puff has been distributed to nearly 5000 users. The models used by Puff and the analysis hard copy facil- ities, and a network analyzer interface. Using a standard dot-matrix printer, Puff

  5. AC 2011-75: ENHANCING STUDENT LEARNING THROUGH HANDS-ON LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

    E-print Network

    of improvement of the class, each student was given a questionnaire before and after completing each experiment and at the end of the academic term. Each questionnaire consisted of five different types of questions relevant, psychology, literature, theater, community studies, economics, history, politics, mathematics, engineering

  6. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Quality Assurance Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; R. Nims; K. J. Kvarfordt; C. Wharton

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The role of the INL in this project is that of software developer and tester. This development takes place using formal software development procedures and is subject to quality assurance (QA) processes. The purpose of this document is to describe how the SAPHIRE software QA is performed for Version 6 and 7, what constitutes its parts, and limitations of those processes.

  7. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  8. An Overview of Science Education and Outreach Activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    J. DeLooper; A. DeMeo; P. Lucas; A. Post-Zwicker; C. Phillips; C. Ritter; J. Morgan; P. Wieser; A. Percival; E. Starkman; G. Czechowicz

    2000-11-07

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has an energetic science education program and outreach effort. This overview describes the components of the programs and evaluates the changes that have occurred in this effort during the last several years. Efforts have been expanded to reach more students, as well as the public in general. The primary goal is to inform the public regarding the fusion and plasma research at PPPL and to excite students so that they can appreciate science and technology. A student's interest in science can be raised by tours, summer research experiences, in-classroom presentations, plasma expos, teacher workshops and web-based materials. The ultimate result of this effort is a better-informed public, as well as an increase in the number of women and minorities who choose science as a vocation. Measuring the results is difficult, but current metrics are reviewed. The science education and outreach programs are supported by a de dicated core group of individuals and supplemented by other members of the PPPL staff and consultants who perform various outreach and educational activities.

  9. The plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft: Applications of laboratory simulations and active in situ experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N. H.; Samir, Uri

    1986-01-01

    Attempts to gain an understanding of spacecraft plasma dynamics via experimental investigation of the interaction between artificially synthesized, collisionless, flowing plasmas and laboratory test bodies date back to the early 1960's. In the past 25 years, a number of researchers have succeeded in simulating certain limited aspects of the complex spacecraft-space plasma interaction reasonably well. Theoretical treatments have also provided limited models of the phenomena. Several active experiments were recently conducted from the space shuttle that specifically attempted to observe the Orbiter-ionospheric interaction. These experiments have contributed greatly to an appreciation for the complexity of spacecraft-space plasma interaction but, so far, have answered few questions. Therefore, even though the plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft is fundamental to space technology, it remains largely an open issue. A brief overview is provided of the primary results from previous ground-based experimental investigations and the preliminary results of investigations conducted on the STS-3 and Spacelab 2 missions. In addition, several, as yet unexplained, aspects of the spacecraft-space plasma interaction are suggested for future research.

  10. Improvement of the prompt-gamma neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Dilmanian, F A; Lidofsky, L J; Stamatelatos, I; Kamen, Y; Yasumura, S; Vartsky, D; Pierson, R N; Weber, D A; Moore, R I; Ma, R

    1998-02-01

    The prompt-gamma neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory was upgraded to improve both the precision and accuracy of its in vivo determinations of total body nitrogen. The upgrade, guided by Monte Carlo simulations, involved elongating and modifying the source collimator and its shielding, repositioning the system's two NaI(Tl) detectors, and improving the neutron and gamma shielding of these detectors. The new source collimator has a graphite reflector around the 238PuBe neutron source to enhance the low-energy region of the neutron spectrum incident on the patient. The gamma detectors have been relocated from positions close to the upward-emerging collimated neutron beam to positions close to and at the sides of the patient. These modifications substantially reduced spurious counts resulting from the capture of small-angle scattered neutrons in the NaI detectors. The pile-up background under the 10.8 MeV 14N(n, gamma)15N spectral peak has been reduced so that the nitrogen peak-to-background ratio has been increased by a factor of 2.8. The resulting reduction in the coefficient of variation of the total body nitrogen measurements from 3% to 2.2% has improved the statistical significance of the results possible for any given number of patient measurements. The new system also has a more uniform composite sensitivity. PMID:9509530

  11. The erosion behaviour of biologically active sewer sediment deposits: observations from a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Banasiak, Robert; Verhoeven, Ronny; De Sutter, Renaat; Tait, Simon

    2005-12-01

    The erosion behaviour of various fine-grained sediment deposits has been investigated in laboratory experiments. This work mainly focused on tests using sewer sediment in which strong biochemical reactions were observed during the deposit formation period. A small number of initial tests were conducted in which the deposits were made from mixtures of "clean" mineral and organic sediments. The erosion behaviour observed in these tests was compared with the erosion characteristics for sediments taken from deposits in a sewer. The impact of the biological processes on physical properties such as bulk density, water content, deposit structure and the erosive behaviour as a function of bed shear stress are quantified and discussed. Based on these observations it is believed that bio-processes weaken the strength of the in-pipe sediment deposits. A significantly weaker sediment surface layer was observed during deposition under quiescent oxygen-rich conditions. This resulted in a deposit with low shear strength which may be a cause of a first foul flush of suspended sediment when flow rates were increased. Comparison between tests with sewer sediments and the artificial representative surrogates suggested that the deposits of the later did not correctly simulate the depositional development and the resultant erosion patterns observed with the more bio-active sewer sediment. PMID:16309729

  12. Mathematics Laboratory Report: Activities during Academic Year, 1983-1984 [and] Plans for Academic Year, 1984-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Joan P.

    During the 1983-84 academic year, a mathematics laboratory was established at Somerset County College to provide tutorial and testing services for high-risk students. This report describes and evaluates the first-year activities of the lab and proposes plans for increasing and evaluating the services and use of the lab during 1984-85. First, the…

  13. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 2-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  14. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades K-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  15. Analyzing the Function of Cartilage Replacements: A Laboratory Activity to Teach High School Students Chemical and Tissue Engineering Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, Julie N.; Emady, Heather N.; Galas, Richards J., Jr.; Zhange, Rong; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; Liu, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    A cartilage tissue engineering laboratory activity was developed as part of the Exciting Discoveries for Girls in Engineering (EDGE) Summer Camp sponsored by the Women In Engineering Program (WIEP) at Purdue University. Our goal was to increase awareness of chemical engineering and tissue engineering in female high school students through a…

  16. Using Laboratory Activities Enhanced with Concept Cartoons to Support Progression in Students' Understanding of Acid-Base Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Burhan, Yasemin; Naseriazar, Akbar; Demircioglu, Hulya

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of an intervention based on a series of laboratory activities enhanced with concept cartoons. The purpose of the intervention was to enhance students' understanding of acid-base chemistry for eight grade students' from two classes in a Turkish primary school. A pretest-posttest non-equivalent…

  17. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  18. Laboratory and field evaluation of biological active substances of plant origin against greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum Westw. (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Taisya D. Chermenskaya; Maria O. Petrova; Elena I. Savelieva

    2009-01-01

    The behavioural responses of greenhouse whitefly to substances of plant origin were investigated in laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The following species of plants were found to provide the most active chemicals to monitor and control greenhouse whitefly – laurel Laurus nobilis L., mullein Verbascum thapsus L., tansy Tanacetum vulgare L., wormwood Artemisia vulgare L.

  19. AN OVERVIEW OF HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING ACTIVITIES AT THE U.S. EPA'S NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computational modeling of human exposure to environmental pollutants is one of the primary activities of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). Assessment of human exposures is a critical part of the overall risk assessm...

  20. LABORATORY AND FIELD STUDIES TO EVALUATE RISKS TO LARVAL FISH FROM PHOTO-ACTIVATED TOXICITY OF PAHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazard from photo-activation of PAHs has been well documented in aquatic organisms. Far less certain is the degree to which risk actually occurs in the field. This presentation outlines a series of laboratory and field experiments conducted to better understand the dosimetry and ...

  1. Implementation of an Activity Oriented Laboratory Science Program for Grades 4, 5, and 6. 1985-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington School District, Phoenix, AZ.

    In an effort to improve the science education program in the Washington School District (Phoenix, Arizona) the school system focused its efforts in the 1983-84 school year on the development of an activity oriented laboratory science program for grades 4-6. This document describes the plan for implementing that program. The implementation…

  2. A Hands-on Education Program on Cyber Physical Systems for High School Students

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Vijay Gadepally

    Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) are the conjoining of an entities' physical and computational elements. The development of a typical CPS system follows a sequence from conceptual modeling, testing in simulated (virtual) worlds, testing in controlled (possibly laboratory) environments and finally deployment. Throughout each (repeatable) stage, the behavior of the physical entities, the sensing and situation assessment, and the computation and control options have to be understood and carefully represented through abstraction. The CPS Group at the Ohio State University, as part of an NSF funded CPS project on "Autonomous Driving in Mixed Environments", has been developing CPS related educational activities at the K-12, undergraduate and graduate levels. The aim of these educational activities is to train students in the principles and design issues in CPS and to broaden the participation in science and engineering. The project team has a strong commitment to impact STEM education across the entire K-20 community. In this paper, we focus on the K-12 community and present a two-week Summer Program for high school juniors and se- niors that introduces them to the principles of CPS design and walks them through several of the design steps. We also provide an online repository that aids CPS researchers in providing a similar educational experience.

  3. Hands-on-Science: Using Education Research to Construct Learner-Centered Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, R. R.; Chimonidou, A.; Kopp, S.

    2014-07-01

    Research into the process of learning, and learning astronomy, can be informative for the development of a course. Students are better able to incorporate and make sense of new ideas when they are aware of their own prior knowledge (Resnick et al. 1989; Confrey 1990), have the opportunity to develop explanations from their own experience in their own words (McDermott 1991; Prather et al. 2004), and benefit from peer instruction (Mazur 1997; Green 2003). Students in astronomy courses often have difficulty understanding many different concepts as a result of difficulties with spatial reasoning and a sense of scale. The Hands-on-Science program at UT Austin incorporates these research-based results into four guided-inquiry, integrated science courses (50 students each). They are aimed at pre-service K-5 teachers but are open to other majors as well. We find that Hands-on-Science students not only attain more favorable changes in attitude towards science, but they also outperform students in traditional lecture courses in content gains. Workshop Outcomes: Participants experienced a research-based, guided-inquiry lesson about the motion of objects in the sky and discussed the research methodology for assessing students in such a course.

  4. Student Content Knowledge Increases After Participation in a Hands-on Biotechnology Intervention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigler, Amber M.; Hanegan, Nikki L.

    2011-06-01

    Implementing biotechnology education through hands-on teaching methods should be considered by secondary biology teachers. This study is an experimental research design to examine increased student content knowledge in biotechnology after a hands-on biotechnology intervention. The teachers from both school groups participated in, Project Crawfish, a biotechnology professional development program. Students from both schools completed a pre and post assessment. The classroom was the unit of analysis. When the assessment was analyzed, each school had statistically significant increases in student content knowledge ( p < 0.0001 for the intervention school and p = 0.0481 for the control school). When the schools were compared to each other, a p-value of 0.0543 provided a suggestive relationship that the biotechnology intervention school had a larger increase in student content knowledge overall. When the assessment was divided into the five components, the intervention school showed significant increases in all five components. The control school had significant increases in student content knowledge in the PCR and DNA sequencing components ( p = 0.0459, p = 0.0043, respectively).

  5. Acts of Sound: Hands-On Workshop for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keolian, Robert; Loubeau, Alexandra; Poese, Matthew E.; Clark, Linde J.; Hansen, Uwe J.; Morrison, Andrew; Korman, Murray S.; Tucholski, Edward

    2005-09-01

    The Committee on Education in Acoustics is proud to present a workshop for high school students from the Minneapolis public schools. The theme of mentorship will be developed throughout the program. The eight mentors have individually developed their own workstations to inspire, challenge and delight a student's imagination about sound. The students will split into eight groups of three and work for 30 minutes at their own stations. After initial guidance, the students will do hands-on experiments, take data and try to come up with their own discoveries. Next, students have 15 minutes to prepare impromptu drawings and transparencies for a ``team'' presentation. Each team will be given 5 minutes to present at their workstation. A mini-cam and projector will be used to zoom in. During refreshments, there will be time for feedback and a musical skit. Then students may walk around to all the other stations to meet the other mentors and do more hands-on experiments at their own pace, as time permits. [Special thanks go to James Bickel, the science curriculum coordinator for the Minneapolis public schools, all the students and their teachers.

  6. Partnering with Pueblos: Involving American Indians in environmental restoration activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shaner, M.H.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1995-02-01

    Many communities in the area surrounding Los Alamos are very concerned about the environmental impact past and current Laboratory operations have on their communities. Their main concerns are contamination of water, soil and air as well as the hazardous and radioactive wastes stored at the Laboratory site. Environmental surveillance results show that contamination may have migrated off-site through the canyons of the Pajarito Plateau to the Rio Grande. San Ildefonso Pueblo and Cochiti Pueblo are located downstream from the canyons that drain the Los Alamos town site and Laboratory lands. Several other pueblos are also located downstream from the Laboratory. The Pueblos located upstream from the laboratory indicated that contamination of air and worry about the contamination of the animals they hunt for food is a more important concern to them. There are many canyons that drain the areas where Los Alamos and Laboratory property are located. To be able to characterize those canyons that are known or suspected to have received contamination, the ER Project needs to prepare RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) work plans for approval by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Once EPA approves the work plant, characterization activities can start for the specific areas identified in the work plan.

  7. Consumer-Oriented Laboratory Activities: A Manual for Secondary Science Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jacqueline; McDuffie, Thomas E., Jr.

    This document provides a laboratory manual for use by secondary level students in performing consumer-oriented laboratory experiments. Each experiment includes an introductory question outlining the purpose of the investigation, a detailed discussion, detailed procedures, questions to be answered upon completing the experiment, and information for…

  8. Cardiovascular activity during laboratory tasks in women with high and low worry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael M. Knepp; Bruce H. Friedman

    2008-01-01

    Worry has been related to delayed stress recovery and cardiovascular disease risk. Cardiovascular responses to a range of laboratory tasks were examined in this study of high and low worriers. Undergraduate women were recruited with the Penn State Worry Questionnaire to form low (n=19) and high (n=22) worry groups. These individuals engaged in six laboratory tasks (orthostatic stress, supine rest,

  9. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF ADULTICIDAL ACTIVITY OF SIXTEEN INSECT REPELLENTS IN AEROSOL SPRAYS AGAINST THREE MOSQUITO SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixteen commercial insect repellents (six natural and 10 chemical products) in spray formulations were evaluated in the laboratory for adult knockdown (KD) and mortality of laboratory-reared female Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Anopheles quadrimaculatus. All tested products produced significa...

  10. Active Participation/Purposeful Listening in the Language Laboratory: Aspects of Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Joan

    1980-01-01

    Perspectives on and methods in second language teaching have changed rapidly during the past 10 years. So also have the role and function of the language laboratory and the laboratory instructor. One area of concern, listening, has been somewhat neglected; generally it has been taught toward the end of increasing speaking proficiency. A review of…

  11. A Coastal Environment Field and Laboratory Activity for an Undergraduate Geomorphology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Jean T.; Rindfleisch, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    A field and laboratory exercise for an undergraduate geomorphology class is described that focuses on the beach. The project requires one day of fieldwork and two laboratory sessions. In the field, students measure water surface fluctuations (waves) with a pressure sensor, survey beach profiles, collect sediment samples, and observe the beach…

  12. Learning Environment, Attitudes and Achievement among Middle-school Science Students Using Inquiry-based Laboratory Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Stephen J.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2008-05-01

    This study compared inquiry and non-inquiry laboratory teaching in terms of students’ perceptions of the classroom learning environment, attitudes toward science, and achievement among middle-school physical science students. Learning environment and attitude scales were found to be valid and related to each other for a sample of 1,434 students in 71 classes. For a subsample of 165 students in 8 classes, inquiry instruction promoted more student cohesiveness than non-inquiry instruction (effect size of one-third of a standard deviation), and inquiry-based laboratory activities were found to be differentially effective for male and female students.

  13. Ancient microbial activity recorded in fracture fillings from granitic rocks (Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden).

    PubMed

    Heim, C; Lausmaa, J; Sjövall, P; Toporski, J; Dieing, T; Simon, K; Hansen, B T; Kronz, A; Arp, G; Reitner, J; Thiel, V

    2012-07-01

    Fracture minerals within the 1.8-Ga-old Äspö Diorite (Sweden) were investigated for fossil traces of subterranean microbial activity. To track the potential organic and inorganic biosignatures, an approach combining complementary analytical techniques of high lateral resolution was applied to drill core material obtained at -450 m depth in the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory. This approach included polarization microscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe (EMP) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The fracture mineral succession, consisting of fluorite and low-temperature calcite, showed a thin (20-100 ?m), dark amorphous layer lining the boundary between the two phases. Microscopic investigations of the amorphous layer revealed corrosion marks and, in places, branched tubular structures within the fluorite. Geochemical analysis showed significant accumulations of Si, Al, Mg, Fe and the light rare earth elements (REE) in the amorphous layer. In the same area, ToF-SIMS imaging revealed abundant, partly functionalized organic moieties, for example, C(x)H(y)?, C(x)H(y)N?, C(x)H(y)O?. The presence of such functionalized organic compounds was corroborated by Raman imaging showing bands characteristic of C-C, C-N and C-O bonds. According to its organic nature and the abundance of relatively unstable N- and O- heterocompounds, the organic-rich amorphous layer is interpreted to represent the remains of a microbial biofilm that established much later than the initial cooling of the Precambrian host rock. Indeed, ?ąłC, ?ą?O and ??Sr/??Sr isotope data of the fracture minerals and the host rock point to an association with a fracture reactivation event in the most recent geological past. PMID:22506979

  14. Microcomputer Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dusseldorp, Ralph; And Others

    Intended to serve as a guide to the development of basic computer competencies for students in teacher preparation programs or as inservice training for teachers, this primarily self-instructional manual provides basic information, worksheets, computer programs, and hands-on learning activities for 16 proficiencies related to computer literacy.…

  15. More 'hands-on' particle physics: Learning with ATLAS at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Lynne

    2011-05-01

    This article introduces teachers and students to a new portal of resources called Learning with ATLAS at CERN (http://learningwithatlas-portal.eu/), which has been developed by a European consortium of academic researchers and schools' liaison and outreach providers from countries across Europe. It includes the use of some of the mind-boggling facts and figures from the Large Hadron Collider experiment to illustrate some basic school physics concepts. It also uses innovative software adapted and made available on the web by European particle physics researchers to introduce a more innovative investigative approach to teaching particle physics concepts. This gives students a more 'hands-on' experience in the classroom and a feel for what real scientific research might be like.

  16. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; S. T. Beck; S. T. Wood

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of computer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessment (PRAs). This volume is the tutorial manual for the SAPHIRE system. In this document, a series of lessons are provided that guide the user through basic steps common to most analyses preformed with SAPHIRE. The tutorial is divided into two major sections covering both basic and advanced features. The section covering basic topics contains lessons that lead the reader through development of a probabilistic hypothetical problem involving a vehicle accident, highlighting the program’s most fundamental features. The advanced features section contains additional lessons that expand on fundamental analysis features of SAPHIRE and provide insights into more complex analysis techniques. Together, these two elements provide an overview into the operation and capabilities of the SAPHIRE software.

  17. Exploring the Solar System in the Classroom: A Hands-On Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.

    2000-01-01

    This final report discusses the development and implementation of several educational products for K-16 teachers and students. Specifically, I received support for: (A) three K-12 Teacher workshops, Exploring the Solar System in the Classroom: A Hands-On Approach, and minimal Support to finish two computer-based tutorials. (B) Contact Light: An Interactive CD-ROM, and (C) Another Look at Taurus Littrow: An Interactive GIS Database. Each of these projects directly supports NASA's Strategic Plan to: "Involve the education community in our endeavors to inspire America's students, create learning opportunities, enlighten inquisitive minds", and, to "communicate widely the content, relevancy, and excitement of NASA's missions and discoveries to inspire and to increase understanding and the broad application of science and technology." Attachment: Appendix A. And also article: "Aristarchus plateau: as potential lunar base site."

  18. eComLab: remote laboratory platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontual, Murillo; Melkonyan, Arsen; Gampe, Andreas; Huang, Grant; Akopian, David

    2011-06-01

    Hands-on experiments with electronic devices have been recognized as an important element in the field of engineering to help students get familiar with theoretical concepts and practical tasks. The continuing increase the student number, costly laboratory equipment, and laboratory maintenance slow down the physical lab efficiency. As information technology continues to evolve, the Internet has become a common media in modern education. Internetbased remote laboratory can solve a lot of restrictions, providing hands-on training as they can be flexible in time and the same equipment can be shared between different students. This article describes an on-going remote hands-on experimental radio modulation, network and mobile applications lab project "eComLab". Its main component is a remote laboratory infrastructure and server management system featuring various online media familiar with modern students, such as chat rooms and video streaming.

  19. Hands-On Astrophysics: Variable Stars in Math, Science, and Computer Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, J. A.; Percy, J. R.

    1999-12-01

    Hands-On Astrophysics (HOA): Variable Stars in Math, Science, and Computer Education, is a project recently developed by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) with funds from the National Science Foundation. HOA uses the unique methods and the international database of the AAVSO to develop and integrate students' math and science skills through variable star observation and analysis. It can provide an understanding of basic astronomy concepts, as well as interdisciplinary connections. Most of all, it motivates the user by exposing them to the excitement of doing real science with real data. Project materials include: a database of 600,000 variable star observations; VSTAR (a data plotting and analysis program), and other user friendly software; 31 slides and 14 prints of five constellations; 45 variable star finder charts; an instructional videotape in three 15-minute segments; and a 560-page student's and teacher's manual. These materials support the National Standards for Science and Math education by directly involving the students in the scientific process. Hands-On Astrophysics is designed to be flexible. It is organized so that it can be used at many levels, in many contexts: for classroom use from high school to college level, or for individual projects. In addition, communication and support can be found through the AAVSO home page on the World Wide Web: http://www.aavso.org. The HOA materials can be ordered through this web site or from the AAVSO, 25 Birch Street Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. We gratefully acknowledge the education grant ESI-9154091 from the National Science Foundation which funded the development of this project.

  20. Life-History Schedules in Daphnia magna: An Ecological Activity for Multiple Laboratory Sessions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Robert E. Sorensen (Purdue University; )

    1996-01-01

    This resource is a manual for instructing a laboratory exercise in population ecology, in which students explore the concepts of population biology, survivorship curves, and life history tables by conducting experiments with Daphnia magna.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory`s mobile PAN (Passive/Active Neutron) system for assay of TRU waste in 55 gallon drums

    SciTech Connect

    Taggart, D.P.; Betts, S.E.; Martinez, E.F. [and others

    1995-12-01

    We describe the refurbishment, reactivation and rough calibration of a mobile second generation Passive/Active Neutron (PAN) assay system previously owned by the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory - Lockheed Idaho Technology Center (INEL-LITC). This system was transferred to LANL a little over one year ago. After substantial refurbishment for operations, including installation of operating software developed at INEL-LITC, we have completed a rough calibration of the system in preparation for the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) expected to begin in the near future. We discuss compensation for the waste matrix neutron moderating and absorbing characteristics and present some data acquired during the calibration process which points out the possible waste matrix effects on the results of an assay. Future plans are also discussed.

  2. Discover science: Hands-on science workshops for elementary teachers and summer science camps for elementary students

    SciTech Connect

    Gotlib, L. [South Granville High School, Creedmoor, NC (United States); Bibby, E. [Granville County Schools, Oxford, NC (United States); Cullen, B. [North Carolina Science and Math Alliance, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Teams of local mentor teachers (assisted by college students in the NC Teaching Fellows Program) run week-long workshops for elementary teachers (at four sites in 1993, six in 1994). Major funding for the camps is provided through The Glaxo Foundation, supplemented with local funds. The workshops focus on hands-on science (using inexpensive materials) and provide familiarity and experience with the new NC science curriculum and assessment program. The use of local resources is stressed (including visiting scientists and readily available store-bought materials). Each camp has its own theme and provides teachers with a variety of resources to be used with students of all abilities. The mentor teachers then run week-long, all expense paid, non-residential science camps for elementary students (open to all students, but with females and minorities as target groups). Students take part in long-and short-term projects, working individually and in groups. Pre and post participation surveys of all participants were conducted and analyzed, with favorable results for both the student and teacher weeks. Additional activities include parent nights, and follow-up workshops. Eighty-nine teachers and 208 students participated in 1993.

  3. Bioinformatics and modeling laboratory Spring 2007

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Jonathan

    GENE4220L Bioinformatics and modeling laboratory Spring 2007 Course description: Hands-on look at the role of bioinformatics in genetic and genomic analyses. This combination lecture/laboratory course, Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Second Edition by Campbell and Heyer, Benjamin Cummings, 2006. It is available

  4. Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division: Semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1986-December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the research activity of the High Energy Physics Division at the Argonne National Laboratory for the period, July 1986-December 1986. Some of the topics included in this report are: high resolution spectrometers, computational physics, spin physics, string theories, lattice gauge theory, proton decay, symmetry breaking, heavy flavor production, massive lepton pair production, collider physics, field theories, proton sources, and facility development. (LSP)

  5. Laboratory directed research and development. FY 1991 program activities: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle``; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  6. The Effect of a Computer Simulation Activity versus a Hands-on Activity on Product Creativity in Technology Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurt Y. Michael

    2001-01-01

    Computer use in the classroom has become a popular method of instruction for many technology educators. This may be due to the fact that software programs have advanced beyond the early days of drill and practice instruction. With the introduction of the graphical user interface, increased processing speed, and affordability, computer use in education has finally come of age. Software

  7. Using a PyMOL Activity to Reinforce the Connection between Genotype and Phenotype in an Undergraduate Genetics Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Alexandra D.; Nguyen, Thao K. T.; Follis, Jack L.; Ribes-Zamora, Albert

    2014-01-01

    With the purpose of developing an activity that would help clarify genetic concepts related to the connection between genotype and phenotype and the nature of mutations, we designed a three hour teaching module using the PyMol software. The activity starts with two pre-laboratory assignments, one to learn how to use PyMol and the other to read about a specific protein or protein family. During the laboratory students are given instructions where and how to find additional information on a specific disease and its causal mutations in order to prepare a 10-minute, in-class presentation. Using a post activity, anonymous quiz, we found a statistically significant different grade distribution in students that participated in the PyMol activity relative to a control group. We also found a significant improvement in the student’s comprehension when answering questions regarding the nature of mutations and protein structure. This demonstrates the utility of this simulation activity as a vehicle to improve student’s understanding of specific key genetic concepts. PMID:25461967

  8. Research activity in the laboratory for inertial confinement fusion in ENEA - Frascati

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Consoli, F.; Cristofari, G.; Di Giorgio, G.

    2014-04-01

    Research on the use of nuclear fusion for energy production is carried out at ENEA mainly in the Frascati Research Center with laboratories dedicated to the study of magnetic confinement (Tokamak FTU) and inertial confinement (ABC). This paper summarizes the on going experimental programs and diagnostic development related to the studies of laser produced plasmas.

  9. Research Report The Equine Reproduction Laboratory (ERL) has been an active education, research, outreach, and

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    2007-2010 Research Report #12;#12;1 Preface The Equine Reproduction Laboratory (ERL) has been in equine reproduction in the world. The ERL is a unit within the Animal Reproduction and Biotechnology-breaking research in the areas of reproductive physiology, pathology, therapeutics, and management. In the past 5

  10. Summary of well-testing activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1975-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, M.G.; Benson, S.M.

    1983-08-01

    Well test data collected from various geothermal fields by the geothermal group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are presented. The type of well tests conducted, the instrumentation used and the data collected are described. Experience gained through interpretation of the data has helped identify problems in test procedures and interpretative methods.

  11. Imploding Soda Cans: From Demonstration to Guided-Inquiry Laboratory Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichler, Jack F.

    2009-01-01

    A guided-inquiry exercise conducted in both the lecture and laboratory components of a college introductory chemistry course for non-science majors is described. The exercise gave students the opportunity to independently determine the relationship between the temperature of water in an aluminum soda can and the intensity of implosion upon placing…

  12. Laboratory Activity to Effectively Teach Introductory Geomicrobiology Concepts to Non-Geology Majors †

    PubMed Central

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Davila-Vazquez, Yarely C.; Martinez, Lilliam Casillas

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a three-week experiment that can complement any microbiology course, to teach main geomicrobiology concepts for non-geology majors. One of the most difficult concepts for non-geology majors to comprehend is how bacteria serve as a platform for different mineralization reactions. In our three-week laboratory practice, students learn the main principles and conditions required for an induced bacterial mineralization. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students will: 1) learn how microbial-induced mineralization (such as calcium carbonate formation) is affected by differential media and growth conditions; 2) understand how bacterial physiology affects any induced in situ or in vitro mineralization; 3) comprehend how growing conditions and bacterial physiologies interrelate, resulting in differential crystal formation. The teaching-learning process was assessed using a pre-/posttest with an increase from 26% to 76% in the number of positive answers from the students. We also measured the students’ proficiency while conducting specific technical tasks, revealing no major difficulties while conducting the experiments. A final questionnaire was provided with satisfactory evaluations from the students regarding the organization and content of the practices. 84–86% of the students agreed that the exercises improved their knowledge in geomicrobiology and would like to attend similar laboratories in the future. Such response is the best indicator that the laboratory practice can be implemented in any undergraduate/graduate microbiology course to effectively teach basic geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors. PMID:24358384

  13. Hands-on Learning CU architectural engineering students learn their trade

    E-print Network

    and architectural plans of the Integrated Teaching and Learning Laboratory to learn about the different types in architectural engineering? Construction Engineer Structural Engineer Building Mechanical Systems Engineer Building Electrical & Lighting Systems Engineer #12;Department Highlights Approximately 50 scholarships

  14. Rapid-Cycling Brassicas (RCB's) in Hands-on Teaching of Plant Biology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Paul H. Williams (University of Wisconsin at Madison; )

    1988-06-06

    This peer reviewed article uses Wisconsin Fast Plants to aid in teaching: development, reproduction, genetics, physiology, and ecology. The development of rapid-cycling brassicas (RCB's) as model organisms for research andeducation is profoundly influencing the quality of science education at all levels by bringingdynamic living materials into the classroom. Most biology courses lack convenient living materials;many use animals predominantly. General and advanced courses in biology, botany, scienceeducation and applied plant sciences usually lack suitable living plant material that would permitstudents to explore plant growth and development, physiology, reproduction, genetics, evolutionand ecology. These speedy relatives of mustard are particularly amenable to classroom settingsbecause they show remarkably rapid development, they flower in 13 to 18 days, theyare small, and they can reproduce at high densities (up to 2500 plants per square meter) underfluorescent lighting in a classroom. The ease with which RCB's can be grown and pollinated,together with the wide array of interesting variants available in the rapid-cycling type, make theseplants particularly attractive to teachers and students. RCB's have far-reaching educationalpotential, from kindergarten through college. Teachers at all levels can help students learn moreabout plant biology through hands-on exploration with these rapidly responding plants.

  15. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Technical Reference

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; W. J. Galyean; S. T. Beck

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. Herein information is provided on the principles used in the construction and operation of Version 6.0 and 7.0 of the SAPHIRE system. This report summarizes the fundamental mathematical concepts of sets and logic, fault trees, and probability. This volume then describes the algorithms used to construct a fault tree and to obtain the minimal cut sets. It gives the formulas used to obtain the probability of the top event from the minimal cut sets, and the formulas for probabilities that apply for various assumptions concerning reparability and mission time. It defines the measures of basic event importance that SAPHIRE can calculate. This volume gives an overview of uncertainty analysis using simple Monte Carlo sampling or Latin Hypercube sampling, and states the algorithms used by this program to generate random basic event probabilities from various distributions. Also covered are enhance capabilities such as seismic analysis, cut set "recovery," end state manipulation, and use of "compound events."

  16. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Technical Reference Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; W. J. Galyean; S. T. Beck

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. Herein information is provided on the principles used in the construction and operation of Version 6.0 and 7.0 of the SAPHIRE system. This report summarizes the fundamental mathematical concepts of sets and logic, fault trees, and probability. This volume then describes the algorithms used to construct a fault tree and to obtain the minimal cut sets. It gives the formulas used to obtain the probability of the top event from the minimal cut sets, and the formulas for probabilities that apply for various assumptions concerning reparability and mission time. It defines the measures of basic event importance that SAPHIRE can calculate. This volume gives an overview of uncertainty analysis using simple Monte Carlo sampling or Latin Hypercube sampling, and states the algorithms used by this program to generate random basic event probabilities from various distributions. Also covered are enhance capabilities such as seismic analysis, cut set "recovery," end state manipulation, and use of "compound events."

  17. Quality initiatives. Respiratory instructions for CT examinations of the lungs: a hands-on guide.

    PubMed

    Bankier, Alexander A; O'Donnell, Carl R; Boiselle, Phillip M

    2008-01-01

    In computed tomographic (CT) examinations of the lung, accurate visualization of the natural contrast between the low attenuation of air and the relatively higher attenuation of vessels, airways, and interstitial structures requires cooperative and coordinated respiratory maneuvers by the patient. Inadequate respiratory maneuvers can influence differences in lung attenuation and lead to misinterpretation by (a) increasing attenuation to simulate disease in normal patients, (b) decreasing attenuation to simulate normal contrast in patients with disease, or (c) creating motion artifacts. For respiratory maneuvers to be effective, patients have to be instructed before the examination and coached during it. However, comprehensive descriptions of such instructions and coaching are lacking in the radiology literature. Therefore, respiratory instructions specifically for use in thoracic CT examinations have been devised. Along with patient coaching, use of these instructions can improve image quality. With this hands-on guide, both radiologists and technologists can optimize the respiratory instructions given to their patients and thereby improve the quality of thoracic CT examinations. PMID:18635620

  18. Half a Million Hands: On the Road with the Little Shop of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian

    2009-05-01

    Can students learn science concepts by exploring and experimenting in an open-ended unstructured environment? Ever since our first school visit in the early 1990s, the focus of the Little Shop of Physics (http://littleshop.physics.colostate.edu) has been to present an open-ended, hands-on physics experience for K-12 students. Our projects are built and our programs are presented by a dedicated group of undergraduate science students who receive a valuable service learning experience. These students learn a lot of science and some very practical skills. But how about the K-12 students we visit? We know that we get K-12 students interested, that they like our program---but are we teaching them anything? We have recently become and education partner of a large research project, the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (http://www.cmmap.org) at Colorado State University, which has given us a chance to expand and carefully evaluate the work that we do. In this talk I will present samples from the different types of programs we present, from school programs to television programs to teacher workshops, as well as recent data demonstrating the effectiveness of the work we do. There will be some cool projects, some interesting observations, some remarkable stories---and some good, solid data.

  19. Modeling Lunar Phases in the Classroom: A Hands-On Interactive Lesson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazine, Angela R.

    2007-12-01

    Using Power-Point technology and hands-on materials, a 45 minute lesson has been created to allow students to explore the cause of lunar phases. Students work in cooperative pairs to model the different phases of the moon. In addition, this lesson does not require a bright light source. Using a partially painted Styrofoam ball, a small cup of Play-dough, a simple, protractor, and a data collection sheet, students observe the lunar phases and measure the angle between the sun and the moon. Students place the moon model in eight different positions simulating its orbit around the earth and record the observed changes. The Power-Point presentation contains three segments. The first section allows the teacher to determine the students’ level of prior knowledge about the moon and to uncover possible misconceptions. The second section facilitates the students’ learning by displaying the proper alignment of the model and the proper viewing position for the students. Finally, the presentation culminates in a review of what the students have just observed. This lesson has been created to meet Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) for 4th grade science regarding the cause of lunar phases. Teacher and student responses to this lesson have been extremely positive.

  20. Incorporation of hands-on sterile technique instruction in an introductory pharmacy practice experience.

    PubMed

    Cretton-Scott, Erika; Cruthirds, Danielle; Coward, Lori

    2015-03-25

    Objective. To examine sterile technique and basic sterile compounding procedures among third-year pharmacy students. Design. Third year pharmacy students participating in an introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) in 2012 (n=126) and 2013 (n=119) performed a modified low-risk compounded sterile product (CSP) media fill challenge test, then prepared a 5 mg/mL vancomycin solution that was subsequently analyzed for accuracy. Assessment. To identify deficiencies in sterile procedures, students were observed while performing a modified low-risk CSP media fill challenge test. In the first year of conducting the challenge test (2012), 3 deficiencies were identified: hand washing before compounding, cleaning items with alcohol prior to start, and cleaning work area upon completion. In 2013, significant improvements were observed in these 3 areas after students watched a demonstration video. Examination of CSPs revealed less than 1% contamination in both years. Analysis of compounded vancomycin solutions showed that 84% and 71% of students prepared solutions in 2012 and 2013, respectively, were within 10% of the targeted final concentration. Conclusion. Hands-on sterile compounding exercises are typically delivered early in the pharmacy professional curriculum with minimal reinforcement in subsequent years. Providing opportunities for advanced pharmacy students to refresh and practice sterile compounding procedures allows students to refine their skills before entering pharmacy practice. PMID:25861109

  1. Incorporation of Hands-On Sterile Technique Instruction in an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cruthirds, Danielle; Coward, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine sterile technique and basic sterile compounding procedures among third-year pharmacy students. Design. Third year pharmacy students participating in an introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) in 2012 (n=126) and 2013 (n=119) performed a modified low-risk compounded sterile product (CSP) media fill challenge test, then prepared a 5 mg/mL vancomycin solution that was subsequently analyzed for accuracy. Assessment. To identify deficiencies in sterile procedures, students were observed while performing a modified low-risk CSP media fill challenge test. In the first year of conducting the challenge test (2012), 3 deficiencies were identified: hand washing before compounding, cleaning items with alcohol prior to start, and cleaning work area upon completion. In 2013, significant improvements were observed in these 3 areas after students watched a demonstration video. Examination of CSPs revealed less than 1% contamination in both years. Analysis of compounded vancomycin solutions showed that 84% and 71% of students prepared solutions in 2012 and 2013, respectively, were within 10% of the targeted final concentration. Conclusion. Hands-on sterile compounding exercises are typically delivered early in the pharmacy professional curriculum with minimal reinforcement in subsequent years. Providing opportunities for advanced pharmacy students to refresh and practice sterile compounding procedures allows students to refine their skills before entering pharmacy practice. PMID:25861109

  2. Activity, aggression, and habitat use of ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) and round goby (Apollonia melanostoma) under laboratory conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, J.F.; Riley, S.C.; Holuszko, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Potential negative ecological interactions between ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus and round goby Apollonia melanostoma (formerly Neogobius melanostomus) might affect the colonization dynamics of these invasive species where they are sympatric in the Great Lakes. In order to determine the potential for ecological interactions between these species, we examined the activity, aggression, and habitat use of round gobies and ruffe in single species and mixed species laboratory experiments. Trials included conditions in which food was concentrated (in light or darkness) or scattered. Results showed that ruffe were more active than gobies, particularly when food was scattered. Activity of both species was significantly lower during darkness. Round gobies were significantly more aggressive than ruffe, and total aggression was lower in mixed species trials. Habitat use by ruffe and round gobies overlapped considerably, but we observed significant differences between species in their use of specific habitats that depended on experimental conditions. Overall, ruffe used open habitats more often than did round gobies, primarily when food was scattered. Round gobies used rocks significantly more frequently than did ruffe, but their use of rock habitat decreased during dark conditions. Ruffe were found more often in plant habitats and less often near the wall of the pool in trials during daylight with concentrated food. Activity and habitat use of ruffe and round goby did not significantly differ between single and mixed species trials. Overall, we found little evidence for negative ecological interactions between ruffe and round goby in these laboratory experiments.

  3. A real-time and hands-on research course in protein purification and characterization: Purification and crystal growth of human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kreiling, Jodi L; Brader, Kerry; Kolar, Carol; Borgstahl, Gloria E O

    2011-01-01

    A new lecture/laboratory course to offer advanced biochemical training for undergraduate and early graduate students has been developed in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. This unique course offers students an opportunity to work hands-on with modern instrumentation not normally found in a predominately undergraduate institution, and to complete an entire research project in a realistic timeframe via a time-intensive curriculum as a special summer session. The course content gives a strong background in protein structure/chemistry, purification principles, protocol development, optimization strategies, use and programming of an automated chromatography instrument, and characterization strategies with an emphasis on X-ray crystallography. The laboratory portion offers students the chance to purify a protein (human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase) from start to finish, program and use an ÄKTA fast protein liquid chromatography instrument, and to grow and analyze their own protein crystals using their purified protein. This innovative laboratory experience gives the participating students the opportunity to complete a miniresearch project in real time and enhances their overall understanding of important biochemical research techniques and the instrumentation involved, fostering a better understanding of the research process all within a classroom setting. Evaluations and feedback concerning this course indicated a positive learning environment, a retention of knowledge and skills, a belief that the skill set learned continues to be useful in current endeavors, and a sense of accomplishment in the completion of an actual research project within the confines of a class setting. PMID:21433250

  4. Developing the Next Generation of International Safeguards and Nonproliferation Experts: Highlights of Select Activities at the National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J; Mathews, C; Kirk, B; Lynch, P; Doyle, J; Meek, E; Pepper, S; Metcalf, R

    2010-03-31

    With many safeguards experts in the United States at or near retirement age, and with the growing and evolving mission of international safeguards, attracting and educating a new generation of safeguards experts is an important element of maintaining a credible and capable international safeguards system. The United States National Laboratories, with their rich experience in addressing the technical and policy challenges of international safeguards, are an important resource for attracting, educating, and training future safeguards experts. This presentation highlights some of the safeguards education and professional development activities underway at the National Laboratories. These include university outreach, summer courses, internships, mid-career transition, knowledge retention, and other projects. The presentation concludes with thoughts on the challenge of interdisciplinary education and the recruitment of individuals with the right balance of skills and backgrounds are recruited to meet tomorrow's needs.

  5. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  6. A report on FY06 IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang

    2006-06-01

    Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. IPv6 deployment in government network backbones has been mandated to occur by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories' network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint, work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

  7. The laboratory experience in introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Maria C.

    1997-03-01

    The last two decades or so have witnessed intense efforts to improve the teaching and learning of physics. Scholarly studies have provided the grounding for many projects which reform the structure of introductory courses. A number of these innovations, however, are resource intensive, or depend on the ability to introduce changes in areas which are beyond the control of the faculty (e.g., scheduling), thus inhibiting their implementation. An alternative strategy that overcomes these obstacles is to modify the nature of the laboratory experience (a component that practically nobody disputes is an essential part of the introductory course), to provide hands-on learning opportunities that differ from the traditional "follow-this-recipe-to-verify-this-law" approach. I have chosen to implement a variety of activities that support the overall objectives of the course: developing conceptual understanding and transferable skills, and providing practice in the ways scientists actually do science. Given the audience in this two-semester, algebra-based course, mostly biology majors and pre-professionals (health-related careers, such as medicine, physical therapy, and veterinary), these goals were identified as the most important and lasting contribution that a physics course can make to the students intellectual development. I offer here examples of the types of hands on activities that I have implemented, organized for the sake of this presentation in four rather loose categories, depending on which subset of the course objectives the activities mostly address: self-designed lab activities, discussion of demo-type activities, building concepts from simple to complex, and out-of-lab physical phenomena.

  8. The effect of perineal control with hands-on and hand-poised methods on perineal trauma and delivery outcome

    PubMed Central

    Foroughipour, Azam; Firuzeh, Farah; Ghahiri, Ataolah; Norbakhsh, Vajihe; Heidari, Tayebeh

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the two methods of delivery, “hands-on” vs. “hands poised”, on perineal trauma and delivery outcome in primiparous women referred to Shariati Hospital of Isfahan during 2007-2008. METHODS: In a clinical trial study, 100 low risk primiparous pregnant women were randomly assigned to two hands-on and hand-poised (hands-off) groups. In the hands-on group, this method was used to control fetal head in the second stage of labor. It means that the fingers of one hand supported fetal occiput and the other hand applied slight pressure on the head to control the delivery of the head during the crowning process. In the hands-poised group, midwife observed the parturient woman and do not touch perineum during the second labor stage while fetal head was delivering. Then, the two groups were compared in terms of perineal trauma, as well as neonatal and delivery outcome. RESULTS: Demographic characteristics of all studied women were similar in two groups. The rate of episiotomy was higher in hands-on group (84% vs. 40%, p = 0.001). The rate of postpartum hemorrhage (4th stage) was higher in hands-on group (12% vs. 4%, p = 0.04). The rate of mild and moderate postpartum pain in hands-on group was higher than hands-off group (70% vs. 58% and 29% vs. 10%, p < 0.001) but sever pain was not different in two groups. CONCLUSIONS: It seems that hands-poised method is associated with less perineal trauma, particularly regarding the lower need for episiotomy and postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:22279480

  9. Hands-on guide for 3D image creation for geological purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Tisato, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Geological structures in outcrops or hand specimens are inherently three dimensional (3D), and therefore better understandable if viewed in 3D. While 3D models can easily be created, manipulated, and looked at from all sides on the computer screen (e.g., using photogrammetry or laser scanning data), 3D visualizations for publications or conference posters are much more challenging as they have to live in a 2D-world (i.e., on a sheet of paper). Perspective 2D visualizations of 3D models do not fully transmit the "feeling and depth of the third dimension" to the audience; but this feeling is desirable for a better examination and understanding in 3D of the structure under consideration. One of the very few possibilities to generate real 3D images, which work on a 2D display, is by using so-called stereoscopic images. Stereoscopic images are two images of the same object recorded from two slightly offset viewpoints. Special glasses and techniques have to be used to make sure that one image is seen only by one eye, and the other image is seen by the other eye, which together lead to the "3D effect". Geoscientists are often familiar with such 3D images. For example, geomorphologists traditionally view stereographic orthophotos by employing a mirror-steroscope. Nowadays, petroleum-geoscientists examine high-resolution 3D seismic data sets in special 3D visualization rooms. One of the methods for generating and viewing a stereoscopic image, which does not require a high-tech viewing device, is to create a so-called anaglyph. The principle is to overlay two images saturated in red and cyan, respectively. The two images are then viewed through red-cyan-stereoscopic glasses. This method is simple and cost-effective, but has some drawbacks in preserving colors accurately. A similar method is used in 3D movies, where polarized light or shuttering techniques are used to separate the left from the right image, which allows preserving the original colors. The advantage of red-cyan anaglyphs is their simplicity and the possibility to print them on normal paper or project them using a conventional projector. Producing 3D stereoscopic images is much easier than commonly thought. Our hands-on poster provides an easy-to-use guide for producing 3D stereoscopic images. Few simple rules-of-thumb are presented that define how photographs of any scene or object have to be shot to produce good-looking 3D images. We use the free software Stereophotomaker (http://stereo.jpn.org/eng/stphmkr) to produce anaglyphs and provide red-cyan 3D glasses for viewing them. Our hands-on poster is easy to adapt and helps any geologist to present his/her field or hand specimen photographs in a much more fashionable 3D way for future publications or conference posters.

  10. HTO and OBT activity concentrations in soil at the historical atmospheric HT release site (Chalk River Laboratories).

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Bredlaw, M; Korolevych, V Y

    2012-01-01

    Tritium is routinely released by the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) nuclear facilities. Three International HT release experiments have been conducted at the CRL site in the past. The site has not been disturbed since the last historical atmospheric testing in 1994 and presents an opportunity to assess the retention of tritium in soil. This study is devoted to the measurement of HTO and OBT activity concentration profiles in the subsurface 25 cm of soil. In terms of soil HTO, there is no evidence from the past HT release experiments that HTO was retained. The HTO activity concentration in the soil pore water appears similar to concentrations found in background areas in Ontario. In contrast, OBT activity concentrations in soil at the same site were significantly higher than HTO activity concentrations in soil. Elevated OBT appears to reside in the top layer of the soil (0-5 cm). In addition, OBT activity concentrations in the top soil layer did not fluctuate much with season, again, quite in contrast with soil HTO. This result suggests that OBT activity concentrations retained the signature of the historical tritium releases. PMID:22036156

  11. The serum complement system: a simplified laboratory exercise to measure the activity of an important component of the immune system

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kimberley A Radziwon (Stonehill College Biology)

    2008-12-01

    The immune system is a vital physiological component that affords animals protection from disease and is composed of innate and adaptive mechanisms that rely on cellular and dissolved components. The serum complement system is a series of dissolved proteins that protect against a variety of pathogens. The activity of complement in serum can be determined by its ability to lyse red blood cells in vitro. Here, we describe a modification of a standard complement hemolysis assay that makes an interesting and informative laboratory exercise suitable for a variety of courses including physiology.

  12. Satellite Validation Activities at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL), Eureka, Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, James

    The PEARL laboratory is situated at Eureka, Nunavut at 80N, 86W. It is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). Instrumentation at the laboratory spans a large range of atmospheric measurements from surface to about 100km altitude using lidars, radars, spectrometers, radiometers, imagers and other methodologies. Data from the laboratory are processed and supplied to several international databases. The location at Eureka provides a very high frequency of overpasses for sun-synchronous polar orbiting satellites. It is also in the high Arctic where few validation measurements can be made for any satellite instrumentation. It therefore provides unique opportunities for validating space instrumentation used for atmospheric studies in the Arctic and this is particularly significant in view of the efforts being undertaken in International Polar Year (IPY) As part of the ongoing program at PEARL, validation measurements have already been made for a number of satellites including the Canadian SciSat, CloudSat, Aura, ENVISAT and others. Because the site is permanent, validation measurements can span a large time frame and can also be anchored in very reliable ground calibrations. This talk will provide an overview of the instrumentation at PEARL and some case studies of how this instrumentation is applied to the problem of satellite validation. PEARL is supported by the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI); Canadian Foundation for Climate and Atmospheric Science (CFCAS); Canadian Space Agency (CSA); Environment Canada (EC); Government of Canada IPY funding; Ontario Innovation Trust (OIT); Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC); Nova Scotia Research Innovation Trust (NSRIT); Ontario Research Fund (ORF); and the Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP).

  13. Estimating active carbon for soil quality assessment: A simplified method for laboratory and field use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. R. Islam; M. A. Stine; J. B. Gruver; S. E. Samson-Liebig; R. R. Weil

    2003-01-01

    A simple method of estimating changes in biologically active soil carbon (C) could help evaluate soil quality impacts of alternative management practices. Most reports of permanganate for active C determination use highly concentrated solutions (0.333 M) that are difficult to work with and tend to react with a large fraction of soil C that is not well distinguished from total

  14. Recent wind resource characterization activities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.L.; Schwartz, M.N.

    1997-07-01

    The wind resource characterization team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working to improve the characterization of the wind resource in many key regions of the world. Tasks undertaken in the past year include: updates to the comprehensive meteorological and geographic data bases used in resource assessments in the US and abroad; development and validation of an automated wind resource mapping procedure; support in producing wind forecasting tools useful to utilities involved in wind energy generation; continued support for recently established wind measurement and assessment programs in the US.

  15. Assembly of a Vacuum Chamber: A Hands-On Approach to Introduce Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussie`re, Guillaume; Stoodley, Robin; Yajima, Kano; Bagai, Abhimanyu; Popowich, Aleksandra K.; Matthews, Nicholas E.

    2014-01-01

    Although vacuum technology is essential to many aspects of modern physical and analytical chemistry, vacuum experiments are rarely the focus of undergraduate laboratories. We describe an experiment that introduces students to vacuum science and mass spectrometry. The students first assemble a vacuum system, including a mass spectrometer. While…

  16. Affordable Hands-On DNA Sequencing and Genotyping: An Exercise for Teaching DNA Analysis to Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Kushani; Thomas, Shelby; Stein, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe a 5-week laboratory exercise for undergraduate biology and biochemistry students in which students learn to sequence DNA and to genotype their DNA for selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Students use miniaturized DNA sequencing gels that require approximately 8 min to run. The students perform G, A, T, C…

  17. Solar Collector Design Optimization: A Hands-on Project Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnie, Dunbar P., III; Kaz, David M.; Berman, Elena A.

    2012-01-01

    A solar power collector optimization design project has been developed for use in undergraduate classrooms and/or laboratories. The design optimization depends on understanding the current-voltage characteristics of the starting photovoltaic cells as well as how the cell's electrical response changes with increased light illumination. Students…

  18. Summer Research Internship Program (FY94) Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Toler, L.T.; Indusi, J.P.

    1995-02-01

    The Summer Research Internship Program is a new program that allows high school teachers to participate and assist scientific staff at national laboratories in specific research assignments. This participation allows the high school teachers to become familiar with new technology and have ``hands-on`` experience with experiments and equipment which utilize both mathematics and science skills. Teachers also have the opportunity to advance their new and well-developed software. This enlightenment and experience is brought back into their schools and classrooms in the hopes that their peers and students will realize the excitement that knowledge and education in the areas of mathematics and science can bring. The Safeguards, Safety and Nonproliferation Division of the Department of Advanced Technology at Brookhaven National Laboratory utilized five high school teachers during FY94 in various projects. The project assignments and internship activities are outlined in this paper.

  19. Fostering environmental literacy through the use of hands-on science, place-based education, and role-played case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Benjamin Paul

    The purpose of this project was to develop environmental literacy in freshmen taking high school biology, using hands-on science labs, place-based education, and a role-played case study. Students participated in hands-on labs that allowed them to quantitatively describe the effects of pollution and eutrophication. Students also participated in an all-day field trip at Bay City State Park, where they studied ecological concepts in "place". The unit culminated in a role-played case study in which students were assigned roles, researched them, and attempted to solve the problem of the eutrophication of Saginaw Bay in a town hall meeting. To evaluate student learning, students were given a pretest and posttest that covered ecological topics taught during unit activities. The analysis of these assessments using a paired T-test showed that the teaching methods successfully increased student understanding of ecological topics, and an increase in environmental literacy. Additional subjective data, including conversations with students, and analysis of student writing during the unit, support that student environmental literacy increased during the unit. However, it was shown that environmental literacy is not something to be obtained in one unit, or even one year. It is a lifelong process to which a strong science foundation should be provided in science classes, from the primary level to the secondary level and beyond.

  20. Building Formal and Informal Partnerships Through a Land-Based, Hands-on Research Expedition for Earth and Ocean Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slough, S.; Prouhet, T.; Peart, L.; Leckie, M.; St. John, K.; Karz-Cooper, S.; Klaus, A.; Petronotis, K.; Firth, J.; Guerin, G.; Buckholtz, C.; Crowder, L.; Peng, C.

    2007-12-01

    Scientific Ocean drilling has a rich legacy which is largely responsible for our current understating of the complex linkages among the different parts of the Earth System. Relaying these understandings to Earth and ocean educators is a challenge that the Joint Oceanographic Institutes (JOI) Alliances has undertaken through sponsorship of the School of Rock (SOR). Building on the successful ocean-going, hands-on SOR (Leckie et al. 2006), the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) - United States Implementing Organization (USIO) piloted a land-based, hands-on research expedition for Earth and ocean science teachers, the School of Rock Expedition II (SOR II). During this seven-day workshop, 18 educators from across the United States were hosted at the IODP Gulf Coast Repository at Texas A&M University where they were mentored and taught by scientists who are actively engaged in IODP research, shipboard technical staff, SOR I veteran teachers, and science educators. Teachers participated in a series of research experiences similar to those that take place on a scientific drilling research vessel or in a post-cruise research lab. These experiences allowed educators to increase their knowledge of IODP and scientific methods as demonstrated by the entire ocean drilling program (proposals, drilling, lab analysis, data acquisition, and post-cruise research). This case study describes the formal and informal partnerships developed through the SOR II with an emphasis on identifying and nurturing informal partnerships.

  1. A report on IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories:FY2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang; Maestas, Joseph H.

    2007-06-01

    Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. As the emerging Internet network protocol, SNL needs to prepare for its eventual deployment in international, national, customer, and local networks. Additionally, the United States Office of Management and Budget has mandated that IPv6 deployment in government network backbones occurs by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution, the Communication & Network Systems, and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

  2. Integrating science, environmental education, public outreach, conservation, and capacity-building through hands-on bird ecology

    E-print Network

    Tipple, Brett

    -building through hands-on bird ecology research at the Rio Mesa Center Cagan H. Sekercioglu & Evan R. Buechley of the demographics of the bird communities to determine population trends for resident species. Furthermore and conservation. We welcome and encourage participation by visitors to Rio Mesa in our bird banding operations

  3. Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology: Real-Time, Hands-On, and Safe Experiments for K-12 Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagaria, Hitesh G.; Dean, Michelle R.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Wong, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    What students and teachers often ask is, how are nano-sized materials made when they are so small? One answer is through the process of self-assembly in which molecules, polymers, and nanoparticles connect to form larger objects of a defined structure and shape. Two hands-on experiments are presented in which students prepare capsules in real time…

  4. Exploding Balloons, Deformed Balls, Strange Reflections and Breaking Rods: Slow Motion Analysis of Selected Hands-On Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    A selection of hands-on experiments from different fields of physics, which happen too fast for the eye or video cameras to properly observe and analyse the phenomena, is presented. They are recorded and analysed using modern high speed cameras. Two types of cameras were used: the first were rather inexpensive consumer products such as Casio…

  5. The Molecular Boat: A Hands-On Experiment to Demonstrate the Forces Applied to Self-Assembled Monolayers at Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Charlene J.; Salaita, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrating how surface chemistry and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) control the macroscopic properties of materials is challenging as it often necessitates the use of specialized instrumentation. In this hands-on experiment, students directly measure a macroscopic property, the floatation of glass coverslips on water as a function of…

  6. How Science Texts and Hands-on Explorations Facilitate Meaning Making: Learning from Latina/o Third Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varelas, Maria; Pieper, Lynne; Arsenault, Amy; Pappas, Christine C.; Keblawe-Shamah, Neveen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined opportunities for reasoning and meaning making that read-alouds of children's literature science information books and related hands-on explorations offered to young Latina/o students in an urban public school. Using a qualitative, interpretative framework, we analyzed classroom discourse and children's writing…

  7. Interactive Web-Based and Hands-On Engineering Education: A Freshman Aerospace Design Course at MIT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Dava J.

    "Introduction to Aerospace and Design" is a 3-hour per week freshman elective course at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that culminates in a Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) vehicle design competition, exposing freshmen to the excitement of aerospace engineering design typically taught in the junior or senior years. In addition to the hands-on

  8. Fifth Graders' Science Inquiry Abilities: A Comparative Study of Students in Hands-On and Textbook Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Jerome; Aschbacher, Pamela; Roth, Ellen; Jones, Melanie; McPhee, Cameron; Martin, Catherine; Phelps, Scott; Kyle, Tara; Foley, Brian

    2006-01-01

    A large number of American elementary school students are now studying science using the hands-on inquiry curricula developed in the 1990s: Insights; Full Option Science System (FOSS); and Science and Technology for Children (STC). A goal of these programs, echoed in the "National Science Education Standards," is that children should gain…

  9. The Chemical Engineering behind How Carbonated Beverages Go Flat: A Hands-On Experiment for Freshmen Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohn, Keith L.

    2007-01-01

    A hands-on project was developed to educate new chemical engineering students about the types of problems chemical engineers solve and to improve student enthusiasm for studying chemical engineering. In this project, students studied the phenomenon of carbonated beverages going flat. The project was implemented in 2003 and 2004 at Kansas State…

  10. Monitoring Animal Activity Rhythms in the Laboratory: Four Easily Assembled Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Sheridan V.

    1989-01-01

    The use of actographs for studying animal activity is discussed. Described are running recorders for rodents, perching and feeding recorders for birds, and tilting box recorders for studying the movement of reptiles, amphibians, and arthropods. (CW)

  11. Building the Body: Active Learning Laboratories that Emphasize Practical Aspects of Anatomy and Integration with Radiology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kitt Shaffer (Boston University Radiology)

    2010-04-23

    This article describes the development of active learning techniques to review anatomy material in the context of radiology. Explanations of how the curriculum was designed to integrate knowledge and reemphasize concepts in different contexts is explained.

  12. A Hands-on Exercise in Building Darcy Tubes to Improve Student Understanding of Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Teaching undergraduate students about sustainability typically includes discussions of water resources and the flow of groundwater in aquifers. Understanding the flow of groundwater is a fundamental step for students, but one that can easily get mired in equations (e.g., Darcy's Law). In an effort to transform Darcy's Law, which describes flow of fluid through a porous medium, from an abstract concept to a hands-on experiment, I had undergraduate students build working "Darcy tubes" and calculate hydraulic conductivity during a three-hour lab period. At the beginning of the lab period, I presented the students with the materials: three pairs of plastic soda bottles with straight sides, glass tubing, pantyhose (for screens), rubber hosing, sieved sand in three grain sizes (1-2 mm, 0.5-1.0 mm, and 0.25-0.5 mm), and various types of tape and adhesive. After we discussed the basic design of a Darcy tube (inlet and outlet, with two piezometers), the students went to work. Real-time problem-solving was an integral (and exciting) part of the exercise. Within two hours, they had built three Darcy tubes, each filled with a different sand size. The students determined the cross-sectional area of each tube (A) and the distance between the two piezometers (L). We then ran the experiments, using tinted water so that we could more easily tell when the sand in the tubes was saturated. We measured discharge (Q) through the tube and marked the height of the water in each piezometer to calculate difference in hydraulic head (?h). With the data we had collected, the students were able to calculate hydraulic conductivity (K) using a simple form of Darcy's Law: Q = -KA (?h/L). Despite the simplicity of the Darcy tubes, the students' K values were reasonable for the sediment types that we used. Student comments on the Darcy tube exercise were overwhelmingly positive. The Darcy tubes could be used in a subsequent lab period for exploration of more advanced concepts, such as breakthrough of contaminants (add water of a different color and collect outflow samples at timed intervals).; One of the Darcy tubes built by undergraduate students.

  13. Hands-on earth science with students at schools for the Deaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Earth science teachers at schools for the Deaf face a variety of challenges. This community of students has a wide range of language skills, teaching resources can be limited and often teachers are not trained in geosciences. An NSF CAREER grant provided an opportunity to make a difference to this community and foster earth science learning at 8 schools for the Deaf around the country. We designed hands-on deformational sandboxes for the teachers and provided accompanying curriculum materials. The sandbox is a physical model of crustal deformation that students can manipulate to test hypotheses. The visual nature of the sandbox was well-suited for the spatial grammar of American Sign Language used by these students. Furthermore, language skills were enhanced by scaffolded observation, sketch, annotation, discussion, interpretation assignments. Geoscience training of teachers was strengthened with workshops and three 5-day field trips for teachers and selected students to Utah, western New England and southern California. The field trips provided opportunity for students to work as geoscientists observing, interpreting, discussing and presenting their investigations. Between field trips, we set up videoconferences from the UMass experimental lab with the high school earth science classrooms. These sessions facilitated dialog between students and researchers at UMass. While the project set out to provide geoscience learning opportunities for students at Schools for the Deaf, the long lasting impact was the improved geoscience training of teachers, most of whom had limited post-secondary earth science training. The success of the project also rested on the dedication of the teachers to their students and their willingness to try new approaches and experiences. By tapping into a community of 6 teachers, who already shared curriculum and had fantastic leadership, the project was able to have significant impact and exceed the initial goals. The project has led to a manuscript in Science Teacher on the educational benefits of the deformational sandbox. At the 2009 GSA meeting, we ran a workshop on the deformational sandbox that included teachers from hearing schools. The project also highlights the potential for a cognitive science investigation on learning of 3D geologic concepts by people who use a language with spatial grammar, such as ASL.

  14. What's the Matter with Food?: A Hands-On Action Research Study on the Effect of Using Food Preparation To Teach Students with Autism about the Three States of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diller, Nicole

    This investigation studied the effectiveness of using food preparation to teach students with Autism about the three states of matter. A hands-on learning approach was used within the home and careers classroom. One class of five students, three boys and two girls, all diagnosed with Autism, participated in a five day academic unit about the three phases of matter: solid, liquid, and gas. The class received hands-on learning science instruction using food through various differentiated activities. Results indicate that students express focus when using food to learn. In addition, this study acknowledges that hands-on learning in science enhances the learning process of students with Autism. One of the main reasons is that students enjoy learning when this teaching style is used in the classroom, and students that enjoy what they are learning are more likely to be engaged and motivated to learn. After using this approach, all the students in the study increased their scores from the pre-assessments to the post-assessments. Students expressed through actions and words that they enjoyed using hands-on experiences to learn in the classroom. Implications for practice indicate that a variety of manipulatives are needed to teach students with Autism. Future research would help uncover additional information about student motivation and learning in the home and careers classroom.

  15. Molluscan cellulolytic activity responses to zinc exposure in laboratory and field stream comparisons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Grudzien; S. E. Belanger; D. S. Cherry; J. Cairns

    1994-01-01

    Changes in cellulolytic activity of Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) and snails (Mudalia dilatata) were monitored throughout 30-d exposures to constant additions (0.0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.50, and 1.0 mg l?1) of zinc (Zn). All exposures of 0.05 mg Zn 1?1 or greater significantly reduced enzyme activity (exo- and endocellulase) in both molluscs as early as 10 d following exposures\\u000a in outdoor

  16. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Department of Energy (DOE) activities at Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories Site (DOE/SSFL), conducted May 16 through 26, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by an private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with DOE activities at SSFL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at SSFL, and interviews with site personnel. 90 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

  17. Integrating laboratory and field data to quantify the immersion freezing ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, R. C.; Petters, M. D.; Tobo, Y.; Niemand, M.; Möhler, O.; Snider, J. R.; Wang, Z.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2014-06-01

    Data from both laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements are used to develop a simple parametric description for the immersion freezing activity of natural mineral dust particles. Measurements made with the Colorado State University (CSU) continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) when processing mineral dust aerosols at a nominal 105% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) are taken to approximate the immersion freezing nucleation activity of particles. Ice active frozen fractions vs. temperature for dusts representative of Saharan and Asian desert sources were consistent with similar measurements in atmospheric dust plumes for a limited set of comparisons available. The parameterization developed follows the form of one suggested previously for atmospheric particles of non-specific composition in quantifying ice nucleating particle concentrations as functions of temperature and the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.5 ?m diameter. Such an approach does not explicitly account for surface area and time dependencies for ice nucleation, but sufficiently encapsulates the activation properties for potential use in regional and global modeling simulations, and possible application in developing remote sensing retrievals for ice nucleating particles. A correction factor is introduced to account for the apparent underestimate (by approximately 3, on average) of the immersion freezing fraction of mineral dust particles for CSU CFDC data processed at an RHw of 105% vs. maximum fractions active at higher RHw. Instrumental factors that affect activation behavior vs. RHw in CFDC instruments remain to be fully explored in future studies. Nevertheless, the use of this correction factor is supported by comparison to ice activation data obtained for the same aerosols from Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics of the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion chamber cloud parcel experiments. Further comparison of the new parameterization to the immersion freezing surface active site density parameterization for mineral dust particles, developed separately from AIDA experimental data alone, shows excellent agreement for data collected in a descent through a Saharan aerosol layer. These studies support the utility of laboratory measurements to obtain atmospherically-relevant data on the ice nucleation properties of dust and other particle types, and suggest the suitability of considering all mineral dust as a single type of ice nucleating particle as a useful first order approximation in numerical modeling investigations.

  18. Integrating laboratory and field data to quantify the immersion freezing ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, R. C.; Petters, M. D.; Tobo, Y.; Niemand, M.; Möhler, O.; Snider, J. R.; Wang, Z.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Data from both laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements are used to develop an empirical parameterization for the immersion freezing activity of natural mineral dust particles. Measurements made with the Colorado State University (CSU) continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) when processing mineral dust aerosols at a nominal 105% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) are taken as a measure of the immersion freezing nucleation activity of particles. Ice active frozen fractions vs. temperature for dusts representative of Saharan and Asian desert sources were consistent with similar measurements in atmospheric dust plumes for a limited set of comparisons available. The parameterization developed follows the form of one suggested previously for atmospheric particles of non-specific composition in quantifying ice nucleating particle concentrations as functions of temperature and the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.5 ?m diameter. Such an approach does not explicitly account for surface area and time dependencies for ice nucleation, but sufficiently encapsulates the activation properties for potential use in regional and global modeling simulations, and possible application in developing remote sensing retrievals for ice nucleating particles. A calibration factor is introduced to account for the apparent underestimate (by approximately 3, on average) of the immersion freezing fraction of mineral dust particles for CSU CFDC data processed at an RHw of 105% vs. maximum fractions active at higher RHw. Instrumental factors that affect activation behavior vs. RHw in CFDC instruments remain to be fully explored in future studies. Nevertheless, the use of this calibration factor is supported by comparison to ice activation data obtained for the same aerosols from Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics of the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion chamber cloud parcel experiments. Further comparison of the new parameterization, including calibration correction, to predictions of the immersion freezing surface active site density parameterization for mineral dust particles, developed separately from AIDA experimental data alone, shows excellent agreement for data collected in a descent through a Saharan aerosol layer. These studies support the utility of laboratory measurements to obtain atmospherically relevant data on the ice nucleation properties of dust and other particle types, and suggest the suitability of considering all mineral dust as a single type of ice nucleating particle as a useful first-order approximation in numerical modeling investigations.

  19. Forest Watch: A K-12 Outreach Program to Engage Pre-College Students in Authentic, Hands-On Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, M. T.; Rock, B. N.

    2009-12-01

    The Forest Watch Program is a K-12 hands-on science outreach program developed at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) in 1991. The program has engaged students and their teachers in assisting researchers at UNH in the assessment of the state-of-health of white pine (Pinus strobus), a known bio-indicator species for exposure to elevated levels of ground-level ozone. Students are introduced to the scientific method while participating in an authentic on-going research program. The program was designed in partnership with participating teachers, and thus the field and classroom activities meet specific New England state science and mathematics curricula standards for K-12 education. Student participation in Forest Watch has resulted in an improved understanding and characterization of inter-annual white pine response to changes in air quality across the region over the past two decades. Forest Watch, students participate in three types of activities: 1. the analysis of remote sensing data (Landsat TM) provided for their local area using MultiSpec freeware. Through image processing, students learn the concepts of spatial and spectral resolution; how to identify landcover features; how plants interact with visible and infrared energy; and how to use this information to determine vegetation types and identify vegetation conditions. 2. students select 5 white pine trees to be permanently tagged near their school within a 30x30 meter (pixel sized sampling plot - the spatial resolution of the TM dataset), followed by collection and analysis of needle samples, and a suite of forest plot biometric measurements such as tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH), and canopy closure and ground cover. 3. the students send a set of their needle samples to UNH for spectral analysis of key reflectance features such as the Red Edge Inflection Point (REIP), the TM 5/4 moisture stress index, and the NIR 3/1. Over 250 schools from all six New England states have participated in the program over the past 19 years. Combining student-derived data plus the reflectance indices and other spectral measures, allows UNH researchers to characterize annual variations in tree state-of-health and relate it to the previous summer’s ozone levels. Results from annual student-provided data between 1991 and 2008 suggest that regional air quality and the state-of-health of white pine have improved since 1991. This improvement in white pine health corresponds with improved regional air quality, in part due to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment.

  20. Critical Issue: Providing Hands-On, Minds-On, and Authentic Learning Experiences in Mathematics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cook, Cathy

    Cathy Cook of the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory writes: â??When educators begin to see learning as knowledge construction, they change their thinking about curriculum, instruction, and assessment, developing more powerful approaches to connecting thinking and mathematics and designing more mathematically significant instructional learning experiences.â?ť To summarize, she believes a revolution in teaching is necessary in order to keep topics current, students interested, and pedagogy cutting edge. In this article, Cook and the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory present an assessment of mathematics instruction in America today, followed by a series of recommendations for improving and innovating those methods we currently employ. This article would be especially helpful for inexperienced instructors, or those who find a new generation of students are not responding to methods that were effective only a few years ago.