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1

Hands On Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The site provides a list of hands on activities, called "toys", that can be made with common household items. Construction details are often provided with pictures and sometimes movies. Alternative designs are sometimes provided. In addition to the toys, the site provides links to a collection of short stories.

Williamson, David

2008-09-07

2

Jefferson Lab Hands-on Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These are some of the hands-on activities used in Jefferson Lab's BEAMS program. In BEAMS, classes of 6th, 7th and 8th grade students are exposed to the Lab's scientific environment. For five consecutive days during school hours, classes of 6th grade students and their teachers participate in these science and math activities conducted with Jefferson Lab staff.

Education, Thomas J.

3

Knowledge Retention for Computer Simulations: A study comparing virtual and hands-on laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of virtual laboratories has the potential to change physics education. These low-cost, interactive computer activities interest students, allow for easy setup, and give educators a way to teach laboratory based online classes. This study investigated whether virtual laboratories could replace traditional hands-on laboratories and whether students could retain the same long-term knowledge in virtual laboratories as compared to hands-on laboratories. This study is a quantitative quasi-experiment that used a multiple posttest design to determine if students using virtual laboratories would retain the same knowledge as students who performed hands-on laboratories after 9 weeks. The study was composed of 336 students from 14 school districts. Students had their performances on the laboratories and their retention of the laboratories compared to a series of factors that might have affected their retention using a pretest and two posttests, which were compared using a t test. The results showed no significant difference in short-term learning between the hands-on laboratory groups and virtual laboratory groups. There was, however, a significant difference (p = .005) between the groups in long-term retention; students in the hands-on laboratory groups retained more information than those in the virtual laboratory groups. These results suggest that long-term learning is enhanced when a laboratory contains a hands-on component. Finally, the results showed that both groups of students felt their particular laboratory style was superior to the alternative method. The findings of this study can be used to improve the integration of virtual laboratories into science curriculum.

Croom, John R., III

4

Hands-on astronomy activities for the elementary school  

SciTech Connect

We held a series of astronomy workshops for local school teachers using astronomy activities from a course we give for Elementary Education majors. The school teachers provide us with feedback about successes and failures. Then we try the revised activities in the classroom. Via this in-service and pre-service feedback, the astronomy laboratory activities in the course have been completely revised over the last three years. The activities we use are almost entirely hands-on. The activities include use of log book (or journal) for describing outside-of-class observations of sunsets, phases of the moon, portable sundial, and the somewhat unique method we use to teach the constellations. In addition, all laboratory activity records are kept in the log book. Laboratory activities cover the use of fists to measure degrees, constellations, phases of the moon, relative distances and size of planets, Invent an Alien, lenses, images and telescopes, and the making of a comet. In our poster, based roughly on the theme of the seasons, we will describe a portable, multi-user sundial, length of the day display using newspaper data, two temperature/season activities, and a model demonstration of why the sundial shadows behave as they do.

Lutz, T.E.; Horne, J.C. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

1994-12-31

5

Software to Enhance Hands-On Laboratory Experimentation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This presentation from MATEC explains the transition from using software to getting hands-on experience in a lab. The laboratory setting in technology related courses is an integral part of the learning experience for the student. It takes the theory that is being learned in the lecture and applies that theory. The text books that are used in the lecture include a copy of either Multi Sim or Electronic Workbench. The software gives the student the ability to "build" the circuits that are under study without the hardware that is found in the lab. The students at Grambling State University are not utilizing the software in the beginning level classes. The students must start utilizing the software earlier in the educational career. To accomplish this, the students are starting to complete the lab assignments with software before going to the lab. By doing this, the students will know what to expect before starting lab. This can and hopefully will remove some confusion that the beginner level circuit student has when constructing a circuit. The next step to improving and enhancing the laboratory experience for the student is to add a computer system to each laboratory station. Each system will contain software and hardware that will connect the test instruments to the computer and perform a multitude of analysis functions. The software that has stimulated some interest is MatLab. MatLab includes curriculum for some of the following: digital signal processing, digital image processing, digital filters, signals and systems, speech processing, computer-controlled systems, applied digital signal processing, dynamic modeling of engineering systems, and continuous-time linear systems. In conclusion, the learning invention for this laboratory is to bring together the lecture and lab through the implementation of software and hardware. This was part of the Learning Invention Labs that MATEC held. Visit the MATEC.org homepage for more information.

Flinders, Shirley

2013-01-01

6

Thinking with Hands-On Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal for library media specialists and teachers is to lead students to use technology to communicate, in a powerful and meaningful way, and to creatively display what they have learned. With these ideas in mind, this article details several projects using Microsoft PowerPoint XP. The activities, with simplified instructions, can be adapted to…

Conover, Patricia Ross

2009-01-01

7

Hands-On Classroom Photolithography Laboratory Module to Explore Nanotechnology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nanotechnology is an area of significant interest and can be used as a motivator for students in subject areas including physics, chemistry, and life sciences. A 5X reducer system and associated lesson plan was used to provide students a hands-on exposure to the basic principles of photolithography and microscale circuit fabrication.

Stelick, Scott J.; Alger, William H.; Laufer, Jesse S.; Waldron, Anna M.; Batt, Carl A.

2005-01-01

8

Fun with Hands-on Science Activities for Elementary Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains hands-on activities in science that make use of balloons and are fun and stimulating as well as challenging. By actively participating in these activities, students can develop science process and critical thinking skills as well as technical and measuring skills. Topics include Air as Matter, Pressure, Chemical Change,…

Barry, Dana M.

9

Hands-On Environmental Education Activities for K-6 Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This environmental education workbook is aimed at helping kindergarten through 6th-grade teachers and contains hands-on activities directly targeted toward a particular age group, with equal distribution to each grade. Subject area descriptions and several multicultural activities are also included. Each activity lists the title, subject taught,…

Kaufman, Donald G.; Eshbaugh, Stephen H.

10

Communicate science: an example of food related hands-on laboratory approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV's Educational and Outreach Laboratory) organized activity with kids to convey scientific knowledge and to promote research on Earth Science, focusing on volcanic and seismic hazard. The combination of games and learning in educational activity can be a valuable tool for study of complex phenomena. Hands-on activity may help in engage kids in a learning process through direct participation that significantly improves the learning performance of children. Making learning fun motivate audience to pay attention on and stay focused on the subject. We present the experience of the hand-on laboratory "Laboratorio goloso per bambini curiosi di scienza (a delicious hands-on laboratory for kids curious about science)", performed in Frascati during the 2013 European Researchers' Night, promoted by the European Commission, as part of the program organized by the Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica in the framework of Associazione Frascati Scienza (http://www.frascatiscienza.it/). The hand-on activity were designed for primary schools to create enjoyable and unusual tools for learning Earth Science. During this activity kids are involved with something related to everyday life, such as food, through manipulation, construction and implementation of simple experiments related to Earth dynamics. Children become familiar with scientific concepts such as composition of the Earth, plates tectonic, earthquakes and seismic waves propagation and experience the effect of earthquakes on buildings, exploring their important implications for seismic hazard. During the activity, composed of several steps, participants were able to learn about Earth inner structure, fragile lithosphere, waves propagations, impact of waves on building ecc.., dealing with eggs, cookies, honey, sugar, polenta, flour, chocolate, candies, liquorice sticks, bread, pudding and sweets. The activity was successful as more than 500 kids of different ages participated with great enthusiasm, as well as they parents, and gave the chance to explore and manipulate even complex scientific arguments without getting the feeling of having doing this.

D'Addezio, Giuliana; Marsili, Antonella; Vallocchia, Massimiliano

2014-05-01

11

Curriculum Materials: Hands-On Activities from The Water Sourcebook  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These curriculum materials are from The Water Sourcebook series, a popular set of hands-on water environment activities. The activities, arranged by grade level, range from construction of a big book about water in the life of a fish for younger students to the exploration of the physics of artesian flow for older learners. Topics include the water cycle, conservation, consumption, contamination, treatment, landfills, rivers, flow dynamics, and detecting radon. Correlations to other subject areas are indicated. Several of the activities are available in Spanish. There are also links to information and a poster about careers in the water environment field.

12

MOBILE: A MOBile Instructional Laboratory Environment for Hands-on Information Technology Education  

E-print Network

MOBILE: A MOBile Instructional Laboratory Environment for Hands-on Information Technology Education environments for information tech- nology education. Using MOBILE, instructors can hold out- reaches technology education. MOBILE is a software system that homogenizes a diverse information technology learning

Wagner, Paul J.

13

Work in progress — Rules of engagement: Student interest and learning in hands-on laboratory experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to evaluate the impact of hands-on experiences on student learning, the authors developed and delivered five one-hour supplemental learning sessions to a group of approximately 25 students over two consecutive years. During the sessions, student groups participated in a total of 16 hands-on activities, ranging in length from 5 to 20 minutes each. The primary objective of the

Allen White; Glen Livesay; Kay C Dee

2010-01-01

14

Hands-On and Minds-On Modeling Activities to Improve Students' Conceptions of Microscopic Friction  

E-print Network

Hands-On and Minds-On Modeling Activities to Improve Students' Conceptions of Microscopic Friction of hands-on and minds-on modeling activities geared towards improving students' understanding imply that through a series of carefully designed hands-on and minds-on modeling activities

Zollman, Dean

15

Quantum mechanics for everyone: Hands-on activities integrated with technology  

E-print Network

Quantum mechanics for everyone: Hands-on activities integrated with technology Dean A. Zollman,a) N approach to higher-level courses. The result is a hands-on approach to learning and teaching quantum interactive instruction and include hands-on activities as well as interactive computer visualiza- tions. Our

Zollman, Dean

16

Promoting Female Students' Learning Motivation towards Science by Exercising Hands-On Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to design different hands-on science activities and investigate which activities could better promote female students' learning motivation towards science. This study conducted three types of science activities which contains nine hands-on activities, an experience scale and a learning motivation scale for data…

Wen-jin, Kuo; Chia-ju, Liu; Shi-an, Leou

2012-01-01

17

Hands-on Activities That Simulate Polar Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article highlights science lessons and activities that can help elementary students gain an understanding of the tools and technology involved in polar research. Suggestions for literacy integration are provided, and activities are aligned to national standards.

Fries-Gaither, Jessica

18

Art Activities for All Ages. Hands-On Africa.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book explores the art heritage of Sub-Saharan Africa with projects (n=40) and activities (n=15) featuring African animals. Artifacts from museums and private collections have inspired the activity choices in the book, and an effort has been made to present fresh and new ideas, not always found in most activity books on diversity. As with all…

Merrill, Yvonne Y.

19

Hands-On Activities for Fourth and Fifth Graders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three activities--"Earth's Orbit and the Four Seasons,""Observing Rabbits," and "Solutes, Solvents, and Solutions"--are described. Included in each are background information, a list of materials, key questions, teacher preparation, teacher introduction, procedure, and follow-up activities. (CW)

Ecklund, Mary C.

1990-01-01

20

Science Action Labs Part 3: Puzzlers. An Innovative Collection of Hands-On Science Activities and Labs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains hands-on science laboratory activities for grades 4 through 9 that use discrepant events to challenge students. All of the "puzzlers" are based upon science principles and include directions for building gadgets that explain the "puzzlers." Topics covered include: volume conservation, magnetic phenomena, optical illusions,…

Shevick, Ed

21

Flower Bulb Science: Activities for the Hands-on Classroom  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learn about The Bulb Project, a website for educators full of activities that demonstrate the value and cross-curricular opportunities of growing flower bulbs for the classroom. These activities encourage students to become more ecologically aware, allow for community involvement, and increase student awareness of the environment. Share your ideas as well on this site developed at Cornell University. This seminar features our experts from the Cornell University Department of Horticulture: Marcia Eames-Sheavly of the Garden-Based Learning Program and Craig Cramer, Communications Specialist, with special guest and site developer Elly Cramer from the National Science Digital Library.

Payo, Robert

22

Comparing Student Learning in Mechanics Using Simulations and Hands-on Activities  

E-print Network

Comparing Student Learning in Mechanics Using Simulations and Hands-on Activities Adrian Carmichael. Keywords: pulleys, simulations, hands-on, concept maps, hypertext, student understanding, physics education research PACS: 01.40.Fk INTRODUCTION Studies comparing the effectiveness of computer simulations to hands

Zollman, Dean

23

Development of Hands-On Student Experience with Modern Facilities, Measurement Systems, and Uncertainty Analysis in Undergraduate Fluids Engineering Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development described of hands-on student experience with modern facilities, measurement systems, and uncertainty analysis in undergraduate fluids engineering laboratories. Classroom and pre-lab lectures and laboratories teach students experimental fluid dynamics (EFD) methodology and uncertainty analysis (UA) procedures following a step-by-step approach, which mirrors the \\

Fred Stern; Marian Muste; Surageet Ghosh; Jun Shao; Don Yarbrough

24

Does the Lack of Hands-On Experience in a Remotely Delivered Laboratory Course Affect Student Learning?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators question whether performing a laboratory experiment as an observer (non-hands-on), such as conducted in a distance education context, can be as effective a learning tool as personally performing the experiment in a laboratory environment. The present paper investigates this issue by comparing the performance of distance education…

Abdel-Salam, Tarek; Kauffman, Paul J.; Crossman, Gary

2006-01-01

25

The Art and Science Connection: Hands-on Activities for Intermediate Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most people think that the artist and the scientist live in two totally different worlds. However, art and science are only two different ways of understanding and knowing the world. To help intermediate students make a connection between art and science, a collection of hands-on activities have been developed. By engaging in these activities that…

Tolley, Kimberley

26

A Hands-On Activity Incorporating the Threefold Representation on Limiting Reactant  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many students share the common belief that the limiting reactant in a chemical reaction is the reactant in the smallest quantity of material. To help students overcome this difficulty a hands-on activity for the limiting reactant concept was developed. The activity incorporates the three levels of representation (macroscopic, submicroscopic, and…

Gonza´lez-Sa´nchez, Ange´lica M.; Ortiz-Nieves, Edgardo L.; Medina, Zuleikra

2014-01-01

27

Pi in the Sky: Hands-on Mathematical Activities for Teaching Astronomy.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book of activities was designed to provide students with the opportunity to create mental models of concepts in astronomy while using simple, homemade tools. In addition, these sequential, hands-on activities are to help students see how scientific knowledge is obtained. The introduction describes the rationale for the book and describes the…

Pethoud, Robert

28

Special Section: Innovative Laboratory Exercises A Real-time and Hands-on Research Course in Protein Purification  

E-print Network

/chemistry, purification principles, protocol development, optimization strategies, use and pro- gramming of an automated applicants with research experience, who are detailed notebook writers, and who have developed solid criticalSpecial Section: Innovative Laboratory Exercises A Real-time and Hands-on Research Course

Borgstahl, Gloria

29

Towards Achieving Hands-On Project Based Learning beyond Laboratories and into the Dorm Rooms  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been a lot of emphasis placed on providing hands-on project based learning in engineering education A lot of these initiatives have also been successful in creating an environment where the student goes beyond theory and incorporates real-world signals in the experiments. However, there is still a major gap in being able to sustain this kind of excitement being

Shekhar Sharad; Tom Robbins

2010-01-01

30

Teaching the Common Core Math Standards with Hands-On Activities, Grades 6-8  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics have been formulated to provide students with instruction that will help them acquire a thorough knowledge of math at their grade level, which will in turn enable them to move on to higher mathematics with competence and confidence. "Hands-on Activities for Teaching the Common Core Math…

Muschla, Judith A.; Muschla, Gary Robert; Muschla, Erin

2012-01-01

31

Hands-on-CERN  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The purpose of the Hands-On CERN project is to increase understanding of the most fundamental processes inside matter, and to explain modern research about particle collisions. The site includes many lab activities, interactive resources, and background information for teachers and learners. CERN is the European Organization for Nuclear Research. It's primary function is to provide the particle accelerators and other infrastructure needed for high-energy physics research. Its laboratory houses the LHC (Large Hadron Collider).

2011-09-13

32

Georgia tech information security center hands-on network security laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

An undergraduate internetwork, security-teaching laboratory, which includes both defensive and offensive security laboratory experimentation, is described. This laboratory is oriented toward an introductory internetworking security class and is intended to complement more theoretical network security classes while sparking student interest. The laboratory is unique in that it uses an isolated laboratory network that provides a simple model of the Internet,

Randal T. Abler; Didier Contis; Julian B. Grizzard; Henry L. Owen

2006-01-01

33

Lab Safety and Bioterrorism Readiness Curricula Using Active Learning and Hands-on Strategies as Continuing Education for Medical Technologists  

PubMed Central

Frequent reports of laboratory- (and hospital-) acquired infection suggest a deficiency in safety training or lack of compliance. To assess the need for continuing education (CE) addressing this problem, an original education needs assessment survey was designed and administered to medical technologists (med-techs) in Northeast Ohio. Survey results were used to design a learner-centered training curriculum (for example, Lab Safety and Bioterrorism Readiness trainings) that engaged med-techs in active learning, integrative peer-to-peer teaching, and hands-on exercises in order to improve microbiology safety knowledge and associated laboratory techniques. The Lab Safety training was delivered six times and the Bioterrorism Readiness training was delivered five times. Pre/posttesting revealed significant gains in knowledge and techniques specific to laboratory safety, security, risk assessment, and bioterrorism readiness amongst the majority of med-techs completing the CE trainings. The majority of participants felt that the hands-on exercises met their needs and that their personal laboratory practices would change as a result of the training course, as measured by attitudinal surveys. We conclude that active learning techniques and peer education significantly enhance microbiology learning amongst participating med-techs. PMID:23914281

Fiester, Steven; Redfearn, James; Helfinstine, Shannon; Meilander, Tracey; Woolverton, Christopher J.

2010-01-01

34

Effects of Combined Hands-on Laboratory and Computer Modeling on Student Learning of Gas Laws: A Quasi-Experimental Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on current theories of chemistry learning, this study intends to test a hypothesis that computer modeling enhanced hands-on chemistry laboratories are more effective than hands-on laboratories or computer modeling laboratories alone in facilitating high school students' understanding of chemistry concepts. Thirty-three high school chemistry…

Liu, Xiufeng

2006-01-01

35

Student Understanding of the Correlation between Hands- on Activities and Computer Visualizations of NMR/MRI  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This study utilizes the implementation of research-based learning materials designed to teach students about the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a concepts-based introductory-level physics course. A progression of activities using hands-on experiments and computer visualizations leads students through the basics of magnetism and resonance, and finally toward a model of MRI. Here we seek to describe how students understand the basics of resonance and then proceed to make correlations between the hands-on activities and visualizations. Results show that students had fundamental difficulties with the concepts surrounding resonance, and that it appears to have led to a rudimentary understanding of the visualization and how the two tasks were correlated. Based on student responses, we postulate what further scaffolding will be necessary for helping the students make more robust connections and a more comprehensive understanding of the phenomena associated with MRI.

Mcbride, Dyan L.; Murphy, Sytil K.; Zollman, Dean A.

2010-12-31

36

Informal Activities with Lasers, Lights, and Lenses: The Hands-On Optics Project  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Hands-On Optics project began as a follow-up to the 2001 NSF planning grant "Optics Education -- A Blueprint for the 21st Century", which described the value of informal science programs in addressing the disconnect between the ubiquity of optics in everyday life and the noticeable absence of optics education in K-12 curricula and in informal science education programs. Key partners in the project are NOAO, SPIE-The International Society for Optical Engineering, and the Optical Society of America (OSA). The informal instructional materials created by the project are distributed through science centers nationwide and through the Mathematics, Engineering, Science Achievement Program (MESA) in a number of states, including Arizona, California, Washington, and Maryland. A key part of the project is the involvement, modeled after Project ASTRO, of optics professionals currently engaged in outreach activities and programs. Optics professionals (termed optics resource volunteers) are teamed with MESA and science center educators in implementing the program. These hands-on, high-interest, standards-connected activities and materials provide 6, three-hour-long optics activity modules that can be used in a variety of informal settings. We will describe the techniques used at NOAO to train educators, parents, and optics professionals who will work with the HOO activities as well as the different approaches needed for different informal education programs, ranging from Saturday programs, after-school programs, and science center programs. NOAO is developing the six modules and associated kits as well as competitions that have broad appeal to 12-year olds. Hands-On Optics: Making an Impact with Light (HOO) is a collaborative NSF-funded four-year informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. NOAO is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc. under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.

2005-12-01

37

Effects of Combined Hands-on Laboratory and Computer Modeling on Student Learning of Gas Laws: A Quasi-Experimental Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on current theories of chemistry learning, this study intends to test a hypothesis that computer modeling enhanced hands-on\\u000a chemistry laboratories are more effective than hands-on laboratories or computer modeling laboratories alone in facilitating\\u000a high school students' understanding of chemistry concepts. Thirty-three high school chemistry students from a private all-girl\\u000a high school in northeastern United States were divided into two

Xiufeng Liu

2006-01-01

38

Integrating Experiment, Modeling and Design using a Hands on Hydraulic Positioning Laboratory for Mechanical Control Systems Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of a laboratory intensive curriculum, Mechanical Engineering students at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo are required to take a senior level class in Mechanical Control Systems. In addition to three one-hour lectures, students attend a weekly three hour laboratory session where course concepts are reinforced through hands-on modeling and experimentation. This paper describes a newly implemented and innovative laboratory experience which is centered on a hydraulic position control system. Often experiments in Mechanical Controls are heavily influenced by non-linearities such as friction or backlash which cause inexperienced students to lose confidence in linear system modeling as an effective analysis and design tool. A hydraulic system was chosen for this laboratory due to excellent correlation between experimental results and the linear modeling techniques taught in the course. This laboratory experience is designed to integrate linear system modeling techniques, experimentation and data collection, control system design, and design verification through physical testing using a variety of hardware and software tools. The main objectives of the laboratory are to give the students practice and confidence in advanced control system modeling, experience with precision hydraulic positioning systems, practice in designing Proportional-Integral (PI) controllers, exposure to digital control systems and experience and physical understanding of the sometimes dramatic condition of instability. The methodology includes a unique procedure that uses root locus concepts and asks the students to drive the system to instability to determine system parameters. The paper describes the laboratory experience in detail and gives some example results and an assessment of student learning.

Birdsong, Charles; Owen, Frank; Ridgely, John; Widmann, James

2009-08-11

39

Hands-on Lessons and Activities about the Tundra and Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article highlights hands-on or multimedia lesson plans about the tundra and ecosystem concepts. Science lessons are paired with suggested literacy lesson plans. All lessons are aligned to national standards.

Fries-Gaither, Jessica

40

Effects of Combined Hands-on Laboratory and Computer Modeling on Student Learning of Gas Laws: A Quasi-Experimental Study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on current theories of chemistry learning, this study intends to test a hypothesis that computer modeling enhanced hands-on chemistry laboratories are more effective than hands-on laboratories or computer modeling laboratories alone in facilitating high school students' understanding of chemistry concepts. Thirty-three high school chemistry students from a private all-girl high school in northeastern United States were divided into two groups to participate in a quasi-experimental study. Each group completed a particular sequence of computer modeling and hands-on laboratories plus pre-test and post-tests of conceptual understanding of gas laws. Each group also completed a survey of conceptions of scientific models. Non-parametric tests, i.e. Friedman's one-way analysis of ranks and Wilcoxon's signed ranks test, showed that the combined computer modeling and hands-on laboratories were more effective than either computer simulations or hands-on laboratory alone in promoting students' conceptual understanding of the gas law on the relationship between temperature and pressure. It was also found that student conception of scientific models as replicas is statistically significantly correlated with students' conceptual understanding of the particulate model of gases. The findings mentioned earlier support the recent call for model-based science teaching and learning in chemistry.

Liu, Xiufeng

2006-03-01

41

Computer Assisted Fluid Power Instruction: A Comparison of Hands-On and Computer-Simulated Laboratory Experiences for Post-Secondary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of utilizing a combination of lecture and computer resources to train personnel to assume roles as hydraulic system technicians and specialists in the fluid power industry. This study compared computer simulated laboratory instruction to traditional hands-on laboratory instruction,…

Wilson, Scott B.

2005-01-01

42

Rain Forest: The Latest Information and Hands-on Activities To Explore Animals, Plants, and Geography. Grades 2-5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains information and activities to help make the study of rainforests an exciting exploration for teachers and students. Students explore the animals, plants, and geography of the rainforest by completing hands-on activities from various disciplines. This book contains five units: (1) "Living Layers"; (2) "Animals, Animals, Animals";…

Bernard, Robin

43

Quantum Mechanics for Everyone: Hands-On Activities Integrated with Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains a hands-on approach to teaching quantum mechanics that challenges the belief shared by many physics instructors that quantum mechanics is a very abstract subject that cannot be understood until students have learned much of the classical physics. (Contains 23 references.) (Author/YDS)

Zollman, Dean A.; Rebello, N. Sanjay; Hogg, Kirsten

2002-01-01

44

Quantum mechanics for everyone: Hands-on activities integrated with technology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article contains information on hands-on instructional materials for quantum mechanics appropriate for a first-year physics course and more advanced courses. The materials referred to are from the Visual Quantum Mechanics project at Kansas State University. Results from field studies are included.

Zollman, Dean A.; Rebello, N. S.; Hogg, Kirsten

2005-08-06

45

Work in progress - integration of hands-on-laboratory experience of power electronics and renewable energy applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work-in-progress presents the research and educational activities designed to create a synergy related to aspects of the power electronics laboratory experience using alternative energy, and dissemination of knowledge related to the impact of renewable energy as part of the solution to achieve a sustainable future & economy for the society, as well as to the national security based on

Eduardo I. Ortiz-Rivera; Marcel J. Castro-Sitiriche

2009-01-01

46

Learning about Modes in Atomic Force Microscopy by Means of Hands-On Activities Based on a Simple Apparatus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was conducted to examine the results of using a low-cost hands-on setup in combination with accompanying activities to promote understanding of the contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM). This contact mode setup enabled learners to study how AFM works by hand scanning using probing cantilevers with different characteristics on…

Phuapaiboon, Unchada; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Osotchan, Tanakorn

2009-01-01

47

Shifting Gears 2. Hands-on Activities for Learning Workplace Skills and English as a Second Language. A Teacher's Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's handbook is the second part of a two-volume curriculum designed to assist teachers providing instruction in vocational English as a second language (ESL) to Indochinese refugees. The main section of the guide, consisting of 24 hands-on core lessons, includes learning activities geared toward helping students develop prevocational,…

World Education, Inc., New York, NY.

48

An Educational Device for a Hands-on Activity to Visualize the Effect of Atherosclerosis on Blood Flow  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An educational device was created to develop a hands-on activity to illustrate how atherosclerosis can dramatically reduce blood flow in human vessels. The device was conceived, designed, and built at the University of Coimbra, in response to a request from the Exploratorio Infante D. Henrique Science Centre Museum, where it is presently…

de Almeida, J. P. P. G. L.; de Lima, J. L. M. P.

2013-01-01

49

Hands On Earth Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication is a collection of 13 hands-on activities that focus on earth science-related activities and involve students in learning about growing crystals, tectonics, fossils, rock and minerals, modeling Ohio geology, geologic time, determining true north, and constructing scale-models of the Earth-moon system. Each activity contains…

Weisgarber, Sherry L.; Van Doren, Lisa; Hackathorn, Merrianne; Hannibal, Joseph T.; Hansgen, Richard

50

Blended Inquiry with Hands-On and Virtual Laboratories: The Role of Perceptual Features during Knowledge Construction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the characteristics of virtual and hands-on inquiry environments for the development of blended learning in a popular domain of bio-nanotechnology: the separation of different-sized DNA fragments using gel-electrophoresis, also known as DNA-fingerprinting. Since the latest scientific developments in nano- and micro-scale tools…

Toth, Eva Erdosne; Ludvico, Lisa R.; Morrow, Becky L.

2014-01-01

51

Hands-on Herps.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a hands-on activity to help primary, intermediate, and advanced students learn about and compare the general characteristics of reptiles and amphibians. Suggests "herp stations" to provide experiences. Details materials, background and procedures necessary for using this activity. (CW)

Science Activities, 1987

1987-01-01

52

HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES VERSUS WORKSHEETS IN REINFORCING PHYSICAL SCIENCE PRINCIPLES: EFFECTS ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT AND ATTITUDE  

Microsoft Academic Search

A posttest-only control group experimental design with a counter-balanced replication was used to determine the effects on cognitive achievement (both immediate and delayed) and attitude toward the subject matter of a hands-on activity versus a worksheet in reinforcing physical science principles. The experimental results were stable across both replications, regardless of the subject matter (Oh m 's Law or incline

Donald M. Johnson; George W. Wardlow; Timothy D. Franklin

1997-01-01

53

Hands-On Hydrology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

2004-01-01

54

A Hands-On Activity to Introduce the Effects of Transmission by an Invasive Species  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This activity engages students to better understand the impact of transmission by invasive species. Using dice, poker chips, and paper plates, an entire class mimics the spread of an invasive species within a geographic region. The activity can be modified and conducted at the K-16 levels.

May, Barbara Jean

2013-01-01

55

How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activities that Relate Mendelian Genetics to Cell Division.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is an activity designed to connect Mendelian laws with the physical processes of cell division. Included are materials production, procedures and worksheets for the meiosis-mitosis game and a genetics game. (CW)

McKean, Heather R.; Gibson, Linda S.

1989-01-01

56

Give Me Some Skin: A Hands-On Science Activity Integrating Racial Sensitivity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What's the largest, fastest growing, organ in the human body? It's the tough, elastic, flexible, and waterproof covering that helps protect other organs and body parts from such things as germs, heat, cold, and sunlight--skin, of course! This life science activity engages middle school students in an exploration of the structure, function, and variety of skin. They "construct" skin layer by layer using simple materials such as felt, foam padding, yarn, and vinyl in various skin tones. This activity provides an opportunity to discuss racial diversity and to show students that skin color is, quite literally, only skin deep.

Houtz, Lynne E.; Quinn, Thomas H.

2003-02-01

57

The Effect of a Computer Simulation Activity versus a Hands-on Activity on Product Creativity in Technology Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A hands-on group of seventh graders in technology education (n=29) used Legos and another group (n=29) used Gryphon Bricks simulation software for problem solving. Analysis of teacher ratings of solutions revealed no differences in creativity, originality, or usefulness of the products. (Contains 34 references.) (SK)

Michael, Kurt Y.

2001-01-01

58

A DNA Fingerprinting Simulation Laboratory for Biology Students: Hands-on Experimentation To Solve a Mock Forensic Problem.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an alternative approach to DNA fingerprinting. Demonstrates how undergraduate students can be involved in many aspects of this type of experiment and how DNA fingerprinting experiments can be incorporated into the laboratory curriculum of courses for majors and nonmajors. (NB)

Palladino, Michael A.; Cosentino, Emily

2001-01-01

59

Manipulatives-based laboratory for majors biology - a hands-on approach to understanding respiration and photosynthesis.  

PubMed

The first course in our year-long introductory series for Biology majors encompasses four learning units: biological molecules and cells, metabolism, genetics, and evolution. Of these, the metabolism unit, which includes respiration and photosynthesis, has shown the lowest student exam scores, least interest, and lowest laboratory ratings. Consequently, we hypothesized that modeling metabolic processes in the laboratory would improve student content learning during this course unit. Specifically, we developed manipulatives-based laboratory exercises that combined paper cutouts, movable blocks, and large diagrams of the cell. In particular, our novel use of connecting LEGO blocks allowed students to move model electrons and phosphates between molecules and within defined spaces of the cell. We assessed student learning using both formal (content indicators and attitude surveys) and informal (the identification of misconceptions or discussions with students) approaches. On the metabolism unit content exam, student performance improved by 46% over pretest scores and by the end of the course, the majority of students rated metabolism as their most-improved (43%) and favorite (33%) subject as compared with other unit topics. The majority of students rated manipulatives-based labs as very helpful, as compared to non-manipulatives-based labs. In this report, we will demonstrate that students made learning gains across all content areas, but most notably in the unit that covered respiration and photosynthesis. PMID:23653756

Boomer, Sarah M; Latham, Kristin L

2011-01-01

60

Teaching chemistry and other sciences to blind and low-vision students through hands-on learning experiences in high school science laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Students with blindness and low vision (BLV) have traditionally been underrepresented in the sciences as a result of technological and attitudinal barriers to equal access in science laboratory classrooms. The Independent Laboratory Access for the Blind (ILAB) project developed and evaluated a suite of talking and audible hardware/software tools to empower students with BLV to have multisensory, hands-on laboratory learning experiences. This dissertation focuses on the first year of ILAB tool testing in mainstream science laboratory classrooms, and comprises a detailed multi-case study of four students with BLV who were enrolled in high school science classes during 2007--08 alongside sighted students. Participants attended different schools; curricula included chemistry, AP chemistry, and AP physics. The ILAB tools were designed to provide multisensory means for students with BLV to make observations and collect data during standard laboratory lessons on an equivalent basis with their sighted peers. Various qualitative and quantitative data collection instruments were used to determine whether the hands-on experiences facilitated by the ILAB tools had led to increased involvement in laboratory-goal-directed actions, greater peer acceptance in the students' lab groups, improved attitudes toward science, and increased interest in science. Premier among the ILAB tools was the JAWS/Logger Pro software interface, which made audible all information gathered through standard Vernier laboratory probes and visually displayed through Logger Pro. ILAB tools also included a talking balance, a submersible audible light sensor, a scientific talking stopwatch, and a variety of other high-tech and low-tech devices and techniques. While results were mixed, all four participating BLV students seemed to have experienced at least some benefit, with the effect being stronger for some than for others. Not all of the data collection instruments were found to reveal improvements for all of the participating students, but each of the types of data sets provided evidence of benefit for varying subgroups of participants. It is the expectation of the ILAB team that continuing to implement adaptive/assistive technologies for BLV students in science laboratory classrooms will foster enhanced opportunities in science classes and professions.

Supalo, Cary Alan

61

Shifting Gears. Hands-on Activities for Learning Workplace Skills and English as a Second Language. A Teacher's Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum handbook uses a hands-on approach to teaching basic skills and language for the U.S. workplace to students who are not familiar with many common tools and procedures. Although designed for Southeast Asian refugees, the curriculum can be adapted for use with other groups, including older adults or young people. The handbook consists…

World Education, Inc., New York, NY.

62

A Year of Hands-on Science: Exciting Theme Units with More Than 100 Activities, Projects, and Experiments To Make Science Come Alive.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains 18 themed teaching units with 2 themes per chapter, organized seasonally around the traditional school year. Each theme includes natural connections and hands-on science activities that correspond to what children are already observing in their world. Each chapter begins with highlights of the month and a reproducible "Science…

Kepler, Lynne; Novelli, Joan, Ed.

63

Science Curriculum in Practice: Student Teachers' Use of Hands-On Activities in High-Stakes Testing Schools  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the influence of recently adopted high-stakes testing on the curriculum and instruction of 12 secondary science student teachers (or interns). The study, which used a postpositivist, qualitative method with researcher as participant as the university supervisor, focused on interns' abilities to implement hands-on, reform-minded practices in the context of their school placements. Findings indicate that high-stakes testing

Charles J. Eick

2002-01-01

64

Are all hands-on activities equally effective? Effect of using plastic models, organ dissections, and virtual dissections on student learning and perceptions.  

PubMed

This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or plastic models). Each group received a 15-min lecture followed by a 45-min activity with one of the treatments. Immediately after the lesson and then 2 mo later, students were tested on anatomy and physiology knowledge and completed an attitude survey. Students who used plastic models achieved significantly higher overall scores on both the initial and followup exams than students who performed organ or virtual dissections. On the initial exam, students in the plastic model and organ dissection treatments scored higher on anatomy questions than students who performed virtual dissections. Students in the plastic model group scored higher than students who performed organ dissections on physiology questions. On the followup exam, when asked anatomy questions, students in the plastic model group scored higher than dissection students and virtual dissection students. On attitude surveys, organ dissections had higher perceived value and were requested for inclusion in curricula twice as often as any other activity. Students who performed organ dissections were more likely than the other treatment groups to agree with the statement that "science is fun," suggesting that organ dissections may promote positive attitudes toward science. The findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of multiple types of hands-on activities in anatomy laboratory courses. PMID:24585474

Lombardi, Sara A; Hicks, Reimi E; Thompson, Katerina V; Marbach-Ad, Gili

2014-03-01

65

Hooked On Hands-On  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This blog entry details the importance of hands on learning in creating a productive classroom environment. Included in this blog is the lesson plan and worksheets for the AIMS activity Jelly Belly(R). In the lesson plan students collect, display, and analyze data using a circle graph.

Cordel, Betty

2013-01-30

66

The Universe at Your Fingertips 2.0 DVD-ROM: A Collection of Hands-on Activities, Resource Guides, Informational Articles, and Videos for Teaching Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new edition of the ASP's key educational publication The Universe at Your Fingertips has been issued in DVD-ROM format, containing 133 classroom-tested, hands-on activities (organized by subject), 43 articles with background information about topics in astronomy, 9 articles on teaching and learning space science in the 21st century, 17 guides to the best published and web resources on key topics, 12 short instructional videos, and a host of images.

Fraknoi, A.; Kruse, B.; Gurton, S.; Schmitt, A. H.; Proudfit, L.; Schatz, D.

2012-08-01

67

The Amazing Animal Activity Book: Dozens of Hands-on Projects That Teach across the Curriculum. Grades 1-3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The activities in this book are designed to encourage children's scientific curiosity as well as their creativity. Activities include puppet making, word scrambles, matching exercises, crossword and jigsaw puzzles, mobiles, games, mini books, coloring activities, Venn diagrams, and plays. These activities are intended as a foundation for children…

Bernard, Robin

68

Engaging Students in Early Exploration of Nanoscience Topics Using Hands-On Activities and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manuscript reports on efforts to introduce beginning college students to the modern nanoscience field. These include: implementing selected experiments into sequencing core first-year and second-year chemistry laboratory courses; providing students with a first research experience; and engaging them in service learning and outreach programs…

Furlan, Ping Y.

2009-01-01

69

Hands-on Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14 Formal and Informal Education Settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introduction: Activities developed by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. Educators may choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum from activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to exploring the solar system. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. The web sites for the activities contain current information so students experience recent mission information such as data from Mars rovers or the status of Stardust sample return. The Johnson Space Center Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic syllabus useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the syllabus is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting, educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. In both the informal and the primary education levels the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest, arouse curiosity and easily take the participants from pre-awareness to the awareness stage. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered may easily be adapted for the upper levels of high school and early college, as they require students to use and analyze data. Syllabus Format: The Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities starts with a variety of solar system scale activities that fit different settings and equipment. The early solar system formation activities are focused on asteroids, meteorites and planet formation. The theme of how and why we explore our solar system encompasses activities that engage the language and creative arts. Further activities highlight the Sun and planetary geology. A key aspect of the usefulness of the syllabus is that it provides easy access to solar system content, activities, related links and the thematic context for the classroom teacher or group leader. Conclusion: The Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities is a concentrated resource of activities and links that allows educators to comfortably and inexpensively share the excitement and science of solar system exploration with students and members of the public. Additional Information: Some of the activities included in the Exploring the Solar System Syllabus of Activities are in the following NASA developed guides. http://ares.jsc.nasa.gov/Education/index.html

Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.

2004-12-01

70

The Geography of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This learning module aims to engage students in problem solving, critical thinking, scientific inquiry, and cooperative learning. The module is appropriate for use in any introductory or intermediate undergraduate course that focuses on human-environment relationships. The module examines the geography of human activities that produce the major…

Liverman, Diana; Solem, Michael

71

Hands-on Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents activities that teach elementary students how light works by having them make rainbows. A primary-/intermediate- level activity involves conducting a rainbow color survey, and a student page provides a copy of the rainbow color survey. A primary-level activity has students create rainbows using water and a mirror. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1996-01-01

72

A Category-Based Video Analysis of Students' Activities in an Out-of-School Hands-on Gene Technology Lesson  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our research objectives focused on monitoring (i) students' activities during experimental teaching phases in an out-of-school gene technology laboratory, and (ii) potential relationships with variables such as work group size and cognitive achievement. Altogether, we videotaped 20 work groups of A-level 12th graders (n = 67) by continuous…

Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.; Klautke, Siegfried

2008-01-01

73

Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

1985-01-01

74

Research and Development. Laboratory Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research and Development is a laboratory-oriented course that includes the appropriate common essential elements for industrial technology education plus concepts and skills related to research and development. This guide provides teachers of the course with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an…

Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

75

Hands-on Science. Exploring Magnification.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents hands-on science activities using inexpensive, hand-held microscopes and slides made from simple, readily available materials. The article describes how to introduce students to microscopes and presents directions for using the microscopes and making slides. A student page investigates fingerprints with microscopes. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1993-01-01

76

Hands-On Nuclear Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nuclear science is an important topic in terms of its application to power generation, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national defense. Unfortunately, the subatomic domain is far removed from daily experience, and few learning aids are available to teachers. What follows describes a low-tech, hands-on method to teach important concepts in…

Whittaker, Jeff

2013-01-01

77

Transforming a Traditional Hands-On Activity into an Enquiry Activity to Foster More In-Depth Understanding of the Concept of Density  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditional methods used to teach the concept of density that employ solid objects of different masses and volumes can be supplemented by enquiry activities in which students vary the mass-to-volume ratio of the same object to test ideas about density and flotation. A simple substance, Blu-Tack, is an ideal material to use in this case. The…

Lee, Yeung Chung; Kwok, Ping Wai

2010-01-01

78

Introducing Basic Molecular Biology to Turkish Rural and Urban Primary School Children via Hands-on PCR and Gel Electrophoresis Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study includes the results of a 2-day education project titled "Molecular Biology Laboratory Summer School, MoBiLYO." The project was held at a University Research Center by scientists from Department of Pharmacology and graduate students. The project was composed of introductory lectures, model construction, DNA isolation,…

Selli, Cigdem; Yildirim, Gokce; Kaymak, Aysegul; Karacicek, Bilge; Ogut, Deniz; Gungor, Turkan; Erem, Erdem; Ege, Mehmet; Bümen, Nilay; Tosun, Metiner

2014-01-01

79

The impact of a hands-on approach to learning visible spectrometry upon students' performance, motivation, and attitudes.  

PubMed

In this paper, the effect of introducing visible spectrometry concepts through hands-on laboratory work upon student learning within four vocational programs are discussed. All together, 118 students, average 18.6 years old, participated in the study. The results showed no correlation between students' motivational components (intrinsic, regulated, and controlled), chemistry self-concept and their achievement on an experiential knowledge test and knowledge gained from this hands-on approach. Statistically significant differences were found for academic achievement among students in a biotechnology technical program (School 1), food processing program (School 2), laboratory biomedicine program (School 3), and a biotechnology general program (School 4). Differences in academic achievement are further reflected in students' perception of particular knowledge gained through their hands-on experiences and in their expressed attitude toward different didactical characteristics. All students, regardless of their study program, highly evaluated the relaxed atmosphere that contributed to their self-confidence in completing their laboratory activities. PMID:23841355

Vrtacnik, Margareta; Gros, Natasa

2013-01-01

80

Engineering Water Analysis Laboratory Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of water treatment in a marine steam power plant are to prevent damage to boilers, steam-operated equipment, and steam and condensate lives, and to keep all equipment operating at the highest level of efficiency. This laboratory exercise is designed to provide students with experiences in making accurate boiler water tests and to…

Schlenker, Richard M.

81

"Didn't Get Expected Answer, Rectify It." Teaching Science Content in an Elementary Science Classroom Using Hands-On Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The call for inquiry science to be a part of the school science curriculum is popular in many parts of the world. While some research in this area revealed success stories of students' learning when they are engaged in student-directed, open-ended scientific inquiry activities, others are more sceptical about how these activities impact students'…

Tan, Aik-Ling; Wong, Hwei-Ming

2012-01-01

82

A Hands-On Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

SUNY Cobleskill offers a two-year program in fish and wildlife management. The goal of the program is to train technicians to work with professional fish and wildlife biologists in the field and in the laboratories of both public and private fish and wildlife management programs. (Author/BW)

Ginsburg, Alan

1980-01-01

83

Hands-On Earth Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This collection of activities from the Ohio Geological Survey features a variety of activities for younger students. These activities use common materials to illustrate geologic topics such as crystal growth, plate tectonics, fossilization, rocks and minerals, and others. There are also games and puzzles, models of the Earth-Moon system and the Sun, and activities on geologic time, Ohio geology, soil liquefaction, and others.

84

Hands-On Physics Activities with Real-Life Applications: Easy-to-Use Labs and Demonstrations for Grades 8-12  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This comprehensive collection of nearly 200 investigations, mini-labs, and other activities uses everyday examples to make physics concepts easy to understand by providing interaction between interaction between students and their world in a way that encourages scientific reasoning. Topics covered include measurement, motion, force, pressure, energy and momentum, waves, light, and electromagnetism.

Cunningham, James

2007-09-20

85

Are All Hands-On Activities Equally Effective? Effect of Using Plastic Models, Organ Dissections, and Virtual Dissections on Student Learning and Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or…

Lombardi, Sara A.; Hicks, Reimi E.; Thompson, Katerina V.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

2014-01-01

86

Introducing basic molecular biology to Turkish rural and urban primary school children via hands-on PCR and gel electrophoresis activities.  

PubMed

This study includes the results of a 2-day education project titled "Molecular Biology Laboratory Summer School, MoBiLYO." The project was held at a University Research Center by scientists from Department of Pharmacology and graduate students. The project was composed of introductory lectures, model construction, DNA isolation, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and gel electrophoresis. The participants were 13-year-old eighth-graders attending primary schools affiliated with Ministry of National Education in urban and rural areas of Izmir, Turkey. The purpose of this study was to introduce basic molecular biology concepts through individually performed experiments such as PCR and gel electrophoresis integrated with creative drama. The students were assessed at the beginning and the end of each project day via mini-tests, experimental and presentation skills evaluation forms. Data showed that students' knowledge about DNA structure and basic molecular biology techniques significantly increased. On the basis of experimental and presentational skills, there was no significant difference between kids from urban and rural schools or between public and boarding public schools, whereas the average score of girls was significantly higher than that of boys. In conclusion, individually performed experiments integrated with creative drama significantly increased students' perception of complex experimental procedures on basic molecular biology concepts. Data suggests that integration of these concepts into the science and technology curriculum of Turkish primary education may support the recruitment of future scientists who can handle rapidly developing genomic techniques that will affect our everyday life. PMID:24474053

Selli, Cigdem; Y?ld?r?m, Gokce; Kaymak, Aysegul; Karacicek, Bilge; Ogut, Deniz; Gungor, Turkan; Erem, Erdem; Ege, Mehmet; Bümen, Nilay; Tosun, Metiner

2014-01-01

87

A New Two-Step Approach for Hands-On Teaching of Gene Technology: Effects on Students' Activities During Experimentation in an Outreach Gene Technology Lab  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emphasis on improving higher level biology education continues. A new two-step approach to the experimental phases within an outreach gene technology lab, derived from cognitive load theory, is presented. We compared our approach using a quasi-experimental design with the conventional one-step mode. The difference consisted of additional focused discussions combined with students writing down their ideas (step one) prior to starting any experimental procedure (step two). We monitored students' activities during the experimental phases by continuously videotaping 20 work groups within each approach ( N = 131). Subsequent classification of students' activities yielded 10 categories (with well-fitting intra- and inter-observer scores with respect to reliability). Based on the students' individual time budgets, we evaluated students' roles during experimentation from their prevalent activities (by independently using two cluster analysis methods). Independently of the approach, two common clusters emerged, which we labeled as `all-rounders' and as `passive students', and two clusters specific to each approach: `observers' as well as `high-experimenters' were identified only within the one-step approach whereas under the two-step conditions `managers' and `scribes' were identified. Potential changes in group-leadership style during experimentation are discussed, and conclusions for optimizing science teaching are drawn.

Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

2011-08-01

88

Introductory Industrial Technology I. Laboratory Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide contains 36 learning modules intended for use by technology teachers and students in grades 7 and 8. Each module includes a student laboratory activity and instructor's resource sheet. Each student activity includes the following: activity topic and overview, challenge statement, objectives, vocabulary/concepts reinforced,…

Towler, Alan L.; And Others

89

Identifying and Reaching the Hands-On Learner  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The following research is the result of frustrations involving teaching carpentry students who display little interest in learning within a classroom environment; however, often the same students excel in a laboratory (kinesthetic/hands-on) situation. Learning style surveys were given and nearly ninety percent of the students within this program…

Brackett, Gary

2006-01-01

90

ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through September 30, 2012.  

E-print Network

ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through September 30, 2012. ______ 99://ice.chem.wisc.edu/Catalog.html) ______ _______ ____________________________________________________________ $_____ $_________ ______ _______ ____________________________________________________________ $_____ $_________ ______ _______ ____________________________________________________________ $_____ $_________ ______ _______ ____________________________________________________________ $_____ $_________ Hands-On Activity Manuals and How-To Guides ______ 91-007 Chem Camp Handbook $20 $_________ ______ 97

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

91

Hands-On Skills for Caregivers  

MedlinePLUS

... someone for a walk, stand directly behind and to the left of him or her. Place your left hand on their left shoulder, and your right hand on their right shoulder. In this way you are walking with your loved one in ...

92

Hands-On Research Schools PARTICIPANTS  

E-print Network

Hands-On Research Schools PARTICIPANTS learn to do science using inexpensive modern instruments (ages 25-35) from developing countries #12;Hands-on table-top science cost: ~$1000 time: ~year memory #12;directors pose Kenneth SHOWALTER West Virginia Rajarshi ROY Maryland Harry SWINNEY Texas Hands

Texas at Austin. University of

93

Hands-on Virtual Clay Adeline Pihuit  

E-print Network

Hands-on Virtual Clay Adeline Pihuit University of Grenoble and INRIA Paul G. Kry McGill University designed for hands-on 3D shape modeling and deformation through natural hand gestures. Our system is made virtual hand that is modeling soft virtual clay. During interaction, the user is provided both passive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

Hands-On Activities for the Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concepts of scale of the Solar System are critical prerequisites for understanding the scale and nature of the universe. Most students and adults have difficulty comprehending how large space really is, and how large the planets and the Sun really are compared with everyday distances and objects, and also with how far away the Sun, Moon, and planets are from

D. L. Young

2006-01-01

95

Hands-on Science Communication  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many of the most important questions studied in science touch on fundamental issues with a great popular appeal, such as: How was the world created? How did life arise? Are we alone? How does it all end? Communication of science to the public is important and will play an even greater role in the coming years. The communication of achieved results is more and more often seen as a natural and mandatory activity to inform the public, attract funding, and attract science students. In some countries university statutes are even being rewritten in these years to include communication with the public as the third mandatory function besides research and education. A number of interesting "lessons learned" from the daily work at the Education and Outreach (EPO) office of the European Space Agency's Hubble Space Telescope will be presented. The topics include conventional as well as unconventional issues such as: • How does the flow of communication from scientist to public work, which actors are involved, and which pitfalls are present in their interaction? How can possible problems be avoided? • What are the criteria that determine whether press releases "make it" or not? • How can a commercial approach benefit an EPO office? • What is the right skills base in a modern EPO office? • How can modern technology be used to communicate science more efficiently?

Christensen, L. L.

2006-08-01

96

Sandia National Laboratories Education Outreach Activities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy and its national laboratories are a major employer of scientists and engineers and consequently have a strong interest in the development and training of a qualified pool of employment candidates. For many years the DOE and its national laboratories have supported education activities devoted to increasing the number and quality of science and engineering graduates. This is part of the DOE mission because of the critical national need for scientists and engineers and the recognized deficiencies in the education system for science and mathematics training. Though funding support for such activities has waxed and waned, strong education programs have survived in spite of budget pressures. This paper reviews a few of the education programs presently supported at Sandia by the Science and Technology Outreach Department. The US DOE Defense Programs Office and Sandia National Laboratories provide financial support for these education activities.

Dawes, William R. Jr.

1999-08-26

97

Hands-On Science: Science Start-ups.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Article discusses the four elements of good elementary science programs and offers ideas for creative hands-on science and across-the-curriculum activities (e.g., a please touch science center, curriculum planning chart, and getting to know you water activity). It notes science-related events and describes four science reference books. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1992-01-01

98

Hands-On Science. Bright Ideas for Teaching About Shadows.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an elementary level hands-on science activity designed to teach students about shadows. The activity helps students draw conclusions about shadows by experimenting with different materials and determining which will make a shadow. A sidebar explains what a shadow is and offers further resources. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1997-01-01

99

Hands-On Whole Science. Pass the Beetles, Please.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Several hands-on whole science activities help elementary students learn about animals' diets and how they affect other animals. One activity involves identifying animals as carnivores, herbivores, or omnivores. Another has students construct food chains. Two across-the-curriculum ideas involve naming carnivores and preparing imaginary menus for…

Kepler, Lynne

1992-01-01

100

Science Fun: Hands-On Science with Dr. Zed.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book presents 65 simple, safe, and intriguing hands-on science activities. In doing these simple experiments, children can make a variety of discoveries that will surprise them. It includes many activities from discovering how people see color and what makes people's hair stand on end, to creating a tornado in a jar or a propeller-driven boat…

Penrose, Gordon

101

Branson Health Department Norovirus "Hands On" Training  

E-print Network

Branson Health Department Norovirus "Hands On" Training Scenario #5 The Big Dipper (Water Park on the radio to inform you they just had a small child have an episode of vomiting and diarrhea in the River

102

Integrating Statistics with a Microbiology Laboratory Activity  

PubMed Central

Statistics is an important tool for microbiologists but is virtually absent from undergraduate laboratory activities. The variables in a stringent protocol, the antibiotic disk diffusion assay described by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, were examined by the authors as a means for introducing hypothesis testing and the application of elementary statistical tools. After several experiments, a lab activity was developed where students examine the effect of cell concentration on antibiotic activity and analyze data with the t test. They also collect data independently from the same samples and compare their measurements using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The outcome of the activity, including an assessment tool, indicated that students learned the appropriate use of the t test and ANOVA, gained an appreciation for standardized protocols, and enjoyed the experience. PMID:23653559

LOROWITZ, WILLIAM; SAXTON, ELIZABETH; SONDOSSI, MOHAMMAD; NAKAOKA, KAREN

2005-01-01

103

Activities of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Work accomplished by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) under contract to NASA in 1985 is described. The work took place in the areas of flight projects, space science, geodynamics, materials science, advanced technology, defense and civil programs, telecommunications systems, and institutional activities.

1986-01-01

104

Traffic Control Tips for Hands-On Labs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides some tried and true methods of avoiding materials management and traffic problems associated with hands-on activities. While each class has its own personality and each teacher has his or her own style, these tips can be useful and practical in a variety of settings.

Hill, Tricia

2004-01-01

105

The Molecular Boat: A Hands-On Experiment To Demonstrate the Forces Applied to Self-Assembled Monolayers at Interfaces  

E-print Network

The Molecular Boat: A Hands-On Experiment To Demonstrate the Forces Applied to Self is challenging as it often necessitates the use of specialized instrumentation. In this hands-on experiment-Division Undergraduate, Laboratory Instruction, Physical Chemistry, Hands-On Learning/Manipulatives, Materials Science

Salaita, Khalid

106

Reading, Science, and Hands On Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the different ways in which science can be taught, including reading of subject matter from a basal textbook and a hands-on approach in ongoing science lessons and units of study. The paper first points out that in 1996 the National Science Teachers Association came out with a set of standards for teachers to emphasize in…

Ediger, Marlow

107

A Hands-on Soar Tutorial  

Microsoft Academic Search

This tutorial gives an overview of Soar as an architecture for developing agents as well as cognitive models. It covers the history of Soar contrasts it with other cognitive architectures, but emphasizes hands-on development where the attendees create Soar programs. Tutorial Description Although Soar has existed for over 20 years, it is still quite relevant for cognitive modeling as it

John E. Laird

108

Hands-On Training for Deckhands.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes riverboat deckhand training program operated by East Mississippi Community College and local river towing companies. Residential program trains deckhands using actual towing equipment, including boat and "quarters barge" with classroom. Describes trainees' rigorous workday, including classes, hands-on drills, and physical training.…

Hoffman, Carl

1992-01-01

109

Hand-on "Cosmos Picture Book"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The authors have designed and produced a hand-on "Cosmos Picture Book" as teaching material in astronomy, and demonstrated it at a public event, The Geo-Carnival for Children, held in Osaka in 2007. The aim of this picture book is to introduce the cosmos to children. This picture book was also used in the university class.

Sumitomo, Naoko; Shibata, Takeru; Mizoguchi, Saori; Nishiyama, Shinji; Fukue, Jun

2008-12-01

110

Archaeology Get Hands on with History!  

E-print Network

Welcome to Archaeology Days 2010 Get Hands on with History! ...The Past in the Present... June sees the start of a summer long series of archaeological and historical events and festivities to celebrate National Archaeology Days. There are a wide variety of exciting events taking place at historical sites

111

Outcomes Assessment in a Hands-On Manufacturing Processes Course  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Industry has consistently identified lack of experience in manufacturing processes as one of the key competency gaps among new engineering graduates. This paper will discuss a laboratory based Manufacturing Processes course that provides hands-on manufacturing experience to students. In addition to standard theoretical concepts, the course uses team-based projects that help students gain hands-on experience with selected manufacturing processes. The projects start with simple components that can be made on a single machine such as a lathe or a mill, and progress to the manufacture and assembly of a fully functional mechanism. This approach introduces students to the issues involved in putting together a non-trivial assembly. Multiple evaluation tools including surveys, focus-groups, and actual observations, were used to determine the effectiveness of the approach used. The results indicate that this is an effective way of addressing industry concerns.

Ssemakula, Mukasa

2009-09-16

112

Mobile robotics activities in DOE laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV"s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV's). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV's and UAV's. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

Lujan, Ron; Harbour, Jerry; Feddema, John; Bailey, Sharon; Barhen, Jacob; Reister, David

2005-05-01

113

Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV’s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV’s). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV’s and UAV’s. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

2005-03-01

114

Solar activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The use of renewable energy technologies is typically thought of as an integral part of creating and sustaining an environment that maximizes the overall quality of life of the Earth`s present inhabitants and does not leave an undue burden on future generations. Sandia National Laboratories has been a leader in developing and deploying many of these technologies over the last two decades. A common but special aspect of all of these activities is that they are all conducted in cooperation with various types of partners. Some of these partners have an interest in seeing these systems grow in the marketplace, while others are primarily concerned with economic benefits that can come from immediate use of these renewable energy systems. This paper describes solar thermal and photovoltaic technology activities at Sandia that are intended to accelerate the commercialization of these solar systems.

Klimas, P.C.; Hasti, D.E.

1994-03-01

115

Laboratory-tutorial activities for teaching probability  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We report on the development of studentsâ ideas of probability and probability density in a University of Maine laboratory-based general education physics course called Intuitive Quantum Physics. Students in the course are generally math phobic with unfavorable expectations about the nature of physics and their ability to do it. We describe a set of activities used to teach concepts of probability and probability density. Rudimentary knowledge of mechanics is needed for one activity, but otherwise the material requires no additional preparation. Extensions of the activities include relating probability density to potential energy graphs for certain âtouchstoneâ examples. Students have difficulties learning the target concepts, such as comparing the ratio of time in a region to total time in all regions. Instead, they often focus on edge effects, pattern match to previously studied situations, reason about necessary but incomplete macroscopic elements of the system, use the gamblerâs fallacy, and use expectations about ensemble results rather than expectation values to predict future events. We map the development of their thinking to provide examples of problems rather than evidence of a curriculumâs success.

Wittmann, Michael C.; Morgan, Jeffrey; Feeley, Roger

2007-06-26

116

The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO systems as a research tool. The activities are divided into three stations: Vision Science, Fourier Optics, and the AO Demonstrator. We briefly overview these activities, which are described fully in other articles in these conference proceedings (Putnam et al., Do et al., and Harrington et al., respectively). We devote attention to the unique challenges encountered in the design of these activities, including the marriage of inquiry-like investigation techniques with complex content and the need to tune depth to a graduate- and PhD-level audience. According to before-after surveys conducted in 2008, the vast majority of participants found that all activities were valuable to their careers, although direct experience with integrated, functional AO systems was particularly beneficial.

Ammons, S. M.; Severson, S.; Armstrong, J. D.; Crossfield, I.; Do, T.; Fitzgerald, M.; Harrington, D.; Hickenbotham, A.; Hunter, J.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, L.; Li, K.; Lu, J.; Maness, H.; Morzinski, K.; Norton, A.; Putnam, N.; Roorda, A.; Rossi, E.; Yelda, S.

2010-12-01

117

Winter 2002 1 A HANDS-ON LABORATORY  

E-print Network

. With sales of novel communication solutions for data networking, broadband, wireless, and optoelectronics, together with the continued strong demand for advanced personal computers, the global semiconductor new products for the internet, computers, and communi- cation technologies. However, the traditional

Chang, Jane P.

118

Hands-On Equations 1 Lite  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this iOS app students use the Hands-On Equations method to balance equations and solve for one variable. This app includes three lessons, each with a short one to two minute video, two example problems, and ten exercises. At the first level students solve an equation that is already set up on the scale, in the second level students must set up the equation on the scale before solving, and in the third lesson students must take this one step forward and eliminate variables as they solve.

Borenson, Henry

2013-06-19

119

Special Science Section: How to Make Hands-on Science Work for You.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents ideas from elementary school teachers who have made hands-on science an integral part of their classrooms. Includes suggestions for overcoming obstacles to hands-on science, innovative teaching techniques that encourage girls to excel in science and math, model activities to win parent/teacher support, and a list of eight "sensational"…

Kepler, Lynne; Pollina, Ann

1996-01-01

120

ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012.  

E-print Network

ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012. ______ 99-001 DNA://ice.chem.wisc.edu/Catalog.html) ______ _______ ____________________________________________________________ $_____ $_________ ______ _______ ____________________________________________________________ $_____ $_________ ______ _______ ____________________________________________________________ $_____ $_________ ______ _______ ____________________________________________________________ $_____ $_________ Hands-On Activity Manuals and How-To Guides ______ 91-007 Chem Camp Handbook $20 $_________ ______ 97

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

121

ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through December 31, 2011.  

E-print Network

ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through December 31, 2011. ______ 99-001 DNA://ice.chem.wisc.edu for more information. Hands-On Activity Manuals and How-To Guides ______ 91-007 Chem Camp Handbook $20

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

122

Delivering hands-on technology education  

SciTech Connect

The Science Alliance serves Delaware and borders of neighboring states. A core group of volunteers and a small paid staff coordinate the technology education needs of K-12 students and their teachers, the time and talent donated by volunteers, and the financial support of local business, and government agencies. In five years we facilitated contact between hundreds of technical professionals and thousands of students. We will provide some details on the diverse elements which secured its success, illustrate typical programs offered, and recommend action directions for prospective groups. The Science Alliance`s success is evident from the national publicity it has received, and the large amount of funding it has secured, but most of all by hands-on experience provided by volunteers and science kits we bought and now routinely loan to teachers.

Nelson, R.; Booth, B. [DuPont Co., Wilmington, DE (United States)

1994-12-31

123

Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-09-01

124

Calculator Controlled Robots: Hands-On Math and Science Discovery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This curriculum includes ten missions and three exploration extensions that provide activities for up to a semester and focus largely on the space exploration theme. It is designed to engage students in hands-on inquiry based learning. It addresses science and technology standards, and specifically focuses on math content and process standards. Although other models will work, the curriculum is geared towards using a Texas Instruments (IT) 83 or 84 series graphing calculator with a Norland research calculator robot. The curriculum can be used in math, science, technology, or after school classes. Students create programs in TI-BASIC to run their robots. Missions are sequentially built on the knowledge of previous activities. Step-by-step programming instructions are provided in the first missions, gradually leading students to create their own programs in later missions. Students use and apply math and science concepts to direct their robots through a variety of challenges. In addition to the detailed activities, teachers are given opportunities to draw on their studentsâ hands-on experience to reach a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts. Several open-ended questions and extension activities are included to encourage potential scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and computer programmers to explore their fields.

Tuchscherer, Tyson

2006-08-01

125

[The metrological support of medical laboratory activity].  

PubMed

The article discusses the methodological approaches in implementing of regulations of the Federal law FZ-102 "On the support of unity of measurements in the area of laboratory medicine "from the positions of GOSTK ISO 9001-2008 "The systems of quality management. Requirements" and GOST K ISO 15189-2009 "medical laboratories. The particular requirements to quality and competence". The application of GOSTK ISO 18113.1-5 "The medicine items for diagnostic in vitro. Information provided by manufacturer (marking)" neatly assigns the responsibility for support of metrological correctness of laboratory measurements. PMID:23808011

Émanuél', A V; Suvorov, V I; Evseenko, O V

2013-02-01

126

Hands-on experiences with buoyant-less water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The phenomenon of weightlessness is known to students thanks to videos of amazing things astronauts do in spaceships orbiting the Earth. In this article we propose two hands-on activities which give students opportunities to infer by themselves the absence of buoyant force in a gravity accelerated system. The system is a free-falling or vertically tossed bottle filled with water with a small, inflated balloon attached to the bottom by a spring. Practical hints on how to make efficient demonstration experiments are added.

Sliško, Josip; Planinši?, Gorazd

2010-05-01

127

Miniaturization and globalization of clinical laboratory activities.  

PubMed

Clinical laboratories provide an invaluable service to millions of people around the world in the form of quality diagnostic care. Within the clinical laboratory industry the impetus for change has come from technological development (miniaturization, nanotechnology, and their collective effect on point-of-care testing; POCT) and the increasingly global nature of laboratory services. Potential technological gains in POCT include: the development of bio-sensors, microarrays, genetics and proteomics testing, and enhanced web connectivity. In globalization, prospective opportunities lie in: medical tourism, the migration of healthcare workers, cross-border delivery of testing, and the establishment of accredited laboratories in previously unexplored markets. Accompanying these impressive opportunities are equally imposing challenges. Difficulty transitioning from research to clinical use, poor infrastructure in developing countries, cultural differences and national barriers to global trade are only a few examples. Dealing with the issues presented by globalization and the impact of developing technology on POCT, and on the clinical laboratory services industry in general, will be a daunting task. Despite such concerns, with appropriate countermeasures it will be possible to address the challenges posed. Future laboratory success will be largely dependent on one's ability to adapt in this perpetually shifting landscape. PMID:21175379

Melo, Murilo R; Clark, Samantha; Barrio, Daniel

2011-04-01

128

A MASSive Laboratory Tour. An Interactive Mass Spectrometry Outreach Activity for Children  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is imperative to fascinate young children at an early stage in their education for the analytical sciences. The exposure of the public to mass spectrometry presently increases rapidly through the common media. Outreach activities can take advantage of this exposure and employ mass spectrometry as an exquisite example of an analytical science in which children can be fascinated. The presented teaching modules introduce children to mass spectrometry and give them the opportunity to experience a modern research laboratory. The modules are highly adaptable and can be applied to young children from the age of 6 to 14 y. In an interactive tour, the students explore three major scientific concepts related to mass spectrometry; the building blocks of matter, charged particle manipulation by electrostatic fields, and analyte identification by mass analysis. Also, the students carry out a mass spectrometry experiment and learn to interpret the resulting mass spectra. The multistage, inquiry-based tour contains flexible methods, which teach the students current-day research techniques and possible applications to real research topics. Besides the scientific concepts, laboratory safety and hygiene are stressed and the students are enthused for the analytical sciences by participating in "hands-on" work. The presented modules have repeatedly been successfully employed during laboratory open days. They are also found to be extremely suitable for (early) high school science classes during laboratory visit-focused field trips.

Jungmann, Julia H.; Mascini, Nadine E.; Kiss, Andras; Smith, Donald F.; Klinkert, Ivo; Eijkel, Gert B.; Duursma, Marc C.; Cillero Pastor, Berta; Chughtai, Kamila; Chughtai, Sanaullah; Heeren, Ron M. A.

2013-07-01

129

Positive Developments in Hands-On Universe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past decade, with generous support from Elementary, Secondary and Informal Science Education program of the NSF, Hands-On Universe (HOU), has developed and continues to develop small telescopes, user friendly image-processing software, XML-tools for image request within a telescope network, curricula for secondary schools,, teacher training materials and workshops,. HOU curricula should be published within a year, and we are developing HOU Centers across America and the World, to be on-going and self-sustained sites for teachers to learn how to teach and undertake astronomy in their classrooms. HOU is currently developing museum kiosks for image acquisition and processing in science centers, using an on site robotic telescope, and 0.35 meter telescopes around the world in real time. Over 700 teachers around the United States and another 700 teachers from around the world have taken HOU workshops, and about 2/3 use it in their classrooms. A particularly important development is the HOU collaboration with Johns Hopkins University as part of the usage of National Virtual Observatory and SDSS images and data for education. Such data systems are beginning to result in a flood of data, which will soon overwhelm students and teachers, unless we prepare for this onslaught carefully. HOU has met resonance with other astronomers and educators around the world. Global HOU is thriving, and next years Global HOU meeting will be held at NAOC in Beijing, China. We seek astronomers at this meeting who would be happy to help coach a few students on a paper, using our Collaboratory system!

Pennypacker, C. R.; Hands-On Universe; Yerkes Observatory; START Collaboration Team

2004-12-01

130

Enhancing Active Learning in the Student Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We previously examined how three approaches to directing students in a laboratory setting impacted their ability to repair a faulty mental model in respiratory physiology (Modell, HI, Michael JA, Adamson T, Goldberg J, Horwitz BA, Bruce DS, Hudson ML, Whitescarver SA, and Williams S. Adv Physiol Educ 23: 82?90, 2000). This study addresses issues…

Modell, Harold I.; Michael, Joel A.; Adamson, Tom; Horwitz, Barbara

2004-01-01

131

NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report  

E-print Network

of reactive nitrogen species (NO, NOX, NOY), precursors to the formation of ground-level ozone, from a rooftop. USCRN Installation of Soil Moisture and Soil Temperature (SM/ST) Probes Air Resources Laboratory processes occurring in the Houston area. Paul Kelley and Winston Luke measured ambient air concentrations

132

NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report  

E-print Network

Highlights 1. OAR Photo Content Award 2. EPA Roadside Sound Barrier Tracer Study Air Resources Laboratory Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division 6. Climate Reference Network (CRN) 7. Air Quality 8. Weather Roadside Sound Barrier Tracer Study. The paper "Tracer studies to characterize the effects of roadside

133

Laboratory-Tutorial Activities for Teaching Probability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report on the development of students' ideas of probability and probability density in a University of Maine laboratory-based general education physics course called "Intuitive Quantum Physics". Students in the course are generally math phobic with unfavorable expectations about the nature of physics and their ability to do it. We describe a…

Wittmann, Michael C.; Morgan, Jeffrey T.; Feeley, Roger E.

2006-01-01

134

State Public Health Laboratory System Quality Improvement Activities  

PubMed Central

The Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) and the APHL Laboratory Systems and Standards Committee manage the Laboratory System Improvement Program (L-SIP). One component of L-SIP is an assessment that allows the members and stakeholders of a laboratory system to have an open and honest discussion about the laboratory system's strengths and weaknesses. From these facilitated discussions, gaps and opportunities for improvement are identified. In some cases, ideas for how to best address these gaps emerge, and workgroups are formed. Depending on resources, both monetary and personnel, laboratory staff will then prioritize the next component of L-SIP: which quality improvement activities to undertake. This article describes a sample of quality improvement activities initiated by several public health laboratories after they conducted L-SIP assessments. These projects can result in more robust linkages between system entities, which can translate into improvements in the way the system addresses the needs of stakeholders. PMID:23997301

Vagnone, Paula Snippes

2013-01-01

135

Hands-On Science Workshop "Controlling Variables."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this document, a description is given of a one activity inservice session intended for teachers kindergarten through grade six. The objective of this activity is to identify the launch angle of a catapult as the variable controlling the distance a projectile will travel. The activity conducted by participants of this workshop deals with the…

Dependents Schools (DOD), Washington, DC. Pacific Region.

136

TOPS Laboratory Program Management Activities Wisconsin Traffic Operations and Safety (TOPS) Laboratory  

E-print Network

TOPS Laboratory Program Management Activities Wisconsin Traffic Operations and Safety (TOPS Development 511 Traveler Information Program Management Volume Speed Occupancy (V-SPOC) Traffic Analysis and Planning Program Management Computer Aided Dispatch Advanced Traffic Management System Interface (Inter

Sheridan, Jennifer

137

Hands-On Whole Science. What Rots?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents activities on the science of garbage to help elementary students learn to save the earth. A rotting experiment teaches students what happens to apple slices sealed in plastic or buried in damp soil. Other activities include reading stories on the subject and conducting classroom composting or toxic materials projects. (SM)

Markle, Sandra

1991-01-01

138

Engaging First-Year Undergraduates in Hands-On Research Experiences: The Upper Green River Barcode of Life Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To improve retention and engagement, first-year college science majors enrolled in University Experience orientation courses participated in a hands-on laboratory research experience: a DNA barcoding project to facilitate species identification. Students

Mcelroy, Douglas M.; Marcus, Jeffrey M.; Wyatt, Robert E.; Hughes, Tia M.

2010-01-01

139

Nematocidal activity of nitazoxanide in laboratory models  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nematocidal activity of a broad-spectrum antiparasitic agent, nitazoxanide [( N-(5-nitrothiazol-2-?l)salicylamide; NTZ], was evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo models using Caenorhabditis elegans, Heligmosomoides polygyrus and Trichinella spiralis. In vitro, NTZ (100 µM) exhibited a low activity against C. elegans and had no effect on embryonation and hatching of H. polygyrus eggs. At concentrations of 100 and 50 µM, the

F. Fonseca-Salamanca; M. M. Martínez-Grueiro; A. R. Martínez-Fernández

2003-01-01

140

How Leaders Foster Self-Managing Team Effectiveness: Design Choices Versus Hands-on Coaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

This multi-method field study examines the relative effects of two kinds of leader behaviors—design choices and hands-on coaching—on the effectiveness of self-managing teams. Find- ings show that how leaders design their teams and the quality of their hands-on coaching both influence team self- management, the quality of member relationships, and member satisfaction, but only leaders' design activities affect team task

Ruth Wageman

2001-01-01

141

Equal Opportunity Learning: Hands-On Science for Girls and Boys.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the results of a comparison of the effects of gender on fourth-grade students' learning in hands-on science. This study is part of a 3-year classroom based project of hands-on science in 6 urban and 2 suburban classrooms (n=171). Half of the teachers used a supported-inquiry approach, and half used activity-based science to…

Dalton, Bridget; And Others

142

Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory Page 1 Technical Activities Report  

E-print Network

Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory Page 1 Technical Activities Report Physical & Chemical Properties Division TABLE OF CONTENTS I. PHYSICAL & CHEMICAL PROPERTIES DIVISION (838.................................................................................................9 1. The NIST WebBook: NIST Chemical Reference Data for Industry

Magee, Joseph W.

143

Electricity/Electronics Systems. Laboratory Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This electricity/electronics guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 35 modules on the following topics: electrical…

Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

144

NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report  

E-print Network

. USCRN/NIDIS Workshop 4. EPA Roadside Sound Barrier Tracer Study 5. National Ambient Air Quality on the Stratosphere 8. Climatological Planetary Boundary Layer Study Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division 9 activities. tilden.meyers@noaa.gov 4. EPA Roadside Sound Barrier Tracer Study. The Roadside Sound Barrier

145

NOAA Air Resources Laboratory Quarterly Activity Report  

E-print Network

://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov I Transit Math Transit of Mercury on May 7, 2003 viewed by the NASA TRACE satellite. The wiggles, NNH08CD59C administered through the NASA Science Mission Directorate. This collection of activities satellite; Middle) NASA, Sun-Earth Day Transit of Venus poster for 2004; Bottom) Transit of Mercury as seen

146

An Inquiry Laboratory Activity for Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The "cookbook " style approach to studying biochemical reactions mediated by enzymes is changed to an inquiry approach. Cooperative teams are each given two questions about the types of living materials that contain the enzymes that break down hydrogen peroxide, and under what conditions the enzyme works best. They write hypotheses and design and conduct experiments to test these hypotheses. The activity provides students the opportunity to engage in meaningful scientific inquiry because they must truly understand the problem in order to attempt to solve it, to construct meaning in performing experiments, to practice observational skills, and to communicate in writing and in reporting orally to the class on their group results.

Nancy Contolini (Brookfield High School REV)

1994-07-30

147

Farm to School Hands on Chef Training and  

E-print Network

Farm to School Hands on Chef Training and Smarter Lunchrooms Finding it a challenge to meet the new? We have just the thing for you! 4-6 hours* of hands-on training for District Food Service Managers and staff � Training provided by Chef David Bearl, Certified Culinary Educator and Certified Chef de Cuisine

Florida, University of

148

THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S COMPREHENSIVE HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from nine U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the world-wide web. The data system is called CHAD-Consolidated Human Activity Database-and it is ...

149

Physics Thematic Paths: Laboratorial Activities and Historical Scientific Instruments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Physics Department of Padua University keeps an important collection of historical physics instruments which alludes to the fruitful scientific activity of Padua through the centuries. This heritage led to the suggestion of setting up laboratory activities connected to the Museum collection for secondary school students. This article shows how…

Pantano, O.; Talas, S.

2010-01-01

150

The Effect of Hands-on '"Energy-Saving House" Learning Activities on Elementary School Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior Regarding Energy Saving and Carbon-Emissions Reduction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Energy saving and carbon-emissions reduction (ESCER) are widely regarded as important issues for progress towards ensuring sustainable forms of economic development. This Taiwanese study focuses on the effects of a series of educational activities about ESCER on students' knowledge, attitudes and behavior. Sixty fifth-grade students from two…

Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Kuen-Yi; Guu, Yunn-Horng; Chang, Liang-Te; Lai, Chih-Chien

2013-01-01

151

Developing hands-on ergonomics lessons for youth  

SciTech Connect

By the time students are ready to enter the workforce they have been exposed to up to 20 years of ergonomics risk factors. As technology evolves, it provides more opportunities for intensive repetitive motion and with computers, cell phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and electronic games. The average student engages in fewer active physical activities, sit stationary in mismatched furniture in schools for hours and carry heavy backpacks. While long-term effects remain to be identified, increasingly ergonomists and others concerned with musculoskeletal health and wellness, see a need for early ergonomics education. This interactive session provides a hands-on approach to introducing ergonomics to students. Although different approaches may effectively introduce ergonomics at even early stages of development, this program was designed for youth at the middle to high school age. Attendees will participate in four activities designed to introduce ergonomics at an experiential level. The modules focus on grip strength, effective breathing, optimizing your chair, and backpack safety. The workshop will include presentation and worksheets designed for use by teachers with minimal ergonomics training. Feedback from the participants will be sought for further refining the usability and safety of the training package.

Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

2006-02-22

152

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING VOL. 44, NO. 1, PP. 183203 (2007) Hands on What? The Relative Effectiveness of Physical Versus Virtual Materials  

E-print Network

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING VOL. 44, NO. 1, PP. 183­203 (2007) Hands on What Abstract: ``Hands-on'' activities play an important, but controversial, role in early science education the preferred instructional medium in many hands-on contexts. � 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 44

Klahr, David

153

Hands-on experiences with buoyant-less water This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-print Network

Hands-on experiences with buoyant-less water This article has been downloaded from IOPscience.iop.org/journals/physed Hands-on experiences with buoyant-less water Josip Slisko1 and Gorazd Planinsic2 1 Autonomous University we propose two hands-on activities which give students opportunities to infer by themselves

Planin�iè, Gorazd

154

[Activity of clinical laboratory physicians in national health insurance].  

PubMed

As places of activity of clinical laboratory physicians in national health insurance, there are committees of the Japan Medical Association and the Social Insurance Union of Societies Related to Internal Medicine. In 1996, additional management fee was approved due to the efforts of the then President Kinya Kono, and subsequently, fees were increased after every revision, markedly contributing to the income at the department of clinical laboratory in hospitals. Another activity of clinical laboratory physicians is work in the Social Insurance Union of Societies Related to Internal Medicine and that Related to Surgery toward the 2006 revision of medical insurance fees. The former union presented a request paper in cooperation with each scientific society for the revision of medical insurance fees, and clinical laboratory physicians played the central role in summarizing requests associated with laboratory tests. We describe the contents of the request paper for the 2006 revision of medical insurance fees presented by this union. In the previous revisions (2004), after the Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare counseled with the Japan Medical Association, the Central Social Insurance Medical Council made the final decisions. In the future, the power of the Ministry of Health Labour, and Welfare may increase. In activities of clinical laboratory physicians in medical insurance fees, clinical laboratory tests and physiological function tests should be evaluated according to each items, and the income/expenditure balance should be improved. In the 2006 revision of medical insurance fees, a marked reduction in medical costs for the increase in medical insurance for the elderly is expected. For this reduction, laboratory tests for which a reduction is easy may become targets. The government reported the principle that reimbursement in 2006 will be reduced by 2-5% to put the brakes on the rise in national medical costs due to the aging of society. The prospective payment system mainly by the diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) is performed mainly at university hospitals at present, and attention is paid to its future progress. PMID:16372754

Mori, Mikio

2005-11-01

155

Hands-On Science: Is It an Acid or a Base? These Colorful Tests Tell All!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two hands-on science activities for K-6 students teach them how to determine if something is an acid or a base. The activities require acid/base indicator juice, testing strips, and a base solution. A recipe for making them in the classroom using red cabbage and baking soda is provided. (SM)

VanCleave, Janice

1998-01-01

156

S'COOL Lesson Plan 88: Create a Cloud in a Jar (Hands-on Version)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With this lesson plan, students participate in a hands-on activity using a glass jar and other simple materials to learn the three factors required for cloud formation. Detailed Procedure and Materials, Vocabulary linked to an on-line glossary, and Teacher Notes are provided. This activity is related to the NASA CERES Students Cloud Observations Online (S'COOL) project.

2010-04-29

157

Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities, and 2001 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

How can we improve our ability to predict the weather? How is the Earth's climate changing? What can the atmospheres of other planets teach us about our own? The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer these and other scientific questions. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. Vigorous research is central to NASA's exploration of the frontiers of knowledge. NASA scientists play a key role in conceiving new space missions, providing mission requirements., and carrying out research to explore the behavior of planetary systems, including, notably, the Earth's. Our Laboratory's scientists also supply outside scientists with technical assistance and scientific data to further investigations not immediately addressed by NASA itself. The Laboratory for Atmospheres is a vital participant in NASA's research program. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Sciences Directorate based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The Directorate itself comprises the Global Change Data Center; the Earth and Space Data Computing Division; three laboratories: the Laboratory for Atmospheres, the Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics, and the Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes; and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York, New York. In this report, you will find a statement of our philosophy and a description of our role in NASA's mission. You'll also find a broad description of our research and a summary of our scientists' major accomplishments in 2001. The report also presents useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community. For your convenience, we have published a version of this report on the Internet. Our Web site includes links to additional information about the Laboratory's Offices and Branches. You can find us on the World Wide Web at http://atmospheres.gsfc.nasa.gov.

Hoegy, Walter R.; Cote, Charles, E.

2002-01-01

158

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2008.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that maintains a primary mission focus the physical sciences, energy sciences, and life sciences, with additional expertise in environmental sciences, energy technologies, and national security. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2008 budget was $531.6 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,300 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development,' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Developlnent at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. Accordingly, this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2008. BNL expended $12 million during Fiscal Year 2008 in support of 69 projects. The program has two categories, the annual Open Call LDRDs and Strategic LDRDs, which combine to meet the overall objectives of the LDRD Program. Proposals are solicited annually for review and approval concurrent with the next fiscal year, October 1. For the open call for proposals, an LDRD Selection Committee, comprised of the Associate Laboratory Directors (ALDs) for the Scientific Directorates, an equal number of scientists recommended by the Brookhaven Council, plus the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning, review the proposals submitted in response to the solicitation. The Open Can LDRD category emphasizes innovative research concepts with limited management filtering to encourage the creativity of individual researchers. The competition is open to all BNL staff in programmatic, scientific, engineering, and technical support areas. Researchers submit their project proposals to the Assistant Laboratory Director for Policy and Strategic Planning. A portion of the LDRD budget is held for the Strategic LDRD (S-LDRD) category. Projects in this category focus on innovative R&D activities that support the strategic agenda of the Laboratory. The Laboratory Director entertains requests or articulates the need for S-LDRD funds at any time. Strategic LDRD Proposals also undergo rigorous peer review; the approach to review is tailored to the size and scope of the proposal. These Projects are driven by special opportunities, including: (1) Research project(s) in support of Laboratory strategic initiatives as defined and articulated by the Director; (2) Research project(s) in support of a Laboratory strategic hire; (3) Evolution of Program Development activities into research and development activities; and (4) ALD proposal(s) to the Director to support unique research opportunities. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred fronl the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. To be one of the premier DOE National Laboratories, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and d

Looney,J.P.; Fox, K.

2009-04-01

159

Environments Hands-On UNIX System Administration DeCal  

E-print Network

Multi-User Environments Hands-On UNIX System Administration DeCal Lecture 3 -- 6 February 2012 #12;UNIX permissions · Your umask governs what permissions new les you create have. Common umasks include

Walker, Matthew P.

160

Close view of statue showing her right hand on the ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Close view of statue showing her right hand on the hilt of a sword - U.S. Capitol, Statue of Freedom, Intersection of North, South, & East Capitol Streets & Capitol Mall, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

161

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory . . . . . . . . Pre Outreach Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  

E-print Network

#12;2 Table of Contents The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory . . . . . . . . Overview Pre Outreach Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What Do We Already Know? Outreach for Integrating Research and Learning . . . . . . . . . Contact us 3 5 7 8 9 12 13 #12;3 What is the NHMFL

Weston, Ken

162

Flat panel display development activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The flat panel display development activities underway at Sandia National Laboratories are described. Research is being conducted in the areas of glass substrates, phosphors, large area processes, and electron emissions. Projects are focused on improving process yield, developing large area processes, and using modeling techniques to predict design performance.

DiBello, E.G.; Worobey, W.; Burchett, S.; Hareland, W.; Felter, T.; Mays, B.

1994-12-31

163

Hands?on and online: scientific explorations through distance learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laboratory experiments are often considered the defining characteristic of science courses. Such activities provide students with real?world contexts for applying scientific concepts, while also allowing them to develop scientific ways of thinking and promoting an interest in science. In recent years, an increasing number of campuses have moved their instruction to the online learning environment. Consequently, in the sciences there

Mary V. Mawn; Pauline Carrico; Ken Charuk; Kim S. Stote; Betty Lawrence

2011-01-01

164

Hands-On Science and Literacy Activities about Solar Energy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article features science lesson plans to teach elementary students about the sun's energy, the relationship between light and heat, albedo, and the absorption of different surfaces. National standards and literacy integrations are provided for each lesson.

Fries-Gaither, Jessica

165

Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities, and 1999 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer questions related to climate, and climate change and other scientific questions about our planet and its neighbors. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of the Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. In this report,there is a statement of the labs philosophy and a description of it's role in NASA's mission. A broad description of the research and a summary of the scientists' major accomplishments in 1999 is also included. The report also presents useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community.

Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

166

Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year 1990 applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities. Four MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for energy testing and program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities.

Parker, G.B.

1991-01-01

167

Illustrating Probability in Genetics with Hands-On Learning: Making the Math Real  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Probability is an essential tool for understanding heredity and modern genetics, yet many students have difficulty with this topic due to the abstract and quantitative nature of the subject. To facilitate student learning of probability in genetics, we have developed a set of hands-on, cooperative activities that allow students to determine…

Pierce, Benjamin A.; Honeycutt, Brenda B.

2007-01-01

168

Tried and True: Traffic control tips for hands-on labs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The following are some tried and true methods of avoiding materials management and traffic problems associated with hands-on activities. While each class has its own personality and each teacher has his or her own style, these tips can be useful and practical in a variety of settings.

Hill, Tricia

2004-09-01

169

Paper Table Hands-on Challenge: Explore Structures with PBS's "Design Squad"[TM  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Build a table that's sturdy enough to hold a heavy weight! The catch? Students can only use eight sheets of newspaper, one piece of cardboard, and masking tape. This article describes "Paper Table," a hands-on activity from "Design Squad," in which kids investigate structures while following the steps of the engineering design process. Teachers…

Feinberg, Lauren

2010-01-01

170

The Hands-On and Far-Out Physics Team: It Starts Out Walking.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Hands-On and Far-Out Physics project is part of the Center for Technology, Environment, and Communication (C-TEC), a project-based learning community at Piner High School in Santa Rosa (California). This article introduces the project team, discusses member activities, presents a walking-speed experiment, and describes a Mars Colony course…

Albrecht, Bob; Firedrake, George

1998-01-01

171

An Evaluation of Two Hands-On Lab Styles for Plant Biodiversity in Undergraduate Biology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice…

Basey, John M.; Maines, Anastasia P.; Francis, Clinton D.; Melbourne, Brett

2014-01-01

172

Building Communities Through Role Models, Mentors, and Hands-on-Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes afterschool science program, implemented by a group of women engineers, to provide 18 African American middle-school female students with hands-on science activities related to the manufacture and design of automobiles. Women engineers served as mentors and role models. Program had positive influence on students' attitudes towards math,…

Ferreira, Maria

2001-01-01

173

Mechatronics for the Masses: a Hands-on Project for a Large, Introductory  

E-print Network

undertake a series of design and dissection projects as a means for learning. The major project is a six design was chosen for the flagship design activity in the course because it is well within the scopeMechatronics for the Masses: a Hands-on Project for a Large, Introductory Design Class* WILLIAM K

Durfee, William K.

174

A Hands-On Approach to Teaching Protein Translation & Translocation into the ER  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The process of protein translation and translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can often be challenging for introductory college biology students to visualize. To help them understand how proteins become oriented in the ER membrane, I developed a hands-on activity in which students use Play-Doh to simulate the process of protein…

LaBonte, Michelle L.

2013-01-01

175

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) GEM Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. Using the SAPHIRE analysis engine and relational database is a complementary program called GEM. GEM has been designed to simplify using existing PRA analysis for activities such as the NRC’s Accident Sequence Precursor program. In this report, the theoretical framework behind GEM-type calculations are discussed in addition to providing guidance and examples for performing evaluations when using the GEM software. As part of this analysis framework, the two types of GEM analysis are outlined, specifically initiating event (where an initiator occurs) and condition (where a component is failed for some length of time) assessments.

C. L. Smith; J. Schroeder; S. T. Beck

2008-08-01

176

Hands-on Space Exploration through High Altitude Ballooning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Adler Planetarium's "Far Horizons" high-altitude ballooning effort serves as the focus for a diverse set of educational activities, including middle school summer camps, a high school summer program (the Astro-Science Workshop), school-year internships for high school students, summer internships for undergraduates, a NSF-funded graduate fellowship, and a thriving public volunteer program. The relatively low costs of both the reusable hardware (less than $1000) and expendable supplies (around $150 per launch) allow us to mount frequent missions throughout the year - and make such a program ideal for replication at institutions of any size. The rapid development schedule for each individual mission permits the cradle-to-grave involvement of short-term participants, making it easy to draw in a wide audience. Students are involved literally in a hands-on manner in all aspects of the construction, launch, tracking, and recovery of simple experimental payloads, which typically include sensors for temperature, pressure, light intensity, and radiation. Stunning imagery provided by onboard cameras can attract significant media interest, which can bring outreach efforts to a very broad audience. Future plans include the design and construction of CubeSats - decimeter-sized picosatellites carried to orbit as secondary payloads. Our first satellite will be a relatively simple Earth-imager, built from commercial, off-the-shelf components. As in the ballooning program, students and volunteers will be involved in all stages of this effort. Once operational, imagery and other data from the satellite will be incorporated into a museum exhibit that will allow visitors to submit target requests. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0525995.

Hammergren, Mark; Gyuk, G.

2010-01-01

177

Laboratory for Atmospheres: Philosophy, Organization, Major Activities and 2000 Highlights  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

How can we improve our ability to predict the weather - tomorrow, next week, and into the future? How is the Earth's climate changing? What causes such change? And what are its costs? What can the atmospheres of distant planets teach us about our own planet and its evolution? The Laboratory for Atmospheres is helping to answer these and other scientific questions about our planet and its neighbors. The Laboratory conducts a broad theoretical and experimental research program studying all aspects of the atmospheres of Earth and other planets, including their structural, dynamical, radiative, and chemical properties. Vigorous research is central to NASA's exploration of the frontiers of knowledge. NASA scientists play a key role in conceiving new space programs, providing mission requirements, and carrying out research to explore the behavior of planetary systems, including, notably, the Earth's. The Laboratory for the Atmospheres is a vital participant in NASA's research program. The Laboratory is part of the Earth Science Directorate based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. In this report, you'll find a statement of our philosophy and a description of our role in NASA's mission. You'll also find a broad description of our research and a summary of our scientists' major accomplishments in 2000. The report also present useful information on human resources, scientific interactions, and outreach activities with the outside community.

Hoegy, Walter R. (Editor); Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

178

Hands on CERN: A Well-Used Physics Education Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Hands on CERN" education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages…

Johansson, K. E.

2006-01-01

179

Hands on CERN: a well-used physics education project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 'Hands on CERN' education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages and has received a lot

K. E. Johansson

2006-01-01

180

Teaching DNA Fingerprinting using a Hands-on Simulation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an inexpensive hands-on lesson in DNA fingerprinting that can be completed in a single class period. Involves students in solving a murder in which a drop of blood is fingerprinted and matched with the blood of the murderer. (DDR)

Schug, Thatcher

1998-01-01

181

Instruction with Hands-on Practice: Grid Generation and Forcing  

E-print Network

of the hands-on tutorial, we will be using a merged dataset of bathymetry points. You will need the following to Meters, then click OK. Figure 1. Projection dialogs. #12;Remove Long Triangles Load the merged bathymetry). For larger bays or river mouths with multiple entrance channels, the user should exercise discretion

US Army Corps of Engineers

182

Materials for Enabling Hands-On Robotics and STEM Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe our approach to enabling hands-on experiential robotics for all ages through the introduction of a robot pro - gramming workbook and robot test-bed. We describe the vi- sion and motivation for the project, and then the details of t he robot hardware, software, and the accompanying workbook and textbook materials. Together, these resources are aimed at providing free,

Maja J Matari; Nathan Koenig; David Feil-Seifer

2007-01-01

183

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ACTIVITIES FOR FY2002.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 1 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2002. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All Fy 2002 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2003. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2002 was $7 million. The actual allocation totaled $6.7 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

FOX,K.J.

2002-12-31

184

Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology  

SciTech Connect

One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

2004-02-15

185

Invention activities as preparation for learning laboratory data handling skills  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Undergraduate physics laboratories are often driven by a mix of goals, and usually enough of them to cause cognitive overload for the student. Our recent findings align well with studies indicating that students often exit a physics lab without having properly learned how to handle real data. The value of having students explore the underlying structure of a problem before being able to solve it has been shown as an effective way to ready students for learning. Borrowing on findings from the fields of education and cognitive psychology, we use ``invention activities'' to precede direct instruction and bolster learning. In this talk I will show some of what we have learned about students' data handling skills, explain how an invention activity works, and share some observations of successful transfer.

Day, James

2012-10-01

186

Recent geothermal reservoir engineering activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly describes the most recent activities in reservoir engineering for the geothermal group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The primary emphasis of the geothermal program of LBL is dedicated to reservoir engineering including theoretical investigations, the development and application of mathematical models, and field studies. The objectives of these activities are to develop and validate methods and instruments which will be utilized in the determination of the parameters of geothermal systems, and the identification and evaluation of the importance of the distinct processes which occur in reservoirs. The ultimate goal of the program is the development of state of the art technologies which characterize geothermal reservoirs and evaluate their productive capacity and longevity.

Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Benson, S.M.; Pruess, K.

1987-09-01

187

In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

1997-11-01

188

Hands-On Solid Modeling Experiences in a Course Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This paper focuses on the hands-on experience of 3-D solid modeling technique and prototyping employed in product design and realization process. Engineering Graphics and CAD/CAM are two of the core courses in the Manufacturing Engineering program. Computer aided design and drafting, as well as solid modeling of parts, are strongly emphasized in the Engineering Graphics curriculum which is taught in the sophomore year. In continuation, both manual and computer aided CNC programming are covered in the CAD/CAM curriculum taught in the junior year. Computer Aided Reverse Engineering of cork opener, gear puller, cell phone case, and cell phone cover were the selected course projects taken by students in the CAD/CAM course. One of the main objectives of the curse project was for the students to extend their knowledge in design process and gain a hands-on experience in the field of solid modeling and product realization. A caliper and a micrometer were used to measure the main dimensions of the parts, and a solid modeling program was used for creating the parts model and assembly as well. This paper describes hands-on solid modeling and prototyping experiences of manufacturing engineering students regarding product realization process at our program.

Ansari, Jahangir

2010-07-29

189

Engaging First-Year Undergraduates in Hands-On Research Experiences: The Upper Green River Barcode of Life Project  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To improve retention and engagement, first-year college science majors enrolled in University Experience orientation courses participated in a hands-on laboratory research experience: a DNA barcoding project to facilitate species identification. Students collected arthropods and hypothesized morphology-based species identifications. Then they…

Marcus, Jeffrey M.; Hughes, Tia M.; McElroy, Douglas M.; Wyatt, Robert E.

2010-01-01

190

Hands on workshops as an effective means of learning advanced technologies including genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics  

PubMed Central

Genomics and proteomics have emerged as key technologies in biomedical research, resulting in a surge of interest in training by investigators keen to incorporate these technologies into their research. At least two types of training can be envisioned in order to produce meaningful results, quality publications, and successful grant applications: 1) immediate, short-term, training workshops, and 2) long-term graduate education or visiting scientist programs. We aimed to fill the former need by providing a comprehensive hands-on training course in genomics, proteomics, and informatics in a coherent, experimentally-based framework. This was accomplished through a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 10-day Genomics and Proteomics Hands On Workshop held at National Jewish Health (NJH) and the University of Colorado School of Medicine (UCD). The course content included: comprehensive lectures and laboratories in mass spectrometry and genomics technologies, extensive hands-on experience with instrumentation and software, video demonstrations, optional workshops, on-line sessions, invited keynote speakers, and local and national guest faculty. Here we describe the detailed curriculum and present the results of short- and long-term evaluations from course attendees. Our educational program consistently received positive reviews from participants and had a substantial impact on grant writing and review, manuscript submissions, and publications. PMID:24316330

Reisdorph, Nichole; Stearman, Robert; Kechris, Katerina; Phang, Tzu Lip; Reisdorph, Richard; Prenni, Jessica; Erle, David J.; Coldren, Christopher; Schey, Kevin; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Geraci, Mark

2014-01-01

191

PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY This publication highlights activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for fiscal year 1996 --1 October  

E-print Network

HIGHLIGHTS PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY #12;This publication highlights activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for fiscal year 1996 -- 1 October 1995 through 30 September 1996 Established in 1951, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laborato- ry (PPPL) is dedicated to developing

192

Research activities on robotics at the Electrotechnical Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various robotics research activities carried out at the Electrotechnical Laboratory in Japan are discussed. The history of robotics research, which has been going on since the late 1960s as a part of artificial-intelligence research is described. Consideration is given to the full-scale robot system called ETL-ROBOT Mk. 1, to the carpenter robot, to the intelligent locomotive-handling robot, to the flexible finger, and to the hand-eye robot. The present aspect of the research in relation to past results is examined and includes the development of new robot systems such as a vision system based on a three-dimensional model, an interactive modeling system, a direct-drive manipulator, a robot vision language, and a language-aided robotic teleoperation system. Research themes planned for the near future include manipulation techniques, sensor techniques, autonomous robot control techniques, advanced teleoperation techniques, and system totalizing techniques.

Kakikura, M.

193

Low-Speed Active Flow Control Laboratory Developed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The future of aviation propulsion systems is increasingly focused on the application of control technologies to significantly enhance the performance of a new generation of air vehicles. Active flow control refers to a set of technologies that manipulate the flow of air and combustion gases deep within the confines of an engine to dynamically alter its performance during flight. By employing active flow control, designers can create engines that are significantly lighter, are more fuel efficient, and produce lower emissions. In addition, the operating range of an engine can be extended, yielding safer transportation systems. The realization of these future propulsion systems requires the collaborative development of many base technologies to achieve intelligent, embedded control at the engine locations where it will be most effective. NASA Glenn Research Center s Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch has developed a state-of-the-art low-speed Active Flow Control Laboratory in which emerging technologies can be integrated and explored in a flexible, low-cost environment. The facility allows the most promising developments to be prescreened and optimized before being tested on higher fidelity platforms, thereby reducing the cost of experimentation and improving research effectiveness.

Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.

2005-01-01

194

Teaching radio astrophysics the hand-on way  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Astronomy and space sciences have always been instrumental in attracting young students to physical sciences. While the lectures/demonstrations and exhibitions pertaining to space sci-ences capture the imagination of young students, these alone are not sufficient to induce them to join scientific research. In countries like India, where a large number of students take to physical sciences for under-graduate education, complex sociological factors are key issues in translating this large body of students to potential researchers. While lectures and exhibition lead to an increase in scientific awareness for these students, these do not give a feel for scien-tific research and bridge the gap between high school/college science education and high end research. In this context, a hands-on approach to astronomy education, in science research environments or closely connected to scientific institutions, offers a promising alternative. This approach has been used in optical astronomy, where inexpensive small telescopes are available, often coupling a vast network of amateur astronomy clubs to leading astronomy institutes. The non-visual and relatively more technical nature of radio astronomy has limited a similar approach in past for connecting students to space sciences using radio waveband. The tech-nological explosion in communication industry and radio connectivity in the last decade along with an expansion in engineering education makes this possible now using a hands-on approach in teaching radio astrophysics. In this presentation, the sociological factors affecting the student choice are discussed followed by a review of the efforts to bridge the above mentioned gap by various groups in the world in the last decade with a view to enumerate the best practices in a hands-on approach. A program using this approach at National Center for Radio Astrophysics is described, where the students are exposed to simple hands-on radio astronomy experiments such as spectral line observations of neutral hydrogen from Milky Way and solar flux moni-toring. Such experiments are also useful to familiarize the students with astronomy jargon, which many times becomes an impediment in connecting them with research. This program also aims to develop low cost radio telescopes with involvement of engineering students and the presentation aims at sharing the experience in this program. Future possibilities bridging the gap between the research institutions, such as ours, and the student population at large are also discussed.

Joshi, Bhal Chandra

195

Hands-on statistics’—empirical introduction to measurement uncertainty  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We would like to share with you our ongoing experiences with ‘hands-on statistics’ lessons we have recently carried out. We have developed a new experimental path for teaching young students using fundamental concepts of ‘statistics’: uncertainty of the measurement, the uncertainty of the mean, the mean itself, etc. The methods themselves need no special skills in mathematics, only the use of a takoyaki setup is needed for the experiments. This equipment we have found makes the lesson far more interesting for the students and has allowed us to work successfully for many years, even with children from elementary schools starting from the age of 10.

Wibig, Tadeusz; Dam-o, Punsiri

2013-03-01

196

Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

2014-08-01

197

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory . . . . . . . . Pre Outreach Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  

E-print Network

#12;2 Table of Contents The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory . . . . . . . . Overview Pre? · The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is a working science research laboratory utilizing state-of-the-art high magnetic field research systems. It is a world leader in magnet-related research and technology

Weston, Ken

198

Argonne National Laboratory: Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1993 program activities. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of Argonne`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory`s R&D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R&D studies which are not yet eligible for timely support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering ``proof-of-principle`` assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these projects are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne`s Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne as indicated in the Laboratory LDRD Plan for FY 1993.

none,

1993-12-23

199

Planaria Laboratory Activity - Student - The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This PDF file is for a student to use during the laboratory activity. Please also see the PDF file and presentation for use by the teacher, also in the Planaria Laboratory Activity collection. This lab activity may be used in conjunction with the rest of the The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research curriculum.

2009-01-01

200

Planaria Laboratory Activity - Presentation - The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This PowerPoint presentation is for the teacher to use during the laboratory activity. Please also see the PDF files for use by students and the teacher, also in the Planaria Laboratory Activity collection. This lab activity may be used in conjunction with the rest of the The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research curriculum.

2009-01-01

201

Planaria Laboratory Activity - Teacher - The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This PDF file is for the teacher to use during the laboratory activity. Please also see the PDF file for use by students and the presentation for use by the teacher, also in the Planaria Laboratory Activity collection. This lab activity may be used in conjunction with the rest of the The Science and Ethics of Stem Cell Research curriculum.

2009-01-01

202

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities for FY 2007.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's Fiscal year 2007 budget was $515 million. There are about 2,600 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development', April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2007. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new 'fundable' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research 'which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions' for the Laboratory. We explicitly indicate that research conducted under the LDRD Program should be highly innovative, and an element of high risk as to success is acceptable. In the solicitation for new proposals for Fiscal Year 2007 we especially requested innovative new projects in support of RHIC and the Light Source and any of the Strategic Initiatives listed at the LDRD web site. These included support for NSLS-II, RHIC evolving to a quantum chromo dynamics (QCD) lab, nanoscience, translational and biomedical neuroimaging, energy and, computational sciences. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL.

Newman,L.

2007-12-31

203

Differential effect of one versus two hands on visual processing.  

PubMed

Hand position in the visual field influences performance in several visual tasks. Recent theoretical accounts have proposed that hand position either (a) influences the allocation of spatial attention, or (b) biases processing toward the magnocellular visual pathway. Comparing these accounts is difficult as some studies manipulate the distance of one hand in the visual field while others vary the distance of both hands, and it is unclear whether single and dual hand manipulations have the same impact on perception. We ask if hand position affects the spatial distribution of attention, with a broader distribution of attention when both hands are near a visual display and a narrower distribution when one hand is near a display. We examined the effects of four hand positions near the screen (left hand, right hand, both hands, no hands) on both temporal and spatial discrimination tasks. Placing two hands near the display compared to two hands distant resulted in improved sensitivity for the temporal task and reduced sensitivity in the spatial task, replicating previous results. However, the single hand manipulations showed the opposite pattern of results. Together these results suggest that visual attention is focused on the graspable space for a single hand, and expanded when two hands frame an area of the visual field. PMID:25058412

Bush, William S; Vecera, Shaun P

2014-10-01

204

Hands-on Learning CU architectural engineering students learn their trade  

E-print Network

Hands-on Learning CU architectural engineering students learn their trade through hands-on work school six months after graduation, with an average starting salary of $51,000. Rankings (USNWR) College

205

Hands-on online : towards experiential product design education with online resources  

E-print Network

This pilot study investigates the potential for teaching experiential, hands-on product design online. Specifically, the work is a first attempt to elucidate differences in outcomes between residential, hands-on educational ...

Ramos, Joshua D

2013-01-01

206

The effect of inquiry-based, hands-on labs on achievement in middle school science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to measure the difference in science achievement between students who had been taught with an inquiry-based, hands-on pedagogical approach and those who had not. Improving student academic achievement and standardized test scores is the major objective of teachers, parents, school administrators, government entities, and students themselves. One major barrier to this academic success in Georgia, and the entire United States, has been the paucity of success in middle level science classes. Many studies have been conducted to determine the learning approaches that will best enable students to not only acquire a deeper understanding of science concepts, but to equip them to apply that new knowledge in their daily activities. Inquiry-based, hands-on learning involves students participating in activities that reflect methods of scientific investigation. The effective utilization of the inquiry-based learning approach demands inclusion of learners in a self-directed learning environment, the ability to think critically, and an understanding of how to reflect and reason scientifically. The treatment group using an inquiry-based, hands-on program did score slightly higher on the CRCT. However, the results revealed that there was not a significant difference in student achievement. This study showed that the traditionally instructed control group had slightly higher interest in science than the inquiry-based treatment group. The findings of this research study indicated that the NCLB mandates might need to be altered if there are no significant academic gains that result from the use of inquiry-based strategies.

Miller, Donna Kaye Green

207

On-site laboratory support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory environmental restoration field activities  

SciTech Connect

A remedial investigation/feasibility study has been undertaken at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Bechtel National, Inc. and partners CH2M Hill, Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, and PEER Consultants are contracted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, performing this work for ORNL`s Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. An on-site Close Support Laboratory (CSL) established at the ER Field Operations Facility has evolved into a laboratory where quality analytical screening results can be provided rapidly (e.g., within 24 hours of sampling). CSL capabilities include three basic areas: radiochemistry, chromatography, and wet chemistry. Radiochemical analyses include gamma spectroscopy, tritium and carbon-14 screens using liquid scintillation analysis, and gross alpha and beta counting. Cerenkov counting and crown-ether-based separation are the two rapid methods used for radiostrontium determination in water samples. By extending count times where appropriate, method detection limits can match those achieved by off-site contract laboratories. Volatile organic compounds are detected by means of gas chromatography using either headspace or purge and trap sample introduction (based on EPA 601/602). Ionic content of water samples is determined using ion chromatography and alkalinity measurement. Ion chromatography is used to quantify both anions (based on EPA 300) and cations. Wet chemistry procedures performed at the CSL include alkalinity, pH (water and soil), soil resistivity, and dissolved/suspended solids. Besides environmental samples, the CSL routinely screens health and safety and waste management samples. The cost savings of the CSL are both direct and indirect.

Burn, J.L.E. [Bechtel Environmental, Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

1995-07-01

208

Educational Science Kits All ages need the opportunity to explore science in a hands-on environment. Educational  

E-print Network

movement of the sun and stars, moon phases, and eclipses. Each of the 4 units in this Sequence contains 4 time through the movement of the sun and moon, experimenting with the variables that influence science using the Sun-Earth-Moon system as the focus. Through models, hands-on activities, and readings

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

209

From Maxwell to Millikan: A Little History and a Little Hands-on with the Photoelectric Effect.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an historical chronology of events related to understanding the photoelectric effect. Focuses on the early history, the mystery of the photoelectric effect, the contributions of Albert Einstein and Robert Millikan to the field, and hands-on activities that demonstrate the phenomenon to students. (DDR)

Gipps, John

1993-01-01

210

Hands-On Educational Programs and Projects at SICSA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) has a long history of projects that involve the design of space structures, including habitats for low-Earth orbit (LEO) and planetary applications. Some of these projects are supported by corporate sponsors, such as a space tourism research, planning and design study conducted for the owner of national U.S. hotel chain. Some have been undertaken in support of programs sponsored by the State Government of Texas, including current commercial spaceport development planning for the Texas Aerospace Commission and three counties that represent candidate spaceport sites. Other projects have been supported by NASA and the Texas Aerospace Consortium, including the design and development of SICSA's "Space Habitation Laboratory", a space station module sized environmental simulator facility which has been featured in the "NASA Select" television broadcast series. This presentation will highlight representative projects. SICSA is internationally recognized for its leadership in the field of space architecture. Many program graduates have embarked upon productive and rewarding careers with aerospace organizations throughout the world. NASA has awarded certificates of appreciation to SICSA for significant achievements contributing to its advanced design initiatives. SICSA and its work have been featured in numerous popular magazines, professional publications, and public media broadcasts in many countries. SICSA applies a very comprehensive scope of activities to the practice of space architecture. Important roles include mission planning conceptualization of orbital and planetary structures and assembly processes, and design of habitats to optimize human safety, adaptation and productivity. SICSA sponsors educational programs for upper division undergraduate students and graduate students with interests in space and experimental architecture. Many fourth year participants continue in the SICSA program throughout their remaining undergraduate studies, and are joined by other new fifth year students. Selected graduate applicants holding a professional degree in architecture from accredited colleges and universities can earn a Master of Architecture degree with a specialization in space and experimental architecture upon completion of 32 credit hours of study which includes two six-hour design studios. Accepted graduate students seeking a Master of Architecture degree who do not hold a professional architecture degree may enter SICSA studios during the final year of their minimum 72 credit hours of study. Subject to necessary University of Houston and Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approvals, SICSA and the College of Architecture propose to expand their graduate education role to add a Master of Science in Space Architecture degree program. This new program is primarily being planned in response to known interests of non-architect professionals from NASA and aerospace corporations who wish to pursue advanced space architecture research and design studies. The program will be also available to working professionals holding an undergraduate architectural degree.

Bell, L.

2002-01-01

211

Harvesting of Lunar Iron: Competitive Hands-on Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Electromagnets can be used to harvest free iron from lunar soil, known as regolith. Iron is important to the US plans for a lunar outpost. It does not rust in space, making it an excellent construction material. Circumpolar railroad tracks would allow a slowly-moving train to follow the sun, making agriculture possible, and enabling continuous operation of factories producing solar cells and oxygen for life support and propulsion. Designing an iron harvesting apparatus for the unique lunar environment requires that students re-think tacit assumptions about how things work. Within the context of a 33-student summer program, two college interns supervised nine high school upperclassmen in an eight week project to design, test, and evaluate a lunar iron harvester. Under the guidance of high school teachers, a research engineer outlined the constraints and parameters for the project. The college interns developed performance metrics, and the teachers established the framework for the competition. Three teams of three students developed their designs, which were reviewed by professional engineers prior to fabrication. A separate team performed research on the properties of lunar soil and prepared a test bed containing 150 kg of simulated regolith. One team identified a novel means to multiply electromagnet force using a recently-issued patent, creating great excitement between the teams and spurring them all to excel. Electromagnets were fabricated in the Packer Engineering shop, then operated by the students in a standardized competition format. Wearing proper protective gear, each team tested their device to determine the amount of free iron extracted from the regolith simulant. Performance was measured in mass of iron harvested per device mass, yielding surprising results, and powerful insights for the students. Results were published in a local newspaper. In this paper, we describe how this hands-on project fits within an overarching philosophy for engineering education within a paid summer intern program.

Beatty, Matthew; Schubert, Peter

2009-08-21

212

The Effectiveness of Active and Traditional Teaching Techniques in the Orthopedic Assessment Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Active learning is a teaching methodology with a focus on student-centered learning that engages students in the educational process. This study implemented active learning techniques in an orthopedic assessment laboratory, and the effects of these teachi

Nottingham, Sara; Verscheure, Susan

2010-05-01

213

Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2010.  

SciTech Connect

As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

(Office of The Director)

2012-04-25

214

Argonne National Laboratory Annual Report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development program activities FY 2011.  

SciTech Connect

As a national laboratory Argonne concentrates on scientific and technological challenges that can only be addressed through a sustained, interdisciplinary focus at a national scale. Argonne's eight major initiatives, as enumerated in its strategic plan, are Hard X-ray Sciences, Leadership Computing, Materials and Molecular Design and Discovery, Energy Storage, Alternative Energy and Efficiency, Nuclear Energy, Biological and Environmental Systems, and National Security. The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel technical concepts, enhance the Laboratory's research and development (R and D) capabilities, and pursue its strategic goals. projects are selected from proposals for creative and innovative R and D studies that require advance exploration before they are considered to be sufficiently developed to obtain support through normal programmatic channels. Among the aims of the projects supported by the LDRD Program are the following: establishment of engineering proof of principle, assessment of design feasibility for prospective facilities, development of instrumentation or computational methods or systems, and discoveries in fundamental science and exploratory development.

(Office of The Director)

2012-04-25

215

The Urban Environmental Laboratory: A Step in the Right Direction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the philosophy, facility features, and program offerings at Brown University's environmental education center. The Urban Environmental Laboratory (UEL) is an integrated instruction, residential, demonstration project for students and the public community. Conservation technologies, active learning, and hands-on experience characterize…

Dolin, Eric Jay

1985-01-01

216

Vectors and Fomites: An Investigative Laboratory for Undergraduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory model system for introductory microbiology students that involves hands-on studies of bacteria vectored in soil nematodes. Describes a series of experiments designed to demonstrate vector-fomite transmission, bacterial survival, and disinfectant activity. Introduces the concept of genetically engineered microorganisms and the…

Adamo, Joseph A.; Gealt, Michael A.

1996-01-01

217

Activities of the University of Saskatchewan, Plasma Physics Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed summaries of research projects conducted at the University of Saskatchewan's Plasma Physics Laboratory during 1991-92 are presented in the fields of tokamak experiments and reactor studies, basic plasma physics, and theories of instabilities and anomalous transport in tokamaks. The tokamak projects include discharge conditions and plasma diagnostics in the STOR-M tokamak, plasma modes and oscillations, edge density and magnetic

G. D. Conway; A. Hirose; K. K. Jain; K. Mark; D. McColl; O. Mitarai; J. Ratzdaff; L. Schott; H. M. Skarsgard; C. Xiao

1992-01-01

218

University Students' Activities, Thinking and Learning during Laboratory Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One aim of physics laboratory instruction is to help students connect theory to practice. So experiments are often chosen in order to "demonstrate" specific concepts. Furthermore, students are expected to approach phenomena in a scientific way, that is, they should develop a hypothesis and plan their experiments accordingly. Although it is usually…

von Aufschnaiter, Claudia; von Aufschnaiter, Stefan

2007-01-01

219

Bumps in the Night. Hands-on Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents elementary school science activities with a Halloween orientation. One activity teaches students to appreciate and understand bats. A second activity has students group and classify monsters by individual characteristics. Activities for integrating science across the curriculum include creating monster myths, conducting surveys of…

Kepler, Lynne

1992-01-01

220

An Intensive Hands-on Course Designed to Teach Molecular Biology Techniques to Physiology Graduate Students  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To address a growing need to make research trainees in physiology comfortable with the tools of molecular biology, we have developed a laboratory-intensive course designed for graduate students. This course is offered to a small group of students over a three-week period and is organized such that comprehensive background lectures are coupled with extensive hands-on experience. The course is divided into seven modules, each organized by a faculty member who has particular expertise in the area covered by that module. The modules focus on basic methods such as cDNA subcloning, sequencing, gene transfer, polymerase chain reaction, and protein and RNA expression analysis. Each module begins with a lecture that introduces the technique in detail by providing a historical perspective, describing both the uses and limitations of that technique, and comparing the method with others that yield similar information. Most of the lectures are followed by a laboratory session during which students follow protocols that were carefully designed to avoid pitfalls. Throughout these laboratory sessions, students are given an appreciation of the importance of proper technique and accuracy. Communication among the students, faculty, and the assistant coordinator is focused on when and why each procedure would be used, the importance of each step in the procedure, and approaches to troubleshooting. The course ends with an exam that is designed to test the studentsÃÂ general understanding of each module and their ability to apply the various techniques to physiological questions.

Dr. Andrea D. Weston (University of Western Ontario Department of Physiology); Dr. Sasha Stasko (University of Western Ontario Department of Physiology); PhD Gerald M. Kidder (Univ. of Western Ontario Dept. of Physiology)

2002-03-01

221

Hands-on environmental stewardship deepens Erica Garcia, civil engineer,  

E-print Network

." Her team also conducts engineering design reviews for the storm water team. In the event of a storm her past while working on water quality with the LANL Environmental Protection group. She currently by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Erica measures the chlorine and pH level in water around the Laboratory

222

Laboratory Technician: Zane Kraft  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a PDF interview, PowerPoint slide set, and webpage biography of a laboratory technician, detailing the career information for someone who enjoys the hands-on experimentation of working with samples in the lab.

2012-05-02

223

Hands-On Whole Science: A Leaf Sampler.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents two elementary school activities to help students learn about autumn. The activities use autumn leaves to teach that each type of tree has its own distinctive type of leaf. One activity involves tracing, drawing, and writing about leaves; the other involves making a quilt using leaf designs. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1991-01-01

224

Bring the Poles to Your Classroom & Community Through Linked Hands-on Learning & IPY Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two major legacies of the 4th International Polar Year (IPY 2007-9) are a newly galvanized educational community and an immense volume of polar data collected by the global science community. The tremendous new polar datasets represent a unique opportunity to communicate the nature of the changing poles to student and public audiences through this polar savvy educational community if effective approaches to link data and understanding are employed. We have developed a strategy for polar education that leverages the IPY data resources, linked with the polar education hands-on ‘manipulatives’ (materials that students can manipulate in a dynamic manner). This linked approach leverages the fundamental inquiry based learning but recognizes that particularly in the polar sciences the size of the earth, the remoteness of the poles and the scale of its processes make it difficult for students to explore in a hands-on manner. The linking of polar hands-on ‘manipulatives’ with IPY data provides a bridge between the tangible and the global. Alone manipulative activities can be beneficial in their ability to help students visualize a process or behavior, but without a strong link back to the Earth through data or evidence the understanding of the process is not transferred from the classroom model to the full scale Earth. The use of activities or models is beneficial in connecting the learner to the polar process(es), while the IPY data provides a unique opportunity to ground the polar manipulative experiments in real data. This linked strategy emerged from a series of NSF sponsored IPY Polar Fairs at major science museums that reached in excess of 12,000 people. The design of the fairs was that polar scientists developed activities linking low cost hands-on manipulatives to scientific evidence/data that was displayed in posters, images, and video clips. The participating scientists walked the ‘audience’ through the hands-on manipulative, then discussed their evidence while provided the reasoning. Adjusting this linked manipulative/data approach to the community of teachers will provide a very tangible education outcome to this community from IPY. Our linked manipulative-data strategy ensures polar processes are demonstrated, measured then matched with IPY data sets so that when examined in a guided exploration will provide the student the tools to generate the reasoning. This linked strategy is a powerful way to engage students in Earth science, and provide them with an entry to the wealth of professionally collected data sets that are available from both IPY and the broader science community, all while aligning with National Science Standards. We will demonstrate this approach, and show how the linked manipulative-data approach can be effectively used in community and school events to reach a wider audience.

Turrin, M.; Bell, R. E.; Kastens, K. A.; Pfirman, S. L.

2009-12-01

225

ICRF heating technology development activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The rf technology program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing the components needed for heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) on future fusion machines, such as the Compact Ignition Tokamak. Components produced in this program are already in use on experiments throughout the world, including Doublet III-D (DIII-D), TMX-U, Alcator-C, and TEXTOR. Designs have been developed for implementation on Tore Supra and ASDEX. Recent developments in vacuum feedthroughs, compact loop antennas, high-current capacitors, and folded waveguides are discussed in this paper.

Baity, F.W.; Bryan, W.E.; Hoffman, D.J.; Schechter, D.E.; Owens, T.L.

1986-01-01

226

Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2007 I have been a Team Leader for the Tzec Maun Foundation, a non-profit foundation dedicated to providing free, research grade, Internet telescopes to students, teachers and researchers around the world. The name Tzec Maun (pronounced “Teh-Zeck-Moan”) comes from Mayan culture. Tzec Maun was the jovial messenger, laughed at adversity. Based on the challenges students, researchers and professional astronomers face with finances, equipment, and telescope access, the jovial mascot seems to fit. Hundreds of hours performing astronomical outreach as a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador and Astronomical League Master of outreach taught me that the best way to inspirationally teach astronomy and space science (and most subjects) is actually being at the eyepiece. I’m NOT a fan of the traditional planetarium experience as a teaching tool because it inhibits inspiration and the learning experience to a 2-D mat on a faux horizon with artificial representations. Once, a student at my dark sky observatory excitedly commented that the night sky was like a 3-D planetarium. I have hosted several classes at my own personal dark sky observatory, but this resource is impractical for all but a few lucky students. Experience has taught me that the next best thing to being at the eyepiece is to control a remote telescope via the Internet. Tzec Maun’s arsenal of telescopes is all research capable, linked to the Internet and positioned for round-the-clock dark skies. The final conditions described above, mean that I can enter an 8:30am science class, log onto the Tzec Maun telescope Portal and turn over control of an Australian system (where it is night) to a student or teacher. Working as a group, the class can either begin their investigations. My Tzec Maun science team (TARP) is engaged in searching for potentially hazardous asteroids (PHAs). PHA work excites student and teacher alike. Teaching from telescopes can unleash powerful attention-getting tools that enable teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

Corneau, M. J.

2009-12-01

227

Name of Department Name of Laboratory Introduction of research activities and laboratory  

E-print Network

to the followingresearch topics: ocean renewable energy, freak waves, marine wind and so forth. The research may involve renewable energy, freak waves, marine wind, SAR (synthetic aperture radar), stereo photogrammetry Ocean activities are on-going: i) marine accident analysis; ii) resource assessment of ocean renewable energy; iii

Yamamoto, Hirosuke

228

Assessing High School Student Learning on Science Outreach Lab Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effect of hands-on laboratory activities on secondary student learning was examined. Assessment was conducted over a two-year period, with 262 students participating the first year and 264 students the second year. Students took a prequiz, performed a laboratory activity (gas chromatography of alcohols, or photosynthesis and respiration), and…

Thomas, Courtney L.

2012-01-01

229

Using Microcomputers in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Activation Energy Experiment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a computer program, "Activation Energy," which is designed for use in physical chemistry classes and can be modified for kinetic experiments. Provides suggestions for instruction, sample program listings, and information on the availability of the program package. (ML)

Touvelle, Michele; Venugopalan, Mundiyath

1986-01-01

230

Anticonvulsive activity of Butea monosperma flowers in laboratory animals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bioassay-guided fractionation of dried flowers of Butea monosperma (BM) was carried out to isolate the active principle responsible for its anticonvulsant activity. The petroleum ether extract was fractionated by column chromatography using solvents of varying polarity such as n-hexane, n-hexane:ethyl acetate, ethyl acetate, and methanol. The anticonvulsive principle of B. monosperma was found to be a triterpene (TBM) present

Veena S Kasture; S. B Kasture; C. T Chopde

2002-01-01

231

Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

1996-10-01

232

Geoelectrical signatures of microbial activity: A laboratory tank investigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experiments in a 2D static tank (dimensions 145 cm x 85 cm x 6 cm) were performed to assess the effectiveness of various geo-electrical methods (induced polarization [IP], resistivity [R], self potential [SP], electrodic potential [El]) to monitor microbial activity. The tank was filled with coarse sand and saturated with water from the river Lagan (Belfast, UK) diluted with tap water (20:80 ratio). The river water was used to 'seed' microbial activity in the tank. We created 2 separate zones of activity by applying a layer of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) and a layer of Oxygen Release Compound (ORC) at the bottom and the middle of the tank respectively. This design aimed to simulate conditions at the oxic - anoxic interface commonly found in contaminated groundwaters. We recorded IP and R signals using a network of 32 electrodes on one side of the tank; the same electrodes were used for El measurements; we recorded the SP signals with 9 Petiau electrodes located at the top of the tank. El measurements provide us with detailed information on the spatial and temporal Eh evolution in the tank, as a result of microbial activity (indirect evidence), whereas the SP measurements are related directly to the microbial activity (direct evidence); IP and R measurements were aimed to provide additional insight on microbial induced fluid conductivity / porosity / mineralization processes expected to occur under our experimental conditions. The combination of El and SP measurements is shown to be a powerful approach for remote monitoring of microbial activity in the subsurface; the methods supplement each other to more accurately describe the microbial evolution. Furthermore , the interpretation of the subsurface conditions are improved when constrained by the fluid conductivity and mineralization changes inferred by the IP and R measurements. The results of this work suggest that a combination of different geo-electrical methods enhance the subsurface monitoring of microbial activity.

Reid, R.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Doherty, R.; Binley, A.

2008-05-01

233

Laboratory Animal Science Issues in the Design and Conduct of Studies with Endocrine-active Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of rodent models for research and testing on endo- crine-active compounds necessitates an awareness of a number of laboratory animal science issues to standardize bioassay methods and facilitate reproducibility of results between laboratories. These issues are not unique to endo- crine research but are particularly important in this field due to the complexities and interdependencies of the endocrine

Jeffrey I. Everitt; Paul M. D. Foster

2004-01-01

234

Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

2013-01-01

235

The Population Game: A Socially Significant Laboratory Activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A game-like activity using dice-like cubes can bring population growth home to all students, scientists, and nonscientists alike, while demonstrating many aspects of probability and uncertainty that are too often ignored in the physics curriculum. The activity can proceed at a variety of levels of sophistication and complication, from a simple demonstration of exponential growth through an elaborate modeling of life expectancy, advanced versus primitive societies, family planning, birth rate, and population momentum. Variations can demonstrate radioactive decay, resource depletion, and the approach of a thermodynamic system to statistical equilibrium.

Hobson, Art

2003-04-01

236

Real-time laboratory implementation results of an active filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proliferation of power electronics converters and electronic equipments has dramatically increased electric pollution in electrical distribution power systems. One solution to this problem could be the use of active filters that are capable of injecting distorted currents in order to cancel harmonics coming from non-linear loads for instance, or from any other equipment. Consequently, many theories have been developed to

Alireza Javadi; Guy Olivier; Frederic Sirois; Andre Youmssi

2010-01-01

237

Student Understanding of Chromatography: A Hands-On Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This exercise sets up a collaborative activity that challenges students to develop a chromatographic solvent with the appropriate polarity to separate leaf chlorophyll and anthocyanin pigments by TLC. The suggested activity has been tested with both high-school advanced-chemistry students and with undergraduate students in an introductory biochemistry class. It includes a demonstration introducing the basic principles of partitioning and differential distribution based on solubility. For the student activity, the materials to be used are leaves of the variegated Coleus plant, plastic-backed silica TLC plates, 2-propanol, acetone, and methanol. Students may work collaboratively within a set of boundary parameters to optimize the chromatographic solvent through a series of rapid iterations of chromatography. Students can also use these chromatography systems to carry out independent projects.

Curtright, Robert D.; Emry, Randy; Markwell*, John

1999-02-01

238

NDE activities and technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NDE, Photometrics, and Optical Data Reduction Department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico provides nondestructive evaluation (NDE) support for all phases of research and development at Sandia. Present facilities and personnel provide radiography, acoustic monitoring, ultrasonic scanning, computed tomography, shearography/ESPI, infrared imaging, high speed and ultra-high speed photometrics, and image processing. Although the department includes photometrics and optical data reduction as well as NDE, I will refer to the NDE department from now on for simplicity. The NDE department has worked on technology transfer to organizations inside and outside the weapons complex. This work has been performed in all the Sandia business sectors: defense programs, energy and environment, and work for others. The technology transfer has been in the form of testing for product improvement such as validation of aircraft inspection equipment, consultation such as detecting lathe bearing slip for a major machine tool manufacturer, and products such as an acoustic sand detector for the oil and gas industry.

Shurtleff, W. W.

1993-11-01

239

Hands-on Science: Getting-to-Know-You Graphing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary teachers can use graphing to introduce students to one another. An eye color graphing activity helps students learn more about each other while experimenting with different ways of organizing and displaying information. For follow up, students can apply their graphing knowledge by collecting and displaying data from their families. (SM)

Kepler, Lynne

1992-01-01

240

Chaos in the Kitchen: A Hands-On Demonstration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article outlines a class activity where students prepare croissants to get an intuitive feeling for the nature of a strange attractor. In particular during the preparation of the pastry dough, students investigate the effects of stretching and folding. These physical processes force trajectories (in this case the pastry dough) to remain…

Roe-Dale, Rachel

2014-01-01

241

Hands-On Addition and Subtraction with the Three Pigs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents activities using the Three Pigs to increase students' understanding of addition and subtraction. Argues that addition and subtraction are something that students can view and participate in when using the Three Pigs instead of just the manipulation of numbers. (ASK)

Bartek, Mary Marron

1997-01-01

242

Discovering Fossils--A Hands-on Lab.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes fossil investigations developed and provided by the Falls of the Ohio State Park near Louisville, Kentucky. The Devonian shale beds contain representatives of over 600 species including corals, sponges, brachiopods, mollusks, and echinoderms. Rather than focusing on identification, the activities emphasize the past ecological…

Goldstein, Alan

2002-01-01

243

A laboratory study of the activities of dried rumen microorganisms  

E-print Network

to be later made available to the host animal thx'ough digestion of the microorganisms. 14uch interest in xecent years ha centered on the problem of establishing and maintaining an active micro- biai population in the rumen. Among the suggested re...- commendations ares (a) the feeding of materials selected for their ability to stimulate bacterial growth (i. e. ~ to pxovide a favoxable medium), and (b) the feeding of dried preparations of viable rumen microorganisms. '. everal feed manufacturers now...

Harbers, Leniel Henry

2012-06-07

244

Anticonvulsive activity of Butea monosperma flowers in laboratory animals.  

PubMed

The bioassay-guided fractionation of dried flowers of Butea monosperma (BM) was carried out to isolate the active principle responsible for its anticonvulsant activity. The petroleum ether extract was fractionated by column chromatography using solvents of varying polarity such as n-hexane, n-hexane:ethyl acetate, ethyl acetate, and methanol. The anticonvulsive principle of B. monosperma was found to be a triterpene (TBM) present in the n-hexane:ethyl acetate (1:1) fraction of the petroleum ether extract. TBM exhibited anticonvulsant activity against seizures induced by maximum electroshock (MES) and its PD(50) was found to be 34.2+/-18.1 mg/kg. TBM also inhibited seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), electrical kindling, and the combination of lithium sulfate and pilocarpine nitrate (Li-Pilo). However, TBM was not effective against seizures induced by strychnine and picrotoxin. TBM exhibited depressant effect on the central nervous system. After repeated use for 7 days, the PD(50) (MES) of TBM increased to 51.5+/-12.1 mg/kg. Similarly, after repeated use of TBM, the duration of sleep induced by pentobarbital was not reduced significantly. Further studies are required to investigate its usefulness in the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:12062587

Kasture, Veena S; Kasture, S B; Chopde, C T

2002-07-01

245

Laboratory experiments on active suppression of advanced turboprop noise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The noise generated by supersonic tip speed propellers may be a cabin environment problem for future propeller-driven airplanes. Active suppression from speakers inside the airplane cabin has been proposed for canceling out this noise. The potential of active suppression of advanced turboprop noise was tested by using speakers in a rectangular duct. Experiments were first performed with sine wave signals. The results compared well with the ideal cancellation curve of noise as a function of phase angle. Recorded noise signals from subsonic and supersonic tip speed propellers were than used in the duct to deterthe potential for canceling their noise. The subsonic propeller data showed significant cancellations but less than those obtained with the sine wave. The blade-passing-tone cancellation curve for the supersonic propeller was very similar to the subsonic curve, indicating that it is potentially just as easy to cancel supersonic as subsonic propeller blade-passing-tone noise. Propeller duct data from a recorded propeller source and spatial data taken on a propeller-drive airplane showed generally good agreement when compared versus phase angle. This agreement, combined with the similarity of the subsonic and supersonic duct propeller data, indicates that the area of cancellation for advanced supersonic propellers will be similar to that measured on the airplane. Since the area of cancellation on the airplane was small, a method for improving the active noise suppression by using outside speakers is discussed.

Dittmar, J. H.

1985-12-01

246

Activities of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 1 January - 31 December 1983  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

There are many facets to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, for JPL is an organization of multiple responsibilities and broad scope, of diverse talents and great enterprise. The Laboratory's philosophy, mission, and goals have been shaped by its ties to the California Institute of Technology (JPL's parent organization) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (JPL's principal sponsor). JPL's activities for NASA in planetary, Earth, and space sciences currently account for almost 75 percent of the Laboratory's overall effort. JPL Research activities in the following areas are discussed: (1) deep space exploration; (2) telecommunications systems; (3) Earth observations; (4) advanced technology; (5) defense programs; and (6) energy and technology applications.

1984-01-01

247

Effects of non-preferred hand on control movement stereotypes  

E-print Network

for type of control, plane of movement, and handedness effects. Also tested was a notion that activation of left- right pairs might be affected by subjects who assumed that symmetrical, or mirror image movements should be employed. The subjects were... and switches has persisted to the present. H. Petropoulos and J. Brebner (1981) state, "Many researchers in the area have emphasized the need to control for handedness when studying display/control relationships (Loveless, 1962; Chapanis and Groper, 1968...

Lenz, Richard Lee

2012-06-07

248

Hands-On TAROT: Intercontinental use of the TAROT for Education and Public Outreach  

E-print Network

The TAROT telescope has for primary goal the search for the prompt optical counterpart of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts. It is a completely autonomous 25cm telescope installed near Nice (France), able to point any location of the sky within 1-2 seconds. The control, scheduling, and data processing activities are completely automated, so the instrument is completely autonomous. In addition to its un-manned modes, we added recently the possibility to remotely control the telescope, as a request of the "Hands-On Universe" (HOU) program for exchange of time within automatic telescopes for the education and public outreach. To this purpose we developed a simple control interface. A webcam was installed to visualize the telescope. Access to the data is possible through a web interface. The images can be processed by the HOU software, a program specially suited for use within the classroom. We experienced these feature during the open days of the University of California Berkeley and the Astronomy Festival of Fleurance (France). We plan a regular use for an astronomy course of the Museum of Tokyo, as well as for French schools. Not only does Hands-On TAROT gives the general public an access to professional astronomy, but it is also a more general tool to demonstrate the use of a complex automated system, the techniques of data processing and automation. Last but not least, through the use of telescopes located in many countries over the globe, a form of powerful and genuine cooperation between teachers and children from various countries is promoted, with a clear educational goal.

M. Boer; C. Thiebaut; A. Klotz; G. Buchholtz; A. L. Melchior; C. Pennypacker; T. Ebisuzaki

2001-09-21

249

Hands-On Practice Helps Students Master IT Skills and Succeed  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in information technology (IT) need realistic, hands-on experience to master IT skills. When students have the opportunity to train with a hands-on curriculum and prepare to certify in the IT field, they become more deeply engaged in both their education and their career path. This article discusses LabSim, an IT certification training…

Wittman, William

2010-01-01

250

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Data Loading Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 6.0 and Version 7.0. In general, the data transfer procedures for version 6 and 7 are the same, but where deviations exist, the differences are noted. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

2006-07-01

251

Circadian Rhythm of Outside-Nest Activity in Wild (WWCPS), Albino and Pigmented Laboratory Rats  

PubMed Central

The domestication process of the laboratory rat has been going on for several hundred generations in stable environmental conditions, which may have affected their physiological and behavioural functions, including their circadian system. Rats tested in our ethological experiments were laboratory-bred wild Norway rats (WWCPS), two strains of pigmented laboratory rats (Brown Norway and Long Evans), and two strains of albino rats (Sprague-Dawley and Wistar). Rats were placed in purpose-built enclosures and their cycle of activity (time spent actively outside the nest) has been studied for one week in standard light conditions and for the next one in round-the-clock darkness. The analysis of circadian pattern of outside-nest activity revealed differences between wild, pigmented laboratory, and albino laboratory strains. During daytime, albino rats showed lower activity than pigmented rats, greater decrease in activity when the light was turned on and greater increase in activity when the light was switched off, than pigmented rats. Moreover albino rats presented higher activity during the night than wild rats. The magnitude of the change in activity between daytime and nighttime was also more pronounced in albino rats. Additionaly, they slept outside the nest more often during the night than during the day. These results can be interpreted in accordance with the proposition that intense light is an aversive stimulus for albino rats, due to lack of pigment in their iris and choroid, which reduces their ability to adapt to light. Pigmented laboratory rats were more active during lights on, not only in comparison to the albino, but also to the wild rats. Since the difference seems to be independent of light intensity, it is likely to be a result of the domestication process. Cosinor analysis revealed a high rhythmicity of circadian cycles in all groups. PMID:23762462

Stryjek, Rafal; Modlinska, Klaudia; Turlejski, Krzysztof; Pisula, Wojciech

2013-01-01

252

Circadian rhythm of outside-nest activity in wild (WWCPS), albino and pigmented laboratory rats.  

PubMed

The domestication process of the laboratory rat has been going on for several hundred generations in stable environmental conditions, which may have affected their physiological and behavioural functions, including their circadian system. Rats tested in our ethological experiments were laboratory-bred wild Norway rats (WWCPS), two strains of pigmented laboratory rats (Brown Norway and Long Evans), and two strains of albino rats (Sprague-Dawley and Wistar). Rats were placed in purpose-built enclosures and their cycle of activity (time spent actively outside the nest) has been studied for one week in standard light conditions and for the next one in round-the-clock darkness. The analysis of circadian pattern of outside-nest activity revealed differences between wild, pigmented laboratory, and albino laboratory strains. During daytime, albino rats showed lower activity than pigmented rats, greater decrease in activity when the light was turned on and greater increase in activity when the light was switched off, than pigmented rats. Moreover albino rats presented higher activity during the night than wild rats. The magnitude of the change in activity between daytime and nighttime was also more pronounced in albino rats. Additionaly, they slept outside the nest more often during the night than during the day. These results can be interpreted in accordance with the proposition that intense light is an aversive stimulus for albino rats, due to lack of pigment in their iris and choroid, which reduces their ability to adapt to light. Pigmented laboratory rats were more active during lights on, not only in comparison to the albino, but also to the wild rats. Since the difference seems to be independent of light intensity, it is likely to be a result of the domestication process. Cosinor analysis revealed a high rhythmicity of circadian cycles in all groups. PMID:23762462

Stryjek, Rafa?; Modli?ska, Klaudia; Turlejski, Krzysztof; Pisula, Wojciech

2013-01-01

253

Classes Azur Astro Espace International Hands-on Space Experience  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Created in 1994 in the wake of the closure of the Space Camp of Patrick Baudry in Cannes, Classes Azur Astro Espace (AAE) provide a world's unique combination of space and astronomy courses, as given by active and retired professionals of two of the best space and astronomical facilities extant: Alcatel Space in Cannes and Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (OCA) in Nice, Grasse and Caussols. Fifteen space modules, of 30 to 60 minutes each, have been established, giving simple and clear explanations on launchers, satellites, their applications, their development, together with an historical background. Basic experiments are included, such as an unique small catapult to explain gravity, or more classical water rockets. The basic AAE sojourn extends over 3 days: one day for space (including a visit of Alcatel Space, the biggest satellite manufacturer outside the US and Russia), one day for astronomy (including a visit of the biggest observatory in Europe) and one day à-la-carte (Côte d'Azur offers much, such as the Oceanographic Museum in Monaco). More and more groups are adding a fourth day, with a visit to the nice old village of Perinaldo in Italy, where famous astronomer Cassini was born. Lycée de Cachan, near Paris, even takes 12-day sojourns every year. The public has been extremely wide, from age 5 to 70, from students to enthusiasts. Coming initially all over from France, participants now include since 2001 German and Italian pupils and teachers. In 2001 also, ESA came in the shape of a Space Camp. ISU's Master of Space Studies participates to a shortened version of AAE every even-year. Up to the end of 2001, 62 classes with 2,025 participants from 20 countries had thus come to enjoy space education on Côte d'Azur. Such success is due in no small part to the very attractive price and flexibility of these activities, notably thanks to the support of ESA, CNES, Rectorat d'Académie de Nice, Conseil Général des Alpes-Maritimes, Ville de Cannes, AAAF, TDF, Alcatel Space and OCA.

Jung, P.

2002-01-01

254

Science &Language Teaching in Hands-on Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As announced in the paper presented in Toulouse, a trinational teacher training program addressing school teachers from France, Germany and Italy on teaching foreign languages together with science and history through Space related projects has been implemented and launched successfully. Supported by the French Ministry of Education (Académie de Nice), the bigovernmental French-German Youth Office (Office franco- allemand pour la Jeunesse) and the European Space Agency the first session was held in Cannes in October 2001 and brought together 36 language, science and history teachers, 12 from each country. Through different workshops, presentations and visits this five-day training encounter initiated the participants with Space activities and exploration as well as offering them back-up information on astronomy. It gave them furthermore the opportunity of improving their linguistic skills and of exchanging their teaching experience. The program was highly welcomed by all the participants who will meet this year in Germany for the second session devoted to establishing together bi- or trinational projects for future class encounters based on the same subjects. My paper will deal with the results of the program which have been beyond expectation and will encourage us to continue this pluridisciplinary approach of language &science teaching and extend it to other language combinations.

Gehlert, Sylvia

2002-01-01

255

PAL(TM) 2.0 Human Anatomy Software Tool Use in Community College Traditional and Online Anatomy Laboratory Classes: Student-Perceived Learning Benefits  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Human anatomy courses, with laboratory, are curricular requirements in graduate medical, undergraduate nursing, and all allied health science programs. Anatomy laboratory courses engage students in hands-on activities, including human cadaver or mammalian dissection, supported by photos from textbooks, detailed plastic models or human anatomical…

Kuyatt, Brian Lee

2012-01-01

256

Writing Activities Embedded in Bioscience Laboratory Courses to Change Students' Attitudes and Enhance Their Scientific Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We introduced writing activities into a project style third year undergraduate biomolecular science laboratory to assist the students to produce a final report in the form of a journal article. To encourage writing while the experimental work was proceeding, the embedded writing activities required ongoing analysis of experimental data. After…

Lee, Susan E.; Woods, Kyra J.; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

2011-01-01

257

The Role of Hands-On Science Labs in Engaging the Next Generation of Space Explorers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Each country participating on the International Space Station (ISS) recognizes the importance of educating the coming generation about space and its opportunities. In 2001 the St. James School in downtown Houston, Texas was approached with a proposal to renovate an unused classroom and become involved with the "GLOBE" Program and other Internet based international learning resources. This inner-city school willingly agreed to the program based on "hands-on" learning. One month after room conversion and ten computer terminals donated by area businesses connectivity established to the internet the students immediately began using the "Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE)" program and the International Space Station (ISS) Program educational resources. The "GLOBE" program involves numerous scientific and technical agencies studying the Earth, who make it their goal to provide educational resources to an international community of K-12 scientist. This project was conceived as a successor to the "Interactive Elementary Space Museum for the New Millennium" a space museum in a school corridor without the same type of budget. The laboratory is a collaboration, which involved area businesses, volunteers from the NASA/Johnson Space Center ISS Outreach Program, and students. This paper will outline planning and operation of the school science laboratory project from the point of view of the schools interest and involvement and assess its success to date. It will consider the lessons learned by the participating school administrations in the management of the process and discuss some of the issues that can both promote and discourage school participation in such projects.

Williams, Teresa A. J.

2002-01-01

258

Cultural Earth Science in Hawai`i: Hands-on Place-Based Investigations that Merge Traditional Knowledge with Earth Science Inquiry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the summer of 2011, the M?lama Ke Ahupua`a (to care of our watershed) GEARUP summer program provided 25 under-served and under-represented minority public high school students (Hawaiian, part-Hawaiian, Filipino, Pacific Islanders) from Farrington High School (Kalihi, Honolulu) with a hands-on place-based multidiscipline course located within Manoa Valley (Ahupua`a O Kona) with the objective of engaging participants in scientific environmental investigations while exploring Hawaii's linkages between traditional knowledge, culture and science. The 4-week field program enabled students to collect samples along the perennial Manoa Stream and conduct water quality assessments throughout the Manoa watershed. Students collected science quality data from eight different sampling stations by means of field- and laboratory-based quantitative water quality testing equipment and GPS/GIS technology. While earning Hawaii DOE academic credits, students were able to document changes along the stream as related to pollution and urbanization. While conducting the various scientific investigations, students also participated in cultural fieldtrips and activities that highlighted the linkages between historical sustainable watershed uses by native Hawaiian communities, and their connections with natural earth processes. Additionally, students also participated in environmental service-learning projects that highlight the Hawaiian values of laulima (teamwork), m?lama (to care for), and imi `ike (to seek knowledge). By contextualizing and merging hands-on place-based earth science inquiry with native Hawaiian traditional knowledge, students experienced the natural-cultural significance of their ahupua`a (watershed). This highlighted the advantages for promoting environmental literacy and geoscience education to under-served and under-represented minority populations in Hawaii from a rich native Hawaiian cultural framework.

Moxey, L.; Dias, R. K.; Legaspi, E.

2011-12-01

259

Metacognitive activity in the physics student laboratory: is increased metacognition necessarily better?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study natural-in-action metacognitive activity during the student laboratory in university physics is explored, with\\u000a an aim towards quantifying the amount of metacognition used by the students. The study investigates whether quantifying natural-in-action\\u000a metacognition is possible and valuable for examining teaching and learning in these contexts. Video recordings of student\\u000a groups working during three types of introductory physics laboratories

Rebecca Lippmann Kung; Cedric Linder

2007-01-01

260

Clinical mycobacteriology. Activities and recommendations by the association of state and territorial public health laboratory directors.  

PubMed

By using the assessment, policy development, and assurance model to describe the functions of public health, the Association of State and Territorial Public Health Laboratory Directors (ASTPHLD) is shown to be responding to the laboratory aspects of tuberculosis detection, prevention, and control. The many activities described illustrate the value of public-private partnerships in addressing population-based, public health threats. The network of state and territorial public health laboratories, through voluntary involvement in ASTPHLD, provides an important resource to the scientific, educational, and policy-making community. PMID:8866189

Warren, N G; Cordts, J R

1996-09-01

261

STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science and technology are widely recognized as major drivers of innovation and industry (e.g. Rising above the Gathering Storm, 2006). While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement and public understanding of STEM disciplines. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. Designed spaces, like libraries, allow lifelong, life-wide, and life-deep learning to take place though the research basis for learning in libraries is not as developed as other informal settings like science centers. The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national education project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. The overarching goal of the project is to reach underserved youth and their families with informal STEM learning experiences. This project will deepen our knowledge of informal/lifelong learning that takes place in libraries and establish a learning model that can be compared to the more established free-choice learning model for science centers and museums. The project includes the development of two STEM hands-on exhibits on topics that are of interest to library staff and their patrons: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. In addition, the project will produce resources and inquiry-based activities that libraries can use to enrich the exhibit experience. Additional resources will be provided through partnerships with relevant professional science and technology organizations (e.g. American Geophysical Union; National Academy of Engineering) that will provide speakers for host library events and webinars. Online and in-person workshops will be conducted for library staff with a focus on increasing content knowledge and improving facilitation expertise. This presentation will report on strategic planning activities for STAR-Net, a Community of Practice model, and the evaluation/research components of this national education program.

Dusenbery, P.

2010-12-01

262

An Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Laboratory Exercise on Cellular Respiration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study is an analysis of the effectiveness of a faculty-designed laboratory experience about a difficult topic, cellular respiration. The activity involves a hands-on model of the cellular-respiration process, making use of wooden ball-and-stick chemistry models and small toy trucks on a table top model of the mitochondrion. Students…

Scholer, Anne-Marie; Hatton, Mary

2008-01-01

263

Can an Inquiry Approach Improve College Student Learning in a Teaching Laboratory?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present an inquiry-based, hands-on laboratory exercise on enzyme activity for an introductory college biology course for science majors. We measure student performance on a series of objective and subjective questions before and after completion of this exercise; we also measure performance of a similar cohort of students before and after…

Rissing, Steven W.; Cogan, John G.

2009-01-01

264

Effects of thematic-based, hands-on science teaching versus a textbook approach for students with disabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Institutions of higher education, states, and local K-12 districts have been challenged to improve math and science education for our nation's students. In the past few years, there has been renewed interest in inquiry-based, activity-oriented instruction in science for students with disabilities. Yet, there still exists the need for further empirical evidence to support instructional improvements for students with more involved emotional and behavioral disabilities. This study describes a program in which 18 middle school students with serious emotional disturbances were instructed, over the course of 8 weeks, on Matter by two different instructional approaches. Students in one classroom received a traditional textbook approach to science content, whereas students in another classroom received science instruction by a hands-on, thematic approach. Over the course of instruction, data were collected regarding students' behavior and achievement. Results indicate that, overall, students in the hands-on instructional program performed significantly better than the students in the textbook program on two of three measures of science achievement, a hands-on assessment and a short-answer test. The students did not differ on a multiple-choice format test. With regard to behavior, there were no significant differences in behavioral problems found between the two groups of students over the course of the study. Findings are discussed in relation to instructional implications for students with disabilities in the science classroom.

McCarthy, Cheryl B.

2005-03-01

265

An Independent Freshman Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a first-year laboratory course designed to fulfill laboratory objectives of reinforcing lecture material, teaching experimental methodology, developing hands-on skills, and imparting a sense of error. The course's six segments examine: digital electronics with students building a photogate timer; error analysis; linear accelerated…

Spencer, C. D.; Seligmann, P. F.

1992-01-01

266

Basic neuron model electrical equivalent circuit: an undergraduate laboratory exercise.  

PubMed

We developed a hands-on laboratory exercise for undergraduate students in which they can build and manipulate a neuron equivalent circuit. This exercise uses electrical circuit components that resemble neuron components and are easy to construct. We describe the methods for creating the equivalent circuit and how to observe different neuron properties through altering the structure of the equivalent circuit. We explain how this hands-on laboratory activity allows for the better understanding of this fundamental neuroscience concept. At the conclusion of this laboratory exercise, undergraduate students will be able to apply the principles of Ohm's law, cable theory with regards to neurons, and understand the functions of resistance and capacitance in a neuron. PMID:24319391

Dabrowski, Katie M; Castaño, Diego J; Tartar, Jaime L

2013-01-01

267

Basic Neuron Model Electrical Equivalent Circuit: An Undergraduate Laboratory Exercise  

PubMed Central

We developed a hands-on laboratory exercise for undergraduate students in which they can build and manipulate a neuron equivalent circuit. This exercise uses electrical circuit components that resemble neuron components and are easy to construct. We describe the methods for creating the equivalent circuit and how to observe different neuron properties through altering the structure of the equivalent circuit. We explain how this hands-on laboratory activity allows for the better understanding of this fundamental neuroscience concept. At the conclusion of this laboratory exercise, undergraduate students will be able to apply the principles of Ohm’s law, cable theory with regards to neurons, and understand the functions of resistance and capacitance in a neuron. PMID:24319391

Dabrowski, Katie M.; Castano, Diego J.; Tartar, Jaime L.

2013-01-01

268

An Activation Energy Experiment for a Second-Order Reaction in a Single Laboratory Period.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes modification of a chemical reaction to a single 4 1/2-hour laboratory period. Reaction kinetics between 2, 4-initrochlorobenzene and piperidine to form 2, 4-dinitrophenyl-piperidine and piperidinium hydrochloride are followed conductometrically at three temperatures to obtain data to calculate activation parameters. (Author/JN)

Barile, Raymond C.; Michiels, Leo P.

1983-01-01

269

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) scientists working on molecular systems comprising the active  

E-print Network

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) scientists working on molecular systems comprising the active element of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices develop a new understanding of the processes for solar energy because of their low cost and light weight, along with their chemically tunable electronic

270

3-Dimensional and Interactive Istanbul University Virtual Laboratory Based on Active Learning Methods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to develop a 3-dimensional interactive multi-user and multi-admin IUVIRLAB featuring active learning methods and techniques for university students and to introduce the Virtual Laboratory of Istanbul University and to show effects of IUVIRLAB on students' attitudes on communication skills and IUVIRLAB. Although…

Ince, Elif; Kirbaslar, Fatma Gulay; Yolcu, Ergun; Aslan, Ayse Esra; Kayacan, Zeynep Cigdem; Alkan Olsson, Johanna; Akbasli, Ayse Ceylan; Aytekin, Mesut; Bauer, Thomas; Charalambis, Dimitris; Gunes, Zeliha Ozsoy; Kandemir, Ceyhan; Sari, Umit; Turkoglu, Suleyman; Yaman, Yavuz; Yolcu, Ozgu

2014-01-01

271

Microprocessor Based Laboratory Activities as Catalysts for Student Construction of Understanding in Physics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From the theoretical reference frame of constructivism, much of the rhetoric and positive research findings in support of microprocessor based laboratory (MBL) activities facilitating science learning can be interpreted in terms of the increased opportunities for student-student interactions and peer group discussions about familiar and discrepant…

Russell, David; Lucas, Keith B.; McRobbie, Campbell J.

272

On the Effectiveness of Active-Engagement Microcomputer-Based Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on the results of substituting one-hour active-engagement tutorials using microcomputer based laboratory (MBL) equipment for traditional problem-solving recitations in introductory calculus-based mechanics classes for engineering students at the University of Maryland. The results of two specific tutorials--one on the concept of…

Redish, Edward F.; Saul, Jeffery M.; Steinberg, Richard N.

273

A LABORATORY REFERENCE VACCINE TO TITRATE IMMUNOGENIC ACTIVITY OF ANTIBRUCELLA VACCINES IN MICE  

E-print Network

A LABORATORY REFERENCE VACCINE TO TITRATE IMMUNOGENIC ACTIVITY OF ANTIBRUCELLA VACCINES IN MICE Reproduction, Nouzilly, 37380 Monnaie, France Résumé UN VACCIN Ã?TALON POUR TITRER L'ACTIVITÃ? IMMUNOGÃ?NIQUE DES VACCINS ANTI-BRU- CELLA SUR LA SOURIS. ― Le nombre de Brucella dans la rate de souris, 15 jours

Boyer, Edmond

274

Promoting Science Outdoor Activities for Elementary School Children: Contributions from a Research Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of the study were to analyse the promotion of scientific literacy through practical research activities and to identify children's conceptions about scientists and how they do science. Elementary school children were engaged in two scientific experiments in a marine biology research laboratory. A total of 136 students answered a…

Boaventura, Diana; Faria, Claudia; Chagas, Isabel; Galvao, Cecilia

2013-01-01

275

Photonic games: hands-on challenges to spark teenagers' interest in light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It often takes one single event to interest teenagers in a topic that will become a passion or a career. It is in this spirit that the SPIE and OSA Student Chapters at Université Laval created the Photonic Games three years ago, to kindle an interest in teenagers towards studies and careers in optics. The activity, offered each year to more than a hundred grade 11 students, is divided in two parts. First, we offer a hands-on workshop in their classrooms about reflection, refraction, dispersion, birefringence and polarization. A few days later, all the students come to the Centre d'optique, photonique et laser (COPL) at Université Laval for a day of competition where a volunteer physics student accompanies each team of four students. Challenges are various to promote the qualities that make great scientists: creativity, teamwork, knowledge, inquisitiveness, self-confidence and perseverance. The first two editions of the Photonic Games have proven to be beneficial for the students, teachers and volunteers, and we endeavor to improve it as we construct on our experience with the past editions to fine-tune and improve the Photonic Games concept.

Poulin-Girard, A.-S.; Thériault, G.; April, A.; Bassene, S.; Dehez, H.; Desbiens, A.; Goubert, G.; Lemieux, H.; Lévesque, J.; Roy, B.; Zambon, V.

2010-08-01

276

Hands-On Universe Teacher Courses and the NASA Kepler Mission Outreach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA Kepler mission has elements that serve a variety of audiences: formal education (elementary, secondary, and colleges), informal education (planetarium shows and museum exhibits), and public outreach (broadcast TV, radio, website, CD-ROM, and toolkit for amateur astronomers). The Kepler Cam program will provide minority colleges with CCD cameras and training systems for ground-based observations of exoplanet transits. Kepler Cam is closely tied with the Hands-On Universe (HOU) project that aims to have high school students actively involved in research projects such as asteroid discovery, supernova searches, cataclysmic variable observations, and studies of the moons of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Last fall (2003), HOU completed an NSF funded study in the relative effectiveness of online and face-to-face professional development courses. The evaluator for the project was TIMSS (Third International Math and Science Study). Findings, based on student performance, indicate that online teacher courses are as effective as face-to-face courses in teacher professional development. Details are in this paper.

Gould, A. D.

2004-12-01

277

Empowering elderly women with osteoarthritis through hands-on exploration of adaptive equipment concepts.  

PubMed

The study investigated the participation experiences of elderly women with hand limitations in a maketools-inspired activity for improving bottle openability and verified the usefulness of the results from this approach. Participatory design was used to stimulate participants' hands-on fabrication of new bottle lid concepts. Air-dry modeling clay, Crayola Model Magic® (Crayola LLC, 1100 Church Lane Easton, PA 18044-0431), clay modeling tools sets and empty bottles were the tools used to explore feasible and user-envisioned ideal lids that could potentially reduce hand pain and improve function when opening bottles. Twenty-five elderly women fully participated in the study. They generated 36 bottle lid design concepts. Qualitative analysis identified inclusion of four primary design features as follows: 1) surface texture; 2) increased leverage through lid shape or diameters; 3) increased contact surface with palm/fingers through lid shape or height; and 4) facilitation of alternative grip types. The major limitations of the study were inclusion of only women participants and healthier persons living in a retirement community. Future research is needed to investigate the bottle lid preferences of men and persons with more severe hand function living in places other than independent living communities. PMID:23553868

Flinn, Sharon R; Sanders, Elizabeth B-N; Yen, Wei-Ting; Sommerich, Carolyn M; Lavender, Steven A

2013-12-01

278

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with general information such as installation instructions, starting and stopping the program, and some pointers on how to get around inside the program. Next, database concepts and structure are discussed. Following that discussion are nine sections, one for each of the menu options on the SAPHIRE main menu, wherein the purpose and general capabilities for each option are furnished. Next, the capabilities and limitations of the software are provided.

C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

2008-08-01

279

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for ansforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with general information such as installation instructions, starting and stopping the program, and some pointers on how to get around inside the program. Next, database concepts and structure are discussed. Following that discussion are nine sections, one for each of the menu options on the SAPHIRE main menu, wherein the purpose and general capabilities for each option are furnished. Next, the capabilities and limitations of the software are provided.

C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

2006-07-01

280

Quality assurance guidance for laboratory assessment plates in support of EM environmental sampling and analysis activities  

SciTech Connect

This document is one of several guidance documents developed to support the EM (DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management) Analytical Services program. Its purpose is to introduce assessment plates that can be used to conduct performance assessments of an organization`s or project`s ability to meet quality goals for analytical laboratory activities. These assessment plates are provided as non-prescriptive guidance to EM-support organizations responsible for collection of environmental data for remediation and waste management programs at DOE facilities. The assessments evaluate objectively all components of the analytical laboratory process to determine their proper selection and use.

Not Available

1994-05-01

281

US Department of Energy reservior research activities Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) does not directly manage large reservoirs, but DOE laboratories conduct research on reservoir monitoring, assessment, and enhancement under several activities. These activities include (1) studies and remedial actions for reservoirs affected by releases from DOE facilities, (2) industry- sponsored research on reservoir and stream fish, (3) climate change research, (4) hydropower impact assessment studies conducted for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and (5) the DOE hydropower program. These activities fall under DOE's missions of providing support for environmentally sound energy technologies and managing the legacies of past waste disposal practices at DOE facilities. 9 refs.

Railsback, S.F.

1991-01-01

282

DEVELOPMENT OF LABORATORY EXERCISES USING RAIN MONITORING INSTRUMENTS  

E-print Network

DEVELOPMENT OF LABORATORY EXERCISES USING RAIN MONITORING INSTRUMENTS TASK: Use the observations from the ATOC rooftop laboratory www.skylab.colorado.edu and develop laboratory exercises like tear drops. MOTIVATION: Integrate more hands-on observation and instrumentation into undergraduate

283

``IT'S ALL IN MOTION" -- A Hands-On Astronomy Workshop For Teachers of Grades 4-8  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe the implementation and results of a four day hands-on astronomy workshop for in-service teachers of grades 4-8. This project, funded by a 1998-1999 IDEAS grant through the Space Telescope Science Institute, included 20 teacher participants from northern New Jersey. We used the workshop's unifying theme -- ``It's All in Motion!" -- to present to the teachers fundamental astrophysical concepts, relevant math and computer skills, and astronomy activities for their classrooms. We learned that there is a great need for this type of training, especially in New Jersey where there are new core curriculum standards and a newly mandated test in science for students in 4th and 8th grades. While the teachers learned content at different rates, the hands-on format gave them confidence to try some of these activities in their classes, especially among under-represented minorities. The most effective activities included human sundials, Sunspotters to measure the rotation of the Earth in 2 minutes, craters in the sand, group mini-reports from posters, speed calculations, physics and astronomy songs, the Ophiuchus Sculpture, a planetarium visit (especially needed in our urban area where the light pollution is severe), and Internet guided sites (See http://www.csam.montclair.edu/ west/ideasresources.html).

West, M. L.; Liu, C.; Conod, K.

1999-12-01

284

UnCommon Knowledge: Projects That Help Middle-School-Age Youth Discover the Science and Mathematics in Everyday Life. Volume One: Hands-On Science Projects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide contains hands-on science activities to connect middle-school students to the traditional knowledge of their grandparents and elders. Because girls often lose interest in science at the middle-school level, and because women in some communities (especially in rural areas) are seldom involved in work with an obvious science basis, the…

Carter, Carolyn S.; Keyes, Marian; Kusimo, Patricia S.; Lunsford, Crystal

285

Student Reciprocal Peer Teaching as a Method for Active Learning: An Experience in an Electrotechnical Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active learning is one of the most efficient mechanisms for learning, according to the psychology of learning. When students act as teachers for other students, the communication is more fluent and knowledge is transferred easier than in a traditional classroom. This teaching method is referred to in the literature as reciprocal peer teaching. In this study, the method is applied to laboratory sessions of a higher education institution course, and the students who act as teachers are referred to as "laboratory monitors." A particular way to select the monitors and its impact in the final marks is proposed. A total of 181 students participated in the experiment, experiences with laboratory monitors are discussed, and methods for motivating and training laboratory monitors and regular students are proposed. The types of laboratory sessions that can be led by classmates are discussed. This work is related to the changes in teaching methods in the Spanish higher education system, prompted by the Bologna Process for the construction of the European Higher Education Area

Muñoz-García, Miguel A.; Moreda, Guillermo P.; Hernández-Sánchez, Natalia; Valiño, Vanesa

2012-10-01

286

Overview of the Air Force Research Laboratory laser applications group active imaging programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Air Force Research Laboratory laser applications group, also known as 'Scorp Works' has been developing user specific, active illumination systems for the past 8 years. A survey of some of these programs will be presented. Programs to be included are the covet adjustable laser illuminator, the Coast Guard search and rescue laser systems, a camera automated tracking system, and a 1.5 ?m covert camera and illuminator.

Cooley, William T.; Gurney, Matthew L.; Dodd, Patrick R.; Griffy, Barton W.; Kelly, John M.; Pressnall, Tim A.

1999-07-01

287

Human factors activities in teleoperator development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing advanced teleoperator systems for maintenance of future nuclear reprocessing facilities. Remote maintenance systems developed by the CFRP emphasize man-in-the-loop teleoperation. Consequently, human factors issues which affect teleoperator performance must be addressed. This papers surveys research and development activities carried out by the human factors group within the Remote Control Engineering Task of the CFRP.

Draper, J.V.; Herndon, J.N.

1986-01-01

288

MRI-compatible Hands-on Cooperative Control of a Pneumatically Actuated Robot  

PubMed Central

MRI compatible robots are emerging as useful tools for image guided interventions. A shared control between a user and the MRI compatible robot makes it more intuitive instrument especially during setup phases of interventions. We present a MRI compatible, hands-on cooperative system using Innomotion robotic arm. An economic MRI compatible user input sensor was developed and its functionality was tested under typical application conditions. Performance improvement in phantom tasks shows promise of adding hands-on interface in MRI compatible robots. PMID:21423882

Kapoor, Ankur; Wood, Brad; Mazilu, Dumitru; Horvath, Keith A.; Li, Ming

2011-01-01

289

Implementation of the 2013 Astro-Science Workshop, a Hands-on High Altitude Ballooning Program at the Adler Planetarium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the past 7 years, high school students participating in the Astro-Science Workshop at the Adler Planetarium have been able to access the extreme environment of near space (approximately 30 km altitude) using high altitude balloons. Taking a hands-on approach the program has allowed students to design, build, and launch their own experiments with programming based at the Adler Planetarium. During flight, payloads are subjected to temperatures of around -65° C, atmospheric pressure of only 1% that at sea level, and cosmic radiation levels more than 60 times the surface background. In some ways, conditions at these altitudes are much like those at the surface of Mars, providing students with the opportunity to build and operate real-world analogs of interplanetary probes. We have found that this hands-on, student-driven research-based program is enhanced by implementing classroom and lab activities as well as by incorporating instruction and collaboration with research professionals currently active in the field of astronomy. We present the steps taken to implement the 2013 Astro-Science Workshop at the Adler Planetarium with a focus on daily instruction and operations planning and launch preparation.

Ratliff, Gayle; Martynowycz, M. W.; Hammergren, M.

2014-01-01

290

Immersive, hands-on, team-based geophysical education at the University of Texas Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a unique and intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring/summer semester intersession. Now entering its seventh year, the course transitions students from a classroom environment through real-world, hands-on field acquisition, on to team-oriented data interpretation, culminating in a professional presentation before academic and industry employer representatives. The course is available to graduate students and select upper-division undergraduates, preparing them for direct entry into the geoscience workforce or for further academic study. Geophysical techniques used include high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, data processing, and laboratory analysis of sediments. Industry-standard equipment, methods, software packages, and visualization techniques are used throughout the course, putting students ahead of many of their peers in this respect. The course begins with a 3-day classroom introduction to the field area geology, geophysical methods, and computing resources used. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of hands-on field and lab work aboard two research vessels: UTIG's 22-foot, aluminum hulled Lake Itasca; and NOAA's 82-foot high-speed catamaran R/V Manta. The smaller vessel handles primarily shallow, inshore targets using multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and grab sampling. The larger vessel is used both inshore and offshore for multichannel seismic, CHIRP profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. Field areas to date have included Galveston and Port Aransas, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, with further work in Grand Isle scheduled for 2014. In the field, students work in teams of three, participating in survey design, instrument set-up, field deployment, data acquisition optimization, quality control, data archival, log-keeping, real-time data processing, laboratory sediment analysis, and even boat-handling. Teams are rotated through the two vessels and the onshore field laboratory to ensure that each student has hands-on experience with each aspect of the process. Although all students work on all data areas in the field, after returning from the field each team is assigned a particular region or geologic problem to interpret. Each team prepares and presents a formal presentation to UTIG researchers and industry representatives, explaining and defending their interpretations. This unique approach to hands-on field training, real-world science, and project-based teamwork helps prepare students for direct entry into the workforce, giving them a leg up on competitors for positions. This course has an impressive success ratio to show, with many students receiving job offers directly as a result of their participation in the course.

Saustrup, S.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Reece, R.

2013-12-01

291

Encouraging Technology and Hands On Science: A School System Model for Systemic Change in Science Education  

E-print Network

components to this plan: 1. Using research based inquiry materials- recommended by the National Science Community Schools oversees and participates in professional development planning. A Science Liaison programEncouraging Technology and Hands On Science: A School System Model for Systemic Change in Science

Spagnolo, Filippo

292

Understanding the Effects of Cognitive Dissonance during Interpretation: Implications for "Hands-On" Programming.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a field experiment that was designed to test the effects of three different interpretive programs on students' attitudes toward live, nonpoisonous snakes. One of the treatments measured the effectiveness of using "hands-on" interpretive techniques. Direct contact with snakes improved students' attitudes but only slightly. Females'…

Morgan, Mark

1996-01-01

293

Visualizing the Transition State: A Hands-On Approach to the Arrhenius Equation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An exercise is presented in which the kinetics of the irreversible "reaction" of pennies in the heads-up state to pennies in the tails-up state is simulated by a hands-on, Monte Carlo approach. In addition, the exercise incorporates a second simulation in which the irreversible "reaction" of dice with a red face uppermost to a blue face uppermost…

Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Swanson, Matthew S.; Sayers, Deborah K.

2007-01-01

294

Developing Physics Concepts through Hands-On Problem Solving: A Perspective on a Technological Project Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a contest featuring hands-on projects, college students were required to design a simple crawling worm using planning, self-monitoring and self-evaluation processes to solve contradictive problems. To enhance the efficiency of problem solving, one needs to practice meta-cognition based on an application of related scientific concepts. The…

Hong, Jon-Chao; Chen, Mei-Yung; Wong, Ashley; Hsu, Tsui-Fang; Peng, Chih-Chi

2012-01-01

295

ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012.  

E-print Network

ICE Order Form Hands-On Science Kits Prices effective through June 30, 2012. ______ 99-001 DNA Kit purchases. ICE Photochromic T-shirt (colors change in sunlight) ______ 93-002 Adult sizes ___S $_________ ______ 11-002 ICE Gift Certificate ___$25 ___$50 ___$75 ___$100 $_________ Replacement Parts, Manuals, Kit

Sheridan, Jennifer

296

The Effect of Hands-on Occupation on Recall Memory in Men with Traumatic Brain Injuries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Males with closed head injuries (n=30) participated in a study of their ability to follow simple written and verbal instructions, upper extremity function for a simple meal task, and ability to attend to a task for 30 minutes. Hands-on tasks resulted in greater recall of instructions than verbal training only. (Contains 15 references.) (JOW)

Eakman, Aaron M.; Nelson, David L.

2001-01-01

297

International Space Station: K-5 Hands-on Science and Math Lesson Plans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Space Station is already capturing the imaginations of American students, encouraging them to pursue careers in the sciences. The idea of living and working in space continues to spark this renewed interest. The material in this guide was developed to provide hands-on experiences in science and math in the context of an International Space…

Boeing Co., Huntsville, AL.

298

Let Your Fingers Do the Talking: Hands-on Language Learning through Signing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children love multisensory learning that involves seeing, hearing, speaking and doing. Sign language can enhance language experiences by engaging all of these modalities. Teaching sign is a developmentally appropriate practice that promotes acceptance of differences and allows for hands-on language learning in the early years.

Linda A. Good; Judy Feekes; Bernadine Shawd

1993-01-01

299

International Space Station: 6-8 Hands-on Science and Math Lesson Plans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These lesson plans, designed for grades 6-8, have been developed to provide a guide to hands-on experience in science and math. They focus on an International Space Station and are designed for use with students working in groups. The three lesson plans highlighting the importance of the scientific method are: (1) International Space Station…

Armstrong, Pat

300

Learning to Solve a Business Problem: "Hands-On" Can Get Results  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Small business training can facilitate business growth. The authors show that a "hands-on" approach can have a direct impact on a business owner's current situation. They consider this in relation to the problem of being unable to find the right staff, demonstrating that a program such as the one they describe enables learning and addresses the…

Neeson, Robyn; Billington, Leo; Barrett, Rowena

2007-01-01

301

Lab 09: When disaster strikes Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal  

E-print Network

Lab 09: When disaster strikes Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal Due October 29, 2012, at 6? (Obviously, answers will vary) 2. Describe the command you would use to create a compressed archive of your to the patch program. If we want to create a patch, we should redirect the output of diff into a file. 1 #12

Walker, Matthew P.

302

User environment: tonight we dine in shell Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal  

E-print Network

Lab 03 User environment: tonight we dine in shell Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal 2012 '$PATH'? 3. Create a file using touch with a single space as the filename. Now remove it using rm, without using quotes in the command. Hint: use the escape character. 4. Create a file using touch

Walker, Matthew P.

303

Wrap up final projects Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal  

E-print Network

Lab 11 Wrap up final projects Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal 2012-11-19 Important note instructions for using the DeCal Cloud--which is part of the final project (which is in turn a required part of the course). The DeCal Cloud For more information about virtualization and the cloud, refer to Lecture 9

Walker, Matthew P.

304

Tricks of the Trade Hands-On UNIX System Administration DeCal  

E-print Network

Tricks of the Trade Hands-On UNIX System Administration DeCal Week 7 -- 5 March 2012 #12;Last time;GNU screen · Start a new screen: % screen · Create a new window: ^A ^C, ^A c switch between them: ^A. Instead, checking in foobar will create an RCS le, foobar,v, in the same directory (or, if it exists

Walker, Matthew P.

305

Pipes, streams, and the user environment Hands-On Unix System Administration DeCal  

E-print Network

Pipes, streams, and the user environment Hands-On Unix System Administration DeCal Lab 2 -- 10 and .bash profile Bash uses a collection of startup files to create an environment. For example, you can's add a new directory to PATH. Before we do anything, note the output of ls $ ls Create a new directory

Walker, Matthew P.

306

A hands-on demonstration of Project LISTEN's Reading Tutor and its embedded experiments  

E-print Network

children learn to read. It uses speech recognition to listen to them read aloud, and responds with spoken LISTEN's Reading Tutor listens to children read aloud, and helps them learn to read (Mostow & Aist, 1999A hands-on demonstration of Project LISTEN's Reading Tutor and its embedded experiments Jack Mostow

Mostow, Jack

307

Hands-on Learning At CU, students learn by doing. In the department of Civil,  

E-print Network

of faculty-student interactions, both inside and outside the classroom. "The hands-on projects I've done and Management Using technical and management skills, construction engineers turn designs into reality -- on time, and project management. This discipline involves organizing a wide variety of skilled workers and specialists

308

Hands-On Science Mysteries for Grades 3-6: Standards-Based Inquiry Investigations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "Hands-On Science Mysteries for Grades 3-6," the authors connect science to real-world situations by investigating actual mysteries and phenomena, such as the strange heads on Easter Island, the ghost ship "Mary Celeste," and the "Dancing Stones" of Death Valley. The labs are designed to encourage the development of science inquiry, in which…

Taris, James Robert; Taris, Louis James

2006-01-01

309

Hands-On Parent Support in Positive Guidance: Early Childhood Professionals as Mentors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports findings from a follow-up study involving mothers and early childhood professionals who completed participation in a 12-week, hands-on parent education program in the United States. In this program, mothers learned about positive guidance in a weekly seminar, and additionally practised implementing positive guidance in an early…

McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Saunders, Rachel

2012-01-01

310

Observational Astronomy for Undergraduate Majors: A Hands-On Approach for Learning Professional Techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a lab curriculum for undergraduates designed to provide hands-on experience with telescope operation, CCD imaging, and data reduction and analysis with IRAF. Theoretical concepts involving telescope optics, CCD detector characteristics, apparent motions of celestial objects, and photometric properties of stars were introduced in weekly lectures and were central to each lab. The students worked in groups of five

G. Doppmann; M. K. Hemenway

2000-01-01

311

Hands-on Verification of Mechanics Training: A Cost-Effectiveness Study of Videodisc Simulation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document reports the results of a study on the feasibility of training smog check mechanics in California via hands-on verification of mechanics' ability to inspect and repair vehicles. The reviews of the research literature that compare the learning effectiveness of different delivery media tend to support the position that in learning, the…

Maher, Thomas G.

312

Teaching reactions and stoichiometry: A comparison of guided inquiry and traditional laboratory activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a major movement in science education towards the inclusion of science inquiry and process. Guided-inquiry instruction is expected to have a positive impact on students' concrete and conceptual knowledge along with their ability to engage in the practices of science. This study examined the impact of inquiry-based teaching on student achievement. The topics of reactions and stoichiometry were taught in two different periods of first-year secondary honors chemistry. Both classes received the same lectures and assignments for this curriculum and both classes performed the same laboratory activities. However, one class received traditional, step-by-step (often called "cookbook") laboratory instructions while the other class developed their own procedures and made decisions about data to complete the laboratory activities. Pre- and post-tests were given to each class, followed by a test of retention after ten weeks. The results of this study indicate that inquiry-based instruction has a positive impact on student achievement. A significant increase between pre- and post- test scores for the experimental group as opposed to the scores for the control group suggests that achievement was correlated with guided inquiry instruction methods. Additionally, a notable trend suggested that guided inquiry instruction has a positive effect on learning retention.

Meister Thomas, Lynn

313

From Concept-to-Flight: An Active Active Fluid Loop Based Thermal Control System for Mars Science Laboratory Rover  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, which was launched on November 26, 2011, incorporates a novel active thermal control system to keep the sensitive electronics and science instruments at safe operating and survival temperatures. While the diurnal temperature variations on the Mars surface range from -120 C to +30 C, the sensitive equipment are kept within -40 C to +50 C. The active thermal control system is based on a single-phase mechanically pumped fluid loop (MPFL) system which removes or recovers excess waste heat and manages it to maintain the sensitive equipment inside the rover at safe temperatures. This paper will describe the entire process of developing this active thermal control system for the MSL rover from concept to flight implementation. The development of the rover thermal control system during its architecture, design, fabrication, integration, testing, and launch is described.

Birur, Gajanana C.; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bame, David; Karlmann, Paul; Mastropietro, A. J.; Liu, Yuanming; Miller, Jennifer; Pauken, Michael; Lyra, Jacqueline

2012-01-01

314

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Intergrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Summary Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. However, INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users, who constitute a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events and quantify associated consequential outcome frequencies. Specifically, for nuclear power plant applications, SAPHIRE can identify important contributors to core damage (Level 1 PRA) and containment failure during a severe accident which lead to releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA where the reactor is at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, it can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming an internal events model to a model for external events, such as flooding and fire analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to the public and environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE also includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM is a special user interface linked to SAPHIRE that automates the SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events (for example, to calculate a conditional core damage probability) very efficiently and expeditiously. This report provides an overview of the functions available in SAPHIRE and presents general instructions for using the software. Section 1 presents SAPHIRE’s historical evolution and summarizes its capabilities. Section 2 presents instructions for installing and using the code. Section 3 explains the database structure used in SAPHIRE and discusses database concepts. Section 4 explains how PRA data (event frequencies, human error probabilities, etc.) can be generated and manipulated using “change sets.” Section 5 deals with fault tree operations, including constructing, editing, solving, and displaying results. Section 6 presents operations associated with event trees, including rule application for event tree linking, partitioning, and editing sequences. Section 7 presents how accident sequences are generated, solved, quantified, and analyzed. Section 8 discusses the functions available for performing end state analysis. Section 9 explains how to modify data stored in a SAPHIRE database. Section 10 illustrates how to generate and customize reports. Section 11 covers SAPHIRE utility options to perform routine functions such as defining constant values, recovering databases, and loading data from external sources. Section 12 provides an overview of GEM’s features and capabilities. Finally, Section 13 summarizes SAPHIRE’s quality assurance process.

C. L. Smith

2008-08-01

315

Education and the Federal Laboratories: An Assessment of Federal Laboratory Educational Activities and Their Present and Potential Relationships with Universities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the use of Federal research and development facilities for advanced education and training (1) to determine how well Federal laboratories are doing in continuing educational efforts, (2) to make recommendations for improvements, and (3) to explore the potential of Federal agencies in contributing more broadly to the…

Federal Council for Science and Technology, Washington, DC. Committee on Federal Labs.

316

Upright standing in the laboratory rat--time expenditure and its relation to locomotor activity.  

PubMed

Various reports have discussed a minimal cage height of 14 cm in rat maintenance. Recommendations for heights between 18 and 22 cm have been proposed and partially put into practice. However, no quantitative data exist on the actual utilisation of higher cages by rats. Thus, upright standing in 19 and 30 cm high cages as well as locomotor activity on the floor was assessed in 54 rats using passive infra-red detectors. The results showed a continuously decreasing use of cage height. On average, adult animals exceeded even a height of 24 cm for 13.8 (strain ACI) and 5.2 (strain LEW and SPRD) minutes per day respectively, corresponding to 8.7 and 5.5% respectively of the locomotor activity on the cage floor. Obviously upright standings is an integral part of the laboratory rat's ethogram showing similar strain-dependent circadian rhythms as locomotor activity. PMID:8312384

Büttner, D

1993-10-01

317

Performance of the delayed- and prompt-gamma neutron activation systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is one of the major facilities pioneering the development of In Vivo Neutron Activation (IVNA) techniques for body composition studies. The IVNA facility at BNL includes a delayed- and prompt-gamma neutron activation system (DGNA and PGNA), as well as an inelastic neutron scattering facility (INS). The BNL DGNA system was first fully established in the 1960's. It is composed of a total-body neutron activation facility (TBNAF) and a whole body counter (WBC), and is used to measure total body sodium, phosphorus, chlorine, and calcium. Body potassium is measured by counting endogenous {sup 40}K with the whole body counter. The DGNA and PGNA facilities have been upgraded and modified since they were first built. 6 refs., 4 figs.

Dilmanian, F.A.; Weber, D.A.; Yasumura, S.; Kehayias, J.J.; Ellis, K.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Kamen, Y.; Lidofsky, L. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA). Dept. of Applied Physics and Nuclear Engineering); Heymsfield, S.B.; Pierson, R.N. Jr.; Wang, J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA). Coll. of Physicians and Surgeons)

1989-01-01

318

Laboratory demonstration model: Active cleaning technique device. [for removal of contaminants from an optical surface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technique which utilizes exposure to a plasma to remove contaminants from a surface was incorporated into a laboratory model which demonstrates active cleaning by both plasma cleaning and ion sputtering modes of operation. The development phase is reported and includes discussion of the plasma tube configuration, device design, and performance tests. A general description of the active cleaning device is provided which includes information on the main power/plasma discharge sensors, and the power, gas supply, and ion accelerator systems. Development of the active cleaning species at high vacuum conditions is described and results indicate that plasma cleaning occurs in the region of a visible plume which extends from the end of the plasma tube. Recommendations are made for research to determine the plasma cleaning mechanism and the plasma species responsible for the cleaning, as well limitations on the type of contaminants that can be removed.

Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

1974-01-01

319

A Hands-on Activity for Teaching the Poisson Distribution Using the Stock Market  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The number of increases a particular stock makes over a fixed period follows a Poisson distribution. This article discusses using this easily-found data as an opportunity to let students become involved in the data collection and analysis process.

Dunlap, Mickey; Studstill, Sharyn

2014-01-01

320

Improving the Preschooler's Science Knowledge and Skills through Hands-on Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A practicum project designed a preschool science curriculum and requisite environment to improve students' enjoyment and interest in science. Based on teacher- and parent-questionnaire results, it was determined that student science attitudes were not positive; that students seldom had opportunities to explore, discover, and solve problems; and…

Wigg, Anne

321

The Scanning Theremin Microscope: A Model Scanning Probe Instrument for Hands-On Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A model scanning probe microscope, designed using similar principles of operation to research instruments, is described. Proximity sensing is done using a capacitance probe, and a mechanical linkage is used to scan this probe across surfaces. The signal is transduced as an audio tone using a heterodyne detection circuit analogous to that used in…

Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Wasio, Natalie A.; Kandel, S. Alex

2014-01-01

322

Learning ion–solid interactions hands-on: An activity based, inquiry oriented, graduate course  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental work, using state of the art instrumentation, is integrated with lectures in a “real life”, learning by discovery approach, in the Ion–Solid Interactions graduate\\/undergraduate course offered by the Department of Physics of the University of Central Florida. The lecture component of the course covers the underlying physical principles, and related scientific and technological applications, associated with the interaction of

Gabriel Braunstein

2005-01-01

323

Summer Camp to Engage Students in Nutritional Chemistry Using Popular Culture and Hands-On Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Action Potential Science Experience (APSE) is a five-day summer camp offering science opportunities for K-8 students. The focus of the APSE curriculum is to teach science concepts and methods while challenging the participants to solve an overarching problem from the popular-culture context. The participants in the APSE entitled Burger 'N Fries…

Skluzacek, Joanna M.; Harper, Joshua; Herron, Emily; Bortiatynski, Jacqueline M.

2010-01-01

324

Hands-On Activities and Challenge Tests in Agricultural and Environmental Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many agricultural and environmental problems are interrelated and overlapping. Several agencies, including nonprofit organizations, have developed programs to educate schoolchildren about agricultural and environmental issues; however, programs that integrate both agricultural and environmental learning, especially among middle and high school…

Poudel, D. D.; Vincent, L. M.; Anzalone, C.; Huner, J.; Wollard, D.; Clement, T.; DeRamus, A.; Blakewood, G.

2005-01-01

325

"Gone" into Solution: Assessing the Effect of Hands-On Activity on Students' Comprehension of Solubility  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Solubility is challenging for many general chemistry students, and the interactions of aqueous species are difficult to conceptualize. Derived from the pedagogies of Johnstone, Bloom, and Piaget, our primary research questions probe whether students' conceptual understandings of solubility could be enhanced by participation in a concept-building,…

Bruck, Laura B.; Bruck, Aaron D.; Phelps, Amy J.

2010-01-01

326

Access Nature[TM]: 45 Fun, Hands-On Activities for Everyone!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Access Nature" is an outdoor science curriculum that focuses on habitats. This curriculum targets students ages 6-14 and aims to develop environmental awareness, environmental leadership skills, and outdoor knowledge and skills. Specific adaptations for disabled students are also considered. Contents include: (1) "Introduction to Habitats"; (2)…

Almeras, Bethe Gilbert; Heath, David

327

Performance Accuracy of Hand-on-needle versus Hand-on-syringe Technique for Ultrasound-guided Regional Anesthesia Simulation for Emergency Medicine Residents  

PubMed Central

Introduction Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks (UGNB) are increasingly used in emergency care. The hand-on-syringe (HS) needle technique is ideally suited to the emergency department setting because it allows a single operator to perform the block without assistance. The HS technique is assumed to provide less exact needle control than the alternative two-operator hand-on-needle (HN) technique; however this assumption has never been directly tested. The primary objective of this study was to compare accuracy of needle targeting under ultrasound guidance by emergency medicine (EM) residents using HN and HS techniques on a standardized gelatinous simulation model. Methods This prospective, randomized study evaluated task performance. We compared needle targeting accuracy using the HN and HS techniques. Each participant performed a set of structured needling maneuvers (both simple and difficult) on a standardized partial-task simulator. We evaluated time to task completion, needle visualization during advancement, and accuracy of needle tip at targeting. Resident technique preference was assessed using a post-task survey. Results We evaluated 60 tasks performed by 10 EM residents. There was no significant difference in time to complete the simple model (HN vs. HS, 18 seconds vs. 18 seconds, p=0.93), time to complete the difficult model (HN vs. HS, 56 seconds vs. 50 seconds, p=0.63), needle visualization, or needle tip targeting accuracy. Most residents (60%) preferred the HS technique. Conclusion For EM residents learning UGNBs, the HN technique was not associated with superior needle control. Our results suggest that the single-operator HS technique provides equivalent needle control when compared to the two-operator HN technique. PMID:25247033

Johnson, Brian; Herring, Andrew; Stone, Michael; Nagdev, Arun

2014-01-01

328

Current research activities at the NASA-sponsored Illinois Computing Laboratory of Aerospace Systems and Software  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Illinois Computing Laboratory of Aerospace Systems and Software (ICLASS) was established to: (1) pursue research in the areas of aerospace computing systems, software and applications of critical importance to NASA, and (2) to develop and maintain close contacts between researchers at ICLASS and at various NASA centers to stimulate interaction and cooperation, and facilitate technology transfer. Current ICLASS activities are in the areas of parallel architectures and algorithms, reliable and fault tolerant computing, real time systems, distributed systems, software engineering and artificial intelligence.

Smith, Kathryn A.

1994-01-01

329

International Council for Laboratory Animal Science: International activities. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources annual report, 1993--1994  

SciTech Connect

In late 1987, the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) requested that the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR), National Research Council (NRC), National Academy of Sciences, reestablish US national membership in the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). The ICLAS is the only worldwide organization whose goal is to foster the humane use of animals in medical research and testing. ILAR`s Mission Statement reflects its commitment to producing highly respected documents covering a wide range of scientific issues, including databases in genetic stocks, species specific management guides, guidelines for humane care of animals, and position papers on issues affecting the future of the biological sciences. As such, ILAR is recognized nationally and internationally as an independent, scientific authority in the development of animal sciences in biomedical research.

Not Available

1994-09-01

330

The Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST) at MIT Lincoln Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST) is the aerosol range within the MIT Lincoln Laboratory's Optical System Test Facility (OSTF). Ladar and Lidar are promising tools for precise target acquisition, identification, and ranging. Solid rocket effluent has a strong Lidar signature. Currently, calculations of the Lidar signature from effluent are in disagreement from measurements. This discrepancy can be addressed through relatively inexpensive laboratory measurements. The SAAST is specifically designed for measuring the polarization-dependent optical scattering cross sections of laboratory-generated particulate samples at multiple wavelengths and angles. Measurements made at oblique angles are highly sensitive to particle morphology, including complex index of refraction and sample shape distribution. With existing hardware it is possible to re-aerosolize previously collected effluent samples and, with online and offline diagnostics, ensure that these samples closely represent those found in situ. Through comparison of calculations and measurements at multiple angles it is possible to create a realistic model of solid rocket effluent that can be used to extrapolate to a variety of conditions. The SAAST has recently undergone a dramatic upgrade, improving sensitivity, flexibility, sample generation, sample verification, and level of automation. Several measurements have been made of terrestrial dust and other samples.

Richardson, Jonathan M.; Aldridge, John C.; Harrison, David C.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Hines, Eric L.; Jiang, Leaf A.; Schultz, Kenneth I.

2006-05-01

331

Field and Laboratory GPR Monitoring of Biological Activity in Saturated Porous Media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent studies of the geophysical signatures of biological processes in earth environments have resulted in the emergent field of "biogeophysics". The ability to monitor remotely and to quantify active biological processes in the subsurface can have transformative implications to a wide range of investigations, including the bioremediation of contaminated sites. Previous studies have demonstrated that ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to detect the products of microbial activity in the subsurface, such as changes in bulk electrical conductivity, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and the formation of biogenic gas. We present a field study and a laboratory experiment that offer insights to the response of GPR signals to microbial activity. In the field, time-lapse borehole radar tomography was used to monitor biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume over a period of two years. A dense grid of fourteen borehole pairs monitoring the bioactive region showed radar wave velocity changes of +/-4% and signal attenuation changes of +/-25%. These GPR observations correlated spatially and temporally to independent measurements of groundwater velocity and geochemical variations that occurred in response to microbial activity. The greatest relative changes in radar wave velocity of propagation and attenuation were observed in the region of enhanced bacterial stimulation where biomass growth was the greatest. Radar wave velocity and attenuation decreased during periods of enhanced biostimulation. Three competing mechanisms are postulated to cause the changes observed in the radar data: 1) biogenic gas production, 2) mineral dissolution, and 3) biomass growth. However, due to the inherent complexity and uncertainties associated with field experimentation, the relative effect of each mechanism on the GPR signal could not be confirmed. To overcome the limitations of field observations in assessing the response of GPR signals to biomass formation, a 90-day laboratory-scale experiment was conducted under controlled conditions. GPR signals were transmitted through a water-saturated quartz-sand reactor during the course of enhanced biostimulation. Radar wave velocity initially decreased as a result of bacterial activity and subsequently increased rapidly as biogenic gas formed in the pore space. Radar signal attenuation increased during the course of the experiment as a result of pore fluid electrical conductivity increase. The relative GPR velocity changes observed in the reactor experiment were small in magnitude but consistent and comparable to the changes observed in the field investigation. The radar wave velocity decrease observed in the experimental reactor provides direct evidence of GPR signal response to bacterial growth in water saturated porous media. We conclude that field and laboratory GPR observations of enhanced biological activity in saturated porous media offer evidence that GPR can be used to monitor biostimulation in earth environments.

Tsoflias, Georgios; Schillig, Peter; McGlashan, Michael; Roberts, Jennifer; Devlin, J. F.

2010-05-01

332

Effectiveness of Hands-On Education for Correct Child Restraint Use by Parents  

PubMed Central

This study evaluates whether a hands-on educational intervention makes a significant difference in the proper use of a child passenger restraint by a parent. The clinical trial design included a sample of 111 parents who were at least seven months pregnant and who were randomly assigned to one of two groups (56 intervention and 55 control). All participants received a free car seat and a standardized education session on the safety and use of child passenger restraints. The experimental group received an additional component consisting of a hands-on demonstration and return demonstration of correct installation and use in their own vehicle. Follow up observation for correctness of use was done after birth using a standardized tool. A total of 24 (22%) parents correctly used the car seat; of these, 18 (32%) were in the intervention group and 6 (11%) were in the control group. The intervention group was 4 times more likely to have correct use than the control group (odds ratio 4.3, P value=0.0074). The range for the number of errors per person was 0 to 7, with the majority (70%) having 0 to 2. The rate of errors was 33% less in the intervention group (ratio of 0.67). There were few serious errors in either group. No secondary variable (age, education, income, or help from others) had a significant effect on the outcome. The hands-on educational intervention made a significant difference in the proper use of a child passenger restraint by a parent. This study demonstrates the value of hands-on teaching for learning how to install and use a child car seat. PMID:20441811

Tessier, Karen

2010-01-01

333

Effects of bag holding with one hand on lower leg muscles and postural control  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the influence of holding a load with one hand on the tissue oxygenation kinetics in the flexor digitorum\\u000a superficialis muscle of the forearm, the electromyographic responses in the lower leg antigravity muscles, and the center\\u000a of foot pressure (COP) sway. Ten healthy young men participated in this study. They kept an upright standing posture while\\u000a holding a

S. Demura; M. Uchiyama

2007-01-01

334

Comparing hands-on and video training for postpartum hemorrhage management.  

PubMed

The objective was to compare two teaching methods for postpartum hemorrhage management: interactive hands-on training and non-interactive video training. In a controlled intervention study at a secondary health care center in Kenya, the two training methods, based on the Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics curriculum, were evaluated utilizing structured observation of a standardized scenario before and after training. Both intervention groups significantly increased in performance scores after receiving hands-on training: 40% (95% CI 29.5-47.0) and video training: 34.5% (95% CI 25.0-42.0); likewise, pass rates improved significantly. No significant differences in performance score or pass rates were found between the two methods. The findings indicate that postpartum hemorrhage management training by mobile media might be just as effective as conventional hands-on training and a feasible way to overcome the outreach gap in sub-Saharan Africa's rural areas, where peripheral health facilities are generally difficult to reach with conventional training programs. PMID:24754607

Nilsson, Cecilia; Sørensen, Bjarke Lund; Sørensen, Jette Led

2014-05-01

335

Modeling the effects of temperature and moisture on soil enzyme activity: Linking laboratory assays to continuous field data  

E-print Network

Modeling the effects of temperature and moisture on soil enzyme activity: Linking laboratory assays methods a b s t r a c t Although potential enzyme activity measurements have a long history of use, temperature strongly affects in situ enzyme activities, but is rarely considered in enzyme assays. To address

Dukes, Jeffrey

336

Effects of activity and energy budget balancing algorithm on laboratory performance of a fish bioenergetics model  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We evaluated the performance of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush that were fed ad libitum in laboratory tanks under regimes of low activity and high activity. In addition, we compared model performance under two different model algorithms: (1) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t and (2) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t + 1. Results indicated that the model significantly underestimated consumption for both inactive and active lake trout when algorithm 1 was used and that the degree of underestimation was similar for the two activity levels. In contrast, model performance substantially improved when using algorithm 2, as no detectable bias was found in model predictions of consumption for inactive fish and only a slight degree of overestimation was detected for active fish. The energy budget was accurately balanced by using algorithm 2 but not by using algorithm 1. Based on the results of this study, we recommend the use of algorithm 2 to estimate food consumption by fish in the field. Our study results highlight the importance of accurately accounting for changes in fish energy density when balancing the energy budget; furthermore, these results have implications for the science of evaluating fish bioenergetics model performance and for more accurate estimation of food consumption by fish in the field when fish energy density undergoes relatively rapid changes.

Madenjian, Charles P.; David, Solomon R.; Pothoven, Steven A.

2012-01-01

337

Field and Laboratory Investigations of Enhanced Biological Activity Influencing Groundwater Velocity and Electromagnetic Wave Propagation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field observations of groundwater velocity using point velocity probes (PVPs) and aquifer dielectric properties using ground penetrating radar (GPR) were made in a bioremediating, gasoline contaminated aquifer to which dissolved oxygen was introduced using Oxygen Release Compound (ORC®). PVPs are sensitive to changes in groundwater flow; whereas GPR is sensitive to changes in the dielectric and geoelectric properties of the pore- fluid and aquifer material. Therefore, the two methods provided complimentary and independent evidence for pore-scale changes associated with enhanced biological activity. Following the addition of ORC, PVP and GPR measured velocities nearest the ORC wells changed in a consistent manner throughout the experiment. GPR velocities measured further down-gradient, outside the influence of the ORC, did not indicate the same trend. Results from geochemical and flow modeling, combined with gas and biomass measurements, show that PVP and GPR velocity changes were not artifacts of seasonally fluctuating hydraulic gradient or temperature. Rather, the changes appear to be caused by factors related to elevated levels biological activity in the aquifer. Preliminary geophysical laboratory testing in a large sandbox reactor previously identified consistent trends with field GPR data that mirrored the field observations. A new, more detailed, laboratory experiment using GPR and PVPs was initiated to 1) confirm with confidence the phenomena observed in the field and the preliminary lab tank experiment, and 2) to gain additional understanding of the mechanisms responsible for PVP and GPR responses. At the time of writing, the results of the detailed experiment are pending.

Schillig, P. C.; Devlin, J. F.; Tsoflias, G. P.; Patterson, E.; Roberts, J. A.; McGlashan, M. A.

2007-12-01

338

A System for Implanting Laboratory Mice with Light-Activated Microtransponders  

PubMed Central

The mouse is the most commonly used laboratory animal, accounting for up to 80% of all mammals used in research studies. Because rodents generally are group-housed, an efficient system of uniquely identifying individual animals for use in research studies, breeding, and proper colony management is required. Several temporary and permanent methods (for example, ear punching and toe clipping) are available for labeling research mice and other small animals, each with advantages and disadvantages. This report describes a new radiofrequency identification tagging method that uses 500-µm, light-activated microtransponders implanted subcutaneously into the ear or tail of mice. The preferred location for implanting is in the side of the tail, because implantation at this site was simple to perform and was associated with shorter implantation times (average, 53 versus 325 s) and a higher success rate (98% versus 50%) compared with the ear. The main benefits of using light-activated microtransponders over other identification methods, including other radiofrequency identification tags, is their small size, which minimizes stress to the animals during implantation and low cost due to their one-piece (monolithic) design. In addition, the implantation procedure uses a custom-designed 21-gauge needle injector and does not require anesthetization of the mice. We conclude that this method allows improved identification and management of laboratory mice. PMID:21205448

Gruda, Maryann C; Pinto, Amanda; Craelius, Aaron; Davidowitz, Hanan; Kopacka, Wesley M; Li, Ji; Qian, Jay; Rodriguez, Efrain; Kuspiel, Edward; Mandecki, Wlodek

2010-01-01

339

Activation of Wnt Signaling Using Lithium Chloride: Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Laboratory Exercises  

PubMed Central

Abstract Zebrafish provide researchers and students alike with an excellent model of vertebrate nervous system development due to a high degree of conserved developmental mechanisms and transparent embryos that develop in synchrony. In these laboratory exercises, undergraduate students explore cell biological concepts while performing hypothesis-driven novel research utilizing methodologies such as immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, image analysis, pharmacology, and basic statistics. In the first block of exercises, students perform anti-acetylated tubulin (anti-AT) immunofluorescence, identify spinal tracts and neuronal subtypes, and perform conventional and confocal microscopy. Building on knowledge acquired in the first block of exercises, during the second block, students subsequently perform pharmacological activation of Wnt signaling through lithium chloride treatments, and assess nervous system integrity through anti-AT immunofluorescence. Students perform various quantitative methods and apply statistics to determine outcomes of Wnt activation. In their final laboratory report, students contextualize their results with foundations of molecular mechanisms of nervous system development. In sum, these exercises offer undergraduate students a model of independent research at the graduate level. PMID:23098089

Ross, Andrew William

2012-01-01

340

Gaining a Better Understanding of Estuarine Circulation and Improving Data Visualization Skills Through a Hands-on Contouring Exercise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The creation and accurate interpretation of graphs is becoming a lost art among students. The availability of numerous graphing software programs makes the act of graphing data easy but does not necessarily aide students in interpreting complex visual data. This is especially true for contour maps; which have become a critical skill in the earth sciences and everyday life. In multiple classes, we have incorporated a large-scale, hands-on, contouring exercise of temperature, salinity, and density data collected in the Hudson River Estuary. The exercise allows students to learn first-hand how to plot, analyze, and present three dimensional data. As part of a day-long sampling expedition aboard an 80' research vessel, students deploy a water profiling instrument (Seabird CTD). Data are collected along a transect between the Verrazano and George Washington Bridges. The data are then processed and binned at 0.5 meter intervals. The processed data is then used during a later laboratory period for the contouring exercise. In class, students work in groups of 2 to 4 people and are provided with the data, a set of contouring instructions, a piece of large (3' x 3') graph paper, a ruler, and a set of colored markers. We then let the groups work together to determine the details of the graphs. Important steps along the way are talking to the students about X and Y scales, interpolation, and choices of contour intervals and colors. Frustration and bottlenecks are common at the beginning when students are unsure how to even begin with the raw data. At some point during the exercise, students start to understand the contour concept and each group usually produces a finished contour map in an hour or so. Interestingly, the groups take pride in the coloring portion of the contouring as it indicates successful interpretation of the data. The exercise concludes with each group presenting and discussing their contour plot. In almost every case, the hands-on graphing has improved the "students" visualization skills. Contouring has been incorporated into the River Summer (www.riversumer.org, http://www.riversumer.org/) program and our Environmental Measurements laboratory course. This has resulted in the exercise being utilized with undergraduates, high-school teachers, graduate students, and college faculty. We are in the process of making this curricular module available online to educators.

Mailloux, B. J.; Kenna, T. C.

2008-12-01

341

Characterization of the Activity and Stability of Amylase from Saliva and Detergent: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Activity and Stability of Amylase from Saliva and Various Commercial Detergents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents two integrated laboratory exercises intended to show students the role of [alpha]-amylases (AAMYs) in saliva and detergents. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the enzymatic activity of amylase from saliva and different detergents using the Phadebas test (quantitative) and the Lugol test…

Valls, Cristina; Rojas, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

2012-01-01

342

Safeguards Implementation: Establishment of Indonesian Safeguards Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Under the International Nuclear Safeguards and Engagement Program (INSEP), U.S. National Laboratories support the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to ''collaborate with international partners to strengthen international safeguards at all stages of nuclear development.'' This engagement in safeguards implementation cooperation is the basis for the security and safeguards arrangement with the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (BAPETEN) and includes strengthening of the State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC). There are many components in a robust SSAC. While INSEP carries on its program in a holistic approach, it is more effective and efficient to address individual components, rather than the entire system at one time, with the objective of strengthening the system as a whole. Nuclear material accountancy is one of these components. Nuclear material accountancy necessitates that a State periodically take an inventory of its material and record changes. To better perform these activities, BAPETEN requested assistance with establishing a safeguards laboratory where its staff could perform independent material characterization, maintain nondestructive assay equipment, and facilitate hands-on training of BAPETEN safeguards inspectors. In compliance with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guidelines and safety series documents, INSEP and BAPETEN opened the BAPETEN Safeguards Laboratory in February 2010 to provide these competencies. BAPETEN showcased these new capabilities in July 2010 at the IAEA-sponsored Regional Workshop on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control at Facilities where hands-on activities were held at BAPETEN's Headquarters in Jakarta using the equipment supplied by INSEP. Discussions have begun on the establishment of a security and safeguards laboratory at the BAPETEN Training Center located in Cisarua. This paper describes the many steps involved with the Safeguards Laboratory Implementation Plan from its drafting in August 2007 to the completion of the laboratory in February 2010.

Shipwash, Jacqueline L [ORNL] [ORNL; Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Smith, Steven E [ORNL] [ORNL; Solodov, Alexander A [ORNL] [ORNL; Suharyanta, Suharyanta [ORNL] [ORNL; Sunaryadi, Dedi [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01

343

Cognitive Achievement and Motivation in Hands-On and Teacher-Centred Science Classes: Does an Additional Hands-On Consolidation Phase (Concept Mapping) Optimise Cognitive Learning at Work Stations?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Our study monitored the cognitive and motivational effects within different educational instruction schemes: On the one hand, teacher-centred versus hands-on instruction; on the other hand, hands-on instruction with and without a knowledge consolidation phase (concept mapping). All the instructions dealt with the same content. For all…

Gerstner, Sabine; Bogner, Franz X.

2010-01-01

344

9.02 Brain Laboratory, Spring 2002  

E-print Network

Consists of a series of hands-on laboratories designed to give students experience with common techniques for conducting neuroscience research. Included are sessions on anatomical, ablation, neurophysiological, and computer ...

Miller, Earl

345

AC 2011-75: ENHANCING STUDENT LEARNING THROUGH HANDS-ON LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES  

E-print Network

of improvement of the class, each student was given a questionnaire before and after completing each experiment and at the end of the academic term. Each questionnaire consisted of five different types of questions relevant, psychology, literature, theater, community studies, economics, history, politics, mathematics, engineering

346

This form must be completed by the PI or their designee. The form is designed to conduct a laboratory hazard assessment specific to activities in each laboratory. The laboratory hazard assessment  

E-print Network

1 This form must be completed by the PI or their designee. The form is designed to conduct work activities. The person conducting the assessment must verify that it is complete and that training has been conducted. This assessment consists of four sections: Section 1: Laboratory Information

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

347

An Overview of Science Education and Outreach Activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a Department of Energy Laboratory, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has an energetic science education program and outreach effort. This overview describes the components of the programs and evaluates this effort during the last several years. The primary goal is to inform the public regarding the fusion and plasma research at PPPL and to excite students so that they can appreciate science and technology. The public's interest in science can be raised by news media publicity, tours, summer research experiences, in-classroom presentations, plasma expos, teacher workshops, printed and web-based materials. The ultimate result of this effort is a better-informed public, as well as an increase in the number of women and minorities who choose science as a vocation. Measuring the results is difficult, but current metrics are reviewed. The science education and outreach programs are supported by a dedicated core group of individuals and supplemented by PPPL staff, friends and family members who help with various outreach and educational activities. Supported by U. S. DOE Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073/ab

Delooper, J.

2005-10-01

348

Soil Activation and Groundwater Contamination at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York  

SciTech Connect

In November 1999, tritium (H-3) was detected in the groundwater near one of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) accelerator experiments at concentrations above the 20,000 pico curie per liter (pCi/L) Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL). Sodium-22 (Na-22) was also detected in the groundwater, but at concentrations well below the 400 pCi/L MCL. An investigation into the source of the contamination revealed that the tritium and sodium-22 originated from activated soil shielding located adjacent to the g-2 target building where approximately five percent of the beam was inadvertently striking one of the beam-line magnets. Rainwater was able to infiltrate the activated soils and carry the tritium and sodium-22 into the groundwater. The highest tritium level detected in groundwater during the 1999 investigation was nearly 1.8 million pCi/L. To prevent additional rainwater infiltration into the activated soil shielding, a concrete cap was constructed over the soil shielding in December 1999. Other corrective actions included refocusing the beam and improved beam loss monitoring to reduce additional soil activation, storm-water management improvements, and additional groundwater monitoring. From 2001 through 2004, three high concentration zones (or slugs) of tritium were observed passing through the groundwater monitoring well network immediately down-gradient of the source area, with a maximum observed concentration of 3.4 million pCi/L. Some of the tritium that was previously leached from the activated soil was trapped in the vadose (unsaturated) zone soils directly above the water table after then cap was installed. A portion of this residual tritium was later mobilized into the groundwater during periods of high groundwater table elevations, which can occur following heavy seasonal rainfall. Monitoring results for the past two years indicate that the amount of tritium being released from the vadose zone is decreasing, with tritium concentrations consistently below 100,000 pCi/L. The tritium plume is currently 550 meters long, and is located entirely in the central portion of the BNL site. The plume has not impacted any of the Laboratory's drinking water supply wells. Contaminant transport modeling suggests that the tritium plume will attenuate entirely in the central portion of the BNL site by years 2010-2015. (authors)

Paquette, D.E.P.G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Chek Beng, Ng P.E. [New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Albany, NY (United States); Penny, G. [Federal Project Director, United States Department of Energy - Brookhaven Site Office, Upton, NY (United States)

2008-07-01

349

Twenty-first century skills for students: hands-on learning after school builds school and life success.  

PubMed

At the core of the movement for twenty-first century skills are students. The growing efforts to increase programs leveraging out-of-school time are focused on giving American youth everything they need to compete in this increasingly complex world. The author is one of many students who have been well served by initiatives imparting twenty-first century skills during after-school hours. Now a senior at Boston Latin School, the author has been helped along the way by Citizen Schools, an after-school education program focused on hands-on learning apprenticeships and homework help. While enrolled in the program as a middle school student, the author took part in projects that exemplified hands-on, inquiry-based learning that helped her develop twenty-first century skills. For example, along with dozens of other students, she advanced her data analysis skills by analyzing statistics about Boston Public high schools, which also helped her select and enroll in one of the city's premier exam schools. Also, she and her peers worked with corporate attorneys who served as writing coaches and whose expertise the author drew from in producing a published essay and greatly improving her writing skills. The author now finds that the public speaking, leadership, organizational, social, and management abilities she built through her participation in Citizen Schools are a great asset to her in high school. The confidence with which she tackles her responsibilities can also be traced back to her experiences in the program. As she looks toward college, the author reflects and realizes that being actively involved in a quality after-school program put her on track for a successful future. PMID:17017266

Cabral, Leide

2006-01-01

350

The standoff aerosol active signature testbed (SAAST) at MIT Lincoln Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Standoff LIDAR detection of BW agents depends on accurate knowledge of the infrared and ultraviolet optical elastic scatter (ES) and ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF) signatures of bio-agents and interferents. MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST) for measuring ES cross sections from BW simulants and interferents at all angles including 180º (direct backscatter). Measurements of interest include the dependence of the ES and UVF signatures on several spore production parameters including growth medium, sporulation protocol, washing protocol, fluidizing additives, and degree of aggregation. Using SAAST, we have made measurements of the ES signature of Bacillus globigii (atropheaus, Bg) spores grown under different growth methods. We have also investigated one common interferent (Arizona Test Dust). Future samples will include pollen and diesel exhaust. This paper presents the details of the SAAST apparatus along with the results of recent measurements.

Richardson, Jonathan M.; Aldridge, John C.

2005-11-01

351

On the effectiveness of active-engagement microcomputer-based laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One hour active-engagement tutorials using microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) equipment were substituted for traditional problem-solving recitations in introductory calculus-based mechanics classes for engineering students at the University of Maryland. The results of two specific tutorials, one on the concept of instantaneous velocity and one on Newton's third law were probed by using standard multiple-choice questions and a free-response final exam question. A comparison of the results of 11 lecture classes taught by six different teachers with and without tutorials shows that the MBL tutorials resulted in a significant improvement compared to the traditional recitations when measured by carefully designed multiple-choice problems. The free-response question showed that, although the tutorial students did somewhat better in recognizing and applying the concepts, there is still room for improvement.

Redish, Edward F.; Steinberg, Richard N.; Saul, Jeffrey

2005-11-23

352

Surface-active substances in a laboratory simulated Titan's organic haze: Prebiotic microstructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, is a key planetary body for astrobiological studies due to its active organic chemistry, hydrocarbon lakes and possible subsurface water-ammonia liquids. We have investigated the physicochemical properties of organic compounds synthesized in a simulated Titan atmosphere. A laboratory analog of Titan's aerosols, called tholin, was produced by irradiation of a nitrogen/methane gas mixture. The primary aim was to determine whether tholin represent possible sources of surface-active substances that could have been involved in the formation of prebiotic structures. A tholin sample was extracted with chloroform-methanol and the chloroform soluble material was separated by two-dimensional thin layer chromatography. Fluorescence excited by UV light was used to identify the major components on the plates. After being scraped from the TLC plate, the components were eluted as specific fractions and investigated by surface chemical methods, FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Fractions 1 and 2 were strongly fluorescent and surface active, producing films at air-water interfaces. When exposed to aqueous phases, components in fraction 1 form spherical microstructures resembling prebionts. The prebionts are precursor structures that might have evolved into the first living cells.

Jagota, Seema; Kawai, Jun; Deamer, David; McKay, Christopher; Khare, Bishun; Beeler, David

2014-11-01

353

Recent upgrade of the in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The in vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of a delayed- and a prompt-gamma neutron activation (DGNA and PGNA) system and an inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. The total body contents of several basic elements, including potassium, calcium, chlorine, sodium, and phosphorus are measured at the DGNA system; total body carbon is measured at the INS system; and the nitrogen-tohydrogen ratio is measured at the PGNA system. Based on the elemental composition, body compartments, such as total body fat and total body protein can be computed with additional independently measured parameters, such as total body water, body size, and body weight. Information on elemental and compartmental body composition obtained through neutron activation analysis is useful, if not essential, for research on growth, malnutrition, aging diseases, such as osteoporosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in which the progression of the illness is closely related to changes in major body compartments, such as bone, adipose tissue, and muscle. The DGNA system has been modified and upgraded several times since it was first built. Recently, all three systems underwent major upgrades. This upgrading and some preliminary studies carried out with the modified facilities are reported here.

Ma, R.; Dilmanian, F.A..; Rarback, H.; Meron, M.; Kamen, Y.; Yasumura, S.; Weber, D.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stamatelatos, I.E. [Ioannina Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics; Lidofsky, L.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Nuclear Engineering; Pierson, R.N. Jr. [Saint Luke`s-Roosevelt Body Composition Unit, New York, NY (United States)

1993-10-01

354

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Quality Assurance Manual  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The role of the INL in this project is that of software developer and tester. This development takes place using formal software development procedures and is subject to quality assurance (QA) processes. The purpose of this document is to describe how the SAPHIRE software QA is performed for Version 6 and 7, what constitutes its parts, and limitations of those processes.

C. L. Smith; R. Nims; K. J. Kvarfordt; C. Wharton

2008-08-01

355

From Creeks to the Classroom: Hands-on Curriculum Units on the Web  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Archway School is in the process of developing 6 curriculum units to teach middle school students about the ecology and environmental science of the San Francisco Bay Area. This is being accomplished through integrated classroom, field trip, and creek restoration project activities. The creek where restoration work takes place becomes an outdoor laboratory for a wide array of classroom lessons tied to both National and California Science Education Standards. The entire curriculum, including all lesson plans, assessments, and examples of student work are being made available, free of charge, to teachers and educators via the Internet. Although the units were initially developed to teach about the natural and geological history of the San Francisco Bay Area, classroom activities are structured such that they could be used at any school and restoration work could be undertaken at any creek in the country. This presentation will showcase the curriculum and provide information so that educators may bring it home to their own institutions. Teachers will get a "tour" of 3 of the 6 curriculum units (Ecology, Watersheds, Earth History) and then have an opportunity to view activities that highlight the strengths of the program.

Salter, I. Y.

2005-12-01

356

Ground-Level Ozone Pollution: An Example of A Scientific Data-Rich Laboratory Activity to Enhance Deep Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research tells us the roles of colleges and universities are shifting from institutions that exist to provide instruction to institutions that exist to produce learning. Meaningful engagement where students are actively involved in the learning process has been demonstrated to promote deep learning. This presentation describes a scientific data-rich activity designed for a non-majors introductory environmental science laboratory. The overarching

O. Alabi; R. Coveney; C. Davies

2008-01-01

357

Activities for Preschoolers--A Laboratory Manual for Use by Child-Care Teacher-Aide Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory manual for use by child care and teacher aide students is arranged by topic according to the months and holidays of the school year. Suggested activities, songs, fingerplays, and poems are included for each topic, along with a list of related resource books. Many of the activities and songs include a number in parentheses following…

Constantine, Jean

358

Help! There are 60 screaming kids in my lab!Outreach activities for 5th graders (L)  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this letter a day of hands-on activities for 60 5th graders is described in the Acoustics and Vibrations Laboratory at TTU. This includes the logistics of having 60 kids in the lab and keeping their attention, a description of each activity, and the equipment used. The purpose of this publication is to encourage my colleagues to reach out to

Corinne M. Darvennes

2005-01-01

359

Scopes for Schools: A Low-Cost Model for Bringing Hands-On Astronomy to the K-12 Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a low-cost, field-tested model for astronomy and space-related outreach aimed at minority and under-serviced populations at the middle-school and high-school levels. The model centers around the creation of an extracurricular astronomy ``club" at a middle school or high school, and an in-service training activity for teachers who will serve as club leaders. Students in the club engage in two hands-on activities: telescope-building and model rocketry. Implementation of the model requires a time investment of 1--2 hours per week over the course of one school year. The primary end products are (1) an ongoing extracurricular school club with trained teacher-leaders, (2) a set of portable Dobsonian telescopes for night-time sky-viewing sessions performed by the club as a service to the community, and (3) basic materials for continued model-rocketry activities. In its ideal implementation, the model brings together teachers and amateur astronomers in a lasting partnership. A specific example for funding an outreach program based on this model is presented. This outreach development was funded by a Special Initiatives outreach grant from the Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium, and by the UW-Madison College Access Program. Additional support was provided by Madison's amateur astronomy organization, the Madison Astronomical Society.

Stassun, K. G.; Lattis, J.

1999-12-01

360

Hands-On Universe: A Global Program for Education and Public Outreach in Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hands-On Universe (HOU) is an educational program that enables students to investigate the Universe while applying tools and concepts from science, math, and technology. Using the Internet, HOU participants around the world request observations from an automated telescope, download images from a large image archive, and analyze them with the aid of user-friendly image processing software. This program is now in many countries, including the USA, France, Germany, Sweden, Japan, and Australia. A network of telescopes has been established, many of them remotely operated. Students in the classroom are able to make night observations during the day, using a telescope in another country. An archive of images taken on large telescopes is also accessible, as well as resources for teachers. Students deal with real research projects, e.g., the search for asteroids, which resulted in the discovery of a Kuiper Belt object by high-school students. Not only does Hands-On Universe give the general public access to professional astronomy, it also demonstrates the use of a complex automated system, data processing techniques, and automation. Using telescopes located in many countries over the globe, a powerful and genuine cooperation between teachers and children from various countries is promoted, with a clear educational goal.

Boër, M.; Thiébaut, C.; Pack, H.; Pennypaker, C.; Isaac, M.; Melchior, A.-L.; Faye, S.; Ebisuzaki, T.

361

An Online Hands-On Program for Middle-School Science Teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science Education Online (SEO) is a new program of science and pedagogy courses developed at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and Lowell campuses, and now offers a Masters Degree in Science Education. The program was developed with NSF support over the last three years and has the goal of reaching in-service teachers, particularly in urban and rural communities. The science content courses have been developed by science and education faculty at UMass, working in collaboration to address Massachusetts and national science frameworks at the middle-school level. The SEO courses take a hands-on approach, with kits of inexpensive materials, cooperative learning strategies, and sharing of digital pictures. We give detailed examples of implementing the online hands-on approach from an astronomy course we developed using many Project STAR materials. One of the more interesting results of the online format is that teachers report that they have found themselves mastering skills that they had avoided in lab group work in college courses. By its nature, the online format also requires the teachers to express their understanding in writing, and we have found that small online groups are effective in helping the teachers to clarify their understanding. The SEO program was developed under National Science Foundation Grant # ESI-0243536.

Schneider, Stephen; Davis, K.

2006-12-01

362

Hands-On Universe: A Global Program for Education and Public Outreach in Astronomy  

E-print Network

Hands-On Universe (HOU) is an educational program that enables students to investigate the Universe while applying tools and concepts from science, math, and technology. Using the Internet, HOU participants around the world request observations from an automated telescope, download images from a large image archive, and analyze them with the aid of user-friendly image processing software. This program is developing now in many countries, including the USA, France, Germany, Sweden, Japan, Australia, and others. A network of telescopes has been established among these countries, many of them remotely operated, as shown in the accompanying demo. Using this feature, students in the classroom are able to make night observations during the day, using a telescope placed in another country. An archive of images taken on large telescopes is also accessible, as well as resources for teachers. Students are also dealing with real research projects, e.g. the search for asteroids, which resulted in the discovery of a Kuiper Belt object by high-school students. Not only Hands-On Universe gives the general public an access to professional astronomy, but it is also a more general tool to demonstrate the use of a complex automated system, the techniques of data processing and automation. Last but not least, through the use of telescopes located in many countries over the globe, a form of powerful and genuine cooperation between teachers and children from various countries is promoted, with a clear educational goal.

M. Boer; H. Pack; C. Pennypacker; A. L. Melchior; S. Faye; T. Ebisuzaki

2001-09-21

363

Hands-on-Science: Using Education Research to Construct Learner-Centered Classes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research into the process of learning, and learning astronomy, can be informative for the development of a course. Students are better able to incorporate and make sense of new ideas when they are aware of their own prior knowledge (Resnick et al. 1989; Confrey 1990), have the opportunity to develop explanations from their own experience in their own words (McDermott 1991; Prather et al. 2004), and benefit from peer instruction (Mazur 1997; Green 2003). Students in astronomy courses often have difficulty understanding many different concepts as a result of difficulties with spatial reasoning and a sense of scale. The Hands-on-Science program at UT Austin incorporates these research-based results into four guided-inquiry, integrated science courses (50 students each). They are aimed at pre-service K-5 teachers but are open to other majors as well. We find that Hands-on-Science students not only attain more favorable changes in attitude towards science, but they also outperform students in traditional lecture courses in content gains. Workshop Outcomes: Participants experienced a research-based, guided-inquiry lesson about the motion of objects in the sky and discussed the research methodology for assessing students in such a course.

Ludwig, R. R.; Chimonidou, A.; Kopp, S.

2014-07-01

364

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory?s Book of Minimum Detectable Activity for Direct Measurement of Internally Deposited Radionuclides in Radiation Workers  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory maintains an in vivo measurement program designed to identify and evaluate the activity of radionuclides deposited in the body. Two types of systems are primarily used for the routine monitoring of radiation workers, the lung counting system and the scanning bed whole body counting system. The lung counting system is comprised of two Canberra ACTII detector sets. Each ACTII set contains two planar germanium detectors with carbon composite end windows optimized to measure low energy photon emitting radionuclides. The ACTII detectors are placed on the upper torso over the lungs for the direct measurement of internally deposited radionuclides in the lungs that emit low energy photons. A correction for the thickness of the chest wall is applied to the efficiency. Because the thickness of the chest wall is a key factor in the measurement of low energy photon emitting radionuclides in the lung, the minimum detectable activity is a function of the chest wall thickness. The scanning bed whole body counting system is comprised of a thin air mattress on top of a carbon fiber bed that slowly scans over four high purity germanium detectors. The scanning system is designed to minimize variations in detected activity due to radionuclide distribution in the body. The scanning bed detection system is typically used for the measurement of internally deposited radionuclides that emit photons above 100 to 200 keV. MDAs have been generated for radionuclides that provide energies above 80 keV since the lowest calibration energy for the system is approximately 86 keV. The following charts and table provide best determination of minimum detectable activity using human subjects as controls for the background contributions. A wide variety of radionuclides are used throughout the laboratory and the following pages represent several of the radionuclides that have been encountered at the Whole Body and Spectroscopy Laboratories within Hazards Control.

Hickman, D P

2008-10-08

365

"RealTime Physics": Active Learning Labs Transforming the Introductory Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Computer-based tools that enable students to collect, display and analyse data in real time have catalysed the design of a laboratory curriculum that allows students to master a coherent body of physics concepts while acquiring traditional laboratory skills. This paper describes "RealTime Physics", a sequenced introductory laboratory curriculum…

Sokoloff, David R.; Laws, Priscilla W.; Thornton, Ronald K.

2007-01-01

366

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2010 Activity Report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2010. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders and to serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work.

Hollie K. Gilbert; Clayton F. Marler; Christina L. Olson; Brenda R. Pace; Julie Braun Williams

2011-09-01

367

Idaho National Laboratory Cultural Resource Management Office FY 2011 Activity Report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site is home to vast numbers and a wide variety of important cultural resources representing at least a 13,500 year span of human land use in the region. As a federal agency, the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has legal responsibility for the management and protection of the resources and has contracted these responsibilities to Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA). The BEA professional staff is committed to maintaining a cultural resource management program that accepts the challenge of preserving INL cultural resources in a manner reflecting their importance in local, regional, and national history. This report is intended as a stand-alone document that summarizes activities performed by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office (CRMO) staff during fiscal year 2011. This work is diverse, far-reaching and though generally confined to INL cultural resource compliance, also includes a myriad of professional and voluntary community activities. This document is intended to be informative to both internal and external stakeholders, serve as a planning tool for future INL cultural resource management work, and meet an agreed upon legal requirement.

Julie Braun Williams; Brenda R. Pace; Hollie K. Gilbert; Christina L. Olson

2012-09-01

368

Lessons Learned from V-Tank Waste Remediation Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to discuss major activities and lessons learned from remediation of the V-tank waste at Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Test Area North (TAN) complex. Remediation activities involved the on-site treatment, solidification and disposal of over 61,000 L (16,000 gal) of radioactively hazardous V-tank waste. In July, 2006, over 98% of the V-tank waste was disposed of at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). Disposal was accomplished using the three 38,000-L (10,000-gal) V-tanks that had stored most of the V-tank waste for over 30 years. Included in V-Tank remediation was the removal of approximately 7,650 m{sup 3} (10,000 yd{sup 3}) of contaminated soil. Plans are to treat the remaining V-tank waste off-site in early 2007, with the treated residual also disposed of at the ICDF. Disposal of the treated V-tank waste at ICDF marked a major step in completing remediation of the TAN V-tanks, a task begun in 1999 when the original Record of Decision (ROD) was published. Over this time, there have been a number of stops and starts associated with remediating this waste. Although many of these stops and starts were unavoidable, there are a number of lessons learned for the V-tank remediation that could help prevent unnecessary expenses and schedule delays in future remediation activities within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper identifies major and minor lessons learned from V-tank waste remediation efforts - those that resulted in unnecessary delays/expenses, as well as those areas that accelerated V-tank remediation efforts. (authors)

Farnsworth, R.K.; Jessmore, J.J.; Eaton, D.L.; McDannel, G.E.; Sloan, P.A.; Jantz, A.E.; Tyson, D.R. [CH2M-Washington Group Idaho -Idaho Cleanup Project-a, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Burt, B.T. [E2 Consulting Engineers, Idaho Falls ID (United States)

2007-07-01

369

Hands-On Science Reform, Science Achievement, and the Elusive Goal of "science for All" in a Diverse Elementary School District  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Given the emphasis on "science for all" in national reform documents, this study analyzed student science achievement scores in hands-on reform versus traditional classrooms for 3,667 students in Grades 3 to 6 by gender, ethnicity, free or reduced lunch status, parent education, and level of English proficiency to determine whether these subgroups performed better or worse in reform classrooms. Teachers in reform classrooms used exemplary hands-on science kits and attended 1-day in-service training per kit. Teachers in traditional classrooms used the regular activity-based science curriculum with textbook. Gender differences favoring boys appeared in both types of classrooms, but were larger in the reform classrooms. Boys from lower socioeconomic levels performed better in reform classrooms, but limited-English-proficient boys performed worse. Parent education was significantly related to higher achievement for boys only in reform classrooms. For girls this relation was significant only in traditional classrooms. White girls performed significantly worse in reform classroom, but there were no differences for Asian and Hispanic girls. Implications for adapting hands-on science reform to meet student needs are discussed.

Echevarria, Marissa

370

Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Tutorial  

SciTech Connect

The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of computer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessment (PRAs). This volume is the tutorial manual for the SAPHIRE system. In this document, a series of lessons are provided that guide the user through basic steps common to most analyses preformed with SAPHIRE. The tutorial is divided into two major sections covering both basic and advanced features. The section covering basic topics contains lessons that lead the reader through development of a probabilistic hypothetical problem involving a vehicle accident, highlighting the program’s most fundamental features. The advanced features section contains additional lessons that expand on fundamental analysis features of SAPHIRE and provide insights into more complex analysis techniques. Together, these two elements provide an overview into the operation and capabilities of the SAPHIRE software.

C. L. Smith; S. T. Beck; S. T. Wood

2008-08-01

371

More 'hands-on' particle physics: Learning with ATLAS at CERN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article introduces teachers and students to a new portal of resources called Learning with ATLAS at CERN (http://learningwithatlas-portal.eu/), which has been developed by a European consortium of academic researchers and schools' liaison and outreach providers from countries across Europe. It includes the use of some of the mind-boggling facts and figures from the Large Hadron Collider experiment to illustrate some basic school physics concepts. It also uses innovative software adapted and made available on the web by European particle physics researchers to introduce a more innovative investigative approach to teaching particle physics concepts. This gives students a more 'hands-on' experience in the classroom and a feel for what real scientific research might be like.

Long, Lynne

2011-05-01

372

Hands-On Astrophysics: Variable Stars in Math, Science, and Computer Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hands-On Astrophysics (HOA): Variable Stars in Math, Science, and Computer Education, is a project recently developed by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) with funds from the National Science Foundation. HOA uses the unique methods and the international database of the AAVSO to develop and integrate students' math and science skills through variable star observation and analysis. It can provide an understanding of basic astronomy concepts, as well as interdisciplinary connections. Most of all, it motivates the user by exposing them to the excitement of doing real science with real data. Project materials include: a database of 600,000 variable star observations; VSTAR (a data plotting and analysis program), and other user friendly software; 31 slides and 14 prints of five constellations; 45 variable star finder charts; an instructional videotape in three 15-minute segments; and a 560-page student's and teacher's manual. These materials support the National Standards for Science and Math education by directly involving the students in the scientific process. Hands-On Astrophysics is designed to be flexible. It is organized so that it can be used at many levels, in many contexts: for classroom use from high school to college level, or for individual projects. In addition, communication and support can be found through the AAVSO home page on the World Wide Web: http://www.aavso.org. The HOA materials can be ordered through this web site or from the AAVSO, 25 Birch Street Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. We gratefully acknowledge the education grant ESI-9154091 from the National Science Foundation which funded the development of this project.

Mattei, J. A.; Percy, J. R.

1999-12-01

373

An Overview of Science Education and Outreach Activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has an energetic science education program and outreach effort. This overview describes the components of the programs and evaluates the changes that have occurred in this effort during the last several years. Efforts have been expanded to reach more students, as well as the public in general. The primary goal is to inform the public regarding the fusion and plasma research at PPPL and to excite students so that they can appreciate science and technology. A student's interest in science can be raised by tours, summer research experiences, in-classroom presentations, plasma expos, teacher workshops and web-based materials. The ultimate result of this effort is a better-informed public, as well as an increase in the number of women and minorities who choose science as a vocation. Measuring the results is difficult, but current metrics are reviewed. The science education and outreach programs are supported by a de dicated core group of individuals and supplemented by other members of the PPPL staff and consultants who perform various outreach and educational activities.

J. DeLooper; A. DeMeo; P. Lucas; A. Post-Zwicker; C. Phillips; C. Ritter; J. Morgan; P. Wieser; A. Percival; E. Starkman; G. Czechowicz

2000-11-07

374

The plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft: Applications of laboratory simulations and active in situ experiments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attempts to gain an understanding of spacecraft plasma dynamics via experimental investigation of the interaction between artificially synthesized, collisionless, flowing plasmas and laboratory test bodies date back to the early 1960's. In the past 25 years, a number of researchers have succeeded in simulating certain limited aspects of the complex spacecraft-space plasma interaction reasonably well. Theoretical treatments have also provided limited models of the phenomena. Several active experiments were recently conducted from the space shuttle that specifically attempted to observe the Orbiter-ionospheric interaction. These experiments have contributed greatly to an appreciation for the complexity of spacecraft-space plasma interaction but, so far, have answered few questions. Therefore, even though the plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft is fundamental to space technology, it remains largely an open issue. A brief overview is provided of the primary results from previous ground-based experimental investigations and the preliminary results of investigations conducted on the STS-3 and Spacelab 2 missions. In addition, several, as yet unexplained, aspects of the spacecraft-space plasma interaction are suggested for future research.

Stone, N. H.; Samir, Uri

1986-01-01

375

Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

1994-09-01

376

Hands-on approach during breastfeeding support in a neonatal intensive care unit: a qualitative study of Swedish mothers' experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Assisting mothers to breastfeed is not easy when babies experience difficulties. In a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), nurses often help mothers by using hands-on-breast without their permission. Little is known about how mothers feel about this unusual body touching. To gain more knowledge from mothers who lived through this experience, this hands-on practice was studied in a NICU

Lena Weimers; Kristin Svensson; Louise Dumas; Lars Navér; Vivian Wahlberg

2006-01-01

377

Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking.

E. L. Zirbel

2002-01-01

378

Current radar-responsive tag development activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past ten years, Sandia has developed RF radar responsive tag systems and supporting technologies for various government agencies and industry partners. RF tags can function as RF transmitters or radar transponders that enable tagging, tracking, and location determination functions. Expertise in tag architecture, microwave and radar design, signal analysis and processing techniques, digital design, modeling and simulation, and testing have been directly applicable to these tag programs. In general, the radar responsive tag designs have emphasized low power, small package size, and the ability to be detected by the radar at long ranges. Recently, there has been an interest in using radar responsive tags for Blue Force tracking and Combat ID (CID). The main reason for this interest is to allow airborne surveillance radars to easily distinguish U.S. assets from those of opposing forces. A Blue Force tracking capability would add materially to situational awareness. Combat ID is also an issue, as evidenced by the fact that approximately one-quarter of all U.S. casualties in the Gulf War took the form of ground troops killed by friendly fire. Because the evolution of warfare in the intervening decade has made asymmetric warfare the norm rather than the exception, swarming engagements in which U.S. forces will be freely intermixed with opposing forces is a situation that must be anticipated. Increasing utilization of precision munitions can be expected to drive fires progressively closer to engaged allied troops at times when visual de-confliction is not an option. In view of these trends, it becomes increasingly important that U.S. ground forces have a widely proliferated all-weather radar responsive tag that communicates to all-weather surveillance. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the recent, current, and future radar responsive research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories that support both the Blue Force Tracking and Combat ID application. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company for the United States Departments of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

Ormesher, Richard C.; Plummer, Kenneth W.; Wells, Lars M.

2004-08-01

379

Cardiovascular activity during laboratory tasks in women with high and low worry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Worry has been related to delayed stress recovery and cardiovascular disease risk. Cardiovascular responses to a range of laboratory tasks were examined in this study of high and low worriers. Undergraduate women were recruited with the Penn State Worry Questionnaire to form low (n=19) and high (n=22) worry groups. These individuals engaged in six laboratory tasks (orthostatic stress, supine rest,

Michael M. Knepp; Bruce H. Friedman

2008-01-01

380

Consumer-Oriented Laboratory Activities: A Manual for Secondary Science Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides a laboratory manual for use by secondary level students in performing consumer-oriented laboratory experiments. Each experiment includes an introductory question outlining the purpose of the investigation, a detailed discussion, detailed procedures, questions to be answered upon completing the experiment, and information for…

Anderson, Jacqueline; McDuffie, Thomas E., Jr.

381

Analyzing the Function of Cartilage Replacements: A Laboratory Activity to Teach High School Students Chemical and Tissue Engineering Concepts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A cartilage tissue engineering laboratory activity was developed as part of the Exciting Discoveries for Girls in Engineering (EDGE) Summer Camp sponsored by the Women In Engineering Program (WIEP) at Purdue University. Our goal was to increase awareness of chemical engineering and tissue engineering in female high school students through a…

Renner, Julie N.; Emady, Heather N.; Galas, Richards J., Jr.; Zhange, Rong; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; Liu, Julie C.

2013-01-01

382

The Effect of Reflective Discussions following Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities on Students' Views of Nature of Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research investigated the effect of reflective discussions following inquiry-based laboratory activities on students' views of the tentative, empirical, subjective, and social aspects of nature of science (NOS). Thirty-eight grade six students from a Lebanese school participated in the study. The study used a pretest-posttest control-group…

Yacoubian, Hagop A.; BouJaoude, Saouma

2010-01-01

383

Sympathetic Activity in Patients With Panic Disorder at Rest, Under Laboratory Mental Stress, and During Panic Attacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

patients and control subjects at rest, as was whole-body epinephrine secretion. Epinephrine spillover from the heart was elevated in patients with panic disorder (P=.01). Responses to laboratory mental stress were almost iden- tical in patient and control groups. During panic at- tacks, there were marked increases in epinephrine se- cretion and large increases in the sympathetic activity in muscle in

Dominic J. C. Wilkinson; Jane M. Thompson; Gavin W. Lambert; Garry L. Jennings; Rosemary G. Schwarz; Don Jefferys; Andrea G. Turner; Murray D. Esler

1998-01-01

384

PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 4-6.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

385

Laboratory and field evaluation of biological active substances of plant origin against greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorum Westw. (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The behavioural responses of greenhouse whitefly to substances of plant origin were investigated in laboratory and greenhouse conditions. The following species of plants were found to provide the most active chemicals to monitor and control greenhouse whitefly – laurel Laurus nobilis L., mullein Verbascum thapsus L., tansy Tanacetum vulgare L., wormwood Artemisia vulgare L.

Taisya D. Chermenskaya; Maria O. Petrova; Elena I. Savelieva

2009-01-01

386

PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades K-1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

387

Using Web-Based Prescription Simulations as an Active Learning Tool in an Integrated Practice Skills Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the development and use of web-based, prescription simulations in the practice skills lab setting. As part of a curricular revision for the Doctor of Pharmacy program at our institution, a single laboratory series (Integrated Lab) was developed, concurrent with the first three years of the four-year professional program. To facilitate active learning in the Integrated Lab, prescription

Gregory S. Wellman; Rodney Larson

2002-01-01

388

Active habitat selection by megalopae and juvenile shore crabs Carcinus maenas: a laboratory study in an annular flume  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied megalopae (postlarvae) and young juveniles of the shore crab ( Carcinus maenas L.) in laboratory experiments to\\u000a examine four potentially important processes for juvenile distribution and recruitment: (1) hydrodynamic processes and passive\\u000a deposition of megalopae, (2) active habitat selection of megalopae, (3) habitat specific predation rates, and (4) active habitat\\u000a selection by juveniles. In an annular flume, simulating

Ola Hedvall; Per-Olav Moksnes; Leif Pihl

1998-01-01

389

Discover science: Hands-on science workshops for elementary teachers and summer science camps for elementary students  

SciTech Connect

Teams of local mentor teachers (assisted by college students in the NC Teaching Fellows Program) run week-long workshops for elementary teachers (at four sites in 1993, six in 1994). Major funding for the camps is provided through The Glaxo Foundation, supplemented with local funds. The workshops focus on hands-on science (using inexpensive materials) and provide familiarity and experience with the new NC science curriculum and assessment program. The use of local resources is stressed (including visiting scientists and readily available store-bought materials). Each camp has its own theme and provides teachers with a variety of resources to be used with students of all abilities. The mentor teachers then run week-long, all expense paid, non-residential science camps for elementary students (open to all students, but with females and minorities as target groups). Students take part in long-and short-term projects, working individually and in groups. Pre and post participation surveys of all participants were conducted and analyzed, with favorable results for both the student and teacher weeks. Additional activities include parent nights, and follow-up workshops. Eighty-nine teachers and 208 students participated in 1993.

Gotlib, L. [South Granville High School, Creedmoor, NC (United States); Bibby, E. [Granville County Schools, Oxford, NC (United States); Cullen, B. [North Carolina Science and Math Alliance, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1994-12-31

390

Active shield technology for space craft protection revisited in new laboratory results and analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Energetic ions in the solar wind plasma are a known hazard to both spacecraft electronics and to astronaut's health. Of primary concern is the exposure to keV--MeV protons on manned space flights to the Moon and Mars that extend over long periods of time. Attempts to protect the spacecraft include active shields that are reminiscent of Star Trek "deflector" shields. Here we describe a new experiment to test the shielding concept of a dipole-like magnetic field and plasma, surrounding the spacecraft forming a "mini magnetosphere". Initial laboratory experiments have been conducted to determine the effectiveness of a magnetized plasma barrier to be able to expel an impacting, low beta, supersonic flowing energetic plasma representing the Solar Wind. Optical and Langmuir probe data of the plasma density, the plasma flow velocity, and the intensity of the dipole field clearly show the creation of a narrow transport barrier region and diamagnetic cavity virtually devoid of energetic plasma particles. This demonstrates the potential viability of being able to create a small "hole" in a Solar Wind plasma, of the order of the ion Larmor orbit width, in which an inhabited spacecraft could reside in relative safety. The experimental results have been quantitatively compared to a 3D particle-in-cell ‘hybrid' code simulation that uses kinetic ions and fluid electrons, showing good qualitative agreement and excellent quantitative agreement. Together the results demonstrate the pivotal role of particle kinetics in determining generic plasma transport barriers. [1] [1] R Bamford et al., "The interaction of a flowing plasma with a dipole magnetic field: measurements and modelling of a diamagnetic cavity relevant to spacecraft protection." 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 124025 (11pp) doi: 10.1088/0741-3335/50/12/124025

Bamford, R.; Gibson, K. J.; Thornton, A. T.; Bradford, J.; Bingham, R.; Gargate, L.; Silva, L. O.; Fonseca, R. A.; Hapgood, M.; Norberg, C.; Todd, T.; Stamper, R.

2009-04-01

391

Life-History Schedules in Daphnia magna: An Ecological Activity for Multiple Laboratory Sessions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource is a manual for instructing a laboratory exercise in population ecology, in which students explore the concepts of population biology, survivorship curves, and life history tables by conducting experiments with Daphnia magna.

Robert E. Sorensen (Purdue University;)

1996-01-01

392

Teachers Touch the Sky: A one-week hands on workshop in astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Teachers Touch the Sky (TTS) is a one week, inquiry-based hands-on workshop in astronomy for teachers in grades 3-10. In its seventh year, TTS was developed under the NASA IDEAS program, and it is now supported by an E/PO Planetary Geology supplement. Offering a comfortable approach to science, the workshop shows the teachers how to enable their students to become "mini-investigators". The week offers a combination of lectures by JPL scientists and engineers and experiments that the teachers practice for classroom use. Many of the experiments are derived from the Great Explorations in Math and Science (GEMS) series developed by the Lawrence Hall of Science of the University of California at Berkeley. This year the themes of the workshop were expanded to include two topics of current interest: Water on Mars and Astrobiology. We make use of returning Master Teachers to assist the participants in curriculum development. The teachers perform a 4-page evaluation of the workshop which ranks their knowledge and confidence levels before and after the workshop. We improve the workshop in subsequent years based on the results of the evaluation. Their average scores in all categories increased about 35 percent. The overall score for the workshop was 4.9 on a scale of 1 to 5.

Buratti, B. J.; Hillier, J. D.; Medin, Z.

2000-10-01

393

Rapid-Cycling Brassicas (RCB's) in Hands-on Teaching of Plant Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer reviewed article uses Wisconsin Fast Plants to aid in teaching: development, reproduction, genetics, physiology, and ecology. The development of rapid-cycling brassicas (RCB's) as model organisms for research andeducation is profoundly influencing the quality of science education at all levels by bringingdynamic living materials into the classroom. Most biology courses lack convenient living materials;many use animals predominantly. General and advanced courses in biology, botany, scienceeducation and applied plant sciences usually lack suitable living plant material that would permitstudents to explore plant growth and development, physiology, reproduction, genetics, evolutionand ecology. These speedy relatives of mustard are particularly amenable to classroom settingsbecause they show remarkably rapid development, they flower in 13 to 18 days, theyare small, and they can reproduce at high densities (up to 2500 plants per square meter) underfluorescent lighting in a classroom. The ease with which RCB's can be grown and pollinated,together with the wide array of interesting variants available in the rapid-cycling type, make theseplants particularly attractive to teachers and students. RCB's have far-reaching educationalpotential, from kindergarten through college. Teachers at all levels can help students learn moreabout plant biology through hands-on exploration with these rapidly responding plants.

Paul H. Williams (University of Wisconsin at Madison;)

1988-06-06

394

Half a Million Hands: On the Road with the Little Shop of Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Can students learn science concepts by exploring and experimenting in an open-ended unstructured environment? Ever since our first school visit in the early 1990s, the focus of the Little Shop of Physics (http://littleshop.physics.colostate.edu) has been to present an open-ended, hands-on physics experience for K-12 students. Our projects are built and our programs are presented by a dedicated group of undergraduate science students who receive a valuable service learning experience. These students learn a lot of science and some very practical skills. But how about the K-12 students we visit? We know that we get K-12 students interested, that they like our program---but are we teaching them anything? We have recently become and education partner of a large research project, the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (http://www.cmmap.org) at Colorado State University, which has given us a chance to expand and carefully evaluate the work that we do. In this talk I will present samples from the different types of programs we present, from school programs to television programs to teacher workshops, as well as recent data demonstrating the effectiveness of the work we do. There will be some cool projects, some interesting observations, some remarkable stories---and some good, solid data.

Jones, Brian

2009-05-01

395

An Experimental Laboratory Environment for Teaching Embedded Hardware Systems  

E-print Network

An Experimental Laboratory Environment for Teaching Embedded Hardware Systems Dennis Brylow laboratory for hands-on projects in an introductory hardware systems course. Our prototype laboratory is now of our laboratory environ- ment, how it is used in our hardware systems course, and how this has

Brylow, Dennis

396

A web-based remote interactive laboratory for Internetworking education  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Web-based remote interactive laboratory (RIL) developed to deliver Internetworking laboratory experience to geographically remote graduate students is presented in this paper. The onsite Internetworking program employs hands-on laboratories in a group setting that correlates with the constructivist and collaborative pedagogical approach. This paper discusses the pedagogical and technical considerations that influence the design and implementation of the remote laboratory

Shyamala C. Sivakumar; William Robertson; Maen Artimy; Nauman Aslam

2005-01-01

397

30 CFR 250.1509 - What must I do when BSEE administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...must I do when BSEE administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing...must I do when BSEE administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing...requires you or your contractor to conduct hands-on, simulator, or other types of...

2013-07-01

398

30 CFR 250.1509 - What must I do when MMS administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...must I do when MMS administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing...must I do when MMS administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing...requires you or your contractor to conduct hands-on, simulator, or other types of...

2010-07-01

399

30 CFR 250.1509 - What must I do when BSEE administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing?  

...must I do when BSEE administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing...must I do when BSEE administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing...requires you or your contractor to conduct hands-on, simulator, or other types of...

2014-07-01

400

30 CFR 250.1509 - What must I do when BSEE administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...must I do when BSEE administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing...must I do when BSEE administers or requires hands-on, simulator, or other types of testing...requires you or your contractor to conduct hands-on, simulator, or other types of...

2012-07-01

401

Bioinformatics and modeling laboratory Spring 2007  

E-print Network

GENE4220L Bioinformatics and modeling laboratory Spring 2007 Course description: Hands-on look at the role of bioinformatics in genetic and genomic analyses. This combination lecture/laboratory course, Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Second Edition by Campbell and Heyer, Benjamin Cummings, 2006. It is available

Arnold, Jonathan

402

Hands-on guide for 3D image creation for geological purposes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Geological structures in outcrops or hand specimens are inherently three dimensional (3D), and therefore better understandable if viewed in 3D. While 3D models can easily be created, manipulated, and looked at from all sides on the computer screen (e.g., using photogrammetry or laser scanning data), 3D visualizations for publications or conference posters are much more challenging as they have to live in a 2D-world (i.e., on a sheet of paper). Perspective 2D visualizations of 3D models do not fully transmit the "feeling and depth of the third dimension" to the audience; but this feeling is desirable for a better examination and understanding in 3D of the structure under consideration. One of the very few possibilities to generate real 3D images, which work on a 2D display, is by using so-called stereoscopic images. Stereoscopic images are two images of the same object recorded from two slightly offset viewpoints. Special glasses and techniques have to be used to make sure that one image is seen only by one eye, and the other image is seen by the other eye, which together lead to the "3D effect". Geoscientists are often familiar with such 3D images. For example, geomorphologists traditionally view stereographic orthophotos by employing a mirror-steroscope. Nowadays, petroleum-geoscientists examine high-resolution 3D seismic data sets in special 3D visualization rooms. One of the methods for generating and viewing a stereoscopic image, which does not require a high-tech viewing device, is to create a so-called anaglyph. The principle is to overlay two images saturated in red and cyan, respectively. The two images are then viewed through red-cyan-stereoscopic glasses. This method is simple and cost-effective, but has some drawbacks in preserving colors accurately. A similar method is used in 3D movies, where polarized light or shuttering techniques are used to separate the left from the right image, which allows preserving the original colors. The advantage of red-cyan anaglyphs is their simplicity and the possibility to print them on normal paper or project them using a conventional projector. Producing 3D stereoscopic images is much easier than commonly thought. Our hands-on poster provides an easy-to-use guide for producing 3D stereoscopic images. Few simple rules-of-thumb are presented that define how photographs of any scene or object have to be shot to produce good-looking 3D images. We use the free software Stereophotomaker (http://stereo.jpn.org/eng/stphmkr) to produce anaglyphs and provide red-cyan 3D glasses for viewing them. Our hands-on poster is easy to adapt and helps any geologist to present his/her field or hand specimen photographs in a much more fashionable 3D way for future publications or conference posters.

Frehner, Marcel; Tisato, Nicola

2013-04-01

403

Research and Teaching: Assessment Results Following Inquiry and Traditional Physics Laboratory Activities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Preservice elementary teachers in a conceptual physics course were given multiple resources to use during several inquiry activities in order to investigate how materials were chosen, used, and valued. These students performed significantly better on assessment items related to the inquiry physics activities than on items related to traditional activities, regardless of the level of success on the inquiry activities.

Bryant, Richard

2006-07-01

404

Attitude Toward Informal Science and Math: a Survey of Boys and Girls Participating in Hands-On Science and Math (funtivities)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article presents results from two studies conducted as part of the evaluation activities of the FUNTIVITIES project, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project to increase girls' and women's interest and comfort level in science and math. The first study was conducted to develop instruments and to assess the impact of informal activities on attitudes toward hands-on science, math, and gender-related issues. The second study was conducted to establish baseline data - the first step in a longitudinal study that will follow participants through high school and college. Our findings show minor differences between girls and boys in their responses to the constructs relating to participation, importance, and future need to know math and science. Girls showed a slightly higher mean, implying greater recognition that achievement in science and math is not related to gender. Females also rated the overall importance of science and math higher than males. Some of our results are inconsistent with earlier literature obtained in a study setting different from ours, which was informal, with hands-on science training and gender-equity training of trainers/teachers.

Teshome, Yalem; Maushak, Nancy; Athreya, Krishna

405

Activities of the University of Saskatchewan, Plasma Physics Laboratory. Progress report, 1991-1992  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detailed summaries of research projects conducted at the University of Saskatchewan's Plasma Physics Laboratory during 1991-92 are presented in the fields of tokamak experiments and reactor studies, basic plasma physics, and theories of instabilities and anomalous transport in tokamaks. The tokamak projects include discharge conditions and plasma diagnostics in the STOR-M tokamak, plasma modes and oscillations, edge density and magnetic

G. D. Conway; A. Hirose; K. K. Jain; K. Mark; D. Mccoll; O. Mitarai; J. Ratzdaff; L. Schott; H. M. Skarsgard; C. Xiao

1992-01-01

406

Research Report The Equine Reproduction Laboratory (ERL) has been an active education, research, outreach, and  

E-print Network

2007-2010 Research Report #12;#12;1 Preface The Equine Reproduction Laboratory (ERL) has been in equine reproduction in the world. The ERL is a unit within the Animal Reproduction and Biotechnology-breaking research in the areas of reproductive physiology, pathology, therapeutics, and management. In the past 5

Stephens, Graeme L.

407

Imploding Soda Cans: From Demonstration to Guided-Inquiry Laboratory Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A guided-inquiry exercise conducted in both the lecture and laboratory components of a college introductory chemistry course for non-science majors is described. The exercise gave students the opportunity to independently determine the relationship between the temperature of water in an aluminum soda can and the intensity of implosion upon placing…

Eichler, Jack F.

2009-01-01

408

Mound Laboratory activities on the removal of plutonium and uranium from wastewater using bone char  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pilot plant studies sponsored by the Division of Military Application (DMA) to treat Mound Laboratory's low risk waste streams with bone char columns have been completed. This project was to accomplish the following: (1) acquire engineering data such as flow rates, adsorption capacity, and optimum particle size for designing a tertiary treatment system, and (2) optimize the primary waste treatment

D. W. Blane; E. L. Murphy

1976-01-01

409

A universal method for measuring functional activity of complement in humans, laboratory, domestic, and agricultural animals, amphibians, and birds.  

PubMed

A new universal method for measuring activity of the serum complement system in humans, laboratory, domestic, agricultural animals, birds and amphibians is based on automated evaluation of the mortality of ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis under the effect of the complement system. In contrast to the hemolytic method, measured activity of the complement shows no erroneously high results caused by reactive lysis in febrile patients. The method can be used for studies of the complement system in humans and animals without species-specific adaptation. PMID:24952500

Kuleshina, O N; Kozlov, L V; Cheremnykh, E G

2014-06-01

410

Solar Collector Design Optimization: A Hands-on Project Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A solar power collector optimization design project has been developed for use in undergraduate classrooms and/or laboratories. The design optimization depends on understanding the current-voltage characteristics of the starting photovoltaic cells as well as how the cell's electrical response changes with increased light illumination. Students…

Birnie, Dunbar P., III; Kaz, David M.; Berman, Elena A.

2012-01-01

411

Evaluation of Natural Compounds for Antimicrobial Activity in the Introductory Microbiology Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an experiment that provides students with an opportunity to investigate folk medicine and herbal cures and their accompanying claims. Involves isolating some active compounds from plant materials and demonstrating their antibacterial activity. (JRH)

Finer, Kim R.

1997-01-01

412

Photochemical Activity of Aldrin and Dieldrin in Liquid and Frozen Aqueous Systems: Field and Laboratory Studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The phenomenon of global distillation generates significant accumulation of volatile, anthropogenic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in polar regions. Bioaccumulation presents serious concerns for human health within Arctic subsistence communities. In the recent past, the photochemical processes of POPs have been observed in the laboratory. Despite some established knowledge regarding photochemical processes in reactive frozen media, little published literature exists regarding the chemical transformations and fate of POPs in the Arctic. Here, we consider the photochemical transformations of aldrin and dieldrin, two structurally similar organochlorine pollutants whose presence has been confirmed in the Arctic. Their photochemical transformation, resulting from ultraviolet exposure, was investigated by both field studies in Barrow, AK and controlled laboratory experiments. Pollutant degradation and photoproduct formation were monitored by GC-ECD analysis. Based on kinetic studies of liquid and frozen samples and identification of photoproducts, we will propose potential reaction mechanisms for the transformations of aldrin and dieldrin. Further implications for environmental processes will be discussed.

Bausch, A. R.; Rowland, G. A.; Grannas, A. M.

2008-12-01

413

Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-09-01

414

A report on FY06 IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories.  

SciTech Connect

Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. IPv6 deployment in government network backbones has been mandated to occur by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories' network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint, work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang

2006-06-01

415

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) Configuration and Data Management Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involvement in the Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) research with both government agencies and private companies dates back to 1989. The discussion here will focus on the US Army's current need for an automated WIM system to weigh and determine the center-of-balance for military wheeled vehicles and cargo and the expanded uses of WIM data. ORNL is

Robert K Abercrombie; Frederick T Sheldon; Bob G Schlicher

2006-01-01

416

MEASUREMENT OF LOW 14C ACTIVITIES IN A LIQUID SCINTILLATION COUNTER IN THE ZAGREB RADIOCARBON LABORATORY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two methods of chemical preparation of radiocarbon samples are implemented in the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory for measurement by a new liquid scintillation counter (LSC), Quantulus 1220™: a CO2 absorption method (LSC- A) and a benzene synthesis method (LSC-B). For samples prepared by both methods, the optimal counting windows for mea- surement in LSC were determined. The total efficiency of LSC-A

Ines Krajcar

417

MATLAB PRIMER This chapter will serve as a hands-on tutorial for beginners who are unfa-  

E-print Network

Chapter 1 MATLAB PRIMER This chapter will serve as a hands-on tutorial for beginners who are unfa://olen.eng.ohio-state.edu/matlab 1 #12;2 MATLAB Primer Chapter 1 1.1 BEFORE STARTING CALCULATIONS how to open MATLAB: On a Unix

deYoung, Brad

418

Fifth Graders' Science Inquiry Abilities: A Comparative Study of Students in Hands-On and Textbook Curricula  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A large number of American elementary school students are now studying science using the hands-on inquiry curricula developed in the 1990s: Insights; Full Option Science System (FOSS); and Science and Technology for Children (STC). A goal of these programs, echoed in the "National Science Education Standards," is that children should gain…

Pine, Jerome; Aschbacher, Pamela; Roth, Ellen; Jones, Melanie; McPhee, Cameron; Martin, Catherine; Phelps, Scott; Kyle, Tara; Foley, Brian

2006-01-01

419

MAKING THE MOST OF HANDS-ON LEARNING AN INTEGRATED COURSE AT RENSSELAER Peter F. Caracappa1  

E-print Network

] environment consisting of note slides and a video of the faculty presenter. Presentations vary to best fit with "gateway" questions that students must answer before proceeding to the next section. Video demonstrations where data may be recorded. Video of experiments is not intended to supplant the hands-on experience

Danon, Yaron

420

Self-Assembly and Nanotechnology: Real-Time, Hands-On, and Safe Experiments for K-12 Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What students and teachers often ask is, how are nano-sized materials made when they are so small? One answer is through the process of self-assembly in which molecules, polymers, and nanoparticles connect to form larger objects of a defined structure and shape. Two hands-on experiments are presented in which students prepare capsules in real time…

Bagaria, Hitesh G.; Dean, Michelle R.; Nichol, Carolyn A.; Wong, Michael S.

2011-01-01

421

Meteorites: Rocks from Space Bob will share his passion with a hands on presentation on everything you ever wanted to  

E-print Network

Meteorites: Rocks from Space Bob will share his passion with a hands on presentation on everything of meteorites and the special fourth class of "meteorwrongs." He also invites visitors who think they may have found a meteorite to bring it to the festival so he can help determine whether or not it's genuine

422

Fifth graders' science inquiry abilities: A comparative study of students in hands-on and textbook curricula  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A large number of American elementary school students are now studying science using the hands-on inquiry curricula developed in the 1990s: Insights; Full Option Science System (FOSS); and Science and Technology for Children (STC). A goal of these programs, echoed in the National Science Education Standards, is that children should gain abilities to do scientific inquiry and understanding about scientific inquiry. We have studied the degree to which students can do inquiries by using four hands-on performance assessments, which required one or three class periods. To be fair, the assessments avoided content that is studied in depth in the hands-on programs. For a sample of about 1000 fifth grade students, we compared the performance of students in hands-on curricula with an equal number of students with textbook curricula. The students were from 41 classrooms in nine school districts. The results show little or no curricular effect. There was a strong dependence on students' cognitive ability, as measured with a standard multiple-choice instrument. There was no significant difference between boys and girls. Also, there was no difference on a multiple-choice test, which used items released from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). It is not completely clear whether the lack of difference on the performance assessments was a consequence of the assessments, the curricula, and/or the teaching.

Pine, Jerome; Aschbacher, Pamela; Roth, Ellen; Jones, Melanie; Mcphee, Cameron; Martin, Catherine

2006-06-08

423

A hands-on introduction to the methods, theories, and practice of excavation and archaeological survey. Students  

E-print Network

Overview A hands-on introduction to the methods, theories, and practice of excavation and archaeological survey. Students participate in a six-week season exploring a city and its surrounding territory to regional archaeological sites. The Archaeological Site The site identified as Strymi was a large 7th-4th

Rowley, Clarence W.

424

Maternal Knowledge and Behaviors regarding Discipline: The Effectiveness of a Hands-On Education Program in Positive Guidance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined which method is most effective in supporting parents to use positive guidance techniques, a lecture-based only parent training series or a lecture-based plus hands-on parent training series. Maternal characteristics of depression, stress level, and attitudes towards positive guidance were explored as possible moderators. In…

Saunders, Rachel; McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Jacobvitz, Deborah; Hazen-Swann, Nancy; Burton, Rosalinda

2013-01-01

425

Exploding Balloons, Deformed Balls, Strange Reflections and Breaking Rods: Slow Motion Analysis of Selected Hands-On Experiments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A selection of hands-on experiments from different fields of physics, which happen too fast for the eye or video cameras to properly observe and analyse the phenomena, is presented. They are recorded and analysed using modern high speed cameras. Two types of cameras were used: the first were rather inexpensive consumer products such as Casio…

Vollmer, Michael; Mollmann, Klaus-Peter

2011-01-01

426

Human Body Explorations: Hands-On Investigations of What Makes Us Tick.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book presents science activities on the human body with materials that can be purchased in a grocery store or pharmacy. Each activity includes an explorer and facilitator guide. Activities include: (1) "Naked Egg"; (2) "Cellular Soap Opera"; (3) "Acid in Your Stomach"; (4) "How Much Do You C?"; (5) "How Sweet It Is"; (6) "Milk Makes Me…

Kalumuck, Karen E.

427

Critical Issue: Providing Hands-On, Minds-On, and Authentic Learning Experiences in Mathematics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Cathy Cook of the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory writes: âÂÂWhen educators begin to see learning as knowledge construction, they change their thinking about curriculum, instruction, and assessment, developing more powerful approaches to connecting thinking and mathematics and designing more mathematically significant instructional learning experiences.â To summarize, she believes a revolution in teaching is necessary in order to keep topics current, students interested, and pedagogy cutting edge. In this article, Cook and the North Central Regional Educational Laboratory present an assessment of mathematics instruction in America today, followed by a series of recommendations for improving and innovating those methods we currently employ. This article would be especially helpful for inexperienced instructors, or those who find a new generation of students are not responding to methods that were effective only a few years ago.

Cook, Cathy

2008-09-10

428

Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory - Semiannual Report: April 1, 1990, Through September 30, 1990  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1990. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. MELs are equipped for the on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. This report describes the testing, test results, and suggested courses of action.

Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

1991-03-01

429

Activity, aggression, and habitat use of ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) and round goby (Apollonia melanostoma) under laboratory conditions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Potential negative ecological interactions between ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus and round goby Apollonia melanostoma (formerly Neogobius melanostomus) might affect the colonization dynamics of these invasive species where they are sympatric in the Great Lakes. In order to determine the potential for ecological interactions between these species, we examined the activity, aggression, and habitat use of round gobies and ruffe in single species and mixed species laboratory experiments. Trials included conditions in which food was concentrated (in light or darkness) or scattered. Results showed that ruffe were more active than gobies, particularly when food was scattered. Activity of both species was significantly lower during darkness. Round gobies were significantly more aggressive than ruffe, and total aggression was lower in mixed species trials. Habitat use by ruffe and round gobies overlapped considerably, but we observed significant differences between species in their use of specific habitats that depended on experimental conditions. Overall, ruffe used open habitats more often than did round gobies, primarily when food was scattered. Round gobies used rocks significantly more frequently than did ruffe, but their use of rock habitat decreased during dark conditions. Ruffe were found more often in plant habitats and less often near the wall of the pool in trials during daylight with concentrated food. Activity and habitat use of ruffe and round goby did not significantly differ between single and mixed species trials. Overall, we found little evidence for negative ecological interactions between ruffe and round goby in these laboratory experiments.

Savino, J. F.; Riley, S. C.; Holuszko, M. J.

2007-01-01

430

Building Formal and Informal Partnerships Through a Land-Based, Hands-on Research Expedition for Earth and Ocean Science Teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific Ocean drilling has a rich legacy which is largely responsible for our current understating of the complex linkages among the different parts of the Earth System. Relaying these understandings to Earth and ocean educators is a challenge that the Joint Oceanographic Institutes (JOI) Alliances has undertaken through sponsorship of the School of Rock (SOR). Building on the successful ocean-going, hands-on SOR (Leckie et al. 2006), the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) - United States Implementing Organization (USIO) piloted a land-based, hands-on research expedition for Earth and ocean science teachers, the School of Rock Expedition II (SOR II). During this seven-day workshop, 18 educators from across the United States were hosted at the IODP Gulf Coast Repository at Texas A&M University where they were mentored and taught by scientists who are actively engaged in IODP research, shipboard technical staff, SOR I veteran teachers, and science educators. Teachers participated in a series of research experiences similar to those that take place on a scientific drilling research vessel or in a post-cruise research lab. These experiences allowed educators to increase their knowledge of IODP and scientific methods as demonstrated by the entire ocean drilling program (proposals, drilling, lab analysis, data acquisition, and post-cruise research). This case study describes the formal and informal partnerships developed through the SOR II with an emphasis on identifying and nurturing informal partnerships.

Slough, S.; Prouhet, T.; Peart, L.; Leckie, M.; St. John, K.; Karz-Cooper, S.; Klaus, A.; Petronotis, K.; Firth, J.; Guerin, G.; Buckholtz, C.; Crowder, L.; Peng, C.

2007-12-01

431

Fostering environmental literacy through the use of hands-on science, place-based education, and role-played case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this project was to develop environmental literacy in freshmen taking high school biology, using hands-on science labs, place-based education, and a role-played case study. Students participated in hands-on labs that allowed them to quantitatively describe the effects of pollution and eutrophication. Students also participated in an all-day field trip at Bay City State Park, where they studied ecological concepts in "place". The unit culminated in a role-played case study in which students were assigned roles, researched them, and attempted to solve the problem of the eutrophication of Saginaw Bay in a town hall meeting. To evaluate student learning, students were given a pretest and posttest that covered ecological topics taught during unit activities. The analysis of these assessments using a paired T-test showed that the teaching methods successfully increased student understanding of ecological topics, and an increase in environmental literacy. Additional subjective data, including conversations with students, and analysis of student writing during the unit, support that student environmental literacy increased during the unit. However, it was shown that environmental literacy is not something to be obtained in one unit, or even one year. It is a lifelong process to which a strong science foundation should be provided in science classes, from the primary level to the secondary level and beyond.

Cooper, Benjamin Paul

432

Forest Watch: A K-12 Outreach Program to Engage Pre-College Students in Authentic, Hands-On Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Forest Watch Program is a K-12 hands-on science outreach program developed at the University of New Hampshire (UNH) in 1991. The program has engaged students and their teachers in assisting researchers at UNH in the assessment of the state-of-health of white pine (Pinus strobus), a known bio-indicator species for exposure to elevated levels of ground-level ozone. Students are introduced to the scientific method while participating in an authentic on-going research program. The program was designed in partnership with participating teachers, and thus the field and classroom activities meet specific New England state science and mathematics curricula standards for K-12 education. Student participation in Forest Watch has resulted in an improved understanding and characterization of inter-annual white pine response to changes in air quality across the region over the past two decades. Forest Watch, students participate in three types of activities: 1. the analysis of remote sensing data (Landsat TM) provided for their local area using MultiSpec freeware. Through image processing, students learn the concepts of spatial and spectral resolution; how to identify landcover features; how plants interact with visible and infrared energy; and how to use this information to determine vegetation types and identify vegetation conditions. 2. students select 5 white pine trees to be permanently tagged near their school within a 30x30 meter (pixel sized sampling plot - the spatial resolution of the TM dataset), followed by collection and analysis of needle samples, and a suite of forest plot biometric measurements such as tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH), and canopy closure and ground cover. 3. the students send a set of their needle samples to UNH for spectral analysis of key reflectance features such as the Red Edge Inflection Point (REIP), the TM 5/4 moisture stress index, and the NIR 3/1. Over 250 schools from all six New England states have participated in the program over the past 19 years. Combining student-derived data plus the reflectance indices and other spectral measures, allows UNH researchers to characterize annual variations in tree state-of-health and relate it to the previous summer’s ozone levels. Results from annual student-provided data between 1991 and 2008 suggest that regional air quality and the state-of-health of white pine have improved since 1991. This improvement in white pine health corresponds with improved regional air quality, in part due to the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment.

Gagnon, M. T.; Rock, B. N.

2009-12-01

433

Developing the Next Generation of International Safeguards and Nonproliferation Experts: Highlights of Select Activities at the National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

With many safeguards experts in the United States at or near retirement age, and with the growing and evolving mission of international safeguards, attracting and educating a new generation of safeguards experts is an important element of maintaining a credible and capable international safeguards system. The United States National Laboratories, with their rich experience in addressing the technical and policy challenges of international safeguards, are an important resource for attracting, educating, and training future safeguards experts. This presentation highlights some of the safeguards education and professional development activities underway at the National Laboratories. These include university outreach, summer courses, internships, mid-career transition, knowledge retention, and other projects. The presentation concludes with thoughts on the challenge of interdisciplinary education and the recruitment of individuals with the right balance of skills and backgrounds are recruited to meet tomorrow's needs.

Reed, J; Mathews, C; Kirk, B; Lynch, P; Doyle, J; Meek, E; Pepper, S; Metcalf, R

2010-03-31

434

Recent wind resource characterization activities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The wind resource characterization team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working to improve the characterization of the wind resource in many key regions of the world. Tasks undertaken in the past year include: updates to the comprehensive meteorological and geographic data bases used in resource assessments in the US and abroad; development and validation of an automated wind resource mapping procedure; support in producing wind forecasting tools useful to utilities involved in wind energy generation; continued support for recently established wind measurement and assessment programs in the US.

Elliott, D.L.; Schwartz, M.N.

1997-07-01

435

Gross alpha and beta activity analysis in water--a routine laboratory method using liquid scintillation analysis.  

PubMed

The generally accepted method for gross alpha and beta activity analysis of drinking water in Australia is based on ISO methods; ISO9696, water quality--measurement of gross alpha activity in non-saline water--thick source method, and ISO9697, water quality--measurement of gross beta activity in non-saline water. A liquid scintillation (LSA) based method that requires smaller sample quantities, less sample preparation time and operator intervention, and produces adequate minimum detection levels for local drinking water guidelines has been developed. A synthetic groundwater sample was analysed using the LSA method and compared with results from ISO method techniques used by two independent Australian laboratories. The results show that the LSA method exceeds performance of the ISO methods in measurement accuracy. PMID:15177367

Kleinschmidt, Ross I

2004-01-01

436

Dynamic active telepathology over National Health Laboratory service network, South Africa: feasibility study using Nikon Coolscope.  

PubMed

Telepathology recently entered a new era with the introduction of digital microscopes combined with Internet technology. The microscope allows viewing real time of whole slide (macro) as well as different chosen fields in four different magnifications. Three Nikon Coolscope were installed in NHLS laboratories in Mthatha, East London and Port Elizabeth. All these microscopes are connected to NHLS server allowing real time viewing of the full slide at any time of the day using Internet browser. Viewing is possible from any PC connected to NHLS Intranet. The challenge was to be able to view slides from other than NHLS computers due to NHLS IT Department network security measures. This was solved by installing NHLS Virtual Private Network server. About 60 cases were viewed by pathologists in Cape Town (Stellenbosh University) and Pretoria (MEDUNSA). All users assessed the system as a helpful tool allowing easy access to cases needing consultation or second opinion. The quality of images was very good. Our experience with Nikon Coolscope is positive. It is an excellent tool for remote small histopathology departments lacking specialists in such areas as dermatopathology, oncology, and haematopathology. Further studies are needed especially in the scope of full utilization of the microscopes installed and impact on laboratory services. PMID:18673517

Banach, Lech; Stepien, Andrzej; Schneider, Johann; Wichrzycka-Lancaster, Elizabeth

2008-01-01

437

A report on IPv6 deployment activities and issues at Sandia National Laboratories:FY2007.  

SciTech Connect

Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) has been a mainstay of the both the Internet and corporate networks for delivering network packets to the desired destination. However, rapid proliferation of network appliances, evolution of corporate networks, and the expanding Internet has begun to stress the limitations of the protocol. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is the replacement protocol that overcomes the constraints of IPv4. As the emerging Internet network protocol, SNL needs to prepare for its eventual deployment in international, national, customer, and local networks. Additionally, the United States Office of Management and Budget has mandated that IPv6 deployment in government network backbones occurs by 2008. This paper explores the readiness of the Sandia National Laboratories network backbone to support IPv6, the issues that must be addressed before a deployment begins, and recommends the next steps to take to comply with government mandates. The paper describes a joint work effort of the Sandia National Laboratories ASC WAN project team and members of the System Analysis & Trouble Resolution, the Communication & Network Systems, and Network System Design & Implementation Departments.

Tolendino, Lawrence F.; Eldridge, John M.; Hu, Tan Chang; Maestas, Joseph H.

2007-06-01

438

Paleomagnetics Laboratory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this website, the California Institute of Technology's Paleomagnetics Laboratory promotes its research of weakly magnetic geologic and biological materials. Users can learn about the facilities such as the biomagnetics lab and the automatic sampler. The website features the laboratory's recent research on many topics including extraterrestrial magnetism, magnetofossils, and historical geomagnetic field behavior. Visitors can find out more about the many laboratory members' research activities through links to their home pages. Researchers can download a selection of the group's publications. Everyone can enjoy the amazing images from recent geologic field trips across the globe.

439

Hands-On Science: Cool Ways to Teach about Warm-Blooded Animals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents three activities for teaching elementary students about the built-in mechanisms that help warm-blooded animals maintain constant internal body temperatures. The activities help students understand why humans sweat, why dogs pant, and why blubber keeps whales warm in frigid water. (SM)

VanCleave, Janice

1998-01-01

440

What's the Matter with Food?: A Hands-On Action Research Study on the Effect of Using Food Preparation To Teach Students with Autism about the Three States of Matter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This investigation studied the effectiveness of using food preparation to teach students with Autism about the three states of matter. A hands-on learning approach was used within the home and careers classroom. One class of five students, three boys and two girls, all diagnosed with Autism, participated in a five day academic unit about the three phases of matter: solid, liquid, and gas. The class received hands-on learning science instruction using food through various differentiated activities. Results indicate that students express focus when using food to learn. In addition, this study acknowledges that hands-on learning in science enhances the learning process of students with Autism. One of the main reasons is that students enjoy learning when this teaching style is used in the classroom, and students that enjoy what they are learning are more likely to be engaged and motivated to learn. After using this approach, all the students in the study increased their scores from the pre-assessments to the post-assessments. Students expressed through actions and words that they enjoyed using hands-on experiences to learn in the classroom. Implications for practice indicate that a variety of manipulatives are needed to teach students with Autism. Future research would help uncover additional information about student motivation and learning in the home and careers classroom.

Diller, Nicole

441

Mobile laboratory programs as vehicles to promote STEM education in K-12 and beyond  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile laboratories refer to self-contained, traveling laboratories that accommodate student participation in hands-on laboratory science aboard the mobile laboratory unit. Most of the mobile laboratory programs that are now in operation focus on providing middle and high school students and teachers with access to science equipment and supplies that are difficult for them to acquire and maintain. In addition, many

Carl Franzblau; Carla A. Romney; Russell Faux; Donald DeRosa

2011-01-01

442

Building the Body: Active Learning Laboratories that Emphasize Practical Aspects of Anatomy and Integration with Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the development of active learning techniques to review anatomy material in the context of radiology. Explanations of how the curriculum was designed to integrate knowledge and reemphasize concepts in different contexts is explained.

Kitt Shaffer (Boston University Radiology)

2010-04-23

443

Monitoring Animal Activity Rhythms in the Laboratory: Four Easily Assembled Devices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of actographs for studying animal activity is discussed. Described are running recorders for rodents, perching and feeding recorders for birds, and tilting box recorders for studying the movement of reptiles, amphibians, and arthropods. (CW)

Merritt, Sheridan V.

1989-01-01

444

Mound Laboratory activities for the Division of Physical Research. Progress report, January--June 1975  

Microsoft Academic Search

Activities in research programs devoted to isotope preparation, ; properties of D and He at low temperature, metal hydrides, separation ; chemistry, and separation research are reported. A separate abstract was ; prepared for each of the five areas of study. (JRD)

Fitzharris

1975-01-01

445

Pacing Early Mars fluvial activity at Aeolis Dorsa: Implications for Mars Science Laboratory observations at Gale Crater and Aeolis Mons  

E-print Network

The impactor flux early in Mars history was much higher than today, so sedimentary sequences include many buried craters. In combination with models for the impactor flux, observations of the number of buried craters can constrain sedimentation rates. Using the frequency of crater-river interactions, we find net sedimentation rate \\lesssim 20-300 {\\mu}m/yr at Aeolis Dorsa. This sets a lower bound of 1-15 Myr on the total interval spanned by fluvial activity around the Noachian-Hesperian transition. We predict that Gale Crater's mound (Aeolis Mons) took at least 10-100 Myr to accumulate, which is testable by the Mars Science Laboratory.

Kite, Edwin S; Fassett, Caleb I

2012-01-01

446

Near-field performance assessment for a low-activity waste glass disposal system: laboratory testing to modeling results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reactive chemical transport simulations of glass corrosion and radionuclide release from a low-activity waste (LAW) disposal system were conducted out to times in excess of 20 000 yr with the subsurface transport over reactive multiphases (STORM) code. Time and spatial dependence of glass corrosion rate, secondary phase formation, pH, and radionuclide concentration were evaluated. The results show low release rates overall for the LAW glasses such that performance objectives for the site will be met by a factor of 20 or more. Parameterization of the computer model was accomplished by combining direct laboratory measurements, literature data (principally thermodynamic data), and parameter estimation methods.

McGrail, B. P.; Bacon, D. H.; Icenhower, J. P.; Mann, F. M.; Puigh, R. J.; Schaef, H. T.; Mattigod, S. V.

2001-09-01

447

Molluscan cellulolytic activity responses to zinc exposure in laboratory and field stream comparisons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes in cellulolytic activity of Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) and snails (Mudalia dilatata) were monitored throughout 30-d exposures to constant additions (0.0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.50, and 1.0 mg l?1) of zinc (Zn). All exposures of 0.05 mg Zn 1?1 or greater significantly reduced enzyme activity (exo- and endocellulase) in both molluscs as early as 10 d following exposures\\u000a in outdoor

J. L. Grudzien; S. E. Belanger; D. S. Cherry; J. Cairns

1994-01-01

448

Cadmium and Copper Removal by a Granular Activated Carbon in Laboratory Column Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single and competitive removal of Cd and Cu from aqueous solutions by using Darco 12–20 mesh granular activated carbon in column systems has been investigated. Seven experiments modifying the initial pH and the flow rate were performed. Results showed the efficiency of activated carbon as a sorbent for both metals. pH is shown to be the decisive parameter on metal

CARMEN GABALDÓN; PAULA MARZAL; AURORA SECO; JUAN A. GONZALEZ

2000-01-01

449

Gross-beta activity in ground water: natural sources and artifacts of sampling and laboratory analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gross-beta activity has been used as an indicator of beta-emitting isotopes in water since at least the early 1950s. Originally designed for detection of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities and weapons tests, analysis of gross-beta activity is widely used in studies of naturally occurring radioactivity in ground water. Analyses of about 800 samples from 5 ground-water regions of the United

Ann H. Mullin; Z SZABO; D PARKHURST; P VANMETRE

1995-01-01

450

Acoustic, fiber optic, and silicon microelectronic microsensors research and development activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, an 8500+ person, multiprogram research and development facility operated for the US Department of Energy, has over 400 research, development and applications scientists and engineers working on sensor technologies. Sandia`s 20 person Microsensors Research and Development Department has invented, developed and fielded sensor systems based on acoustic, fiber optic, and silicon microelectronic technologies. These sensors have been used for diverse applications inducting the monitoring of cleaning chemical concentrations in industrial process effluent streams, detection of explosive gas concentrations in aging industrial equipment, real-time measurements of fluid viscosity in equipment lubricants, and monitoring of contaminant concentration levels in ultrapure process gases. Representative sensor technologies available for technology transfer will be described including bulk acoustic wave resonators, surface acoustic wave devices, fiber optic micromirror sensors, and silicon microelectronic sensors.

Wiczer, J.J.

1993-08-01

451

Measuring residual activity of topical antimicrobials: is the residual activity of chlorhexidine an artefact of laboratory methods?  

PubMed

Residual activity of chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) was evaluated by pretreating hands with CHG and then touching Staphylococcus aureus dried on to stainless steel discs. By this method, no reduction in bacteria was observed up to 15min, suggesting that residual CHG does not offer protection against contamination with transient micro-organisms in clinical practice. PMID:25078726

Rutter, J D; Angiulo, K; Macinga, D R

2014-10-01

452

Sculpting behavior : a tangible language for hands-on play and learning  

E-print Network

For over a century, educators and constructivist theorists have argued that children learn by actively forming and testing -- constructing -- theories about how the world works. Recent efforts in the design of "tangible ...

Raffle, Hayes Solos, 1974-

2008-01-01

453

Evaluating Astronomy Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A set of non-traditional astronomy laboratories for non-science majors will be presented along with evaluations of lab technicians (these labs were originally developed at the College of Staten Island of the City University of New York). The goal of these labs is twofold: (a) to provide the students with hands-on experiences of scientific methodology and (b) to provoke critical thinking. Because non-science majors are often rather resistant to learning the relevant methodology - and especially to thinking critically - this manual is structured differently. It does not only provide traditional cook-book recipes but also contains several leading questions to make the students realize why they are doing what. The students are encouraged to write full sentences and explain how they reach which conclusions. This poster summarizes the experiences of the laboratory assistants that worked with the instructor and presents how they judge the effectiveness of the laboratories.

Zirbel, E. L.

2002-12-01

454

Hands-on science methods class for pre-service elementary teachers  

SciTech Connect

If elementary teachers are to be comfortable teaching science, they must have positive pre-service experiences. A science methods class that is activity-based and student-centered, rather than lecture-based and teacher-centered, peaks their interest in science and alleviates their fears. Activities conducted by the students illustrate science concepts or integrate science with children`s literature books such as The Grouchy Ladybug. These activities are conducted by each student with the rest of the class and the professor acting as an elementary class. Each activity is then evaluated as to the science concept, what was done well, and how it could be improved. The students also relate how the activity would be integrated with other subjects such as social studies, art, math, and language arts. Student feedback indicates this method is enjoyable, educational, and valuable in preparing them to teach science. The {open_quotes}oohs{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}I didn`t know that!{close_quotes} during activities are positives, but students have also learned some science, lost most of their science anxiety, and will teach science with the confidence and enthusiasm that was lacking at the beginning of the course.

Manner, B.M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1994-12-31

455

Clinical and laboratory parameters of mast cell activation as basis for the formulation of diagnostic criteria.  

PubMed

Mast cell (MC) activation occurs in a number of different pathologic conditions. Acute activation is commonly seen in patients with allergic reactions, with consecutive massive release of vasoactive and proinflammatory mediator substances from MCs, leading to the clinical signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis. In these patients, serum tryptase concentrations usually increase subtantially above baseline levels. Chronic MC activation is more difficult to diagnose, especially when symptoms are mild or atypical, and no underlying disease is found. In these patients, serum tryptase levels usually are normal. In a smaller group of patients, tryptase levels are constantly elevated and may point to an occult form of mastocytosis. These patients have to be examined for MC monoclonality, other criteria of a primary MC disease, non-MC hematopoietic neoplasms, and reactive disorders producing chronic MC activation or MC accumulation. In most patients in whom MC activation is found, histamine-induced symptoms can be documented and usually respond to treatment with histamine receptor antagonists or MC stabilizers. If this is not the case, alternative explanations for symptoms and differential diagnoses have to be considered. PMID:21576982

Valent, Peter; Horny, Hans-Peter; Triggiani, Massimo; Arock, Michel

2011-01-01

456

Ovicidal activity of entomopathogenic hyphomycetes on Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) under laboratory conditions.  

PubMed

The ovicidal activity of 21 hyphomycete fungi species against Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) was tested. Fungi with ovicidal activity developed on high numbers of eggs (> or =70%) during 25 d of exposure. A clear ovicidal activity with low values of hatch (1.3-40%) was observed after 25 d of incubation with Isaria farinosa (Holm: Fries) Fries, Paecilomyces carneus (Duché & Heim) Brown & Smith, Paecilomyces marquandii (Massee) Hughes, Isaria fumosorosea (Wize), Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin, Penicillium sp., Paecilomyces lilacinus (Thom) Samson, Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin, and Evlachovaea kintrischica Borisov & Tarasov. More than 63% of eggs hatched after 25-d exposures to 11 other fungi species deemed as ineffective. These are the first results to show the effects of entomopathogenic fungi against eggs of Ae. aegypti, and they suggest their potential as control agents of this vector. PMID:17915511

Luz, C; Tai, M H H; Santos, A H; Rocha, L F N; Albernaz, D A S; Silva, H H G

2007-09-01

457

Microseismic activity and fluid fault interactions: some results from the Corinth Rift Laboratory (CRL), Greece  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Gulf of Corinth, in western-central Greece, is one of the fastest continental rifts in the world. In its western section near the city of Aigion, the previous work has outlined the existence of a shallow dipping seismogenic zone between 5 and 12 km. This seismic activity has been monitored with a network of 12 three-component stations for the period 2000-2007. Three, few months long, seismic swarms have been observed. They mobilize a complex structural fault system that associates both shallow dipping elements and subvertical structures with very different azimuths, some of which extend to depths greater than that of the shallow dipping zone. The swarm activity associates intensely active, short crises (a few days) with more quiescent periods. The long-term growth velocity of the seismically activated domains is compatible with a fluid diffusion process. Its characteristics are discussed in the context of the results from the 1000 m deep AIG10 well that intersects the Aigion Fault at 760 m. The vertical growth directions of the seismically activated volumes outline two different sources for the fluid and imply non-steady pressure conditions within the seismic domain. The diffusivity along the cataclastic zone of the faults is in the order of 1 m2 s-1, while faults act as hydraulic barrier in the direction perpendicular to their strike. If the vertical direction is a principal stress component, the high pore pressure values that must be reached to induce slip on the shallowly dipping planes can result only from transitory dynamic conditions. It is argued that the shallow dipping active seismic zone is only local and does not correspond to a 100 km scale decollement zone. We propose to associate the localization process with deep fluid fluxes that have progressively modified the local stress field and may be the cause for the quiescence of the West Heliki Fault presently observed.

Bourouis, S.; Cornet, F. H.

2009-07-01

458

Bacterial Population Dynamics in a Laboratory Activated Sludge Reactor Monitored by Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA  

PubMed Central

The microbial population in a laboratory activated sludge reactor was monitored for 245 d at 75 time points by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA. Synthetic wastewater was used as the influent, and the reactor was operated under the same conditions throughout the experiment. The behaviors of different bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were observed. Multiple OTUs showed periodic propagation and recession. One of the OTUs showed sharp recession, which suggests that cells in the OTU were selectively killed. The behaviors of different phylogenetic lineages of Candidatus ‘Accumulibacter phosphatis’ were also visualized. It was clearly demonstrated that pyrosequencing with barcoded primers is a very effective tool to clarify the dynamics of the bacterial population in activated sludge. PMID:23100021

Satoh, Hiroyasu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Ranasinghe, Purnika; Li, Ning; Gunawardana, Egodaha Gedara Wasana; Hattori, Masahira; Mino, Takashi

2013-01-01

459

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Department of Energy (DOE) activities at Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Ventura County, California  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) activities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratories Site (DOE/SSFL), conducted May 16 through 26, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by an private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with DOE activities at SSFL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at SSFL, and interviews with site personnel. 90 refs., 17 figs., 28 tabs.

Not Available

1989-02-01

460

Integrating laboratory and field data to quantify the immersion freezing ice nucleation activity of mineral dust particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data from both laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements are used to develop a simple parametric description for the immersion freezing activity of natural mineral dust particles. Measurements made with the Colorado State University (CSU) continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) when processing mineral dust aerosols at a nominal 105% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) are taken to approximate the immersion freezing nucleation activity of particles. Ice active frozen fractions vs. temperature for dusts representative of Saharan and Asian desert sources were consistent with similar measurements in atmospheric dust plumes for a limited set of comparisons available. The parameterization developed follows the form of one suggested previously for atmospheric particles of non-specific composition in quantifying ice nucleating particle concentrations as functions of temperature and the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.5 ?m diameter. Such an approach does not explicitly account for surface area and time dependencies for ice nucleation, but sufficiently encapsulates the activation properties for potential use in regional and global modeling simulations, and possible application in developing remote sensing retrievals for ice nucleating particles. A correction factor is introduced to account for the apparent underestimate (by approximately 3, on average) of the immersion freezing fraction of mineral dust particles for CSU CFDC data processed at an RHw of 105% vs. maximum fractions active at higher RHw. Instrumental factors that affect activation behavior vs. RHw in CFDC instruments remain to be fully explored in future studies. Nevertheless, the use of this correction factor is supported by comparison to ice activation data obtained for the same aerosols from Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics of the Atmosphere (AIDA) expansion chamber cloud parcel experiments. Further comparison of the new parameterization to the immersion freezing surface active site density parameterization for mineral dust particles, developed separately from AIDA experimental data alone, shows excellent agreement for data collected in a descent through a Saharan aerosol layer. These studies support the utility of laboratory measurements to obtain atmospherically-relevant data on the ice nucleation properties of dust and other particle types, and suggest the suitability of considering all mineral dust as a single type of ice nucleating particle as a useful first order approximation in numerical modeling investigations.

DeMott, P. J.; Prenni, A. J.; McMeeking, G. R.; Sullivan, R. C.; Petters, M. D.; Tobo, Y.; Niemand, M.; Möhler, O.; Snider, J. R.; Wang, Z.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

2014-06-01

461

The Opinions of Turkish Highschool Pupils on Inquiry Based Laboratory Activities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to prepare inquiry based experimental activities on the photosynthesis, thought to be a very difficult subject by pupils, and to determine the pupil's ideas towards this method. This study was made with 24 pupils from Grade 3 at Ataturk Anatolian High school in Turkey. As data gathering material; seven inquiry…

Kilinc, Ahmet

2007-01-01

462

Activity and adaptation of nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-degrading bacteria: field and laboratory studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Adaptation of bacterial activity for the degradation of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) was studied using natural sediment samples and an NTA-degrading bacterium (strain ATCC 29600). Sediment samples from a river with persistent levels of NTA had much higher NTA-degradative activity than comparable samples from a less contaminated control site. When sediment from the control site was exposed to high levels of NTA a 5 day lag preceded an abrupt increase in NTA degradation while strain 29600 colonized on sand and grown in the absence of NTA became induced within eight hours. The induction of strain 29600 was compared between bacteria in suspension and cells attached to sand. The sand-associated bacteria became induced 4 to 5 h before the planktonic suspension and displayed over threefold greater specific activity. Suspensions of strain 29600 became adapted within 8 h when placed in membrane diffusion chambers that were immersed within a municipal wastewater reactor containing NTA. These findings support the concept that induction is a part of the process of bacterial adaptation to degrade NTA and sand-associated bacteria can adapt more quickly to and have a greater degradative activity for NTA than planktonic cells.

McFeters, G. A.; Egli, T.; Wilberg, E.; Alder, A.; Schneider, R.; Suozzi, M.; Giger, W.

1990-01-01

463

Student Reciprocal Peer Teaching as a Method for Active Learning: An Experience in an Electrotechnical Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Active learning is one of the most efficient mechanisms for learning, according to the psychology of learning. When students act as teachers for other students, the communication is more fluent and knowledge is transferred easier than in a traditional classroom. This teaching method is referred to in the literature as reciprocal peer teaching. In…

Muñoz-García, Miguel A.; Moreda, Guillermo P.; Hernández-Sánchez, Natalia; Valiño, Vanesa

2013-01-01

464

Assisting in the Medical Laboratory. Instructor's Guide, Students' Manual, and Student Learning Activities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a hospital, clinic, or physician's office. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. The course is intended for individualized study and is…

Fair, Helena J.

465

Heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of bacteria: new laboratory experiments at simulated cloud conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ice nucleation activities of five different Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas viridiflava and Erwinia herbicola bacterial species and of Snomax™ were investigated in the temperature range between -5 and -15°C. Water suspensions of these bacteria were directly sprayed into the cloud chamber of the AIDA facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe at a temperature of -5.7°C. At this temperature, about 1% of the Snomax™ cells induced immersion freezing of the spray droplets before the droplets evaporated in the cloud chamber. The living cells didn't induce any detectable immersion freezing in the spray droplets at -5.7°C. After evaporation of the spray droplets the bacterial cells remained as aerosol particles in the cloud chamber and were exposed to typical cloud formation conditions in experiments with expansion cooling to about -11°C. During these experiments, the bacterial cells first acted as cloud condensation nuclei to form cloud droplets. Then, only a minor fraction of the cells acted as heterogeneous ice nuclei either in the condensation or the immersion mode. The results indicate that the bacteria investigated in the present study are mainly ice active in the temperature range between -7 and -11°C with an ice nucleation (IN) active fraction of the order of 10-4. In agreement to previous literature results, the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax™ cells was much larger with an IN active fraction of 0.2 at temperatures around -8°C.