Sample records for hanna basin wyoming

  1. Water-quality data for the Hanna and Carbon basins, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freudenthal, Pamela B.

    1979-01-01

    Water-quality data for the Hanna and Carbon Basins, south-central Wyoming, are presented in tables with no interpretation. Common-constituent, trace-element, and radiochemical data for ground and surface water and sediment concentrations for surface water are included. Ground water at 53 sites and surface water at 3 gaging stations were sampled. (Kosco-USGS)

  2. Coal-spoil and ground-water chemical data from two coal mines; Hanna Basin and Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Data are presented describing chemical and mineralogical composition of spoil material and chemical quality of groundwater at 2 Wyoming mine sites. Samples were collected at Medicine Bow-Seminoe Number 1 mining area in the Hanna basin and at the Cordero Mine in the Powder River basin. The data collected from these sites, along with similar data from other coal-mining states in the West, are used to evaluate methods used in predicting post-mining groundwater quality. The data include mineral-composition analyses, paste-extract analyses, and sulfur-forms analyses of coal spoil, chemical analyses of water from batch-mixing experiments; and analyses of water samples collected from wells in the coal aquifers and from wells in the saturated spoils. (USGS)

  3. Geology of the Hanna Formation, Hanna Underground Coal Gasification Site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.L.; Youngberg, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The Hanna Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) study area consists of the SW1/4 of Section 29 and the E1/2SE1/4 of Section 30 in Township 22 North, Range 81 West, Wyoming. Regionally, this is located in the coal-bearing Hanna Syncline of the Hanna Basin in southeast Wyoming. The structure of the site is characterized by beds dipping gently to the northeast. An east-west fault graben complex interrupts this basic trend in the center of the area. The target coal bed of the UCG experiments was the Hanna No. 1 coal in the Hanna Formation. Sedimentary rocks comprising the Hanna Formation consist of a sequence of nonmarine shales, sandstones, coals and conglomerates. The overburden of the Hanna No. 1 coal bed at the Hanna UCG site was divided into four broad local stratigraphic units. Analytical studies were made on overburden and coal samples taken from cores to determine their mineralogical composition. Textural and mineralogical characteristics of sandstones from local stratigraphic units A, B, and C were analyzed and compared. Petrographic analyses were done on the coal including oxides, forms of sulfur, pyrite types, maceral composition, and coal rank. Semi-quantitative spectrographic and analytic geochemical analyses were done on the overburden and coal and relative element concentrations were compared. Trends within each stratigraphic unit were also presented and related to depositional environments. The spectrographic analysis was also done by lithotype. 34 references, 60 figures, 18 tables.

  4. Role of hydrogeology in Rocky Mountain 1 underground coal gasification test, Hanna basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, D.J.; Schmit, C.R.; Beaver, F.W.; Evans, J.M. (North Dakota Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute, Grand Forks (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Experience has shown that the designs and implementation of Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) operations that are technically sound and environmentally safe require a thorough understanding of the hydrogeology of the UCG site, complemented by an understanding of the potential interactions between the elements of the hydrogeologic system and UCG process. This is significant because UCG is conducted in the saturated zone, consumes large volumes of ground water, and has the potential to adversely affect ground water quality and flow. The textural, mineralogical, chemical, and structural character of the geologic materials constituting the UCG reactor, as well as the occurrence, flow, and quality of fluids moving through that three-dimensional matrix of geologic materials, must be understood. The US Department of Energy and an industry consortium led by the Gas Research Institute recently conducted the Rocky Mountain 1 Test in the Hanna basin of Wyoming. For this test, the hydrogeologic aspects of the site were characterized to an extent unprecedented in UCG testing. This information was then used to develop and evaluate operating strategies intended to prevent or minimize contamination. Such strategies included gasifying at less than hydrostatic pressure to enhance ground water flow toward the gasification modules and to restrict contamination to the module area. Hydrogeologic information also allowed a more complete evaluation of process-setting interactions. For example, a substantial and widespread drop in elevation heat noted for the ground water in the target coal emphasized the importance of an adequate water supply for UCG, particularly in a long-term commercial operation.

  5. The thermal and structural properties of a Hanna Basin Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.E.

    1984-06-01

    In an effort to understand the cavity growth mechanisms occurring during an Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) test, a study of the thermomechanical effects has been initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. The first phase of this study has been the determination of the intrinsic thermal and structural properties of the Hanna Basin Coal that was utilized in a series of four UCG tests near the town of Hanna, Wyoming. The result of this study is a consistent set of thermal and structural properties of a Hanna Basin coal. This set has been used in a model that successfully simulated the growth of the cavity observed during the Hanna II UCG test.

  6. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project: Petroleum Systems and Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas, Hanna, Laramie, and Shirley Basins Province, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey Hanna, Laramie, and Shirley Basins Province Assessment Team

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The purpose of the U.S. Geological Survey?s (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment is to develop geologically based hypotheses regarding the potential for additions to oil and gas reserves in priority areas of the United States. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Hanna, Laramie, and Shirley Basins Province in Wyoming and northeastern Colorado. The assessment is based on the geologic elements of each total petroleum system (TPS) defined in the province, including hydrocarbon source rocks (source-rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation, and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap formation and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined three TPSs and seven assessment units (AUs) within them; undiscovered resources for three of the seven AUs were quantitatively assessed.

  7. An Underground Coal Gasification Experiment, Hanna, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leo Schrider; James Jennings; C. F. Brandenburg; D. F. Fischer

    1974-01-01

    In the fall of 1972, the U.S. Bureau of Mines began an experiment to investigate the technologic, economic, and environmental considerations of underground gasification of a W. subbituminous coal. The gasification site is near the town of Hanna, Wyo., approx. 70 miles northwest of Laramie. The test results indicate that gas volumes and gas heating values have fluctuated over a

  8. Results of the groundwater restoration project, Hanna Underground Coal Gasification Test Site, Wyoming: Topical report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1988-01-01

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments conducted during the 1970s at the Department of Energy (DOE) site near Hanna, Wyoming, formed six underground cavities in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam, an aquifer of low permeability. When the first Hanna UCG experiment began in March 1973, researchers had little information about what effects the geologic or hydrologic characteristics of the area

  9. Postburn evaluation of the Hanna IV A and B UCG (underground coal gasification) experiments, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Oliver; D. J. Sinks; G. Berdan

    1986-01-01

    Data from process monitoring, geophysical surveys, and postburn core studies were integrated to delineate the extent of affected coal and overburden at the Hanna IV A and B underground coal gasification experiment sites in southeastern Wyoming. The experiments were conducted from December 1977 to September 1979 in the Hanna No. 1 coal bed of the Eocene Hanna Formation. A postburn

  10. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test

    SciTech Connect

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 1. General information and executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation. This report covers: (1) history of underground coal gasification leading to the Hanna tests; (2) area characteristics (basic meteorological and socioeconomic data); (3) site selection history; (4) site characteristics; (5) permitting; and (6) executive summary. 5 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Role of site characteristics in coal gasification. [Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, B.E.; Glass, R.E.

    1981-12-01

    Field test data for a series of four underground coal gasification tests (UCG) at a site near Hanna, Wyoming are presented. Results of these field tests were combined with modeling efforts to identify site selective parameters broadly identified as the flow and mechanical properties of a coal seam that can help determine the degree to which any UCG test would be successful. Specifically, the characteristics shown to be important are concluded to be: (1) permeability structure and mobile water, which play a crucial role in determining air flow paths; (2) high permeability zones at midstream and above to act as the primary air flow path; (3) spacing of injection and production wells can be varied to enhance the chance of keeping the air flow paths low in the coal seam; (4) completion of the process wells in a manner that minimizes neighboring permeability inhibits the chance of override; (5) the orthotropic permeability of coal improve UCG results; (6) thermochemical properties of coal are important with respect to the manner of combustion front propogation; and (7) heating will result in stress dependent anisotropic strength characteristics of the coal. Other properties characteristic of a given coal, petrographic constitutents of a coal, chemistry of combustion and the in situ stress distribution are also pointed out as significant factors to be considered in the most efficient use of UCG technique. 14 references, (BLM)

  13. Results of the groundwater restoration project, Hanna Underground Coal Gasification Test Site, Wyoming: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments conducted during the 1970s at the Department of Energy (DOE) site near Hanna, Wyoming, formed six underground cavities in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam, an aquifer of low permeability. When the first Hanna UCG experiment began in March 1973, researchers had little information about what effects the geologic or hydrologic characteristics of the area might have on the UCG process; likewise, the effects of UCG on the environment were unknown. Since the UCG experiments were completed, dilute concentrations of pyrolysis products and leachates have been detected in groundwater monitoring wells in and near some of the six cavities. Three primary UCG indicator constituents have been measured at elevated concentrations: phenols, TDS, and sulfate. The Hanna III cavity water exceeded the DOE target level for TDS and sulfate, and the Hanna I cavity water exceeded the DOE target level for phenols. The indicated phenols contamination, however, was in groundwater sampled from a well which was previously used as a production well during the experiment. Water pumped during the restoration project and a new well located approximately 10 ft from the old production well was sampled and no elevated phenols concentration was detected. Therefore, the restoration performed on the Hanna I cavity water was not necessary. The restoration was performed, however, because these indications were not available until during the restoration. Locally, various other constituents exceed DOE target levels, but concentrations are very near target levels and are well within livestock use limits. 2 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Sampling and analyses report for June 1992 semiannual postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG site, Hanna, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lindblom

    1992-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RMl) underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted from November 16, 1987 through February 26, 1988 (United Engineers and Constructors 1989) at a site approximately one mile south of Hanna, Wyoming. The test consisted of dual module operation to evaluate the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) technology, the elongated linked well (ELW) technology, and the interaction

  15. High resolution seismic survey of the Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification area

    SciTech Connect

    Youngberg, A.D.; Berkman, E.; Orange, A.

    1982-01-01

    In November 1980 a high resolution seismic survey was conducted at the Department of Energy, Laramie Energy Technology Center's underground coal gasification test site near Hanna, Wyoming. The objectives of the survey were to determine the feasibility of utilizing high resolution seismic technology to locate and characterize underground coal burn zones and to identify shallow geologic faults at the test site. Seismic data acquisition and processing parameters were specifically designed to emphasize reflections at the shallow, 61 to 91 meter (200 to 300 foot) depths of interest. A three-dimensional grid of data was obtained over the Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3 burn zone. Processing included time varying filters, deconvolution, trace composition, and two-dimensional, areal stacking of the data in order to identify burn zone anomalies. An anomaly was clearly discernable resulting from the rubble-collapse void above the burn zone which was studied in detail and compared to synthetic models. It is felt, based on these results, that the seismic method can be used to define similar burns if great care is taken in both acquisition and processing phases of an investigation. The fault studies disclosed faults at the test site of hitherto unsuspected complexity. The fault system was found to be a graben complex with numerous antithetic faults. The antithetic faults also contain folded beds. One of the faults discovered may be responsible for the unexpected problems experienced in some of the early in-situ gasification tests at the site. A series of anomalies were discovered on the northeast end of one of the seismic lines, and these reflections have been identified as adits from the old Hanna No. 1 Coal Mine.

  16. Summary of the groundwater monitoring program at the Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification test sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, S.D.; Oliver, R.L.

    1985-07-01

    Water quality analyses of groundwaters at the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification (UCG) test sites comprise part of a continuing monitoring program to assess the impact of UCG on the environment. Collection and analysis of groundwater samples by DOE and various DOE contractor laboratories were initiated in 1974 and intensified in 1980. Samples from 48 wells were tested for 46 chemical and physical water quality parameters. This report includes data collected through December 1982. The objectives of this report are to make the raw data available and to draw preliminary conclusions on the extent of contamination at the site based on data analysis. Critical analysis of the water quality data is limited by the fact that the Hanna UCG test sites were primarily designed to provide engineering data rather than environmental data. However, the environmental monitoring program has been able to provide some conclusions about water quality based on the presence and levels of the two major UCG water-borne wastes, which are pyrolysis products and leachates. Pyrolysis products and leachates were detected in wells completed in both the coal and overburden aquifers. The impact was greatest in the gasification cavities, with some evidence of contamination in noncavity wells proximate to the burn areas. Contamination detected in both the cavity and noncavity wells was greater for those wells completed in the coal aquifer. 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Sampling and analyses report for December 1991 semiannual postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted from November 16, 1987, through February 26, 1988 at a site approximately one mile south of Hanna, Wyoming. The test consisted of a dual-module operation to evaluate the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) technology, the elongated linked well (ELW) technology, and the interaction of closely spaced modules operating simultaneously. The test caused two cavities to form in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and associated overburden. The Hanna No. 1 coal seam was approximately 30 ft thick and lay at depths between 350 and 365 ft below the surface in the test area. The coal seam was overlain by sandstones, siltstones, and claystones deposited by various fluvial environments. The groundwater monitoring was designed to satisfy the requirements of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) in addition to providing research data toward the development of UCG technology that minimizes environmental impacts. Further background material and the sampling and analytical procedures associated with the sampling task are described in the Rocky Mountain 1 Postburn Groundwater Monitoring Quality Assurance Plan (Mason and Johnson 1988).

  18. Sampling and analyses report for June 1992 semiannual postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, S.R.

    1992-08-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RMl) underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted from November 16, 1987 through February 26, 1988 (United Engineers and Constructors 1989) at a site approximately one mile south of Hanna, Wyoming. The test consisted of dual module operation to evaluate the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) technology, the elongated linked well (ELW) technology, and the interaction of closely spaced modules operating simultaneously. The test caused two cavities to be formed in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and associated overburden. The Hanna No. 1 coal seam is approximately 30 ft thick and lays at depths between 350 ft and 365 ft below the surface in the test area. The coal seam is overlain by sandstones, siltstones and claystones deposited by various fluvial environments. The groundwater monitoring was designed to satisfy the requirements of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) in addition to providing research data toward the development of UCG technology that minimizes environmental impacts. The June 1992 semiannual groundwater.sampling took place from June 10 through June 13, 1992. This event occurred nearly 34 months after the second groundwater restoration at the RM1 site and was the fifteenth sampling event since UCG operations ceased. Samples were collected for analyses of a limited suite set of parameters as listed in Table 1. With a few exceptions, the groundwater is near baseline conditions. Data from the field measurements and analysis of samples are presented. Benzene concentrations in the groundwater were below analytical detection limits.

  19. Sampling and analyses report for December 1991 semiannual postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG site, Hanna, Wyoming. [Quarterly report, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted from November 16, 1987, through February 26, 1988 at a site approximately one mile south of Hanna, Wyoming. The test consisted of a dual-module operation to evaluate the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) technology, the elongated linked well (ELW) technology, and the interaction of closely spaced modules operating simultaneously. The test caused two cavities to form in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and associated overburden. The Hanna No. 1 coal seam was approximately 30 ft thick and lay at depths between 350 and 365 ft below the surface in the test area. The coal seam was overlain by sandstones, siltstones, and claystones deposited by various fluvial environments. The groundwater monitoring was designed to satisfy the requirements of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) in addition to providing research data toward the development of UCG technology that minimizes environmental impacts. Further background material and the sampling and analytical procedures associated with the sampling task are described in the Rocky Mountain 1 Postburn Groundwater Monitoring Quality Assurance Plan (Mason and Johnson 1988).

  20. Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120{sup 0}F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin. 68 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  1. Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hanna IV, underground coal gasification site, Wyoming, and comparison to other Wyoming UCG sites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Marcouiller; L. K. Burns; F. G. Ethridge

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of 21 post-burn cores taken from the Hanna IV UCG site allows 96 m (315 ft) of overburden to be subdivided into four local stratigraphic units. The 7.6 m (25 ft) thick Hanna No. 1 coal seam is overlain by a laterally discontinuous, 3.3 m (11 ft) thick shaley mudstone (Unit A') in part of the Hanna IV site.

  2. Overburden characterization and post-burn study at the Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification site: stratigraphy, depositional environments and mineralogy, Hanna Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, G.N. II; Burns, L.K.; Ethridge, F.G.; Laughter, T.; Youngberg, A.D.

    1982-03-01

    Several underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments have been conducted in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam. During the fall of 1980 the Laramie Energy Technology Center performed a post-burn field study of the Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3 experiment at the Hanna UCG site. The field work consisted of high resolution seismic, drilling, coring, and geophysical logging. The Department of Earth Resources, Colorado State University, contributed to the post-burn study by doing laboratory work on the cores and geophysical logs. The purpose of the laboratory work was to provide an estimate of the temperatures and chemical conditions reached during the conversion experiment by studying the mineralogical and textural characteristics of thermally altered and ulaltered overburden. In the vicinity of the burn cavity, overburden rocks have been subjected to high temperature pyrometamorphism during the Hanna II Phases 2 and 3 UCG experiments. Paralava rocks, buchites and paralava breccias containing glass and various high temperature minerals such as oligoclase, clinopyroxene, ferrocordierite, mullite, cristobalite, magnetite, and tridymite formed. Textures of some of these minerals suggest crystallization directly from a melt. Mineralogy and melting relations of the paralavas, ash fusion temperatures, and thermocouple measurements made during the experiment suggest that tempratures in excess of 1200/sup 0/C were attained. Rock color and the presence of reduced iron bearing minerals and blebs of native iron indicate that the experimental burn and the product gases in the area of paralava formation were reducing.

  3. GOLDEN EAGLE PREDATION ON PRONGHORNS IN WYOMING'S GREAT DIVIDE BASIN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. D. DEBLINGER; A. WILLIAM ALLDREDGE

    From 1980-85, while studying pronghorn antelope in Wyoming's Great Divide Basin, we recorded seven inci- dents of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) attacking prong- horns (Antilocapra americana). Most reported observa- uons of golden eagle predation on pronghorns involve newborn fawns during spring and summer (Beale and Smith 1973, Barrett 1978, Beale 1978, Bodie 1978, Von Gunten 1978, Autenrieth 1980), but a

  4. New vitrinite reflectance data for the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pawlewicz, Mark J.; Finn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The Wind River Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 7,400 square miles in central Wyoming. The basin is bounded by the Washakie Range and Owl Creek and southern Bighorn Mountains on the north, the Casper arch on the east and northeast, and the Granite Mountains on the south, and Wind River Range on the west. The purpose of this report is to present new vitrinite reflectance data collected mainly from Cretaceous marine shales in the Wind River Basin to better characterize their thermal maturity and hydrocarbon potential.

  5. Analysis of runoff from small drainage basins in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Gordon S.; Rankl, James G.

    1978-01-01

    A flood-hydrograph study has defined the magnitude and frequency of flood volumes and flood peaks that can be expected from drainage basins smaller than 11 square miles in the plains and valley areas of Wyoming. Rainfall and runoff data, collected for 9 years on a seasonal basis (April through September), were used to calibrate a rainfall-runoff model on each of 22 small basins. Long-term records of runoff volume and peak discharge were synthesized for these 22 basins. Flood volumes and flood peaks of specific recurrence intervals (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 years) were then related to basin characteristics with a high degree of correlation. Flood volumes were related to drainage area, maximum relief, and basin slope. Flood peaks were related to drainage area, maximum relief, basin slope, and channel slope. An investigation of ponding behind a highway embankment, with available storage capacity and with a culvert to allow outflow, has shown that the single fast-rising peak is most important in culvert design. Consequently, a dimensionless hydrograph defines the characteristic shape of flood hydrographs to be expected from small drainage basins in Wyoming. For design purposes, a peak and volume can be estimated from basin characteristics and used with the dimensionless hydrograph to produce a synthetic single-peak hydrograph. Incremental discharges of the hydrograph can be routed along a channel, where a highway fill and culvert are to be placed, to help determine the most economical size of culvert if embankment storage is to be considered.

  6. Thermal history determined by fission-track dating for three sedimentary basins in California and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, Nancy D.

    1984-01-01

    The use of fission-tracks is demonstrated in studies of time-temperature relationships in three sedimentary basins in the western United States; in the Tejon Oil Field area of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California; in the northeastern Green River basin, Wyoming, and in drill holes in the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming.

  7. Structural analysis of the Sheep Mountain anticline, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming 

    E-print Network

    Hennier, Jeffrey Hugh

    1984-01-01

    structural basins in the Rocky Mountain foreland. The overall extent of the foreland province includes the general area from southwest Montana to northern New Mexico, and from the western margin of the Great Plains to approximately the Idaho... sedimentalogical transition zone or hinge line extended from Mexico through the western U. S. to Canada, separating the deeply subsiding Cordilleran geosynclinal trough to the west in Idaho and Utah from stable cratonic shelf to the east in Wyoming (Thomas...

  8. Vitrinite Reflectance Data for the Wind River Basin, Central Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.; Roberts, Laura N.R.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The Wind River Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 7,400 mi2 in central Wyoming. The basin boundaries are defined by fault-bounded Laramide uplifts that surround it, including the Owl Creek and Bighorn Mountains to the north, Wind River Range to the west, Granite Mountains to the south, and Casper Arch to the east. The purpose of this report is to present new vitrinite reflectance data to be used in support of the U.S Geological Survey assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Wind River Basin. One hundred and nineteen samples were collected from Jurassic through Tertiary rocks, mostly coal-bearing strata, in an effort to better understand and characterize the thermal maturation and burial history of potential source rocks.

  9. Bison basin, central Wyoming - geologic overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnell, M.L.

    1984-07-01

    The northeastern part of the Great Divide basin is a separate, unique, and until recently, little-explored subbasin sometimes called the Bison basin. It is bounded by the Wind River Mountains, Sweetwater-Granite Mountain foreland uplift, Lost Soldier-Wertz structure, and a little-studied very positive east-west structural arch approximately coincident with the Sweetwater-Fremont county line. A comprehensive seismic, Landsat, and subsurface geologic examination or, better, dissection of the Bison basin was initiated in 1978. Numerous oil and gas prospects were delineated by this study. Since this small, 12 by 40 mi (19 by 64 km) basin is bordered by known reserves of 260 million bbl of oil and 90 million bcf of gas, these prospects proved to be a popular target of the drill bit. At least one of these prospects appears to be productive; others are currently being drilled. The presence of major east-west wrench faults, a well-documented foreland uplift, until recently undrilled surface and subsurface structures, faults with throw measured in tens of thousands of feet, and an oil seep indicate possible additional hydrocarbon potential in the Bison basin that could exceed presently known reserves. Currently drilling wells and abundant already acquired reflection seismic data are the beginning step in an ongoing exploration program of an interesting, complex, and rewarding small basin with a lot of promise.

  10. Depositional environments, subsurface stratigraphy, and post-burn characterization of the Paleocene-Eocene Hanna formation at the Hanna, Wyo UCG site: Hanna III experiment. [Hanna III post mortem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. D. Youngberg; J. E. McClurg; J. G. Schmitt

    1983-01-01

    During the summer of 1981 the Laramie Energy Technology Center conducted a post-burn coring program at the Hanna III Underground Coal Gasification site, Hanna, Wyoming. Detailed geologic studies were conducted on the altered and unaltered overburden as well as an analysis of the burn cavity. The overburden consists of about 46m of Paleocene-Eocene Hanna formation above the Hanna No. 1

  11. Ground-water data, Green River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Everett Alfred; Collier, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrologic and geologic data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of energy-related projects in the Green River basin of Wyoming are compiled from the files of the Geological Survey and the Wyoming State Engineer as of 1977. The data include well and spring location, well depth, casing diameter, type of lifts, type of power, use of water, rock type of producing zone, owner, and discharge for more than 1,600 sites. Analyses for common chemical constituents, trace elements, and radioactive chemicals are tabulated as well as water temperature and specific conductance measurement data. Lithologic logs of more than 300 wells, test holes, and measured sections constitute much of this report. County maps at a scale of 1:500 ,000 show the locations. (USGS)

  12. Three-dimensional seismic stratigraphic study of Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Campbell County, Wyoming 

    E-print Network

    Walters, Donna Lynn

    1988-01-01

    THREE-DIMENSIONAL SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHIC STUDY OF MINNELUSA FORMATION, POWDER RIVER BASIN, CAMPBELL COUNTY, WYOMING A Thesis by DONNA LYNN WALTERS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Geophysics THREE-DIMENSIONAL SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHIC STUDY OF MINNELUSA FORMATION, POWDER RIVER BASIN, CAMPBELL COUNTY, WYOMING A Thesis by DONNA LYNN WALTERS Approved...

  13. Hydrodynamic effect on oil accumulation in a stratigraphic trap, Kitty Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-print Network

    Larberg, Gregory Martin

    1976-01-01

    HYDRODYNAMIC EFFECT ON OIL ACCUMULATION IN A STRATIGRAPHIC TRAP, KITTY FIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by GREGORY MARTIN LARBERG "I Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Geology HYDRODYNAMIC EFFECT ON OIL ACCUMULATION IN A STRATIGRAPHIC TRAP, KITTY FIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by GREGORY MARTIN LARBERG Approved as to style...

  14. Hydrodynamic effect on oil accumulation in a stratigraphic trap, Kitty Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming 

    E-print Network

    Larberg, Gregory Martin

    1976-01-01

    HYDRODYNAMIC EFFECT ON OIL ACCUMULATION IN A STRATIGRAPHIC TRAP, KITTY FIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by GREGORY MARTIN LARBERG "I Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subject: Geology HYDRODYNAMIC EFFECT ON OIL ACCUMULATION IN A STRATIGRAPHIC TRAP, KITTY FIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by GREGORY MARTIN LARBERG Approved as to style...

  15. Depositional environments of Fort Union Formation, Bison Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Southwell, E.H.; Steidtmann, J.R.; Middleton, L.

    1983-08-01

    The Paleocene Fort Union Formation crops out in the vicinity of the Bison basin, approximately equidistant from the southeast terminus of the Wind River Range and the southwestern edge of the Granite Mountains uplift in central Wyoming. Early Laramide tectonic activity produced a series of uplifts north of the area forming a platform separating the Wind River and Great Divide basins. During middle to late Paleocene, aggrading fluvial systems flowing southward, rapidly deposited a sequence of thin, lenticular conglomerates and medium to coarse-grained planar-bedded sandstones in braided and anastomosing stream channels and carbonaceous overbank silt and claystones. Subaerially exposed interchannel areas developed cyclic pedogenic horizons. Early diagenetic cementation preserved tubular burrows and rhizoliths as well as impressions of fruits, nuts, leaves, and wood. Anomalous silicic cementation of mudstone, sandstone, and conglomerates probably are silcrete soil horizons developed in a warm temperature to subtropical humid climate. The sandstones are multicyclic containing fragments of preexisting siliceous sedimentary rocks (e.g., Tensleep Sandstone, Mowry Shale, and cherts from the Madison, Morrison, and Phosphoria Formations). Reworked glauconite is locally abundant in some Fort Union sandstones, reflecting the proximity of Paleozoic sources. Altered and embayed feldspars are present in trace amounts throughout most of the section, but significant accumulations of fresh feldspar are present near the top, indicating unroofing of Precambrian source before the Eocene.

  16. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kaszuba, John P. [University of Wyoming; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [University of Wyoming; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-03-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  17. THE CRUSTAL STRUCTURE OF ORIENTALE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR BASIN FORMATION. J. C. Andrews-Hanna1

    E-print Network

    @eps.harvard.edu Introduction. The topography [1] and gravity [2] of the Moon are dominated by the signatures of impact basins loading in the basin interiors [4]. It is shown that the super-isostatic state of the basin floors). The surface relief in the bottom panel is stretched by a factor of 5 relative to the Moho relief. used

  18. Gas desorption and adsorption isotherm studies of coals in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and adjacent basins in Wyoming and North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; McGarry, Dwain E.; Stillwell, Dean P.; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Stillwell, Cathy R.; Ochs, Alan M.; Ellis, Margaret S.; Osvald, Karl S.; Taylor, Sharon L.; Thorvaldson, Marjorie C.; Trippi, Michael H.; Grose, Sherry D.; Crockett, Fred J.; Shariff, Asghar J.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the State Office, Reservoir Management Group (RMG), of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Casper (Wyoming), investigated the coalbed methane resources (CBM) in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, from 1999 to the present. Beginning in late 1999, the study also included the Williston Basin in Montana and North and South Dakota and Green River Basin and Big Horn Basin in Wyoming. The rapid development of CBM (referred to as coalbed natural gas by the BLM) during the early 1990s, and the lack of sufficient data for the BLM to fully assess and manage the resource in the Powder River Basin, in particular, gave impetus to the cooperative program. An integral part of the joint USGS-BLM project was the participation of 25 gas operators that entered individually into confidential agreements with the USGS, and whose cooperation was essential to the study. The arrangements were for the gas operators to drill and core coal-bed reservoirs at their cost, and for the USGS and BLM personnel to then desorb, analyze, and interpret the coal data with joint funding by the two agencies. Upon completion of analyses by the USGS, the data were to be shared with both the BLM and the gas operator that supplied the core, and then to be released or published 1 yr after the report was submitted to the operator.

  19. Megascopic lithologic studies of coals in the Powder River basin in Wyoming and in adjacent basins in Wyoming and North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trippi, Michael H.; Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; Stanton, Ronald W.; Chiehowsky, Lora A.; Moore, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    Between 1999 and 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigated coalbed methane (CBM) resources in the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin. The study also included the CBM resources in the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin of North Dakota and the Wyoming portion of the Green River Basin of Wyoming. This project involved the cooperation of the State Office, Reservoir Management Group (RMG) of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Casper, Wyo., and 16 independent gas operators in the Powder River, Williston, and Green River Basins. The USGS and BLM entered into agreements with these CBM operators to supply samples for the USGS to analyze and provide the RMG with rapid, timely results of total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high-pressure methane adsorption isotherm data. This program resulted in the collection of 963 cored coal samples from 37 core holes. This report presents megascopic lithologic descriptive data collected from canister samples extracted from the 37 wells cored for this project.

  20. 78 FR 56650 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Wyoming; Thunder Basin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    The Forest Service intends to prepare an environmental impact statement to analyze and disclose the environmental effects of amending the 2001 Thunder Basin National Grassland Plan to modify Categories 1 and 2 of the 2009 Prairie Dog Management Strategy. The amendment is being proposed to address continuing concerns regarding prairie dog management, raised by the State of Wyoming (April 17,......

  1. Chapter 27 Pedogenic Understanding Raster Classification Methodology for Mapping Soils, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. J. Cole; J. L. Boettinger

    2006-01-01

    Vast areas of the earth need new or updated soil survey data, but traditional methods of soil survey are inefficient, expensive and often inaccurate. We developed and tested a methodology that incorporates geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing and modelling to predict and map soil distribution in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. Based on conceptual models in which unique

  2. Precipitation Reconstructions and Periods of Drought in the Upper Green River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Follum; A. Barnett; J. Bellamy; S. Gray; G. Tootle

    2008-01-01

    Due to recent drought and stress on water supplies in the Colorado River Compact States, more emphasis has been placed on the study of water resources in the Upper Green River Basin (UGRB) of Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. The research described here focuses on the creation of long-duration precipitation records for the UGRB using tree-ring chronologies. When combined with existing

  3. Glacial geology of the West Tensleep Drainage Basin, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Burggraf, G.B.

    1980-08-01

    The glacial deposits of the West Tensleep Basin in the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming are mapped and a relative chromology established. The deposits are correlated with the regional model as defined in the Wind River Mountains. A statistical analysis is performed on the density and weathering characteristics of the surficial boulders to determine their validity as indicators of relative age. (ACR)

  4. Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Bighorn Basin Province, Wyoming and Montana, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 989 billion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, a mean of 72 million barrels of undiscovered oil, and a mean of 13 million barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Bighorn Basin Providence of Wyoming and Montana.

  5. Status Report: USGS coal assessment of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James A. Luppens; Timothy J. Rohrbacher; Jon E. Haacke; David C. Scott; Lee M. Osmonson

    2006-01-01

    This publication reports on the status of the current coal assessment of the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming and Montana. This slide program was presented at the Energy Information Agency's 2006 EIA Energy Outlook and Modeling Conference in Washington, DC, on March 27, 2006. The PRB coal assessment will be the first USGS coal assessment to include estimates of

  6. Basin analysis studies of lower Paleozoic rocks, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Macke, D.L.

    1988-07-01

    The lower Paleozoic (Cambrian through Mississippian) sedimentary rocks of the Powder River basin represent nearly half of Phanerozoic time, yet they remain virtually unexplored in the subsurface. Rocks of the same age in the Big Horn and Williston basins and in the Central Montana trough have produced much oil and gas, as have the overlying Pennsylvanian strata of the Powder River basin. A synthesis of published stratigraphic information, together with a regional analysis of sedimentary sequences, has been undertaken to evaluate the economic potential of the lower Paleozoic formations. The lack of an economic impetus to study these rocks has hampered the development of precise depositional models for these sequences. Furthermore, the depths of prospective beds, as well as long-standing misconceptions about the regional stratigraphy, have also served to restrain exploration. Stratigraphic studies have documented a succession of marine transgressions and regressions on the flanks of a highland in southeastern Wyoming. The highland persisted as a subdued geographic feature through most of early Paleozoic time, until it rose at the end of the Mississippian. Erosion during the Late Silurian and Devonian removed much of the depositional record in the area, but onlap can be demonstrated with relative certainty for Ordovician and Mississippian rocks. The repetition of sedimentologic features indicates persistent geologic controls in the region and suggests that these paleoenvironments might provide good targets for exploration.

  7. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the northern Wyoming Powder River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.; Rohrbacher, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The abundance of new borehole data from recent coal bed natural gas development in the Powder River Basin was utilized by the U.S. Geological Survey for the most comprehensive evaluation to date of coal resources and reserves in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. It is the second area within the Powder River Basin to be assessed as part of a regional coal assessment program; the first was an evaluation of coal resources and reserves in the Gillette coal field, adjacent to and south of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. There are no active coal mines in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area at present. However, more than 100 million short tons of coal were produced from the Sheridan coal field between the years 1887 and 2000, which represents most of the coal production within the northwestern part of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. A total of 33 coal beds were identified during the present study, 24 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. Given current technology, economic factors, and restrictions to mining, seven of the beds were evaluated for potential reserves. The restrictions included railroads, a Federal interstate highway, urban areas, and alluvial valley floors. Other restrictions, such as depth, thickness of coal beds, mined-out areas, and areas of burned coal, were also considered. The total original coal resource in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area for all 24 coal beds assessed, with no restrictions applied, was calculated to be 285 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource that is accessible for potential mine development after subtracting all restrictions, are about 263 billion short tons (92.3 percent of the original coal resource). Recoverable coal, which is that portion of available coal remaining after subtracting mining and processing losses, was determined for seven coal beds with a stripping ratio of 10:1 or less. After mining and processing losses were subtracted, a total of 50 billion short tons of recoverable coal was calculated. Coal reserves are the portion of the recoverable coal that can be mined, processed, and marketed at a profit at the time of the economic evaluation. With a discounted cash flow at 8 percent rate of return, the coal reserves estimate for the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area is 1.5 billion short tons of coal (1 percent of the original resource total) for the seven coal beds evaluated.

  8. Description and correlation of Eocene rocks in stratigraphic reference sections for the Green River and Washakie basins, southwest Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roehler

    1992-01-01

    Stratigraphic reference sections of the Wasatch, Green River, and Bridger (Washakie) Formations were measured on outcrops in the Green River and Washakie basins adjacent to the Rock Springs uplift in southwest Wyoming. The Washakie basin reference section is 7,939 feet thick and consists of 708 beds that were measured, described, and sampled to evaluate the origin, composition, and paleontology of

  9. Coalbed Methane Extraction and Soil Suitability Concerns in the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    The Powder River Basin is located in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana. It is an area of approximately 55,000 square kilometers. Extraction of methane gas from the coal seams that underlie the Powder River Basin began in Wyoming in the late 1980s and in Montana in the late 1990s. About 100-200 barrels of co-produced water per day are being extracted from each active well in the Powder River Basin, which comes to over 1.5 million barrels of water per day for all the active coalbed methane wells in the Basin. Lab testing indicates that Powder River Basin co-produced water is potable but is high in sodium and other salts, especially in the western and northern parts of the Powder River Basin. Common water management strategies include discharge of co-produced water into drainages, stock ponds, evaporation ponds, or infiltration ponds; treatment to remove sodium; or application of the water directly on the land surface via irrigation equipment or atomizers. Problems may arise because much of the Powder River Basin contains soils with high amounts of swelling clays. As part of the USGS Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center's hyperspectral research program, researchers are investigating whether hyperspectral remote sensing data can be beneficial in locating areas of swelling clays. Using detailed hyperspectral data collected over parts of the Powder River Basin and applying our knowledge of how the clays of interest reflect energy, we will attempt to identify and map areas of swelling clays. If successful, such information will be useful to resource and land managers.

  10. Geospatial data for coal beds in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinney, Scott A.; Scott, David C.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide geospatial data for various layers and themes in a Geographic Information System (GIS) format for the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. In 2015, as part of the U.S. Coal Resources and Reserves Assessment Project, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of coal resources and reserves within the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. This report is supplemental to USGS Professional Paper 1809 and contains GIS data that can be used to view digital layers or themes, including the Tertiary limit of the Powder River Basin boundary, locations of drill holes, clinker, mined coal, land use and technical restrictions, geology, mineral estate ownership, coal thickness, depth to the top of the coal bed (overburden), and coal reliability categories. Larger scale maps may be viewed using the GIS data provided in this report supplemental to the page-size maps provided in USGS Professional Paper 1809. Additionally, these GIS data can be exported to other digital applications as needed by the user. The database used for this report contains a total of 29,928 drill holes, of which 21,393 are in the public domain. The public domain database is linked to the geodatabase in this report so that the user can access the drill-hole data through GIS applications. Results of this report are available at the USGS Energy Resources Program Web site,http://energy.usgs.gov/RegionalStudies/PowderRiverBasin.aspx.

  11. Geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hinckley, B.S.; Heasler, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Wind River Basin were investigated. Oil-well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data have been interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. Basic thermal data, which includes the background thermal gradient and the highest recorded temperature and corresponding depth for each basin, is tabulated. Background heat flow in the Wind River Basin is generally insufficient to produce high conductive gradients. Only where hydrologic systems re-distribute heat through mass movement of water will high temperatures occur at shallow depths. Aquifers which may have the confinement and structural characteristics necessary to create such geothermal systems are the Lance/Fort Union, Mesa Verde, Frontier, Muddy, Cloverly, Sundance, Nugget, Park City, Tensleep, Amsden, Madison, Bighorn, and Flathead Formations. Of these the Tensleep Sandstone and Madison Limestone are the most attractive in terms of both productivity and water quality. Most of the identified geothermal anomalies in the Wind River Basin occur along complex structures in the southwest and south. The most attractive geothermal prospects identified are anomalous Areas 2 and 3 north of Lander, Sweetwater Station Springs west of Jeffrey City, and the thermal springs southwest of Dubois. Even in these areas, it is unlikely temperatures in excess of 130 to 150/sup 0/F can be developed. 16 refs., 7 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  12. Geological remote sensing of Palaeogene rocks in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishtalka, L.; Stucky, R. K.; Redline, A. D.

    1988-01-01

    Remote sensing studies of Palaeogene sediments in the Wind River Basin (Wyoming) were used for mapping stratigraphic units, sedimentary features and facies, and structural patterns. Thematic Mapper principal component images for the central and eastern Wind River Basin along with geological investigations and spectral analyses allowed: mapping of the Fort Union, Wind River, and Wagon Bed formations (Fm) and their subunits; recognition of two subunits in the Wind River Fm, one of which can be traced for 75 km; determination of sediment source and depositional environment of units within the Wind River Fm; correlation of the Wagon Bed Fm across the basin; and apparent confirmation of different sources of volcanic debris in the western and southeastern exposures of the Wagon Bed Fm.

  13. Dissolution of Permian salt and Mesozoic depositional trends, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.L.; Bean, D.W.

    1983-08-01

    Salt deposits in the Powder River basin of Wyoming occur in the Late Permian Ervay Member of the Goose Egg Formation which was deposited in a redbed-evaporite trend extending from the Williston basin of North Dakota to the Alliance basin of Nebraska and Wyoming. However, only remnants of the once extensive Ervay salt remain in the Powder River basin, with major salt dissolution events occurring during Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Subsidence and deposition at the surface were contemporaneous with subsurface salt dissolution except in areas where uplift and erosion were occurring. Earliest dissolution of the Ervay salt occurred in the Jurassic, during regional uplift and erosion of the overlying Triassic Chugwater Formation in the present Hartville uplift and southeastern Powder River basin areas. Thickness variations of the Canyon Springs and Stockade Beaver members of the early Late Jurassic Sundance Formation, which unconformably overlie the deeply eroded Chugwater Formation, may be related in part to dissolution of the Ervay salt. Extensive salt dissolution, synsubsidence, and syndeposition occurred throughout most of the Powder River basin during the latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Many producing fields from the Mowry, Muddy, and Dakota formations exhibit either rapid stratigraphic changes syndepositional to salt collapse or fracture-enhanced reservoir quality due to postdepositional salt collapse. Major Muddy accumulations occurring in areas of local Ervay salt collapse include Kitty, Hilight, Fiddler Creek, and Clareton which have produced jointly over 172 million bbl of oil. The relationship of Ervay salt dissolution to Lower Cretaceous deposition can be exploited as an effective exploration tool.

  14. Diagenesis of upper Cretaceous Teapot sandstones, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, S.P.; Tieh, T.T.

    1984-04-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Teapot sandstones of Well Draw field, Converse County, Wyoming, are turbidite fan deposits bounded stratigraphically by marine shales. They presently occur from 6360 to 7200 ft (1920 to 2195 m), dipping to the northwest. Cored samples selected from nonbioturbated A bedsets show that the sandstones are fine to very fine-grained feldspathic litharenites. Major authigenic minerals include carbonate cement, quartz overgrowths, and clay minerals. The clay minerals originated either as alteration rims on detrital silicates or as precipitated from pore fluids. Alteration rims typically consist of illite, smectite, mixed layer illite/smectite, and lesser chlorite. Feldspars are altered to kaolinite. Precipitated clays occur as thin, unoriented, grain coating chlorite and kaolinite; pore lining mixed layer illite/smectite and lesser chlorite oriented with (001) normal to the pore wall; and unoriented, poorly crystalline, pore filling chlorite. The diagenetic sequence is: compaction and limited quartz overgrowth development; complete calcite cementation and precipitation of grain-coating clays; dissolution of carbonate cement; precipitation of pore lining and later pore filling clays; and development of second stage quartz overgrowths. Development of silicate alteration rims occurred throughout the diagenetic history. Dissolution of carbonate cement produced the majority of present-day porosity; however, this secondary porosity was reduced by precipitation of clays minerals. In the downdip sandstones, hydrodynamic flow and an increase in the abundance of detrital labile grains have caused an increased abundance of clay mineral precipitates, reducing the reservoir potential. The pore fluids which controlled sandstones diagenesis were likely provided by dewatering and diagenesis of enclosing shales.

  15. Sour gas resources in western Wyoming basins and adjacent Overthrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, A.G.

    1983-03-01

    Sour gas is widely distributed in the Big Horn, western Wind River, and greater Green River basins, and the eastern part of the Overthrust belt in Wyoming. In adjacent parts of Idaho and Utah, available data to evaluate the probable occurrence of sour gas diminished rapidly west of the Wyoming border. Principal geologic and geochemical factors in the formation of sour gas include (1) hydrocarbon reactions with sulfates in source and reservoir rocks and formation fluids, (2) thermal desulfurization of crude oil at temperatures in excess of 100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F) and depths of 3000 m (9842 ft) or greater, and (3) catagenic decomposition of kerogen to form CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/S at temperatures of about 350/sup 0/C (662/sup 0/F) and depths of 7000 m (22,965 ft) or more. Sour gas is found with an increasing probability of occurrence from the Chugwater Formation (Triassic) to the Madison Group (Mississippian). It also occurs in lower Paleozoic rocks, but the few reported occurrences preclude estimation of its resource potential at this time. Based on both surface and subsurface evidence, sour gas is closely associated with carbonate-evaporite sequences from cyclic depositional environments from subtidal through supratidal-sabkha that are present in western Wyoming from the Mississippian through the Triassic. In the three basins and the Overthrust belt, sour gas resources are estimated to have a mean volume of 20 to 27 tcf, with a 95 to 5% probability range of 7.5 to 56 tcf. The distribution by basin is estimated to be the following: Big Horn, 17%; western Wind River, 13%; greater Green River, 45%; and eastern Overthrust belt, 25%.

  16. Glacial stratigraphy of Stough Creek Basin, Wind River Range, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Dennis E.

    2002-01-01

    Multiparameter relative-age (RA) techniques identify four post-Pinedale morphostratigraphic units in each of three cirque valleys tributary to Stough Creek Basin, Wind River Range, WY. Soil development, lichenometry, boulder weathering characteristics, and the geomorphic relations among morphostratigraphic units indicate glacial deposits here correspond to the sequence previously described in the Temple Lake valley [Arct. Alp. Res. 6 (1974) 301]. Cirque deposits in Stough Creek Basin correspond to the Temple Lake, Alice Lake, Black Joe, and Gannett Peak alloformations [GSA Abs. Prog. 32 (2000) A-16]. 10Be ages from moraine boulders and polished-striated bedrock [Assoc. Am. Geogr. Annu. Mtg. Abs. (2000) 155] support recent numeric age estimates from Temple Lake and Titcomb Basin that indicate the Temple Lake Alloformation corresponds to the Younger Dryas climate episode [Geogr. Phys. Quat. 41 (1987) 397; Geology 23 (1995) 877; Science 268 (1995) 1329; GSA Abs. Prog. 31 (1999) A-56]. Soils described from Pinedale recessional deposits here represent the first systematic description of Pinedale alpine deposits in the WRR.

  17. ANOMALOUSLY PRESSURED GAS DISTRIBUTION IN THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald C. Surdam

    2003-03-31

    Anomalously pressured gas (APG) assets, typically called ''basin-center'' gas accumulations, represent either an underdeveloped or undeveloped energy resource in the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB). Historically, the exploitation of these gas resources has proven to be very difficult and costly. In this topical report, an improved exploration strategy is outlined in conjunction with a more detailed description of new diagnostic techniques that more efficiently detect anomalously pressured, gas-charged domains. The ability to delineate gas-charged domains occurring below a regional velocity inversion surface allows operators to significantly reduce risk in the search for APG resources. The Wind River Basin was chosen for this demonstration because of the convergence of public data availability (i.e., thousands of mud logs and DSTs and 2400 mi of 2-D seismic lines); the evolution of new diagnostic techniques; a 175 digital sonic log suite; a regional stratigraphic framework; and corporate interest. In the exploration scheme discussed in this topical report, the basinwide gas distribution is determined in the following steps: (1) A detailed velocity model is established from sonic logs, 2-D seismic lines, and, if available, 3-D seismic data. In constructing the seismic interval velocity field, automatic picking technology using continuous, statistically-derived interval velocity selection, as well as conventional graphical interactive methodologies are utilized. (2) Next, the ideal regional velocity/depth function is removed from the observed sonic or seismic velocity/depth profile. The constructed ideal regional velocity/depth function is the velocity/depth trend resulting from the progressive burial of a rock/fluid system of constant rock/fluid composition, with all other factors remaining constant. (3) The removal of the ideal regional velocity/depth function isolates the anomalously slow velocities and allows the evaluation of (a) the regional velocity inversion surface (i.e., pressure surface boundary); (b) detection and delineation of gas-charged domains beneath the velocity inversion surface (i.e., volumes characterized by anomalously slow velocities); and (c) variations within the internal fabric of the velocity anomaly (i.e., variations in gas charge). Using these procedures, it is possible to construct an anomalous velocity profile for an area, or in the case of the Wind River Basin, an anomalous velocity volume for the whole basin. Such an anomalous velocity volume has been constructed for the Wind River Basin based on 1600 mi of 2-D seismic data and 175 sonic logs, for a total of 132,000 velocity/depth profiles. The technology was tested by constructing six cross sections through the anomalous velocity volume coincident with known gas fields. In each of the cross sections, a strong and intense anomalously slow velocity domain coincided with the gas productive rock/fluid interval; there were no exceptions. To illustrate the applicability of the technology, six target areas were chosen from a series of cross sections through the anomalous velocity volume. The criteria for selection of these undrilled target areas were (1) they were characterized by anomalous velocity domains comparable to known gas fields; (2) they had structural, stratigraphic, and temporal elements analogous to one of the known fields; and (3) they were located at least six sonic miles from the nearest known gas field. The next step in the exploration evolution would be to determine if the detected gas-charged domains are intersected by reservoir intervals characterized by enhanced porosity and permeability. If, in any of these targeted areas, the gas-charged domains are penetrated by reservoir intervals with enhanced storage and deliverability, the gas-charged domains could be elevated to drillable prospects. Hopefully, the work described in this report (the detection and delineation of gas-charged domains) will enable operators in the Wind River Basin and elsewhere to reduce risk significantly and increase the rate and magnitude of conve

  18. Geologic application of thermal-inertia mapping from satellite. [Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Offield, T. W. (principal investigator); Miller, S. H.; Watson, K.

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Two night-time thermal images of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming distinctly show a major thermal feature. This feature is substantially coincident with a drainage divide and the southward facing slope appears cooler, suggesting a lower thermal inertia. An initial examination of regional geologic maps provides no clear evidence to suggest what type of geologic feature or structure may be present, although it can be noted that its northeastern end passes directly through Lead, South Dakota where the Homestake Gold Mine is located.

  19. Paleoenvironments of upper Cretaceous Lewis Shale and Fox Hills Formation, south-central Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Perman, R.c.

    1988-02-01

    The Maestrichtian Lewis Shale and Fox Hills Formation in south-central Wyoming were deposited during the final major transgression and regression of the North American epicontinental sea. Outcrops of these formations were examined along the margins of the Great Divide, Washakie, Hanna, and Carbon basins. Bore-hole logs from approximately 200 wells within these basins were studied and correlated with outcrops. Lists of fossils from nearly 300 localities were compiled to obtain information on paleoenvironments and to identify stratigraphic positions of fossils indicating ages of the formations.

  20. Results of Phase 1 postburn drilling and coring, Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification Site, Hanna Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.; Oliver, R.L.

    1990-09-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) test consisted of two different module configurations: the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) and elongated linked well (ELW) configurations. The postburn coring of the RM1 UCG site was designed in two phases to fulfill seven objectives outlined in the Western Research Institute's (WRI) annual project plan for 1988--1989. The seven objectives were to (1) delineate the areal extent of the cavities, (2) identify the extent of roof collapse, (3) obtain samples of all major cavity rock types, (4) characterize outflow channels and cavity stratigraphy, (5) characterize the area near CRIP points and ignition points, (6) further define the structural geology of the site, and (7) identify the vertical positioning of the horizontal process wells within the coal seam. Phase 1 of the coring was completed in the summer of 1989 and served to partially accomplish all seven objectives. In relation to the seven objectives, WRI determined that (1) the ELW cavity extends farther to the west and the CRIP cavity was located 5--10 feet farther to the south than anticipated; (2) roof collapse was contained within unit A in both modules; (3) samples of all major rock types were recovered; (4) insufficient data were obtained to characterize the outflow channels, but cavity stratigraphy was well defined; (5) bore holes near the CRIP points and ignition point did not exhibit characteristics significantly different from other bore holes in the cavities; (6) a fault zone was detected between VIW=1 and VIW-2 that stepped down to the east; and (7) PW-1 was only 7--12 feet below the top of the coal seam in the eastern part of the ELW module area; and CIW-1 was located 18--20 feet below the top of the coal seam in the CRIP module area. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Comparison of coal tars generated by pyrolysis of Hanna coal and UCG (underground coal gasification) Hanna IVB coal tars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. A. Barbour; R. E. Cummings

    1986-01-01

    The compositions of coal tars produced by laboratory and pilot scale apparatus have been compared to those produced during underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments at Hanna, Wyoming. Four coal tars were generated by pyrolysis using the block reactor and the laboratory reference retort, and a fifth coal tar was composited from products produced by UCG. Coal tars were separated into

  2. Selected hydrologic data, Yampa River basin and parts of the White River basin, northwestern Colorado and south-central Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giles, T.F.; Brogden, Robert E.

    1978-01-01

    Selected hydrologic data are presented from four energy-related projects conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Yampa River basin and parts of the White River basin in northwestern Colorado and south-central Wyoming. Water-quality data during 1974 and 1975 and parts of 1976 for 129 ground-water sites and 119 surface-water sites are tabulated. For most samples, major cations, anions, and trace metals were analyzed. For the same time period, field measurements of specific conductance, temperature, and pH were made on 252 springs and wells. These samplings sites, as well as the locations of 20 climatological stations, 18 snow-course sites, and 43 surface-water gaging stations, are shown on maps. Geologic units that contain coal deposits or supply much of the water used for stock and domestic purposes in the area also are shown on a map. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Preliminary results on the characterization of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary low-permeability (tight) gas-bearing rocks in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Fouch; W. R. Keefer; T. M. Finn

    1993-01-01

    The Wind River Basin is a structural and sedimentary basin in central Wyoming (Figure 1) that was created during the Laramide orogeny from Late Cretaceous through Eocene time. The objectives of the Wind River Basin tight gas sandstone project are to define the limits of the tight gas accumulation in the basin and to estimate in-place and recoverable gas resources.

  4. Depositional history of the Lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River basin area, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, R.K.; Paull, R.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Thirty-three measured sections of the Dinwoody Formation, including five from the literature, provide information on thickness, lithology, paleontology, and stratigraphic relations within the Wind River basin and immediately adjacent areas of Wyoming. Most of these sections are in Fremont County, and some lie within the Wind River Indian Reservation. The Dinwoody becomes progressively thinner eastward, from a maximum thickness of 54.6 m in the northwestern Wind River Mountains to zero near the Natrona County line. The formation is characterized by yellowish-weathering, gray siltstone and silty shale. Variable amounts of limestone, sandstone, gypsum, and claystone are also present. Marine bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods (Lingula), and conodonts are common in the western part of the study area, but are absent to the northeast in gypsiferous strata, and near the eastern limit of Dinwoody deposition. The Dinwoody in the Wind River Basin area was deposited unconformably on the Upper Permian Ervary Member of the Park City Formation during the initial Mesozoic flood onto the Wyoming shelf during the Griesbachian, and represents the first of three Lower Triassic transgressive sequences in the western miogeocline. Conodonts of the Isarcica Chronozone document the rapid nature of this eastward transgression. The Permian surface underlying the Dinwoody rarely shows evidence of the long hiatus separating rocks of this age and earliest Triassic deposits. The Dinwoody transgression was followed by westward progradation of the Red Peak Formation of the Chugwater Group across the study area.

  5. Chapter 1: Executive Summary - Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Wind River Basin Province, Wyoming, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    USGS Wind River Basin Province Assessment Team

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 2.4 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, a mean of 41 million barrels of undiscovered oil, and a mean of 20.5 million barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Wind River Basin Province of Wyoming.

  6. WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF THE UPPER SNAKE RIVER BASIN, IDAHO AND WESTERN WYOMING - ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING, 1980-92.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data summarized in this report are used in companion reports to help define the relations among land use, water use, water quality, and biological conditions. The upper Snake River Basin (1704) is located in southeastern Idaho and northwestern Wyoming and includes small parts of...

  7. MAJOR SOURCES OF NITROGEN INPUT AND LOSS IN THE UPPER SNAKE RIVER BASIN, IDAHO AND WESTERN WYOMING, 1990.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total nitrogen input and loss from cattle manure, fertilizer, legume crops, precipitation, and domestic septic systems in the upper Snake River Basin, Idaho and western Wyoming (1704), were estimated by county for water year 1990. The purpose of these estimations was to rank inp...

  8. Genetic structure of cougar populations across the Wyoming basin: Metapopulation or megapopulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, C.R., Jr.; Lindzey, F.G.; McDonald, D.B.

    2004-01-01

    We examined the genetic structure of 5 Wyoming cougar (Puma concolor) populations surrounding the Wyoming Basin, as well as a population from southwestern Colorado. When using 9 microsatellite DNA loci, observed heterozygosity was similar among populations (HO = 0.49-0.59) and intermediate to that of other large carnivores. Estimates of genetic structure (FST = 0.028, RST = 0.029) and number of migrants per generation (Nm) suggested high gene flow. Nm was lowest between distant populations and highest among adjacent populations. Examination of these data, plus Mantel test results of genetic versus geographic distance (P ??? 0.01), suggested both isolation by distance and an effect of habitat matrix. Bayesian assignment to population based on individual genotypes showed that cougars in this region were best described as a single panmictic population. Total effective population size for cougars in this region ranged from 1,797 to 4,532 depending on mutation model and analytical method used. Based on measures of gene flow, extinction risk in the near future appears low. We found no support for the existence of metapopulation structure among cougars in this region.

  9. Vegetation analysis in the Laramie Basin, Wyoming from ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. A.; Redfern, F. R.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The application of ERTS-1 imagery to vegetation mapping and identification was tested and confirmed by field checking. ERTS-1 imagery interpretation and density contour mapping allows definition of minute vegetation features and estimation of vegetative biomass and species composition. Large- and small-scale vegetation maps were constructed for test areas in the Laramie Basin and Laramie mountains of Wyoming. Vegetative features reflecting grazing intensity, moisture availability, changes within the growing season, cutting of hay crops, and plant community constituents in forest and grassland are discussed and illustrated. Theoretical considerations of scattering, sun angle, slope, and instrument aperture upon image and map resolution were investigated. Future suggestions for applications of ERTS-1 data to vegetative analysis are included.

  10. Challenges in assessment, management and development of coalbed methane resources in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    McGarry, D.E.

    2000-07-01

    Coalbed methane development in the Powder River Basin has accelerated rapidly since the mid-1990's. forecasts of coalbed methane (CBM) production and development made during the late 1980's and early 1990's have proven to be distinctly unreliable. Estimates of gas in place and recoverable reserves have also varied widely. This lack of reliable data creates challenges in resource assessment, management and development for public resource management agencies and the CBM operators. These challenges include a variety of complex technical, legal and resource management-related issues. The Bureau of Land Management's Wyoming Reservoir Management Group (WRMG) and US Geological Survey (USGS), with the cooperation and assistance of CBM operators and other interested parties have initiated cooperative studies to address some of these issues. This paper presents results of those studies to date and outlines the agencies' goals and accomplishments expected at the studies' conclusion.

  11. Viability of underground coal gasification in the 'deep coals' of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    2007-06-15

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the PRB coal geology, hydrology, infrastructure, environmental and permitting requirements and to analyze the possible UCG projects which could be developed in the PRB. Project economics on the possible UCG configurations are presented to evaluate the viability of UCG. There are an estimated 510 billion tons of sub-bituminous coal in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. These coals are found in extremely thick seams that are up to 200 feet thick. The total deep coal resource in the PRB has a contained energy content in excess of twenty times the total world energy consumption in 2002. However, only approximately five percent of the coal resource is at depths less than 500 feet and of adequate thickness to be extracted by open pit mining. The balance is at depths between 500 and 2,000 feet below the surface. These are the PRB 'deep coals' evaluated for UCG in this report. The coal deposits in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming are thick, laterally continuous, and nearly flat lying. These deposits are ideal for development by Underground Coal Gasification. The thick deep coal seams of the PRB can be harvested using UCG and be protective of groundwater, air resources, and with minimum subsidence. Protection of these environmental values requires correct site selection, site characterization, impact definition, and impact mitigation. The operating 'lessons learned' of previous UCG operations, especially the 'Clean Cavity' concepts developed at Rocky Mountain 1, should be incorporated into the future UCG operations. UCG can be conducted in the PRB with acceptable environmental consequences. The report gives the recommended development components for UCG commercialization. 97 refs., 31 figs., 57 tabs., 1 app.

  12. Invasive species and coal bed methane development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Bergquist, E; Evangelista, P; Stohlgren, T J; Alley, N

    2007-05-01

    One of the fastest growing areas of natural gas production is coal bed methane (CBM) due to the large monetary returns and increased demand for energy from consumers. The Powder River Basin, Wyoming is one of the most rapidly expanding areas of CBM development with projections of the establishment of up to 50,000 wells. CBM disturbances may make the native ecosystem more susceptible to invasion by non-native species, but there are few studies that have been conducted on the environmental impacts of this type of resource extraction. To evaluate the potential effects of CBM development on native plant species distribution and patterns of non-native plant invasion, 36 modified Forest Inventory and Analysis plots (each comprised of four 168-m2 subplots) were established in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. There were 73 168-m2 subplots on control sites; 42 subplots on secondary disturbances; 14 on major surface disturbances; eight on well pads; and seven on sites downslope of CBM wells water discharge points. Native plant species cover ranged from 39.5 +/- 2.7% (mean +/- 1 SE) in the secondary disturbance subplots to 17.7 +/- 7.5% in the pad subplots. Non-native plant species cover ranged from 31.0 +/- 8.4% in the discharge areas to 14.7 +/- 8.9% in the pad subplots. The control subplots had significantly less non-native species richness than the combined disturbance types. The combined disturbance subplots had significantly greater soil salinity than the control sites. These results suggest that CBM development and associated disturbances may facilitate the establishment of non-native plants. Future research and management decisions should consider the accumulative landscape-scale effects of CBM development on preserving native plant diversity. PMID:17016748

  13. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

    1999-11-01

    The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

  14. Nature of natural gas in anomalously thick coal beds, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D.; Flores, R.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Anomalously thick coal beds (as much as 250 ft thick) occur in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River basin, Wyoming. These laterally discontinuous coal beds were deposited in raised, ombrotrophic peat bogs of fluvial environments. The coal beds include the Anderson-Canyon, Wyodak-Anderson, and Big George zones in the Powder River-Recluse area, Gillette area, and central part of the basin, respectively. The coal resources in these areas are approximately 155 billion short tons. The average maceral composition of the coals is 88% huminite (vitrinite), 5% liptinite, and 7% inertinite. The coals vary in rank from subbituminous C to A (R{sub 0} values of 0.4 to 0.5%). Natural gas desorbed and produced from the coal beds and adjacent sandstones is composed mainly of methane with lesser amounts of CO{sub 2} (less than 10%). The methane is isotopically light ({delta}{sup 13}C{sup 1} values of {minus}56.7 to {minus}60.9%). Based on the chemical and isotopic composition of the gases and on the low rank of the coals, the gases are interpreted to be microbial in origin: they were generated by anaerobic bacteria that broke down the coals at low temperatures, prior to the main phase of thermogenic methane generation by devolatilization. The adsorbed amounts of methane-rich microbial gas per unit of coal in the Powder River basin are relatively low compared to amounts of thermogenic coal-bed gases from other basins. However, the total coal-bed gas resource is considered to be large (as much as several trillion cubic feet) because of the vast coal resources.

  15. Stratigraphy and tectonic significance of the Tunp conglomerate in the Fossil basin, southwest Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, D.J.; Steidtmann, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Tunp Member of the Wasatch Formation in the Fossil basin of southwestern Wyoming was deposited by debris flows containing abundant, very poorly sorted to unsorted coarse debris in a mudstone matrix. Deposition occurred on alluvial fans where small braided streams reworked the toes of the debris flows generating minor fluvial deposits. Tunp sediments are preserved in three separate north-south trending belts adjacent to the northern Fossil basin and deposits in each belt had separate sources in discrete highlands. The Tunp on Commissary Ridge was generated by passive uplift of the Absaroka sheet over a ramp in the Darby thrust. The deposits on Rock Creek and Dempsey ridges are related to motion on the Tunp thrust. The Tunp on Boulder Ridge was derived from the hanging wall of the Crawford thrust but it is not clear whether this was a passive or active source. Stratigraphic relations of these Tunp deposits with dated beds in the Wasatch and Green River formations indicate that the belts of Tunp are successively older to the west and that passive rotation of the Absaroka sheet preceded movement on the Tunp thrust which, in turn, preceded the generation of a source on the Crawford. Deposition of the Tunp therefore records a sequence, progressively younger to the west, of minor adjustments to compression during the last phase of thrusting.

  16. Tree-Ring-Based Reconstruction of Precipitation in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, since 1260 a.d

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen T. Gray; Christopher L. Fastie; Stephen T. Jackson; Julio L. Betancourt

    2004-01-01

    Cores and cross sections from 79 Douglas fir () and limber pine (Pinus flexilis) trees at four sites in the Bighorn Basin of north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana were used to develop a proxy for annual (June June) precipitation spanning 1260 1998 A.D. The reconstruction exhibits considerable nonstationarity, and the instrumental era (post-1900) in particular fails to capture the full

  17. Tree-Ring-Based Reconstruction of Precipitation in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, since 1260 A.D

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEPHEN T. G RAY; CHRISTOPHER L. FASTIE; STEPHEN T. J ACKSON; JULIO L. BETANCOURT

    2004-01-01

    Cores and cross sections from 79 Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and limber pine (Pinus flexilis) trees at four sites in the Bighorn Basin of north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana were used to develop a proxy for annual (June-June) precipitation spanning 1260-1998 A.D. The reconstruction exhibits considerable nonstationarity, and the instrumental era (post-1900) in particular fails to capture the full range

  18. Geologic characteristics of low-permeability gas reservoirs in Greater Green River basin of Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ben E. Law

    1984-01-01

    Large gas resources occur in low-permeability Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary reservoirs in the Greater Green River basin of Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. Most of the gas-bearing reservoirs are overpressured, beginning at depths of 8000-11,500 ft (2440-3500 m). The reservoirs are typically lenticular nonmarine and marginal marine sandstones. In situ permeabilities to gas are generally less than 0.1 md, and

  19. Middle Jurassic (Bajocian and Bathonian) dinosaur megatracksites, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvale, E.P.; Johnson, G.D.; Mickelson, D.L.; Keller, K.; Furer, L.; Archer, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two previously unknown rare Middle Jurassic dinosaur megatracksites are reported from the Bighorn Basin of northern Wyoming in the Western Interior of the United States. These trace fossils occur in carbonate units once thought to be totally marine in origin, and constitute the two most extensive Middle Jurassic dinosaur tracksites currently known in North America. The youngest of these occurs primarily along a single horizon at or near the top of the "basal member" of the "lower" Sundance Formation, is mid-Bathonian in age, and dates to ??? 167 ma. This discovery necessitates a major change in the paleogeographic reconstructions for Wyoming for this period. The older tracksites occur at multiple horizons within a 1 m interval in the middle part of the Gypsum Spring Formation. This interval is uppermost Bajocian in age and dates to ??? 170 ma. Terrestrial tracks found, to date, have been all bipedal tridactyl dinosaur prints. At least some of these prints can be attributed to the theropods. Possible swim tracks of bipedal dinosaurs are also present in the Gypsum Spring Formation. Digitigrade prints dominate the Sundance trackways, with both plantigrade and digitigrade prints being preserved in the Gypsum Spring trackways. The Sundance track-bearing surface locally covers 7.5 square kilometers in the vicinity of Shell, Wyoming. Other tracks occur apparently on the same horizon approximately 25 kilometers to the west, north of the town of Greybull. The Gypsum Spring megatracksite is locally preserved across the same 25 kilometer east-west expanse, with the Gypsum Spring megatracksite more extensive in a north-south direction with tracks occurring locally across a 100 kilometer extent. Conservative estimates for the trackway density based on regional mapping in the Sundance tracksite discovery area near Shell suggests that over 150, 000 in situ tracks may be preserved per square kilometer in the Sundance Formation in this area. Comparable estimates have not been made for other areas. Similarities between the two megatracksites include their formation and preservation in upper intertidal to supratidal sediments deposited under at least seasonally arid conditions. Microbial mat growth on the ancient tidal flats apparently initiated the preservation of these prints.

  20. Trace element chemistry of coal bed natural gas produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Richard E. Jackson; K.J. Reddy [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department of Renewable Resources

    2007-09-15

    Coal bed natural gas (CBNG) produced water is usually disposed into nearby constructed disposal ponds. Geochemistry of produced water, particularly trace elements interacting with a semiarid environment, is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to collect produced water samples at outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds and monitor pH, iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), boron (B), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), cadmium (Cd), and barium (Ba). Outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds were sampled from five different watersheds including Cheyenne River (CHR), Belle Fourche River (BFR), Little Powder River (LPR), Powder River (PR), and Tongue River (TR) within the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming from 2003 to 2005. Paired tests were conducted between CBNG outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds for each watershed. Results suggest that produced water from CBNG outfalls is chemically different from the produced water from corresponding disposal ponds. Most trace metal concentrations in the produced water increased from outfall to disposal pond except for Ba. In disposal ponds, Ba, As, and B concentrations increased from 2003 to 2005. Geochemical modeling predicted precipitation and dissolution reactions as controlling processes for Al, Cu, and Ba concentrations in CBNG produced water. Adsorption and desorption reactions appear to control As, Mo, and B concentrations in CBNG water in disposal ponds. Overall, results of this study will be important to determine beneficial uses (e.g., irrigation, livestock/wildlife water, and aquatic life) for CBNG produced water in the PRB, Wyoming. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Oil shale resources in the Eocene Green River Formation, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey Oil Shale Assessment Team

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a comprehensive assessment of in-place oil in oil shales in the Eocene Green River in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. This CD-ROM includes reports, data, and an ArcGIS project describing the assessment. A database was compiled that includes about 47,000 Fischer assays from 186 core holes and 240 rotary drill holes. Most of the oil yield data were analyzed by the former U.S. Bureau of Mines oil shale laboratory in Laramie, Wyoming, and some analyses were made by private laboratories. Location data for 971 Wyoming oil-shale drill holes are listed in a spreadsheet and included in the CD-ROM. Total in-place resources for the three assessed units in the Green River Formation are: (1) Tipton Shale Member, 362,816 million barrels of oil (MMBO), (2) Wilkins Peak Member, 704,991 MMBO, and (3) LaClede Bed of the Laney Member, 377,184 MMBO, for a total of 1.44 trillion barrels of oil in place. This compares with estimated in-place resources for the Piceance Basin of Colorado of 1.53 trillion barrels and estimated in-place resources for the Uinta Basin of Utah and Colorado of 1.32 trillion barrels.

  2. Ecological Assessment of Streams in the Powder River Structural Basin, Wyoming and Montana, 2005-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.A.; Wright, P.R.; Edwards, G.P., Jr.; Hargett, E.G.; Feldman, D.L.; Zumberge, J.R.; Dey, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Energy and mineral development, particularly coalbed natural gas development, is proceeding at a rapid pace in the Powder River Structural Basin (PRB) in northeastern Wyoming. Concerns about the potential effects of development led to formation of an interagency working group of primarily Federal and State agencies to address these issues in the PRB in Wyoming and in Montana where similar types of resources exist but are largely undeveloped. Under the direction of the interagency working group, an ecological assessment of streams in the PRB was initiated to determine the current status (2005-06) and to establish a baseline for future monitoring. The ecological assessment components include assessment of stream habitat and riparian zones as well as assessments of macroinvertebrate, algal, and fish communities. All of the components were sampled at 47 sites in the PRB during 2005. A reduced set of components, consisting primarily of macroinvertebrate and fish community assessments, was sampled in 2006. Related ecological data, such as habitat and fish community data collected from selected sites in 2004, also are included in this report. The stream habitat assessment included measurement of channel features, substrate size and embeddedness, riparian vegetation, and reachwide characteristics. The width-to-depth ratio (bankfull width/bankfull depth) tended to be higher at sites on the main-stem Powder River than at sites on the main-stem Tongue River and at sites on tributary streams. The streambed substrate particle size was largest at sites on the main-stem Tongue River and smallest at sites on small tributary streams such as Squirrel Creek and Otter Creek. Total vegetative cover at the ground level, understory, and canopy layers ranged from less than 40 percent at a few sites to more than 90 percent at many of the sites. A bank-stability index indicated that sites in the Tongue River drainage were less at risk of bank failure than sites on the main-stem Powder River. Macroinvertebrate communities showed similarity at the river-drainage scale. Macroinvertebrate communities at sites with mountainous headwaters and snowmelt-driven hydrology, such as Clear Creek, Crazy Woman Creek, and Goose Creek, showed similarity with communities from the main-stem Tongue River. The data also indicated similarity among sites on the main-stem Powder River and among small tributaries of the Tongue River. Data analyses using macroinvertebrate observed/expected models and multimetric indices developed by the States of Wyoming and Montana indicated a tendency toward declining biological condition in the downstream direction along the Tongue River. Biological condition for the main-stem Powder River generally improved downstream, from below Salt Creek to near the Wyoming/Montana border, followed by a general decline downstream from the border to the confluence with the Yellowstone River. The biological condition generally was not significantly different between 2005 and 2006, although streamflow was less in 2006 because of drought. Algal communities showed similarity at the river-drainage scale with slight differences from the pattern observed in the macroinvertebrate communities. Although the algal communities from Clear Creek and Goose Creek were similar to those from the main-stem Tongue River, as was true of the macroinvertebrate communities, the algal communities from Crazy Woman Creek had more similarity to those of main-stem Powder River sites than to the Tongue River sites, contrary to the macroinvertebrates. Ordination of algal communities, as well as diatom metrics including salinity and dominant taxa, indicated substantial variation at two sites along the main stem of the Powder River. Fish communities of the PRB were most diverse in the Tongue River drainage. In part due to the effects of Tongue River Reservoir, 15 species of fish were found in the Tongue River drainage that were not found in the Cheyenne, Belle Fourche,

  3. Petrophysical Properties of Cody, Mowry, Shell Creek, and Thermopolis Shales, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P. H.

    2013-12-01

    The petrophysical properties of four shale formations are documented from well-log responses in 23 wells in the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming. Depths of the examined shales range from 4,771 to 20,594 ft. The four formations are the Thermopolis Shale (T), the Shell Creek Shale (SC), the Mowry Shale (M), and the lower part of the Cody Shale (C), all of Cretaceous age. These four shales lie within a 4,000-ft, moderately overpressured, gas-rich vertical interval in which the sonic velocity of most rocks is less than that of an interpolated trendline representing a normal increase of velocity with depth. Sonic velocity, resistivity, neutron, caliper, and gamma-ray values were determined from well logs at discrete intervals in each of the four shales in 23 wells. Sonic velocity in all four shales increases with depth to a present-day depth of about 10,000 ft; below this depth, sonic velocity remains relatively unchanged. Velocity (V), resistivity (R), neutron porosity (N), and hole diameter (D) in the four shales vary such that: VM > VC > VSC > VT, RM > RC > RSC > RT, NT > NSC ? NC > NM, and DT > DC ? DSC > DM. These orderings can be partially understood on the basis of rock compositions. The Mowry Shale is highly siliceous and by inference comparatively low in clay content, resulting in high sonic velocity, high resistivity, low neutron porosity, and minimal borehole enlargement. The Thermopolis Shale, by contrast, is a black fissile shale with very little silt--its high clay content causes low velocity, low resistivity, high neutron response, and results in the greatest borehole enlargement. The properties of the Shell Creek and lower Cody Shales are intermediate to the Mowry and Thermopolis Shales. The sonic velocities of all four shales are less than that of an interpolated trendline that is tied to velocities in shales above and below the interval of moderate overpressure. The reduction in velocity varies among the four shales, such that the amount of offset (O) from the trendline is OT > OSC > OC > OM, that is, the velocity in the Mowry Shale is reduced the least and the velocity in the Thermopolis Shale is reduced the most. Velocity reductions are attributed to increases in pore pressure during burial, caused by the generation and retention of gas, with lithology playing a key role in the amount of reduction. Sonic velocity in the four shale units remains low to the present day, after uplift and erosion of as much as 6,500 ft in the deeper part of the basin and consequent possible reduction from maximum pore pressures reached when strata were more deeply buried. A model combining burial history, the decrease of effective stress with increasing pore pressure, and Bower's model for the dependence of sonic velocity on effective stress is proposed to explain the persistence of low velocity in shale units. Interruptions to compaction gradients associated with gas occurrences and overpressure are observed in correlative strata in other basins in Wyoming, so the general results for shales in the Bighorn Basin established in this paper should be applicable elsewhere.

  4. Kriging analysis of mean annual precipitation, Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Skrivan, James A.

    1981-01-01

    Kriging is a statistical estimation technique for regionalized variables which exhibit an autocorrelation structure. Such structure can be described by a semi-variogram of the observed data. The kriging estimate at any point is a weighted average of the data, where the weights are determined using the semi-variogram and an assumed drift, or lack of drift, in the data. Block, or areal, estimates can also be calculated. The kriging algorithm, based on unbiased and minimum-variance estimates, involves a linear system of equations to calculate the weights. Kriging variances can then be used to give confidence intervals of the resulting estimates. Mean annual precipitation in the Powder River basin, Montana and Wyoming, is an important variable when considering restoration of coal-strip-mining lands of the region. Two kriging analyses involving data at 60 stations were made--one assuming no drift in precipitation, and one a partial quadratic drift simulating orographic effects. Contour maps of estimates of mean annual precipitation were similar for both analyses, as were the corresponding contours of kriging variances. Block estimates of mean annual precipitation were made for two subbasins. Runoff estimates were 1-2 percent of the kriged block estimates. (USGS)

  5. Testing some models of foreland deformation at the Thermopolis anticline, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Paylor, E.D.; Lang, H.R.; Conel, J.E.; Adams, S.L. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (USA)); Muncy, H.L. (Tenneco Oil Exploration and Production, Englewood, CO (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The Thermopolis anticline is a typical structure in the Rocky Mountain foreland, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Photogeologic interpretation of Landsat Thematic Mapper data, in combination with the evaluation of topographic, bore hole, seismic reflection, and field data were used to analyze structure and constrain tectonic models. The anticline is near-concentric, asymmetric with a southwest sense of vergence, and plunges to the northwest. The steeply dipping to overturned southwest limb of the fold is cut at the surface by several thrust faults dipping northeast. Approximately 25% of the stratigraphic section on the southwest limb is missing due to faulting. Two east to northeast-striking, basement-controlled compartmental faults segment the anticline into three blocks that apparently deformed simultaneously but probably independently from one another. Slickensides indicate a dominant southwest tectonic transport direction. Additionally, subtle northeast-trending folds are superposed on the dominant northwest structural trend. Structural patterns at Thermopolis anticline can be explained using models that propose a single phase of northeast Laramide compression, combined with shear-zone deformation.

  6. Analysis of sediment production from two small semiarid basins in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankl, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Data were collected at two small, semiarid basins in Wyoming to determine the relation between rainfall, runoff, and sediment production. The basins were Dugout Creek tributary and Saint Marys Ditch tributary. Sufficient rainfall and runoff data were collected at Dugout Creek tributary to determine the source of sediment and the dominant sediment production processes. Because runoff from only one storm occurred in Saint Marys Ditch tributary, emphasis of the study was placed on the analysis of data collected at Dugout Creek tributary. At Dugout Creek tributary, detailed measurements were made to establish the source of sediment. To determine the quantity of material removed from headcuts during the study, two headcuts were surveyed. Aerial photographs were used to define movement of all headcuts. The total quantity of sediment removed from all headcuts between September 26, 1982, and September 26, 1983, was estimated to be 1,220 tons, or 15%-25% of the estimated total sediment load passing the streamflow-gaging station. A soil plot was used to sample upland erosion. A rainfall and runoff modeling system was used to evaluate the interaction between the physical processes which control sediment production. The greatest change in computed sediment load was caused by changing the parameter values for equations used to compute the detachment of sediment particles by rainfall and overland flow resulted in very small changes in computed sediment load. The upland areas were the primary source of sediment. A relationship was developed between the peak of storm runoff and the total sediment load for that storm runoff. The sediment concentration used to compute the total sediment load for the storm runoff was determined from sediment samples collected by two automatic pumping samplers. The coefficient of variation of the relationship is 34% with a 0.99 correlation coefficient. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Stratigraphy of Upper Jurassic Morrison and Lower Cretaceous Cloverly formations of Big Horn basin, northern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Kvale, E.P.; Vondra, C.F.

    1983-08-01

    The Morrison and Cloverly Formations in the Big Horn basin of northern Wyoming and southern Montana are part of a distal edge of a westward-thickening clastic wedge of sediment deposited in an elongate intracontinental basin in the western North American craton. These formations reflect orogenic and volcanic activity in the western Cordillera during Late Jurassic and the subsequent eastward migration of volcanic centers during Early Cretaceous. The Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) conformably overlies the Jurassic marine Sundance Formation and consists of light olive-green, lenticular, calcareous siltstones and mudstones interbedded with white to buff or yellowish green, massive and cross laminated, calcareous quartz-arenites. The Cloverly Formation (Lower Cretaceous) consists of three members: the Pryor Conglomerate, and Little Sheep Mudstone, and the Himes; it overlies the Morrison Formation both conformably and unconformably. Both the Morrison and Cloverly Formations are characterized by high ratios of overbank fines relative to coarse channel sands. It has been assumed, but not documented by detailed sedimentologic study, that the deposits were part of an aggrading alluvial flood plain complex dotted by seasonal lakes and swamps and crossed by braided rivers. This model deviates from most modern braided systems which are characterized by rapid lateral mobility and the lack of fine-grained overbank material. The large ratio of fine-grained siltstones and mudstones to coarser grained sandstones can be explained by a number of processes, the most probable being rapid overbank aggradation as a result of a large influx of windblown volcanic material from vents to the west.

  8. Analysis of stream quality in the Yampa River Basin, Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentz, Dennis A.; Steele, Timothy Doak

    1980-01-01

    Historic data show no significant water-temperature changes since 1951 for the Little Snake or Yampa Rivers, the two major streams of the Yampa River basin in Colorado and Wyoming. Regional analyses indicate that harmonic-mean temperature is negatively correlated with altitude. No change in specific conductance since 1951 was noted for the Little Snake River; however, specific conductance in the Yampa River has increaed 14 % since that time and is attributed to increased agricultural and municipal use of water. Site-specific relationships between major inorganic constituents and specific conductance for the Little Snake and Yampa Rivers were similar to regional relationships developed from both historic and recent (1975) data. These relationships provide a means for estimating concentrations of major inorganic constituents from specific conductance, which is easily measured. Trace-element and nutrient data collected from August 1975 through September 1976 at 92 sites in the Yampa River basin indicate that water-quality degradation occurred upstream from 3 sites. The degradation resulted from underground drainage from pyritic materials that probably are associated with coal at one site, discharge from powerplant cooling-tower blowdown water at a second site, and runoff from a small watershed containing a gas field at the third site. Ambient concentrations of dissolved and total iron and manganese frequently exceeded proposed Colorado water-quality standards. The concentrations of many dissolved and total trace elements and nutrients were greatest during March 1976. These were associated with larger suspended-sediment concentrations and smaller pH values than at other times of the year. (USGS)

  9. Map showing structure contours on the top of the upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crysdale, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies (MF) maps showing computer-generated structure contours, isopachs, and cross sections of selected formations in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana. The map and cross sections were constructed from information stored in a U.S. Geological Survey Evolution of Sedimentary Basins data base. This data base contains picks of geologic formation and (or) unit tops and bases determined from electric resistivity and gamma-ray logs of 8,592 wells penetrating Tertiary and older rocks in the Powder River basin. Well completion cards (scout tickets) were reviewed and compared with copies of all logs, and formation or unit contacts determined by N. M. Denson, D.L. Macke, R. R. Schumann and others. This isopach map is based on information from 2,429 of these wells that penetrate the Minnelusa Formation and equivalents.

  10. Geochemical constraints on Cenozoic intraplate magmatism in the Upper Wind River Basin, Wyoming (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, A. C.; Dodd, Z. C.; Brueseke, M. E.; Adams, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Upper Wind River Basin is located in north-central Wyoming (USA). At the northwestern edge of the basin, preliminary work by others has identified <4 Ma igneous rocks (lavas and shallow intrusives in low volumes) that are exposed southeast of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field. Virtually no literature exists on these rocks aside from a few K-Ar ages. Pilot Knob is an augite-rich intrusive body that yields a 3.4 ± 0.06 Ma K-Ar age. Lava Mountain, which lies ~ 4 km south of Pilot Knob, is a shield volcano where ~25 lavas are exposed in what appear to be glacially truncated cliffs. At the summit, a small capping cinder cone overlies lavas; one of the youngest lavas yields a K-Ar age of 0.48 ± 0.06 Ma. Crescent Mountain lies ~6 miles northeast of Lava Mountain and one Crescent Mountain lava yielded an ~3.6 Ma K-Ar age. At Spring Mountain, ~14 km north of Dubois, WY, local eruptions of at least one thin basaltic lava occurred from fissures that cut Paleozoic and Eocene sedimentary strata. Materials sampled from all locations range from basalt to dacite and define a primarily calc-alkaline differentiation array. Pilot Knob and one Crescent Mountain sample have wt. % K2O values between 2.7 to 3.8 at ~53 to 56 wt. % SiO2, which are much more K-rich than any other sample. These samples are also characterized by enrichments in LILE (e.g., >2000 ppm Ba, >1500 ppm Sr), LREE (>100 ppm La, >250 ppm Ce), Zr, Pb, and HREE depletions, relative to the other samples. The least evolved basalts from Spring Mountain are primitive with Mg # ~70 and Cr >900 ppm. Preliminary field constraints and satellite imagery indicates that regional fault zones control the location of individual eruptive loci/intrusives. For example, Pilot Knob and Lava Mountain lie along the projection of a normal fault zone that extends southeast from the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field. Work is ongoing to further physically, geochemically, and isotopically characterize these igneous rocks with the goal of determining whether they are related to mantle melting associated with the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and the eastern Snake River Plain (e.g., Yellowstone hotspot), or other regional lithospheric-derived melting associated with continental extension (e.g., Basin and Range faulting or other causes).

  11. Coal geology and assessment of coal resources and reserves in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luppens, James A.; Scott, David C.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents the final results of the first assessment of both coal resources and reserves for all significant coal beds in the entire Powder River Basin, northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana. The basin covers about 19,500 square miles, exclusive of the part of the basin within the Crow and Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservations in Montana. The Powder River Basin, which contains the largest resources of low-sulfur, low-ash, subbituminous coal in the United States, is the single most important coal basin in the United States. The U.S. Geological Survey used a geology-based assessment methodology to estimate an original coal resource of about 1.16 trillion short tons for 47 coal beds in the Powder River Basin; in-place (remaining) resources are about 1.15 trillion short tons. This is the first time that all beds were mapped individually over the entire basin. A total of 162 billion short tons of recoverable coal resources (coal reserve base) are estimated at a 10:1 stripping ratio or less. An estimated 25 billion short tons of that coal reserve base met the definition of reserves, which are resources that can be economically produced at or below the current sales price at the time of the evaluation. The total underground coal resource in coal beds 10–20 feet thick is estimated at 304 billion short tons.

  12. Evapotranspiration Retrieval through Optical/Thermal Satellite Imagery and Ground Measurements in the Green River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, N.; Hendrickx, J. M.; Ogden, F. L.; Wollf, S. W.

    2010-12-01

    Remote sensing methods are increasingly employed in combination with modeling for evapotranspiration estimation because they can provide multi-temporal, spatially-distributed estimates of key variables based on spatially distributed measurements. The approach for estimating evapotranspiration with remotely sensed data couples thermal and optical remote sensing with energy balance models such as: SEBAL, Surface Energy Balance Algorithms for Land, and METRICtm, Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution using Internalized Calibration. The objective of this study is to investigate how ground measurements and satellite imagery at different scales can be combined to retrieve actual evapotranspiration over large watersheds. Scales of ground measurements are: (1) point scale that is typical for regular meteorological measurements such as air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed; (2) footprint scale that varies from about 5,000 m2 for eddy-covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes to about 5,000,000 m2 for scintillometer sensible heat flux measurements when optical/thermal Landsat and MODIS satellites pass over around 10 am. In our analysis, we focused on evapotranspiration or consumptive use associated with irrigated agriculture in the Green River Basin in Wyoming that is the main headwater tributary of the entire Colorado River Basin. Ground-based meteorological stations, eddy-covariance and large-aperture scintillometers were set up in Pinedale, Green River basin, Wyoming to conduct the research. METRIC is used to retrieve evapotranspiration estimates from Landsat5 (30-120 m resolution) and MODIS (250-1000 m resolution) imagery.

  13. Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment: A Science-Management Partnership to Inform Public Land Management under Changing Climate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A. J.; Means, R.; Liebmann, B.; Carr, N. B.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) administers more public land in the U.S. West than any other Federal agency, including over 17.5 million acres of public lands and 40.7 million acres of federal mineral estate in Wyoming. BLM is developing Rapid Ecoregional Assessments (REAs), to support ecoregion-based conservation strategies on public lands and to facilitate planning and analysis for the management of ecological resources, and will feed into a wide range management plans such as Resource Management Plans and National Environmental Policy Act documents. This analysis includes 'change agents' including climate and energy development. BLM Wyoming, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and US Geological Survey (USGS) are partnering to synthesize and create climate science to inform the BLM Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment, a landscape-scale ecological assessment for over 33 million acres in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, and Montana. BLM needs to know vulnerabilities to climate of their resources, therefore, a primary focus of the assessment is to project the potential risks and vulnerabilities to the structure and functions of ecological communities posed by changing climate, and the associated management implications. In addition to synthesizing information from various downscaling efforts, NOAA is working to provide BLM with the translational information to provide an assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of different downscaling datasets being used in ecological modeling. Primary among BLM's concerns is which among the global climate models reasonably represent the climate features of Wyoming. Another significant concern arises because ecological modelers have put substantial effort into studies using different downscaled climate datasets; BLM Wyoming is interested in how the ecological modeling results would be expected to be different, given these different climate datasets. For longer range decision making, BLM needs an understanding of what the confidence or uncertainty in trends and changes in climate for the region, and also which areas within the region have more or less certainty, if any. NOAA is working with BLM and USGS on the concept of 'Reasonably Foreseeable Climate Futures,' to commmunicate about scenarios we are more confident about and the range of scenarios. This term is a deliberate analogue to the Reasonably Foreseeable Development Futures that are created for energy development and familiar to BLM stakeholders. This presentation will discuss the science-management partnership between BLM, NOAA, and USGS and provide some results of our analyses to support their decisionmaking.

  14. Assessment of Coal Geology, Resources, and Reserves in the Gillette Coalfield, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luppens, James A.; Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Rohrbacher, Timothy J.; Ellis, Margaret S.

    2008-01-01

    The Gillette coalfield, within the Powder River Basin in east-central Wyoming, is the most prolific coalfield in the United States. In 2006, production from the coalfield totaled over 431 million short tons of coal, which represented over 37 percent of the Nation's total yearly production. The Anderson and Canyon coal beds in the Gillette coalfield contain some of the largest deposits of low-sulfur subbituminous coal in the world. By utilizing the abundance of new data from recent coalbed methane development in the Powder River Basin, this study represents the most comprehensive evaluation of coal resources and reserves in the Gillette coalfield to date. Eleven coal beds were evaluated to determine the in-place coal resources. Six of the eleven coal beds were evaluated for reserve potential given current technology, economic factors, and restrictions to mining. These restrictions included the presence of railroads, a Federal interstate highway, cities, a gas plant, and alluvial valley floors. Other restrictions, such as thickness of overburden, thickness of coal beds, and areas of burned coal were also considered. The total original coal resource in the Gillette coalfield for all eleven coal beds assessed, and no restrictions applied, was calculated to be 201 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource that is accessible for potential mine development after subtracting all restrictions, are about 164 billion short tons (81 percent of the original coal resource). Recoverable coal, which is the portion of available coal remaining after subtracting mining and processing losses, was determined for a stripping ratio of 10:1 or less. After mining and processing losses were subtracted, a total of 77 billion short tons of coal were calculated (48 percent of the original coal resource). Coal reserves are the portion of the recoverable coal that can be mined, processed, and marketed at a profit at the time of the economic evaluation. With a discounted cash flow at 8 percent rate of return, the coal reserves estimate for the Gillette coalfield is10.1 billion short tons of coal (6 percent of the original resource total) for the 6 coal beds evaluated.

  15. Revised Subsurface Stratigraphic Framework of the Fort Union and Wasatch Formations, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Romeo M.; Spear, Brianne D.; Purchase, Peter A.; Gallagher, Craig M.

    2010-01-01

    Described in this report is an updated subsurface stratigraphic framework of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and Eocene Wasatch Formation in the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming and Montana. This framework is graphically presented in 17 intersecting west-east and north-south cross sections across the basin. Also included are: (1) the dataset and all associated digital files and (2) digital files for all figures and table 1 suitable for large-format printing. The purpose of this U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Report is to provide rapid dissemination and accessibility of the stratigraphic cross sections and related digital data to USGS customers, especially the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), to facilitate their modeling of the hydrostratigraphy of the PRB. This report contains a brief summary of the coal-bed correlations and database, and is part of a larger ongoing study that will be available in the near future.

  16. Stratigraphy of the Mesaverde Group in the central and eastern greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper identifies and correlates lithostratigraphic and chronostratigraphic units and maps the paleogeography of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the central and eastern greater Green River basin of Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. The purpose is to develop a stratigraphic framework for a group of formations in a large area where previous investigations were incomplete and partly inaccurate. The stratigraphic information presented contributes to the understanding of the sedimentary and tectonic evolution of the greater Green River basin and to the origin and distribution of mineral resources. The paper is entirely stratigraphic in approach. Correlations are based on the physical continuity of lithologic units and are supported by ammonite zonation. Maps and cross sections are constructed to scale. The consistent use of stylized columnar sections, hypothetical depositional models, and cartoons for illustrations has been avoided. No new stratigraphic names are introduced, and no nomenclature problems are discussed.

  17. Jonah field, sublette county, Wyoming: Gas production from overpressured Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Green River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, S.L.; Robinson, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Jonah field, located in the northwestern Green River basin, Wyoming, produces gas from overpressured fluvial channel sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation. Reservoirs exist in isolated and amalgamated channel facies 10-100 ft (3-30 m) thick and 150-4000 ft (45-1210 m) wide, deposited by meandering and braided streams. Compositional and paleocurrent studies indicate these streams flowed eastward and had their source area in highlands associated with the Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt to the west. Productive sandstones at Jonah have been divided into five pay intervals, only one of which (Jonah interval) displays continuity across most of the field. Porosities in clean, productive sandstones range from 8 to 12%, with core permeabilities of .01-0.9 md (millidarcys) and in-situ permeabilities as low as 3-20 ??d (microdarcys), as determined by pressure buildup analyses. Structurally, the field is bounded by faults that have partly controlled the level of overpressuring. This level is 2500 ft (758 m) higher at Jonah field than in surrounding parts of the basin, extending to the top part of the Lance Formation. The field was discovered in 1975, but only in the 1990s did the area become fully commercial, due to improvements in fracture stimulation techniques. Recent advances in this area have further increased recoverable reserves and serve as a potential example for future development of tight gas sands elsewhere in the Rocky Mountain region.

  18. Tree-Ring-Based Reconstruction of Precipitation in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, since 1260 a.d.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Stephen T.; Fastie, Christopher L.; Jackson, Stephen T.; Betancourt, Julio L.

    2004-10-01

    Cores and cross sections from 79 Douglas fir () and limber pine (Pinus flexilis) trees at four sites in the Bighorn Basin of north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana were used to develop a proxy for annual (June June) precipitation spanning 1260 1998 A.D. The reconstruction exhibits considerable nonstationarity, and the instrumental era (post-1900) in particular fails to capture the full range of precipitation variability experienced in the past 750 years. Both single-year and decadal-scale dry events were more severe before 1900. Dry spells in the late thirteenth and sixteenth centuries surpass both magnitude and duration of any droughts in the Bighorn Basin after 1900. Precipitation variability appears to shift to a higher-frequency mode after 1750, with 15 20-yr droughts becoming rare. Comparisons between instrumental and reconstructed values of precipitation and indices of Pacific basin variability reveal that precipitation in the Bighorn Basin generally responds to Pacific forcing in a manner similar to that of the southwestern United States (drier during La Niña events), but high country precipitation in areas surrounding the basin displays the opposite response (drier during El Niño events).


  19. Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lourdes B. Colmenares; Mark D. Zoback

    2007-01-01

    Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl\\/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal.

  20. Petrology and reservoir paragenesis in the Sussex B sandstone of the Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale, House Creek and Porcupine fields, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This book of reservoir paragenesis includes detailed descriptions of the petrology of depositional facies of the Sussex B sandstone of the Sussex Sandstone Member of the Upper Cretaceous Cody Shale in the House Creek and Porcupine fields, Powder River basin, Wyoming.

  1. Petrology and reservoir paragenesis in the Sussex 'B' sandstone of the upper Cretaceous Cody Shale, House Creek and Porcupine Fields, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, D.K.

    1991-05-03

    Using petrologic and sedimentologic studies, the paper characterizes the influence of sedimentologic and petrologic variations on reservoir heterogeneity in the Sussex 'B' sandstone in the House Creek and Porcupine fields, Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Effects of authigenic minerals on reservoir properties are described in detail for selected inter-ridge and ridge facies sandstones.

  2. Strong wintertime ozone events in the Upper Green River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglück, B.; Ackermann, L.; Alvarez, S.; Golovko, J.; Buhr, M.; Field, R.; Soltis, J.; Montague, D. C.; Hauze, B.; Adamson, S.; Risch, D.; Wilkerson, G.; Bush, D.; Stoeckenius, T.; Keslar, C.

    2013-07-01

    During recent years, elevated ozone (O3) values have been observed repeatedly in the Upper Green River Basin (UGRB), Wyoming during wintertime. This paper presents an analysis of high ozone days in late winter 2011 (1 h average up to 166 ppbv). Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) of ambient monitoring were performed which included comprehensive surface and boundary layer measurements. On IOP days, maximum O3 values are restricted to a very shallow surface layer. Low wind speeds in combination with low mixing layer heights (~50 m a.g.l. around noontime) are essential for accumulation of pollutants within the UGRB. Air masses contain substantial amounts of reactive nitrogen (NOx) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) emitted from fossil fuel exploration activities in the Pinedale Anticline. On IOP days in the morning hours in particular, reactive nitrogen (up to 69%), aromatics and alkanes (~10-15%; mostly ethane and propane) are major contributors to the hydroxyl (OH) reactivity. Measurements at the Boulder monitoring site during these time periods under SW wind flow conditions show the lowest NMHC/NOx ratios (~50), reflecting a relatively low NMHC mixture, and a change from a NOx-limited regime towards a NMHC limited regime as indicated by photochemical indicators, e.g. O3/NOy, O3/NOz, and O3/HNO3 and the EOR (Extent of Reaction). OH production on IOP days is mainly due to nitrous acid (HONO). Until noon on IOP days, HONO photolysis contributes between 74-98% of the entire OH-production. Ozone photolysis (contributing 2-24%) is second to HONO photolysis. However, both reach about the same magnitude in the early afternoon (close to 50%). Photolysis of formaldehyde (HCHO) is not important (2-7%). High HONO levels (maximum hourly median on IOP days: 1096 pptv) are favored by a combination of shallow boundary layer conditions and enhanced photolysis rates due to the high albedo of the snow surface. HONO is most likely formed through (i) abundant nitric acid (HNO3) produced in atmospheric oxidation of NOx, deposited onto the snow surface and undergoing photo-enhanced heterogeneous conversion to HONO (estimated HONO production: 2250 pptv h-1) and (ii) combustion related emission of HONO (estimated HONO production: ~585 pptv h-1). HONO, serves as the most important precursor for OH, strongly enhanced due to the high albedo of the snow cover (HONO photolysis rate 2900 pptv h-1). OH radicals will oxidize NMHCs, mostly aromatics (toluene, xylenes) and alkanes (ethane, propane), eventually leading to an increase in ozone.

  3. Strong wintertime ozone events in the Upper Green River basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglück, B.; Ackermann, L.; Alvarez, S.; Golovko, J.; Buhr, M.; Field, R. A.; Soltis, J.; Montague, D. C.; Hauze, B.; Adamson, S.; Risch, D.; Wilkerson, G.; Bush, D.; Stoeckenius, T.; Keslar, C.

    2014-05-01

    During recent years, elevated ozone (O3) values have been observed repeatedly in the Upper Green River basin (UGRB), Wyoming, during wintertime. This paper presents an analysis of high ozone days in late winter 2011 (1 h average up to 166 ppbv - parts per billion by volume). Intensive operational periods (IOPs) of ambient monitoring were performed, which included comprehensive surface and boundary layer measurements. On IOP days, maximum O3 values are restricted to a very shallow surface layer. Low wind speeds in combination with low mixing layer heights (~ 50 m above ground level around noontime) are essential for accumulation of pollutants within the UGRB. Air masses contain substantial amounts of reactive nitrogen (NOx) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) emitted from fossil fuel exploration activities in the Pinedale Anticline. On IOP days particularly in the morning hours, reactive nitrogen (up to 69%), aromatics and alkanes (~ 10-15%; mostly ethane and propane) are major contributors to the hydroxyl (OH) reactivity. Measurements at the Boulder monitoring site during these time periods under SW wind flow conditions show the lowest NMHC / NOx ratios (~ 50), reflecting a relatively low reactive NMHC mixture, and a change from a NOx-limited regime towards a NMHC-limited regime as indicated by photochemical indicators, e.g., O3 /NOy, O3 /NOz, and O3 / HNO3 and the EOR (extent of reaction). OH production on IOP days is mainly due to nitrous acid (HONO). On a 24 h basis and as determined for a measurement height of 1.80 m above the surface HONO photolysis on IOP days can contribute ~ 83% to OH production on average, followed by alkene ozonolysis (~ 9%). Photolysis by ozone and HCHO photolysis contribute about 4% each to hydroxyl formation. High HONO levels (maximum hourly median on IOP days: 1096 pptv - parts per trillion by volume) are favored by a combination of shallow boundary layer conditions and enhanced photolysis rates due to the high albedo of the snow surface. HONO is most likely formed through (i) abundant nitric acid (HNO3) produced in atmospheric oxidation of NOx, deposited onto the snow surface and undergoing photo-enhanced heterogeneous conversion to HONO (estimated HONO production: 10.2 ± 40% ppbv h-1) and (ii) combustion-related emission of HONO (estimated HONO production: ~ 0.1 ± 30% ppbv h-1). HONO production is confined to the lowermost 10 m of the boundary layer. HONO, serves as the most important precursor for OH, strongly enhanced due to the high albedo of the snow cover (HONO photolysis rate 10.7 ± 30% ppbv h-1). OH radicals will oxidize NMHCs, mostly aromatics (toluene, xylenes) and alkanes (ethane, propane), eventually leading to an increase in ozone.

  4. Burial History, Thermal Maturity, and Oil and Gas Generation History of Source Rocks in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Laura N.R.; Finn, Thomas M.; Lewan, Michael D.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Burial history, thermal maturity, and timing of oil and gas generation were modeled for seven key source-rock units at eight well locations throughout the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Also modeled was the timing of cracking to gas of Phosphoria Formation-sourced oil in the Permian Park City Formation reservoirs at two well locations. Within the basin boundary, the Phosphoria is thin and only locally rich in organic carbon; it is thought that the Phosphoria oil produced from Park City and other reservoirs migrated from the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Other petroleum source rocks include the Cretaceous Thermopolis Shale, Mowry Shale, Frontier Formation, Cody Shale, Mesaverde and Meeteetse Formations, and the Tertiary (Paleocene) Fort Union Formation. Locations (wells) selected for burial history reconstructions include three in the deepest parts of the Bighorn Basin (Emblem Bench, Red Point/Husky, and Sellers Draw), three at intermediate depths (Amoco BN 1, Santa Fe Tatman, and McCulloch Peak), and two at relatively shallow locations (Dobie Creek and Doctor Ditch). The thermal maturity of source rocks is greatest in the deep central part of the basin and decreases to the south, east, and north toward the basin margins. The Thermopolis and Mowry Shales are predominantly gas-prone source rocks, containing a mix of Type-III and Type-II kerogens. The Frontier, Cody, Mesaverde, Meeteetse, and Fort Union Formations are gas-prone source rocks containing Type-III kerogen. Modeling results indicate that in the deepest areas, (1) the onset of petroleum generation from Cretaceous rocks occurred from early Paleocene through early Eocene time, (2) peak petroleum generation from Cretaceous rocks occurred during Eocene time, and (3) onset of gas generation from the Fort Union Formation occurred during early Eocene time and peak generation occurred from late Eocene to early Miocene time. Only in the deepest part of the basin did the oil generated from the Thermopolis and Mowry Shales start generating gas from secondary cracking, which occurred in the late Eocene to Miocene. Also, based on modeling results, gas generation from the cracking of Phosphoria oil reservoired in the Park City Formation began in the late Eocene in the deep part of the basin but did not anywhere reach peak generation.

  5. Geothermal resources of the Green River Basin, Wyoming, including thermal data for the Wyoming portion of the Thrust Belt

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, S.A.; Heasler, H.P.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Green River basin were investigated. Oil-well bottom-hole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data have been interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. Basic thermal data, which includes the background thermal gradient and the highest recorded temperature and corresponding depth is tabulated. It was concluded that large areas are underlain by water at temperatures greater than 120/sup 0/F. Although much of this water is too deep to be economically tapped solely for geothermal use, oil and gas wells presently provide access to this significant geothermal resource. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist. These areas - many revealed by hot springs - represent geothermal systems which might presently be developed economically. 34 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs. (ACR)

  6. Stratigraphic framework and regional subsurface geology of upper Cretaceous through lower Eocene rocks in Wind River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Hogle, D.G.; Jones, R.W.

    1989-03-01

    A detailed stratigraphic study of over 6000 m of Upper Cretaceous through lower Eocene sedimentary rocks in the Wind River basin. Wyoming, has refined and expanded previous work and conclusions. A much larger data base than previously available was assembled to include a correlation net of 325 geophysical well logs, 36 drill holes with palynological age dates, lithology logs of drill hoes, and limited surface exposures. The most significant results and conclusions from this study are summarized below. (1) The lower part of the Mesaverde Formation intertongues with marine sandstones and shales of the upper Cody Shale to the east and with marine sandstones of the lower Mesaverde Formation in the Big Horn basin to the north. (2) An unconformity between the Mesaverde and Fort Union Formations in the southwestern part of the basin can be traced into the subsurface. (3) During the latest Cretaceous and Paleocene, over 2100 m of Lance Formation and over 2700 m of Fort Union Formation were deposited in the northeastern part of the basin. Ponding during the Paleocene is demonstrated by correlation and subsurface mapping of over 900 m of shale and siltstone in the Waltman Shale Member of the Fort Union Formation. (4) The Lance and Fort Union Formations can be mapped in the subsurface throughout much of the basin. The Lance Formation pinches out in the western part of the basin. (5) Coal beds can be traced for short distances in the subsurface; coal bed occurrence is documented for the Mesaverde, lower Fort Union, and Meeteetse Formations in the southwestern, northern and central, and northwestern parts of the basin, respectively.

  7. Hydrodynamic flow in Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstones, Rozet Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming 

    E-print Network

    Smith, David Arthur

    1984-01-01

    and other Muddy Formation oil fields. Contour interval 1000 ft (305 m). . . Regional east-west cross section showing variable sandstone development in the Muddy interval from Kitty to Rozet Fields. . . . . . . . . Diagrammatic environments the northern... the format and style of the t ' A ' t' f P t 1 G l~tB 11*t' BELL CREEK MONTANA WYOMING ~ + ~ RECLUSE ~ I ~ ~ ~ GAG DRAW~ G RDZ ET. KITTY~ AX T ~ ~O, BLACK FIDDLER CR. y~ x~ J CLARETON MO ~ TARA WYOMING M I LE S 50 Figure l. Index map...

  8. Basin analysis of Upper Cretaceous strata of the Washakie and Red Desert basins, southwestern Wyoming, employing computer-generated maps and cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kohles, K.M.; Potts, J. (Geological Data Services, Dallas, TX (United States)); Reid, F.S.

    1991-03-01

    The Washakie and Red Desert basins comprise the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basins of southwestern Wyoming. Stratigraphically the basins are dominated by a thick package of Cretaceous clastic sediments, as much as 16,000 ft thick, which resulted from several major transgressive-regressive cycles. Upper Cretaceous strata deposited during the latest cycle contain extensive deposits of commercial hydrocarbons, particularly gas. Much of the present structural configuration of the area is the result of the Laramide Orogeny in Late Cretaceous time. To facilitate a comprehensive geological analysis of the area a computerized subsurface data base was constructed from available well logs for approximately 3,000 wells in the Washakie and Red Desert basins. This data base contains correlated tops for most of the major Upper Cretaceous stratigraphic units, including selected subdivisions and net sand thickness values. Consistent correlations were achieved through the use of a tight, loop-tied cross section and key well network containing over 400 correlated well-logs. A complete suite of structure contour maps on all correlated horizons was generated from the data base with commercially available software. These maps, along with selected computer-generated structural cross sections, reveal a detailed subsurface picture of the Washakie and Red Desert basins. Isopachous maps of selected intervals were also produced to illustrate the Late Cretaceous depositional history of the area.

  9. Reservoir-development impacts on surface-water quantity and quality in the Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, D. Briane; Bauer, Daniel P.; Dale, Robert H.; Steele, Timothy Doak

    1983-01-01

    Development of coal resources and associated economy is accelerating in the Yampa River basin in northwestern Colorado and south-central Wyoming. Increased use of the water resources of the area will have a direct impact on their quantity and quality. As part of 18 surface-water projects, 35 reservoirs have been proposed with a combined total storage of 2.18 million acre-feet, 41% greater than the mean annual outflow from the basin. Three computer models were used to demonstrate methods of evaluating future impacts of reservoir development in the Yampa River basin. Four different reservoir configurations were used to simulate the effects of different degrees of proposed reservoir development. A multireservoir-flow model included both within-basin and transmountain diversions. Simulations indicated that in many cases diversion amounts would not be available for either type of diversion. A corresponding frequency analysis of reservoir storage levels indicated that most reservoirs would be operating with small percentages of total capacities and generally with less than 20% of conservation-pool volumes. Simulations using a dissolved-solids model indicated that extensive reservoir development could increase average annual concentrations at most locations. Simulations using a single-reservoir model indicated no significant occurrence of water-temperature stratification in most reservoirs due to limited reservoir storage. (USGS)

  10. Tentative Growth Curve for Rhizocarpon geographicum s. I. in Stroud Basin, Wind River Range, Western Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William C. Mahaney

    A tentative fime{ize curre for Rhizocarpon geographicun s. l. hasheen dereloped for dating Neoelacial deposits in the Vind River Range, Wyoming. Nunerous differences in fie Inaxinum diamerers of R. geogrdphicun s.l. on Neoglacial subshares have proved useful as relarive age indicarors in severai Wind River cirques; however, consrruction ofa erowth curve {as hampered by a lack of deposirs dared by

  11. Streamflow Reconstructions and Periods of Drought in the Upper Green River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Barnett; T. Watson; S. T. Gray; G. Tootle

    2007-01-01

    The upper Green River represents a vital water supply region for southwestern Wyoming and Upper \\/ Lower Colorado River Compact states. Rapid development in the southwestern U.S. (e.g., Las Vegas, Phoenix) combined with the recent drought has greatly stressed the water supply system of the Colorado River. This has resulted in increased interest in the Colorado River Compact and related

  12. Geology of the Pumpkin Buttes Area of the Powder River Basin, Campbell and Johnson Counties, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, William Neil; White, Amos McNairy

    1956-01-01

    About 200 uranium occurrences have been examined in the Pumpkin Buttes area, Wyoming. Uranium minerals are visible at most of these places and occur in red and buff sandstone lenses in the Wasatch formation of Eocene age. The uranium minerals are disseminated in buff sandstone near red sandstone, and also occur in red sandstone in manganese oxide concretions and uraninite concretions.

  13. The history of dinosaur footprint discoveries in Wyoming with emphasis on the Bighorn basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvale, E.P.; Mickelson, D.L.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Johnson, G.D.

    2003-01-01

    Dinosaur traces are well known from the western United States in the Colorado Plateau region (Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona). Utah contains the greatest abundance of known and documented dinosaur footprints and trackways. Far less well known, however, is the occurrence and distribution of dinosaur footprint-bearing horizons in Wyoming. Scientific studies over the past 10 years have shown that three of the four Middle and Upper Jurassic formations in northern Wyoming contain dinosaur footprints. Two of the footprint-bearing horizons are located in geologic intervals that were once thought to have been deposited in offshore to nearshore marine settings and represent rare North American examples of Middle Jurassic (Bajocian and Bathonian) dinosaur remains. Some of these new Wyoming sites can be correlated to known dinosaur footprint-bearing horizons or intervals in Utah. Wyoming has a great potential for additional discoveries of new dinosaur footprint-bearing horizons, and further prospecting and study is warranted and will ultimately lead to a much better understanding of the geographic distribution and behavior of the potential footprint-makers. ?? Taylor and Francis Inc.

  14. Paleoenvironments of Upper Cretaceous Lewis Shale and Fox Hills Formation, south-central Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Perman, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Maestrichtian Lewis Shale and Fox Hills Formation in south-central Wyoming were deposited during the final major transgression and regression of the North American epicontinental sea. Outcrops of these formations were examined along the margins of the Great Divide, Washakie, Hanna, and Carbon basins. Bore-hole logs from approximately 200 wells within these basins were studied and correlated with outcrops. Lists of fossils from nearly 300 localities were compiled to obtain information on paleoenvironments and to identify stratigraphic positions of fossils indicating ages of the formations. The Lewis Shale is divided into lower and upper, predominantly shale members and the intervening Dad Sandstone Member. The lower shale member contains mostly deep-water marine facies, except in the Hanna basin where it contains sandstone units representing barrier bar facies. The Dad Sandstone was deposited in deep-water to marginal marine environments. Sandstone and interbedded shale units include prodelta turbidite facies, storm-deposited delta front facies, and barrier bar/lagoon facies. The upper shale member represents relatively shallow-water shoreface and delta front facies.

  15. Description and correlation of Eocene rocks in stratigraphic reference sections for the Green River and Washakie basins, southwest Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.

    1992-01-01

    Stratigraphic reference sections of the Wasatch, Green River, and Bridger (Washakie) Formations were measured on outcrops in the Green River and Washakie basins adjacent to the Rock Springs uplift in southwest Wyoming. The Washakie basin reference section is 7,939 feet thick and consists of 708 beds that were measured, described, and sampled to evaluate the origin, composition, and paleontology of the rocks. The reference section in the Green River basin is 6,587 feet thick and consists of 624 beds that were measured and described but were not sampled. Columnar sections that have been prepared combine information on the stratigraphic nomenclature, age, depositional environments, lithologies, and fossils of each bed in the reference sections. Eocene strata in the Green River and Washakie basins have been correlated biostratigraphically, chronostratigraphically, and lithostratigraphically. The time boundaries of the lower, middle, and upper Eocene rocks in the reference sections are located partly from biostratigraphic investigations and partly from chronostratigraphic investigations. The time boundaries agree with North American land mammal ages. Major stratigraphic units and key marker beds correlated between the reference sections appeared similar in thickness and lithology, which suggests that most depositional events were contemporaneous in both basins. Rocks sampled in the Washakie basin reference section were examined petrographically and were analyzed using heavy mineral separations, X-ray techniques, and assays. The mineralogy suggests that source rocks in the lower part of the Eocene were mostly of plutonic origin and that source rocks in the upper part of the Eocene were mostly of volcanic origin. Economically significant beds of oil shale and zeolite were identified by the analyses. 51 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Petroleum Systems and Geologic Assessment of Oil and Gas in the Bighorn Basin Province, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey Bighorn Basin Assessment Team

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Bighorn Basin Province, which encompasses about 6.7 million acres in north-central Wyoming and southern Montana. The assessment is based on the geologic elements of each total petroleum system defined in the province, including petroleum source rocks (source-rock maturation, petroleum generation, and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy and petrophysical properties), and traps (trap formation and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined two total petroleum systems: (1) Phosphoria, and (2) Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite. Within these two systems, eight assessment units (AU) were defined, and undiscovered oil and gas resources were quantitatively estimated within each AU.

  17. The application of geologic remote sensing to vertebrate biostratigraphy - General results from the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stucky, Richard K.; Krishtalka, Leonard

    1991-01-01

    Since 1986, remote sensing images derived from satellite and aircraft-borne sensor data have been used to study the stratigraphy and sedimentology of the vertebrate-bearing Wind River and Wagon Bed formations in the Wind River Basin (Wyoming). Landsat 5 TM and aircraft Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data were combined with conventional geologic analyses. The remote sensing data have contributed significantly to: (1) geologic mapping at the formation, member, and bed levels; (2) stratigraphic correlation; (3) reconstruction of ancient depositional environments; and (4) identification of structural complexity. This information is critical to vertebrate paleontology in providing the stratigraphic, sedimentologic, and structural framework required for evolutionary and paleoecologic studies. Of primary importance is the ability to map at minimal cost the geology of large areas (20,000 sq km or greater) at a high level of precision. Remote sensing data can be especially useful in geologically and paleontologically unexplored or poorly understood regions.

  18. Vitrinite reflectance data for Cretaceous marine shales and coals in the Bighorn Basin, north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pawlewicz, Mark J.; Finn, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    The Bighorn Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 10,400 square miles in north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana. The purpose of this report is to present new vitrinite reflectance data collected from Cretaceous marine shales and coals in the Bighorn Basin to better characterize the thermal maturity and petroleum potential of these rocks. Ninety-eight samples from Lower Cretaceous and lowermost Upper Cretaceous strata were collected from well cuttings from wells stored at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Core Research Center in Lakewood, Colorado.

  19. Geology of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, with reference to subsurface disposal of radioactive wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beikman, Helen M.

    1962-01-01

    The Powder River Basin is a structural and topographic basin occupying an area of about 20,000 square miles in northeastern Wyoming arid southeastern Montana. The Basin is about 230 miles long in a northwest-southeast direction and is about 100 miles wide. It is bounded on three sides by mountains in which rocks of Precambrian age are exposed. The Basin is asymmetrical with a steep west limb adjacent to the Bighorn Mountains and a gentle east limb adjacent to the Black Hills. Sedimentary rocks within the Basin have a maximum thickness of about 18,000 feet and rocks of every geologic period are represented. Paleozoic rocks are about 2,500 feet thick and consist of marine bonate rocks and sandstone; Mesozoic rocks are about 9,500 feet thick and consist of both marine and nonmarine siltstone and sandstone; and Cenozoic rocks are from 4,000 to 6,000 feet thick and consist of coal-bearing sandstone and shale. Radioactive waste could be stored in the pore space of permeable sandstone or in shale where space could be developed. Many such rock units that could be used for storing radioactive wastes are present within the Powder River Basin. Permeable sandstone beds that may be possible reservoirs for storage of radioactive waste are present throughout the Powder River Basin. These include sandstone beds in the Flathead Sandstone and equivalent strata in the Deadwood Formation, the Tensleep Sandstone and equivalent strata in the Minnelusa Formation and the Sundance Formation in rocks of pre-Cretaceous age. However, most of the possible sandstone reservoirs are in rocks of Cretaceous age and include sandstone beds in the Fall River, Lakota, Newcastle, Frontier, Cody, and Mesaverde Formations. Problems of containment of waste such as clogging of pore space and chemical incompatibility would have to be solved before a particular sandstone unit could be selected for waste disposal. Several thick sequences of impermeable shale such as those in the Skull Creek, Mowry, Frontier, Belle Fourche, Cody, Lewis, and Pierre Formations, occur in rocks of Cretaceous age in the Basin. Limited storage space for liquid waste might be developed in impermeable shale by fracturing the shale and space for calcined or fused waste could be developed by mining cavities.

  20. William Hanna, 1910-2001

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    de Nie, Michael Willem.

    2001-01-01

    Legendary cartoonist William Hanna has died at his home in Los Angeles at age 90. Hanna, along with his partner of over 50 years, Joseph Barbera, created some of the world's best known and most beloved cartoon characters, including Tom and Jerry, the Flintstones, Scooby-Doo, Snagglepuss, Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, and many, many others. Hanna got his start as a lyricist and composer with Harmon-Ising Studios, the company that created the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoon series, in the early 1930s. In 1937 Hanna moved to MGM and soon afterward partnered with Barbera. Their first success was "Puss Gets the Boot," a cat and mouse cartoon that earned an Academy Award nomination and provided the genesis for Tom and Jerry. Between 1943 and 1952 the team won seven Oscars for their animated shorts. After MGM closed its animation division in the 1950s, Hanna and Barbera formed their own company and moved to television, producing numerous successful animated comedies. Probably the best known of these were the Flintstones, a parody of the Honeymooners and the first prime-time cartoon series, and Yogi Bear, who was modeled after Phil Silvers' Sergeant Bilko. Over the years since its creation in 1957 the Hanna-Barbera company developed over 150 cartoon and live-action television series and produced more than 5,000 TV animations, winning eight Emmys in the process. As a testament to the continued appeal of Hanna and Barbera's characters, the Cartoon Network recently created the Boomerang cable network, which exclusively showcases the Hanna-Barbera library.

  1. A new Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary locality in the western powder River basin, Wyoming: biological and geological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, D.J.; Brown, J.L.; Attrep, M., Jr.; Orth, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    A newly discovered Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary locality in the western Powder River basin, Wyoming, is characterized by a palynologically defined extinction horizon, a fern-spore abundance anomaly, a strong iridium anomaly, and shock-metamorphosed quartz grains. Detailed microstratigraphic analyses show that about one third of the palynoflora (mostly angiosperm pollen) disappeared abruptly, placing the K-T boundary within a distinctive, 1- to 2-cm-thick claystone layer. Shocked quartz grains are concentrated at the top of this layer, and although fern-spore and iridium concentrations are high in this layer, they reach their maximum concentrations in a 2-cm-thick carbonaceous claystone that overlies the boundary claystone layer. The evidence supports the theory that the K-T boundary event was associated with the impact of an extraterrestrial body or bodies. Palynological analyses of samples from the K-T boundary interval document extensive changes in the flora that resulted from the boundary event. The palynologically and geochemically defined K-T boundary provides a unique time-line of use in regional basin analysis. ?? 1992.

  2. Map Showing Principal Coal Beds and Bedrock Geology of the Ucross-Arvada Area, Central Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molnia, Carol L.

    2013-01-01

    The Ucross-Arvada area is part of the Powder River Basin, a large, north-trending structural depression between the Black Hills on the east and the Bighorn Mountains on the west. Almost all of the study area is within Sheridan and Johnson Counties, Wyoming. Most of the Ucross-Arvada area lies within the outcrop of the Wasatch Formation of Eocene age; the extreme northeast corner falls within the outcrop of the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age. Within the Powder River Basin, both the Wasatch Formation and the Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation contain significant coal resources. The map includes locations and elevations of coal beds at 1:50,000 scale for an area that includes ten 7½-minute quadrangles covering some 500 square miles. The Wasatch Formation coal beds shown (in descending order) are Monument Peak, Walters (also called Ulm 1), Healy (also called Ulm 2), Truman, Felix, and Arvada. The Fort Union Formation coal beds shown (in descending order) are Roland (of Baker, 1929) and Smith.

  3. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D. (USGS, Denver, CO); Harbert, W.P.

    2008-05-01

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin ofWyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam’s inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  4. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, Brian A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Sams, James I. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Smith, Bruce D. [U.S. Geological Survey. Denver, CO (United States); Harbert, William [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam's inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  5. Fluvial and glacial implications of tephra localities in the western Wind River basin, Wyoming, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworowski, C. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Examination of Quaternary fluvial and glacial deposits in the western Wind River Basin allows a new understanding of the Quaternary Wind River fluvial system. Interbedded fluvial sediments and volcanic ashes provide important temporal information for correlation of Quaternary deposits. In the western Wind River Basin, six mid-Pleistocene localities of tephra, the Muddy Creek, Red Creek, Lander, Kinnear, Morton and Yellow Calf ashes are known. Geochronologic studies confirm the Muddy Creek, Red Creek, Kinnear and Lander ashes as the 620--650ka Lava Creek tephra from the Yellowstone region in northwestern Wyoming. The stratigraphic position and index of refraction of volcanic glass from the Morton and Yellow Calf ashes are consistent with identification as Lava Creek tephra. Approximately 350 feet (106 meters) above the Wind River and 13 miles downstream from Bull Lake, interbedded Wind River fluvial gravels, volcanic glass and pumice at the Morton locality correlate to late (upper) Sacajawea Ridge gravels mapped by Richmond and Murphy. Associated with the oxygen isotope 16--15 boundary, the ash-bearing terrace deposits reveal the nature of the Wind River fluvial system during late glacial-early interglacial times. The Lander and Yellow Calf ashes, are found in terrace deposits along tributaries of the Wind River. Differences in timing and rates of incision between the Wind River and its tributary, the Little Wind River, results in complex terrace development near their junction.

  6. A point-infiltration model for estimating runoff from rainfall on small basins in semiarid areas of Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankl, James G.

    1990-01-01

    A physically based point-infiltration model was developed for computing infiltration of rainfall into soils and the resulting runoff from small basins in Wyoming. The user describes a 'design storm' in terms of average rainfall intensity and storm duration. Information required to compute runoff for the design storm by using the model include (1) soil type and description, and (2) two infiltration parameters and a surface-retention storage parameter. Parameter values are tabulated in the report. Rainfall and runoff data for three ephemeral-stream basins that contain only one type of soil were used to develop the model. Two assumptions were necessary: antecedent soil moisture is some long-term average, and storm rainfall is uniform in both time and space. The infiltration and surface-retention storage parameters were determined for the soil of each basin. Observed rainstorm and runoff data were used to develop a separation curve, or incipient-runoff curve, which distinguishes between runoff and nonrunoff rainfall data. The position of this curve defines the infiltration and surface-retention storage parameters. A procedure for applying the model to basins that contain more than one type of soil was developed using data from 7 of the 10 study basins. For these multiple-soil basins, the incipient-runoff curve defines the infiltration and retention-storage parameters for the soil having the highest runoff potential. Parameters were defined by ranking the soils according to their relative permeabilities and optimizing the position of the incipient-runoff curve by using measured runoff as a control for the fit. Analyses of runoff from multiple-soil basins indicate that the effective contributing area of runoff is less than the drainage area of the basin. In this study, the effective drainage area ranged from 41.6 to 71.1 percent of the total drainage area. Information on effective drainage area is useful in evaluating drainage area as an independent variable in statistical analyses of hydrologic data, such as annual peak frequency distributions and sediment yield.A comparison was made of the sum of the simulated runoff and the sum of the measured runoff for all available records of runoff-producing storms in the 10 study basins. The sums of the simulated runoff ranged from 12.0 percent less than to 23.4 percent more than the sums of the measured runoff. A measure of the standard error of estimate was computed for each data set. These values ranged from 20 to 70 percent of the mean value of the measured runoff. Rainfall-simulator infiltrometer tests were made in two small basins. The amount of water uptake measured by the test in Dugout Creek tributary basin averaged about three times greater than the amount of water uptake computed from rainfall and runoff data. Therefore, infiltrometer data were not used to determine infiltration rates for this study.

  7. Remote Stratigraphic and Structural Analysis: Multisensor Results in the Wind River/Bighorn Basin Area, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, H. R.; Paylor, E. D.; Conel, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    A brief survey is given of research on the San Juan Basin located in northwest New Mexico and Southern Colorado. Seismic, LANDSAT multispectral scanner and geologic data will be examined in order to understand the changing structural configuration of the basin. Several questions concerned with the discrimination of lithology using LANDSAT multispectral scanner data are posed.

  8. Geologic map and coal stratigraphy of the Doty Mountain quadrangle, eastern Washakie basin, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a geologic map of the Doty Mountain 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface. Detailed measured sections are provided for the type sections of the Red Rim Member of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation and China Butte and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. The data set was collected as part of a larger effort to acquire data on Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary coal-bearing rocks in the eastern Washakie Basin and southeastern Great Divide Basin. Regions in the eastern Washakie Basin and southeastern Great Divide Basin have potential for coal development and were considered previously for coal leasing by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

  9. Subsurface cross section of lower Paleozoic rocks, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Macke, D.L.

    1988-07-01

    The Powder River basin is one of the most actively explored Rocky Mountain basins for hydrocarbons, yet the lower Paleozoic (Cambrian through Mississippian) rocks of this interval remain little studied. As a part of a program studying the evolution of sedimentary basins, approximately 3200 km of cross section, based on more than 50 combined geophysical and lithologic logs, have been constructed covering an area of about 200,000 km/sup 2/. The present-day basin is a Cenozoic structural feature located between the stable interior of the North American craton and the Cordilleran orogenic belt. At various times during the early Paleozoic, the basin area was not distinguishable from either the stable craton, the Williston basin, the Central Montana trough, or the Cordilleran miogeocline. Both deposition and preservation in the basin have been greatly influenced by the relative uplift of the Transcontinental arch. Shows of oil and dead oil in well cuttings confirm that hydrocarbons have migrated through at least parts of the basin's lower Paleozoic carbonate section. These rocks may have been conduits for long-distance migration of hydrocarbons as early as Late Cretaceous, based on (1) the probable timing of thermal maturation of hydrocarbon-source rocks within the basin area and to the west, (2) the timing of Laramide structural events, (3) the discontinuous nature of the reservoirs in the overlying, highly productive Pennsylvanian-Permian Minnelusa Formation, and (4) the under-pressuring observed in some Minnelusa oil fields. Vertical migration into the overlying reservoirs could have been through deep fractures within the basin, represented by major lineament systems. Moreover, the lower Paleozoic rocks themselves may also be hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  10. New Vitrinite Reflectance Data for the Bighorn Basin, North-Central Wyoming and South-Central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finn, Thomas M.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Bighorn Basin is a large Laramide (Late Cretaceous through Eocene) structural and sedimentary basin that encompasses about 10,400 mi2 in north-central Wyoming and south-central Montana (fig. 1). Important conventional oil and gas resources have been discovered and produced from reservoirs ranging in age from Cambrian through Tertiary (Fox and Dolton, 1989, 1996a, b; De Bruin, 1993). In addition, a potential unconventional basin-centered gas accumulation may be present in Cretaceous reservoirs (Johnson and Finn, 1998; Johnson and others, 1999). The purpose of this report is to present new vitrinite reflectance data to be used in support of the U.S Geological Survey's assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Bighorn Basin. These new data supplement previously published data by Nuccio and Finn (1998), and Yin (1997), and lead to a better understanding and characterization of the thermal maturation and burial history of potential source rocks. Eighty-nine samples of Cretaceous and Tertiary strata (fig. 2) were collected and analyzed - 15 samples were from outcrops around the margins of the basin and 74 samples were well cuttings (fig. 1). Forty-one of the samples were shale, two were carbonaceous shale, and the remainder from coal. All samples were analyzed by vitrinite reflectance to determine levels of thermal maturation. Preparation of samples for reflectance analysis required (1) crushing the larger pieces into 0.25-to 1-mm pieces, (2) casting the pieces with epoxy in pre-cut and drilled plugs, and (3) curing the samples overnight. Subsequently, a four-step grinding and polishing process was implemented that included sanding with progressively finer sandpaper (60 and 600 grit) followed with a two-step polishing process (0.3 and 0.05 micron). Vitrinite reflectance measurements were determined at 500 X magnification using plane-polarized incident white light and a 546-nm monochromatic filter in immersion oil. For samples containing sufficiently high quality vitrinite, at least 25 measurements were recorded. For samples of poorer quality, either due to a poor polish or to the presence of mineral or other inorganic material, fewer measurements were recorded. Analytical results are given in tables 1 and 2.

  11. Hydrogeologic features of the alluvial deposits in the Greybull River valley, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, M.E.; Head, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    The alluvial aquifer along the Greybull River in Wyoming, consists principally of the Greybull terrace doposits and flood-plain alluvium but also includes Burlington terrace deposits east of Burlington, the McKinnie terrace, and the younger, generally undissected alluvial-fan deposits. Well-log data and 18 surface-resistivity measurements at four localities indicate that the thickness of the alluvial aquifer is as much as 60 feet thick only near Burlington and Otto. The most favorable area for development of ground water from the alluvial aquifer is near Burlington and Otto where relatively large amounts of water can be obtained from the Greybull terrace deposits and the flood-plain alluvium. Elsewhere, the deposits of the alluvial aquifer yield only small amounts of water to wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. A SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-print Network

    Professional Paper 1625-A #12;SW-iii Figures--Continued SW-6. Lithofacies and coal distribution in the Fort-coal-thickness isopach map of the Shotgun Member, Fort Union Formation, Wind River Basin. SW-8. Lithofacies and coal

  13. Basin-scale cyclostratigraphy of the Green River Formation, Wyoming W. Aswasereelert1,2,

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    patterns of three different lithofacies associa- tions from 8 to 12 localities that span much of the basin-predicted orbital period- icities, with a particularly strong ~100 k.y. cycle expressed in all lithofacies

  14. Three-dimensional seismic stratigraphic study of Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Campbell County, Wyoming

    E-print Network

    Walters, Donna Lynn

    1988-01-01

    Information, 1987. POWDER RIVER BASIN Lance Formation UPPER CRETACEOUS Mesa- Vade Uca sw Shale sr man an stone uxsex. an stone hannon 'sndstone S teele Shale Niohnua Shale Carlilc Shale Cody Shale Frontier Formation LOWER CRETACEOUS UPPER...

  15. The geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.E.; Keith, T.E.C. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Hutchinson, R.A. (US National Park Service (US))

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone Caldera, one of the largest volcanic features of its type in the world. Hydrothermal activity may have been continuous for {gt}100,000 years B.P. Norris Basin includes the highest erupting geyser of recent water types, colors of organisms and inorganic precipitates, frequent changes in activity and chemistry, and very high subsurface temperatures ({gt}240{degrees}C). Norris Basin is only a part of the Norris-Mammoth Corridor that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. Norris Basin has a heat flow roughly 10 percent of that of the Yellowstone Caldera and requires an estimated 0.01 km{sup 3} of rhyolitic magma per year-a quantity far greater than the corridor's rate of eruption.

  16. Tar yields from low-temperature carbonization of coal facies from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanton, R.W.; Warwick, P.D.; Swanson, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Tar yields from low-temperature carbonization correlate with the amount of crypto-eugelinite in samples selected to represent petrographically distinct coal facies of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone. Tar yields from Fischer Assay range from <1 to 11 wt.% on a dry basis and correspond (r = 0.72) to crypto-eugelinite contents of the coal that range from 15 to 60 vol.%. Core and highwall samples were obtained from active surface mines in the Gillette field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Because the rank of the samples is essentially the same, differences in low-temperature carbonization yields are interpreted from compositional differences, particularly the crypto-eugelinite content. In the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone, crypto-eugelinite probably was derived from degraded humic matter which absorbed decomposition products from algae, fungi, bacteria, and liptinitic plant parts (materials possibly high in hydrogen). Previous modeling of the distribution of crypto-eugelinite in the discontinuous Wyodak-Anderson coal zone indicated that tar yields should be greater from coal composing the upper part and interior areas than from coal composing the lower parts and margins of the individual coal bodies. It is possible that hydrocarbon yields from natural coalification processes would be similar to yields obtained from laboratory pyrolysis. If so, the amount of crypto-eugelinite may also be an important characteristic when evaluating coal as source rock for migrated hydrocarbons.

  17. Preliminary report on coal resources of the Wyodak-Anderson coal zone, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Margaret S.; Gunther, Gregory L.; Flores, Romeo M.; Ochs, Allen M.; Stricker, Gary D.; Roberts, Steven B.; Taber, Thomas T.; Bader, Lisa R.; Schuenemeyer, John H.

    1998-01-01

    The National Coal Resource Assessment (NCRA) project by the U.S. Geological Survey is designed to assess US coal with the greatest potential for development in the next 20 to 30 years. Coal in the Wyodak-Anderson (WA) coal zone in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana is plentiful, clean, and compliant with EPA emissions standards. This coal is considered to be very desirable for development for use in electric power generation. The purpose of this NCRA study was to compile all available data relating to the Wyodak- Anderson coal, correlate the beds that make up the WA coal zone, create digital files pertaining to the study area and the WA coal, and produce a variety of reports on various aspects of the assessed coal unit. This report contains preliminary calculations of coal resources for the WA coal zone and is one of many products of the NCRA study. Coal resource calculations in this report were produced using both public and confidential data from many sources. The data was manipulated using a variety of commercially available software programs and several custom programs. A general description of the steps involved in producing the resource calculations is described in this report.

  18. Tracking solutes and water from subsurface drip irrigation application of coalbed methane–produced waters, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, Mark A. [U.S. Geological Survey. Reston, VA (United States); Bern, Carleton R. [U.S. Geological Survey. Denver, CO (United States); Healy, Richard W. [U.S. Geological Survey. Denver, CO (United States); Sams, James I. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Zupancic, John W. [BeneTerra LLC. Sheridan, WY (United States); Schroeder, Karl T. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2011-09-01

    One method to beneficially use water produced from coalbed methane (CBM) extraction is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) of croplands. In SDI systems, treated CBM water (injectate) is supplied to the soil at depth, with the purpose of preventing the buildup of detrimental salts near the surface. The technology is expanding within the Powder River Basin, but little research has been published on its environmental impacts. This article reports on initial results from tracking water and solutes from the injected CBM-produced waters at an SDI system in Johnson County, Wyoming. In the first year of SDI operation, soil moisture significantly increased in the SDI areas, but well water levels increased only modestly, suggesting that most of the water added was stored in the vadose zone or lost to evapotranspiration. The injectate has lower concentrations of most inorganic constituents relative to ambient groundwater at the site but exhibits a high sodium adsorption ratio. Changes in groundwater chemistry during the same period of SDI operation were small; the increase in groundwater-specific conductance relative to pre-SDI conditions was observed in a single well. Conversely, groundwater samples collected beneath another SDI field showed decreased concentrations of several constituents since the SDI operation. Groundwater-specific conductance at the 12 other wells showed no significant changes. Major controls on and compositional variability of groundwater, surface water, and soil water chemistry are discussed in detail. Findings from this research provide an understanding of water and salt dynamics associated with SDI systems using CBM-produced water.

  19. Age of uranium mineralization at the Highland mine, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, as indicated by U-Pb isotope analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, E.S.; Ludwig, K.R.

    1983-05-01

    Most of the uranium deposits in the Powder River basin occur at various stratigraphic levels in the Wasatch Formation of Eocene age, but pollen and spores found in the Highland mine host rocks indicate that the deposits here may be in the upper part of the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age. Analyses of U-Pb isotopes in several samples of ore from the Highland mine were made in order to compare the apparent age of mineralization of this deposit with that of host rocks of equivalent age at Gas Hills, Crooks Gap, and Shirley basin, Wyoming. The samples used for age determinations were collected in the southernmost of a series of open pit mines and in the uppermost of the three host units. All samples contain only reduced uranium minerals which are mainly coprecipitated mixtures of pitchblende and coffinite. Sample EP17-7 consists of ore at the boundary with oxidized yellow sandstone and sample EP17-8 of ore 6 m (20 ft) from the interface with oxidized sandstone. Sample J represents calcite-cemented ore from a thin zone at the base of the upper host sandstone unit (lower limb ore). The others are randomly selected grab samples of mineralized material in the ore deposit at the same level as EP-17-7. With the exception of sample J, all samples were collected from exposures of ore on the pit floor 60 m (200 ft) below the original land surface and at an elevation of 5,060 feet. Sample J came from the pit floor at an elevation of about 5,040 ft.

  20. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald C. Surdam

    1999-08-01

    A primary objective of the Institute for Energy Research (IER)-Santa Fe Snyder Corporation DOE Riverton Dome project is to test the validity of a new conceptual model and resultant exploration paradigm for so-called ''basin center'' gas accumulations. This paradigm and derivative exploration strategy suggest that the two most important elements crucial to the development of prospects in the deep, gas-saturated portions of Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) are (1) the determination and, if possible, three-dimensional evaluation of the pressure boundary between normal and anomalous pressure regimes (i.e., this boundary is typically expressed as a significant inversion in both sonic and seismic velocity-depth profiles) , and (2) the detection and delineation of porosity/permeability ''sweet spots'' (i.e., areas of enhanced storage capacity and deliverability) in potential reservoir targets below this boundary. There are other critical aspects in searching for basin center gas accumulations, but completion of these two tasks is essential to the successful exploration for the unconventional gas resources present in anomalously pressured rock/fluid systems in the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins. The southern Wind River Basin, in particular the Riverton Dome and Emigrant areas, is a neat location for testing this exploration paradigm. Preliminary work within the Wind River Basin has demonstrated that there is a regionally prominent pressure surface boundary that can be detected by inversions in sonic velocity depth gradients in individual well log profiles and that can be seen as a velocity inversion on seismic lines. Also, the Wind River Basin in general--and the Riverton Dome area specially--is characterized by a significant number of anomalously pressured gas accumulations. Most importantly, Santa Fe Snyder Corporation has provided the study with sonic logs, two 3-D seismic studies (40 mi{sup 2} and 30 mi {sup 2}) and a variety of other necessary geological and geophysical information.

  1. Geologic map and coal stratigraphy of the Blue Gap quadrangle, eastern Washakie Basin, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    This report provides a geologic map of the Blue Gap 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface.

  2. Eustatic and tectonic control on localization of porosity and permeability, Mid-Permian, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. P. Simmons; P. A. Scholle

    1990-01-01

    The Goose Egg Formation of the northeastern Bighorn basin was deposited in an arid shoreline (sabkha) environment during a time of global cyclic sea level variations and local tectonic uplift Eustatic sea level lows are represented by terrestrial red beds (seals), whereas highs resulted in the deposition of supratidal to shallow subtidal carbonates (reservoirs). Pennsylvanian and Permian differential uplift along

  3. Lake basin response to tectonic drainage diversion: Eocene Green River Formation, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey T. Pietras; Alan R. Carroll; Meredith K. Rhodes

    2003-01-01

    A previously unidentified major sequence boundary within the Eocene Green River Formation separates fluctuating profundal facies of the Tipton Shale Member from evaporative facies of the Wilkins Peak Member. During deposition of the Tipton Shale Member, rivers entered the basin from the north, across the subdued Wind River Mountains, and deposited the southward prograding deltaic complex of the Farson Sandstone

  4. The Geology and Remarkable Thermal Activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Donald Edward; Hutchinson, Roderick A.; Keith, Terry E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin, normally shortened to Norris Basin, is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone caldera at the common intersection of the caldera rim and the Norris-Mammoth Corridor, a zone of faults, volcanic vents, and thermal activity that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. An east-west fault zone terminates the Gallatin Range at its southern end and extends from Hebgen Lake, west of the park, to Norris Basin. No local evidence exists at the surface in Norris Basin for the two oldest Yellowstone volcanic caldera cycles (~2.0 and 1.3 m.y.B.P.). The third and youngest cycle formed the Yellowstone caldera, which erupted the 600,000-year-old Lava Creek Tuff. No evidence is preserved of hydrothermal activity near Norris Basin during the first 300,000.years after the caldera collapse. Glaciation probably removed most of the early evidence, but erratics of hot-spring sinter that had been converted diagenetically to extremely hard, resistant chalcedonic sinter are present as cobbles in and on some moraines and till from the last two glacial stages, here correlated with the early and late stages of the Pinedale glaciation <150,000 years B.P.). Indirect evidence for the oldest hydrothermal system at Norris Basin indicates an age probably older than both stages of Pinedale glaciation. Stream deposits consisting mainly of rounded quartz phenocrysts of the Lava Creek Tuff were subaerial, perhaps in part windblown and redeposited by streams. A few small rounded pebbles are interpreted as chalcedonic sinter of a still older cycle. None of these are precisely dated but are unlikely to be more than 150,000 to 200,000 years old. ...Most studies of active hydrothermal areas have noted chemical differences in fluids and alteration products but have given little attention to differences and models to explain evolution in types. This report, in contrast, emphasizes the kinds of changes in vents and their changing chemical types of waters and then provides models for explaining these differences. Norris Basin is probably not an independent volcanic-hydrothermal system. The basin and nearby acid-leached areas (from oxidation of H2S-enriched vapor) are best considered as parts of the same system, extending from Norris Basin to Roaring Mountain and possibly to Mammoth. If so, are they parts of a single large system centered within the Yellowstone caldera, or are Norris Basin and the nearby altered areas both parts of one or more young independent corridor systems confined, at least in the shallow crust, to the Norris-Mammoth Corridor? Tentatively, we favor the latter relation, probably having evolved in the past ~300,000 years. A model for large, long-lived, volcanic-hydrothermal activity is also suggested, involving all of the crust and upper mantle and using much recent geophysical data bearing on crust-mantle interrelations. Our model for large systems is much superior to previous suggestions for explaining continuing hydrothermal activity over hundreds of thousands of years, but is less attractive for the smaller nonhomogenized volcanic system actually favored here for the Norris-Mammoth Corridor.

  5. Map showing contours on the top of the Pennsylvanian and Permian Minnelusa Formation and equivalents, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crysdale, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies (MF) maps showing computer-generated structure contours, isopachs, and cross sections of selected formations in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana. The map and cross sections were constructed from information stored in a U.S. Geological Survey Evolution of Sedimentary Basins data base. This data base contains picks of geologic formation and (or) unit tops and bases determined from electric resistivity and gamma-ray logs of 8,592 wells penetrating Tertiary and older rocks in the Powder River basin. Well completion cards (scout tickets) were reviewed and compared with copies of all logs, and formation or unit contacts determined by N. M. Denson, D.L. Macke, R. R. Schumann and others. This isopach map is based on information from 1,480 of these wells that penetrate the Minnelusa Formation and equivalents.

  6. Isopach map of the interval from surface elevation to the top of the Pennsylvanian and Permian Minnelusa Formation and equivalents, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crysdale, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies (MF) maps showing computer-generated structure contours, isopachs, and cross sections of selected formations in the Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana. The map and cross sections were constructed from information stored in a U.S. Geological Survey Evolution of Sedimentary Basins data base. This data base contains picks of geologic formation and (or) unit tops and bases determined from electric resistivity and gamma-ray logs of 8,592 wells penetrating Tertiary and older rocks in the Powder River basin. Well completion cards (scout tickets) were reviewed and compared with copies of all logs, and formation or unit contacts determined by N. M. Denson, D.L. Macke, R. R. Schumann and others. This isopach map is based on information from 1,480 of these wells that penetrate the Minnelusa Formation and equivalents.

  7. Bighorn Basin Coring Project: Palynofloral changes and taphonomy through the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, G.; Jardine, P.

    2012-12-01

    The early Palaeogene hyperthermals provide an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the biotic responses to rapid and transient global warming events. As part of the Bighorn Basin Coring Project (BBCP), we have analyzed 182 sporomorph (pollen and spore) samples from three newly cored sites in the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming. Two sites, Basin Substation (121 samples) and Polecat Bench (41 samples), contain the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, ETM1), and one early Eocene site, Gilmore Hill (20 samples), contains the ELMO (ETM2) event. We have focused initially on the Basin Substation section, because it is more organic rich, has demonstrated higher sporomorph recovery potential than the other two sites, and is the main focus of complementary geochemical analyses. Below 90 m core depth sporomorph concentrations are typically 1000 - 10 000 grains/gram, but between 90 and 60 m these decline to <100 grains/gram, before rising again to levels similar to those seen at the base of the core. Correlation between marker beds in the core and those at outcrop suggests that this zone of low recovery corresponds closely to the position of the PETM. Prior to this interval, the sporomorph assemblage is dominated by the gymnosperms Cupressacites hiatipites (cypress, Cupressaceae) and bisaccate pollen (Pinaceae and/or Podocarpaceae), and the angiosperm taxa Polyatriopollenites vermontensis (wingnut or wheel wingnut, Juglandaceae), Caryapollenites spp. (hickory, Juglandaceae), and Alnipollenites spp. (alder, Betulaceae). However, samples are heterogeneous in terms of the dominant taxon, with different taxa having the highest relative abundance in different samples. In the upper part of the core, the assemblage is similar to that in the lower part, but with a more consistent dominance of gymnosperm taxa, and with the addition of Eocene marker taxa Intratriporopollenites instructus (linden, Tilioideae) and Celtis spp. (hackberry, Cannabaceae). These both have their first appearance at 56.14 m in the core, just above the zone of low sporomorph recovery. These results point to (a) a decrease in sporomorph preservation that is linked to environmental change during the PETM event, and (b) repeated reorganizations of plant relative abundances prior to the PETM. Current research is focusing on the timing, and possible climatic control, of these floral changes in the lead up to the PETM event.

  8. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the Southwestern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osmonson, Lee M.; Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 37 coal beds were identified during this assessment, 23 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. The total original coal resource in the Southwestern Powder River Basin assessment area for these 23 coal beds, with no restrictions applied was calculated to be 369 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original resource that is accessible for potential mine development after subtracting all restrictions, are about 341 billion short tons (92.4 percent of the total original resource). Approximately 61 percent are at depths between 1,000 and 2,000 ft, with a modeled price of about $30 per short ton. Therefore, the majority of coal resources in the South-western Powder River Basin assessment area are considered sub-economic.

  9. Groundwater chemistry near an impoundment for produced water, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Richard W.; Bartos, Timothy T.; Rice, Cynthia A.; McKinley, Michael P.; Smith, Bruce D.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryThe Powder River Basin is one of the largest producers of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) in the United States. An important environmental concern in the Basin is the fate of the large amounts of groundwater extracted during CBNG production. Most of this produced water is disposed of in unlined surface impoundments. A 6-year study of groundwater flow and water chemistry at one impoundment, Skewed Reservoir, has produced the most detailed data set for any impoundment in the Basin. Data were collected from a network of 21 observation wells and three suction lysimeters. A groundwater mound formed atop bedrock within initially unsaturated, unconsolidated deposits underlying the reservoir. Heterogeneity in physical and chemical properties of sediments resulted in complex groundwater flow paths and highly variable groundwater chemistry. Sulfate, bicarbonate, sodium, and magnesium were the dominant ions in all areas, but substantial variability existed in relative concentrations; pH varied from less than 3 to more than 9, and total dissolved solids concentrations ranged from less than 5000 to greater than 100,000 mg/L. Selenium was a useful tracer of reservoir water; selenium concentrations exceeded 300 ?g/L in samples obtained from 18 of the 24 sampling points. Groundwater travel time from the reservoir to a nearby alluvial aquifer (a linear distance of 177 m) was calculated at 474 days on the basis of selenium concentrations. The produced water is not the primary source of solutes in the groundwater. Naturally occurring salts and minerals within the unsaturated zone, dissolved and mobilized by infiltrating impoundment water, account for most of the solute mass in groundwater. Gypsum dissolution, cation-exchange, and pyrite oxidation appear to be important reactions. The complex geochemistry and groundwater flow paths at the study site underscore the difficulty in assessing effects of surface impoundments on water resources within the Powder River Basin.

  10. Hydrologic data for Paleozoic rocks in the upper Colorado River basin, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geldon, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains data used to interpret the hydrology of Paleozoic rocks in the Upper Colorado River Basin under the U.S. Geological Survey 's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis program. The study area includes the drainages of the Green and Colorado Rivers from their headwaters to Lees Ferry, Arizona. Hydrologic data presented in this report include artesian yields from wells and springs, and values of porosity, intrinsic permeability, and hydraulic conductivity determined by laboratory analyses and aquifer tests. (USGS)

  11. Hydrodynamic flow in lower Cretaceous Muddy sandstone, Gas Draw Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming 

    E-print Network

    Lin, Joseph Tien-Chin

    1978-01-01

    . Simple numbering of these Muddy zones solves this confusion. Stoudt (1974) divided the units from one to six in descending order. Larberg (1976a) divided the unit into four zones in Kitty field area and combined Stoudt's fourth and fifth zones into a... fields (Berg, ig76a). The second Muddy zone has its maximum development at Bell Creek field. The third through sixth Table 1. Stratigraphic Nomenclature for the Muddy Formation in the Eastern Powder River Basin. Standard Section Stone (1972) Kitty...

  12. Laramide deformation of the Rocky Mountain Foreland, southeastern corner of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    E-print Network

    Derr, Douglas Neanion

    1991-01-01

    Thesis Problem. Location and Geography of the Study Area. Regional Tectonics and Basin History. General Stratigraphy Precambrian Rocks (Basement). Flathead Sandstone (Lower Cambrian) Gros Ventre Formation (Lower Cambrian). . . . . Gallatin... activity than may be observed in Laramide aged rocks of the central Rocky Mountains. An alternative hypothesis for the formation for the central Rocky Mountains may be provided by analogy to the modern Pampeanas Range of Chili and western Argentina...

  13. Variation in sedimentology and architecture of Eocene alluvial strata, Wind River and Washakie basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, P.E.; Larson, E.E. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Eocene continental, alluvial strata of the Wind River Formation (Wind River Basin) and the Cathedral Bluffs Member of the Wasatch Formation (Washakie basin) provide two examples of Laramide intermontane basin aggradation. These alluvial sediments primarily represent overbank flood deposits marginal to channel complexes. Their sedimentology and architecture, although grossly similar, appear to vary somewhat with proximity to Laramide uplifts. In both cases, repetitive sedimentation on the floodplain produced a succession of depositional couplets, each composed of a light-gray sand overlain by a red clay-rich silt or sand. The lower sands are tabular bodies that, near their distal margins, taper discernibly. They commonly display planar and ripple-drift laminations. Upper clay-rich layers, which are laminated, are also generally tabular. Those floodplain strata depositional proximal to Laramide uplifts show little evidence of scouring prior to deposition of the next, overlying couplet. Most of these sedimentary layers, therefore, are laterally continuous (up to 2 km). This alluvial architecture results in relatively uniform porosity laterally within depositional units but variable porosity stratigraphically through the sequence. In contrast, alluvial sediments deposited farther from the Laramide uplifts have undergone sporadic incision (either during rising flood stage or subsequently) followed by aggradation. As a result, many of these floodplain couplets are discontinuous laterally and, hence, exhibit large-scale lateral variability in porosity. Both alluvial sequences have undergone similar types and extents of burial diagenesis.

  14. An empirical method for determining average soil infiltration rates and runoff, Powder River structural basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankl, James G.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes a method to estimate infiltration rates of soils for use in estimating runoff from small basins. Average rainfall intensity is plotted against storm duration on log-log paper. All rainfall events are designated as having either runoff or nonrunoff. A power-decay-type curve is visually fitted to separate the two types of rainfall events. This separation curve is an incipient-ponding curve and its equation describes infiltration parameters for a soil. For basins with more than one soil complex, only the incipient-ponding curve for the soil complex with the lowest infiltration rate can be defined using the separation technique. Incipient-ponding curves for soils with infiltration rates greater than the lowest curve are defined by ranking the soils according to their relative permeabilities and optimizing the curve position. A comparison of results for six basins produced computed total runoff for all events used ranging from 16.6 percent less to 2.3 percent more than measured total runoff. (USGS)

  15. Climate control on Quaternary coal fires and landscape evolution, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Riihimaki, C.A.; Reiners, P.W.; Heffern, E.L. [Drew University, Madison, NJ (USA). Dept. of Biology

    2009-03-15

    Late Cenozoic stream incision and basin excavation have strongly influenced the modern Rocky Mountain landscape, but constraints on the timing and rates of erosion are limited. The geology of the Powder River basin provides an unusually good opportunity to address spatial and temporal patterns of stream incision. Numerous coal seams in the Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Wasatch Formations within the basin have burned during late Cenozoic incision, as coal was exposed to dry and oxygen-rich near-surface conditions. The topography of this region is dominated by hills capped with clinker, sedimentary rocks metamorphosed by burning of underlying coal beds. We use (U-Th)/He ages of clinker to determine times of relatively rapid erosion, with the assumption that coal must be near Earth's surface to burn. Ages of 55 in situ samples range from 0.007 to 1.1 Ma. Clinker preferentially formed during times in which eccentricity of the Earth's orbit was high, times that typically but not always correlate with interglacial periods. Our data therefore suggest that rates of landscape evolution in this region are affected by climate fluctuations. Because the clinker ages correlate better with eccentricity time series than with an oxygen isotope record of global ice volume, we hypothesize that variations in solar insolation modulated by eccentricity have a larger impact on rates of landscape evolution in this region than do glacial-interglacial cycles.

  16. Geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.E.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone caldera at the common intersection of the caldera rim and the Norris-Mammoth Corridor, a zone of faults, volcanic vents, and thermal activity that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. The dominant quartz sand is hydrothermally cemented by chalcedony and is extremely hard, thereby justifying the term hydrothermal quartzite. The fundamental water type in Norris Basin is nearly neutral in pH and high in Cl and SiO/sub 2/. Another common type of water in Norris Basin is high in SO/sub 4/ and moderately high in Cl, with Cl/SO/sub 4/ ratios differing considerably. This study provides no new conclusive data on an old problem, the source or sources of rare dissolved constitutents. An important part of this paper consists of examples of numerous changes in behavior and chemical composition of most springs and geysers, to extents not known elsewhere in the park and perhaps in the world. Hydrothermal mineralogy in core samples from three research holes drilled entirely in Lava Creek Tuff to a maximum depth of -331.6 m permits an interpretation of the hydrothermal alteration history. A model for large, long-lived, volcanic-hydrothermal activity is also suggested, involving all of the crust and upper mantle and using much recent geophysical data bearing on crust-mantle interrelations.

  17. Tracking solutes and water from subsurface drip irrigation application of coalbed methane-produced waters, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, M.A.; Bern, C.R.; Healy, R.W.; Sams, J.I.; Zupancic, J.W.; Schroeder, K.T.

    2011-01-01

    One method to beneficially use water produced from coalbed methane (CBM) extraction is subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) of croplands. In SDI systems, treated CBMwater (injectate) is supplied to the soil at depth, with the purpose of preventing the buildup of detrimental salts near the surface. The technology is expanding within the Powder River Basin, but little research has been published on its environmental impacts. This article reports on initial results from tracking water and solutes from the injected CBM-produced waters at an SDI system in Johnson County, Wyoming. In the first year of SDI operation, soil moisture significantly increased in the SDI areas, but well water levels increased only modestly, suggesting that most of the water added was stored in the vadose zone or lost to evapotranspiration. The injectate has lower concentrations of most inorganic constituents relative to ambient groundwater at the site but exhibits a high sodium adsorption ratio. Changes in groundwater chemistry during the same period of SDI operation were small; the increase in groundwater-specific conductance relative to pre-SDI conditions was observed in a single well. Conversely, groundwater samples collected beneath another SDI field showed decreased concentrations of several constituents since the SDI operation.Groundwater-specific conductance at the 12 other wells showed no significant changes. Major controls on and compositional variability of groundwater, surface water, and soil water chemistry are discussed in detail. Findings from this research provide an understanding of water and salt dynamics associated with SDI systems using CBM-produced water. Copyright ??2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  18. Phospholipid Evidence for Methanogenic Archaea and Sulfate-reducing Bacteria in Coalbed Methane Wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glossner, A.; Flores, R. M.; Mandernack, K.

    2008-12-01

    The Powder River Basin (PRB) comprises roughly 22,000 mi2 in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana; it is a major source of coal and natural gas in the Rocky Mountain and Great Plains regions. The coalbed methane (CBM) produced from Paleocene Fort Union Formation coals in the PRB is thought primarily to be of bacterial origin due to its low ?13C values of -51 to -82 permil. Determination of the timing of methanogenesis, however, requires a methodology suitable for distinguishing viable methanogenic microorganisms. Here we provide evidence of living methanogenic Archaea and sulfate- reducing bacteria collected from co-produced water from CBM wells using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and phospholipid ether lipid (PLEL) analyses. Twelve producing wells were sampled in May, 2007, using a high- pressure filtering apparatus. PLFAs were analyzed as fatty acid methyl esters and PLELs analyzed by their liberated core components using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Phospholipid analyses revealed an ecosystem dominated by Archaea, as the Archaeal isoprenoid, phytane, was the dominant phospholipid observed in nine of the wells sampled. Total microbial biomass estimates ranged from 1.1 ×106 cells/L to 8.3 ×107 cells/L, with the proportion of Archaeal cells ranging from 77.5 to 99.7 percent. In addition, the biomarkers 10me16:0, and cy17:0, considered to be biomarkers for genera of sulfate-reducing bacteria, were observed in several wells. The dominance of lipids from living Archaea in co- produced waters from CBM wells provides evidence supporting a recent origin of gas in the PRB coals.

  19. Cumulative potential hydrologic impacts of surface coal mining in the eastern Powder River structural basin, northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, L.J.; Naftz, D.L.; Lowham, H.W.; Rankl, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    There are 16 existing and six proposed surface coal mines in the eastern Powder River structural basin of northeastern Wyoming. Coal mining companies predict water level declines of 5 ft or more in the Wasatch aquifer to extend form about 1,000 to about 2,000 ft beyond the mine pits. The predicted 5 ft water level decline in the Wyodak coal aquifer generally extends 4-8 mi beyond the lease areas. About 3,000 wells are in the area of potential cumulative water level declines resulting from all anticipated mining. Of these 3,000 wells, about 1,200 are outside the areas of anticipated mining: about 1,000 wells supply water for domestic or livestock uses, and about 200 wells supply water for municipal, industrial, irrigation, and miscellaneous uses. The 1,800 remaining wells are used by coal mining companies. Future surface coal mining probably will result in postmining groundwater of similar quality to that currently present in the study area. By use of geochemical modeling techniques, the results of a hypothetical reaction path exercise indicate the potential for marked improvements in postmining water quality because of chemical reactions as postmining groundwater with a large dissolved solids concentration (3,540 mg/L) moves into a coal aquifer with relatively small dissolved solids concentrations (910 mg/L). Results of the modeling exercise also indicate geochemical conditions that are most ideal for large decreases in dissolved solids concentrations in coal aquifers receiving recharge from a spoil aquifer. (Lantz-PTT)

  20. Water-quality characteristics, including sodium-adsorption ratios, for four sites in the Powder River drainage basin, Wyoming and Montana, water years 2001-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.; Mason, Jon P.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality, monitors streams throughout the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming and parts of Montana for potential effects of coalbed natural gas development. Specific conductance and sodium-adsorption ratios may be larger in coalbed waters than in stream waters that may receive the discharge waters. Therefore, continuous water-quality instruments for specific conductance were installed and discrete water-quality samples were collected to characterize water quality during water years 2001-2004 at four sites in the Powder River drainage basin: Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming; Crazy Woman Creek near Arvada, Wyoming; Clear Creek near Arvada, Wyoming; and Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. During water years 2001-2004, the median specific conductance of 2,270 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius (?S/cm) in discrete samples from the Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming, was larger than the median specific conductance of 1,930 ?S/cm in discrete samples collected downstream from the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. The median specific conductance was smallest in discrete samples from Clear Creek (1,180 ?S/cm), which has a dilution effect on the specific conductance for the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. The daily mean specific conductance from continuous water-quality instruments during the irrigation season showed the same spatial pattern as specific conductance values for the discrete samples. Dissolved sodium, sodium-adsorption ratios, and dissolved solids generally showed the same spatial pattern as specific conductance. The largest median sodium concentration (274 milligrams per liter) and the largest range of sodium-adsorption ratios (3.7 to 21) were measured in discrete samples from the Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming. Median concentrations of sodium and sodium-adsorption ratios were substantially smaller in Crazy Woman Creek and Clear Creek, which tend to decrease sodium concentrations and sodium-adsorption ratios at the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. Dissolved-solids concentrations in discrete samples were closely correlated with specific conductance values; Pearson's correlation coefficients were 0.98 or greater for all four sites. Regression equations for discrete values of specific conductance and sodium-adsorption ratios were statistically significant (p-values <0.001) at all four sites. The strongest relation (R2=0.92) was at the Powder River at Sussex, Wyoming. Relations on Crazy Woman Creek (R2=0.91) and Clear Creek (R2=0.83) also were strong. The relation between specific conductance and sodium-adsorption ratios was weakest (R2=0.65) at the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana; however, the relation was still significant. These data indicate that values of specific conductance are useful for estimating sodium-adsorption ratios. A regression model called LOADEST was used to estimate dissolved-solids loads for the four sites. The average daily mean dissolved-solids loads varied among the sites during water year 2004. The largest average daily mean dissolved-solids load was calculated for the Powder River at Moorhead, Montana. Although the smallest concentrations of dissolved solids were in samples from Clear Creek, the smallest average daily mean dissolved-solids load was calculated for Crazy Woman Creek. The largest loads occurred during spring runoff, and the smallest loads occurred in late summer, when streamflows typically were smallest. Dissolved-solids loads may be smaller than average during water years 2001-2004 because of smaller than average streamflow as a result of drought conditions.

  1. Genesis of clay mineral assemblages and micropaleoclimatic implications in the Tertiary Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M.; Weaver, J.N. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)); Bossiroy, D.; Thorez, J. (Liege State Univ. (Belgium))

    1990-05-01

    An x-ray diffraction (XRD) study was undertaken on the clay mineralogy of the early Tertiary coal-bearing sequences of the Powder River basin. The vertical and lateral distribution of alternating fluvial conglomerates, sandstones, mudstones, shales, coals, and paleosols reveals a transition from alluvial fans along the basin margin to an alluvial plain and peat bogs basinward. Samples included unweathered shales and mudstones from a borehole and a variety of corresponding surface outcrop samples of Cambrian to Eocene age. Samples older than Tertiary were collected along the basin margin specifically to determine the potential source of parent material during Tertiary sedimentation. XRD analyses were performed on the <2-{mu}m fraction prepared as oriented aggregates. To investigate the materials in their natural state, no chemical pre-treatments the authors applied before the analysis. A series of specific post-treatments, consisting of catonic saturation (Li+, K+), a solution with polyalcohols, heating, acid attack and hydrazine saturation was selectively applied. These post-treatments permit a good discrimination between the mimetic clay minerals such as smectite and illite-smectite mixed layers that constitute the bulk of the clay fraction in the Tertiary rocks. When analyzed only using routine XRD, these swelling minerals are apparently uniformly distributed in the fluvial sedimentary rocks and are better interpreted as a single smectitic population. However, the post-treatments clearly differentiate both qualitatively and quantitatively this smectitic stock. Other clays include illite and kaolinite, which have different degrees of crystallinity, and minor interstratified clays (i.e., illite-chlorite, chlorite-smectite). The clay minerals in pre-Tertiary (and pedogenic) materials are different from those in the Tertiary rocks.

  2. Feasibility of CO2 Sequestration with Simultaneous Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, H. E.; Zoback, M. D.

    2005-12-01

    CO2 sequestration in geological formations has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. Coal is an attractive geologic environment for CO2 sequestration because CO2 is retained in the coal as an adsorbed phase and the cost of sequestration can be offset by enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Using reservoir simulations of sub-bituminous coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, we examined the feasibility of injecting and sequestering CO2 in this basin, particularly looking at whether hydraulically fracturing the coal would help increase CO2 injectivity. Our 3D model was built in an area where the least principal stress is equal to the overburden stress, resulting in horizontal hydraulic fractures, and gamma ray logs from coalbed methane wells were used to determine the depth and thickness of the coal. These wells produce from the Big George coal, which is approximately 20 m thick in this area, with a depth to the top of 310-360 m. Geostatistical techniques were employed to populate the coal matrix and cleats with permeability and porosity data taken from published reports. We conducted enhanced coalbed methane simulations using a commercial enhanced coalbed methane simulator. Our base case involved one injection well and one production well (1/4 of a 5-spot pattern). We then added a hydraulic fracture at the base of the injector and closed the rest of the well off. All our simulations were run with and without coal matrix shrinkage and swelling. The natural fracture system of the coal is the main pathway for gas migration. We found that gravity and buoyancy were the major driving forces behind gas flow within the coal, which reduced gas sweep efficiency and sequestration. Gravity caused the gas to migrate upwards at first and then along the top of the coal. The presence of the hydraulic fracture assisted in greater penetration of gas into the base of the reservoir, creating a more uniform vertical sweep as gas rose to the top. In addition, the hydraulic fracture enabled more CO2 to be injected into the coal and maintained high permeability close to the injection well during coal matrix swelling.

  3. Laramie, Wyoming December, 1999

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    (800) 877-9975. Printed on 50% recycled fiber paper. 400 copies printed by Pony X-Press, Cheyenne, Wyoming - Industrial Minerals and Uranium W. Dan Hausel, Senior Economic Geologist - Metals and Precious Stones Robert........................................................................................... 20 Developments in the Powder River Basin (PRB) ............................. 24 Developments

  4. Uranium in the Poison Basin area, Carbon County, Wyoming - a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vine, James D.; Prichard, George E.

    1953-01-01

    Uranium minerals were found on October 15, 1953, about seven miles west of Baggs in the Browns Park formation of the Poison Basin area, Carbon County, Wyo. The occurrences extend over an area of at least several square miles in secs. 4 and 5, T. 12 N., R. 92 W., and secs. 32 and 33, T. 13 N., R. 92 W. Uranophane-bearing sandstones contain as much as 3.21 percent uranium in select samples. The occurrences cannot be evaluated because their dimensions and average grade have not been determined. The presence of uranium, however, is significant because it indicates that uranium deposits may be present in the Browns Park formation and also in the underlying formations unconformably overlapped by the Browns Park.

  5. Arsenic data for streams in the uppper Missouri River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapton, J.R.; Horpestad, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    Although large concentrations of arsenic originating from geothermal sources within Yellowstone National Park have been known to be present in the Madison River for many years, systematic monitoring throughout the upper Missouri River basin had not been done. Therefore, a monitoring network consisting of 24 stations was established for the purpose of measuring arsenic concentrations and determining arsenic discharge. Included were 5 sites on mainstems of the Madison and Missouri Rivers and 19 sites on major and some minor tributaries from Yellowstone National Park to Canyon Ferry Lake. Fifteen of the 24 stations were sampled 12 times from November 1985 to October 1986. The remaining stations were sampled twice during the year, at high flow and at low flow. Total recoverable arsenic discharge (loading) in pounds per day was calculated for each sample by multiplying total recoverable arsenic concentration by water discharge (obtained at time of sample collection) and a conversion factor. This report presents data resulting from the monitoring program. (USGS)

  6. Geology and oil production of the Ervay (Phosphoria) reservoirs, eastern Big Horn Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Coalson, E.B. (Bass Enterprises Production, Co., Denver, CO (USA)); Inden, R.F. (LSSI, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-07-01

    The Ervay consists of carbonate ramp sediments deposited under conditions of varying sea level. On the east flank of the Bighorn Basin, the Ervay displays two major, regionally correlative, shallowing-upward cycles that vary in lithofacies across the basin. West of this area, the Ervay contains four regional cycles. Within each cycle, lithofacies tracts lie subparallel to northwest-trending Permian uplifts. From southwest to northeast, the lithofacies are open-marine limestones, restricted-subtidal dolomites, peritidal (island) dolomites, and lagoon/salina deposits. Each Ervay lithofacies displays characteristic ranges in matrix permeability. The most permeable reservoirs are lower-intertidal dolomite boundstones containing well-connected laminoid-fenestral pores. As a result, lower matrix permeabilities are seen in upper-intertidal to supratidal dolomites containing poorly-connected irregular fenestral pores and vugs. Restricted-subtidal dolomites contain mainly small intercrystalline pores and poorly-connected vugs and molds, and therefore also display poor reservoir quality. Vertical tectonic macrofractures probably make a significant contribution to primary production in relatively few wells, while negatively affecting secondary recovery. Microfractures, on the other hand, may be important to primary production throughout the study area. Thus, the major factors determining Ervay Member producibility are stratigraphic and diagenetic, even though may traps are structural. In the Cottonwood Creek area, many wells with thick sequences of lower-intertidal rocks produce more than 250,000 BO, irrespective of whether or not they are structurally high. By contrast, upper-intertidal, restricted-subtidal, and fractured reservoirs generally produce fewer than 100,000 BO per well.

  7. Hydrogeologic framework and estimates of ground-water volumes in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinaman, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    The Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana is an important source of energy resources for the United States. Coalbed methane gas is contained in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River Basin. This gas is released when water pressure in coalbeds is lowered, usually by pumping ground water. Issues related to disposal and uses of by-product water from coalbed methane production have developed, in part, due to uncertainties in hydrologic properties. One hydrologic property of primary interest is the amount of water contained in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River Basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, conducted a study to describe the hydrogeologic framework and to estimate ground-water volumes in different facies of Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. A geographic information system was used to compile and utilize hydrogeologic maps, to describe the hydrogeologic framework, and to estimate the volume of ground water in Tertiary and upper Cretaceous hydrogeologic units in the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming. Maps of the altitudes of potentiometric surfaces, altitudes of the tops and bottoms of hydrogeologic units, thicknesses of hydrogeologic units, percent sand of hydrogeologic units, and outcrop boundaries for the following hydrogeologic units were used: Tongue River-Wasatch aquifer, Lebo confining unit, Tullock aquifer, Upper Hell Creek confining unit, and the Fox Hills-Lower Hell Creek aquifer. Literature porosity values of 30 percent for sand and 35 percent for non-sand facies were used to calculate the volume of total ground water in each hydrogeologic unit. Literature specific yield values of 26 percent for sand and 10 percent for non-sand facies, and literature specific storage values of 0.0001 ft-1 (1/foot) for sand facies and 0.00001 ft-1 for non-sand facies, were used to calculate a second volume of ground water for each hydrogeologic unit. Significant figure considerations limited estimates of ground-water volumes to two significant digits. A total ground-water volume of 2.0x1014 ft3 (cubic feet) was calculated using porosity values, and a total ground-water volume of 3.6x1013 ft3 was calculated using specific yield and specific storage values. These results are consistent with retention properties, which would have some of the total water being retained in the sediments. Sensitivity analysis shows that the estimates of ground-water volume are most sensitive to porosity. The estimates also are sensitive to confined thickness and saturated thickness. Better spatial information for hydrogeologic units could help refine the ground-water volume estimates.

  8. Chapter 4: The Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System, Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.C.; Finn, Thomas M.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Roberts, Stephen B.; Roberts, Laura N.R.; Cook, Troy; Taylor, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS) of the Wind River Basin Province includes all strata from the base of the Lower Cretaceous Cloverly Formation to the base of the Waltman Shale Member of the Paleocene age Fort Union Formation and, where the Waltman is absent, includes strata as young as the Eocene Wind River Formation. Locally, Cretaceous-sourced gas migrated into strata as old as the Mississippian Madison Limestone, and in these areas the TPS extends stratigraphically downward to include these reservoirs. The extensive vertical migration of gases in highly fractured areas of the Wind River Basin led to the commingling of gases from several Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary sources, thus only two petroleum systems are recognized in these rocks, the Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Composite TPS, the subject of this report, and the Waltman Shale TPS described by Roberts and others (Chapter 5, this CD-ROM). The Cretaceous-lower Tertiary Composite TPS was subdivided into (1) seven continuous gas assessment units (AU): (a) Frontier-Muddy Continuous Gas AU, (b) Cody Sandstone Continuous Gas AU, (c) Mesaverde--Meeteetse Sandstone Gas AU, (d) Lance-Fort Union Sandstone Gas AU, (e) Mesaverde Coalbed Gas AU, (f) Meeteetse Coalbed Gas AU, and (g) Fort Union Coalbed Gas AU; (2) one continuous oil assessement unit--- Cody Fractured Shale Continuous Oil AU; and (3) one conventional assessment Unit--- Cretaceous-Tertiary Conventional Oil and Gas AU. Estimates of undiscovered resources having the potential for additions to reserves were made for all but the Cody Fractured Shale Continuous Oil AU, which is considered hypothetical and was not quantitively assessed. The mean estimate of the total oil is 41.99 million barrels, mean estimate of gas is 2.39 trillion cubic feet, and mean estimate of natural gas liquids is 20.55 million barrels. For gas, 480.66 billion cubic feet (BCFG) is estimated for the Frontier-Muddy Continuous Gas AU, 115.34 BCFG for the Cody Sandstone Continuous Gas AU, 383.16 BCFG for the Mesaverde-Meeteetse Sandstone Continuous Gas AU, 711.30 BCFG for the Lance-Fort Union Sandstone Gas AU, 107.18 BCFG for the Mesaverde Coalbed Gas AU, 21.29 BCFG for the Meeteetse Coalbed Gas AU, and 118.08 BCFG for the Fort Union Coalbed Gas AU. All the undiscovered oil and 98.94 BCFG of undiscovered gas is in the Cretaceous-Tertiary Conventional Oil and Gas AU.

  9. Habitat Strategies Susan Hanna, Ph.D., Professor of Marine Economics, Oregon State University

    E-print Network

    , 2003. 7. Sheppard, Stephen R.J. "Landscape visualisation and climate change: the potential for. --. "Human Population Impacts on Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife." 2007. 6. Reed, B. Lavigno and J.hanna@oregonstate.edu Peter J. Paquet Ph.D., Manager, Wildlife and Resident Fish, Northwest Power & Conservation Council 503

  10. Preliminary results on the characterization of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary low-permeability (tight) gas-bearing rocks in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Fouch, T.D.; Keefer, W.R.; Finn, T.M. [and others

    1993-12-31

    The Wind River Basin is a structural and sedimentary basin in central Wyoming (Figure 1) that was created during the Laramide orogeny from Late Cretaceous through Eocene time. The objectives of the Wind River Basin tight gas sandstone project are to define the limits of the tight gas accumulation in the basin and to estimate in-place and recoverable gas resources. The approximate limits of the tight gas accumulation are defined from available drillhole information. Geologic parameters, which controlled the development of the accumulation, are studied in order to better understand the origins of tight gas accumulations, and to predict the limits of the accumulation in areas where little drillhole information is available. The architecture of sandstone reservoirs are studied in outcrop to predict production characteristics of similar reservoirs within the tight gas accumulation. Core and cuttings are used to determine thermal maturities, quality of source rocks, and diagenetic histories. Our work thus far has concentrated in the Wind River Indian Reservation in the western part of the basin.

  11. Preliminary applications of Landsat images and aerial photography for determining land-use, geologic, and hydrologic characteristics, Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimes, F.J.; Moore, G.K.; Steele, T.D.

    1978-01-01

    Expanded energy- and recreation-related activities in the Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming, have caused a rapid increase in economic development which will result in increased demand and competition for natural resources. In planning for efficient allocation of the basin 's natural resources, Landsat images and small-scale color and color-infrared photographs were used for selected geologic, hydrologic and land-use applications within the Yampa River basin. Applications of Landsat data included: (1) regional land-use classification and mapping, (2) lineament mapping, and (3) areal snow-cover mapping. Results from the Landsat investigations indicated that: (1) Landsat land-use classification maps, at a regional level, compared favorably with areal land-use patterns that were defined from available ground information, (2) lineaments were mapped in sufficient detail using recently developed techniques for interpreting aerial photographs, (3) snow cover generally could be mapped for large areas with the exception of some densely forested areas of the basin and areas having a large percentage of winter-season cloud cover. Aerial photographs were used for estimation of turbidity for eight stream locations in the basin. Spectral reflectance values obtained by digitizing photographs were compared with measured turbidity values. Results showed strong correlations (variances explained of greater than 90 percent) between spectral reflectance obtained from color photographs and measured turbidity values. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. Extensional tectonic influence on lower and upper cretaceous stratigraphy and reservoirs, southern Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, G.C.; Rogers, M.H.

    1993-04-01

    The southern Powder River basin has been influenced significantly by an extensional system affecting Lower Cretaceous, Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary units. The system is composed of small throw, nearly vertical normal faults which are identified in the Cretaceous marine shales and that we believe are basement derived. Resultant fractures were present at erosional/depositional surfaces, both marine and nonmarine, that, in part, controlled erosion and subsequent deposition of Lower and Upper Cretaceous rocks. The normal faults also affected coal deposition in the Tertiary, now exposed at the surface. The erosion and resultant deposition formed extensive stratigraphic traps in Cretaceous units in both conventional and unconventional reservoirs. These reservoirs are interbedded with mature source rocks that have generated and expelled large amounts of hydrocarbons. Resulting overpressuring in the Fall River through the Niobrara formations has kept fractures open and has preserved primary porosity in the reservoirs. The normal faults offset thin sandstone reservoirs forming permeability barriers. Associated fractures may have provided vertical pathways for organic acids that assisted development of secondary porosity in Upper Cretaceous sandstones. These normal...faults and fractures provide significant potential for the use of horizontal drilling techniques to evaluate fractured, overpressured conventional and unconventional reservoirs.

  13. Types of stratigraphic traps in Lower Cretaceous Muddy Formation, northern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lovekin, J.R.; Odland, S.K.; Quartarone, T.S. Gardner, M.H.; Ritchie, J.G.

    1986-08-01

    Stratigraphic traps account for most of the oil produced from the Muddy Sandstone in the northern Powder River basin. Two categories of traps exist. The first trap type is the result of lateral and vertical facies changes. Reservoir facies include tidal channels, point bars, bayhead deltas, barrier islands, and strand-plain sandstones; trapping facies include bay-fill and estuarine sediments, mud-filled tidal channels, and flood-plain deposits. The second of the two categories of traps results from an unconformity that juxtaposes permeable and impermeable sediments of quite different ages. Structural and diagenetic factors often modify and locally enhance reservoir quality within both categories of stratigraphic traps. The various types of traps are demonstrated by studies of six field areas: (1) barrier-island sandstones, sealed updip by back-barrier shales, produce at Ute and Kitty fields; (2) tidal channels produce at Collums and Kitty fields; (3) bayhead deltas, encased in estuarine sediments, form traps at Oedekoven and Kitty fields; (4) fluvial point-bar sandstones form traps at Oedekoven, Store, and Kitty fields; (5) unconformity-related traps exist where Muddy fluvial valley-fill sediments lap out against impermeable valley walls of Skull Creek Shale on the updip side at Store, Oedekoven, and Kitty fields; and (6) the clay-rich weathered zone, directly beneath an intraformational unconformity, forms the seal to the reservoirs at Amos Draw field.

  14. Hydrothermal alteration in research drill hole Y-2, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Bargar, K.E.; Beeson, M.H.

    1981-05-01

    Y-2, a US Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, was drilled to a depth of 157.4 meters. The hole penetrated interbedded siliceous sinter and travertine to 10.2 m, glacial sediments of the Pinedale Glaciation interlayered with pumiceous tuff from 10.2 to 31.7 m, and rhyolitic lavas of the Elephant Back flow of the Central Plateau Member and the Mallard Lake Member of the Pleistocene Plateau Rhyolite from 31.7 to 157.4 m. Hydrothermal alteration is pervasive in most of the nearly continuous drill core. Rhyolitic glass has been extensively altered to clay and zeolite minerals (intermediate heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite, montmorillonite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, and illite) in addition to quartz and adularia. Numerous veins, vugs, and fractures in the core contain these and other minerals: silica minerals (opal, ..beta..-cristobalite, ..cap alpha..-cristobalite, and chalcedony), zeolites (analcime, wairakite, dachiardite, laumontite, and yugawaralite), carbonates (calcite and siderite), clay (kaolinite and chlorite), oxides (hematite, goethite, manganite, cryptomelane, pyrolusite, and groutite), and sulfides (pyrhotite and pyrite) along with minor aegirine, fluorite, truscottite, and portlandite. Interbedded travertine and siliceous sinter in the upper part of the drill core indicate that two distinct types of thermal water are responsible for precipitation of the surficial deposits, and further that the water regime has alternated between the two thermal waters more than once since the end of the Pinedale Glaciation (approx. 10,000 years B.P.). Alternation of zones of calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the water chemistry in this drill hole varies with depth.

  15. Carbon dioxide sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in unmineable coalbeds of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Hannah Elizabeth

    The first problem addressed in this thesis is global warming, where it has been shown that the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has risen from pre-industrial levels of 280 ppm to present levels of ˜380 ppm. This increase in atmospheric CO2 is attributed to the world's expanding use of fossil fuels and is believed to be one of the primary causes of global warming. To examine the feasibility of sequestering CO2 in unmineable coalbeds of the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming, a reservoir characterization study and fluid flow simulations have been carried out. The results suggest that after 13 years of CO2 injection, ˜99% of the total CO 2 injected into the Big George coal would be sequestered (assuming the coalbed is overlain by an impermeable caprock), that methane production would be ˜5-8 times greater with CO2 injection than without, and that one injection well would be able to sequester ˜9 kt of CO2 a year. The second issue addressed in this thesis is the disposal of coalbed methane (CBM) water, which is co-produced with CBM in the PRB. CBM water poses a serious environmental hazard to the PRB because the water has high saline and sodium contents, making it unsuitable for agricultural use and damaging to wildlife habitats. One option for the disposal of CBM water is injection into aquifers. To determine if pore pressures in aquifers are low enough to allow for significant CBM water injection and to determine whether the coals and sands are in hydraulic communication with each other, pore pressures in 250 wells that monitor water levels in coalbeds and adjacent sands within the PRB have been calculated. The analysis indicates that both sands and coalbeds have sub-hydrostatic pore pressures and that at present all sand aquifers in hydraulic communication with a producing coalbed are within ˜200 ft of the coalbed. Therefore, in order to be sure that disposed CBM water does not migrate back into producing coalbeds over time, CBM water disposal should be undertaken in sub-hydrostatic sand aquifers that are not in hydraulic communication with a coalbed.

  16. Godiva Rim Member: A new stratigraphic unit of the Green River Formation in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado. Geology of the Eocene Wasatch, Green River, and Bridger (Washakie) Formations, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    The report names and describes the Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation in the eastern part of the Washakie basin in southwest Wyoming and the central part of the Sand Wash basin in northwest Colorado. The Godiva Rim Member comprises lithofacies of mixed mudflat and lacustrine origin situated between the overlying lacustrine Laney Member of the Green River Formation and the underlying fluvial Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation. The Godiva Rim Member is laterally equivalent to and grades westward into the LaClede Bed of the Laney Member. The Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation was deposited along the southeast margins of Lake Gosiute and is correlated to similar lithologic units that were deposited along the northeast margins of Lake Uinta in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. The stratigraphic data presented provide significant evidence that the two lakes were periodically connected around the east end of the Uinta Mountains during the middle Eocene.

  17. Evaluation of the rhenium-osmium geochronometer in the Phosphoria petroleum system, Bighorn Basin of Wyoming and Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lillis, Paul G.; Selby, David

    2013-01-01

    Rhenium-osmium (Re-Os) geochronometry is applied to crude oils derived from the Permian Phosphoria Formation of the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming and Montana to determine whether the radiogenic age reflects the timing of petroleum generation, timing of migration, age of the source rock, or the timing of thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). The oils selected for this study are interpreted to be derived from the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale and Retort Phosphatic Shale Members of the Phosphoria Formation based on oil-oil and oil-source rock correlations utilizing bulk properties, elemental composition, ?13C and ?34S values, and biomarker distributions. The ?34S values of the oils range from -6.2‰ to +5.7‰, with oils heavier than -2‰ interpreted to be indicative of TSR. The Re and Os isotope data of the Phosphoria oils plot in two general trends: (1) the main trend (n = 15 oils) yielding a Triassic age (239 ± 43 Ma) with an initial 187Os/188Os value of 0.85 ± 0.42 and a mean square weighted deviation (MSWD) of 1596, and (2) the Torchlight trend (n = 4 oils) yielding a Miocene age (9.24 ± 0.39 Ma) with an initial 187Os/188Os value of 1.88 ± 0.01 and a MSWD of 0.05. The scatter (high MSWD) in the main-trend regression is due, in part, to TSR in reservoirs along the eastern margin of the basin. Excluding oils that have experienced TSR, the regression is significantly improved, yielding an age of 211 ± 21 Ma with a MSWD of 148. This revised age is consistent with some studies that have proposed Late Triassic as the beginning of Phosphoria oil generation and migration, and does not seem to reflect the source rock age (Permian) or the timing of re-migration (Late Cretaceous to Eocene) associated with the Laramide orogeny. The low precision of the revised regression (±21 Ma) is not unexpected for this oil family given the long duration of generation from a large geographic area of mature Phosphoria source rock, and the possible range in the initial 187Os/188Os values of the Meade Peak and Retort source units. Effects of re-migration may have contributed to the scatter, but thermal cracking and biodegradation likely have had minimal or no effect on the main-trend regression. The four Phosphoria-sourced oils from Torchlight and Lamb fields yield a precise Miocene age Re-Os isochron that may reflect the end of TSR in the reservoir due to cooling below a threshold temperature in the last 10 m.y. from uplift and erosion of overlying rocks. The mechanism for the formation of a Re-Os isotopic relationship in a family of crude oils may involve multiple steps in the petroleum generation process. Bitumen generation from the source rock kerogen may provide a reset of the isotopic chronometer, and incremental expulsion of oil over the duration of the oil window may provide some of the variation seen in 187Re/188Os values from an oil family.

  18. A Synoptic Study of Fecal-Indicator Bacteria in the Wind River, Bighorn River, and Goose Creek Basins, Wyoming, June-July 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.; Gamper, Merry E.

    2003-01-01

    A synoptic study of fecal-indicator bacteria was conducted during June and July 2000 in the Wind River, Bighorn River, and Goose Creek Basins in Wyoming as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program for the Yellowstone River Basin. Fecal-coliform concentrations ranged from 2 to 3,000 col/100 mL (colonies per 100 milliliters) for 100 samples, and Escherichia coli concentrations ranged from 1 to 2,800 col/100 mL for 97 samples. Fecal-coliform concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recommended limit for a single sample for recreational contact with water in 37.0 percent of the samples. Escherichia coli concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recommended limit for a single sample for moderate use, full-body recreational contact with water in 38.1 percent of the samples and the recommended limit for infrequent use, full-body recreational contact with water in 24.7 percent of the samples. Fecal-indicator-bacteria concentrations varied by basin. Samples from the Bighorn River Basin had the highest median concentrations for fecal coliform of 340 col/100 mL and for Escherichia coli of 300 col/100 mL. Samples from the Wind River Basin had the lowest median concentrations for fecal coliform of 50 col/100 mL and for Escherichia coli of 62 col/100 mL. Fecal-indicator-bacteria concentrations varied by land cover. Samples from sites with an urban land cover had the highest median concentrations for fecal coliform of 540 col/100 mL and for Escherichia coli of 420 col/100 mL. Maximum concentrations for fecal coliform of 3,000 col/100 mL and for Escherichia coli of 2,800 col/100 mL were in samples from sites with an agricultural land cover. The lowest median concentrations for fecal coliform of 130 col/100 mL and for Escherichia coli of 67 col/100 mL were for samples from sites with a forested land cover. A strong and positive relation existed between fecal coliform and Escherichia coli (Spearman's Rho value of 0.976). The majority of the fecal coliforms were Escherichia coli during the synoptic study. Fecal-indicator-bacteria concentrations were not correlated to streamflow, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conduc-tance, and alkalinity. Fecal-indicator-bacteria concentrations were moderately correlated with turbidity (Spearman's Rho values of 0.662 and 0.640 for fecal coliform and Escherichia coli, respectively) and sediment (Spearman's Rho values of 0.628 and 0.636 for fecal coliform and Escherichia coli, respectively). Escherichia coli isolates analyzed by discriminant analysis of ribotype patterns for samples from the Bighorn River at Basin, Wyoming, and Bitter Creek near Garland, Wyoming, in the Bighorn River Basin were determined to be from nonhuman and human sources. Using a confidence interval of 90 percent, more of the isolates from both sites were classified as being from nonhuman than human sources; however, both samples had additional isolates that were classified as unknown sources. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  19. Structural and microstructural evolution of the Rattlesnake Mountain Anticline (Wyoming, USA): New insights into the Sevier and Laramide orogenic stress build-up in the Bighorn Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Leprêtre, Rémi; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Lacombe, Olivier; Amrouch, Khalid; Callot, Jean-Paul; Emmanuel, Laurent; Daniel, Jean-Marc

    2012-11-01

    The Rocky Mountains in western US provide among the best examples of thick-skinned tectonics: following a period of thin-skinned tectonics related to the Sevier orogeny, the compressional reactivation of basement faults gave birth to the so-called Laramide uplifts/arches. The Bighorn basin, located in Wyoming, is therefore a key place to study the transition from thin- to thick-skinned tectonics in orogenic forelands, especially in terms of microstructural and stress/strain evolution. Our study focuses on a classic Laramide structure: the Rattlesnake Mountain Anticline (RMA, Wyoming, USA), a basement-cored anticline located in the western part of the Bighorn basin. Stress and strain evolution analysis in folded sedimentary layers and underlying faulted basement rocks were performed on the basis of combined analyses of fractures, fault-slip data and calcite twinning paleopiezometry. Most of the fractures are related to three main tectonic events: the Sevier thin-skinned contraction, the Laramide thick-skinned contraction, and the Basin and Range extension. Serial balanced cross-sections of RMA and displacement profiles suggest that all thrust faults were coeval, evidencing strain distribution in the basement during faulting. The comparison of RMA with another structure located in the eastern edge of the Bighorn basin, i.e. the Sheep Mountain Anticline (SMA), allows to propose a conceptual model for the geometric and kinematic evolution of Laramide-related basement-cored anticlines. Finally, the stress evolution is reconstructed at both the fold scale and the basin scale. We show that the evolution of stress trends and magnitudes was quite similar in both structures (RMA and SMA) during Laramide times (thick-skinned tectonics), in spite of different stress regimes. During Sevier (thin-skinned tectonics) and post-Laramide times, stress trends and fracture patterns were different in these two structures. These results suggest that the distance to the orogenic front influenced the fracture patterns but not the foreland stress magnitudes, which were likely controlled by the structural style.

  20. Geology of Paleozoic Rocks in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming, Excluding the San Juan Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geldon, Arthur L.

    2003-01-01

    The geology of the Paleozoic rocks in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming, was studied as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program to provide support for hydrogeological interpretations. The study area is segmented by numerous uplifts and basins caused by folding and faulting that have recurred repeatedly from Precambrian to Cenozoic time. Paleozoic rocks in the study area are 0-18,000 feet thick. They are underlain by Precambrian igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks and are overlain in most of the area by Triassic formations composed mostly of shale. The overlying Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks are 0-27,000 feet thick. All Paleozoic systems except the Silurian are represented in the region. The Paleozoic rocks are divisible into 11 hydrogeologic units. The basal hydrogeologic unit consisting of Paleozoic rocks, the Flathead aquifer, predominantly is composed of Lower to Upper Cambrian sandstone and quartzite. The aquifer is 0-800 feet thick and is overlain gradationally to unconformably by formations of Cambrian to Mississippian age. The Gros Ventre confining unit consists of Middle to Upper Cambrian shale with subordinate carbonate rocks and sandstone. The confining unit is 0-1,100 feet thick and is overlain gradationally to unconformably by formations of Cambrian to Mississippian age. The Bighom aquifer consists of Middle Cambrian to Upper Ordovician limestone and dolomite with subordinate shale and sandstone. The aquifer is 0-3,000 feet thick and is overlain unconformably by Devonian and Mississipplan rocks. The Elbert-Parting confining unit consists of Lower Devonian to Lower Mississippian limestone, dolomite, sandstone, quartzite, shale, and anhydrite. It is 0-700 feet thick and is overlain conformably to unconformably by Upper Devonian and Mississippian rocks. The Madison aquifer consists of two zones of distinctly different lithology. The lower (Redwall-Leadville) zone is 0-2,500 feet thick and is composed almost entirely of Upper Devonian to Upper Mississippian limestone, dolomite, and chert. The overlying (Darwin-Humbug) zone is 0-800 feet thick and consists of Upper Mississippian limestone, dolomite, sandstone, shale, gypsum, and solution breccia. The Madison aquifer is overlain conformably by Upper Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks. The Madison aquifer in most areas is overlain by Upper Mississippian to Middle Pennsylvanian rocks of the Four Comers confining unit. The lower part of this confining unit, the Belden-Molas subunit, consists of as much as 4,300 feet of shale with subordinate carbonate rocks, sandstone, and minor gypsum. The upper part of the confining unit, the Paradox-Eagle Valley subunit, in most places consists of as much as 9,700 feet of interbedded limestone, dolomite, shale, sandstone, gypsum, anhydrite, and halite. Locally, the evaporitic rocks are deformed into diapirs as much as 15,000 feet thick. The Four Corners confining unit is overlain gradationally to disconformably by Pennsylvanian rocks. The uppermost Paleozoic rocks comprise the Canyonlands aquifer, which is composed of three zones with distinctly different lithologies. The basal (Cutler-Maroon) zone consists of as much as 16,500 feet of Lower Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian sandstone, conglomerate, shale, limestone, dolomite, and gypsum. The middle (Weber-De Chelly) zone consists of as much as 4,000 feet of Middle Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian quartz sandstone with minor carbonate rocks and shale. The upper (Park City-State Bridge) zone consists of as much as 800 feet of Lower to Upper Permian limestone, dolomite, shale, sandstone, phosphorite, chert, and gypsum. The Canyonlands aquifer is overlain disconformably to unconformably by formations of Triassic and Jurassic age.

  1. Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water Budget at a Storage Impoundment Site, Beaver Creek Drainage, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, A. A.; Saffer, D. M.; Wheaton, J. R.; Bierbach, S.

    2003-12-01

    Rapid coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, has resulted in a dramatic increase in the number of producing wells, from less than 300 in 1997 to more than 10,000 in 2002, with as many as 40,000 new wells projected to be drilled during the next decade. CBM development involves the co-production of large volumes of coalbed water, which is most commonly discharged to impoundments. Little is known about the potentially significant effects that this co-produced water may have on shallow aquifers and water budgets. A small study site (1600 meters in length) was chosen in the Beaver Creek drainage (a tributary to the Powder River) to quantify the fate of CBM water. Discharge into two in-channel infiltration impoundments (areas of 4000 m2 and 10,500 m2) began in November, 2002. We installed monitoring wells at three locations-upstream, between, and downstream of the ponds. We emplaced a series of v-notch weirs between and dowstream of the ponds to quantify conveyance losses, and constructed a floating pan in one impoundment to measure evaporation. Over the study period from July 23 to August 21, 2003, we established a water budget from daily coalbed water production, flow measurements, and evaporation data. Water production from five wells into the two ponds averaged 647 L/min, or about 4500 bbl/day. Mean evaporation from the ponds and stream channel was 102 L/min. Infiltration determined by differences in water production and streamflow plus evaporation loss indicate an average infiltration of 240 L/min in the ponds, and 97 L/min within 1100 meters of investigated stream channel. Approximately 52% of the CBM co-produced water infiltrated, 16% was lost to evaporation, and 32% left the study area as surface water. Mean infiltration rates within the ponds ranged from 0.07 cm/hr in the smaller upstream pond to 0.1 cm/hr in the larger pond. In the middle sections of the stream channel, infiltration rates were about 0.7 cm/hr. Directly below the downstream pond, the infiltration rate was 0.3 cm/hr, slightly less than that determined for other streambed sections. In the most dowstream section of stream channel, the infiltration rate was 1.1 cm/hr. Well water levels in a control area unaffected by CBM water dropped by 18.3 cm over the study duration, while levels dropped only 6.1 cm between the ponds, and 12.2 cm below both ponds. Preliminary results suggest potentially significant variations in infiltration rates between the pond and stream settings. The response of the shallow aquifer water table also appears to vary within the study area.

  2. Chapter 3: Geologic Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources in the Phosphoria Total Petroleum System of the Wind River Basin Province, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirschbaum, M.A.; Lillis, P.G.; Roberts, L.N.R.

    2007-01-01

    The Phosphoria Total Petroleum System (TPS) encompasses the entire Wind River Basin Province, an area of 4.7 million acres in central Wyoming. The source rocks most likely are black, organic-rich shales of the Meade Peak and Retort Phosphatic Shale Members of the Permian Phosphoria Formation located in the Wyoming and Idaho thrust belt to the west and southwest of the province. Petroleum was generated and expelled during Jurassic and Cretaceous time in westernmost Wyoming and is interpreted to have migrated into the province through carrier beds of the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone where it was preserved in hypothesized regional stratigraphic traps in the Tensleep and Permian Park City Formation. Secondary migration occurred during the development of structural traps associated with the Laramide orogeny. The main reservoirs are in the Tensleep Sandstone and Park City Formation and minor reservoirs are in the Mississippian Madison Limestone, Mississippian-Pennsylvanian Amsden Formation, Triassic Chugwater Group, and Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Sundance Formation. The traps are sealed by shale or evaporite beds of the Park City, Amsden, and Triassic Dinwoody Formations, Triassic Chugwater Group, and Jurassic Gypsum Spring Formation. A single conventional oil and gas assessment unit (AU), the Tensleep-Park City AU, was defined for the Phosphoria TPS. Both the AU and TPS cover the entire Wind River Basin Province. Oil is produced from 18 anticlinal fields, the last of which was discovered in 1957, and the possibility of discovering new structural oil accumulations is considered to be relatively low. Nonassociated gas is produced from only two fields, but may be underexplored in the province. The discovery of new gas is more promising, but will be from deep structures. The bulk of new oil and gas accumulations is dependent on the discovery of hypothesized stratigraphic traps in isolated carbonate reservoirs of the Park City Formation. Mean resource estimates for the Tensleep-Park City Conventional Oil and Gas AU total 18 million barrels of oil, 294 billion cubic feet of gas, and 5.9 million barrels of natural gas liquids.

  3. Detailed measured sections, cross sections, and paleogeographic reconstructions of the upper cretaceous and lower tertiary nonmarine interval, Wind River Basin, Wyoming: Chapter 10 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas resources in the Wind River Basin Province, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed measured sections and regional stratigraphic cross sections are used to reconstruct facies maps and interpret paleogeographic settings for the interval from the base of Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Formation to top of lower member of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming. The Mesaverde Formation spans the time during which the Upper Cretaceous seaway retreated eastward out of central Wyoming in Campanian time and the initial stages of the Lewis transgression in earliest Maastrichtian time. This retreat stalled for a considerable period of time during deposition of the lower part of the Mesaverde, creating a thick buildup of marginal marine sandstones and coaly coastal plain deposits across the western part of the basin. The Lewis sea transgressed into the northeast part of Wind River Basin, beginning in early Maastrichtian time during deposition of the Teapot Sandstone Member of the Mesaverde Formation. The Meeteetse Formation, which overlies the Teapot, was deposited in a poorly-drained coastal plain setting southwest of the Lewis seaway. The Lewis seaway, at maximum transgression, covered much of the northeast half of the Wind River Basin area but was clearly deflected around the present site of the Wind River Range, southwest of the basin, providing the first direct evidence of Laramide uplift on that range. Uplift of the Wind River Range continued during deposition of the overlying Maastrichtian Lance Formation. The Granite Mountains south of the basin also became a positive feature during this time. A rapidly subsiding trough during the Maastrichtian time formed near the presentday trough of the Wind River Basin in which more than 6,000 feet of Lance was deposited. The development of this trough appears to have begun before the adjacent Owl Creek Mountains to the north started to rise; however, a muddy facies in the upper part of Lance in the deep subsurface, just to the south, might be interpreted to indicate that the Cretaceous Cody Shale was being eroded off a rising Owl Creek Mountains in latest Cretaceous time. The Paleocene Fort Union Formation unconformably overlies older units but with only slight angular discordance around much of the margins of the Wind River Basin. Pre-Fort Union erosion was most pronounced toward the Wind River Range to the southwest, where the Fort Union ultimately overlies strata as old as the upper part of the Cretaceous Cody Shale. The unconformity appears to die out toward the basin center. Coal-forming mires developed throughout the western part of the basin near the beginning of the Paleocene. River systems entering the basin from the Wind River Range to the southwest and the Granite Mountains to the south produced areas of sandy fluvial deposition along mountain fronts. A major river system appears to have entered the basin from about the same spot along the Wind River Range throughout much of the Paleocene, probably because it became incised and could not migrate laterally. The muddy floodplain facies that developed along the deep basin trough during latest Cretaceous time, expanded during the early part of the Paleocene. Coal-forming mires that characterize part of the lower Fort Union Formation reached maximum extent near the beginning of the late Paleocene and just prior to the initial transgression of Lake Waltman. From the time of initial flooding, Lake Waltman expanded rapidly, drowning the coal-forming mires in the central part of the basin and spreading to near basin margins. Outcrop studies along the south margin of the basin document that once maximum transgression was reached, the lake was rapidly pushed basinward and replaced by fluvial environments.

  4. Conductive thermal modeling of Wyoming geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01

    A summary of techniques used by the Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group in defining low-temperature hydrothermal resource areas is presented. Emphasis is placed on thermal modeling techniques appropriate to Wyoming's geologic setting. Thermal parameters discussed include oil-well bottom hole temperatures, heat flow, thermal conductivity, and measured temperature-depth profiles. Examples of the use of these techniques are from the regional study of the Bighorn Basin and two site specific studies within the Basin.

  5. Coal Quality and Major, Minor, and Trace Elements in the Powder River, Green River, and Williston Basins, Wyoming and North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stricker, Gary D.; Flores, Romeo M.; Trippi, Michael H.; Ellis, Margaret S.; Olson, Carol M.; Sullivan, Jonah E.; Takahashi, Kenneth I.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Wyoming Reservoir Management Group (RMG) of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and nineteen independent coalbed methane (CBM) gas operators in the Powder River and Green River Basins in Wyoming and the Williston Basin in North Dakota, collected 963 coal samples from 37 core holes (fig. 1; table 1) between 1999 and 2005. The drilling and coring program was in response to the rapid development of CBM, particularly in the Powder River Basin (PRB), and the needs of the RMG BLM for new and more reliable data for CBM resource estimates and reservoir characterization. The USGS and BLM entered into agreements with the gas operators to drill and core Fort Union coal beds, thus supplying core samples for the USGS to analyze and provide the RMG with rapid, real-time results of total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high pressure methane adsorption isotherm data (Stricker and others, 2006). The USGS determined the ultimate composition of all coal core samples; for selected samples analyses also included proximate analysis, calorific value, equilibrium moisture, apparent specific gravity, and forms of sulfur. Analytical procedures followed those of the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM; 1998). In addition, samples from three wells (129 samples) were analyzed for major, minor, and trace element contents. Ultimate and proximate compositions, calorific value, and forms of sulfur are fundamental parameters in evaluating the economic value of a coal. Determining trace element concentrations, along with total sulfur and ash yield, is also essential to assess the environmental effects of coal use, as is the suitability of the coal for cleaning, gasification, liquefaction, and other treatments. Determination of coal quality in the deeper part (depths greater than 1,000 to 1,200 ft) of the PRB (Rohrbacher and others, 2006; Luppens and others, 2006) is especially important, because these coals are targeted for future mining and development. This report contains summary tables, histograms, and isopleth maps of coal analyses. Details of the compositional internal variability of the coal beds are based on the continuous vertical sampling of coal sequences, including beds in the deeper part of the PRB. Such sampling allows for close comparisons of the compositions of different parts of coal beds as well as within the same coal beds at different core hole locations within short distances of each other.

  6. Temporal and Spatial Distributions of Volatile Organic Compounds Associated with Oil and Gas Development in the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. A.; Soltis, J.; Montague, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    Oil and gas development has in recent years become associated with the phenomenon of wintertime ground level ozone. Here we present the results of research performed in the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming. This basin is associated with the Jonah and Pinedale Anticline (PAPA) developments. The focus of our research in this area has been to determine spatial and temporal variations of key ozone precursor compounds. We present temporal VOC data, from our background air sampling location Boulder South Road, that is located 4 miles from the edge of PAPA for 2011. Our linked spatial assessments using canister and passive sampling methods show variations that indicate the importance of different emission sources for a variety of compound classes. For VOC we identify two areas with relatively high VOC concentrations. One is associated with oil and gas production, the other with water treatment. We highlight the importance of the compositional profile of emission processes, as those with higher levels of aromatic VOC have relatively high ozone creation potentials. Effective policy decisions require an understanding of the relationship between air quality measurements and meteorology with emission inventories and modeling. We discuss the problem of gaining a clear focus on a problem that has ever changing conditions.ater Treatment Survey et Gas vs Water Treatment Emission Carbon Distribution

  7. Assessment of impacts of proposed coal-resource and related economic development on water resources, Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming; a summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, Timothy Doak; Hillier, Donald E.

    1981-01-01

    Expanded mining and use of coal resources in the Rocky Mountain region of the western United States will have substantial impacts on water resources, environmental amenities, and social and economic conditions. The U.S. Geological Survey has completed a 3-year assessment of the Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming, where increased coal-resource development has begun to affect the environment and quality of life. Economic projections of the overall effects of coal-resource development were used to estimate water use and the types and amounts of waste residuals that need to be assimilated into the environment. Based in part upon these projections, several physical-based models and other semiquantitative assessment methods were used to determine possible effects upon the basin's water resources. Depending on the magnitude of mining and use of coal resources in the basin, an estimated 0.7 to 2.7 million tons (0.6 to 2.4 million metric tons) of waste residuals may be discharged annually into the environment by coal-resource development and associated economic activities. If the assumed development of coal resources in the basin occurs, annual consumptive use of water, which was approximately 142,000 acre-feet (175 million cubic meters) during 1975, may almost double by 1990. In a related analysis of alternative cooling systems for coal-conversion facilities, four to five times as much water may be used consumptively in a wet-tower, cooling-pond recycling system as in once-through cooling. An equivalent amount of coal transported by slurry pipeline would require about one-third the water used consumptively by once-through cooling for in-basin conversion. Current conditions and a variety of possible changes in the water resources of the basin resulting from coal-resource development were assessed. Basin population may increase by as much as threefold between 1975 and 1990. Volumes of wastes requiring treatment will increase accordingly. Potential problems associated with ammonia-nitrogen concentrations in the Yampa River downstream from Steamboat Springs were evaluated using a waste-load assimilative-capacity model. Changes in sediment loads carried by streams due to increased coal mining and construction of roads and buildings may be apparent only locally; projected increases in sediment loads relative to historic loads from the basin are estimated to be 2 to 7 percent. Solid-waste residuals generated by coal-conversion processes and disposed of into old mine pits may cause widely dispersed ground-water contamination, based on simulation-modeling results. Projected increases in year-round water use will probably result in the construction of several proposed reservoirs. Current seasonal patterns of streamflow and of dissolvedsolids concentrations in streamflow will be altered appreciably by these reservoirs. Decreases in time-weighted mean-annual dissolved-solids concentrations of as much as 34 percent are anticipated, based upon model simulations of several configurations of proposed reservoirs. Detailed statistical analyses of water-quality conditions in the Yampa River basin were made. Regionalized maximum waterquality concentrations were estimated for possible comparison with future conditions. Using Landsat imagery and aerial photographs, potential remote-sensing applications were evaluated to monitor land-use changes and to assess both snow cover and turbidity levels in streams. The technical information provided by the several studies of the Yampa River basin assessment should be useful to regional planners and resource managers in evaluating the possible impacts of development on the basin's water resources.

  8. Depositional environments and sand body morphologies of the muddy sandstones at Kitty Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Larberg, G.M.B.

    1980-01-01

    Lower Cretaceous muddy sandstones form a stratigraphic trap at Kitty Field, Campbell County, Wyoming. Porosity and permeability are generally low, but the best reservoir develop maximum effective porosity of 17% and maximum permeability of 442 md. Reservoirs sandstones average less than 15 ft and rarely exceed 30 ft in thickness. Ultimate recovery from the field is estimated at 23 million bbl. Based on electric log character, 4 easily recognizable zones within the muddy interval at Kitty were numbered one through 4 in slabbed cores and petrographic analyses of selected core samples, suggest that sandstones in the second, third, and fourth muddy zones were deposited as part of a sequence associated with the overall transgression of the lower Cretaceous sea. Fourth zone sandstones are fluvial in origin, and were deposited in lows on the unconformable surface of the underlying skull creek shale. 18 references.

  9. Water Budget and Modeling of Stream Channel Infiltration of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water at a Storage Impoundment Site, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, A. A.; Saffer, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    Rapid coalbed methane (CBM) development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, has resulted in a dramatic increase in the number of producing wells, with as many as 40,000 new wells projected to drilled during the next decade. CBM development involves the co-production of large volumes of coalbed water, which is most commonly discharged to impoundments. Little is known about the potentially significant effects that this co-produced water may have on shallow aquifers and water budgets. Since many of the impoundments in the Powder River Basin are in-channel and supplement surface water flow, it is important to understand what factors influence stream channel infiltration. Modeling of cross-sectional infiltration in a stream channel was undertaken using the U. S. Geological Survey's SUTRA finite-element code, simulating fluid movement from the stream channel, through the unsaturated zone, and into the shallow aquifer. Soil type, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and degree of anisotropy within the soil layer were analyzed to better understand the effects that each have on channel infiltration. At a small study site containing two in-channel infiltration impoundments in the Beaver Creek drainage (a tributary to the Powder River), water budgets have been determined from late July, 2003 to the present (excluding the winter months). Calculated infiltration rates of 0.04 cfs/mile in a 0.8 m wide stream channel compared well with modeled regional soils. Slug tests were utilized to determine aquifer properties in the underlying alluvium/weathered bedrock. A two-layer SUTRA model is presented representing the upper soil layer and underlying alluvium/weathered bedrock and compared to observed changes in groundwater levels in the stream sections affected by introduced CBM water.

  10. Structure and kinematic genesis of the Quealy wrench duplex: Transpressional reactivation of the Precambrian Cheyenne belt in the Laramie Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D.S.

    1995-09-01

    Seismic and borehole data in the southern Laramie basin of southeastern Wyoming outline a fault-bordered pop-up structure that is central to the Quealy wrench duplex and the site of the Quealy Dome oil field. This contractional duplex formed at a restraining fault offset between two parallel, laterally extensive, northeast-trending fault zones-the South and North Quealy faults. Spaced about 2 mi (3.2 km) apart, these parallel fault zones are interpreted as wrench straights, equivalent to the floor and roof thrusts of a duplex in a fold and thrust belt, but described in map view rather than in cross section. The Quealy wrench duplex is comprised of three east-vergent, basement-involved thrust imbricates and a west-vergent, antithetic thrust, detached in Permian shales. Duplex thrusts strike at high angles to the bordering South and North Quealy fault zones. Measurements based on interpretive piercing-point evidence and fault-parallel, differential shortening indicate that net slip on the dominant shortening indicate that net slip on the dominant South Quealy fault zone is dextraloblique. A component of dextral slip is also indicated on the North Quealy fault zone. The South Quealy fault and North Quealy/Overland fault trends can be traced southwesterly into the footwall of the north-trending Arlington (basin-boundary) thrust and projected into the Precambrian Cheyenne belt of the Medicine Bow Mountains in the hanging wall of the Arlington thrust. It is proposed that the Quealy wrench duplex is a product of Precambrian shear zone reactivation along the Cheyenne belt under Permian and Laramide (Tertiary) transpression.

  11. Comparison of coal tars generated by pyrolysis of Hanna coal and UCG (underground coal gasification) Hanna IVB coal tars

    SciTech Connect

    Barbour, F.A.; Cummings, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    The compositions of coal tars produced by laboratory and pilot scale apparatus have been compared to those produced during underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments at Hanna, Wyoming. Four coal tars were generated by pyrolysis using the block reactor and the laboratory reference retort, and a fifth coal tar was composited from products produced by UCG. Coal tars were separated into chemically defined fractions and were characterized by gas chromatography. Specific compounds were not identified, but rather fingerprinting or compound-type profiling was used for identifying similarities and differences in the product tars. This permitted the evaluation of the different methods of tar production with respect to one another. The UCG coal tars appeared to have undergone more secondary cracking than the pyrolytic products. The coal tar products from the laboratory reference retort appear to be more indicative of the coal's chemical structure. Products from the block reactor contained lesser amounts of the lighter boiling material. In addition there is organic sulfur contamination as indicated by the large amount of sulfur present in the product tar from the block reactor. 11 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Hydrologic properties and ground-water flow systems of the Paleozoic rocks in the upper Colorado River basin in Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming, excluding the San Juan Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geldon, Arthur L.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrologic properties and ground-water flow systems of Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the Upper Colorado River Basin were investigated under the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) program of the U.S. Geological Survey in anticipation of the development of water supplies from bedrock aquifers to fulfill the region's growing water demands. The study area, in parts of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming, covers about 100,000 square miles. It includes parts of four physiographic provinces--the Middle Rocky Mountains, Wyoming Basin, Southern Rocky Mountains, and Colorado Plateaus. A variety of landforms, including mountains, plateaus, mesas, cuestas, plains, badlands, and canyons, are present. Altitudes range from 3,100 to 14,500 feet. Precipitation is distributed orographically and ranges from less than 6 inches per year at lower altitudes to more than 60 inches per year in some mountainous areas. Most of the infrequent precipitation at altitudes of less than 6,000 feet is consumed by evapotranspiration. The Colorado and Green Rivers are the principal streams: the 1964-82 average discharge of the Colorado River where it leaves the Upper Colorado River Basin is 12,170 cubic feet per second (a decrease of 5,680 cubic feet per second since construction of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963). On the basis of their predominant lithologic and hydrologic properties, the Paleozoic rocks are classified into four aquifers and three confining units. The Flathead aquifer, Gros Ventre confining unit, Bighorn aquifer, Elbert-Parting confining unit, and Madison aquifer (Redwall-Leadville and Darwin-Humbug zones) make up the Four Corners aquifer system. A thick sequence, composed mostly of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian shale, anhydrite, halite, and carbonate rocks--the Four Corners confining unit (Belden-Molas and Paradox-Eagle Valley subunits)--overlies the Four Corners aquifer system in most areas and inhibits vertical ground-water flow between the Four Corners aquifer system and the overlying Canyonlands aquifer. Composed of the uppermost Paleozoic rocks, the Canyonlands aquifer consists, in ascending order, of the Cutler-Maroon, Weber-De Chelly, and Park City-State Bridge zones. The Paleozoic rocks are underlain by a basal confining unit consisting of Precambrian sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks and overlain throughout most of the Upper Colorado River Basin by the Chinle-Moenkopi confining unit, which consists of Triassic formations composed mostly of shale. The largest values of porosity, permeability, hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity, and artesian yield are exhibited by the Redwall-Leadville zone of the Madison aquifer and the Weber-De Chelly zone of the Canyonlands aquifer. The former consists almost entirely of Devonian and Mississippian carbonate rocks: the latter consists mostly of Pennsylvanian and Permian quartz sandstone. Unit-averaged porosity in hydrogeologic units composed of Paleozoic rocks ranges from less than 1 to 28 percent. Permeability ranges from less than 0.0001 to 3,460 millidarcies. Unit-averaged hydraulic conductivity ranges from 0.000005 to 200 feet per day. The composite transmissivity of Paleozoic rocks ranges from 0.0005 to 47,000 feet squared per day. Artesian yields to wells and springs (excluding atypical springflows) from these hydrogeologic units range from less than 1 to 10,000 gallons per minute. The permeability and watersupply capabilities of all hydrogeologic units progressively decrease from uplifted areas to structural basins. Recharge to the Paleozoic rocks is provided by direct infiltration of precipitation, leakage from streams, and ground-water inflows from structurally continuous areas west and north of the Upper Colorado River Basin. The total recharge available flom ground-water systems in the basin from direct precipitation and stream leakage is estimated to be 6,600,000 acre-feet per year. However, little of this recharge directly enters the Paleozoic rocks

  13. Age of uranium mineralization at the Highland mine, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, as indicated by UPb isotope analyses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. S. Santos; K. R. Ludwig

    1983-01-01

    Most of the uranium deposits in the Powder River basin occur at various stratigraphic levels in the Wasatch Formation of Eocene age, but pollen and spores found in the Highland mine host rocks indicate that the deposits here may be in the upper part of the Fort Union Formation of Paleocene age. Analyses of U-Pb isotopes in several samples of

  14. Controls on bacterial gas accumulations in thick Tertiary coal beds and adjacent channel sandstones, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D.; Flores, R.M. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Coal beds, as much as 250 ft thick, and adjacent sandstones in the Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation are reservoirs for coal-derived natural gas in the Powder River basin. The discontinuous coal beds were deposited in raised, ombrotrophic peat bogs about 3 mi{sup 2} in size, adjoining networks of fluvial channels infilled by sand. Coal-bed thickness was controlled by basin subsidence and depositional environments. The average maceral composition of the coals is 88% huminite (vitrinite), 5% liptinite, and 7% inertinite. The coals vary in rank from subbituminous C to A (R{sub o} values of 0.4 to 0.5%). Although the coals are relatively low rank, they display fracture systems. Natural gas desorbed and produced from the coal beds and adjacent sandstones is composed mainly of methane with lesser amount of Co{sub 2} ({lt}10%). The methane is isotopically light and enriched in deuterium. The gases are interpreted to be generated by bacterial processes and the fermentation pathway, prior to the main phase of thermogenic methane generation by devolatilization. Large amounts of bicarbonate water generated during early stages of coalification will have to be removed from the fracture porosity in the coal beds before desorption and commercial gas production can take place. Desorbed amounts of methane-rich, bacterial gas in the Powder River basin are relatively low ({lt}60 Scf/ton) compared to amounts of thermogenic coal-bed gases (hundreds of Scf/ton) from other Rocky Mountain basins. However, the total coal-bed gas resource in both the coal beds and the adjacent sandstones is considered to be large (as much as 40 Tcf) because of the vast coal resources (as much as 1.3 trillion tons).

  15. Depositional history of Dakota Sandstone, Moxa Arch and vicinity, southwestern Wyoming - implications for early evolution of Cretaceous Foreland Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ryer, T.A.; McClurg, J.J.; Muller, M.M.

    1987-05-01

    The Dakota Sandstone in the vicinity of the Moxa Arch is divided into upper and lower parts using an unconformity identified on the basis of petrographic evidence and facies relationships. The unconformity is believed to be of subaerial origin and came into being during a pronounced lowering of relative sea level during the late Albian. The lower Dakota consists predominantly of shoreline sandstone and offshore marine shale on the northern part of the Moxa Arch; it consists predominantly of fluvial strata on the southern part of the arch. Meander belts of the lower Dakota trend north-northeastward toward the west-northwest-trending shoreline of the Thermopolis Sea. The upper Dakota consists predominantly of strata deposited in low-energy, restricted marine paleoenvironments that came into being during gradual transgression of the Shell Creek/Mowery Sea. Barrier-island sandstones bodies are elongate toward the northeast, indicating that the shoreline trended in that direction. The reorientation of the shoreline from west-northwest-trending in the lower Dakota to northeast-trending in the upper Dakota is attributed to acceleration in the rate of subsidence in the foreland basin. The Shell Creek Sea advanced down the eastern side of the foreland basin, transgressing over lacustrine deposits that accumulated there during the low-stand of sea level. The Moxa Arch appears to have served as the eastern hinge of the foreland basin during the Dakota; only later, in the Late Cretaceous, did it assume the characteristics of a foreland welt.

  16. Artesian pressures and water quality in Paleozoic aquifers in the Ten Sleep area of the Bighorn Basin, north-central Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Major Paleozoic artesian aquifers in the southeastern Bighorn Basin of Wyoming area, in descending order, the Tensleep Sandstone; the Madison Limestone and Bighorn Dolomite, which together form the Madison-Bighorn aquifer; and the Flathead Sandstone. Operating yields commonly are more than 1,000 gallons per minute from flowing wells completed in the Madison-Bighorn aquifer. The initial test of one well indicated a flow of 14,000 gallons per minute. Wellhead pressures range from less than 50 to more than 400 pounds per square inch. Transmissivities are 500-1,900 feet squared per day for the Madison-Bighorn aquifer and 90-325 feet squared per day for the Tensleep and Flathead Sandstones. Despite extensive development for irrigation there have been few decreases in pressure. Some decreases in pressure have occurred in wells completed in the Flathead Sandstone. Fractures along linear structural features result in significant secondary permeability and allow upward interformational movement of water that affects the altitude of the potentiometric surfaces in the Tensleep Sandstone and Madison-Bighorn aquifer. Upward-moving water from the Tensleep and other formations discharges at the land surface as springs along or near these lineations. Water from the aquifers generally contains minimal concentrations of dissolved solids and individual constituents but has excessive hardness. The water is satisfactory for irrigation and other purposes when hardness is not a detrimental factor. Wellhead temperatures range from 11 degrees to 27.5 degrees C, giving a geothermal gradient of about 0.44 degrees C per 100 feet. (USGS)

  17. A debris flow deposit in alluvial, coal-bearing facies, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA: Evidence for catastrophic termination of a mire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, S.B.; Stanton, R.W.; Flores, R.M.

    1994-01-01

    Coal and clastic facies investigations of a Paleocene coal-bearing succession in the Grass Creek coal mine, southwestern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, USA, suggest that disruption of peat accumulation in recurrent mires was caused by the repetitive progradation of crevasse splays and, ultimately, by a catastrophic mass movement. The mass movement, represented by deposits of debris flow, marked the termination of significant peat accumulation in the Grass Creek coal mine area. Megascopic and microscopic analyses of coal beds exposed along the mine highwalls suggest that these deposits developed in low-lying mires, as evidenced primarily by their ash yields and maceral composition. Disruption of peat accumulation in successive mires was caused by incursions of sediment into the mire environments. Termination by crevasse splay progradation is represented by coarsening-upward successions of mudrock and tabular, rooted sandstone, which overlie coal beds in the lower part of the coal-bearing interval. A more rapid process of mire termination by mass movement is exemplified by a debris flow deposit of diamictite, which overlies the uppermost coal bed at the top of the coal-bearing interval. The diamictite consists of a poorly sorted, unstratified mixture of quartzite cobbles and pebbles embedded in a claystone-rich or sandy mudstone matrix. Deposition of the diamictite may have taken place over a matter of weeks, days, or perhaps even hours, by catastrophic flood, thus reflecting an instantaneous process of mire termination. Coarse clastics and mud were transported from the southwest some 20-40 km as a viscous debris flow along stream courses from the ancestral Washakie Range to the Grass Creek area, where the flow overrode a low-lying mire and effectively terminated peat accumulation. ?? 1994.

  18. Selenium and mining in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Phase III - a preliminary survey of selenium concentrations in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) livers

    SciTech Connect

    Raisbeck, M.L.; Vance, G.F. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Steward, D.G. [AMAX Coal West, Inc., Gillette, WY (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Samples of liver tissue from deer mice trapped on not-yet-mined areas and reclaimed areas at five surface coal mines in the Powder River Basin of northeastern Wyoming were analyzed for selenium. The overall mean concentration of selenium in wet weight liver tissue was 1.685 ppm. The mean value from not-yet-mined areas was 1.437 ppm; the mean value from reclaimed areas was 1.910 ppm (significant at p<0.1016). When one not-yet-mined outlier was removed, significance rose to p<0.0004. Mine-to-mine comparison of samples stratified by type (that is, by not-yet-mined or reclaimed), showed average tissue concentrations from the reclaimed area of Mine 1 were also higher (p<0.0143) then not-yet-mined area samples at Mine 1. No statistically significant differences were found between mines for samples from not-yet-mined areas, and no statistically significant differences were found between Mines 2, 3, 4, and 5 for samples from reclaimed areas. Multiple analysis of variance using the factors: site (mine) and type (not-yet-mined or reclaimed) was not significantly significant (p<0.2115). Simple linear regression showed that selenium concentrations in dry tissue could easily be predicted from wet tissue selenium (r2=0.9775), demonstrating that percent water in the samples was relatively constant. Animal body weight in general was not a predictor for either wet or dry tissue selenium concentrations, but was related to body weight at the higher tissue concentrations of selenium encountered in samples from the reclaimed area at Mine 1. Mouse body weights at Mine 1 were higher on the reclaimed area than mouse body weights from the not-yet-mined area.

  19. Mobile Methane Monitoring Surveys of the Pinedale Anticline Development in the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. A.; Soltis, J.; Murphy, S. M.; Montague, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Methane emissions from the oil and gas sector have become part of a wider debate of the magnitude of climate change impacts from different fossil fuels. This debate is contentious, as a wide range of estimates of development area leakage rates have been postulated. Here we present the results of mobile monitoring performed in the Pinedale Anticline, WY (PAPA) development. A 4-hour circuit upwind, downwind and within the development was designed to determine methane distributions relative to background concentrations. The circuit was repeated thirty-two times to assess the influence of meteorology and emission sources upon measured values. Figure 1 is a composite of methane data for the project. This pilot project enabled identification of areas and emission sources for subsequent plume quantification studies planned for 2014. Here we present the finding of the circuits through mapping and site comparisons. Along with the methane measurements, mobile ozone and oxides of nitrogen observations were also performed, thereby facilitating a better understanding of the phenomenon of wintertime ground level ozone. Building upon surveys from 2012, we also carried out canister measurements of VOC at selected sites to demonstrate the importance of relating methane and selected VOC concentrations when identifying variations in the contributions of emission sources to ambient measurements. While methane and C2 to C5 alkanes elevations are widespread and highly correlated, those of higher molecular weight VOC, in particular benzene, toluene and xylene isomers, show the importance of emission sources other than wet gas leakage. We discuss the utility of 3D visualization of methane data for illustrating the distribution of leakage relative to emission sources. The influence of emission sources and meteorology upon the data is explored through a comparative analysis of the circuit data. This assessment sets the foundation for planned plume quantification. Finally we compare the mobile data with 1-minute data from the Wyoming DEQ site at Boulder, WY, to determine how well the site represents conditions in the surrounding area. Effective policy decisions require better coupling of air quality measurements and emission inventories. We outline an approach that links regulatory network site data with mobile monitoring and plume quantification that should reduce uncertainty for determining the magnitude of methane emissions from oil and gas sources. Pinedale Anticline methane concentrations for mobile monitoring circuits 2/12/2013 to 3/8/2013

  20. Systematics of Water Temperature and Flow at Tantalus Creek During Calendar Year 2005, Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clor, Laura E.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Heasler, Henry P.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze data for stream flow and water temperature from Tantalus Creek in the Norris Geyser Basin and their relationship to air temperature, precipitation, and geyser eruptions during calendar year 2005. The creek is of interest because it is the primary drainage of the Norris Geyser Basin and carries a very high proportion of thermal water derived directly from hot springs. Two separate diurnal patterns emerge - (1) a winter pattern where increases in water temperature and stream flow closely track those of air temperature and (2) a summer pattern where water and air temperature are closely aligned but stream flow declines once water temperature reaches its daily maximum. The winter pattern is present when the daily average temperature consistently drops below 0 ?C whereas the summer pattern is recognizable when the daily average temperature regularly exceeds 0 ?C. Spring and fall systematics are much more irregular, although both summer and winter patterns can be discerned occasionally during those seasons. We interpret increases in stream flow associated with the winter pattern to result from addition of locally sourced melt water (both snow and soil-bound ice) that increases in abundance once temperatures increase in the morning. Melting is facilitated by the warm ground temperatures in the geyser basin, which are significantly higher than air temperatures in the winter. The summer pattern appears to be strongly affected by increased evaporation in the afternoon, decreasing flow and cooling the remaining water. Discharge from eruptions at Echinus Geyser are clearly visible as peaks in the hydrograph, and indicate that water from this geyser reach the Tantalus weir in 80 to 90 minutes, reflecting a slug of water that travels about 0.4 m s-1.

  1. Geochemical processes controlling selenium in ground water after mining, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, D.L.; Rice, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Geochemical data for samples of overburden from three mines in the Powder River Basin indicate a statistically significant (0.01 confidence level) positive correlation (r = 0.74) between Se and organic C. Results of factor analysis with varimax rotation on the major and trace element data from the rock samples indicate large (>50) varimax loadings for Se in two of the three factors. In Factor 1, the association of Se with constituents common to detrital grains indicates that water transporting the detrital particles into the Powder River Basin also carried dissolved Se. The large (>50) varimax loadings of Se and organic C in Factor 2 probably are due to the organic affinities characteristic of Se. Dissolved Se concentrations in water samples collected at one coal mine are directly related to the dissolved organic C concentrations. Hydrophilic acid concentrations in the water samples from the mine ranged from 35 to 43% of the total dissolved organic C, and hydrophobic acid concentrations ranged from 40 to 49% of the total dissolved organic C. The largest dissolved organic C concentrations in water from the same mine (34-302 mg/l), coupled with the large proportion of acidic components, may saturate adsorption sites on geothite and similar minerals that comprise the aquifer material, thus decreasing the extent of selenite (SeO32-) adsorption as a sink for Se as the redox state of ground water decreases. ?? 1989.

  2. Unconformity-related oil entrapment in Muddy Sandstone: comparison of Kitty and Amos Draw fields, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Odland, S.K.; Gardner, M.H.; Gustason, E.R.

    1986-08-01

    It has long been known that an unconformity plays a critical role in trapping oil in the Muddy Sandstone in the Powder River basin, but opinions have varied as to exactly where in the section that unconformity is located. Their work indicates that there are, in fact, two unconformities associated with the Muddy in the northern part of the basin. The older of these occurs on top of the Skull Creek Shale, whereas the younger is largely intraformational. In places, the younger unconformity has truncated the older one. It is the younger unconformity that is responsible for creating favorable settings for stratigraphic entrapment of oil. Two types of unconformity-related oil traps result from fluvial downcutting into and through the strand-plain sandstones of the oldest member of the Muddy during a major sea level drop. In cases where the unconformity cuts through the Muddy into the underlying Skull Creek Shale, permeable valley-fill sediments, deposited during the Muddy transgression, are juxtaposed against the impermeable Skull Creek Shale along the valley walls. Where valleys are oriented roughly perpendicular to regional structure, as at Kitty field, the updip portion of the valley wall can form a permeability barrier to the fluvial reservoir sandstones of the adjacent valley fill. In cases where the unconformity is intraformational, such as at Amos Draw field, early diagenetic clay, associated with the weathered horizon directly beneath the unconformity, can create a seal on top of the strand-plain sandstones of the oldest member of the Muddy.

  3. Seismic, magnetic, and geotechnical properties of a landslide and clinker deposits, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C.H.

    1979-01-01

    Exploitation of vast coal and other resources in the Powder River Basin has caused recent, rapid increases in population and in commercial and residential development and has prompted land utilization studies. Two aspects of land utilization were studied for this report: (1) the seismic and geotechnical properties of a landslide and (2) the seismic, magnetic, and geotechnical properties of clinker deposits. (1) The landslide seismic survey revealed two layers in the slide area. The upper (low-velocity) layer is a relatively weak mantle of colluvium and unconsolidated and weathered bedrock that ranges in thickness from 3.0 to 7.5 m and has an average seismic velocity of about 390 m/s. It overlies high-velocity, relatively strong sedimentary bedrock that has velocities greater than about 1330 m/s. The low-velocity layer is also present at the other eight seismic refraction sites in the basin; a similar layer has also been reported in the Soviet Union in a landslide area over similar bedrock. The buried contact of the low- and high-velocity layers is relatively smooth and is nearly parallel with the restored topographic surface. There is no indication that any of the high-velocity layer (bedrock) has been displaced or removed. The seismic data also show that the shear modulus of the low-velocity layer is only about one-tenth that of the high-velocity layer and the shear strength (at failure) is only about one-thirtieth. Much of the slide failure is clearly in the shear mode, and failure is, therefore, concluded to be confined to the low-velocity layer. The major immediate factor contributing to landslide failure is apparently the addition of moisture to the low-velocity layer. The study implies that the low-velocity layer can be defined over some of the basin by seismic surveys and that they can help predict or delineate potential slides. Preventative actions that could then be taken include avoidance, dewatering, prevention of saturation, buttressing the toe, and unloading the head. The low-velocity layer is usually less than about 5 m thick and may be excavated by dozing, whereas the bedrock must be blasted. Thus, it would seem economically feasible to underpin a structure to nonweathered bedrock or, perhaps, to remove the low-velocity layer prior to construction. (2) Many coal beds in the Powder River Basin have burned along their outcrops, and the resulting intense heat has baked and fused the overlying clastic (sedimentary) rocks into clinkers. The clinkers are very magnetic and a buried edge of a single layer of burn can easily be located by magnetic prospecting methods. Location of the edge is very important in estimating unburned coal deposits, locating clinker quarries, and planning drilling of seismic reflection lines. The clinkers are very porous and highly fractured,-and seismic and geotechnical tests show that they have relatively low strength and competency. Many of the laboratory tests, however, are inherently biased because the clinkers are so highly fractured that only competent samples are selected. The laboratory tests, for example, show that clinkers must be loosened by heavy ripping tractors or blasting, whereas the field data and practical experience indicate that clinkers may be mined with light equipment. Heavy structures such as coal silos and bridge abutments may have to be sited on clinkers. However, differential settlement may occur, with failure in the shear mode, because chimneys of relatively greater strength occur among the weaker clinkers. Preliminary data indicate that the chimneys may be located by magnetic or possibly seismic surveys. Special foundation-preparation techniques could be used or, perhaps, the chimneys could be avoided altogether at a construction site.

  4. Erosion and deposition as indicated by sediment accumulation in stock reservoirs in the Powder River drainage basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roach, Carl H.; Colby, Bruce R.

    1957-01-01

    This report gives the results of an investigation by the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation of sediment accumulation in stock reservoirs in the powder River drainage basin upstream from Arvada, Wyo. The study was made to determine the net rates of erosion in the upland areas and the effects of the reservoirs on the amount of sediment transported to the parent stream. The climate of the area ranges from cold and humid on the high mountains to warm and semiarid on the plains. The average annual precipitation ranges from less than 15 inches on the plains to more than 27 inches in the high mountains, which have a maximum altitude of 13,165 feet. The rocks in the Powder River drainage basin range in age from Precambrian to Recent. The 25 stock reservoirs that were used in the study have drainage areas of 0.09 to 3.53 square miles, are from 3 to 51 years old, and impound water from areas that have land slopes averaging from about 3 to 41 percent. The ratio of average reservoir capacity to drainage area ranges from about 2 to nearly 200 acre-feet per square mile. After adjustment for trap efficiency the average annual sediment yield to the 25 reservoirs ranged from 0.04 to 1.49 acre-feet per square mile and averaged 0.50 acre-foot per square mile of drainage area. The average sediment yield from 6 drainage areas mostly underlain by shale was 0.80 acre-foot per year, 2.3 times greater than yields from the areas underlain by sandstone or sandy shales. Correlations show that the sediment yield increased approximately as the 1.5 power of the channel density, the 0.4 power oif the shape factor, the 0.7 power of the average land slope, and the -0.25 power of the age of the reservoir. Empirical equations for sediment yield and trap efficiency for the area studied are given.

  5. Eocene lake basins in Wyoming and Nevada record rollback of the Farallon flat-slab beneath western North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. E.; Cassel, E. J.; Jicha, B. R.; Singer, B. S.; Carroll, A.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical and conceptual models of flat-slab rollback predict broad initial dynamic subsidence above the slab hinge then uplift and volcanism triggered by the advection of asthenosphere beneath the overriding plate. These predicted surface effects provide a viable but largely untested explanation for lake basin formation in Cordilleran-type orogenies. We argue that the hydrologic closure of both the foreland (early Eocene) and hinterland (late Eocene) of the North American Cordillera were caused by a trenchward-migrating wave of dynamic and thermal topography resulting from progressive removal of the Farallon flat-slab. Two major episodes of hydrologic drainage closure are recorded by Eocene terrestrial strata in the western United States. The first occurred in the retroarc foreland during the early Eocene, and resulted in the deposition of the Green River Fm. The second occurred in the hinterland during the late Eocene and resulted in accumulation of the Elko Fm. In both regions, lake strata overlie fluvial strata and become progressively more evaporative up-section, and are overlain by volcaniclastic strata. Both successions were then truncated by regional unconformities that extend until the Oligocene. We interpret these stratigraphic successions to record trenchward propagation of a regional topographic wave, caused by slab rollback. Migration of the slab-hinge initially caused dynamic subsidence and initiation of lacustrine deposition. Regional surface uplift followed, and was associated with scattered volcanism. Uplift promoted formation of endorheic basins and ultimately the development of regional unconformities. The height of the uplift can be roughly approximated by the preserved thickness of lacustrine and other nonmarine deposits at both locations (0.2-1.0 km). The 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb geochronology of Green River Fm ash beds indicate that this surface topographic wave migrated trenchward (SW) across the foreland from 53 to 47 Ma at a velocity of ~6 cm/yr. Single crystal sanidine 40Ar/39Ar ages for ash beds within the Elko Fm indicate hydrologic ponding from 43 to 38 Ma. The 4 myr gap between Green River and Elko Fm deposition may represent the time required for the rollback wave to transit the steep eastern slope of the Sevier fold-thrust belt.

  6. Occurrence and flux of selected pesticides in surface water of the upper snake River Basin, Idaho and western Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, G.M.

    1997-01-01

    During May and June 1994, 37 water samples were collected at 31 sites in the upper Snake River Basin and analyzed for 83 pesticides and pesticide metabolites. EPTC, atrazine, and the atrazine metabolite deethylated atrazine were the most frequently detected and were found in 30, 20, and 13 of the samples, respectively. Fifteen additional pesticides were detected at least once. All the compounds detected were at concentrations of less than 1 microgram per liter. Total annual applications of EPTC and atrazine within subbasins and their instantaneous instream fluxes have a logarithmic relation with coefficients of determination (R2 values) of 0.55 and 0.62, respectively. At the time of sampling, the median daily flux of EPTC was about O. 0001% of the annual amount applied in a subbasin, whereas the median daily flux of atrazine was between 0.001 and 0.01%. The difference in fluxes between EPTC and atrazine probably results from differences in their physical properties and in the method and timing of application.

  7. Carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide degassing and cryptic thermal input to Brimstone Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergfeld, D.; Evans, William C.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Hurwitz, S.

    2012-01-01

    Brimstone Basin, a remote area of intense hydrothermal alteration a few km east of the Yellowstone Caldera, is rarely studied and has long been considered to be a cold remnant of an ancient hydrothermal system. A field campaign in 2008 confirmed that gas emissions from the few small vents were cold and that soil temperatures in the altered area were at background levels. Geochemical and isotopic evidence from gas samples (3He/4He ~ 3RA, ?13C-CO2 ~ ? 3‰) however, indicate continuing magmatic gas input to the system. Accumulation chamber measurements revealed a surprisingly large diffuse flux of CO2 (~ 277 t d-1) and H2S (0.6 t d-1). The flux of CO2 reduces the 18O content of the overlying cold groundwater and related stream waters relative to normal meteoric waters. Simple isotopic modeling reveals that the CO2 likely originates from geothermal water at a temperature of 93 ± 19 °C. These results and the presence of thermogenic hydrocarbons (C1:C2 ~ 100 and ?13C-CH4 = ? 46.4 to ? 42.8‰) in gases require some heat source at depth and refute the assumption that this is a “fossil” hydrothermal system.

  8. Configuration of shelf sandstone oil reservoirs, Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) Turner Sandy member of Carlilie Shale, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D.; Keighin, C.W.

    1989-03-01

    Oil production in the Upper Cretaceous Turner Sandy Member of the Carlile shale on the east flank of the Powder River basin is established in two types of stratigraphic traps characterized by distinct geometries and reservoir properties. One type is medium-grained sandstone bodies as much as 4 m thick that have filled elongate (as much as 10 km), narrow (< 1.5 km), east-west-trending erosional depressions of low relief. Trough and tabular cross-stratification indicates an eastward direction of transport. This type of sandstone is interpreted as previously deposited sediments reworked by transgression following global drop in sea level in middle Turonian time. The sands were redistributed and concentrated by offshore-directed downwelling flows on inner shelf in irregularly spaced depressions controlled by recurrent movement of basement fault blocks. Although this type is limited in areal extent, reservoirs in it are good (porosity and permeability are as much as 20% and 100 md, respectively). In contrast, the other type of trap is generally very fine-grained sandstone that occurs in shoaling-upward sequences as much as 12 m thick. Shale intercalations decrease upward, and planar lamination and hummocky cross-stratification are prevalent. Upper parts of sequence are bioturbated and contain trace fossils of Skolithos ichnofacies. These sequences form widespread (70 km/sup 2/) bodies that were deposited below fair-weather base on the storm-wave-dominated outer shelf. Although the overall sandstone bodies are extensive and resulting production is large, reservoir in these bodies are characterized by thin beds and vertical and lateral discontinuity on a centimeter scale. In addition, sandstones are tight (average porosity and permeability are 15% and 0.5 md, respectively) because of original fine grain size and presence of authigenic clays.

  9. Unraveling the multiple origins of heterogeneity within Lower Mississippian Madison reservoirs: Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and Montana, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenfeld, M.D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    {open_quotes}Fracture-controlled{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}karst-controlled{close_quotes} contributions to reservoir heterogeneity tend to be viewed as non-fabric selective in nature. Given such an outlook, predictions of fracture and karst overprints depend on an awareness of extrinsic controls such as past and present stress-fields, structural curvature, fault proximity, and the positions and movements of paleo-water tables. The hierarchical sequence stratigraphy of the 300 m Madison provides the stratigraphic framework necessary to characterize the vertical distribution of early, fabric-selective platformal dolomite; additionally, this framework assists in discriminating between fabric-selective and non-fabric-selective styles of karst and fracturing. In the case of Madison karst, early meteoric lithification and subtle Mississippian tectonics resulted in a vertically oriented fracture-controlled karst on top of the Madison, yet this non fabric-selective system channeled waters into several fabric-selective, regionally widespread solution collapse zones and cave systems. The horizontally oriented regional dissolution was stratigraphically controlled by soluble evaporitic zones and/or argillaceous aquitards overlying intra-Madison sequence boundaries rather than occurring at various unconfined water-table stillstands. Evaporite solution collapse breccias presently form partial to complete barriers to vertical fluid flow depending on thickness and degree of associated argillaceous influx, while cave-roof {open_quotes}fracture breccias{close_quotes} were preferential sites of late dolomitization within the giant Elk Basin Madison reservoir. In the case of Madison fracturing, stratigraphic cycles of several scales provide effective scales of analysis in the quest for true mechanical stratigraphic units defined by common fracture styles.

  10. Geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane: Sand wash basin, Colorado and Wyoming. Topical report, August 1, 1991-April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S.; Tyler, R.; McMurry, R.G.

    1993-08-01

    Contents: tectonic evolution, stratigraphic setting, and coal fracture patterns of the sand wash basin; stratigraphy and coal occurrence of the upper cretaceous mesaverde group, sand wash basin; coal rank, gas content, and composition and origin of coalbed gases, mesaverde group, sand wash basin; hydrologic setting of the upper mesaverde group, sand wash basin; stratigraphy and coal occurrence of the paleocene fort union formation, sand wash basin; coal rank, gas content, and composition and origin of coalbed gases, fort union formation, sand wash basin; hydrologic setting of the fort union formation, sand wash basin; and resources and producibility of coalbed methane in the sand wash basin.

  11. Burial history, thermal maturity, and oil and gas generation history of petroleum systems in the Wind River Basin Province, central Wyoming: Chapter 6 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas resources in the Wind River Basin Province, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Laura N.R.; Finn, Thomas M.; Lewan, Michael D.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Burial history, thermal maturity, and timing of oil and gas generation were modeled for eight key source rock units at nine well locations throughout the Wind River Basin Province. Petroleum source rocks include the Permian Phosphoria Formation, the Cretaceous Mowry Shale, Cody Shale, and Mesaverde, Meeteetse, and Lance Formations, and the Tertiary (Paleocene) Fort Union Formation, including the Waltman Shale Member. Within the province boundary, the Phosphoria is thin and only locally rich in organic carbon. Phosphoria oil produced from reservoirs in the province is thought to have migrated from the Wyoming and Idaho thrust belt. Locations (wells) selected for burial history reconstructions include three in the deepest parts of the province (Adams OAB-17, Bighorn 1-5, and Coastal Owl Creek); three at intermediate depths (Hells Half Acre, Shell 33X-10, and West Poison Spider); and three at relatively shallow locations (Young Ranch, Amoco Unit 100, and Conoco-Coal Bank). The thermal maturity of source rocks is greatest in the deep northern and central parts of the province and decreases to the south and east toward the basin margins. The results of the modeling indicate that, in the deepest areas, (1) peak petroleum generation from Cretaceous rocks occurred from Late Cretaceous through middle Eocene time, and (2) onset of oil generation from the Waltman Shale Member occurred from late Eocene to early Miocene time. Based on modeling results, gas generation from the cracking of Phosphoria oil reservoired in the Park City Formation reached a peak in the late Paleocene/early Eocene (58 to 55 Ma) only in the deepest parts of the province. The Mowry Shale and Cody Shale (in the eastern half of the basin) contain a mix of Type-II and Type-III kerogens. Oil generation from predominantly Type-II source rocks of these units in the deepest parts of the province reached peak rates during the latest Cretaceous to early Eocene (65 to 55 Ma). Only in these areas of the basin did these units reach peak gas generation from the cracking of oil, which occurred in the early to middle Eocene (55 to 42 Ma). Gas-prone source rocks of the Mowry and Cody Shales (predominantly Type-III kerogen), and the Mesaverde, Meeteetse, Lance, and Fort Union Formations (Type –III kerogen) reached peak gas generation in the latest Cretaceous to late Eocene (67 to 38 Ma) in the deepest parts of the province. Gas generation from the Mesaverde source rocks started at all of the modeled locations but reached peak generation at only the deepest locations and at the Hells Half Acre location in the middle Paleocene to early Eocene (59 to 48 Ma). Also at the deepest locations, peak gas generation occurred from the late Paleocene to the early Eocene (57 to 49 Ma) for the Meeteetse Formation, and during the Eocene for the Lance Formation (55 to 48 Ma) and the Fort Union Formation (44 to 38 Ma). The Waltman Shale Member of the Fort Union Formation contains Type-II kerogen. The base of the Waltman reached a level of thermal maturity to generate oil only at the deep-basin locations (Adams OAB-17 and Bighorn 1-5 locations) in the middle Eocene to early Miocene (36 to 20 Ma).

  12. A new Wyoming phytosaur

    E-print Network

    Eaton, T. H., Jr.

    1965-08-01

    Wyoming Phytosaur 3 FIG. 1. Angistorhintts acolamnis EATON, n. sp., Upper Triassic, Wyoming (see explanation on lacing page). 4 The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions Thus it is no longer necessary to separate Brachy- suchus from... Wyoming Phytosaur 3 FIG. 1. Angistorhintts acolamnis EATON, n. sp., Upper Triassic, Wyoming (see explanation on lacing page). 4 The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions Thus it is no longer necessary to separate Brachy- suchus from...

  13. Tectonically induced climate and its control on the distribution of depositional systems in a continental foreland basin, Cloverly and Lakota Formations (Lower Cretaceous) of Wyoming, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, William S.; Suttner, Lee J.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2007-12-01

    Continental sediments of the Cloverly and Lakota Formations (Lower Cretaceous) in Wyoming are subdivided into three depositional systems: perennial to intermittent alluvial, intermittent to ephemeral alluvial, and playa. Chert-bearing sandstones, conglomerates, carbonaceous mudrocks, blocky mudrocks, and skeletal limestones were deposited by perennial to intermittent alluvial systems. Carbonaceous mudrocks contain abundant wood fragments, cuticle and cortical debris, and other vascular plant remains representing deposition in oxbow lakes, abandoned channels, and on floodplains under humid to seasonal conditions. Intraformational conglomerates, sandstones, bioturbated and blocky mudrocks with caliche nodules, and bioturbated limestones characterize deposition in intermittent to ephemeral alluvial systems. Bioturbated limestones are encased in bioturbated mudrocks with abundant pseudo-slickensides. The presence of caliche nodules in some of the blocky to bioturbated mudrocks is consistent with supersaturation and precipitation of calcium carbonate from groundwater under semi-arid conditions. Caliche nodules, pseudo-slickensides, and carbonate-rich floodplain sediments are interpreted to have been deposited by intermittent to ephemeral alluvial systems under seasonal to semi-arid climatic conditions. Laminated mudrocks, siltstones, vuggy carbonates, bedded to nodular evaporites, pebbly mudrocks, and diamictites were deposited in evaporative alkaline lakes or playas. Pebbly mudrocks and diamictites are interpreted to represent deposition from channelized and unchannelized hyperconcentrated flows on a playa, resulting from intense rain events within the basin. The areal abundance and distribution of these depositional systems change systematically across the overfilled portion of the Early Cretaceous Cordilleran foreland basin in Wyoming. The lower part (A-interval) of the Cloverly and Lakota Formations is characterized by deposits of perennial to intermittent rivers that existed 300 to 1000 km east of the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt. Proximal to the Sevier fold-and-thrust belt, the A-interval of the Cloverly Formation and upper Ephraim Formation of the Gannett Group are typified by deposits of intermittent to ephemeral rivers and their associated floodplains. In the middle part (B-interval) of the Cloverly Formation, intermittent to ephemeral alluvial systems expand to 600 km into the basin. The upper part (C-interval) of the Cloverly Formation is characterized by playa deposits in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins and intermittent to ephemeral alluvial deposits along the front of the ancestral Sevier Mountains. Deposits of perennial to intermittent alluvial systems in the C-interval of the Cloverly and Lakota Formations are restricted to the Black Hills region, almost 900 km to the east of the Sevier Mountains. The change in the areal distribution of depositional systems through time within this continental foreland basin may be attributed to the development of a rain shadow associated with the uplift of the Sevier Mountains in the Early Cretaceous.

  14. Artesian pressures and water quality in Paleozoic aquifers in the Ten Sleep area of the Bighorn Basin, north-central Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, Maurice E.

    1986-01-01

    The major Paleozoic artesian aquifers, the aquifers most favorable for continued development, in the Ten Sleep area of the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming are the Tensleep Sandstone, the Madison Limestone and Bighorn Dolomite (Madison-Bighorn aquifer), and the Flathead Sandstone. The minor aquifers include the Goose Egg and Park City Formations (considered in the Ten Sleep area to be the lateral equivalent of the Phosphoria Formation) and the Amsden Formation. Most wells completed in the major and minor aquifers flow at the land surface. Wellhead pressures generally are less than 50 pounds per square inch for the Tensleep Sandstone, 150-250 pounds per square inch for the Madison-Bighorn aquifer, and more than 400 pounds per square inch for the Flathead Sandstone. Flowing wells completed in the Madison-Bighorn aquifer and the Flathead Sandstone yield more than 1,000 gallons per minute. The initial test of one well completed in the Madison-Bighorn aquifer indicated a flow rate of 14,000 gallons per minute. Transmissivities range from 500 to 1,900 feet squared per day for the Madison-Bighorn aquifer and from about 90 to 325 feet squared per day for the Tensleep and Flathead Sandstones. Significant secondary permeability from fracturing in the Paleozoic aquifers allows local upward interformational movement of water, and this affects the altitude of the potentiometric surfaces of the Tensleep Sandstone and the Madison-Bighorn aquifer. Water moves upward from the Tensleep and other formations, through the Goose Egg Formation, to discharge at the land surface as springs. Much of the spring flow is diverted for irrigation or is used for rearing fish. Decreases from original well pressures were not apparent in wells completed in the Tensleep Sandstone or in the Madison-Bighorn aquifer in the study area except for a few wells in or near the town of Ten Sleep. Most wells completed in the Flathead Sandstone, which also are open to the Madison-Bighorn aquifer, show a decrease of pressure from the time of completion to 1978. The decrease of pressure is partly the result of water moving from the Flathead Sandstone into the Madison-Bighorn aquifer, which has a lower potentiometric surface than does the Flathead Sandstone, even during the time the wells are not in operation. Pressure in some small-capacity wells completed in the Goose Egg Formation also has decreased near Ten Sleep. Most of the wells, particularly the irrigation wells, show a progressive decrease in pressure during the irrigation season but recover during periods of nonuse. Measurements of the pressure were made principally in 1953, 1962, 1970, and 1975-78. Well water from the Paleozoic aquifers generally contains minimal concentrations of dissolved solids and individual constituents but excessive hardness. Dissolved-solids concentrations of water are less than 300 milligrams per liter in the Tensleep Sandstone and the Madison-Bighorn aquifer, less than 200 milligrams per liter in the Flathead Sandstone, and as much as 450 milligrams per liter in the Goose Egg Formation. Bicarbonate is the major constituent, followed by calcium and magnesium. Relatively large concentrations of sulfate, as much as 490 milligrams per liter, were found, mainly in water from the Goose Egg Formation. The water has low sodium (alkali) and medium salinity; therefore, the water is satisfactory for irrigation and most other uses, if excessive hardness is not a detrimental factor. Wellhead temperatures range from 11 ? to 27.5 ? Celsius (51 ? to 81.5 ? Fahrenheit) within a range in depth of approximately 250 to 4,000 feet. This gives a geothermal gradient of about 0.44 ? Celsius per 100 feet (0.79 ? Fahrenheit per 100 feet).

  15. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FERRIS AND HANNA COAL IN THE HANNA AND CARBON BASINS

    E-print Network

    ...................................................................................................HF-6 Ferris 23-25 Coal Beds: Structural Cross Section A-A'...............................HF-7 Ferris 65,1 V.V. Cavaroc, Jr.,2 and L.R. Bader1 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A Click here or on this symbol in the toolbar to return. 1999

  16. Northwest Indiana Regional Development Authority William Hanna, Executive Director

    E-print Network

    Northwest Indiana Regional Development Authority William Hanna, Executive Director 9800 Connecticut.in.gov/rda Northwest Indiana Regional Development Authority: Established to fund and develop transportation, shoreline and economic development projects in Northwest Indiana, the Northwest Indiana Regional Development Authority

  17. Paleotectonics of Frontier Formation in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, W.H. III

    1983-08-01

    The most intense and widespread pre-Laramide structural deformation of Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in Wyoming is associated with the Wall Creek sandstone of the Frontier Formation. Most of the evidence of structural deformation is found immediately below the regional unconformity at the base of this sandstone. Regionally, an isopach map from the top of the Frontier Formation to the top of the Mowry Formation shows strong and persistent thinning onto a north-trending arch in western Wyoming and thickening into a northwest trending basin in eastern Wyoming. Part of the thinning onto the western arch is caused by progressively deeper erosion of a regional unconformity at the base of the Wall Creek sandstone, and regional onlap of the Wall Creek sandstone above the unconformity. There is also some westward thinning of the lower Frontier interval, however, which is not related to the Wall Creek unconformity. Of the more specific paleostructures discussed, the north-trending anticlines in the vicinity of the Moxa arch in southwestern Wyoming are particularly well developed. An east-west anticline in the Bison basin area appears to have been faulted on the south flank, and a broad arch on the west side of the Powder River basin may have influenced paleocurrents and sandstone depositional trends of the productive First Frontier Sandstone of that area.

  18. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project: petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas in the Southwestern Wyoming Province, Wyoming, Colorado and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    USGS Southwest Wyoming Province Assessment Team

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Southwestern Wyoming Province of southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado, and northeastern Utah (fig. 1). The USGS Southwestern Wyoming Province for this assessment included the Green River Basin, Moxa arch, Hoback Basin, Sandy Bend arch, Rock Springs uplift, Great Divide Basin, Wamsutter arch, Washakie Basin, Cherokee ridge, and the Sand Wash Basin. The assessment of the Southwestern Wyoming Province is based on geologic principles and uses the total petroleum system concept. The geologic elements of a total petroleum system include hydrocarbon source rocks (source rock maturation, hydrocarbon generation, and migration), reservoir rocks (sequence stratigraphy, petrophysical properties), and hydrocarbon traps (trap types, formation, and timing). Using this geologic framework, the USGS defined 9 total petroleum systems (TPS) and 23 assessment units (AU) within these TPSs, and quantitatively estimated the undiscovered oil and gas resources within 21 of the 23 AUs.

  19. Coalbed Methane in Wyoming

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Black Diamond Energy, Inc.

    Coalbed methane (CH4) is a natural gas and valuable energy resource that occurs in coal beds. This site, hosted by an energy development corporation, explains the geology and stratigraphy of Wyoming in the context of the formation of coalbed methane and its occurrence in Wyoming. Maps, cross sections, stratigraphic columns and fence diagrams are provided to explain Cretaceous and Tertiary coalbed methane-plays in Wyoming.

  20. Water-quality characteristics and trend analyses for the Tongue, Powder, Cheyenne, and Belle Fourche River drainage basins, Wyoming and Montana, for selected periods, water years 1991 through 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.

    2012-01-01

    The Powder River structural basin in northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana is an area of ongoing coalbed natural gas (CBNG) development. Waters produced during CBNG development are managed with a variety of techniques, including surface impoundments and discharges into stream drainages. The interaction of CBNG-produced waters with the atmosphere and the semiarid soils of the Powder River structural basin can affect water chemistry in several ways. Specific conductance and sodium adsorption ratios (SAR) of CBNG-produced waters that are discharged to streams have been of particular concern because they have the potential to affect the use of the water for irrigation. Water-quality monitoring has been conducted since 2001 at main-stem and tributary sites in the Tongue, Powder, Cheyenne, and Belle Fourche River drainage basins in response to concerns about CBNG effects. A study was conducted to summarize characteristics of stream-water quality for water years 2001–10 (October 1, 2000, to September 30, 2010) and examine trends in specific conductance, SAR, and primary constituents that contribute to specific conductance and SAR for changes through time (water years 1991–2010) that may have occurred as a result of CBNG development. Specific conductance and SAR are the focus characteristics of this report. Dissolved calcium, magnesium, and sodium, which are primary contributors to specific conductance and SAR, as well as dissolved alkalinity, chloride, and sulfate, which are other primary contributors to specific conductance, also are described. Stream-water quality in the Tongue, Powder, Cheyenne, and Belle Fourche River drainage basins was variable during water years 2001–10, in part because of variations in streamflow. In general, annual runoff was less than average during water years 2001–06 and near or above average during water years 2007–10. Stream water of the Tongue River had the smallest specific conductance values, sodium adsorption ratios, and major ion concentrations of the main-stem streams. Sites in the Tongue River drainage basin typically had the smallest range of specific conductance and SAR values. The water chemistry of sites in the Powder River drainage basin generally was the most variable as a result of diverse characteristics of that basin. Plains tributaries in the Powder River drainage basin had the largest range of specific conductance and SAR values, in part due to the many tributaries that receive CBNG-produced waters. Trends were analyzed using the seasonal Kendall test with flow-adjusted concentrations to determine changes to water quality through time at sites in the Tongue, Powder, Cheyenne, and Belle Fourche River drainage basins. Trends were evaluated for water years 2001–10 for 17 sites, which generally were on the main-stem streams and primary tributaries. Trends were evaluated for water years 2005–10 for 26 sites to increase the spatial coverage of sites. Trends were evaluated for water years 1991–2010 for eight sites to include water-quality data collected prior to widespread CBNG development and expand the temporal context of trends. Consistent patterns were not observed in trend results for water years 2001–10 for flow-adjusted specific conductance and SAR values in the Tongue, Powder, and Belle Fourche River drainage basins. Significant (p-values less than 0.05) upward trends in flow-adjusted specific conductance values were determined for 3 sites, a downward trend was determined for 1 site, and no significant (p-value greater than 0.05) trends were determined for 13 sites. One of the sites with a significant upward trend was the Tongue River at the Wyoming-Montana State line. No trend in flow-adjusted specific conductance values was determined for the Powder River at Moorhead, Mont. Significant upward trends in flow-adjusted SAR values were determined for 2 sites and no significant trends were determined for 15 sites. No trends in flow-adjusted SAR values were determined for the Tongue River at the Wyoming-Montana State line

  1. WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF THE UPPER SNAKE RIVER BASIN, IDAHO AND WESTERN WYOMING - SUMMARY OF AQUATIC BIOLOGICAL DATA FOR SURFACE WATER THROUGH 1992

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial phase of this study involved compiling data to describe the current (1992) and historical aquatic biological conditions of surface water in the Snake River Basin (1704). To assess water quality of the basin, at least 26 different macroinvertebrate and fish community ...

  2. Geologic map of the Peach Orchard Flat quadrangle, Carbon County, Wyoming, and descriptions of new stratigraphic units in the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation and Paleocene Fort Union Formation, eastern Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming-Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honey, J.D.; Hettinger, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    This report provides a geologic map of the Peach Orchard Flat 7.5-minute quadrangle, located along the eastern flank of the Washakie Basin, Wyo. Geologic formations and individual coal beds were mapped at a scale of 1:24,000; surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described; and well logs were examined to determine coal correlations and thicknesses in the subsurface. In addition, four lithostratigraphic units were named: the Red Rim Member of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation, and the China Butte, Blue Gap, and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation.

  3. Wyoming fossils change theories about extinction Casper, Wyoming -Wednesday, March 12, 2003

    E-print Network

    Wilf, Peter

    Wyoming fossils change theories about extinction Casper, Wyoming - Wednesday, March 12, 2003 Marketplace Classifieds Internet Service Subscribe Home > News > Wyoming > Wyoming fossils change theories Regional Lee Newspapers Billings Gazette Wyoming fossils change theories about extinction By DAN WHIPPLE

  4. Basin-margin depositional environments of the Fort Union and Wasatch Formations (Tertiary) in the Buffalo-Lake De Smet area, Johnson County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obernyer, Stanley L.

    1979-01-01

    The Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Wasatch Formations along the east flank of the Bighorn Mountains in the Buffalo-Lake De Smet area, Wyoming, consist of continental alluvial fan, braided stream, and poorly drained alluvial plain deposits. The Fort Union conformably overlies the Cretaceous Lance Formation, which is marine in its lower units and nonmarine in its upper part. The formations dip steeply along the western margin of the study area and are nearly horizontal in the central and eastern portions. This structural configuration permits the reconstruction of depositional environments as an aid to understanding: (1) the evolution of the Bighorn uplift and its effects on the depositional patterns marginal to the uplift during Paleocene and Eocene time and (2) the changing depositional environments basinward from the margin of the uplift during a relatively small period of time in the Eocene.

  5. Anisotropy and Spatial Variation of Relative Permeability and Lithologic Character of Tensleep Sandstone Reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Thomas L.

    1996-10-01

    This multidisciplinary study is designed to provide improvements in advanced reservoir characterization techniques. This goal is to be accomplished through: (1) an examination of the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability in the Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs of Wyoming; (2) the placement of that variation and anisotropy into paleogeographic, depositional, and diagenetic frameworks; (3) the development of pore-system imagery techniques for the calculation of relative permeability; (4) reservoir simulations testing the impact of relative permeability anisotropy and spatial variation on Tensleep Sandstone reservoir enhanced oil recovery; and (5) a geochemical investigation of the spatial and dynamic alteration in sandstone reservoirs that is caused by rock-fluid interaction during CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery processes.

  6. Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    The Wyoming Business Council, representing the state’s interests, is participating in a collaborative evaluation of energy development opportunities with the NGNP Industry Alliance (an industry consortium), the University of Wyoming, and the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. Three important energy-related goals are being pursued by the State of Wyoming: Ensuring continued reliable and affordable sources of energy for Wyoming’s industries and people Restructuring the coal economy in Wyoming Restructuring the natural gas economy in Wyoming

  7. Assessment of selected constituents in surface water of the upper Snake River basin, Idaho and western Wyoming, water years 1975-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Gregory M.

    1994-01-01

    A more extensive data-collection program in the upper Snake River Basin is needed to address a number of water-quality issues. These include an analysis of effects of land use on the quality of surface water; quantification of mass movement of nutrients and suspended sediment at key locations in the basin; distribution of aquatic organisms; and temporal and spatial distribution of pesticides in surface water, bottom sediment, and biota.

  8. Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    James Bauder

    2008-09-30

    U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when water supplies sourced from coalbed methane extraction are plentiful. Constructed wetlands, planted to native, salt tolerant species demonstrated potential to utilize substantial volumes of coalbed methane product water, although plant community transitions to mono-culture and limited diversity communities is a likely consequence over time. Additionally, selected, cultured forage quality barley varieties and native plant species such as Quail bush, 4-wing saltbush, and seaside barley are capable of sustainable, high quality livestock forage production, when irrigated with coalbed methane product water sourced from the Powder River Basin. A consequence of long-term plant water use which was enumerated is elevated salinity and sodicity concentrations within soil and shallow alluvial groundwater into which coalbed methane product water might drain. The most significant conclusion of these investigations was the understanding that phytoremediation is not a viable, effective technique for management of coalbed methane product water under the present circumstances of produced water within the Powder River Basin. Phytoremediation is likely an effective approach to sodium and salt removal from salt-impaired sites after product water discharges are discontinued and site reclamation is desired. Coalbed methane product water of the Powder River Basin is most frequently impaired with respect to beneficial use quality by elevated sodicity, a water quality constituent which can cause swelling, slaking, and dispersion of smectite-dominated clay soils, such as commonly occurring within the Powder River Basin. To address this issue, a commercial-scale fluid-bed, cationic resin exchange treatment process and prototype operating treatment plant was developed and beta-tested by Drake Water Technologies under subcontract to this award. Drake Water Technologies secured U.S. Patent No. 7,368,059-B2, 'Method for removal of benevolent cations from contaminated water', a beta Drake Process Unit (DPU) was developed and deployed for operation in the Powder River Basin. First year operatio

  9. Physical, chemical, and biological relations of four ponds in the Hidden Water Creek strip-mine area, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wangsness, David J.

    1977-01-01

    The Hidden Water Creek area in Wyoming was mined from 1944 to 1955 and abandoned. The open pits filled with water and pond-type ecosystems developed. Light was transmitted to greater depths within two control ponds located outside the mine area. The lower light transmittance in the ponds within the mined area probably was due, in part, to the greater number of phytoplankton cells. Also, unconsolidated soil material within the mine area was observed to slough off the pond banks, which could add to the concentration of suspended sediments. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were lower in the ponds within the mined area. Most of the major ions (calcium, magnesium, sulfate, and sodium) were present in greater concentrations in the ponds within the mined area. Higher concentrations of bicarbonate and total hardness were in the water within the mined area. Biological communities were less diverse and chemical concentrations fluctuated more in the mined area than in the ponds outside the mined area. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Competition for early arrival in migratory birds HANNA KOKKO

    E-print Network

    can also lead to partial migration, in which case birds in good condition are expected to be most likely to remain resi- dent. Key-words: ¯oating, partial migration, protandry, seasonal optimizationCompetition for early arrival in migratory birds HANNA KOKKO Department of Zoology, University

  11. President: Erika Hanna Contact Email: hannaer@onid.orst.edu

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    President: Erika Hanna Contact Email: hannaer@onid.orst.edu Mission/Purpose: The Oregon State Polo are welcome to come and get taught riding and polo. How is the game played? Intercollegiate polo follows the rules and regulations of arena polo, which is a variation on outdoor polo. The main difference between

  12. Wyoming Kids Count in Wyoming Factbook, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Children's Action Alliance, Cheyenne.

    This Kids Count factbook details statewide trends in the well-being of Wyoming's children. Following an overview of key indicators and data sources, the factbook documents trends by county for 20 indicators, including the following: (1) poverty and population; (2) welfare reform; (3) certified day care facilities; (4) births; (5) infant deaths;…

  13. ANALYSIS OF DATA ON NUTRIENTS AND ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN GROUND WATER IN THE UPPER SNAKE RIVER BASIN, IDAHO AND WESTERN WYOMING, 1980-91

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nutrient and organic compound data from the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET data bases provided information for development of a preliminary conceptual model of spatial and temporal ground-water quality in the upper Snake River Basin (17...

  14. ASSESSMENT OF SELECTED CONSTITUENTS IN THE SURFACE WATER OF THE UPPER SNAKE RIVER BASIN, IDAHO AND WESTERN WYOMING, WATER YEARS 1975-1989.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1991, a water-quality investigation of the upper Snake River Basin (1704) was initiated as part of the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Nearly 9,000 analyses of nutrients and suspended sediment from more than 450 stations were retrieved from the U.S. Environmen...

  15. Characteristics of fish assemblages and related environmental variables for streams of the upper Snake River basin, Idaho and western Wyoming, 1993-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.

    1997-01-01

    limited designation for the middle reach of the Snake River between Milner Dam and King Hill and provide a framework for developing indices of biotic integrity by using fish assemblages to evaluate water quality of streams in the upper Snake River Basin.

  16. Characteristics and trends of streamflow and dissolved solids in the upper Colorado River Basin, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liebermann, Timothy D.; Mueller, David K.; Kircher, James E.; Choquette, Anne F.

    1989-01-01

    Annual and monthly concentrations and loads of dissolved solids and major constituents were estimated for 70 streamflow-gaging stations in the Upper Colorado River Basin. Trends in streamflow, dissolved-solids concentrations, and dissolved-solids loads were identified. Nonparametric trend-analysis techniques were used to determine step trends resulting from human activities upstream and long-term monotonic trends. Results were compared with physical characteristics of the basin and historical water-resource development in the basin to determine source areas of dissolved solids and possible cause of trends. Mean annual dissolved-solids concentration increases from less than 100 milligrams per liter in the headwater streams to more than 500 milligrams per liter in the outflow from the Upper Colorado River Basin. All the major tributaries that have high concentrations of dissolved solids are downstream from extensive areas of irrigated agriculture. However, irrigation predated the period of record for most sites and was not a factor in many identified trends. Significant annual trends were identified for 30 sites. Most of these trends were related to transbasin exports, changes in land use, salinity-control practices, or reservoir development. The primary factor affecting streamflow and dissolved-solids concentration and load has been the construction of large reservoirs. Reservoirs have decreased the seasonal and annual variability of streamflow and dissolved solids in streams that drain the Gunnison and San Juan River basins. Fontenelle and Flaming Gorge Reservoirs have increased the dissolved-solids load in the Green River because of dissolution of mineral salts from the bank material. The largest trends occurred downstream from Lake Powell. However, the period of record since the completion of filling was too short to estimate the long-term effects of that reservoir.

  17. Einstein in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Ian

    1996-01-01

    Describes "Einstein's Adventurarium," a science center housed in an empty shopping mall in Gillette, Wyoming, created through school, business, and city-county government partnership. Describes how interactive exhibits allow exploration of life sciences, physics, and paleontology. (KDFB)

  18. Sampling and analyses report for postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG Site, Hanna, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Crader

    1989-01-01

    Between June 22, 1989 and June 26, 1989, Western Research Institute (WRI) completed the second quarterly Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification (RM1 UCG) site groundwater monitoring for the year 1989. This quarterly sample outing represents the third sampling since the completion of the RM1 groundwater restoration. Background material and the sampling and analytical procedures associated with this task are

  19. Sampling and analyses report for postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG Site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Crader, S.E.

    1989-06-01

    Between June 22, 1989 and June 26, 1989, Western Research Institute (WRI) completed the second quarterly Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification (RM1 UCG) site groundwater monitoring for the year 1989. This quarterly sample outing represents the third sampling since the completion of the RM1 groundwater restoration. Background material and the sampling and analytical procedures associated with this task are described in the `Rocky Mountain 1 Postburn Groundwater Monitoring Quality Assurance Plan`, prepared by the U.S. DOE.

  20. Sampling and analyses report for postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG Site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Crader, S.E.

    1988-12-01

    Between November 28, 1988 and December 05, 1988, Western Research Institute (WRI) completed the fourth quarterly Rocky Mountain 1 (RMI) groundwater monitoring for the year 1988. This quarterly sample outing represents the first sampling since the completion of the RM1 groundwater restoration. Background material and the sampling and analytical procedures associated with this task are described in the ``Rocky Mountain 1 Postburn Groundwater Monitoring Quality Assurance Plan,`` prepared by Western Research Institute for the Gas Research Institute and the US Department of Energy. The results of sample analyses for compliance suite parameters of all wells sampled during December, 1988 are presented in Table 3. In general, wells in the west and southwest areas oi the RMI site, the wells that showed the most significant effect during the UCG burn (TW-2, EMW-lla, TW-18, and TW-17), are still showing effects of the burn after the groundwater restoration. There is a trend of higher concentrations of TOC and sulfate, with its associated higher amounts of total dissolved solids, in the groundwater from coal seam wells. Further, cross contamination to groundwater in the overburden units is indicated by the data.

  1. Sampling and analyses report for postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG Site, Hanna, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Crader

    1988-01-01

    Between November 28, 1988 and December 05, 1988, Western Research Institute (WRI) completed the fourth quarterly Rocky Mountain 1 (RMI) groundwater monitoring for the year 1988. This quarterly sample outing represents the first sampling since the completion of the RM1 groundwater restoration. Background material and the sampling and analytical procedures associated with this task are described in the ``Rocky Mountain

  2. Water-Quality Assessment of the Yellowstone River Basin, Montana and Wyoming-Water Quality of Fixed Sites, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Kirk A.; Clark, Melanie L.; Wright, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey initiated an assessment in 1997 of the quality of water resources in the Yellowstone River Basin. Water-quality samples regularly were collected during 1999-2001 at 10 fixed sites on streams representing the major environmental settings of the basin. Integrator sites, which are heterogeneous in land use and geology, were established on the mainstem of the Yellowstone River (4 sites) and on three major tributaries?Clarks Fork Yellowstone River (1 site), the Bighorn River (1 site), and the Powder River (1 site). Indicator sites, which are more homogeneous in land use and geology than the integrator sites, were located on minor tributaries with important environmental settings?Soda Butte Creek in a mineral resource area (1 site), the Tongue River in a forested area (1 site), and the Little Powder River in a rangeland area (1 site). Water-quality sampling frequency generally was at least monthly and included field measurements and laboratory analyses of fecal-indicator bacteria, major ions, dissolved solids, nutrients, trace elements, pesticides, and suspended sediment. Median concentrations of fecal coliform and Escherichia coli were largest for basins that were predominantly rangeland and smallest for basins that were predominantly forested. Concentrations of fecal coliform and Escherichia coli significantly varied by season (p-value <0.001); the smallest median concentrations were during January?March and the largest median concentrations were during April?June. Fecal-coliform concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommended limit for a single sample of 400 colonies per 100 milliliters in 2.6 percent of all samples. Escherichia coli concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommended limit for a single sample of 298 colonies per 100 milliliters for moderate use, full-body contact recreation in 7.6 percent of all samples. Variations in water type in the basin are reflective of the diverse geologic terrain in the Yellowstone River Basin. The water type of Soda Butte Creek and the Tongue River was calcium bicarbonate. These two sites are in forested and mountainous areas where igneous rocks and Paleozoic-era and Mesozoic-era sedimentary rocks are the dominant geologic groups. The water type of the Little Powder River was sodium sulfate. The Little Powder River originates in the plains, and geology of the basin is nearly homogenous with Tertiary-period sedimentary rocks. Water type of the Yellowstone River changed from a mixed-cation bicarbonate type upstream to a mixed-cation sulfate type downstream. Dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from fairly dilute in Soda Butte Creek, which had a median concentration of 118 milligrams per liter, to concentrated in the Little Powder River, which had a median concentration of 2,840 milligrams per liter. Nutrient concentrations generally were small and reflect the relatively undeveloped conditions in the basin; however, some correlations were made with anthropogenic factors. Median dissolved-nitrate concentrations in all samples from the fixed sites ranged from 0.04 milligram per liter to 0.54 milligram per liter. Flow-weighted mean dissolved-nitrate concentrations were positively correlated with increasing agricultural land use and rangeland on alluvial deposits upstream from the sites and negatively correlated with increasing forested land. Ammonia concentrations generally were largest in samples collected from the Yellowstone River at Corwin Springs, Montana, which is downstream from Yellowstone National Park and receives discharge from geothermal waters that are high in ammonia. Median total-phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.007 to 0.18 milligram per liter. Median total-phosphorus concentrations exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recommended goal of 0.10 milligram per liter for preventing nuisance plant growth for samples collec

  3. Water quality and environmental isotopic analyses of ground-water samples collected from the Wasatch and Fort Union Formations in areas of coalbed methane development : implications to recharge and ground-water flow, eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartos, Timothy T.; Ogle, Kathy Muller

    2002-01-01

    Chemical analyses of ground-water samples were evaluated as part of an investigation of lower Tertiary aquifers in the eastern Powder River Basin where coalbed methane is being developed. Ground-water samples were collected from two springs discharging from clinker, eight monitoring wells completed in the Wasatch aquifer, and 13 monitoring or coalbed methane production wells completed in coalbed aquifers. The ground-water samples were analyzed for major ions and environmental isotopes (tritium and stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen) to characterize the composition of waters in these aquifers, to relate these characteristics to geochemical processes, and to evaluate recharge and ground-water flow within and between these aquifers. This investigation was conducted in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer's Office and the Bureau of Land Management. Water quality in the different aquifers was characterized by major-ion composition. Samples collected from the two springs were classified as calcium-sulfate-type and calcium-bicarbonate-type waters. All ground-water samples from the coalbed aquifers were sodium-bicarbonate-type waters as were five of eight samples collected from the overlying Wasatch aquifer. Potential areal patterns in ionic composition were examined. Ground-water samples collected during this and another investigation suggest that dissolved-solids concentrations in the coalbed aquifers may be lower south of the Belle Fourche River (generally less than 600 milligrams per liter). As ground water in coalbed aquifers flows to the north and northwest away from an inferred source of recharge (clinker in the study area), dissolved-solids concentrations appear to increase. Variation in ionic composition in the vertical dimension was examined qualitatively and statistically within and between aquifers. A relationship between ionic composition and well depth was noted and corroborates similar observations by earlier investigators in the Powder River Basin in both Wyoming and Montana. This relationship results in two different water-quality zones with different characteristics - a shallow zone, comprising the upper part of the Wasatch aquifer, characterized by mixed cation composition and either sulfate or bicarbonate as the dominant anion; and a deeper zone, comprising the lower (deeper) part of the Wasatch aquifer and the underlying coalbed aquifers, characterized by sodium-bicarbonate-type waters. The zonation appears to be related to geochemical processes described by earlier investigators such as dissolution and precipitation of minerals, ion exchange, sulfate reduction, and mixing of waters. Qualitative and statistically significant differences were observed in sulfate concentrations between the coalbed aquifers and the overlying Wasatch aquifer. Ionic composition suggests that bacterially mediated redox processes such as sulfate reduction were probably the dominant geochemical processes in the anaerobic coalbed aquifers. Tritium was used to qualitatively estimate the time of ground-water recharge. Tritium concentrations in both springs suggests that both were recharged after 1952 and contain modern water. Tritium was not detected at concentrations suggestive of modern water in any ground-water samples collected from the coalbed aquifers or in six of eight ground-water samples collected from the overlying Wasatch aquifer. Tritium concentrations in the remaining two wells from the Wasatch aquifer suggest a mixture between submodern (recharged before 1952) and modern water, although the low concentrations suggest that ground water in these two wells have very little modern water. The relative absence of modern water in all aquifers in the study area suggests that recharge processes to these aquifers are probably very slow. Paired d2H (deuterium/hydrogen isotopic ratio) and d18O (oxygen-18/oxygen-16 isotopic ratio) values for samples collected from the springs and all aquifers are close to the Globa

  4. Trace Elements and Organic Compounds in Sediment and Fish Tissue from the Great Salt Lake Basins, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming, 1998-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddell, Kidd M.; Giddings, Elise M.

    2004-01-01

    A study to determine the occurrence and distribution of trace elements, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and semivolatile organic compounds in sediment and in fish tissue was conducted in the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program during 1998-99. Streambed-sediment and fish-tissue samples were collected concurrently at 11 sites and analyzed for trace-element concentration. An additional four sites were sampled for streambed sediment only and one site for fish tissue only. Organic compounds were analyzed from streambed-sediment and fish-tissue samples at 15 sites concurrently. Bed-sediment cores from lakes, reservoirs, and Farmington Bay collected by the NAWQA program in 1998 and by other researchers in 1982 were used to examine historical trends in trace-element concentration and to determine anthropogenic sources of contaminants. Cores collected in 1982 from Mirror Lake, a high-mountain reference location, showed an enrichment of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, tin, and zinc in the surface sediments relative to the deeper sediments, indicating that enrichment likely began after about 1900. This enrichment was attributed to atmospheric deposition during the period of metal-ore mining and smelting. A core from Echo Reservoir, in the Weber River Basin, however, showed a different pattern of trace-element concentration that was attributed to a local source. This site is located downstream from the Park City mining district, which is the most likely historical source of trace elements. Cores collected in 1998 from Farmington Bay show that the concentration of lead began to increase after 1842 and peaked during the mid-1980s and has been in decline since. Recent sediments deposited during 1996-98 indicate a 41- to 62-percent reduction since the peak in the mid-1980s. The concentration of trace elements in streambed sediment was greatest at sites that have been affected by historic mining, including sites on Little Cottonwood Creek in the Jordan River basin, Silver Creek in the Weber River basin, and the Weber River below the confluence with Silver Creek. There was significant correlation of lead concentrations in streambed sediment and fish tissue, but other trace elements did not correlate well. Streambed sediment and fish tissue collected from sites in the Bear River basin, which is predominantly rangeland and agriculture, generally had low concentrations of most elements. Sediment-quality guidelines were used to assess the relative toxicity of streambed-sediment sites to aquatic communities. Sites affected by mining exceeded the Probable Effect Concentration (PEC), the concentration at which it is likely there will be a negative effect on the aquatic community, for arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, silver, mercury, and zinc. Sites that were not affected by mining did not exceed these criteria. Concentrations of trace elements in samples collected from the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit (GRSL) are high compared to those of samples collected nationally with the NAWQA program. Nine of 15 streambed-sediment samples and 11 of 14 fish-tissue samples had concentrations of at least one trace element greater than the concentration of 90 percent of the samples collected nationally during 1993-2000. Organic compounds that were examined in streambed sediment and fish-tissue samples also were examined in bed-sediment cores. A bed-sediment core from Farmington Bay of Great Salt Lake showed an increase in total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations coincident with the increase in population in Salt Lake Valley, which drains into this bay. Analysis of streambed-sediment samples showed that the highest concentrations of PAHs were detected at urban sites, including two sites in the lower Jordan River (the Jordan River flows into Farmington Bay), the Weber River at Ogden Bay, and the Provo River near Provo. Other organic compounds detected i

  5. Subsurface geology and porosity distribution, Madison Limestone and underlying formations, Powder River basin, northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, James A.

    1978-01-01

    To evaluate the Madison Limestone and associated rocks as potential sources for water supplies in the Powder River Basin and adjacent areas, an understanding of the geologic framework of these units, their lithologic facies patterns, the distribution of porosity zones, and the relation between porosity development and stratigraphic facies is necessary. Regionally the Madison is mainly a fossiliferous limestone. However, in broad areas of the eastern Rocky Mountains and western Great Plains, dolomite is a dominant constituent and in places the Madison is almost entirely dolomite. Within these areas maximum porosity development is found and it seems to be related to the coarser crystalline dolomite facies. The porosity development is associated with tabular and fairly continuous crystalline dolomite beds separated by non-porous limestones. The maximum porosity development in the Bighorn Dolomite, as in the Madison, is directly associated with the occurrence of a more coarsely crystalline sucrosic dolomite facies. Well data indicate, however, that where the Bighorn is present in the deeper parts of the Powder River Basin, it may be dominated by a finer crystalline dolomite facies of low porosity. The 'Winnipeg Sandstone' is a clean, generally well-sorted, medium-grained sandstone. It shows good porosity development in parts of the northern Powder River Basin and northwestern South Dakota. Because the sandstone is silica-cemented and quartzitic in areas of deep burial, good porosity is expected only where it is no deeper than a few thousand feet. The Flathead Sandstone is a predominantly quartzose, slightly feldspathic sandstone, commonly cemented with iron oxide. Like the 'Winnipeg Sandstone,' it too is silica-cemented and quartzitic in many places so that its porosity is poor in areas of deep burial. Illustrations in this report show the thickness, percent dolomite, and porosity-feet for the Bighorn Dolomite and the Madison Limestone and its subdivisions. The porosity-feet for the 'Winnipeg' and Flathead Sandstones and four regional geologic sections are also shown.

  6. Geological Characterization, Capacity Estimates and Long-Term Fate of CO2 Storage in Deep Saline Aquifers in the Two Elk Energy Park Pilot Test site, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, R.; Benson, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Energy Park (North America Power Group) is a commercial-scale demonstration project planned as a series of renewable and other electric power generation, carbon capture, sequestration and related facilities, located in the eastern side of the Powder River Basin, northeastern Wyoming. The site is located on top of several deep saline aquifers, depleted oil reservoirs, and coal seams. The Powder River basin was identified by NETL and Big Sky partnership as having high potential for CO2 sequestration. The aims of our current study were to identify and describe all porous sections below the proposed site, to estimate the capacity of each unit, and to conduct simulations to better understand the faith of injected CO2 between those different layers. The storage goal of the project is 3 Mt/year for 50 years of operation. The project is supported by the DOE. Detailed geological characterization of the section between the Madison Formation and the Mowry Shale was based on two wells, located ~10 km from the proposed site. Porous sandstone layers were identified in the Minnelusa, Spearfish, Sundance, Morrison, Lakota, and Dakota formations. Average porosity in all of those units is between 8 to 15%. These formations consist of interbedded sandstone and shale, with some anhydrite and dolomite layers in the Minnelusa Formation. Our interest was to examine the ability of these impermeable layers (shale, anhydrite, and dolomite) to act as local seal to the different porous units. Other shale dominant formations also occur in the section (Opeche, Fuson, Skull, and Mowry formations) and will act as major seals to the whole porous section. The complex stratigraphy and relatively low permeability of the rocks at this site appear to preclude identification of a single unit that can be used for CO2 storage. Instead, the most promising option is to inject CO2 into large thickness of sediments, resulting in the injection of a relatively small amount of CO2 into a number of formations isolated from each other by low permeability shale, anyhydrite and dolomite layers. The benefits and drawbacks of storage in this type of setting for injectivity and long term storage security are examined using the TOUGH2-ECO2N simulation model. Additionally, CO2 capacity was calculated, using NETL equations and range for storage efficiency, and compared to estimates based on the TOUGH2-ECO2N simulation model.

  7. Chemical and stable isotopic evidence for water/rock interaction and biogenic origin of coalbed methane, Fort Union Formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, C.A.; Flores, R.M.; Stricker, G.D.; Ellis, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    Significant amounts (> 36??million m3/day) of coalbed methane (CBM) are currently being extracted from coal beds in the Paleocene Fort Union Formation of the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. Information on processes that generate methane in these coalbed reservoirs is important for developing methods that will stimulate additional production. The chemical and isotopic compositions of gas and ground water from CBM wells throughout the basin reflect generation processes as well as those that affect water/rock interaction. Our study included analyses of water samples collected from 228 CBM wells. Major cations and anions were measured for all samples, ??DH2O and ??18OH2O were measured for 199 of the samples, and ??DCH4 of gas co-produced with water was measured for 100 of the samples. Results show that (1) water from Fort Union Formation coal beds is exclusively Na-HCO3-type water with low dissolved SO4 content (median < 1??mg/L) and little or no dissolved oxygen (< 0.15??mg/L), whereas shallow groundwater (depth generally < 120??m) is a mixed Ca-Mg-Na-SO4-HCO3 type; (2) water/rock interactions, such as cation exchange on clay minerals and precipitation/dissolution of CaCO3 and SO4 minerals, account for the accumulation of dissolved Na and depletion of Ca and Mg; (3) bacterially-mediated oxidation-reduction reactions account for high HCO3 (270-3310??mg/L) and low SO4 (median < 0.15??mg/L) values; (4) fractionation between ??DCH4 (- 283 to - 328 per mil) and ??DH2O (- 121 to - 167 per mil) indicates that the production of methane is primarily by biogenic CO2 reduction; and (5) values of ??DH2O and ??18OH2O (- 16 to - 22 per mil) have a wide range of values and plot near or above the global meteoric water line, indicating that the original meteoric water has been influenced by methanogenesis and by being mixed with surface and shallow groundwater.

  8. Chemical and stable isotopic composition of water and gas in the Fort Union Formation of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: Evidence for water/rock interaction and the biogenic origin of coalbed natural gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Cynthia A.; Flores, Romeo M.; Stricker, Gary D.; Ellis, Margaret S.

    2008-01-01

    Significant amounts (> 36 million m3/day) of coalbed methane (CBM) are currently being extracted from coal beds in the Paleocene Fort Union Formation of the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. Information on processes that generate methane in these coalbed reservoirs is important for developing methods that will stimulate additional production. The chemical and isotopic compositions of gas and ground water from CBM wells throughout the basin reflect generation processes as well as those that affect water/rock interaction. Our study included analyses of water samples collected from 228 CBM wells. Major cations and anions were measured for all samples, ?DH2O and ?18OH2O were measured for 199 of the samples, and ?DCH4 of gas co-produced with water was measured for 100 of the samples. Results show that (1) water from Fort Union Formation coal beds is exclusively Na–HCO3-type water with low dissolved SO4 content (median < 1 mg/L) and little or no dissolved oxygen (< 0.15 mg/L), whereas shallow groundwater (depth generally < 120 m) is a mixed Ca–Mg–Na–SO4–HCO3 type; (2) water/rock interactions, such as cation exchange on clay minerals and precipitation/dissolution of CaCO3 and SO4 minerals, account for the accumulation of dissolved Na and depletion of Ca and Mg; (3) bacterially-mediated oxidation–reduction reactions account for high HCO3 (270–3310 mg/L) and low SO4 (median < 0.15 mg/L) values; (4) fractionation between ?DCH4 (? 283 to ? 328 per mil) and ?DH2O (? 121 to ? 167 per mil) indicates that the production of methane is primarily by biogenic CO2 reduction; and (5) values of ?DH2O and ?18OH2O (? 16 to ? 22 per mil) have a wide range of values and plot near or above the global meteoric water line, indicating that the original meteoric water has been influenced by methanogenesis and by being mixed with surface and shallow groundwater.

  9. Prevalence of Yersinia pestis in rodents and fleas associated with black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at Thunder Basin National Grassland, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiagarajan, B.; Bal, Y.; Gage, K.L.; Cully, J.F., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Rodents (and their fleas) that are associated with prairie dogs are considered important for the maintenance and transmission of the bacterium (Yersinia pestis) that causes plague. Our goal was to identify rodent and flea species that were potentially involved in a plague epizootic in black-tailed prairie dogs at Thunder Basin National Grassland. We collected blood samples and ectoparasites from rodents trapped at off- and on-colony grids at Thunder Basin National Grassland between 2002 and 2004. Blood samples were tested for antibodies to Y. pestis F-1 antigen by a passive hemagglutination assay, and fleas were tested by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, for the presence of the plague bacterium. Only one of 1,421 fleas, an Oropsylla hirsuta collected in 2002 from a deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, tested positive for Y. pestis. Blood samples collected in summer 2004 from two northern grasshopper mice, Onychomys leucogaster, tested positive for Y. pestis antibodies. All three positive samples were collected from on-colony grids shortly after a plague epizootic occurred. This study confirms that plague is difficult to detect in rodents and fleas associated with prairie dog colonies, unless samples are collected immediately after a prairie dog die-off. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  10. Inventory of biological investigations related to stream water quality in the South Platte River basin, Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming, 1891-1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tate, Cathy M.; Ortiz-Zayas, Jorge R.

    1995-01-01

    An inventory of the biological investigations conducted in the South Platte River Basin from 1891 to 1994 was done as a part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program in the South Platte River Basin. To aid in the sampling design of the biological component of the South Platte NAWQA, sources of water-related studies were compiled from computerized literature searches of biological data bases and by contacting other Federal, State, and local agencies. Biological investigations were categorized by their location in either of two major physiographic provinces-the Southern Rocky Mountains or the Great Plains, or in the transition zone between the mountains and the plains. From this collection of 102 references, five general categories of biological investigations were identified: algae, invertebrates, fish, habitat characterization, and chemicals in organism tissue. The most abundant literature was on studies of invertebrate and fish communities. Invertebrate studies primarily were conducted in the mountain region. There was limited information on algae, invertebrates in the plains region, flood-plain vegetation in the mountains and transition zone, and chemicals in organism tissue.

  11. Prevalence of Yersinia pestis in rodents and fleas associated with black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) at Thunder Basin National Grassland, Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Bala; Bai, Ying; Gage, Kenneth L; Cully, Jack F

    2008-07-01

    Rodents (and their fleas) that are associated with prairie dogs are considered important for the maintenance and transmission of the bacterium (Yersinia pestis) that causes plague. Our goal was to identify rodent and flea species that were potentially involved in a plague epizootic in black-tailed prairie dogs at Thunder Basin National Grassland. We collected blood samples and ectoparasites from rodents trapped at off- and on-colony grids at Thunder Basin National Grassland between 2002 and 2004. Blood samples were tested for antibodies to Y. pestis F-1 antigen by a passive hemagglutination assay, and fleas were tested by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, for the presence of the plague bacterium. Only one of 1,421 fleas, an Oropsylla hirsuta collected in 2002 from a deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, tested positive for Y. pestis. Blood samples collected in summer 2004 from two northern grasshopper mice, Onychomys leucogaster, tested positive for Y. pestis antibodies. All three positive samples were collected from on-colony grids shortly after a plague epizootic occurred. This study confirms that plague is difficult to detect in rodents and fleas associated with prairie dog colonies, unless samples are collected immediately after a prairie dog die-off. PMID:18689663

  12. Assessment of nutrients, suspended sediment, and pesticides in surface water of the upper Snake River basin, Idaho and western Wyoming, water years 1991-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Gregory M.

    1997-01-01

    Quality Assessment Program. As part of the investigation, intensive monitoring was conducted during water years 1993 through 1995 to assess surface-water quality in the basin. Sampling and analysis focused on nutrients, suspended sediments, and pesticides because of nationwide interest in these constituents. Concentrations of nutrients and suspended sediment in water samples from 19 sites in the upper Snake River Basin, including nine on the main stem, were assessed. In general, concentrations of nutrients and suspended sediment were smaller in water from the 11 sites upstream from American Falls Reservoir than in water from the 8 sites downstream from the reservoir where effects from land-use activities are most pronounced. Median concentrations of dissolved nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen at the 19 sites ranged from less than 0.05 to 1.60 milligrams per liter; total phosphorus as phosphorus, less than 0.01 to 0.11 milligrams per liter; and suspended sediment, 4 to 72 milligrams per liter. Concentrations of nutrients and suspended sediment in the main stem of the Snake River, in general, increased downstream. The largest concentrations in the main stem were in the middle reach of the Snake River between Milner Dam and the outlet of the upper Snake River Basin at King Hill. Significant differences (p Nutrient and suspended sediment inputs to the middle Snake reach were from a variety of sources. During water year 1995, springs were the primary source of water and total nitrogen to the river and accounted for 66 and 60 percent of the total input, respectively. Isotope and water-table information indicated that the springs derived most of their nitrogen from agricultural activities along the margins of the Snake River. Aquacultural effluent was a major source of ammonia (82 percent), organic nitrogen (30 percent), and total phosphorus (35 percent). Tributary streams were a major source of organic nitrogen (28 percent) and suspended sediment (58 percent). In proportion to its discharge (less than 1 percent), the Twin Falls sewage-treatment plant was a major source of total phosphorus (13 percent). A comparison of discharge and loading in water year 1995 with estimates of instream transport showed a good correlation (relative difference of less than 15 percent) for discharge, total organic nitrogen, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus. Estimates of dissolved ammonia and suspended sediment loads correlated poorly with instream transport; relative differences were about 79 and 61 percent, respectively. The pesticides EPTC, atrazine, desethylatrazine, metolachlor, and alachlor were the most commonly detected in the upper Snake River Basin and accounted for about 75 percent of all pesticide detections. All pesticides detected were at concentrations less than 1 microgram per liter and below water-quality criteria established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In samples collected from two small agriculturally dominated tributary basins, the largest number and concentrations of pesticides were detected in May and June following early growing season applications. At one of the sites, the pesticide atrazine and its metabolite desethylatrazine were detected throughout the year. On the basis of 37 samples collected basinwide in May and June 1994, total annual subbasin applications and instantaneous instream fluxes of EPTC and atrazine showed logarithmic relations with coefficients of determination (R2 values) of 0.55 and 0.62, respectively. At the time of sampling, the median daily flux of EPTC was about 0.0001 percent of the annual quantity applied, whereas the median daily flux of atrazine was between 0.001 and 0.01 percent.

  13. Flexural analysis of two broken foreland basins; Late Cenozoic Bermejo basin and Early Cenozoic Green River basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. B. Flemings; T. E. Jordan; S. Reynolds

    1986-01-01

    Lithospheric flexure that generates basin in a broke foreland setting (e.g., the Laramide foreland of Wyoming) is a three-dimensional system related to shortening along basin-bounding faults. The authors modeled the elastic flexure in three dimensions for two broken foreland basins: the early Cenozoic Green River basin and the analogous late Cenozoic Bermejo basin of Argentina. Each basin is located between

  14. Gas, Oil, and Water Production from Jonah, Pinedale, Greater Wamsutter, and Stagecoach Draw Fields in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Ewald, Shauna M.; Santus, Stephen L.; Trainor, Patrick K.

    2010-01-01

    Gas, oil, and water production data were compiled from selected wells in four gas fields in rocks of Late Cretaceous age in southwestern Wyoming. This study is one of a series of reports examining fluid production from tight-gas reservoirs, which are characterized by low permeability, low porosity, and the presence of clay minerals in pore space. Production from each well is represented by two samples spaced five years apart, the first sample typically taken two years after commencement of production. For each producing interval, summary diagrams of oil versus gas and water versus gas production show fluid production rates, the change in rates during five years, the water-gas and oil-gas ratios, and the fluid type. These diagrams permit well-to-well and field-to-field comparisons. Fields producing water at low rates (water dissolved in gas in the reservoir) can be distinguished from fields producing water at moderate or high rates, and the water-gas ratios are quantified. The ranges of first-sample gas rates in Pinedale field and Jonah field are quite similar, and the average gas production rate for the second sample, taken five years later, is about one-half that of the first sample for both fields. Water rates are generally substantially higher in Pinedale than in Jonah, and water-gas ratios in Pinedale are roughly a factor of ten greater in Pinedale than in Jonah. Gas and water production rates from each field are fairly well grouped, indicating that Pinedale and Jonah fields are fairly cohesive gas-water systems. Pinedale field appears to be remarkably uniform in its flow behavior with time. Jonah field, which is internally faulted, exhibits a small spread in first-sample production rates. In the Greater Wamsutter field, gas production from the upper part of the Almond Formation is greater than from the main part of the Almond. Some wells in the main and the combined (upper and main parts) Almond show increases in water production with time, whereas increases in water production are rare in the upper part of the Almond, and a higher percentage of wells in the upper part of the Almond show water decreasing at the same rate as gas than in the main or combined parts of the Almond. In Stagecoach Draw field, the gas production rate after five years is about one-fourth that of the first sample, whereas in Pinedale, Jonah, and Greater Wamsutter fields, the production rate after five years is about one-half that of the first sample. The more rapid gas decline rate seems to be the outstanding feature distinguishing Stagecoach Draw field, which is characterized as a conventional field, from Pinedale, Jonah, and Greater Wamsutter fields, which are generally characterized as tight-gas accumulations. Oil-gas ratios are fairly consistent within Jonah, Pinedale, and Stagecoach Draw fields, suggesting similar chemical composition and pressure-temperature conditions within each field, and are less than the 20 bbl/mmcf upper limit for wet gas. However, oil-gas ratios vary considerably from one area to another in the Greater Wamsutter field, demonstrating a lack of commonality in either chemistry or pressure-temperature conditions among the six areas. In all wells in all four fields examined here, water production commences with gas production-there are no examples of wells with water-free production and no examples where water production commences after first-sample gas production. The fraction of records with water production higher in the second sample than in the first sample varies from field to field, with Pinedale field showing the lowest percentage of such cases and Jonah field showing the most. Most wells have water-gas ratios exceeding the amount that could exist dissolved in gas at reservoir pressure and temperature.

  15. Analysis of data on nutrients and organic compounds in ground water in the upper Snake River basin, Idaho and western Wyoming, 1980-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.

    1994-01-01

    Nutrient and organic compound data from the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET data bases provided information for development of a preliminary conceptual model of spatial and temporal ground-water quality in the upper Snake River Basin. Nitrite plus nitrate (as nitrogen; hereafter referred to as nitrate) concentrations exceeded the Federal drinking-water regulation of 10 milligrams per liter in three areas in Idaho" the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, the area north of Pocatello (Fort Hall area), and the area surrounding Burley. Water from many wells in the Twin Falls area also contained elevated (greater than two milligrams per liter) nitrate concentrations. Water from domestic wells contained the highest median nitrate concentrations; water from industrial and public supply wells contained the lowest. Nitrate concentrations decreased with increasing well depth, increasing depth to water (unsaturated thickness), and increasing depth below water table (saturated thickness). Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations decreased with increasing well depth and depth below water table. The relation between kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations and depth to water was poor. Nitrate and total phosphorus concentrations in water from wells were correlated among three hydrogeomorphic regions in the upper Snake River Basin, Concentrations of nitrate were statistically higher in the eastern Snake River Plain and local aquifers than in the tributary valleys. There was no statistical difference in total phosphorus concentrations among the three hydrogeomorphic regions. Nitrate and total phosphorus concentrations were correlated with land-use classifications developed using the Geographic Information Retrieval and Analysis System. Concentrations of nitrate were statistically higher in area of agricultural land than in areas of rangeland. There was no statistical difference in concentrations between rangeland and urban land and between urban land and agricultural land. There was no statistical difference in total phosphorus concentrations among any of the land-use classifications. Nitrate and total phosphorus concentrations also were correlated with land-use classifications developed by the Idaho Department of Water Resources for the Idaho part of the upper Snake River Basin. Nitrate concentrations were statistically higher in areas of irrigated agriculture than in areas of dryland agriculture and rangeland. There was no statistical difference in total phosphorus concentrations among any of the Idaho Department of Water Resources land-use classifications. Data were sufficient to assess long-term trends of nitrate concentrations in water from only eight wells: four wells north of Burley and four wells northwest of Pocatello. The trend in nitrate concentrations in water from all wells in upward. The following organic compounds were detected in ground water in the upper Snake River Basin: cyanazine, 2,4-D DDT, dacthal, diazinon, dichloropropane, dieldrin, malathion, and metribuzin. Of 211 wells sampled for organic compounds, water from 17 contained detectable concentrations.

  16. Wyoming State Geological Survey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This agency's mission is to study, examine, and seek an understanding of the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State; to prepare, publish, and distribute reports and maps of Wyoming's geology, mineral resources, and physical features; and to provide information, advice, and services related to the geology, mineral resources, and physical features of the State. This site contains details and reports about metals in Wyoming, earthquakes and other hazards, coal, industrial minerals, uranium, oil and gas. The field trip section contains details about various areas to visit with students and gives a general geologic description. There is also a searchable bibliography with publications about Wyoming geology. Links are provided for additional resources.

  17. Wyoming geo-notes No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    After a general overview of the mineral industry in Wyoming, activities and data are given on petroleum, natural gas, coal, uranium, trona, thorium, and other industrial minerals, metals, and precious stones. Coal production figures by county and basin are given. Maps are included showing regions containing subbituminous, bituminous, lignite, and strippable deposits of coal; major active and inactive uranium deposits; oil, gas, and oil shale deposits and pipeline corridors; and selected mineral occurrences of bentonite, trona, and jade. Production forecasts are given for uranium, trona, oil, gas, and coal. Reserve estimates are given for petroleum, natural gas, coal, trona, uranium, and oil shale. 8 references, 4 figures, 7 tables.

  18. Hydraulic Communication Between Coalbeds and Overlying Sands in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: Implications for Re-injection of Coalbed Methane Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, H. E.; Zoback, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) production in the Powder River Basin (PRB) is associated with the production of large volumes of CBM water. CBM water from the PRB has high saline and sodium contents, making it unsuitable for agriculture and environmentally damaging. One option for the disposal of CBM water is re-injection into aquifers, but for injection to be feasible the porosity and permeability of the sands needs to be high, the pore pressure needs to be low, and the aquifer cannot be in hydraulic communication with the coalbeds. In order to determine if pore pressures in the aquifers are low enough to allow for significant CBM water re-injection and to determine whether the coals and sands are in hydraulic communication with each other we have calculated pore pressures in 220 wells that monitor water levels in coalbeds and adjacent sands within the PRB. All 220 wells have pore pressures below hydrostatic pressure, implying that re-injection of CBM water should be feasible. However, by analyzing pore pressure changes with time for both the coals and their overlying sands, we find that sands less than 100 ft from coal appear to be in communication with the coalbed. Therefore, re- injection of CBM water should be carried out in sands further than 100 ft from adjacent coalbeds. It also follows that CO2 sequestration in PRB coalbeds should not be carried out in areas where sands and coals are hydraulically connected, as potential leakage pathways for CO2 maybe present.

  19. Assessment of ecological conditions and potential effects of water produced from coalbed natural gas development on biological communities in streams of the Powder River structural basin, Wyoming and Montana, 2005-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, David A.; Clark, Melanie L.; Foster, Katharine; Wright, Peter R.; Boughton, Gregory K.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing development of coalbed natural gas in the Powder River structural basin in Wyoming and Montana led to formation of an interagency task group to address concerns about the effects of the resulting production water on biological communities in streams of the area. The interagency task group developed a monitoring plan and conducted sampling of macroinvertebrate, algal, and fish communities at 47 sites during 2005-08 to document current ecological conditions and determine existing and potential effects of water produced from coalbed natural gas development on biological communities. Macroinvertebrate, algal, and fish community composition varied between drainage basins, among sites within drainage basins, and by year. Macroinvertebrate communities of the main-stem Tongue River were characterized by higher taxa richness and higher abundance of Ephemeroptera, for example, compared to macroinvertebrate communities in plains tributaries of the Tongue River and the main-stem Powder River. Fish communities of the Tongue River were characterized by higher taxa richness and abundance of introduced species compared to the Powder River where native species were dominant. Macroinvertebrate community metric values from sites in the middle reach of the main-stem Powder River, from below Willow Creek to below Crazy Woman Creek, differed from metric values in the upper and lower reaches of the Powder River. Metrics indicative of communitywide differences included measures of taxa richness, relative abundance, feeding mode, and tolerance. Some of the variation in the macroinvertebrate communities could be explained by variation in environmental variables, including physical (turbidity, embeddedness, bed substrate size, and streamflow) and chemical (alkalinity and specific conductance) variables. Of these environmental variables, alkalinity was the best indicator of coalbed natural gas development because of the sodiumbicarbonate signature of the production water. Algal samples from the main-stem Powder River generally confirmed the pattern observed in the macroinvertebrate communities. Algal communities at sites in the middle reach of the Powder River commonly were characterized by dominance by a single taxon and by low biovolume of algae compared to other sites. In contrast to the macroinvertebrate and algal communities, species richness of fish communities was highest in the middle reach of the Powder River. Although a few significant differences in fish metrics were determined along the main-stem Powder River, the differences did not correspond to the pattern observed for the macroinvertebrate and algae communities. Differences in biological communities were noted between years, potentially due to the effects of drought. Macroinvertebrate community metrics, such as Diptera taxa richness, were significantly different in the severe drought year of 2006 from metric values in 2005 and 2007-08. Waterquality data collected during the study indicated that, with few exceptions, water-quality constituents generally did not exceed State or Federal acute and chronic criteria for the protection of aquatic life.

  20. Wyoming Government, Unit VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming government presents concepts, activities, and stories for elementary school students. Concepts stress that the functions of government are determined according to the demands, needs, and traditions of the people; each part of government has a special function; as citizens, we should be loyal to the underlying concepts of our…

  1. Estimation of Growing Season ET using Wyoming ET Calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, R. W.; Park, G.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate estimations of Evapotranspiration (ET) and Consumptive Irrigation Requirement (CIR) are essential for water resources planning and management. The Wyoming State Engineer's Office currently determines monthly reference evapotranspiration (ET) with an Excel Spreadsheet ET model using average monthly data from a nearby weather station (usually an airport weather station) for the irrigated area of interest, and interpolates them into daily reference ET using either linear or cubic functions. The purpose of this project is to replace the current Excel model with a GIS-based ET calculator. Our approach uses daily weather data to calculate daily reference and actual ET, and then aggregate actual ET into monthly and seasonal ET. Among many reference ET equations available, the ASCE Standardized Reference Evapotranspiration Equation (ASCE-ET) and the Hargreaves-Samani equations were selected to calculate daily reference ET. Wyoming ET Calculator, a GIS-based ET tool, was developed to calculate daily potential ET, CIR, and actual ET, using daily reference ET, crop coefficients, effective precipitation ratios, and water stress factors. Total monthly and growing season ET and CIR were determined over the Upper Green River Basin in Wyoming. The long term trends of these totals from 1960-2009 were analyzed and compared to trends in weather data (minimum and maximum temperatures, wind speed, and dew point temperature). We also evaluated the total monthly and growing season ET from Wyoming ET Calculator against satellite-based ET (METRIC ET) estimations for June, July, and August of 2009 around an irrigated area near the Wind River Mountain Range in Wyoming. The total monthly ET from Wyoming ET Calculator agrees very well with total monthly ET from METRIC for well-watered crop areas. For other areas, the Wyoming ET Calculator tends to overestimate total monthly ET values than METRIC, because the tool assumes all NLCD crop area are being irrigated.

  2. Nutrient, suspended-sediment, and total suspended-solids data for surface water in the Great Salt Lake basins study unit, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming, 1980-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hadley, Heidi K.

    2000-01-01

    Selected nitrogen and phosphorus (nutrient), suspended-sediment and total suspended-solids surface-water data were compiled from January 1980 through December 1995 within the Great Salt Lake Basins National Water-Quality Assessment study unit, which extends from southeastern Idaho to west-central Utah and from Great Salt Lake to the Wasatch and western Uinta Mountains. The data were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System and the State of Utah, Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality database. The Division of Water Quality database includes data that are submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STOrage and RETrieval system. Water-quality data included in this report were selected for surface-water sites (rivers, streams, and canals) that had three or more nutrient, suspended-sediment, or total suspended-solids analyses. Also, 33 percent or more of the measurements at a site had to include discharge, and, for non-U.S. Geological Survey sites, there had to be 2 or more years of data. Ancillary data for parameters such as water temperature, pH, specific conductance, streamflow (discharge), dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, alkalinity, and turbidity also were compiled, as available. The compiled nutrient database contains 13,511 samples from 191 selected sites. The compiled suspended-sediment and total suspended-solids database contains 11,642 samples from 142 selected sites. For the nutrient database, the median (50th percentile) sample period for individual sites is 6 years, and the 75th percentile is 14 years. The median number of samples per site is 52 and the 75th percentile is 110 samples. For the suspended-sediment and total suspended-solids database, the median sample period for individual sites is 9 years, and the 75th percentile is 14 years. The median number of samples per site is 76 and the 75th percentile is 120 samples. The compiled historical data are being used in the basinwide sampling strategy to characterize the broad-scale geographic and seasonal water-quality conditions in relation to major contaminant sources and background conditions. Data for this report are stored on a compact disc.

  3. Analysis of nitrate and volatile organic compound data for ground water in the Great Salt Lake Basins, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming, 1980-98, National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiros, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, ground water was the source of drinking water to about 52 percent of the population served by public drinking water systems in the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit, which includes parts of Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming. Existing nitrate and volatile organic compound data for ground water collected in the study unit were compiled and summarized as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program?s objective to describe water-quality conditions in the Nation?s aquifers. Prerequisites for the inclusion of nitrate and volatile organic compound data into this retrospective analysis are that the data set is available in electronic form, the data were collected during 1980-98, the data set is somewhat regional in coverage, and the locations of the sampled sites are known. Ground-water data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water Information Systemand the Idaho and Utah Public DrinkingWater Systems databases were reviewed. Only the most recent analysis was included in the data sets if more than one analysis was available for a site. The National Water Information System data set contained nitrate analyses for water from 480 wells. The median concentration of nitratewas 1.30 milligrams per liter for the 388 values above minimum reporting limits. The maximum contaminant level for nitrate as established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was exceeded in water from 10 of the 200 wells less than or equal to 150 feet deep and in water from3 of 280 wells greater than 150 feet deep. The Public Drinking Water Systems data set contained nitrate analyses for water from 587 wells. The median concentration of nitrate was 1.12 milligrams per liter for the 548 values above minimum reporting limits. The maximum contaminant level for nitrate was exceeded at 1 site and 22 sites had concentrations equal to or greater than 5 milligrams per liter. The types of land use surrounding a well and the well depth were related to measured nitrate concentrations in the sampled ground water. Overall, water sampled from wells in rangeland areas had a lowermedianmeasured nitrate concentration (0.76 milligrams per liter) than water from areas with an agricultural or urban/residential land use (1.41 and 1.20 milligrams per liter, respectively). In the NationalWater Information System data set, the median measured nitrate concentration in water from urban/residential areas varied from 1.00 milligrams per liter for wells greater than 150 feet deep to 1.84 milligrams per liter for wells less than or equal to 150 feet deep. The Public DrinkingWater Systems and the National Water Information System data sets contained analyses for most of the State and Federally regulated volatile organic compounds in water from about 368 and 74 wells, respectively. Fifteen different volatile organic compounds were detected at least once in ground water sampled from the Great Salt Lake Basins study unit. Water from 21 wells contained at least 1 volatile organiccompound at detectable concentrations. About 68 percent of the volatile organic compounds detected were in water sampled from wells in Salt Lake County, Utah. Tetrachloroethylene was the most commonly detected volatile organic compound in ground water sampled from the study unit, present in 8 out of 442 samples. Maximum contaminant levels for tetrachloroethylene and 1,1-dichloroethylene as established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were exceeded in water from one well each.

  4. Suckers in headwater tributaries, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweet, D.E.; Compton, R.I.; Hubert, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    Bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus) and flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis) populations are declining throughout these species' native ranges in the Upper Colorado River Basin. In order to conserve these populations, an understanding of population dynamics is needed. Using age estimates from pectoral fin rays, we describe age and growth of these 2 species in 3 Wyoming stream systems: Muddy Creek, the Little Sandy River, and the Big Sandy River. Within all 3 stream systems, flannelmouth suckers were longer-lived than bluehead suckers, with maximum estimated ages of 16 years in Muddy Creek, 18 years in Little Sandy Creek, and 26 years in the Big Sandy River. Bluehead suckers had maximum estimated ages of 8 years in Muddy Creek, 10 years in Little Sandy Creek, and 18 years in the Big Sandy River. These maximum estimated ages were substantially greater than in other systems where scales have been used to estimate ages. Mean lengths at estimated ages were greater for flannelmouth suckers than for bluehead suckers in all 3 streams and generally less than values published from other systems where scales were used to estimate ages. Our observations of long life spans and slow growth rates among bluehead suckers and flannelmouth suckers were probably associated with our use of fin rays to estimate ages as well as the populations being in headwater tributaries near the northern edges of these species' ranges.

  5. Tectonically induced climate and its control on the distribution of depositional systems in a continental foreland basin, Cloverly and Lakota Formations (Lower Cretaceous) of Wyoming, U.S.A

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William S. Elliott Jr.; Lee J. Suttner; Lisa M. Pratt

    2007-01-01

    Continental sediments of the Cloverly and Lakota Formations (Lower Cretaceous) in Wyoming are subdivided into three depositional systems: perennial to intermittent alluvial, intermittent to ephemeral alluvial, and playa. Chert-bearing sandstones, conglomerates, carbonaceous mudrocks, blocky mudrocks, and skeletal limestones were deposited by perennial to intermittent alluvial systems. Carbonaceous mudrocks contain abundant wood fragments, cuticle and cortical debris, and other vascular plant

  6. Wyoming's Education Progress Report--1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming State Dept. of Education, Cheyenne.

    This document comprises the third annual Wyoming Education Progress Report, which measures the state's progress toward achieving the six National Education Goals by the year 2000. Three years of data indicate that parents, educators, and students are responding to the national and local education goals, and that more Wyoming students are preparing…

  7. Water Resources of Wyoming

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This U.S Geological Survey (USGS) website contains water data including water quality samples and water use data, information on USGS projects, links to USGS educational sites, and a bibliography of USGS water resource publications. Projects and studies covered include: the Wyoming Drought Watch, which contains maps of daily streamflow conditions and historical streamflow data; algal-nutrient relations in the Yellowstone River; county water resource studies; estimating peak-streamflow characteristics at ungaged sites; the Integrating Aquatic Ecosystem Data project of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP); an aquifer; water-quality issues associated with irrigation drainage; watershed delineation; urban hydrology; and a pathogen indicator synoptic study.

  8. Reflections on the work of Hanna Segal (1918-2011).

    PubMed

    Steiner, John

    2015-02-01

    This paper is based on a talk given at the conference to celebrate the Work of Hanna Segal and attempts to summarise her contribution to psychoanalysis. I suggest that in addition to being the important presenter of the work of Melanie Klein, she made major contributions to our understanding of many analytic ideas, for example, symbol formation, the usefulness of the concept of the death instinct and the relation between phantasy and reality. She was a pioneer in the analytic treatment of psychosis and sh wrote important papers on literature and aesthetics. She was a great teacher and emphasised the central role played by the analytic setting in representing the attitude of the analyst. PMID:25229672

  9. National uranium resource evaluation: Sheridan Quadrangle, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Damp, J N; Jennings, M D

    1982-04-01

    The Sheridan Quadrangle of north-central Wyoming was evaluated for uranium favorability according to specific criteria of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Procedures consisted of geologic and radiometric surveys; rock, water, and sediment sampling; studying well logs; and reviewing the literature. Five favorable environments were identified. These include portions of Eocene Wasatch and Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Powder River Basin and Lower Cretaceous Pryor sandstones of the Bighorn Basin. Unfavorable environments include all Precambrian, Cambrian, Ordovician, Permian, Triassic, and Middle Jurassic rocks; the Cretaceous Thermopolis, Mowry, Cody, Meeteetse, and Bearpaw Formations; the Upper Jurassic Sundance and Morrison, the Cretaceous Frontier, Meseverde, Lance, and the Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Willwood Formations of the Bighorn Basin; the Wasatch Formation of the Powder River Basin, excluding two favorable areas and all Oligocene and Miocene rocks. Remaining rocks are unevaluated.

  10. 9. VIEW OF THE PRESSURE CULVERT STILLING BASIN, LOOKING NORTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF THE PRESSURE CULVERT STILLING BASIN, LOOKING NORTH. NOTE THE LEVEE TO THE RIGHT. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  11. WILDLIFE MITIGATION TECHNIQUES AT SURFACE COAL MINES IN NORTHEAST WYOMING1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gwyn McKee

    Wildlife issues at surface coal mines in the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming have been a topic of discussion since operations first began in the early 1970s. Since then, wildlife monitoring and mitigation programs have evolved to address changing concerns, and incorporate new information and techniques. Over the last 26 years, biologists with Thunderbird - Jones & Stokes (J&S)

  12. Hanna Franberg-Delahaye SPIRAL 2 production station 4th HPTW 2011 Page 1 SPIRAL 2 production station

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    : 2.20 m Weigth: 8 t Material: stainless steel 316L, Weight: 2,1t Size of the production module #12Hanna Franberg-Delahaye SPIRAL 2 production station ­ 4th HPTW 2011 Page 1 SPIRAL 2 production station Hanna Frånberg Delahaye Radioactive beam production GANIL-SPIRAL 2, Caen, France May 3, 2011 #12

  13. Results of Phase 2 postburn drilling, coring, and logging: Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification Test, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.L.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

    1991-02-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) site consisted of two different module configurations: the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) and elongated linked well (ELW) configurations. The postburn coring of the RM1 UCG site was designed in two phases to fulfill seven objectives outlined in Western Research Institute`s Annual Project Plan for 1989 (Western Research Institute 1989). The seven objectives were to (1) delineate the areal extent of the cavities, (2) identify the extent of roof collapse, (3) obtain samples of all major cavity rock types, (4) characterize outflow channels and cavity stratigraphy, (5) characterize the area near CRIP points and ignition points, (6) further define the structural geology of the site, and (7) identify the vertical positioning of the horizontal process wells within the coal seam. Phase 1 of the coring was completed during the summer of 1989 and served to partially accomplish all seven objectives. A detailed description of Phase 1 results was presented in a separate report (Lindblom et al. 1990). Phase 2, completed during the summer of 1990, was designed to complete the seven objectives; more specifically, to further define the areal extent and location of the cavities, to evaluate the outflow channels for both modules, and to further characterize the structural geology in the ELW module area.

  14. Sampling and analyses report for the September 1989 postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG Site, Hanna, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Crader

    1989-01-01

    Between September 14, 1989 and September 19, 1989, Western Research Institute (WRI) completed the third quarterly Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) groundwater monitoring for the year 1989. This quarterly sample outing represents the first sampling since the completion of the second RM1 groundwater restoration in August 1989. Background material and the sampling and analytical procedures associated with this task are described

  15. Results of Phase 2 postburn drilling, coring, and logging: Rocky Mountain 1 Underground Coal Gasification Test, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.L.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

    1991-02-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) site consisted of two different module configurations: the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) and elongated linked well (ELW) configurations. The postburn coring of the RM1 UCG site was designed in two phases to fulfill seven objectives outlined in Western Research Institute's Annual Project Plan for 1989 (Western Research Institute 1989). The seven objectives were to (1) delineate the areal extent of the cavities, (2) identify the extent of roof collapse, (3) obtain samples of all major cavity rock types, (4) characterize outflow channels and cavity stratigraphy, (5) characterize the area near CRIP points and ignition points, (6) further define the structural geology of the site, and (7) identify the vertical positioning of the horizontal process wells within the coal seam. Phase 1 of the coring was completed during the summer of 1989 and served to partially accomplish all seven objectives. A detailed description of Phase 1 results was presented in a separate report (Lindblom et al. 1990). Phase 2, completed during the summer of 1990, was designed to complete the seven objectives; more specifically, to further define the areal extent and location of the cavities, to evaluate the outflow channels for both modules, and to further characterize the structural geology in the ELW module area.

  16. CLOUD PEAK PRIMITIVE AREA AND ADJACENT AREAS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiilsgaard, Thor H.; Patten, Lowell L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey of the Cloud Peak Primitive Area and adjacent areas in Wyoming indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. There are some prospect workings, particularly in the northern part of the area, but in none of them were there indications that ore had been mined. Samples from the workings, from nearby rocks and sediments from streams that drain the area did not yield any metal values of significance. The crystalline rocks that underlie the area do not contain oil and gas or coal, products that are extracted from the younger rocks that underlie basins on both sides of the study area.

  17. Wyoming's "Education Reform & Cost Study."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Joseph B.

    A history of education in the state of Wyoming, along with a description of recent legislative initiatives, are presented in this paper. It opens with statewide reorganizations begun in the 1960s that unified school districts and equalized property valuation. A decade later a court order ruled the system inequitable and new laws provided for a…

  18. Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming State Dept. of Education, Cheyenne.

    Because children entering kindergarten come with a variety of preschool and home experiences, and accordingly, with varying levels of school readiness, the Wyoming Early Childhood Readiness Standards have been developed to provide a more consistent definition of school readiness. The goal for the Standards is to provide early childhood educators…

  19. MAP OF ECOREGIONS OF WYOMING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecoregions of Wyoming have been identified, mapped, and described and provide a geographic structure for environmental resources research, assessment, monitoring, and management. This project is part of a larger effort by the U.S. EPA to create a national, hierarchical ecore...

  20. Soil CO2 production in upland tundra where permafrost is thawing Hanna Lee,1,2

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Diane

    Soil CO2 production in upland tundra where permafrost is thawing Hanna Lee,1,2 Edward A. G. Schuur to understand the response of belowground C emissions for different soil depths from upland tundra as a result moist acidic tundra and highest where thawing of permafrost and thermokarst was most pronounced. We were

  1. Learning the Structure of Deep Sparse Graphical Models Ryan Prescott Adams Hanna M. Wallach Zoubin Ghahramani

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yiling

    Learning the Structure of Deep Sparse Graphical Models Ryan Prescott Adams Hanna M. Wallach Zoubin a nonparametric Bayesian framework to perform structure learning in deep networks, a problem that has not been Ghahramani University of Toronto University of Massachusetts Amherst University of Cambridge Abstract Deep

  2. Learning the Structure of Deep Sparse Graphical Models Ryan Prescott Adams Hanna M. Wallach Zoubin Ghahramani

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    1 Learning the Structure of Deep Sparse Graphical Models Ryan Prescott Adams Hanna M. Wallach a nonparametric Bayesian framework to perform structure learning in deep networks, a problem that has not been Abstract Deep belief networks are a powerful way to model complex probability distributions. However

  3. Identity Uncertainty and Citation Matching Hanna Pasula, Bhaskara Marthi, Brian Milch, Stuart Russell, Ilya Shpitser

    E-print Network

    Russell, Stuart

    Identity Uncertainty and Citation Matching Hanna Pasula, Bhaskara Marthi, Brian Milch, Stuart consider the problem in the context of citation matching--the prob- lem of deciding which citations and a probabilistic citation grammar. Identity uncertainty is handled by extending standard models to incorporate

  4. Instrumentation for in situ coal gasification: an assessment of techniques evaluated on the Hanna II experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Northrop; S. G. Beard; L. C. Bartel; L. W. Beckham; P. J. Hommert

    1977-01-01

    The Hanna II in-situ coal gasification experiment was conducted by the Laramie Energy Research Center during 1975 to 76. Sandia Laboratories designed, fielded, and evaluated variations of seven instrumentation techniques belonging to two general classes: (a) diagnostic techniques (thermal, in-seam gas sampling and pressure, and overburden tilt and displacement) to obtain data for process characterization and (b) remote monitoring techniques

  5. Statistical Visual Language Models for Ink Parsing Michael Shilman, Hanna Pasula, Stuart Russell, Richard Newton

    E-print Network

    Russell, Stuart

    Statistical Visual Language Models for Ink Parsing Michael Shilman, Hanna Pasula, Stuart Russell for automatic recognition of hand-sketched digital ink. By viewing sketched drawings as utterances in a visual developed an algorithm for ink parsing that uses a statistical model to disambiguate. Under this formulation

  6. HIGH RESOLUTION SIMULATION OF THE SUCCESSION OF HURRICANES IN 2008: GUSTAV, HANNA, AND IKE

    E-print Network

    HIGH RESOLUTION SIMULATION OF THE SUCCESSION OF HURRICANES IN 2008: GUSTAV, HANNA, AND IKE W. Lin of Atlantic hurricanes in August-September 2008 is used to assess the ability of the Weather Research and the eastern United States. The succession of the hurricanes in observation developed from either local

  7. Wyoming DOE EPSCoR

    SciTech Connect

    Gern, W.A.

    2004-01-15

    All of the research and human resource development projects were systemic in nature with real potential for becoming self sustaining. They concentrated on building permanent structure, such as faculty expertise, research equipment, the SEM Minority Center, and the School of Environment and Natural Resources. It was the intent of the DOE/EPSCoR project to permanently change the way Wyoming does business in energy-related research, human development for science and engineering careers, and in relationships between Wyoming industry, State Government and UW. While there is still much to be done, the DOE/EPSCoR implementation award has been successful in accomplishing that change and enhancing UW's competitiveness associated with coal utilization, electrical energy efficiency, and environmental remediation.

  8. University of Wyoming Digital Collections

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Since 2002, the University of Wyoming's Digital Initiatives program has been crafting carefully considered collections from their vast storehouse of historical ephemera. The Initiative is a member of the Collaborative Digitization Program, and they have worked on projects such as the Rocky Mountain Online Archive and the Wyoming Memory Portal. This site provides access to all of their digital collections, which include document archives related to the career of noted historian and national activist Grace Raymond Hebard and the travels of Thomas Kennet-Were, an English gentleman who wandered across the United States and Canada in 1868 and 1869. Visitors can search through all of the collections here as they see fit, and educators will also want to click on over to the "Teacher Resources" area for a selection of high quality lesson plans and activities.

  9. Displacements required during multiple drapefolding along the northwest Bighorn Mountain front, Wyoming 

    E-print Network

    Tirey, Martha Margaret

    1978-01-01

    by Stearns (1971) at Rattlesnake Mountain, ' Cody, Wyoming on the western edge of the Bighorn Basin. Rattle- snake Mountain is a well exposed and fully developed. fold. Even the frontal fault in the basement, which is a high angle normal fault (throw is 2... 0 ~ ~ 0 0 ~ ~ 0 0 ~ 0 0 6 ~ Page Geologic map of the Cottonwood Canyon area (after Voldseth, 1973). 8 Cross section through Rattlesnake Mountain (fron Stearns, 1971). . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Partial stratigraphic column for the Cotton- wood...

  10. Hydrology of the Bear Lake Basin, Utah

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patsy Palacios; Chris Luecke; Justin Robinson

    2007-01-01

    Bear Lake’s natural watershed is made up of relatively low mountains covered with sagebrush at lower elevations and southern exposures and fir-aspen forests at higher elevations and northern exposures. The basin is traversed by the Bear River that begins high in the Unita Mountains and flows through Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming before feeding the Great Salt Lake. The Bear River

  11. Surface Geometry of C60 on Ag(111) K. J. Hanna,1

    E-print Network

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Surface Geometry of C60 on Ag(111) H. I. Li,1 K. Pussi,2 K. J. Hanna,1 L.-L. Wang,3 D. D. Johnson,3 monolayers on close-packed metal surfaces. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.056101 PACS numbers: 68.43.Fg, 61 a commensurate ð2 ffiffiffi 3 p  2 ffiffiffi 3 p ÞR30 structure (nearest-neighbor distance 10.01 A

  12. Eolian sandstone unit of Morrison Formation, central Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, D.M.

    1986-08-01

    The fine-grained quartzarenite that overlies the Sundance Formation in the southwestern Powder River basin, Wind River basin, and southern Bighorn basin is interpreted as being primarily the result of eolian deposition. This unit, often more than 20 m (65.6 ft) thick, is the probable correlative of the Unkpapa Sandstone member of the Morrison Formation of the southeastern Black Hills region. An eolian interpretation is based on the presence of large-scale sets of high-angle, planar cross-stratification. Observed considerable variation in the thickness of the unit is likely to be an expression of the depositional (dune-form) topography rather than the result of later erosion. Discrete dunes are exposed near Thermopolis along the northern margin of the unit: the transitional marine deposits of the uppermost Sundance formation are the most likely source of the wind-transported sand. Stratigraphic and facies relationships and lithologic similarity support correlation of the eolian unit with the Unkpapa Sandstone. Together, the units represent regions of significant eolian deposition within the predominantly fluvial Morrison depositional environment. The properties of the eolian sandstone, its thickness, its superposition above the marine Sundance Formation, and the possibility of its persistence in the subsurface of the southern Powder River basin give it potential as a petroleum reservoir. These anomalous eolian deposits may record the positions of gentle structures developed in central Wyoming and western South Dakota at the onset of, and in association with, Sevier compression.

  13. Agricultural land-use classification using landsat imagery data, and estimates of irrigation water use in Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, and Minidoka counties, 1992 water year, Upper Snake River basin, Idaho and western Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maupin, Molly A.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the upper Snake River Basin study unit, land- and water-use data were used to describe activities that have potential effects on water quality, including biological conditions, in the basin. Land-use maps and estimates of water use by irrigated agriculture were needed for Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln, and Minidoka Counties (south-central Idaho), four of the most intensively irrigated counties in the study unit. Land use in the four counties was mapped from Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery data for the 1992 water year using the SPECTRUM computer program. Land-use data were field verified in 108 randomly selected sections (640 acres each); results compared favorably with land-use maps from other sources. Water used for irrigation during the 1992 water year was estimated using land-use and ancillary data. In 1992, a drought year, estimated irrigation withdrawals in the four counties were about 2.9 million acre-feet of water. Of the 2.9 million acre-feet, an estimated 2.12 million acre-feet of water was withdrawn from surface water, mainly the Snake River, and nearly 776,000 acre-feet was withdrawn from ground water. One-half of the 2.9 million acre-feet of water withdrawn for irrigation was considered to be lost during conveyance or was returned to the Snake River; the remainder was consumptively used by crops during the growing season.

  14. 76 FR 23333 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ...Director, Bureau of Land Management, 5353 Yellowstone Road, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82009. FOR...Management, Wyoming State Office, 5353 Yellowstone Road, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82009, 307-775-6257...Office, Bureau of Land Management, 5353 Yellowstone Road, Cheyenne, Wyoming 82009,...

  15. 77 FR 34894 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ...INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeffrey Fleischman, Director, Casper Field Office, Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, Dick Cheney Federal Building, POB 11018, 150 East B Street, Casper, Wyoming 82601-1018; Telephone: 307-261-6550,...

  16. The Cretaceous record in a northeast-trending transect, northern Utah to east-central Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Merewether, E.A. (U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in the Laramide basins of the middle Rocky Mountains include 16,600 ft (5060 m) of predominantly siliciclastic strata in the thrust-belt of northern Utah and 7800 ft (2380 m) of mainly siliciclastic and calcareous strata near the craton in east central Wyoming. Regional changes in the thickness of the strata indicate that crustal subsidence during the Cretaceous was generally greatest in northern Utah and western Wyoming where it was associated with tectonic and sediment loading. However, the considerable thickness of uppermost Cretaceous nonmarine beds in several other areas reflects pronounced basin subsidence during early stages of the Laramide orogeny. In a transect from northern Utah to east-central Wyoming, based on outcrop sections, borehole logs, and chronostratigraphic data, Cretaceous rocks grade northeastward from mainly fluvial and nearshore marine synorogenic conglomerate, sandstone, mudstone, coal, and bentonite to mostly nearshore and offshore marine sandstone, mudstone, calcareous shale, and bentonite. Lateral changes in the lithofacies and in the extent of enclosed unconformities indicate marine transgressions and regressions that were effected by structural deformation, sedimentation, and eustatic events. Significant unconformities have been found at the base of the Cretaceous strata, at two horizons within beds of Albian age, at two horizons within rocks of Cenomanian and Turonian ages, at one horizon within Coniacian strata, and at two horizons within Campanian beds. Most of these unconformities are either flooding surfaces or sequence boundaries.

  17. Proceedings of the University of Wyoming Trustees Symposium. (Jackson, Wyoming, August 2-5, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Univ., Jackson.

    The 1987 University of Wyoming (UW) Trustees Symposium focused on five major topics. The topics and keynote speakers are as follows: "An Introduction to the University of Wyoming--The Perspective of a Newcomer," (Terry P. Roark); "College: Making the Connections" (Ernest L. Boyer); "A Quality Faculty for the Second Century" (Jack H. Schuster);…

  18. The trials of Hanna Porn: the campaign to abolish midwifery in Massachusetts.

    PubMed Central

    Declercq, E R

    1994-01-01

    The case of Hanna Porn affords an opportunity to examine how the laws that led to the abolition of midwifery in Massachusetts evolved and were applied to the midwife whose case set the state legal precedent. Mrs Porn served primarily a Finnish-Swedish clientele of wives of laborers. The outcomes of the births she attended appear to have been positive, and she maintained a neonatal mortality rate of less than half that of local physicians. She also repeatedly defied court orders to stop practicing. Her case exemplifies the efforts that occurred nationally to abolish midwifery in the United States. PMID:8203670

  19. SIMULATION MODELING OF LIMITED IRRIGATION CROPPING SYSTEMS IN THE SOUTH PLATTE RIVER BASIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The South Platte River Basin is located primarily in Northeastern Colorado, with lesser parts in Nebraska and Wyoming. Agriculture is the predominant water user in the basin and demand frequently exceeds supply, particularly in times of drought. Further exacerbating the problem is water demand from ...

  20. Post-fire seeding on Wyoming big sagebrush ecological sites: Regression analyses of seeded nonnative and native species densities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark E. Eiswerth; Karl Krauter; Sherman R. Swanson; Mike Zielinski

    2009-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, sagebrush rangelands in the Great Basin of the United States have experienced more frequent and larger wildfires. These fires affect livestock forage, the sagebrush\\/grasses\\/forbs mosaic that is important for many wildlife species (e.g., the greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)), post-fire flammability and fire frequency. When a sagebrush, especially a Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle

  1. Paleoecology of Early eocene strata near Buffalo, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, T.V.; Rich, F.J.

    1986-08-01

    Palynological investigation has helped illustrate the paleoecology of a vertical section of strata from the Wasatch Formation between the Healy and Walters coal burns near Buffalo, Wyoming. Numerous silicified logs and stumps of cypress and sequoia have been preserved at the site and drew initial attention to it. Flood-basin deposits enclose the trees and include sandstones, siltstones, shale, and coal beds that accumulated as channel, levee, crevasse-splay, and swamp/marsh sediments. Detrital sediments were probably derived from the Bighorn Mountains and accumulated as they were carried into the Powder River basin fluvial system. One hundred five polynomorph taxa have been distinguished, as well as 10 types of fungal spores. Platycarya, Tilia, Sparganium, and Platanus pollen indicate an early Eocene age for the strata. Other pollen, as well as the genera of trees and megafossil remains from a clinker bed several miles from the study area, reinforce the interpretation of a warm-temperature or subtropical climate at the time of deposition. The megafossil assemblage includes pinnae of the aquatic fern Marsilea, never before described from the fossil record. Variations in the species composition of the polynomorph assemblages show that several plant communities existed in succession at the site. These varied from pond or marsh types to mature forests.

  2. Wyoming Cloud Lidar: instrument description and applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhien; Wechsler, Perry; Kuestner, William; French, Jeffrey; Rodi, Alfred; Glover, Brent; Burkhart, Matthew; Lukens, Donal

    2009-08-01

    The Wyoming Cloud Lidar (WCL), a compact two-channel elastic lidar, was designed to obtain cloud measurements together with the Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR) on the University of Wyoming King Air and the National Science Foundation/National Center of Atmospheric Research C-130 aircraft. The WCL has been deployed in four field projects under a variety of atmospheric and cloud conditions during the last two years. Throughout these campaigns, it has exhibited the needed reliability for turn-key operation from aircraft. We provide here an overview of the instrument and examples to illustrate the measurements capability of the WCL. Although the WCL as a standalone instrument can provide unique measurements for cloud and boundary layer aerosol studies, the synergy of WCL and WCR measurements coupled with in situ sampling from an aircraft provide a significant step forward in our ability to observe and understand cloud microphysical property evolution. PMID:19654765

  3. Basin-scale relations via conditioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.; Guertin, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    A rainfall-runoff model is used in conjunction with a probabilistic description of the input to this model to obtain simple regression-like relations for basin runoff in terms of basin and storm characteristics. These relations, similar to those sought in regionalization studies, are computed by evaluating the conditional distribution of model output given basin and storm characteristics. This method of conditioning provides a general way of examining model sensitivity to various components of model input. The resulting relations may be expected to resemble corresponding relations obtained by regionalization using actual runoff to the extent that the rainfall-runoff model and the model input specification are physically realistic. The probabilistic description of model input is an extension of so-called "random-model" of channel networks and involves postulating an ensemble of basins and associated probability distributions that mimic the variability of basin characteristics seen in nature. Application is made to small basins in the State of Wyoming. Parameters of the input variable distribution are estimated using data from Wyoming, and basin-scale relations are estimated both, parametrically and nonparametrically using model-generated runoff from simulated basins. Resulting basin-scale relations involving annual flood quantiles are in reasonable agreement with those presented in a previous regionalization study, but error estimates are smaller than those in the previous study, an artifact of the simplicity of the rainfall-runoff model used in this paper. We also obtain relations for peak of the instantaneous unit hydrograph which agree fairly well with theoretical relations given in the literature. Finally, we explore the issues of sensitivity of basin-scale, relations and error estimates to parameterization of the model input probability distribution and of how this sensitivity is related to making inferences about a particular ungaged basin. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Late Quaternary stratigraphy and geochronology of the western Killpecker Dunes, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayer, J.H.; Mahan, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    New stratigraphic and geochronologic data from the Killpecker Dunes in southwestern Wyoming facilitate a more precise understanding of the dune field's history. Prior investigations suggested that evidence for late Pleistocene eolian activity in the dune field was lacking. However, luminescence ages from eolian sand of ???15,000 yr, as well as Folsom (12,950-11,950 cal yr B.P.) and Agate Basin (12,600-10,700 cal yr) artifacts overlying eolian sand, indicate the dune field existed at least during the latest Pleistocene, with initial eolian sedimentation probably occurring under a dry periglacial climate. The period between ???13,000 and 8900 cal yr B.P. was characterized by relatively slow eolian sedimentation concomitant with soil formation. Erosion occurred between ???8182 and 6600 cal yr B.P. on the upwind region of the dune field, followed by relative stability and soil formation between ???5900 and 2700 cal yr B.P. The first of at least two latest Holocene episodes of eolian sedimentation occurred between ???2000 and 1500 yr, followed by a brief (???500 yr) episode of soil formation; a second episode of sedimentation, occurring by at least ???700 yr, may coincide with a hypothesized Medieval warm period. Recent stabilization of the western Killpecker Dunes likely occurred during the Little Ice Age (???350-100 yr B.P.). The eolian chronology of the western Killpecker Dunes correlates reasonably well with those of other major dune fields in the Wyoming Basin, suggesting that dune field reactivation resulted primarily due to departures toward aridity during the late Quaternary. Similar to dune fields on the central Great Plains, dune fields in the Wyoming Basin have been active under a periglacial climate during the late Pleistocene, as well as under near-modern conditions during the latest Holocene. ?? 2003 University of Washington. All rights reserved.

  5. Ground-water levels in Wyoming, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballance, W.C.; Freudenthal, Pamela B.

    1977-01-01

    Ground-water levels are measured periodically in a network of about 280 observation wells in Wyoming to record changes in ground-water storage. The areas of water-level observation are mostly where ground water is used in large quantities for irrigation or municipal purposes. This report contains maps showing location of observation wells and water-level changes from 1976 to 1977. Well history, highest and lowest water levels , and hydrographs for most wells also are included. The program of groundwater observation is conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer and the city of Cheyenne. (Woodard-USGS)

  6. Interpretation of planetary stress systems: Determination of tectonic over-printing in Northwest Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, D. U.; Allison, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Structural and tectonic interpretations of planetary surfaces rely strongly on visual determination of regional structural grain. This grain can be very complex and confusing, and sorting out of discrete trends in time and space is of utmost importance. This study is a test of these techniques applied to a well known area having several discrete structural grains. In the Bighorn Basin region of Wyoming, a largely overlooked N10E structural grain has been verified with detailed structural analysis and indicates a significant change in stress orientation at the end of the Laramide orogeny.

  7. HYDROTHERMAL MINERALOGY OF RESEARCH DRILL HOLE Y-3, YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, Keith E.; Beeson, Melvin H.

    1984-01-01

    The approximate paragenetic sequence of hydrothermal minerals in the Y-3 U. S. Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, is: hydrothermal chalcedony, hematite, pyrite, quartz, clay minerals (smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite), calcite, chlorite, fluorite, pyrite, quartz, zeolite minerals (analcime, dachiardite, laumontite, stilbite, and yugawaralite), and clay minerals (smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite). A few hydrothermal minerals that were identified in drill core Y-3 (lepidolite, aegirine, pectolite, and truscottite) are rarely found in modern geothermal areas. The alteration minerals occur primarily as vug and fracture fillings that were deposited from cooling thermal water. Refs.

  8. Structural analysis of the Sheep Mountain anticline, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    E-print Network

    Hennier, Jeffrey Hugh

    1984-01-01

    , evidenced by nearly uniform bedding thickness, fold geometry, and slickensides along bedding surfaces. Precambrian basement rocks at the base of the sedimentary sequence are assumed to deform by alternative mechanisms due to the brittle nature of massive... Stereonet plot of slickensides measured in bedding planes of the Gypsum Springs Format1on on the steep flank of Sheep Mounta1n anticline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 18 Examples of bedding plane slip and related m1nor thrusting at Sheep...

  9. Thermochronology of lower Cretaceous source rocks in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Burtner, R.L. [TerraSpec Associates, Fullerton, CA (United States); Nigrini, A. [TerraSpec Associates, La Habra Heights, CA (United States); Donelick, R.A. [Donelick Analytical, Katy, TX (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Lower Cretaceous organic-rich source rocks that are thermally mature to postmature crop out on the Absaroka, Darby, and Prospect plates in linear belts that run parallel to the trace of the thrusts in the Idaho-Wyoming portion of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah thrust belt. Although the common assumption is that burial by thrust plates and the synorogenic sediments derived from them have been responsible for thermal maturation of the organic-rich strata, commercial amounts of hydrocarbons have not been found in structural traps in this portion of the thrust belt. In a companion paper, Burtner and Nigrini demonstrated that gravity-driven fluid flow in the Idaho-Wyoming portion of the thrust belt was responsible for moving large amounts of heat from the depths of the Early Cretaceous foreland basin eastward toward the stable platform. In this paper we demonstrate, through the application of organic maturation indicators and a new refinement of the apatite fission track technique, that this process heated Lower Cretaceous organic-rich source rocks to temperatures sufficient to generate hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon generation and migration occurred prior to the development of the thrusts that are often assumed to have played a major role in the generation and entrapment of hydrocarbons in this portion of the thrust belt.

  10. GLACIER VARIABILITY IN WYOMING’S WIND RIVER RANGE AND TETON RANGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D.; Bell, J. E.; Edmunds, J.; Tootle, G. A.; Kerr, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Wind River Range (WRR) in west central Wyoming is host to 63 glaciers, while the Teton Range (TR) is host to 10 named glaciers. These glaciers serve as natural water reservoirs, and the continued recession of glaciers will impact agricultural water supply in the region. Glacier area changes in the WRR were estimated for 44 glaciers using un-rectified high resolution (1 m) aerial photography from 1966 to 2006. Additionally, glacier area was also developed for ten of the 44 glaciers using resampled aerial photography at 10 m (SPOT), 15 m (ASTER), 22.5 m (IRS-LISS) and 30 m (Landsat) resolutions for 1966 and 2006. The total surface area of the 44 glaciers was calculated to be 45.9 ± 0.13 km2 in 1966 and 28.5 ± 0.11 km2 in 2006, an average decrease of 38% over the 40 year period. Small glaciers experienced noticeably more area reduction than large glaciers. Of the 44 glaciers analyzed, 22 had an area of greater than 0.5 km2 in 1966, while 22 were less than 0.5 km2 in 1966. The glaciers with a surface area less than 0.5 km2 experienced an average surface area loss (fraction of 1966 surface area) of 47%, while the larger glaciers (greater than 0.5 km2) experienced an average surface area loss of 36% in 2006. Of the ten glaciers analyzed by resampling, the total surface area (fraction of 1966 surface area) decreased by 36.8% using aerial photographs, 36.5% using SPOT images, 36.6% using ASTER images, 36.0% using IRS-LISS images and 37.1% using Landsat images. Glacier area changes in the TR were estimated for three glaciers using un-rectified aerial photography from 1967 to 2006. The total surface area of the three glaciers was calculated to be 0.53 ± 0.13 km2 in 1967 and 0.40 ± 0.10 km2 in 2006, an average decrease of 34% over the 39 year period. The smallest glacier Teepe experienced the most noticeable lost, losing 60% while the Teton glacier lost 17%. Applying area-volume scaling relationships for Teton, Middle Teton, and Teepe glaciers, volume loss was estimated to be 3.2 million cubic meters (MCM) over the 35 year period, which results in an estimated 4 to 10% contribution to warm season (July - September) streamflow. Accompanied with the calculation of glacier area loss, the amount of glacial volume lost was also determined for selected glaciers in the WRR from 1966 to 1989. A subset of 29 glaciers throughout two basins were analyzed as part of a paired watershed (glaciated vs. non-glaciated) analysis. Through the use of photogrammetric techniques, volume loss in the 17 glaciers of the Upper Green River sub-basin was estimated to be 319 x 106 m3 (14% area loss), while 12 glaciers in the Bull Lake sub-basin lost 369 x 106 m3 (16% area loss) over the 23 year period. The pure glacial ice melt contribution to late summer (Jul., Aug. and Sep.) downstream flow was 8% and 14%, respectively, for the basins above. Also, the paired watershed analysis indicated glaciers delayed spring snowmelt runoff to an extent where, in combination with glacial ice melt, the flow resulting from the glacial terminus was approximated as 40% of the late summer downstream flows.

  11. Glacial-topographic interactions in the Teton Range, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, David; Brocklehurst, Simon H.; Gawthorpe, Rob L.

    2010-03-01

    Understanding interactions among tectonics, topography, climate, and erosion is fundamental to studies of mountainous landscapes. Here, we combine topographic analyses with modeled distributions of precipitation, insolation, and flexural isostasy to present a conceptual model of topographic evolution in the Teton Range, Wyoming, and test whether efficient glacial relief production has contributed to summit elevations. The conceptual model reveals a high degree of complexity inherent in even a relatively small, glaciated, mountain range. Back tilting has caused topographic asymmetry, with the greatest relief characterizing eastern catchments in the center of the range. Two high summits, Grand Teton and Mount Moran, rise hundreds of meters above the surrounding landscape; their elevations set by the threshold hillslope angle and the spacing between valleys hosting large, erosionally efficient glaciers. Only basins >20 km2 held glaciers capable of eroding sufficiently rapidly to incise deeply and maintain shallow downvalley gradients on the eastern range flank. Glacial erosion here was promoted by (1) prevailing westerly winds transporting snow to high-relief eastern basins, leading to cross-range precipitation asymmetry; (2) the wind-blown redistribution of snow from open western headwaters into sheltered eastern cirques, with the associated erosion-driven migration of the drainage divide increasing eastern accumulation areas; and (3) tall, steep hillslopes providing shading, snow influx from avalanching, and insulating debris cover from rockfalls to valley floor glaciers. In comparison, the topographic enhancement of glacial erosion was less pronounced in western, and smaller eastern, basins. Despite dramatic relief production, insufficient rock mass is removed from the Teton Range to isostatically raise summit elevations.

  12. Ranch in the Green River Valley, Wyoming

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A section of the Upper Green River Valley in western Wyoming, just south of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, showing different ecosystems (such as forests, wetlands, and aquatic habitats) whose capacities for carbon storage and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions will be assessed by the...

  13. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs all partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

  14. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships assist…

  15. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships assist…

  16. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs all partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

  17. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs all partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

  18. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Wyoming edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF PHYTOPLANKTON IN WYOMING LAKES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the species and abundance of phytoplankton in the 14 lakes sampled by the National Eutrophication Survey in the State of Wyoming. Results from the calculation of several water quality indices are also included (Nygaard's Trophic State Index, Palmer's Organic P...

  20. Instructional Computing in Wyoming: Status and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansky, Bob

    The status of instructional computing in Wyoming's public schols as of April 1980 is reported. Specifically the document indicates the nature and extent of computer usage in grades K-12, summarizes teachers' opinions regarding the potential instructional uses of computers in the schools, and presents the recommendations of a select committee of…

  1. 78 FR 43061 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ...regulations under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation...baseline surface water data on acidity. Wyoming subsequently...levels of government.'' Data Quality Act In developing...peer review under the Data Quality Act (Pub. L...Intergovernmental relations, Surface mining, Underground...

  2. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Casper Quadrangle, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Griffin; E. J. Milton

    1982-01-01

    The Casper Quadrangle, Wyoming, was evaluated for areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. Examination of surface exposures of known uranium occurrences, reconnaissance geochemical sampling, and ground radiometric surveys were conducted. Anomalous areas recognized from airborne radiometric surveys were ground checked. Electric and gamma logs were used to determine subsurface structure, stratigraphy, lithology, and areas of anomalous radioactivity. Fourteen

  3. Cretaceous References: Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Montana

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    PetroDynamics Inc.

    This site supplies a comprehensive list of references relevant to Cretaceous stratigraphy, paleogeography, tectonics and petroleum exploration in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and Montana. The references range from the 1930's to the 1990's cover a variety of specific topics. Additional information and references are available on the site's home page under resources.

  4. SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING

    E-print Network

    and Open Pit Mining ·Current Mine Permit (381C) ·Updating POO, Reclamation Plan & Bond ·Uranium Recovery;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C ·Historical Operation ·Western Nuclear Crooks Gap Project ·Mined 1956 ­ 1988

  5. Geochemistry of early Precambrian graywackes from Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kent C. Condie

    1967-01-01

    Twenty-three samples of slightly metamorphosed early Precambrian graywackes from the southern Wind River Mountains in Wyoming have been analyzed for Si, Al, Ti, Fe, Mg, K, Ca, Rb, Sr, Zr and Ni by X-ray fluorescence and for Na and Mn by neutron activation; modal analyses have also been made of these samples. These graywackes, which possess well preserved primary textures

  6. [McWilliams, Possible Wind River Basin Thrust Fault]1 Evidence of a Possible 32-Mile-Wide Thrust Fault,

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    [McWilliams, Possible Wind River Basin Thrust Fault]1 Evidence of a Possible 32-Mile-Wide Thrust Fault, Wind River Basin, Fremont County Wyoming Robert G. McWilliams, Professor Emeritus, Department Indian Meadows and lower Wind River Formations. Love (1987) described in detail this fold-thrust fault

  7. Oil shale and nahcolite resources of the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey Oil Shale Assessment Team

    2010-01-01

    This report presents an in-place assessment of the oil shale and nahcolite resources of the Green River Formation in the Piceance Basin of western Colorado. The Piceance Basin is one of three large structural and sedimentary basins that contain vast amounts of oil shale resources in the Green River Formation of Eocene age. The other two basins, the Uinta Basin of eastern Utah and westernmost Colorado, and the Greater Green River Basin of southwest Wyoming, northwestern Colorado, and northeastern Utah also contain large resources of oil shale in the Green River Formation, and these two basins will be assessed separately. Estimated in-place oil is about 1.5 trillion barrels, based on Fischer a ssay results from boreholes drilled to evaluate oil shale, making it the largest oil shale deposit in the world. The estimated in-place nahcolite resource is about 43.3 billion short tons.

  8. 76 FR 77829 - Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ...Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming...Investigation of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion, Wyoming...draft ``Investigation of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion,...

  9. High Resolution Mapping of Reference ET for the State of Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, R. W.; Park, G.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate estimation of Consumptive Use (CU) and Consumptive Irrigation Requirement (CIR) are essential components for water resources planning and management. The Wyoming State Engineer’s Office currently determines monthly reference evapotranspiration (ET) with an Excel Spreadsheet ET model using average monthly data from a nearby weather station (usually an airport weather station) for the irrigated area of interest. The monthly reference ET is then interpolated into daily reference ET using either linear or cubic functions. The purpose of this project is to enhance the current Excel model with a GIS-based ET calculator. Our approach will use daily weather data to calculate reference ET and actual ET, and then aggregate them into monthly and seasonal ET. Among the many reference ET equations available, the ASCE Standardized Reference Evapotranspiration Equation (ASCE-ET) and the Hargreaves-Samani equations were selected to calculate daily reference ET. Data needed for the equations (minimum and maximum temperatures, wind speed, and dew point temperature) was gathered at various resolutions from several sources, such as weather stations in Wyoming and from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). High resolution (1km x 1km) gridded reference ET maps were produced from interpolated weather data for the three major river basins in southern Wyoming (North Platte River, Green River, and Bear River basins). Monthly and seasonal reference ET values will be determined using daily reference ET. Gridded reference ET values from the two methods will be compared with the reference ET using data from a single weather station. These reference ET maps will then be used to develop a GIS-based ET calculator.

  10. Basin-centered gas evaluated in Dnieper-Donets basin, Donbas foldbelt, Ukraine

    SciTech Connect

    Law, B.E. [Law (B.E.), Lakewood, CO (United States); Ulmishek, G.F.; Clayton, J.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Kabyshev, B.P. [Ukrainian State Geological Inst., Chernigov (Ukraine); Pashova, N.T.; Krivosheya, V.A. [Ukrainian State Geological Inst., Poltava (Ukraine)

    1998-11-23

    An evaluation of thermal maturity, pore pressures, source rocks, reservoir quality, present-day temperatures, and fluid recovery data indicates the presence of a large basin-centered gas accumulation in the Dnieper-Donets basin (DDB) and Donbas foldbelt (DF) of eastern Ukraine. This unconventional accumulation covers an area of at least 35,000 sq km and extends vertically through as much as 7,000 m of Carboniferous rocks. The gas accumulation is similar, in many respects, to some North American accumulations such as Elmworth in the Alberta basin of western Canada, the Greater Green River basin of southwestern Wyoming, and the Anadarko basin of Oklahoma. Even though rigorous assessments of the recoverable gas have not been conducted in the region, a comparison of the dimensions of the accumulation to similar accumulations in the US indicates gas resources in excess of 100 tcf in place. The paper describes the geology, the reservoirs, source rocks, seals, and recommendations for further study.

  11. Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

    2005-12-30

    In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

  12. Using Airborne and Ground Electromagnetic Surveys and DC Resistivity Surveys to Delineate a Plume of Conductive Water at an In-Channel Coalbed Methane Produced Water Impoundment Near the Powder River, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Lipinski; W. Harbert; R. Hammack; J. Sams; G. Veloski; B. D. Smith

    2004-01-01

    Development of coal bed methane (CBM) in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana has significantly increased since 1997. Production of CBM involves withdrawing groundwater from the coal bed to lower the hydrostatic pressure thereby allowing methane to desorb from the coal. The water co-produced with CBM is managed by storing it in impoundments until it can infiltrate to

  13. Multidisciplinary study of Wyoming test sites. [hydrology, biology, geology, lithology, geothermal, and land use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, R. S. (principal investigator); Marrs, R. W.; Agard, S. S.; Downing, K. G.; Earle, J. L.; Froman, N. L.; Gordon, R.; Kolm, K. E.; Tomes, B.; Vietti, J.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Investigation of a variety of applications of EREP photographic data demonstrated that EREP S-190 data offer a unique combination of synoptic coverage and image detail. The broad coverage is ideal for regional geologic mapping and tectonic analysis while the detail is adequate for mapping of crops, mines, urban areas, and other relatively small features. The investigative team at the University of Wyoming has applied the EREP S-190 data to: (1) analysis of photolinear elements of the Powder River Basin, southern Montana, and the Wind River Mountains; (2) drainage analysis of the Powder River Basin and Beartooth Mountains; (3) lithologic and geologic mapping in the Powder River Basin, Black Hills, Green River Basin, Bighorn Basin and Southern Bighorn Mountains; (4) location of possible mineralization in the Absaroka Range; and (5) land use mapping near Riverton and Gillette. All of these applications were successful to some degree. Image enhancement procedures were useful in some efforts requiring distinction of small objects or subtle contrasts.

  14. View of north central Wyoming and southern Montana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A view of approximately 3,600 square miles of north central Wyoming and southern Montana as seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The Big Horn River flowing northward crosses between the northwest trending Big Horn Mountains and the Pryor Mountains. Yellowtail Reservoir, in the center of the picture, is impounded by a dam across the Big Horn River. A sharp contrast is clearly evident between the small rectangular crop areas along the Big Horn River (upper right) and the strip farming (yellow) practiced on the rolling hill along the Big Horn River and its tributaries (upper left corner and right edge). The low sun angle enhances the structural features of the mountains as well as the drainage patterns in the adjacent basins. Rock formations appear in this color photograph as they would to the eye from this altitude. The distinctive redbeds can be traced along the fr

  15. Invertebrate communities of small streams in northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Invertebrate communities of small streams in an energy-mineral- development area in the Powder River structural basin of northeastern Wyoming were studied during 1980-81. The largest average density of benthic invertebrates among 11 sites was 983 invertebrates/sq ft at a site on a perennial stream, the Little Powder River at State Highway 59. The smallest average densities were 3.4 invertebrates/sq ft in Salt Creek and 16.6 invertebrates/sq ft in the Cheyenne River, two streams where the invertebrates were stressed by degraded water quality or inadequate substrate or both. The rates of invertebrate drift were fastest in three perennial streams, compared to the rates in intermittent and ephemeral streams. Analysis of the invertebrate communities using the Jaccard coefficient of community similarity and a cluster diagram showed communities inhabiting perennial streams were similar to each other, because of the taxa adapted to flowing water in riffles and runs. Communities from sites on ephemeral streams were similar to each other, because of the taxa adapted to standing water and vegetation in pools. Communities of intermittent streams did not form a group; either they were relatively similar to those of perennial or ephemeral streams or they were relatively dissimilar to other communities. The communities of the two streams stressed by degraded water quality or inadequate substrate or both, Salt Creek and the Cheyenne River, were relatively dissimilar to communities of the other streams in the study. (USGS)

  16. Ground-water levels in Wyoming, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballance, W.C.; Freudenthal, Pamela B.

    1976-01-01

    Ground-water levels are measured periodically in a network of about 260 observation wells in Wyoming to record changes in ground-water storage. The areas of water-level observation are mostly where ground water is used in large quantities for irrigation or municipal purposes. This report contains maps showing location of observation wells and water-level changes from 1975 to 1976. Well history, highest and lowest water levels , and hydrographs for most wells also are included. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) systems in the US - Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Lageson; E. K. Maughan; W. J. Sando

    1979-01-01

    Lower Carboniferous strata of Wyoming (Mississippian to early middle Pennsylvanian) represent 2 marine depositional sequences separated by a period of epeirogenic uplift and erosion. The Mississippian part of the succession is a wedge that thickens northwestward from a zero edge in S.E. Wyoming; this wedge is disconformably overlain by predominantly thin-bedded terrigenous strata of the upper part of the succession.

  18. The Impact of New Informational Technology on Education in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolly, John; And Others

    Educational changes in Wyoming that are linked to the emergence of new informational technologies are considered. Attention is directed to the following topics: assumptions for Wyoming educators as they plan to respond to the impact of technology on teacher education; the importance of educational goals and objectives; the national climate…

  19. WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH INFLUENCE ON COMMUNITY RESOURCE CAPTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wyoming big sagebrush alliance is the most extensive subspecies of the 62 million ha big sagebrush complex in the western United States. A substantial decrease in the area occupied by Wyoming big sagebrush has occurred due to altered fire regimes, invasion by exotic annuals, and anthropogenic contr...

  20. Seeds and Seedling Establishment of Wyoming Big Sagebrush

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. T. Booth; Y. Bai

    Success with Wyoming sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) depends on good seed vigor, and rapid seedling development. These characteristics are influenced by harvesting, processing, storing, and sowing. In this paper we discuss research findings related to those activities: (1) It appears that Wyoming big sagebrush growing on the western edge of the Great Plains might hold viable seed longer into

  1. Geologic structure and altitude of the top of the Minnelusa Formation, northern Black Hills, South Dakota and Wyoming, and Bear Lodge Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peter, Kathy D.; Kyllonen, David P.; Mills, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Beginning in 1981, a 3-yr project was conducted to determine the availability and quality of groundwater in the sedimentary bedrock aquifers in the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. The project was limited to three bedrock units in order of increasing age: the Cretaceous Inyan kara Group, Permian and Pennsylvanian Minnelusa Formation, and Mississippian Madison (or Pahasapa) Limestone. This map shows the altitude of the top of the Minnelusa Formation in the northern Black Hills, and shows the configuration of the structural features in the northern part of the Black Hills and the eastern part of the Bear Lodge Mountains. In general, the Minnelusa Formation dips away from the Black Hills uplift, either to the northeast and the Williston Basin or, south of the Bear Lodge Mountains, to the southwest and the Powder River basin, which is outside the map area. In the map area, the upper beds of the Minnelusa Formation are an aquifer and the lower beds are a confining or semi-confining unit. The upper part of the Minnelusa Formation has a greater percentage of coarse-grained sandstone beds than the lower part. Furthermore, solution and removal of anhydrite, brecciation, and solution of cement binding the sandstone grains may have increased the permeability of the upper part of the Minnelusa Formation in the Black Hills. Wells completed in the upper part of the Minnelusa have yields that exceed 100 gal/min in some areas and at least one large diameter well is reported to flow 1,000 gal/min in some areas and at least one large diameter well is reported to flow 1,000 gal/min. Flowing wells have been completed in the Minnelusa aquifer in most of the study area in South Dakota and in about the northern one-half of Crook County, Wyoming. (Lantz-PTT)

  2. A Study of Wyoming School Resource Use and Instructional Improvement Strategies at Eight Wyoming Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parady, Elizabeth Skiles

    2013-01-01

    The intersection of the accountability measures found in NCLB with the legislative response to the Campbell decisions in Wyoming has resulted in an unprecedented focus on accountability for student achievement and resource use. Funding provided to schools has increased with a concomitant drive for accountability and transparency, the publication…

  3. Building the Arts in Education in Wyoming. A Preliminary Report. Wyoming Arts Education Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Council of the Arts, Cheyenne.

    An arts education survey was undertaken in 1989 to establish comprehensive, baseline information regarding arts education in Wyoming schools. The findings serve as a standard against which to measure future changes in the quality of arts education in the state. This report is designed to highlight the initial findings of the survey. Arts education…

  4. Airborne measurements of aerosol extinction in the lower and middle troposphere over Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ziguang; Montague, Derek C.; Snider, Jefferson R.

    Particle size distributions, and scattering and absorption coefficients were measured over the Green River basin of Wyoming during the Southwest Wyoming Visibility Study (SWYVIS) in February and March 1996. Eleven flights were carried out, using the Wyoming King Air research aircraft. In the least polluted regions of the planetary boundary layer, particle number densities detected in the diameter range 0.13-3.0 ?m were <100 cm -3. Aloft, in the stable air of the free troposphere, they were generally even lower, often falling to a few tens of particles per cm 3. Analyses of bulk aerosol filter samples showed that organic carbonaceous material was the dominant chemical component, with sulfate and refractory species being the largest inorganic components. Combining the filter data with separately measured black carbon mass loading values allowed refractive indices for the aerosol to be calculated, so that PCASP measured size distributions could be revised. Characterizing size parameters were obtained by fitting particle populations to bimodal lognormal distributions. Particle size distributions were somewhat broader at higher altitudes so that larger particles made greater contributions to extinction. Optical closure was attempted by comparing scattering and total extinctions computed by Mie theory with the corresponding values derived from the observations. While the calculated and measured single scattering albedo average values were in reasonably good agreement, even though individual pairs of values sometimes differed significantly, computed scattering coefficients often exceeded those derived from the measurements, by an average of 60%. Reasons for this discrepancy are explored, including the possible modification of the size distribution by partial or total volatilization of particles within the nephelometer and its inlet.

  5. Identification and Implementation of Native Fish Conservation Areas in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel C. Dauwalter; John S. Sanderson; Jack E. Williams; James R. Sedell

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater fishes continue to decline at a rapid rate despite substantial conservation efforts. Native fish conservation areas (NFCAs) are a management approach emphasizing persistent native fish communities and healthy watersheds while simultaneously allowing for compatible human uses. We identified potential NFCAs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Wyoming—focusing on Colorado River cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus), flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus

  6. Water Planning in the States of the Upper Basin of the Colorado River.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Dean E.

    1978-01-01

    Discussion of issues involved in water planning of the upper basin of the Colorado River: attitudes toward water planning, agricultural leisure and environmental issues, pollution, and energy issues. Various sections are devoted to Indian interests and the interests of Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico. Final section discusses the future of…

  7. Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Nealon, Teresa

    2014-06-30

    This report outlines the accomplishments of the Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Technology Institute (WCTI), including creating a website and online course catalog, sponsoring technology transfer workshops, reaching out to interested parties via news briefs and engaging in marketing activities, i.e., advertising and participating in tradeshows. We conclude that the success of WCTI was hampered by the lack of a market. Because there were no supporting financial incentives to store carbon, the private sector had no reason to incur the extra expense of training their staff to implement carbon storage. ii

  8. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Peggy Robinson

    2005-07-01

    This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

  9. Rocky Mountain Tertiary coal-basin models and their applicability to some world basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Tertiary intermontane basins in the Rocky Mountain region of the United States contain large amounts of coal resources. The first major type of Tertiary coal basin is closed and lake-dominated, either mud-rich (e.g., North Park Basin, Colorado) or mud plus carbonate (e.g., Medicine Lodge Basin, Montana), which are both infilled by deltas. The second major type of Tertiary coal basin is open and characterized by a preponderance of sediments that were deposited by flow-through fluvial systems (e.g., Raton Basin, Colorado and New Mexico, and Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana). The setting for the formation of these coals varies with the type of basin sedimentation, paleotectonism, and paleoclimate. The mud-rich lake-dominated closed basin (transpressional paleotectonism and warm, humid paleoclimate), where infilled by sandy "Gilbert-type" deltas, contains thick coals (low ash and low sulfur) formed in swamps of the prograding fluvial systems. The mud- and carbonate-rich lake-dominated closed basin is infilled by carbonate precipitates plus coarse-grained fan deltas and fine-grained deltas. Here, thin coals (high ash and high sulfur) formed in swamps of the fine-grained deltas. The coarse-clastic, open basins (compressional paleotectonism and warm, paratropical paleoclimate) associated with flow-through fluvial systems contain moderately to anomalously thick coals (high to low ash and low sulfur) formed in swamps developed in intermittently abandoned portions of the fluvial systems. These coal development patterns from the Tertiary Rocky Mountain basins, although occurring in completely different paleotectonic settings, are similar to that found in the Tertiary, Cretaceous, and Permian intermontane coal basins in China, New Zealand, and India. ?? 1989.

  10. Depositional environments of Upper Cretaceous Dad Sandstone Member of Lewis Shale, south-central Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Perman, R.C.; Merewether, E.A.; Winn, R.D.

    1986-08-01

    The Lewis Shale of Carbon County, Wyoming, was deposited in marine environments during Maestrichtian time and consists of three members: lower and upper unnamed, predominantly mudstone members; and the intervening Dad Sandstone, characterized by alternating units of sandstone and mudstone. The Dad Sandstone is 139 to 264 m thick and contains three distinctive lithofacies. The first lithofacies coarsens upward and is composed of interstratified units of sandstone and mudstone. Sandstone units are typically less than 1.5 m thick (although amalgamated beds are as much as 20 m thick) and contain hummocky stratification, ripple lamination, and contorted and massive bedding. These rocks were probably deposited on a delta front during storms. The second lithofacies consists of sandstone units that are generally 12 to 43 m thick and contain abundant Ophiomorpha. This sandstone commonly has horizontal to subhorizontal bedding but locally has tabular cross-bedding, and massive and contorted bedding. These rocks are more proximal than the first lithofacies and are interpreted as upper delta-front deposits. The third lithofacies is composed of thick mudstone units that probably accumulated in shallow-water environments. Sediments of the Dad Member in the eastern part of Carbon County apparently had a southeastern source; those in the western part of the county were most likely derived from the Sheridan delta of northwestern Wyoming. West and southwest of the study area in the Great Divide and Washakie basins, laterally equivalent sandstone units were deposited beneath storm base by sediment gravity flows at the toe of the delta.

  11. Investigation of tar sand and heavy oil deposits of Wyoming for underground coal gasification applications

    SciTech Connect

    Trudell, L.G.

    1985-02-01

    A literature review was conducted to identify and evaluate tar sand and heavy oil deposits of Wyoming which are potentially suitable for in situ processing with process heat or combustible gas from underground coal gasification (UCG). The investigation was undertaken as part of a project to develop novel concepts for expanding the role of UCG in maximizing energy recovery from coal deposits. Preliminary evaluations indicate six surface deposits and three shallow heavy oil fields are within 5 miles of coal deposits, the maximum distance judged to be feasible for UCG applications. A tar sand or heavy oil deposit in the northeast Washakie Basin is less than 250 feet above a zone of four coal seams suitable for UCG, and another deposit near Riverton appears to be interbedded with coal. Three shallow light oil fields found to be within 5 miles of coal may be amenable to application of UCG technology for enhanced oil recovery. Sufficient data are not available for estimating the size of Wyoming's tar sand and heavy oil resource which is suitable for UCG development. Additional investigations are recommended to more fully characterize promising deposits and to assess the potential resource for UCG applications. 54 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Ecological Status of Wyoming Streams, 2000-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, David A.; Hargett, Eric G.; Wright, Peter R.; Zumberge, Jeremy R.

    2007-01-01

    The ecological status of perennial streams in Wyoming was determined and compared with the status of perennial streams throughout 12 States in the western United States, using data collected as part of the Western Pilot Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP-West). Results for Wyoming are compared and contrasted in the context of the entire EMAP-West study area (west-wide) and climatic regions (based on aggregated ecoregions) within Wyoming. In Wyoming, ecological status, estimated as the proportion of the perennial stream length in least disturbed, most disturbed, and intermediate disturbance condition, based on ecological indicators of vertebrate and invertebrate assemblages was similar, in many cases, to the status of those assemblages determined for EMAP-West. Ecological status based on chemical and physical habitat stressors also was similar in Wyoming to west-wide proportions in many cases. Riparian disturbance was one of the most common physical stressors west-wide and in Wyoming. The estimates of riparian disturbance indicated about 90 percent of the stream length in the xeric climatic region in Wyoming was rated most disturbed, compared to about 30 percent rated most disturbed in the mountain climatic region in Wyoming. Results from analyses using a macroinvertebrate multi-metric index (MMI) and macroinvertebrate ratio of observed to expected taxa (O/E) developed specifically for the west-wide EMAP study were compared to results using a macroinvertebrate MMI and O/E developed for Wyoming. Proportions of perennial stream length in various condition categories determined from macroinvertebrate MMIs often were similar in Wyoming to proportions observed west-wide. Differences were larger, but not extreme, between west-wide and Wyoming O/E models. An aquatic life use support decision matrix developed for interpreting the Wyoming MMI and O/E model data indicated about one-half of the stream length statewide achieves the State's narrative aquatic life use criteria, and the remainder of the stream length either exceeds the criteria, indicating partial or non-support of aquatic life Wyominguses, or is undetermined. These results provide initial estimates of aquatic life use support at a statewide basis as required for 305(b) reporting, and coupled with current and future State-level probability survey designs, a foundation for tracking conditions over time at multiple scales.

  13. Behavioral and catastrophic drift of invertebrates in two streams in northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wangsness, David J.; Peterson, David A.

    1980-01-01

    Invertebrate drift samples were collected in August 1977 from two streams in the Powder River structural basin in northeastern Wyoming. The streams are Clear Creek, a mountain stream, and the Little Powder River, a plains stream. Two major patterns of drift were recognized. Clear Creek was sampled during a period of normal seasonal conditions. High drift rates occurred during the night indicating a behavioral drift pattern that is related to the benthic invertebrate density and carrying capacity of the stream substrates. The mayfly genes Baetis, a common drift organism, dominated the peak periods of drift in Clear Creek. The Little Powder River has a high discharge during the study period. Midge larvae of the families Chironomidae and Ceratopogonidae, ususally not common in drift, dominated the drift community. The dominance of midge larvae, the presence of several other organisms not common in drift, and the high discharge during the study period caused a catastrophic drift pattern. (USGS)

  14. Northern part of the Washakie Wilderness and nearby roadless areas, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Antweiler, J.C.; Bieniewski, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    The northern part of the Washakie Wilderness and nearby roadless areas, Wyoming were found to contain areas with probable and substantiated resource potential for base and precious metals, and probable resource potential for natural gas and oil on the basis of a mineral survey conducted by the USGS and USBM in 1975-1977. Geologic and geochemical evidence was found in many of the areas indicating copper-molybdenum porphyry systems, with associated veins of base and precious metals. Resources of oil and gas may exist in the sedimentary rocks that lie below the volcaniclastic rocks that cover nearly all of the wilderness, except for areas in the vicinity of the intrusive igneous centers. Data to distinguish favorable areas from those lacking favorable structures are not presently available. Based on gravity studies, the Younts Basin in the southwest corner of the area has a probable oil and gas resource potential.

  15. Relative Validity of the Orleans-Hanna Algebra Prognosis Test in the Prediction of Girls' and Boys' Grades in First-Year Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Gerald S.; Sonnenschein, Joan L.

    1985-01-01

    The relative predictive validity of girls' and boys' success in algebra is examined. Eighth-grade students completed the Orleans-Hanna Algebra Prognosis Test. These prognosis test scores were correlated with grades that students subsequently earned in first-year algebra. Algebra grades of girls proved to be the more predictable. (Author/DWH)

  16. Review of Machine Learning, written by A. AbuHanna. Appeared in Artificial Intelligence in Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 16, 1999, pp. 201--204.

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, Tom

    Review of Machine Learning, written by A. Abu­Hanna. Appeared in Artificial Intelligence in Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 16, 1999, pp. 201--204. Tom M. Mitchell Machine Learning McGraw­Hill, 1997 ISBN 0­07­115467­1 Paperback, 414 pages Price $21.99 An old dream of Machine Learning has been to teach computers how to solve

  17. Uranium assessment for the Precambrian pebble conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Borgman, L.E.; Sever, C.; Quimby, W.F.; Andrew, M.E.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.

    1981-03-01

    This volume is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates, and is a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential to Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 2: Drill-Hole Data, Drill-Site Geology, and Geochemical Data from the Study of Precambrian Uraniferous Conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming.

  18. Effect of fungicide on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert D Cox; Lance H Kosberg; Nancy L Shaw; Stuart P Hardegree

    2011-01-01

    Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different water potentials (-0.033 and -0.7 MPa) and found that treating

  19. Effect of fungicide on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert D Cox; Lance H Kosberg; Nancy L Shaw; Stuart P Hardegree

    2011-01-01

    :Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different water potentials (-0.033 and -0.7 MPa) and found that treating

  20. A study of alteration associated with uranium occurrences in sandstone and its detection by remote sensing methods, volume 1. [spectral reflectance of rocks in Utah and Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.; Abrams, M. J.; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1978-01-01

    The anomalous coloration of altered rocks associated with tabular uranium occurrences in the San Raphael Swell, Utah, and remnants of roll-front type deposits in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming was studied. Field and Laboratory spectral reflectance studies on these uranium deposits or occurrences were carried out and supplemented with mineralogical and chemical analyses to determine the origin of spectral features observed. The principal alteration products are geothite/limonite (Utah deposits) and geothite/limonite and hematite (Wyoming deposits). The principal clay mineral present in the deposits is montomorillonite. Statistical analysis of the field data was performed using a stepwise linear discriminant function analysis computer program that determines which combinations of input wavelength bands provide best separation of specified groupings of data. Altered and unaltered rocks could be repeated with 95% accuracy using spectral data including all wavelength bands. Of the satellite-simulated wavelength region tests, LANDSAT D bands gave the best classification accuracy.

  1. Oil and Gas Development in Southwestern Wyoming - Energy Data and Services for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, Laura R.H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to explore current oil and gas energy development in the area encompassing the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative. The Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative is a long-term science-based effort to ensure southwestern Wyoming's wildlife and habitat remain viable in areas facing development pressure. Wyoming encompasses some of the highest quality wildlife habitats in the Intermountain West. At the same time, this region is an important source of natural gas. Using Geographic Information System technology, energy data pertinent to the conservation decision-making process have been assembled to show historical oil and gas exploration and production in southwestern Wyoming. In addition to historical data, estimates of undiscovered oil and gas are included from the 2002 U.S. Geological Survey National Assessment of Oil and Gas in the Southwestern Wyoming Province. This report is meant to facilitate the integration of existing data with new knowledge and technologies to analyze energy resources development and to assist in habitat conservation planning. The well and assessment data can be accessed and shared among many different clients including, but not limited to, an online web-service for scientists and resource managers engaged in the Initiative.

  2. Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions

    E-print Network

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

  3. 78 FR 55694 - Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ...EPA-HQ-ORD-2011-0895] Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming AGENCY: Environmental...research report titled, ``Investigation of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion, Wyoming.'' The draft...

  4. Geochemical, biogeochemical, and sedimentological studies of the Green River Formation. Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tuttle

    1991-01-01

    The report contains the following sections: Introduction; Sulfur geochemistry and isotopy of the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; A preliminary study of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic biogeochemistry of lacustrine sedimentary rocks from the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; Trace elements in pyrites of the Green River Formation oil shales, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; An experimental

  5. The Physical Education Standards Movement in Wyoming: An Effort in Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Tami Benham; Byra, Mark; Jenkins, Jayne; Gates, Ward E.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how Wyoming developed and implemented content standards, benchmarks, and performance standards (state standards) in health and physical education. The effort involved Wyoming's health/physical education coalition member plus three University of Wyoming faculty members with expertise in health, physical education, physical education…

  6. Macro- and micromorphology of superimposed paleo-spodosols, Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), central Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Southwell, E.H.; Steidtmann, J.R.; Munn, L.C.

    1985-01-01

    The interfluvial overbank deposits of the Paleocene Fort Union Fm. near Bison Basin, Wyoming, contain a series of superimposed paleo-spodosols. Soil horizon differentiation took place during periods of quiescence between flood events. Paleosols developed under a broad-leafed, deciduous forest cover and their mineralogy supports evidence of a humid, warm temperature climate with marked seasonality. Former land surfaces are defined by endocarp compressions, tree trunks in growth position, zones of vertebrate fossil accumulation and traces of invertebrate burrowing activity. Soil horizons are distinctively color banded due to translocation of silica, Fe, Mn, Al and clay from the grey elluvial layers to the dusky red illuvial layers. This early, pedogenic cementation has preserved a variety of durinode concretions, rhizoliths, micro- and macro-endostratal faunal traces, as well as clues to the original mineralogy of the deposit. Local variations in thickness and mineralogy of the soil profiles offer unique information on paleotopography, drainage and ground water levels with indications of rapid, punctuated deposition and basin subsidence.

  7. Geochemical, biogeochemical, and sedimentological studies of the Green River Formation. Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Tuttle, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The report contains the following sections: Introduction; Sulfur geochemistry and isotopy of the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; A preliminary study of the carbon and nitrogen isotopic biogeochemistry of lacustrine sedimentary rocks from the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; Trace elements in pyrites of the Green River Formation oil shales, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; An experimental study of goethite sulfidization--Relationships to the diagenesis of iron and sulfur; Effects of source, depositional environment, and diagenesis on characteristics of organic matter in oil shale from the Green River Formation, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado; Petrography of iron sulfide minerals in the Green River Formation of Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado.

  8. Water resources of Weston County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowry, M.E.; Head, W.J.; Rankl, J.G.; Busby, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Surface water is scarce in Weston County, Wyoming. Groundwater has been developed from rocks ranging in age from Mississippian to Holocene. Adequate supplies for domestic or stock use can be developed from wells generally less than 1,000 ft deep, except in the area underlain by a thick sequence of predominantly marine shale that will yield only small quantities of very mineralized water. In the early 1960 's decreases in artesian pressures occurred in some wells completed in the Lakota Formation of Early Cretaceous age and Pahasapa Limestone of Early Mississippian age. Only the decrease in the Lakota was attributed to development of water from the formation. Extensive development of either of these aquifers, however, may result in significant interference between nearby wells completed within the same aquifer. There are other aquifers within a few hundred feet of the overlying Lakota Formation that could be developed as an alternative to the Lakota to help limit the loss of pressure. The much deeper Pahasapa Limestone generally is developed because of the large supplies that are possible. Because there are no other large yield aquifers, there are no alternatives to limit the loss of pressure of the Pahasapa in the event of increased development. (USGS)

  9. Deformational stress fields of Casper Mountain, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Burfod, A.E.; Gable, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Casper Mountain is an east-west-trending Laramide feature located immediately west of the north termination of the Laramie Mountains in central Wyoming. Precambrian rocks are exposed as its core; off-dipping Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata characterize the flanks and ends. The north side is abruptly downthrown along a major east-west fault or faults. A complex of stress fields of Precambrian and younger ages is indicated by high-angle shears and shear zones, steep-dip foliations, and multiple joint systems. One or more of the indicated Precambrian stress fields may be equivalent to that of the Cheyenne belt of the southern Laramie Mountains. In addition, at least two well-developed Laramide stress fields were active during the formation of the mountain structure. The principal maximum compressive stress of each was oriented north-south; the mean compressive axis of one was vertical whereas in the other the minimum compressive axis was vertical. Some structural features of Precambrian age, faulting in particular, appear to have influenced structures of younger ages. Prominent east-northeast-trending, high-angle faults lie approximately parallel to the Precambrian structural grain; they offset structural features of Laramide age and may be of late Laramide and/or post-Laramide age.

  10. Stratigraphic sections of the Phosphoria formation in Wyoming, 1952

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheldon, R.P.; Cressman, E.R.; Carswell, L.D.; Smart, R.A.

    1953-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has measured and sampled the Phosphoria formation of Permian age at many localities in Wyoming and adjacent states. These data will not be fully synthesized for many years, but segments of the data, accompanied by little or no interpretation, are published as preliminary reports as they are assembled. This report, which contains abstracts of the sections measured in western Wyoming (fig. 1), during 1952, is the fourth Wyoming report of this series. The field and laboratory procedures adopted in these investigations are described rather fully in a previous report (McKelvey and others, 1953a). Many people have taken part in this investigation. T. M. Cheney participated in the description of strata and the collection of samples referred to in this report and T. K. Rigby assisted in the collection of samples. The laboratory preparation of samples for chemical analysis was done in Denver, Colo., under the direction of W. P. Huleatt.

  11. Early Campanian coastal progradational systems and their coal-forming environments, Wyoming to New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, W.E.; Flores, R.M.; Ethridge, F.G.; Cavaroc, V.V.

    1985-05-01

    Ammonite zones (Baculites obtusus-Scaphites hippocrepis) in the marine facies associated with the Mesaverde Formation in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming, Star Point Sandstone and Blackhawk Formation in the Wasatch Plateau, Utah, and the Point Lookout Sandstone, Menefee Formation, and Crevasse Canyon Formation in the Gallup coalfield, New Mexico, indicate that these formations were deposited during early Campanian time (80-84 Ma). The coal-forming environments of these early Campanian formations were located landward of wave-reworked coastal sand complexes of progradational systems along the western margin of the Cretaceous seaway from Wyoming to New Mexico. The Mesaverde coals accumulated in swamps of the lower delta plain and coeval interdeltaic strandplain environments. The Star Point-Blackhawk coals accumulated in swamps of the lower delta plains of laterally shifting, prograding deltas and associated barrier ridge plains. The Point Lookout, Menefee, and Crevasse canyon coals formed in swamps of the lower delta plain and infilled lagoons behind barrier islands. Although the common coal-forming environments of these progradational systems are back barrier and delta plain, the former setting was the more conducive for accumulation of thick, laterally extensive coals. Economic coal deposits formed in swamps built on abandoned back-barrier platforms that were free of detrital influx and marine influence. Delta-plain coals tend to be lenticular and laterally discontinuous and thus uneconomic. The early Campanian coal-forming coastal-plain environments are analogous to modern peat-forming environments along the coast of Belize, Central America. Deltaic sediments deposited along the Belize coast by short-headed streams are reworked by waves into coastal barrier systems.

  12. Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect

    Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-11

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses. Additional information about the PEIS can be found at http://ostseis.anl.gov.

  13. Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

    2010-01-01

    This Wyoming wind-turbine data set represents locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 1, 2009. Each wind turbine is assigned to a wind farm. For each turbine, this report contains information about the following: potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, land ownership, county, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with its wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some attributes are estimates based on information that was obtained through the American Wind Energy Association and miscellaneous online reports. The locations are derived from August 2009 true-color aerial photographs made by the National Agriculture Imagery Program; the photographs have a positional accuracy of approximately ?5 meters. The location of wind turbines under construction during the development of this data set will likely be less accurate than the location of turbines already completed. The original purpose for developing the data presented here was to evaluate the effect of wind energy development on seasonal habitat used by greater sage-grouse. Additionally, these data will provide a planning tool for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative Science Team and for other wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey's Fort Collins Science Center. Specifically, these data will be used to quantify disturbance of the landscape related to wind energy as well as quantifying indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set was developed for the 2010 project 'Seasonal predictive habitat models for greater sage-grouse in Wyoming.' This project's spatially explicit seasonal distribution models of sage-grouse in Wyoming will provide resource managers with tools for conservation planning. These specific data are being used for assessing the effect of disturbance resulting from wind energy development within Wyoming on sage-grouse populations.

  14. Equations of state for ZnO and MgZnO by high pressure x-ray diffraction G. J. Hanna,1,a)

    E-print Network

    McCluskey, Matthew

    Equations of state for ZnO and MgZnO by high pressure x-ray diffraction G. J. Hanna,1,a) S. T were obtained for ZnO and MgxZn1ÀxO alloys under hydrostatic pressure, using x-ray diffraction.1063/1.3644969] I. INTRODUCTION With a direct gap of 3.4 eV at room temperature, ZnO is a wide bandgap semiconductor

  15. Post-fire seeding on Wyoming big sagebrush ecological sites: regression analyses of seeded nonnative and native species densities.

    PubMed

    Eiswerth, Mark E; Krauter, Karl; Swanson, Sherman R; Zielinski, Mike

    2009-02-01

    Since the mid-1980s, sagebrush rangelands in the Great Basin of the United States have experienced more frequent and larger wildfires. These fires affect livestock forage, the sagebrush/grasses/forbs mosaic that is important for many wildlife species (e.g., the greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)), post-fire flammability and fire frequency. When a sagebrush, especially a Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young)), dominated area largely devoid of herbaceous perennials burns, it often transitions to an annual dominated and highly flammable plant community that thereafter excludes sagebrush and native perennials. Considerable effort is devoted to revegetating rangeland following fire, but to date there has been very little analysis of the factors that lead to the success of this revegetation. This paper utilizes a revegetation monitoring dataset to examine the densities of three key types of vegetation, specifically nonnative seeded grasses, nonnative seeded forbs, and native Wyoming big sagebrush, at several points in time following seeding. We find that unlike forbs, increasing the seeding rates for grasses does not appear to increase their density (at least for the sites and seeding rates we examined). Also, seeding Wyoming big sagebrush increases its density with time since fire. Seeding of grasses and forbs is less successful at locations that were dominated primarily by annual grasses (cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.)), and devoid of shrubs, prior to wildfire. This supports the hypothesis of a "closing window of opportunity" for seeding at locations that burned sagebrush for the first time in recent history. PMID:18790557

  16. University of Wyoming College of Engineering undergraduate design projects to aid Wyoming persons with disabilities, a mid-program review.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Steven F; Gray, J Renee

    2005-01-01

    In Spring 2002 the University of Wyoming received National Science Foundation funding from the Division of Bioengineering and Environmental Systems to provide a meaningful design experience for University of Wyoming, College of Engineering students that will directly aid individuals with disabilities within the state of Wyoming. At the 2003 RMBS we presented a paper on the value of starting such a program. We have found that students receive a much richer capstone design experience when developing a project for direct use by a challenged individual. We are now approximately midway through this project. Since its inception the program has blossomed to include serving individuals in several regional states, outreach short courses to the community, projects have become of increasing difficulty and involve interdisciplinary teamwork, and many challenged individuals have been provided specialized one of a kind assistive devices. In this paper we will report on these advancements, lessons learned, and benefits received by participating in this vital program. PMID:15850096

  17. The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.R. (Bristol Univ. (England)); Sturchio, N.C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Boron concentrations and isotope compositions have been measured in fourteen hot spring waters, two drill hole waters, an unaltered rhyolite flow, and hydrothermally altered rhyolite from the geothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The samples are representative of the major thermal areas within the park and span the range of fluid types. For the fluids, the B concentrations range from 0.043-2.69 mM/kg, and the {delta}{sup 11}B values range from {minus}9.3 to +4.4{per thousand}. There is no relationship between the dissolved B concentrations or isotope compositions with the concentration of any major element (other than Cl) or physical property. Each basin is characterized by a restricted range in B/Cl ratios and {delta}{sup 11}B values. Hot spring waters from the Norris Basin, Upper Geyser Basin, Calcite Springs, and Clearwater have {delta}{sup 11}B values close to that of unaltered rhyolite ({minus}5.2{per thousand}) and are interpreted to have derived their B from this source. Waters from Mammoth Hot Springs, Sheepeater, and Rainbow Springs have lower {delta}{sup 11}B values close to {minus}8{per thousand}. These lower values may reflect leaching of B from sedimentary rocks outside the Yellowstone caldera, but they are similar to the {delta}{sup 11}B value of hydrothermally altered rhyolite ({minus}9.7{per thousand}). Hence, the light boron isotope compositions recorded in these hot spring waters may reflect leaching of previously deposited hydrothermal minerals. Cooler springs along the Yellowstone River just outside the park boundary have lower B concentrations and higher {delta}{sup 11}B values that may reflect mixing with shallow meteoric water.

  18. Wyoming Tombstone Symbolism: A Reflection of Western Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochenour, John; Rezabek, Landra L.

    Eleven cemeteries in Wyoming are examined for visuals pertaining to life in the West. The purpose is to demonstrate the importance of Western culture tradition evidenced through tombstone symbolism--representations of the activities and environments of the living through the memory provided by the deceased. The visual symbols found on the…

  19. Wyoming Fine and Performing Arts Content and Performance Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming State Dept. of Education, Cheyenne.

    This booklet sets out the state standards for students in Wyoming public schools for succeeding in the Fine and Performance Arts in grades K-12. Five standards are defined for benchmark grades 4, 8, and 11: (1) creative expression through production; (2) artistic perception; (3) aesthetic valuing; (4) historical and cultural context; and (5)…

  20. Body Measuremenls of Western Jumping Mice from Northwestern Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tim W. Clark

    The ecology of tlrc western jumping mouse (Z.tpn( priniept aabeufu) was investigated by Clark (1971) in Grand Teton Narional Park, \\\\Fyoming. In conjunction with rhar study, body measure- ments were made on 115 mice. This paper reports those data (Table 1). The only previously published morphological data on Z. p. utdhensir from Wyoming were by Iong (1965). He listed average

  1. LEVEL IV ECOREGION DELINEATION FOR THE STATE OF WYOMING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Level III ecoregions were refined and subdivided into level IV for the state of Wyoming in a manner consistent with ecoregion revision and subdivision that has been completed or is on-going in 37 of the conterminous United States. The project was collaborative, involving the scie...

  2. Wyoming big sagebrush associations of eastern Oregon; vegetation attributes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report provides a synopsis of several vegetative characteristics for the Wyoming big sagebrush complex in eastern Oregon covering the High Desert , Snake River, and Owyhee Ecological Provinces in Harney, Lake, and Malheur Counties. The complex has been grouped into six associations defined by t...

  3. FURTHER STUDIES ON TRYPANOSOMES IN GAME ANIMALS IN WYOMING 1100

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NEWTON KINGSTON; E. TOM; GEORGE M. THOMAS; B LINDA McHOLLANDand; MALCOLM S. TRUEBLOOD

    Further studies on moose revealed trypanosomes in two captive moose (Alces alces shirasi) and in 4 of 7 free-ranging moose in Wyoming by blood culture. Two free-ranging moose from Utah were negative. One of two additional captive moose calves was positive for trypanosomes. Trypanosomes also were detected in blood cultures of 8 of 39 American bison (Bison bison) being brought

  4. VEGETATION CHARACTERISTICS ACROSS PART OF THE WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH ALLIANCE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young) S.L. Welsh) alliance is the most extensive of the big sagebrush complex in the Intermountain West. This alliance provides critical habitat for many sagebrush obligate and facultative wildlife species and serves as...

  5. BIG GAME DEPREDATIONS AND DAMAGE COMPENSATION IN WYOMING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John R. Demaree

    1985-01-01

    The Wyoming Game and Fish Department is responsible for controlling depredations by big game, trophy game, and game birds. Under certain guidelines landowners can submit a claim to the department for compensation from wildlife depredations. Measures used by department personnel to prevent wildlife damage are the use of scare devices, harassment techniques, repellents, fencing, trapping, issuing of kill permits, and

  6. A new species of Oryzopsis (Gramineae) from Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yaakov Shechter; B. Lennart Johnson

    1966-01-01

    Oryzopsis hymenoides (Roem. & Schult.) Ricker (Gramineae: Stipeae) is a widely distributed species, common to the arid and semi-arid regions of the western United States. A morphologically distinct form of O. hymenoides was described by Johnson (1945) as Oryzopsis hyraenoides var. contracta. This taxon Occurs only in the Big Hollow area of southern Wyoming, where it exists sympatrically with O.

  7. Enhancing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Establishment with Cultural Practices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. E. Schuman; D. T. Booth; R. A. Olson

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) has proven difficult to re- establish by direct seeding on mined lands in the western U.S. This paper reviews research accomplishments over the last decade that address ecological and cultural practices to enhance big sagebrush establishment. Direct-placed topsoil, mulching and arbuscular mycorrhizae have been shown to positively influence seedling establishment of this species

  8. Browsing Effects on Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plants and Communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carl L. Wambolt; Trista Hoffman

    The effect of likely yearlong browsing by several wild ungulate species on individual Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) plants and communities was studied. The investigation was conducted near Gardiner, MT, in the ungu- late-rich boundary line area of the Northern Yellowstone Winter Range. Plant level responses were measured in this study and related to reported community responses. Individual

  9. U.S. in the World: Wyoming/Algeria

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Population Reference Bureau

    Wyoming and Algeria help power the world as major providers of energy. Although energy production forms the backbone of both regions, agricultural production --both farming and livestock--dominates the landscape. Read about how energy development and agriculture challenge both places' environmental quality.

  10. ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2012. Wyoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report provides information about the performance of Wyoming's 2012 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2012 and tested under standard time conditions. This report focuses on: (1) Performance: student test performance in the…

  11. A new species of cymopterus (Umbelliferae) from northwestern Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald L. Hartman; Robert S. Kirkpatrick

    1986-01-01

    Cymopterus evertii, from Park and Hot Springs counties, Wyoming, is described as new. It appears to be a derivative taxon from what has been\\u000a calledC. bipinnatus. Data are presented justifying the relegation of the latter name to synonymy underC. nivalis. A key is provided for distinguishingC. evertii from its presumed closest relatives.

  12. Bioprospecting for podophyllotoxin in the Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate variations in podophyllotoxin concentrations in Juniperus species found in the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming. It was found that Juniperus species in the Big Horn Mountains included three species; J. communis L. (common juniper), J. horizontalis Moench. (c...

  13. SAVANNAH SPARROWS NESTING IN ALPINE HABITAT IN WYOMING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PAUL HENDRICKS; COLEEN PIDGEON

    Three Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) nests were found in alpine willow habitat at 3150 m elevation in the Beartooth Mountains of northern Wyoming, USA during July 1988. These are the first documented alpine nests for this species south of Canada. The nesting conditions are described and discussed in terms of a recent colonization of alpine habitat by a small, expanding

  14. Use of Spatial Resources by Fishes in Grayrocks Reservoir, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wayne A. Hubert; Daniel T. OShea

    1992-01-01

    Relative abundance of fishes in different habitat types and sampling areas of a reservoir in eastern Wyoming was assessed with experimental gill nets during summer 1989. Seven of 12 species captured in the gill nets were numerous enough to enable statistical evaluation: quillback (Carpiodes cyprinus), common carp (Cyprinus carpio), walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), shorthead redhorse (Moxostoma macrolepidotum),

  15. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  16. Seismic model study of Patrick Draw field, Wyoming: a stratigraphic trap in the Upper Cretaceous Almond Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Robert C.; Ryder, Robert T.

    1978-01-01

    The Patrick Draw field, located on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift in the Washakie basin of southwestern Wyoming, was discovered in 1959 without the use of geophysical methods. The field is a classic example of a stratigraphic trap, where Upper Cretaceous porous sandstone units pinch out on a structural nose. Two-dimensional seismic modeling was used to construct the seismic waveform expressions of the Patrick Draw field, and to better understand how to explore for other 'Patrick Draw' fields. Interpretation of the model shows that the detection of the reservoir sand is very difficult, owing to a combination of acoustic contrasts and bed thickness. Because the model included other major stratigraphic units in the subsurface, several stratigraphic traps are suggested as potential exploration targets.

  17. Revision of the Wind River faunas, early Eocene of central Wyoming. IX - The oldest known hystricomorphous rodent (Mammalia: Rodentia)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Mary R.; Krishtalka, Leonard; Stucky, Richard K.

    1990-01-01

    The rostral portion of the skull of a new genus and species of rodent, Armintomys tullbergi, from the earliest middle Eocene of the Wind River Basin (Wyoming) provides the geologically oldest known record of the hystricomorphous zygomasseteric structure. Armintomys also preserves the oldest known occurrence of incisor enamel that is transitional from pauciserial to uniserial. Other dental characters include: anteriorly grooved incisor, small premolars, and relatively primitive sciuravidlike molars. Analysis of this unique combination of characters implies that Armintomys is the oldest known myomorph rodent and the only known representative of a new family. Armintomyidae, which is referred, with question, to the myomorph superfamily Dipodoidea. Armintomys is more primitive, especially in premolar retention and structure, than the Bridgerian zapodid Elymys from Nevada, but adds to evidence from the latter for an early origin and radiation of dipodoid rodents.

  18. One State's Response to the Collaborative Imperative: Voluntary Articulation Between the University of Wyoming and Wyoming's Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Judith A.; Gillum, Forrest E.; Murdock, Maggi; Winter, Jerry; Muto, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Presents the statewide articulation agreements developed by Wyoming higher education institutions, resulting in a common name and numbering system for lower-division courses, as well as dual admission agreements; 2+2, 2+3, and 3+1 articulation agreements; joint delivery of degree programs; and shared data on student performance. These agreements…

  19. Oceanographic restriction and deposition of the Permian Park City and Phosphoria formations, northeastern Utah and western Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, M.T. (Syracuse Univ., NY (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Detailed lithofacies analyses of the Permian Park City Formation, in northeastern Utah and western Wyoming, reveal that it was deposited in both open and restricted continental shelf and slope environments bordering the Oquirrh and Sublett basins. The Park City and the intercalated Phosphoria Formation document the interplay between carbonate, clastic, evaporite, and organic-rich sedimentation, fluctuating sea-level and bottom water oxygenated, and oceanic upwelling. New data from the Park City and Phosphoria formations imply that paleoceanographic models for the deposition of these units must be revised. Both physical and chemical restriction, resulting from paleogeographic constraints, regressive conditions, and the decay of organic matter produced in nutrient-rich upwelled waters, were important to the development of lithofacies patterns. Evidence of restriction includes massive and bedded anhydrite deposits and calcite replaced anhydrite nodules, carbonate facies with low levels of bioturbation and significant quantities of authigenic pyrite, and laminated black, organic-rich shales indicating low oxygen conditions. Park City and Phosphoria lithofacies imply that upwelling began during regression that resulted from a glacio-eustatic drop in sea level. This was accompanied by a greater pole-to-equator temperature gradient and intensified atmospheric circulation that induced eastern ocean basin upwelling. Physical and chemical restriction of marginal Permian basins was important in the development of dysaerobic to anaerobic conditions that facilitated the preservation of organic matter.

  20. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-05-01

    Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural gas. However, opportunities to add new energy exports in the form of power generation are limited by insufficient transmission capacity. This fact sheet summarizes results from a recent analysis conducted by NREL for the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) that estimates jobs and economic development activity that could occur in Wyoming should the market support new investments in power generation and transmission in the state.

  1. Coalbed Methane Product Water Chemistry in Three Wyoming Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeth, Ian H.; Reddy, Katta J.; Skinner, Quentin D.

    2003-06-01

    The Powder River Basin in Wyoming has become one of the most active areas of coalbed methane (CBM) development in the western United States. Extraction of methane from coalbeds requires pumping of aquifer water, which is called product water. Two to ten extraction wells are manifolded into one discharge point and product water is released into nearby unlined holding ponds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemistry, salinity, and sodicity of CBM product water at discharge points and associated holding ponds as a function of watershed. The product water samples from the discharge points and associated holding ponds were collected from the Cheyenne River (CHR), Belle Fourche River (BFR), and Little Powder River (LPR) watersheds during the summers of 1999 and 2000. These samples were analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), total dissolved solids (TDS), alkalinity, sodium (Na), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), sulfate (SO4 2-), and chloride (Cl-). From the chemical data, practical sodium adsorption ratio (SARp) and true sodium adsorption ratio (SARt) were calculated for the CBM discharge water and pond water. The pH, EC, TDS, alkalinity, Na, Ca, Mg, K, SARp, and SARt of CBM discharge water increased significantly moving north from the CHR watershed to the LPR watershed. CBM discharge water in associated holding ponds showed significant increases in EC, TDS, alkalinity, Na, K, SARp, and SARt moving north from the CHR to the LPR watershed. Within watersheds, the only significant change was an increase in pH from 7.21 to 8.26 between discharge points and holding ponds in the LPR watershed. However, the LPR and BFR exhibited larger changes in mean chemistry values in pH, salinity (EC, TDS), and sodicity (SAR) between CBM product water discharges and associated holding ponds than the CHR watershed. For instance, the mean EC and TDS of CBM product water in LPR increased from 1.93 to 2.09 dS/m, and from1,232 to 1,336 mg/L, respectively, between discharge and pond waters. The CHR exhibited no change in EC, TDS, Na, or SAR between discharge water and pond water. Also, while not statistically significant, mean alkalinity of CBM product water in BFR and LPR watersheds decreased from 9.81 to 8.01 meq/L and from 19.87 to 18.14 meq/L, respectively, between discharge and pond waters. The results of this study suggest that release of CBM product water onto the rangelands of BFR and LPR watersheds may precipitate calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in soils, which in turn may decrease infiltration and increase runoff and erosion. Thus, use of CBM product water for irrigation in LPR and BFR watersheds may require careful planning based on water pH, EC, alkalinity, Na, and SAR, as well as local soil physical and chemical properties.

  2. Parana basin

    SciTech Connect

    Zalan, P.V.; Wolff, S.; Conceicao, J.C.J.; Vieira, I.S.; Astolfi, M.A.; Appi, V.T.; Zanotto, O.; Neto, E.V.S.; Cerqueira, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Parana basin is a large intracratonic basin in South America, developed entirely on continental crust and filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks ranging in age from Silurian to Cretaceous. It occupies the southern portion of Brazil (1,100,000 km/sup 2/ or 425,000 mi/sup 2/) and the eastern half of Paraguay (100,000 km/sup 2/ or 39,000 mi/sup 2/); its extension into Argentina and Uruguay is known as the Chaco-Parana basin. Five major depositional sequences (Silurian, Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Juro-Cretaceous) constitute the stratigraphic framework of the basin. The first four are predominantly siliciclastic in nature, and the fifth contains the most voluminous basaltic lava flows of the planet. Maximum thicknesses are in the order of 6000 m (19,646 ft). The sequences are separated by basin wide unconformities related in the Paleozoic to Andean orogenic events and in the Mesozoic to the continental breakup and sea floor spreading between South America and Africa. The structural framework of the Parana basin consists of a remarkable pattern of criss-crossing linear features (faults, fault zones, arches) clustered into three major groups (N45/sup 0/-65/sup 0/W, N50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/E, E-W). The northwest- and northeast-trending faults are long-lived tectonic elements inherited from the Precambrian basement whose recurrent activity throughout the Phanerozoic strongly influenced sedimentation, facies distribution, and development of structures in the basin. Thermomechanical analyses indicate three main phases of subsidence (Silurian-Devonian, late Carboniferous-Permian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) and low geothermal gradients until the beginning of the Late Jurassic Permian oil-prone source rocks attained maturation due to extra heat originated from Juro-Cretaceous igneous intrusions. The third phase of subsidence also coincided with strong tectonic reactivation and creation of a third structural trend (east-west).

  3. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Gillette Quadrangle, Wyoming, South Dakota, and Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, H.W. Jr.; Robinson, K.; Stanton, M.R.; Geer, K.A.

    1982-09-01

    Uranium resources of the Gillette 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Wyoming, and a very small part of South Dakota, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m (5000 ft) using available surface and subsurface information. Most of the uranium occurrences reported in the literature were searched for and many were found, sampled, and described. Some reported occurrences, however, were never located. As time permitted, ground radiometric surveys were made over areas showing Hydrochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) or aerial radiometric anomalies. In general, ground radiometric surveys did not confirm either HSSR or aerial radiometric anomalies in the Powder River Basin portion of the quadrangle. Surface and subsurface studies outlined three areas favorable for uranium deposits. These areas are limited to certain rock units and depositional environments. The eastern- most area consists of the Lower Cretaceous Inyan Kara Group which contains marine, marginal-marine, and fluvial paleoenvironments. The second favorable area occurs to the west and up-section in the Upper Cretaceous marginal-marine Fox Hills Sandstone and the overlying fluvial Lance Formation. The third and westernmost favorable area is a small area of the Eocene Wasatch Formation. Unfavorable areas include areas underlain by Tertiary rocks, with the exception of the small area of the Wasatch Formation mentioned above; all Mesozoic rocks above the Lower Cretaceous Inyan Kara Group and below the Upper Cretaceous Fox Hills Sandstone and Lance Formation. All Paleozoic and older rocks and Tertiary intrusives are considered unfavorable.

  4. Limnology of the Upper North Platte Reservoir System, Wyoming. Final report, 1976-1979

    SciTech Connect

    Sartoris, J.J.; LaBounty, J.F.; Campbell, S.G.; Boehmke, J.R.

    1981-07-01

    The baseline limnology of Seminoe, Kortes, Pathfinder, and Alcova Reservoirs, on the North Platte River in Wyoming, was studied by Bureau limnologists during 1976-79. The study period included 2 years of severe drought followed by two of higher than average runoff in the North Platte basin. The reservoirs differ greatly in volume and operating patterns: Seminoe (1.25 x 10 to the 9th power/cu m) is mainly for power production; Kortes (5.88 x 10 to the 6th power cu m) and Alcova (2.27 x 10 to the 8th power cu m), flow regulation; and Pathfinder (1.25 x 10 to the 9th power cu m), for storage. The three major system tributaries, the North Platte, Medicine Bow, and Sweetwater Rivers, differ significantly in chemical composition and annual flow volume. Limnology of the Upper North Platte reservoir system is typical in many ways of the High Plains Region of the Western U.S.; i.e., the reservoir waters are dimictic and alkaline, with salinity averaging 369 mg/l and calcium carbonate hardness averaging 184 mg/l. Also, the bluegreen alga, Aphanizomenon flox-aquae, blooms in late summer. Study results showed that this annual bloom depends on a shift from phosphorus-limiting conditions in early summer to more nitrogen-limiting conditions by late summer.

  5. Late Quaternary Vegetation and Climate of the Wind River Range, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, Patricia L.; Davis, P. Thompson; Zielinski, Gregory A.

    1995-05-01

    Sediments from Rapid Lake document glacial and vegetation history in the Temple Lake valley of the Wind River Range, Wyoming over the past 11,000 to 12,000 yr. Radiocarbon age determinations on basal detrital organic matter from Rapid Lake (11,770 ± 710 yr B.P.) and Temple Lake (11,400 ± 630 yr B.P.) bracket the age of the Temple Lake moraine, suggesting that the moraine formed in the late Pleistocene. This terminal Pleistocene readvance may be represented at lower elevations by the expansion of forest into intermontane basins 12,000 to 10,000 yr B.P. Vegetation in the Wind River Range responded to changing environmental conditions at the end of the Pleistocene. Following deglaciation, alpine tundra in the Temple Lake valley was replaced by a Pinus albicaulis parkland by about 11,300 14C yr B.P. Picea and Abies, established by 10,600 14C yr B.P., grew with Pinus albicaulis in a mixed conifer forest at and up to 100 m above Rapid Lake for most of the Holocene. Middle Holocene summer temperatures were about 1.5°C warmer than today. By about 5400 14C yr B.P. Pinus albicaulis and Abies became less prominent at upper treeline because of decreased winter snowpack and higher maximum summer temperatures. The position of the modern treeline was established by 3000 14 C yr B.P. when Picea retreated downslope in response to Neoglacial cooling.

  6. Laramide tectonics and humid alluvial fan sedimentation, Ne Uinta uplift, Utah and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Crews, S.G.; Ethridge, F.G. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (United States))

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes and interprets a sequence of syntectonic conglomerates and sandstones shed from the northeast flank of the Uinta Mountains during an early Eocene phase of the Laramide orogeny. The study area centers around a cuesta 10 km long known as Richards Mountain located on the Utah-Wyoming border about 3 km north of the Uinta fault zone. Conglomerates and sandstones of the basal Wasatch Formation that crop out on Richards Mountain constitute an exhumed, strike-parallel deposit of carose sediments that formed adjacent to the rising Uinta Mountains uplift. These rocks are an example of sedimentation in a proximal, humid piedmont setting and provide clues to the relative rate and timing of a major cycle of uplift and erosion of the Uinta Mountains. Topics specifically addressed in this study include: (1) sedimentary facies, fluvial architecture, depositional processes, paleocurrents, and grain-size trends at Richards Mountain, based on detailed measured sections; (2) tectonic significance of the richards Mountain sequence, including tectonic and geomorphic explanations for several scales of cyclicity within the sequence; and (3) Early Paleogene tectonic and depositional history of the northeastern flank of the Uinta Uplift and the southern Green River Basin.

  7. 77 FR 38884 - Wyoming Connect Railroad LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Union Pacific Railroad Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ...TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35640] Wyoming Connect Railroad LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Union Pacific Railroad Company Wyoming Connect Railroad LLC (WCR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified...

  8. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  9. Law of oil and gas in Wyoming: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, M.W.

    1982-01-01

    Wyoming's laws dealing with petroleum and natural gas have been traditionally kept at a minimum and have dealt with specific issues only. This review identifies the principles adopted by lawmakers to deal with a variety of problems in the context of oil and gas. It is divided into three sections, the first concentrating on the nature of interests in oil and gas, including ownership theory and the consequences of the classification of interests in those resources. The second section deals with the legal protection extended to an owner of interests in oil and gas. The final section relates the fairly recent development of efforts to conserve the resources of Wyoming through well spacing, pooling, and unitization. 112 references.

  10. Estimates of Glacier Mass Loss and Contributions to Streamflow: Wind River Range (Wyoming, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tootle, G. A.; Marks, J.; Kerr, G.

    2011-12-01

    The Wind River Range (WRR) of Wyoming is host to approximately 63 glaciers. Extensive research has been conducted using remote imagery to estimate the area changes of these glaciers, with the goal of estimating the potential impacts of these changes on watershed streamflow. Results show that the glaciers were mostly in recession from 1966 to 2006 with glacier area losses estimated at 38%. Recent research efforts (paired watershed analysis), which supplement the results from the remote imagery analyses, evaluated late summer [July-August-September (JAS)] streamflows from glaciated and non-glaciated watersheds. The difference in observed JAS flows between glaciated and non-glaciated watersheds ranged between 8% and 23% and glaciers accounted for 23% to 54% of the observed late summer (JAS) flow in glaciated watersheds. This was primarily attributed to the glaciers decelerating the snowmelt runoff through internal storage/delayed release of liquid water and, to a lesser extent, the loss of glacier mass. However, no estimates were made as to what percentage of late summer streamflow is attributed to glacier mass (volume) loss. Applying established empirical relationships between glacier area and volume, estimates of glacier volume loss and the contribution to late summer streamflow were estimated for two glaciated watersheds of the WRR, the Upper Green River basin (west slope) and Bull Lake Creek basin (east slope). The results show that glacier mass contributes 2% to 8% of late summer streamflow resulting in estimated glacier losses of 0.4 to 0.7 meters per year from 1966 to 2006.

  11. Geology of the Carnegie museum dinosaur quarry site of Diplodocus carnegii, Sheep Creek, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brezinski, D.K.; Kollar, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    The holotype of Diplodocus carnegii Hatcher, 1901, consists of a partial skeleton (CM 84) that was recovered, along with a second partial skeleton of the same species (CM 94), from the upper 10 m of the Talking Rock facies of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation exposed along Bone Quarry Draw, a tributary of Sheep Creek in Albany County, Wyoming. A composite measured section of the stratigraphic interval exposed adjacent to the quarry indicates that the Brushy Basin Member in this area is a stacked succession of lithofacies consisting of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone and greenish brown, dense, fine-grained limestone. The more erosion resistant limestone layers can be traced over many hundreds of meters. Thus, these strata do not appear to represent a highly localized deposit such as a stream channel, oxbow lake, or backwater pond. The Sheep Creek succession is interpreted as representing a clastic-dominated lake where high turbidity and sediment influx produced deposition of calcareous mudstone. During drier periods the lake's turbidity decreased and limestone and dolomite precipitation replaced mud deposition. Microkarsting at the top of some limestone/ dolomite layers suggests subaerial deposition may have prevailed during these dry episodes. The quarry of D. carnegii was excavated within the top strata of one of the numerous intervals of hackly, greenish gray, calcareous mudstone that represent an ephemeral freshwater lake. The quarry strata are directly overlain by 0.3 m of dolomite-capped limestone that was deposited shortly after interment of D. carnegii in the lake mudstones. The close vertical proximity of the overlying limestone to the skeleton's stratigraphic: level suggests that the animal's carcass may have been buried beneath the drying lake deposits during a period of decreased rainfall.

  12. Topographically-enhanced glacial erosion and the elevation of the Teton Range, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D.; Brocklehurst, S.; Gawthorpe, R.

    2008-12-01

    Rapid rock uplift and significant glacial erosion of the Teton Range, Wyoming, have created some of the highest values of relief in the conterminous United States. We combine digital topographic analyses, fault slip, and climate data to explore patterns of topographically-enhanced glacial erosion, and implement a flexural-isostatic model to investigate the contribution of erosion to range elevations. Activity since ~5 Ma on the normal Teton Fault bounding the east side of the range accounts for the spectacular modern topography. A cross-range tectonic gradient results in a distinct topographic asymmetry, with the range crest (notably two high supra-elevated peaks, Grand Teton and Mount Moran) offset several kilometers east of the drainage divide. This strongly affects patterns of precipitation, insolation, and glacial erosion. Precipitation is focused at the high peaks and snow efficiently transferred to valley floors by avalanching. Slowly-falling snow would have been advected farther into the range by prevailing westerlies, which would also have redistributed snow deposits from the subdued topography typical of the headwaters of western-draining basins. Greater topographic shading and cover by rock debris would have mitigated ablation of glaciers bounded by high valley walls. Glacier size, ice flux and erosion were therefore enhanced in eastern-draining basins, generating the highest measures of relief, although only large catchments (>20 km2) appear to have held glaciers capable of eroding at rates that kept pace with rock uplift. A flexural-isostatic model accounting for relief production in the Tetons and sediment deposition in the adjacent Teton Valley shows that patterns of deflection correlate to the distribution of relief. However, isostatic uplift was unlikely to significantly outpace summit erosion, even for a relatively thin, flexible crust. The relatively small aerial dimensions of the Teton Range would have limited the total mass removed, despite the significant topographic-enhancement of erosion.

  13. Radium isotope geochemistry of thermal waters, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N.C.; Bohlke, J.K.; Markun, F.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Radium isotope activities ([sup 226]Ra, [sup 228]Ra, and [sup 224]Ra), chemical compositions, and sulfur isotope ratios in sulfate were determined for water samples from thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Activities of [sup 226]Ra in these waters range from <0.2 to 37.9 dpm/kg. Activity ratios of [sup 228]Ra/[sup 226]Ra range from 0.26 to 14.2, and those of [sup 224]Ra/[sup 228]Ra range from 0.73 to 3.1. Radium concentrations are inversely correlated with aquifer equilibration temperatures (estimated from dissolved silica concentrations), while [Ra/Ba][sub aq] and [sup 228]Ra/[sup 226]Ra activity ratios depend upon U/Ba and Th/U ratios in aquifer rocks. Major controls on Ra concentration in Yellowstone thermal waters are inferred to be (1) barite saturation (at Norris Geyser Basin, Mammoth Hot Springs, and other northern areas) and (2) zeolite-water ion exchange (at Upper Geyser Basin). The data are consistent with a model in which (1) radium and barium are supplied to water by bulk dissolution of aquifer rock, and (2) chemical equilibration of water with rock is rapid relative to the 1602 year half-life of [sup 226]Ra. The [sup 228]Ra/[sup 226]Ra activity ratios of the waters may in some cases reflect surface enrichments of [sup 232]Th and/or may indicate that [alpha]-recoil input of [sup 228]Ra is rapid relative to water-rock chemical equilibration. Activity ratios of [sup 224]Ra/[sup 228]Ra indicate a nearly ubiquitous [sup 224]Ra excess that generally increases with decreasing pH. Near-surface ([le]100 m) thermal water flow velocities at Mammoth Hot Springs are estimated from [sup 224]Ra/[sup 228]Ra variation to be [ge]1 m h[sup [minus]1]. 73 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Announcements from the Wyoming oil and gas conservation commission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Basko

    1970-01-01

    A complete set of electric logs is available on file on microfilm, and a viewer-printer with both full-scale and half-scale lenses is available also. For correlation or viewing of electric logs, this system is many times faster than the conventional way of pulling the separate files and finding the section of a log of interest. The Wyoming Oil and Gas

  15. Habitat use and movements of repatriated Wyoming toads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, J.M.; Anderson, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    We studied habitat use and movements of a repatriated population of federally endangered Wyoming toads (Bufo baxteri) after the breeding season at Mortenson Lake, Albany County, Wyoming, USA. We followed 8 adult toads using telemetry (n = 68 relocations) during periods of activity and observed 59 post-metamorphic juvenile toads (n = 59 locations). Adult toads used habitat with a greater mean vegetation canopy cover (mean = 52.6%) than juveniles (mean = 39.20%). We found adults farther from the shoreline (mean = 1.32 m) than juveniles (mean = 1.04 m). Substrates used by toads had a mean surface temperature of 20.31??C for adults and 23.05??C for juveniles. We found most adult and juvenile toads on saturated substrates. All adult toads sampled did not move outside of a 30 x 500 m area along the east-to-south shore where they were captured. Toads were active diurnally through the end of October. We found toads torpid at night. We compared our results to a similar study of the historic population and found that adult toads of the current population used denser vegetation than those of the historic population. Unlike many bufonids, terrestrial stages of the Wyoming toad appear to depend on saturated substrates. The best logistic regression predictors of adult and juvenile toad presence were surface temperature and distance to shore. Survey transects within the moist margin of the lake (???10 m from water) and after substrates have reached temperatures ???20??C will likely yield more detections.

  16. Further studies on trypanosomes in game animals in Wyoming II.

    PubMed

    Kingston, N; Thorne, E T; Thomas, G M; McHolland, L; Trueblood, M S

    1981-10-01

    Further studies on moose revealed trypanosomes in two captive moose (Alces alces shirasi) and in 4 of 7 free-ranging moose in Wyoming by blood culture. Two free-ranging moose from Utah were negative. One of two additional captive moose calves was positive for trypanosomes. Trypanosomes also were detected in blood cultures of 8 of 39 American Bison (Bison bison) being brought into Wyoming from Nebraska. Nineteen additional bison were negative for trypanosomes by blood cultures. Identification of species was not possible due to the failure to obtain bloodstream trypomastigotes from this host. Trypanosomes were recovered from 8 of 57 pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana). This is the first report of Trypanosoma sp. from bison and from pronghorn; the trypanosome from moose was identified as Trypanosoma cervi from bloodstream trypomastigotes. In 1978, natural transplacental transmission of trypanosomes was found to occur in 1 of 15 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) fetuses, examined near term by blood culture. No trypanosomes were found in 18 male deer fetuses examined in 1979. Of 100 free-ranging elk from western Wyoming examined by blood culture in 1979, 71 were infected. These data are compared with data from 1973-74. PMID:7338978

  17. Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, D.A.

    1981-12-01

    A description of the geology of the Permian Basin of the West Texas And Southeastern New Mexico was presented. Also, a brief history of the petroleum and natural gas drilling in the region was given. It was concluded that the New Mexico portion of the Permian Basin has the greatest potential for future fuel production. During 1980, there were 646 oil well completions, and 168 dry holes were recorded in southeast New Mexico. The average total depths of new wells completed was 4,901 feet for oil wells, 8,987 feet for gas wells, and 6,250 feet for dry holes.

  18. Ground-water resources of Riverton irrigation project area, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, Donald Arthur; Hackett, O.M.; Vanlier, K.E.; Moulder, E.A.; Durum, W.H.

    1959-01-01

    The Riverton irrigation project area is in the northwestern part of the Wind River basin in west-central Wyoming. Because the annual precipitation is only about 9 inches, agriculture, which is the principal occupation in the area, is dependent upon irrigation. Irrigation by surface-water diversion was begum is 1906; water is now supplied to 77,716 acres and irrigation has been proposed for an additional 31,344 acres. This study of the geology and ground-water resources of the Riverton irrigation project, of adjacent irrigated land, and of nearby land proposed for irrigation was begun during the summer of 1948 and was completed in 1951. The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the ground-water resources of the area and to study the factors that should be considered in the solution of drainage and erosional problems within the area. The Riverton irrigation project area is characterized by flat to gently sloping stream terraces, which are flanked by a combination of badlands, pediment slopes, and broad valleys. These features were formed by long-continued erosion in an arid climate of the essentially horizontal, poorly consolidated beds of the Wind River formation. The principal streams of the area flow south-eastward. Wind River and Fivemile Creek are perennial streams and the others are intermittent. Ground-water discharge and irrigation return flow have created a major problem in erosion control along Fivemile Creek. Similar conditions might develop along Muddy and lower Cottonwood Creeks when land in their drainage basins is irrigated. The bedrock exposed in the area ranges in age from Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary (middle Eocene). The Wind River formation of early and middle Eocene age forms the uppermost bedrock formation in the greater part of the area. Unconsolidated deposits of Quaternary age, which consist of terrace gravel, colluvium, eolian sand and silt. and alluvium, mantle the Wind River formation in much of the area. In the irrigated parts of the project, water from domestic use is obtained chiefly from the sandstone beds of the Wind River formation although some is obtained from the alluvium underlying the bottom land and from the unconsolidated deposits underlying the lower terraces along the Wind River. Although adequate quantities if water for domestic use are available from the Wind River formation, there quantities are not considered to be large enough to warrant pumping of ground water for irrigation. Only a few wells are in the nonirrigated part of the area. When this new land is irrigated, a body of ground water will gradually form in the terrace deposits and the alluvial and colluvial-alluvial deposits. Eventually, the terrace deposits may yield adequate quantities of water for domestic and stock use, but only locally are the alluvial and colluvial-alluvial deposits likely to become suitable aquifers. In the Riverton irrigation project area, ground water occurs under water-table conditions near the surface and under artesian conditions in certain strata at both shallow and greater depths. Irrigation is the principal source of recharge to the shallow aquifers; the water level in wells that tap these aquifers fluctuates with irrigation. The depth to water in the shallow wells ranges from less than 1 foot to about 30 feet below the land surface, depending on the season of the year and on the length of time the land has been irrigated. The water level in the wells that tap the deep confined aquifers , which receive recharge indirectly from surface sources, fluctuates only slightly because the recharge and discharge are more constant. In most places the depth to water in wells penetrating the deep confined aquifers is mush greater than that in shallow wells. but in certain low areas water from the deep aquifers flows at the surface from wells. Ground water moves from the area of recharge in the direction of the hydraulic gradient and is discharges either by evapotranspiration; by inflow into streams, drains, or lakes; by pumping or flow of wells; or by flow of springs. Waterlogging and the a

  19. Structural and facies characterization of the Niobrara Formation in Goshen and Laramie counties, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernan, Nicholas Devereux

    The Niobrara Formation is a fine-grained marine rock deposited in the Western Interior Seaway during the Late Cretaceous. It is composed of fossil-rich interlayered shale, marls, and chalks. Recent interest in the Niobrara has grown due to the advent of lateral drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing. This technology allows operators to economically extract hydrocarbons from chalkier Niobrara facies. Yet two aspects of the Niobrara Formation have remained enigmatic. The first is the occurrence of abundant, randomly oriented, layer-bound, normal faults. The second is the large degree of vertical heterogeneity. This research aimed to increase understanding in both these aspects of the Niobrara Formation. Randomly oriented normal faults have been observed in Niobrara outcrops for nearly a hundred years. Recent high resolution 3D seismic in the Denver Basin has allowed investigators to interpret these faults as part of a polygonal fault system (PFS). PFS are layer bound extensional structures that typically occur in fine-grained marine sediments. Though their genesis and development is still poorly understood, their almost exclusive occurrence in fine-grained rocks indicates their origin is linked to lithology. Interpretation of a 3D seismic cube in Southeast Wyoming found a tier of polygonal faulting within the Greenhorn-Carlile formations and another tier of polygonal faulting within the Niobrara and Pierre formations. This research also found that underlying structural highs influence fault growth and geometries within both these tiers. Core data and thin sections best describe vertical heterogeneity in fine-grained rocks. This investigation interpreted core data and thin sections in a well in Southeast Wyoming and identified 10 different facies. Most of these facies fall within a carbonate/clay spectrum with clay-rich facies deposited during periods of lower sea level and carbonate-rich facies deposited during periods of higher sea level. Because the average operator will typically have little core but abundant well logs, this investigation used three different methods of describing facies variability with logs. Facies interpreted with these methods are referred to as electrofacies. First, a conventional interpretation of Niobrara sub-units was done using gamma ray and resistivity logs. Then a cluster analysis was conducted on an extensive petrophysical log suite. Finally, a neural network was trained with the previous core interpretation so that it learned to identify facies from logs. The research found that when little core is available a cluster analysis method can capture significant amounts of vertical heterogeneity within the Niobrara Formation. But if core is available then a neural network method provides more meaningful and higher resolution interpretations.

  20. Space Radar Image of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    These two radar images show the majestic Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, the oldest national park in the United States and home to the world's most spectacular geysers and hot springs. The region supports large populations of grizzly bears, elk and bison. In 1988, the park was burned by one of the most widespread fires to occur in the northern Rocky Mountains in the last 50 years. Surveys indicated that 793,880 acres of land burned. Of that, 41 percent was burned forest, with tree canopies totally consumed by the fire; 35 percent was a combination of unburned, scorched and blackened trees; 13 percent was surface burn under an unburned canopy; 6 percent was non-forest burn; and 5 percent was undifferentiated burn. Six years later, the burned areas are still clearly visible in these false-color radar images obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. The image at the left was obtained using the L-band radar channel, horizontally received and vertically transmitted, on the shuttle's 39th orbit on October 2, 1994. The area shown is 45 kilometers by 71 kilometers (28 miles by 44 miles) in size and centered at 44.6 degrees north latitude, 110.7 degrees west longitude. North is toward the top of the image (to the right). Most trees in this area are lodge pole pines at different stages of fire succession. Yellowstone Lake appears as a large dark feature at the bottom of the scene. At right is a map of the forest crown, showing its biomass, or amount of vegetation, which includes foliage and branches. The map was created by inverting SIR-C data and using in situ estimates of crown biomass gathered by the Yellowstone National Biological Survey. The map is displayed on a color scale from blue (rivers and lakes with no biomass) to brown (non-forest areas with crown biomass of less than 4 tons per hectare) to light brown (areas of canopy burn with biomass of between 4 and 12 tons per hectare). Yellow indicates areas of canopy burn and mixed burn with a biomass of between 12 to 20 tons per hectare; light green is mixed burn and on-burn forest with a biomass of 20 to 35 tons per hectare; and green is non-burned forest with a biomass of greater than 35 tons per hectare. Forest recovery from the fire seems to depend on fire intensity and soil conditions. In areas of severe canopy burn and poor soil conditions, crown biomass was still low in 1994 (indicated by the brown areas at the center left), whereas in areas of mixed burn with nutrient-rich soils, seen west of Yellowstone Lake, crown biomass has increased significantly in six years (indicated by the yellow and light green areas). Imaging fire-affected regions with spaceborne radar illustrates SIR-C/X-SAR's keen abilities to monitor regrowth after a fire. Knowing the amount of carbon accumulated in the atmosphere by regenerating forest in the 20 to 50 years following a fire disturbance is also a significant factor in understanding the global carbon cycle. Measuring crown biomass is necessary to evaluate the effects of past and future fires in specific regions. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) are part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm), and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes that are caused by nature and those changes that are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italian

  1. WILD AND PRESCRIBED FIRE EFFECTS TO WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH STEPPE, EASTERN OREGON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fire remains a management tool for increasing herbaceous diversity and structural complexity in large, intact Wyoming big sagebrush communities such as found in eastern Oregon and northern Nevada. However, there is limited information available on Wyoming sagebrush community dynamics following fire...

  2. Geothermal potential of three areas in southeastern Idaho and western Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. W. Huttrer; A. H. Tamm

    1977-01-01

    Three areas in southeastern Idaho and western Wyoming have been determined to have significant geothermal potential based on their geologic environment, structural characteristics, and persistent microseismicity. Thermal manifestations at the three areas are somewhat dissimilar. The Afton, Wyoming, prospect is on the edge of a seismically active graben within the overthrust belt. Predominantly Mesozoic sedimentary rocks underlie the interest area.

  3. The Wyoming Infant Stimulation Program--Go WISP, Young Baby, Go WISP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinek, Janis A.; Flamboe, Thomas C.

    The Wyoming Infant Stimulation Program (WISP) provides a comprehensive preschool program utilizing both center-based and home-based intervention for handicapped preschool children (age 0-3 years) and their families in rural Wyoming. A developmental-prescriptive model is used and the curriculum objective is that each child will progress according…

  4. Wyoming Community College System Annual Enrollment Report. Academic Year 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report provides annualized enrollment information for the Wyoming community college system for the 2006-2007 academic year. During this year, credit headcount at Wyoming's community colleges has increased by 0.2%, and now exceeds 23,000. The report also indicates that the difference between enrollments of men and women continues to decrease.…

  5. Are there benefits to mowing intact Wyoming big sagebrush communities? An evaluation from southeastern Oregon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrus...

  6. EFFECTS OF WILDLIFE UTILIZATION ON WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH GROWTH AND SURVIVAL ON RECLAIMED MINE LANDS1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristene A. Partlow; Gerald E. Schuman; Richard A. Olson; Scott E. Belden

    Ensuring Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) survival remains a challenge on many mines even years after initial establishment. Wildlife utilization may be a major influence on its survival. A wildlife exclosure was erected in June 2001 on a portion of a study initiated in 1990 at the North Antelope\\/Rochelle Mine in northeastern Wyoming. Investigations

  7. Growth Response of Wyoming Big Sagebrush to Heavy Browsing by Wild Ungulates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Trista L. Hoffman; Carl L. Wambolt

    An exclosure in a Wyoming big sagebrush Wyoming big sagebrush plants that were not subjected to 35 years of winter browsing by elk, mule deer, and

  8. Paleomagnetism and geochronology of an Early Proterozoic quartz diorite in the southern Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Geisman, J.W.; Premo, W.R.

    2003-01-01

    We present geochronologic and paleomagnetic data from a north-trending quartz diorite intrusion that cuts Archean metasedimentary and metaigneous rocks of the South Pass Greenstone Belt of the Wyoming craton. The quartz diorite was previously thought to be either Archean or Early Proterozoic (?) in age and is cut by north and northeast-trending Proterozoic diabase dikes of uncertain age, for which we also report paleomagnetic data. New U-Pb analyses of baddeleyite and zircon from the quartz diorite yield a concordia upper intercept age of 2170 ?? 8 Ma (95% confidence). An 40Ar/39Ar amphibole date from the same sample yields a similar apparent age of about 2124 ?? 30 Ma (2??), thus confirming that the intrusion is Early Proterozoic in age and that it has probably not been thermally disturbed since emplacement. A magmatic event at ca. 2.17 Ga has not previously been documented in the Wyoming craton. The quartz diorite and one of the crosscutting diabase dikes yield essentially identical, well-defined characteristic remanent magnetizations. Results from eight sites in the quartz diorite yield an in situ mean direction of north declination and moderate to steep positive inclination (Dec.=355??, Inc.=65??, k=145, ??95=5??) with a paleomagnetic pole at 84??N, 215??E (??m=6??, ??p=7??). Data from other diabase dike sites are inconsistent with the quartz diorite results, but the importance of these results is uncertain because the age of the dikes is not well known. Interpretation of the quartz diorite remanent magnetization is problematic. The in situ direction is similar to expected directions for magnetizations of Late Cretaceous/early Tertiary age. However, there is no compelling evidence to suggest that these rocks were remagnetized during the late Mesozoic or Cenozoic. Assuming this magnetization to be primary, then the in situ paleomagnetic pole is strongly discordant with poles of 2167, 2214, and 2217 Ma from the Canadian Shield, and is consistent with proposed separation of the Wyoming Craton and Laurentia prior to about 1.8 Ga. Correcting the quartz diorite pole for the possible effects of Laramide-age tilting of the Wind River Range, based on the attitude of nearby overlying Cambrian Flathead Sandstone (dip=20??, N20??E), gives a tilt corrected pole of 75??N, 58??E (??m=4??, ??p=6??), which is also discordant with respect to time-equivalent poles from the Superior Province. Reconstruction of the Superior and Wyoming Province using a rotation similar to that proposed by Roscoe and Card [Can. J. Earth Sci. 46(1993)2475] is problematic, but reconstruction of the Superior and Wyoming Provinces based on restoring them to their correct paleolatitude and orientation using a closest approach fit indicates that the two cratons could have been adjacent at about 2.17 Ga prior to rifting at about 2.15 Ga. The paleomagnetic data presented are consistent with the hypothesis that the Huronian and Snowy Pass Supergroups could have evolved as part of a single epicratonic sedimentary basin during the Early Proterozoic. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sundaland basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert; Morley, Christopher K.

    The continental core of Sundaland, comprising Sumatra, Java, Borneo, the Thai-Malay Peninsula and Indochina, was assembled during the Triassic Indosinian orogeny, and formed an exposed landmass during Pleistocene lowstands. Because the region includes extensive shallow seas, and is not significantly elevated, it is often assumed to have been stable for a long period. This stability is a myth. The region is today surrounded by subduction and collision zones, and merges with the India-Asia collision zone. Cenozoic deformation of Sundaland is recorded in the numerous deep sedimentary basins alongside elevated highlands. Some sediment may have been supplied from Asia following Indian collision but most was locally derived. Modern and Late Cenozoic sediment yields are exceptionally high despite a relatively small land area. India-Asia collision, Australia-SE Asia collision, backarc extension, subduction rollback, strike-slip faulting, mantle plume activity, and differential crust-lithosphere stretching have been proposed as possible basin-forming mechanisms. In scale, crustal character, heat flow and mantle character the region resembles the Basin and Range province or the East African Rift, but is quite unlike them in tectonic setting. Conventional basin modeling fails to predict heat flow, elevation, basin depths and subsidence history of Sundaland and overestimates stretching factors. These can be explained by interaction of a hot upper mantle, a weak lower crust, and lower crustal flow in response to changing forces at the plate edges. Deformation produced by this dynamic model explains the maintenance of relief and hence sediment supply over long time periods.

  10. Characterization of a methanogenic consortium enriched from a coalbed methane well in the Powder River Basin, U.S.A

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael S. Green; Keith C. Flanegan; Patrick C. Gilcrease

    2008-01-01

    Well-bore water samples from the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming tested positive for the presence of living microbial communities capable of generating methane from Wyodak coal under laboratory conditions. The methanogens in this consortium produced methane from acetate and methanol, but did not produce methane from a H2–CO2 headspace. This was consistent with a phylogenetic

  11. Snow cover, snowmelt timing and stream power in the Wind River Range, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Foster, James L.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Riggs, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Earlier onset of springtime weather, including earlier snowmelt, has been documented in the western United States over at least the last 50 years. Because the majority (> 70%) of the water supply in the western U.S. comes from snowmelt, analysis of the declining spring snowpack (and shrinking glaciers) has important implications for the management of streamflow. The amount of water in a snowpack influences stream discharge which can also influence erosion and sediment transport by changing stream power, or the rate at which a stream can do work, such as move sediment and erode the stream bed. The focus of this work is the Wind River Range (WRR) in west-central Wyoming. Ten years of Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-cover, cloud-gap-filled (CGF) map products and 30 years of discharge and meteorological station data are studied. Streamflow data from streams in WRR drainage basins show lower annual discharge and earlier snowmelt in the decade of the 2000s than in the previous three decades, though no trend of either lower streamflow or earlier snowmelt was observed within the decade of the 2000s. Results show a statistically-significant trend at the 95% confidence level (or higher) of increasing weekly maximum air temperature (for three out of the five meteorological stations studied) in the decade of the 1970s, and also for the 40-year study period as a whole. The extent of snow-cover (percent of basin covered) derived from the lowest elevation zone (2500-3000 m) of the WRR, using MODIS CGF snow-cover maps, is strongly correlated with maximum monthly discharge on 30 April, where Spearman's Rank correlation, r s, = 0.89 for the decade of the 2000s. We also investigated stream power for Bull Lake Creek above Bull Lake; and found a trend (significant at the 90% confidence level) toward reduced stream power from 1970 to 2009. Observed changes in streamflow and stream power may be related to increasing weekly maximum air temperature measured during the 40-year study period, possibly contributing to a reduction in snow cover. In addition, the strong relationship between percent of basin that was snow covered, and maximum monthly streamflow indicates that MODIS snow-cover maps are useful for predicting streamflow, and can be used to improve management of water resources in the drought-prone western United States.

  12. Energy development and water options in the Yellowstone River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, R.; MacIntyre, D.D.; Torpy, M.F.

    1980-08-01

    Using a mixed-integer programming model, the impacts of institutional constraints on the marginal capacity for energy development in the Yellowstone River Basin and consequent hydrologic changes were examined. Under average annual flow conditions, energy outputs in the Yellowstone Basin can increase roughly nine times by 1985 and 12 to 18 times by 2000. In contrast, water availability is limiting energy development in the Tongue and Powder River Basins in Wyoming. Variability in hydrologic regime causes model solutions to change drastically. If flows decrease to 80 and 60% of average annual levels, the energy production is decreased by 17 and 95%, respectively. If development strategies in the basin are followed on the basis of 80% average annual flows, the Buffalo Bill enlargement (271,300 acre-ft), Tongue River Modification (58,000 acre-ft), and the two reservoirs at Sweetgrass Creek (each 27,000 acre-ft) will be necessary, in addition to several small storage facilities, to best meet the instream flow needs in Montana and to deliver the waters apportioned by compact between Wyoming and Montana. Furthermore, the results indicate that relaxing the instream flow requirements from recommended levels by 10% could increase regional energy output by 19% in 1985 and 35% in 2000. This model illustrates that modifications in institutional restrictions to achieve greater water mobility between users in a given state, as well as flexible practices for transferring water between states, can assist economic growth. Thus, the probability for restricted energy development at this juncture appears to be affected to a greater degree by institutional constraints than by water availability constraints.

  13. Redescription of Bellerophon bittneri (Gastropoda: Triassic) from Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yochelson, E.L.; Boyd, D.W.; Wardlaw, B.

    1985-01-01

    Bellerophon bittneri Newell and Kummel is an Early Triassic bellerophontacean from the Dinwoody Formation in the Wind River Mountains. The available type material consists of one fair, but incomplete, external mold, which resembles a Bellerophon but is actually a Retispira. After repeated search, additional specimens were found at one locality in the southern Wind River Range of Wyoming; Retispira bittneri is redescribed from this new material. Like other Triassic bellerophontaceans, there is nothing unusual about the species apart from occurrence in the Mesozoic; it is clearly congeneric with Permian Retispira from underlying rocks. -Authors

  14. Characterization of Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2004-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eddy-Miller, Cheryl A.; Peterson, David A.; Wheeler, Jerrod D.; Leemon, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Fish Creek, a tributary to the Snake River, is about 15 river miles long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson (fig. 1). Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address this concern, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District, began studying Fish Creek in 2004 to describe the hydrology of the creek and later (2007?08) to characterize the water quality and the biological communities. The purpose of this fact sheet is to summarize the study results from 2004 to 2008.

  15. 78 FR 65609 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Wyoming; Thunder Basin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    A Notice of Intent (NOI) for this proposal was first published in the Federal Register on September 13, 2013 (78 FR 56650). This corrected NOI is being published to reinitiate the scoping period to allow for the rescheduling of public meetings that were cancelled during the original scoping period due to the lapse in government funding; to identify adjustments in project timelines; and to......

  16. Hydrogeologic features of the alluvial deposits in the Owl Creek Valley, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooley, M.E.; Head, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    The alluvial acquifer principally of the flood-plain alluvium and part of the Arapahoe Ranch terrace deposits and consists subordinately of alluvial-fan deposits. Thickness of the alluvial aquifer is generally 20 to 40 feet. Dissolved-solids concentration of water in the alluvial aquifer ranges from about 500 to more than 3,000 milligrams per liter. The most favorable areas for groundwater development are the flood-plain alluvium and part of the Arapahoe Ranch terrace deposits; however, in much of these units, the water contains more than 2,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids. Measurements of specific conductance of the flow of Owl Creek indicate a progressive increase in the down stream direction and range between 15 and 355 micromhos per centimeter at 25C per mile. The increases are due to return flow of irrigation water, inflow from tributaries, and inflow from groundwater. Conspicuous terraces in Owl Creek Valley included an unnamed terrace at 500 feet above Owl Creek, the Embar Ranch terrace 160 to 120 feet above the creek, and the Arapahoe Ranch terrace 50 to 20 feet above the creek. (USGS)

  17. Hydrocarbon trapping mechanisms in the Miller Creek area of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming 

    E-print Network

    Armstrong, Jennifer Ann

    1975-01-01

    for the channels end orobable Recerwoir Trigood Lucerne 3 32-AN-66W Regional Pet Inc Corda%1 F-1 9-AN-68M SP -10~ 0 oem-m 50 0 oh'-m SP -10+ 6' 5900 Figure 3, Rlectric Log Profiles of Regional and Reservoir Dakota Sandstones. 10 I Q MILLER CREEK...

  18. Stable isotope stratigraphy and paleoclimatology of the Paleogene Bighorn Basin (Wyoming, USA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul L. Koch; James C. Zachos; David L. Dettman

    1995-01-01

    Climatic warming from the late Paleocene into the early Eocene had profound effects on atmospheric and marine circulation, marine thermal gradients, and benthic biota. In addition, marine carbon isotope values decreased substantially in both surface and deep waters. Because carbon is rapidly exchanged between reservoirs at the earth's surface, such as marine surface water, the atmosphere, land plants, and materials

  19. Laramide deformation of the Rocky Mountain Foreland, southeastern corner of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming 

    E-print Network

    Derr, Douglas Neanion

    1991-01-01

    . The Warm Springs anticline trends east-west, the Wildhorse Butte anticline and the Bridger Monocline trend northwest-southeast, and the Red Springs anticline has a distinctly arcuate shape incorporating both east-west and northwest-southeast trends... whenever possible in order to allow three dimensional constraint of each structure. All balanced cross sections were restored to zem deformation to insure valid solutions. Balanced cross sections indicate the Warm Springs anticline is underlain by a...

  20. Depositional environments of Upper Cretaceous Fox Hills Formation, Niobrara and Weston counties, east-central Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, H.W. Jr.; Crandall, T.M.

    1983-08-01

    The Upper Cretaceous Fox Hills Formation on the southeastern flank of the Powder River basin, Wyoming, was deposited along a regressive, northeast-trending, low-energy, tidally affected, wave-dominated coastline. The Fox Hills Formation consists of rocks deposited successively in marine transitional-lower shoreface, upper shoreface, foreshore, and tidal-flat environments. The marine transitional-lower shoreface beds are characterized by generally highly bioturbated, very fine-grained sandstone and silty claystone with interbedded siltstone, silty shale, and shale. The amount of sandstone in them increases landward. The upper shoreface deposits consist dominantly of sandstone and have minor amounts of siltstone, silty claystone, and shale. The sandstone generally becomes coarser and better sorted upward. The deposits of the foreshore (intertidal) consist of moderately sorted to well-sorted fine-grained sandstone that has seaward-dipping wedge-planar cross-bedding. Tidal-flat deposits are common in the upper part of the section in the northern part of the study area. At one locality, these deposits consist of at least 75 ft (23 m) of intercalated fine-grained sandstone and claystone that have lenticular to flaser bedding. The majority of these deposits show a high degree of bioturbation and are considered to be intertidal. These sediments are overlain by approximately 15 ft (4.5 m) of fine-grained silty sandstone and claystone which have plant root casts and a high content of carbonaceous material, and which could represent supratidal deposits. Overlying these deposits is a 12 ft (3.7 m) sandstone bed having a scour base, lag of clay clasts and woody fragments, parallel bedding that grades upward into trough cross-bedding, and a 6 ft (1.8 m) bed of oyster shells near its top.

  1. Buried soils of Late Quaternary moraines of the Wind River Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, D.E. (Univ. of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Geography Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Buried soils occur on kettle floors of four Pinedale moraine catenas of the western Wind River Mountains of Wyoming. Radiocarbon ages from bulk samples of Ab horizons indicate the soils were buried during the mid-Holocene. Soils on kettle floors have silty A and Bw horizons that overlie buried A and B horizons that also formed in silt-rich sediments. Crests and backslope soils also have A and Bw horizons of sandy loam formed over 2BCb and 2Cb horizons of stony coarse loamy sand. Recent data show the silty textures of the A and B horizons are due to eolian silt and clay from the Green River Basin just west of the mountains. The buried soils appear to represent alternate periods of erosion and deposition on the moraines during the Holocene. The original soils developed on higher slopes of the moraines were eroded during the mid-Holocene and the 2BC and 2C horizons exposed at the surface. Eroded soil sediments were transported downslope onto the kettle floors. Following erosion, silt-rich eolian sediments accumulated on all surfaces and mixed with the BC and C horizons (the mixed loess of Shroba and Birkeland). The present surface soils developed within this silt-rich material. Stone lines often occur at the Bw-2BCb/2Cb boundary, and mark the depth to which the earlier soils were eroded. Thus, soil profiles at the four localities result from two periods of soil formation, interrupted by an interval of erosion during the mid-Holocene. Moraines of this study are adjacent to the Fremont Lake type area for the Pinedale glaciation of the Rocky Mountains. Buried soils in kettles of the moraines indicates the soil characteristics of the Pinedale type region are not necessarily due to continuous post-Pinedale development, but may result from more than one episode of soil formation.

  2. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    Surface remediation was completed at the former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, in 1990. Residual radioactive materials (contaminated soil and debris) were removed and disposed of at Union Carbide Corporation`s (Umetco) nearby Gas Hills Title 2 facility. Ground water in the surficial and semiconfined aquifers (known collectively as the `uppermost aquifer`) below the former mill and tailings site has been contaminated. No contamination has been detected in the deeper, confined sandstone aquifer. The contaminant plume extends off site to the south and east. The plume is constrained by surface wetlands and small streams to the east and west of the site and by the Little Wind River to the south. Fifteen monitor wells installed in 1993 were sampled to better define the contaminant plume and to provide additional water quality data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples also were collected from domestic wells in response to a request by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in January 1994. No contamination attributable to the former uranium milling operations have ever been detected in any of the domestic wells used for potable supplies.

  3. Geologic Map of Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary Strata and Coal Stratigraphy of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation, Rawlins-Little Snake River Area, South-Central Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hettinger, R.D.; Honey, J.G.; Ellis, M.S.; Barclay, C.S.V.; East, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    This report provides a map and detailed descriptions of geologic formations for a 1,250 square mile region in the Rawlins-Little Snake River coal field in the eastern part of the Washakie and Great Divide Basins of south-central Wyoming. Mapping of geologic formations and coal beds was conducted at a scale of 1:24,000 and compiled at a scale of 1:100,000. Emphasis was placed on coal-bearing strata of the China Butte and Overland Members of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. Surface stratigraphic sections were measured and described and well logs were examined to determine the lateral continuity of individual coal beds; the coal-bed stratigraphy is shown on correlation diagrams. A structure contour and overburden map constructed on the uppermost coal bed in the China Butte Member is also provided.

  4. Database of the Geology and Thermal Activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flynn, Kathryn; Graham Wall, Brita; White, Donald E.; Hutchinson, Roderick A.; Keith, Terry E.C.; Clor, Laura; Robinson, Joel E.

    2008-01-01

    This dataset contains contacts, geologic units and map boundaries from Plate 1 of USGS Professional Paper 1456, 'The Geology and Remarkable Thermal Activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.' The features are contained in the Annotation, basins_poly, contours, geology_arc, geology_poly, point_features, and stream_arc feature classes as well as a table of geologic units and their descriptions. This dataset was constructed to produce a digital geologic map as a basis for studying hydrothermal processes in Norris Geyser Basin. The original map does not contain registration tic marks. To create the geodatabase, the original scanned map was georegistered to USGS aerial photographs of the Norris Junction quadrangle collected in 1994. Manmade objects, i.e. roads, parking lots, and the visitor center, along with stream junctions and other hydrographic features, were used for registration.

  5. Weatherization: Wyoming's Hidden Resource; Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    D& R International

    2001-10-10

    Wyoming demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  6. 76 FR 75900 - Notice of Application for Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management...Meeting; Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...SUMMARY: The United States Forest Service (USFS...Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management...Aklufi, USFS Rocky Mountain Region, (307)...

  7. Wyoming State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The Wyoming State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Wyoming. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Wyoming. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Wyoming.

  8. 77 FR 54655 - Genesee & Wyoming Inc.-Control-RailAmerica, Inc., et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ...Genesee & Wyoming Inc.--Control--RailAmerica, Inc., et al. AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Decision...determine a merger's significance. See Village of Barrington et al. v. Surface Transportation Board, 636 F.3d 650...

  9. PRESCRIBED FIRE EFFECTS ON UNDERSTORY COMPONENTS IN A WYOMING BIG SAGEBRUSH COMMUNITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically, fire was a naturally occurring disturbance in the Wyoming big sagebrush alliance (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young), temporarily shifting plant community dominance from sagebrush to perennial grasses. Research efforts have been focused on fire effects on sites with...

  10. 22. Top 30/5. Plan of superstructure elevations. Wyoming Valley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Top 30/5. Plan of superstructure elevations. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  11. 24. Top 30/7. Plan of superstructure details. Wyoming Valley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Top 30/7. Plan of superstructure details. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  12. 20. Top 30/3. Plan of exposed substructure elevations. Wyoming ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Top 30/3. Plan of exposed substructure elevations. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  13. 23. Top 30/6. Plan of superstructure sections. Wyoming Valley ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Top 30/6. Plan of superstructure sections. - Wyoming Valley Flood Control System, Woodward Pumping Station, East of Toby Creek crossing by Erie-Lackawanna Railroad, Edwardsville, Luzerne County, PA

  14. 77 FR 40629 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180996, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ...of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180996, Wyoming...sharing basis, in its program for the exploration of coal deposits owned by the United...party electing to participate in this exploration program must send written notice...

  15. LANDSLIDE SOILS AND GEOMORPHOLOGY IN CAMP DAVIS QUADRANGLE, BRIDGER-TETON NATIONAL FOREST, WYOMING

    E-print Network

    Zung, Ashley B.

    2008-07-31

    Active landslides are evident throughout Bridger-Teton National Forest (BTNF), and northwestern Wyoming has one of the highest landslide densities in the country (Case, 1990 and Fallon, 1996). Land use changes and increased ...

  16. 78 FR 25484 - License Amendment for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County, Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...Amendment for Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, Bear Creek Facility, Converse County, Wyoming...License Condition (LC) No. 47 for its Bear Creek Uranium Mill facility in Converse...SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Bear Creek Uranium Mill operated from...

  17. Mining practices at four uranium properties in the Gas Hills, Wyoming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1963-01-01

    Report describes the geology, exploration, open-pit development and mining, and shaft sinking in the Gas Hills uranium district of Wyoming. Cost and performance data are presented as made available by the four mining companies.

  18. Scale dependencies in structural analysis as illustrated by chevron folds along the Beartooth Front, Wyoming

    E-print Network

    Cook, Robert Annan

    1972-01-01

    SCALE DEPENDENCIES IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AS ILLUSTRATED BY CHEVRON FOLDS ALONG THE BEARTOOTH FRONT, WYOMING A Thesis ROBERT ANNAN COOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement..., for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Ma)or Sub)oct: Geology SCALE DEPENDENCIES IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AS ILLUSTRATED BY CHEVRON FOLDS ALONG THE BEARTOOTH FRONT, WYOMING A Thesis by ROBERT ANNAN COOK Approved as to style and content by...

  19. Thick-skinned deformation of the Archean Wyoming province during Proterozoic arc-continent collision

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin R. Chamberlain; Suresh C. Patel; B. Ronald Frost; George L. Snyder

    1993-01-01

    Two major mylonite zones are exposed in the southeastern Archean Wyoming province: the Cheyenne belt, which marks the boundary between the Wyoming and Colorado provinces, and the Laramie Peak shear zone, across which Archean rocks have been uplifted differentially at least 10 km. Between the two mylonite zones is a 60-100-km-wide belt of Archean migmatitic gneiss, which has been intruded

  20. Scale dependencies in structural analysis as illustrated by chevron folds along the Beartooth Front, Wyoming 

    E-print Network

    Cook, Robert Annan

    1972-01-01

    SCALE DEPENDENCIES IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AS ILLUSTRATED BY CHEVRON FOLDS ALONG THE BEARTOOTH FRONT, WYOMING A Thesis ROBERT ANNAN COOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement..., for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Ma)or Sub)oct: Geology SCALE DEPENDENCIES IN STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS AS ILLUSTRATED BY CHEVRON FOLDS ALONG THE BEARTOOTH FRONT, WYOMING A Thesis by ROBERT ANNAN COOK Approved as to style and content by...

  1. Recovery of Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Features in Wyoming Big Sagebrush following Prescribed Fire

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey L. Beck; John W. Connelly; Kerry P. Reese

    2009-01-01

    The ability of prescribed fire to enhance habitat features for Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus )i n Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata wyomin- gensis) in western North America is poorly understood. We evaluated recovery of habitat features important to wintering, nesting, and early brood-rearing Sage-Grouse in Wyoming big sagebrush following prescribed fire. Our case study included 1 year of preburn (1989)

  2. Are There Benefits to Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities? An Evaluation in Southeastern Oregon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirk W. Davies; Jon D. Bates; Aleta M. Nafus

    2011-01-01

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there\\u000a is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities\\u000a with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference\\u000a plots

  3. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2011-03-01

    This report is intended to inform policymakers, local government officials, and Wyoming residents about the jobs and economic development activity that could occur should new infrastructure investments in Wyoming move forward. The report and analysis presented is not a projection or a forecast of what will happen. Instead, the report uses a hypothetical deployment scenario and economic modeling tools to estimate the jobs and economic activity likely associated with these projects if or when they are built.

  4. Model a Catchment Basin

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The GLOBE Program, UCAR (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research)

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this resource is to introduce what a catchment basin is and how it works. Students will make a 3-dimensional model of a catchment basin to understand how water moves through the basin and explore how water is affected when there are changes in the basin.

  5. Are There Benefits to Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities? An Evaluation in Southeastern Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Kirk W.; Bates, Jon D.; Nafus, Aleta M.

    2011-09-01

    Wyoming big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference plots in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities at eight sites for three years post-treatment. Mowing generally did not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation cover, density, or biomass production ( P > 0.05). Annual forbs and exotic annual grasses were generally greater in the mowed compared to the reference treatment ( P < 0.05). By the third year post-treatment annual forb and annual grass biomass production was more than nine and sevenfold higher in the mowed than reference treatment, respectively. Our results imply that the application of mowing treatments in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities does not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation, but may increase the risk that exotic annual grasses will dominate the herbaceous vegetation. We suggest that mowing Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understories does not produce the expected benefits. However, the applicability of our results to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with greater sagebrush cover and/or degraded understories needs to be evaluated.

  6. Are there benefits to mowing Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities? An evaluation in southeastern Oregon.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kirk W; Bates, Jon D; Nafus, Aleta M

    2011-09-01

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference plots in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities at eight sites for three years post-treatment. Mowing generally did not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation cover, density, or biomass production (P > 0.05). Annual forbs and exotic annual grasses were generally greater in the mowed compared to the reference treatment (P < 0.05). By the third year post-treatment annual forb and annual grass biomass production was more than nine and sevenfold higher in the mowed than reference treatment, respectively. Our results imply that the application of mowing treatments in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities does not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation, but may increase the risk that exotic annual grasses will dominate the herbaceous vegetation. We suggest that mowing Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understories does not produce the expected benefits. However, the applicability of our results to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with greater sagebrush cover and/or degraded understories needs to be evaluated. PMID:21755343

  7. Outplanting Wyoming big sagebrush following wldfire: stock performance and economics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dettweiler-Robinson, Eva; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Evans, James R.; Newsome, Heidi; Davies, G. Matt; Wirth, Troy A.; Pyke, David A.; Easterly, Richard T.; Salstrom, Debra; Dunwiddle, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    mycorrhizal amendments. Most mortality occurred during the first year after planting; this period is the greatest barrier to establishment of sagebrush stock. The proportion of healthy stock in Year 1 was positively related to subsequent survival to Year 3. Costs were minimized, and survival maximized, by planting container stock or bare-root stock with a hydrogel dip. Our results indicate that outplanting is an ecologically and economically effective way of establishing Wyoming big sagebrush. However, statistical analyses were limited by the fact that data about initial variables (stock quality, site conditions, weather) were often unrecorded and by the lack of a replicated experimental design. Sharing consistent data and using an experimental approach would help land managers and restoration practitioners maximize the success of outplanting efforts.

  8. Forecasting and evaluating patterns of energy development in southwestern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garman, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of future oil and natural gas development in southwestern Wyoming on wildlife populations are topical to conservation of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem. To aid in understanding these potential effects, the U.S. Geological Survey developed an Energy Footprint simulation model that forecasts the amount and pattern of energy development under different assumptions of development rates and well-drilling methods. The simulated disturbance patterns produced by the footprint model are used to assess the potential effects on wildlife habitat and populations. A goal of this modeling effort is to use measures of energy production (number of simulated wells), well-pad and road-surface disturbance, and potential effects on wildlife to identify build-out designs that minimize the physical and ecological footprint of energy development for different levels of energy production and development costs.

  9. Seed weight variation of Wyoming sagebrush in northern Nevada.

    PubMed

    Busso, Carlos A; Perryman, Barry L

    2005-12-01

    Seed size is a crucial plant trait that may potentially affect not only immediate seedling success but also the subsequent generation. We examined variation in seed weight of Wyoming sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle and Young), an excellent candidate species for rangeland restoration. The working hypothesis was that a major fraction of spatial and temporal variability in seed size (weight) of Wyoming sagebrush could be explained by variations in mean monthly temperatures and precipitation. Seed collection was conducted at Battle Mountain and Eden Valley sites in northern Nevada, USA, during November of 2002 and 2003. Frequency distributions of seed weight varied from leptokurtic to platykurtic, and from symmetry to skewness to the right for both sites and years. Mean seed weight varied by a factor of 1.4 between locations and years. Mean seed weight was greater (P < 0.05) in 2003 than in 2002 at both sites. This can partially be attributed to 55% greater precipitation in 2003 than 2002, since mean monthly temperatures were similar (P > 0.05) in all study situations. Simple linear regression showed that monthly precipitation (March to November) explained 85% of the total variation in mean seed weight (P = 0.079). Since the relationship between mean monthly temperature (June-November) and mean seed weight was not significant (r2 = 0.00, P = 0.431), this emphasizes the importance of precipitation as an important determinant of mean seed weight. Our results suggest that the precipitation regime to which the mother plant is exposed can have a significant effect on sizes of seeds produced. Hence, seasonal changes in water availability would tend to alter size distributions of produced offspring. PMID:16524249

  10. Regional geology of eastern Idaho and western Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Link, P.K.; Kuntz, M.A.; Platt, L.B. (eds.)

    1993-01-01

    The first section, Regional Synthesis, consists of a single 53-page chapter entitled The track of the Yellowstone hot spot: Volcanism faulting, and uplift.'' The authors' approach is to interpret major features or regional geology as resulting in large part from the last 16 Ma of southwesterly migration by the North American plate over a stationary thermal plume in the mantle. Evidence that may relate to the Yellowstone hot spot model is presented under headings dealing with volcanic track of the hot spot, neotectonic faulting associated with the hot spot, and regional topographic anomalies which may have resulted from hot spot-induced uplift or subsidence. The second section of the book deals with the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt. Each chapter is a separate article by different authors, so coverage is of selected topics in the Idaho-Wyoming thrust belt rather than a comprehensive overview. Extensional tectonics is the topic of the book's third section. Field investigations of two major structures, the Grand Valley fault and the Teton normal fault, are presented in chapters eight and nine, respectively. Chapter ten focuses on surficial gravity slide sheets that are well-exposed in the area, with particular emphasis on their structural features and mechanisms of emplacement. The final 90 pages of the book make up a four-chapter section that deals with the eastern Snake River plain (ESRP). Topical coverage is quite varied, ranging from details of Quaternary stratigraphy at one site to an overview of the eastern Snake River plain basaltic volcanism and an investigation of ignimbrites of the Heise volcanic field.

  11. Hydrogeology and simulation of water flow in strata above Bearpaw Shale and equivalents of eastern Montana and northeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.; Levings, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Powder River, Bull Mountains, and Williston basins of Montana and Wyoming were investigated to understand the geohydrology and subsurface water flow. Rocks were separated into: Fox Hills-lower Hell Creek aquifer (layer 1), upper Hell Creek confining layer (layer 2), Tullock aquifer (layer 3), Lebo confining layer (layer 4), and Tongue River aquifer (layer 5). Aquifer transmissivities were estimated from ratios of sand and shale and adjusted for kinematic viscosity and compaction. Vertical hydraulic conductance per unit area between layers was estimated. Potentiometric surface maps were drawn from limited data. A three-dimensional finite-difference model was used for simulation. Five stages of simulation decreased and standard error of estimate for hydraulic head from 135 to 110 feet for 739 observation nodes. The resulting mean transmissivities for layers 1-5 were 443, 191, 374, 217, and 721 sq ft/d. The corresponding mean vertical hydraulic conductances per unit area between the layers were simulated; they ranged from 0.000140 to 0.0000150. Mean annual recharge across the study area was about 0.26 percent of average annual precipitation. Large volumes of interlayer flow indicate the vertical flow may be significant. (USGS)

  12. Projected effects of intermittent changes in withdrawal of water from the Arikaree Aquifer near Wheatland, southeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoxie, Dwight T.

    1979-01-01

    Effects on streamflows and ground-water levels attributable to a proposed intermittent change in use and sites of withdrawal of 3 ,146 acre-feet of water from the Arikaree aquifer in central Platte County, WY, are assessed with a previously developed ground-water flow model. This water has been permitted for agricultural use by the State of Wyoming, and under the proposal would supplement, when needed, existing industrial surface- and ground-water supplies for the Laramie River Station of the Missouri Basin Power Project. Under a scenario wherein the supplemental industrial usage occurs in every 10th year commencing in 1980, the model predicts a cumulative streamflow-depletion rate in the Laramie and North Laramie Rivers of 7.7 cubic feet per second in the year 2020 compared to a rate of 6.9 cubic feet per second that is predicted if the intermittent industrial usage does not occur. Areas in which drawdowns relative to the simulated 1973 head configuration exceed 5, 10, 25, and 50 feet are predicted to be 107, 78, 38, and 2 square miles, respectively, in 2020 under the intermittent-usage scenario compared to corresponding areas of 104, 76, 36, and 2 square miles that are predicted if the intermittent industrial usage does not occur. (USGS).

  13. Differentiating paleowetland subenvironments using a multi-disciplinary approach: An example from the Morrison formation, South Central Wyoming, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Debra S.; Lovelace, David M.; Driese, Steven G.

    2011-06-01

    Small lakes are excellent records of environmental changes and are sensitive to local climate fluctuations. Large lacustrine systems record larger-scale climate events. Wetland deposits also provide high-resolution paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental data. Although wetland deposits are typically associated with wet climatic conditions, they actually occur in a wide variety of climates. Whereas lakes and wetlands are very sensitive to changes in climate, high-resolution data in these archives are lost unless it is possible to differentiate these deposits from other "floodplain" deposits. Synthesis of micromorphological and geochemical data with facies relationships is critical to accurate interpretations of ancient wetland-lacustrine deposits. This study illustrates how micromorphology and geochemistry, combined with facies relationships, provide a viable method for differentiating complex, ancient wetland-lacustrine subenvironments. A hydrogeomorphological classification is proposed to provide appropriate genetic terminology that is useful in the rock record. Eight Morrison Formation subenvironments within lacustrine depositional successions from north central Wyoming were delineated using this interdisciplinary approach. Subenvironments include shallow-water wetlands, marsh, lacustrine fringe, and fen basin and fringe deposits. Synthesized data indicate that an overall basinal infilling succession was punctuated by 3 major lake contraction events, which were followed by extended periods of landscape stability. Initially balance-filled conditions dominated the shallowing-upward lacustrine deposits such that sediment and water supply, and accommodation space were relatively equal. As the lake basin filled, shallower water, underfilled lake conditions prevailed. The distribution of wetland pedotypes indicates that evapotranspiration remained high, suggesting that a stable, semi-arid to arid climate dominated in this area throughout Morrison time. Also supporting a semi-arid to arid climate are more positive carbon isotopes compared to values for disseminated organic material in the surrounding area, abundant barite nodules, gypsum pseudomorphs, and zeolites. Although major fluctuations in lake level may have resulted from punctuated wetter episodes, synthesized data suggest that overall the climate remained relatively arid to semiarid and the lake basin remained closed throughout most of Morrison time. Fluctuations in lake level likely resulted from a significant increase in recharge in the source area, possibly related to volcanic events rather than a change in climate.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

    2000-07-01

    For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

  16. Hydrology and management of Lakes Mead and Mohave within the Colorado River Basin: Chapter 3 in A synthesis of aquatic science for management of Lakes Mead and Mohave

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holdren, G. Chris; Tietjen, Todd; Turner, Kent; Miller, Jennell M.

    2012-01-01

    The Colorado River Basin covers parts of seven States: Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona, and California; at 1,450 mi (2,333.5 km) in length, the Colorado River is the seventh longest river in the United States (fig. 3-1). The Bureau of Reclamation has the responsibility for management of this system, in coordination with the seven basin States, within a complex framework of law, regulations, compact, treaty, and policies often referred to collectively as the “Law of the River.” Lake Mead is a critical component of the overall Colorado River management, providing the capacity to store almost 2 years of the average runoff of the river.

  17. Economics and a novel voltage conversion technique associated with exporting Wyoming's energy by HVDC transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kaili

    Wyoming is by far the largest coal producing state in the US, but local utilization is extremely low. As much as 92% of Wyoming's coal is shipped to the other states and is mainly consumed by their electricity producers. Coal accounts for more than 50% of the US electricity generation and is one of the least expensive energy sources. Wyoming could utilize its coal better by exporting electricity instead of exporting the coal only in its raw form. Natural gas is another important energy resource in Wyoming but local utilization is even lower. As a result of the development in coalbed methane fields, natural gas production in Wyoming is almost in pace with its coal production. In addition to constructing more new pipelines, new transmission lines should be considered as an alternative way of exporting this energy. Because of their enormous electricity market sizes and high electricity prices, California, Texas and Illinois are chosen to be the target markets for Wyoming's electricity. The proposed transmission schemes use High Voltage DC (HVDC) lines, which are suitable for long distance and cross-system power transmission. Technical and economic feasibilities are studied in details. The Wyoming-California scheme has a better return of investment than both the Wyoming-Texas and the Wyoming-Illinois schemes. A major drawback of HVDC transmission is the high level of harmonics generated by the converters. Elaborate filtering is required at both the AC and the DC sides. A novel pulse-multiplication method is proposed in the thesis to reduce the harmonics from the converter source. By introducing an averaging inductor, the proposed method uses less thyristors to achieve the same high-pulse operation as the existing series scheme. The reduction of thyristors makes the switching circuit more reliable and easier to control and maintain. Harmonic analysis shows that the harmonic level can be reduced to about one third of the original system. The proposed method is also simulated by using the Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS) with a few assumptions. Simulation results of various operating conditions confirm the theoretical analysis results.

  18. 77 FR 25664 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removal of the Gray Wolf in Wyoming From the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ...October 5, 2011, proposal to remove the gray wolf (Canis lupus) in Wyoming from the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife...2011, proposal (76 FR 61782) to remove the gray wolf (Canis lupus) in Wyoming from the List of Endangered and Threatened...

  19. Hormonal priming, induction of ovulation and in-vitro fertilization of the endangered Wyoming toad (Bufo baxteri)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert K Browne; Jessica Seratt; Carrie Vance; Andrew Kouba

    2006-01-01

    The endangered Wyoming toad (Bufo baxteri) is the subject of an extensive captive breeding and reintroduction program. Wyoming toads in captivity rarely ovulate spontaneously and hormonal induction is used to ovulate females or to stimulate spermiation in males. With hormonal induction, ovulation is unreliable and egg numbers are low. The sequential administration of anovulatory doses of hormones (priming) has increased

  20. Escherichia coli O157 Exposure in Wyoming and Seattle: Serologic Evidence of Rural Risk

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Jason P.; Jelacic, Srdjan; Besser, Thomas E.; Weinberger, Edward; Kirk, Donald J.; McKee, Garry L.; Harrison, Shannon M.; Musgrave, Karl J.; Miller, Gayle; Price, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that rural populations have increased exposure to Escherichia coli O157:H7. We measured circulating antibodies against the O157 lipopolysaccharide in rural Wyoming residents and in blood donors from Casper, Wyoming, and Seattle, Washington, by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). EIA readings were compared by analysis of variance and the least squares difference multiple comparison procedure. Rural Wyoming residents had higher antibody levels to O157 LPS than did Casper donors, who, in turn, had higher levels than did Seattle donors (respective least squares means: 0.356, 0.328, and 0.310; p<0.05, Seattle vs. Casper, p<0.001, rural Wyoming vs. either city). Lower age was significantly correlated with EIA scores; gender; and, in rural Wyoming, history of bloody diarrhea, town, duration of residence, and use of nontreated water at home were not significantly correlated. These data suggest that rural populations are more exposed to E. coli O157:H7 than urban populations. PMID:14609456

  1. Geodatabase of Wyoming statewide oil and gas drilling activity to 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, Laura R.H.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) compiled a geographic information system (GIS) of Wyoming statewide historical oil and gas drilling activity for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI). The WLCI is representative of the partnerships being formed by the USGS with other Department of the Interior bureaus, State and local agencies, industry, academia, and private landowners that are committed to maintaining healthy landscapes, sustaining wildlife, and preserving recreational and grazing uses as energy resources development progresses in southwestern Wyoming. This product complements the 2009 USGS publication on oil and gas development in southwestern Wyoming http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/437/) by approximating, based on database attributes, the time frame of drilling activity for each well (start and stop dates). This GIS product also adds current oil and gas drilling activity not only in the area encompassing the WLCI, but also statewide. Oil and gas data, documentation, and spatial data processing capabilities are available and can be downloaded from the USGS website. These data originated from the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC), represent decades of oil and gas drilling (1900 to 2010), and will facilitate a landscape-level approach to integrated science-based assessments, resource management and land-use decision making.

  2. Multiscale sagebrush rangeland habitat modeling in southwest Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homer, Collin G.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Meyer, Debra K.; Coan, Michael J.; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2009-01-01

    Sagebrush-steppe ecosystems in North America have experienced dramatic elimination and degradation since European settlement. As a result, sagebrush-steppe dependent species have experienced drastic range contractions and population declines. Coordinated ecosystem-wide research, integrated with monitoring and management activities, would improve the ability to maintain existing sagebrush habitats. However, current data only identify resource availability locally, with rigorous spatial tools and models that accurately model and map sagebrush habitats over large areas still unavailable. Here we report on an effort to produce a rigorous large-area sagebrush-habitat classification and inventory with statistically validated products and estimates of precision in the State of Wyoming. This research employs a combination of significant new tools, including (1) modeling sagebrush rangeland as a series of independent continuous field components that can be combined and customized by any user at multiple spatial scales; (2) collecting ground-measured plot data on 2.4-meter imagery in the same season the satellite imagery is acquired; (3) effective modeling of ground-measured data on 2.4-meter imagery to maximize subsequent extrapolation; (4) acquiring multiple seasons (spring, summer, and fall) of an additional two spatial scales of imagery (30 meter and 56 meter) for optimal large-area modeling; (5) using regression tree classification technology that optimizes data mining of multiple image dates, ratios, and bands with ancillary data to extrapolate ground training data to coarser resolution sensors; and (6) employing rigorous accuracy assessment of model predictions to enable users to understand the inherent uncertainties. First-phase results modeled eight rangeland components (four primary targets and four secondary targets) as continuous field predictions. The primary targets included percent bare ground, percent herbaceousness, percent shrub, and percent litter. The four secondary targets included percent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), percent big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), percent Wyoming sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis), and sagebrush height (centimeters). Results were validated by an independent accuracy assessment with root mean square error (RMSE) values ranging from 6.38 percent for bare ground to 2.99 percent for sagebrush at the QuickBird scale and RMSE values ranging from 12.07 percent for bare ground to 6.34 percent for sagebrush at the full Landsat scale. Subsequent project phases are now in progress, with plans to deliver products that improve accuracies of existing components, model new components, complete models over larger areas, track changes over time (from 1988 to 2007), and ultimately model wildlife population trends against these changes. We believe these results offer significant improvement in sagebrush rangeland quantification at multiple scales and offer users products that have been rigorously validated.

  3. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  4. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  5. Digital Archives - Thomas M. Bown's Bighorn Basin Maps: The Suite of Forty-Four Office Master Copies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKinney, Kevin C.

    2001-01-01

    This CD-ROM is a digitally scanned suite of master 'locality' maps produced by Dr. Thomas M. Bown. The maps are archived in the US Geological Survey Field Records. The maps feature annual compilations of newly established fossil (nineteen 7.5 degree maps) of central basin data collections. This master suite of forty-four maps represents a considerably broader geographic range within the basin. Additionally, three field seasons of data were compiled into the master suite of maps after the final editing of the Professional Paper. These maps are the culmination of Dr. Bown's Bighorn Basin research as a vertebrate paleontologist for the USGS. Data include Yale, Wyoming, Duke, Michigan and USGS localities. Practical topographic features are also indicated, such as jeep=trail access, new reservoirs, rerouted roadbeds, measured sections, fossil reconnaissance evaluations (G=good, NG=no good and H=hideous), faults, palcosol stages, and occasionally 'camp' vernacular for locality names.

  6. Composition and depositional environment of concretionary strata of early Cenomanian (early Late Cretaceous) age, Johnson County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merewether, E.A.; Gautier, Donald L.

    2000-01-01

    Unusual, concretion-bearing mudrocks of early Late Cretaceous age, which were deposited in an early Cenomanian epeiric sea, have been recognized at outcrops in eastern Wyoming and in adjoining areas of Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, and Colorado. In Johnson County, Wyo., on the western flank of the Powder River Basin, these strata are in the lower part of the Belle Fourche Member of the Frontier Formation. At a core hole in south-central Johnson County, they are informally named Unit 2. These strata are about 34 m (110 ft) thick and consist mainly of medium- to dark-gray, noncalcareous, silty shale and clayey or sandy siltstone; and light-gray to grayish-red bentonite. The shale and siltstone are either bioturbated or interlaminated; the laminae are discontinuous, parallel, and even or wavy. Several ichnogenera of deposit feeders are common in the unit but filter feeders are sparse. The unit also contains marine and continental palynomorphs and, near the top, a few arenaceous foraminifers. No invertebrate macrofossils have been found in these rocks. Unit 2 conformably overlies lower Cenomanian shale in the lowermost Belle Fourche Member, informally named Unit 3, and is conformably overlain by lower and middle Cenomanian shale, siltstone, and sandstone within the member, which are informally named Unit 1. The mineral and chemical composition of the three Cenomanian units is comparable and similar to that of shale and siltstone in the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale, except that these units contain more SiO2 and less CaO, carbonate carbon, and manganese. Silica is generally more abundant and CaO is generally less abundant in river water than in seawater. The composition of Unit 2 contrasts significantly with that of the underlying and overlying units. Unit 2 contains no pyrite and dolomite and much less sulfur than Units 1 and 3. Sulfate is generally less abundant in river water than in seawater. Unit 2 also includes sideritic and calcitic concretions, whereas Units 1 and 3 contain neither concretions nor siderite and only sparse calcite. Carbon-sulfur-iron chemistry for the concretions suggests that sulfate availability was the limiting factor in pyrite formation and sulfide incorporation in Unit 2. Isotopic compositions of the carbon and oxygen in siderite and calcite from several concretions are variable and suggest cementation during early diagenesis in a variety of microenvironments. The isotopic composition of these carbonate minerals differs from that of Upper Cretaceous marine limestones. When considered in conjunction with the proportions of sulfur, organic carbon, and iron in Unit 2, major-element and micropaleontological data suggest that the composition of the original pore waters and of overlying waters in the late early Cenomanian sea was brackish to fresh. The mudrocks of Units 3 and 2, and a lower part of Unit 1, accumulated on a shelf at low to moderate rates of sedimentation in association with variable but generally weak current action. In Unit 2 and laterally equivalent rocks of the region, the sideritic and calcitic concretions probably indicate the extent of a body of brackish to fresh and oxygen-deficient water. Rates of precipitation in this region during the mid-Cretaceous could have been unusually high and the precipitation probably was seasonal. The organic matter in Unit 2 is humic-rich and would have been derived from continental environments. If the epeiric sea was brackish to fresh in the region of eastern Wyoming and contiguous areas, meteoric runoff from the adjoining lowlands must have been periodically large and the seaway north of the region probably was constricted. Seasonal changes in salinity might have been accompanied by changes in water temperature and oxygen content. The lower part of the Frontier Formation (Units 3, 2, and 1) in Wyoming records an intermittently and easterly prograding shoreline during late early and early middle Cenomanian time. Laterally equivalent strata in Nebraska

  7. BOREAS AFM-2 Wyoming King Air 1994 Aircraft Sounding Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team used the University of Wyoming King Air aircraft during IFCs 1, 2, and 3 in 1994 to collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for the large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns over the SSA and NSA and areas along the transect between these study areas. The data described here form a second set, namely soundings that were incorporated into nearly every research flight by the King Air in 1994. These soundings generally went from near the surface to above the inversion layer. Most were flown immediately after takeoff or immediately after finishing the last flux pattern of that particular day's flights. The parameters that were measured include wind direction, wind speed, west wind component (u), south wind component (v), static pressure, air dry bulb temperature, potential temperature, dewpoint, temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and CO2 concentration. Data on the aircraft's location, attitude, and altitude during data collection are also provided. These data are stored in tabular ASCH files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

    2014-01-01

    These data represent locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 2012. We assigned each wind turbine to a wind farm and, in these data, provide information about each turbine’s potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, the status of the land ownership where the turbine exists, the county each turbine is located in, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with each wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some of the attributes are estimates based on the information we found via the American Wind Energy Association and other on-line reports. The locations are derived from National Agriculture Imagery Program (2009 and 2012) true color aerial photographs and have a positional accuracy of approximately +/-5 meters. These data will provide a planning tool for wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Fort Collins Science Center and other government and non-government organizations. Specifically, we will use these data to support quantifying disturbances of the landscape as related to wind energy as well as to quantify indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set represents an update to a previous version by O’Donnell and Fancher (2010).

  9. Dismembered Archean ophiolite in the SE. Wind River Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    Ophiolitic rocks occur as wall rocks of the 2.7 Ga Louis Lake batholith near Atlantic City, Wyoming. All of the Archean rocks are strongly deformed and metamorphosed to a greenschist and amphibolite facies, but relict structures and textures are commonly preserved. These include the following, from west to east: (1) metadiabase with rare coarse-grained metagabbro; (2) ultramafic rocks and metagabbro; (3) amphibolite, locally pillowed, overlain(.) by pelitic schist, banded iron formation, and quartzite; and (4) pillow lavas, massive sills or flows, and minor metasedimentary rocks. Slice 1 locally contains parallel dike margins and rare metagabbro screens; these features suggest that it may represent a sheeted dike complex. Slice 2 locally contains ultramafic rocks having relict cumulus textures and igneous layering, corresponding to the cumulus portion of an ophiolite. The pillow lavas of slice 4 and possibly slice 3 are interpreted as comprising the extrusive portion of the ophiolite. The immobile trace element chemistry (Ti, V, Zr, Y, Cr, Ni) of slice 1 and 4 is very similar and supports a cogenetic origin, whereas pillow lavas of slice 3 are somewhat distinct. The metadiabases and lavas of slices 1 and 4 are similar to modern mid-ocean ridge basalt, whereas lavas of slice 3 are more similar to island-arc tholeiites. Rare high-Ti basaltic komatiites occur in slices 1 and 4, but have very distinct trace element chemistry and probably represent later off-axis dikes. The ophiolitic rocks are interpreted to represent the remains of Archean oceanic crust.

  10. Precipitation records and flood-producing storms in Cheyenne, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindner-Lunsford, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    Annual maximum precipitation data for Cheyenne, Wyoming, are presented for the years 1871-1986 for durations of 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes and 1, 2, and 24 hours. Precipitation-frequency curves are developed on the basis of data collected before 1985; a second set of curves are developed on the basis of data collected through 1986. The data are plotted and analyzed three times, assuming: (1) The data are described by a Gumbel distribution; (2) the logarithms of the data are described by a Gumbel distribution; and (3) the logarithms of the data are described by a Pearson Type III distribution. The inclusion of data for the large storm of August 1, 1985, had the most noticeable effect on the prediction of the magnitude of storms of long average recurrence intervals for the 1-, 2-, and 24-hour durations. Seven intensity-duration curves were calculated for the August 1, 1985 storm. For durations greater than 30 minutes, the observed curve indicates greater intensity than do five of the seven calculated curves. Dimensionless hyetographs were developed for 10 flood-producing storms that have occurred in the Cheyenne area since 1903. The pattern index (integral of the dimensionless hyetograph curve) for the storm of August 1, 1985, is 3 standard deviations lower than the mean of the pattern indices for the remaining 9 storms, indicating that the distribution of precipitation with time for the August 1, 1985, storm was outside the normal range for Cheyenne. (USGS)

  11. Mule deer and pronghorn migration in western Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawyer, H.; Lindzey, F.; McWhirter, D.

    2005-01-01

    Migratory mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) populations rely on seasonal ranges to meet their annual nutritional and energetic requirements. Because seasonal ranges often occur great distances apart and across a mix of vegetation types and land ownership, maintaining migration corridors to and from these ranges can be difficult, especially if managers do not have detailed information on mule deer and pronghorn seasonal movements. We captured, radiomarked, and monitored mule deer (n = 171) and pronghorn (n = 34) in western Wyoming to document seasonal distribution patterns and migration routes. Mule deer and pronghorn migrated 20-158 km and 116-258 km, respectively, between seasonal ranges. These distances represented the longest recorded migrations for either species. We identified a number of bottlenecks along the migration routes of mule deer and pronghorn, but the most critical appeared to be the 1.6-km-wide Trapper's Point bottleneck, which was used by both mule deer and pronghorn during their spring and autumn migrations. Housing developments and roadways apparently have reduced the effective width of this bottleneck to <0.8 km. We estimate 2,500-3,500 mule deer and 1,500-2,000 pronghorn move through the bottleneck twice a year during spring and autumn migrations. Identification and protection of migration corridors and bottlenecks will be necessary to maintain mule deer and pronghorn populations throughout their range.

  12. Digital model of the Arikaree Aquifer near Wheatland, southeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoxie, Dwight T.

    1977-01-01

    A digital model that mathematically simulates the flow of ground water, approximating the flow system as two-dimensional, has been applied to predict the long-term effects of irrigation and proposed industrial pumping from the unconfined Arikaree aquifer in a 400 square-mile area in southeastern Wyoming. Three cases that represent projected maximum, mean, and minimum combined irrigation and industrial ground-water withdrawals at annual rates of 16,176, 11,168, and 6,749 acre-feet, respectively, were considered. Water-level declines of more than 5 feet over areas of 124, 120, and 98 square miles and depletions in streamflow of 14.4, 8.9, and 7.2 cfs from the Laramie and North Laramie Rivers were predicted to occur at the end of a 40-year simulation period for these maximum, mean, and minimum withdrawal rates, respectively. A tenfold incrase in the vertical hydraulic conductivity that was assumed for the streambeds results in smaller predicted drawdowns near the Laramie and North Laramie Rivers and a 36 percent increase in the predicted depletion in streamflow for the North Laramie River. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Reclamation planning for sensitive species in southwest Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Harshbarger, R.M. [Bridger Coal Company, Rock Springs, WY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Surface coal mine land reclamation can be enhanced to improve its attractiveness and usability for sensitive wildlife species. Enhancements for sensitive wildlife have been incorporated into reclamation at the Jim Bridger Coal mine, located in southwest Wyoming. A diverse wildlife population occupies various habitats within the mine`s study area and includes several species listed as sensitive by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. The defined postmine land use is wildlife habitat and livestock grazing. The potential for postmine land use by sensitive species is assessed by documenting the species present during premining baseline studies and monitoring their use of habitat on the permit during mining. The collected wildlife information allows the company to adjust and fine-tune the reclamation plan to create and place habitat where it will attract and accommodate indigenous sensitive species, since extensive lead time is often needed to develop enhanced habitats. Examples would be placement of special vegetative mixes to reestablish historic sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) leks or construction of physical entities such as rock structures within current nesting territories for permanent ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) nest sites. Analysis of the species present, and their habitat requirements during the mining process, also allows time to request variances or modifications in the permitted reclamation plan for enhancements not originally accepted by the regulatory authorities.

  14. Stability of leaning column at Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harp, Edwin L.; Lindsay, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    In response to reports from climbers that an 8-meter section (referred to as the leaning column) of the most popular climbing route on Devils Tower in northeastern Wyoming is now moving when being climbed, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey inspected the site to determine the stability of the column and the underlying column that serves as a support pedestal. Evidence of a recent tensile spalling failure was observed on the pedestal surface immediately beneath the contact with the overlying leaning column. The spalling of a flake-shaped piece of the pedestal, probably due to the high stress concentration exerted by the weight of the leaning column along a linear contact with the pedestal, is likely causing the present movement of the leaning column. Although it is unlikely that climbers will dislodge the leaning column by their weight alone, the possibility exists that additional spalling failures may occur from the pedestal surface and further reduce the stability of the leaning column and result in its toppling. To facilitate detection of further spalling failures from the pedestal, its surface has been coated with a layer of paint. Any new failures from the pedestal could result in the leaning column toppling onto the climbing route or onto the section of the Tower trail below.

  15. Rancher and farmer quality of life in the midst of energy development in southwest Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Leslie; Montag, Jessica; Lyon, Katie; Soileau, Suzanna; Schuster, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is usually defined as a person’s general well-being, and may include individual perceptions of a variety of factors such family, work, finances, local community services, community relationships, surrounding environment, and other important aspects of their life, ultimately leading to life satisfaction. Energy development can have an effect on QOL components for rural residents. Southwest Wyoming is a rural area with a history of ranching and farming which continues today. This area has also seen a “boom” of increasing wind, solar, oil and gas energy developments over the past decade. Wyoming Department of Agriculture, as part of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), sponsored research to examine the effect of energy development on ranchers’ and farmers’ quality of life.

  16. Nuclear fuel and precious-metal occurrences in Precambrian rocks of southeast Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, P.

    1986-08-01

    Studies done on Precambrian metasediments in southeast Wyoming show the occurrence of quartz-pebble conglomerates containing subeconomic amounts of uranium and thorium. These conglomerates were marginal deposits in the late 1970s when uranium prices reached $50/lb. Fuel minerals occur in silicate phases and complicate milling operations. Because of the additional cost of processing and underground mining, no attempt to develop these resources was made. Additional studies show a favorable comparison of the rocks in Wyoming to the auriferous Witwatersrand section of South Africa. Exploration for gold in the Wyoming conglomerates has been done in a preliminary manner, but assay values to 10 ppm are reported. Both fuel minerals and gold are deposited as fossil placers by fluvial systems operating in an anoxic environment. Lag gravel and meander deposits contain heavy-mineral suites formed of coffinite, pyrite, thorite, gold, and uraninite. Available studies have not considered producing fuel and precious minerals as coproducts of surface mining methods.

  17. Hydrologic data for the Cache Creek-Bear Thrust environmental impact statement near Jackson, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, G.S., Jr.; Ringen, B.H.; Cox, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    Information on the quantity and quality of surface and ground water in an area of concern for the Cache Creek-Bear Thrust Environmental Impact Statement in northwestern Wyoming is presented without interpretation. The environmental impact statement is being prepared jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Forest Service and concerns proposed exploration and development of oil and gas on leased Federal land near Jackson, Wyoming. Information includes data from a gaging station on Cache Creek and from wells, springs, and miscellaneous sites on streams. Data include streamflow, chemical and suspended-sediment quality of streams, and the occurrence and chemical quality of ground water. (USGS)

  18. Lithospheric Deformation Along the Southern and Western Suture Zones of the Wyoming Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuyen, C.; Porritt, R. W.; O'Driscoll, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Wyoming Province is an Archean craton that played an early role in the construction and growth of the North American continent. This region, which encompasses the majority of modern day Wyoming and southern Montana, initially collided with other Archean blocks in the Paleoproterozoic (2.0-1.8 Ga), creating the Canadian Shield. From 1.8-1.68 Ga, the Yavapai Province crashed into the Wyoming Province, suturing the two together. The accretion of the Yavapai Province gave way to the Cheyenne Belt, a deformational zone that exists along the southern border of the Wyoming Province where earlier studies have found evidence for crustal imbrication and double a Moho. Current deformation within the Wyoming province is due to its interaction with the Yellowstone Hotspot, which is currently located in the northwest portion of the region. This study images the LAB along the western and southern borders of the Wyoming Province in order to understand how the region's Archean lithosphere has responded to deformation over time. These results shed light on the inherent strength of Archean cratonic lithosphere in general. We employ two methods for this study: common conversion point (CCP) stacking of S to P receiver functions and teleseismic and ambient Rayleigh wave dispersion. The former is used to image the LAB structure while the latter is used to create a velocity gradient for the region. Results from both of the methods reveal a notably shallower LAB depth to the west of the boundary. The shallower LAB west of the Wyoming Province is interpreted to be a result of lithospheric thinning due to the region's interaction with the Yellowstone Hotspot and post-Laramide deformation and extension of the western United States. We interpret the deeper LAB east of the boundary to be evidence for the Wyoming Province's resistance to lithospheric deformation from the hotspot and tectonic processes. CCP images across the Cheyenne Belt also reveal a shallower LAB under the western perimeter of the belt. We believe that this is a result of the LAB jumping up to a mid-lithospheric discontinuity (MLD) as the less stable lower lithosphere was thinned or removed. This same MLD appears above the intact LAB in the eastern portion of the Cheyenne Belt. This suggests that the western end of the Cheyenne Belt has undergone more deformation over time than the eastern end.

  19. Divergent/passive margin basins

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.D. (Shell Oil Company (US)); Santogrossi, P.A. (Shell Offshore Inc. (US))

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the detailed geology of the four divergent margin basins and establishes a set of analog scenarios which can be used for future petroleum exploration. The divergent margin basins are the Campos basin of Brazil, the Gabon basin, the Niger delta, and the basins of the northwest shelf of Australia. These four petroleum basins present a wide range of stratigraphic sequences and structural styles that represent the diverse evolution of this large and important class of world petroleum basins.

  20. Santa Barbara Basin Los Angeles Basin

    E-print Network

    Einat, Aharonov

    of Groundwater Salinity Seawater Intrusion Mixing with Basinal Brines Dissolution of Evaporites Evaporation ca. 2:1 slope Ca-Enrichment Mineral Buffering Hanor (2006) #12;McIntosh and Walter (2005) Subglacial