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Sample records for hanni kalju kask

  1. Galaxy Zoo: `Hanny's Voorwerp', a quasar light echo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin; Keel, William; van Arkel, Hanny; Bennert, Nicola; Edmondson, Edward; Thomas, Daniel; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Herbert, Peter D.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Virani, Shanil; Andreescu, Dan; Bamford, Steven P.; Land, Kate; Murray, Phil; Nichol, Robert C.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Slosar, Anže; Szalay, Alex; Vandenberg, Jan

    2009-10-01

    We report the discovery of an unusual object near the spiral galaxy IC2497, discovered by visual inspection of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) as part of the Galaxy Zoo project. The object, known as Hanny's Voorwerp, is bright in the SDSS g band due to unusually strong [OIII]4959, 5007 emission lines. We present the results of the first targeted observations of the object in the optical, ultraviolet and X-ray, which show that the object contains highly ionized gas. Although the line ratios are similar to extended emission-line regions near luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN), the source of this ionization is not apparent. The emission-line properties, and lack of X-ray emission from IC2497, suggest either a highly obscured AGN with a novel geometry arranged to allow photoionization of the object but not the galaxy's own circumnuclear gas, or, as we argue, the first detection of a quasar light echo. In this case, either the luminosity of the central source has decreased dramatically or else the obscuration in the system has increased within 105yr. This object may thus represent the first direct probe of quasar history on these time-scales. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 100000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo project. Their contributions are individually acknowledged at http://www.galaxyzoo.org/Volunteers.aspx E-mail: cjl@astro.ox.ac.uk ‡ Visiting Astronomer, Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  2. Hanny and the Mystery of the Voorwerp: Citizen Science in the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, K.; Reilly, E.; Bracey, G.; Gay, P.

    2012-08-01

    The highly engaging graphic comic Hanny and the Mystery of the Voorwerp is the focus of an eight-day educational unit geared to middle level students. Activities in the unit link national astronomy standards to the citizen science Zooniverse website through tutorials that lead to analysis of real data online. NASA resources are also included in the unit. The content of the session focused on the terminology and concepts - galaxy formation, types and characteristics of galaxies, use of spectral analysis - needed to classify galaxies. Use of citizen science projects as tools to teach inquiry in the classroom was the primary focus of the workshop. The session included a hands-on experiment taken from the unit, including a NASA spectral analysis activity called "What's the Frequency, Roy G Biv?" In addition, presenters demonstrated the galaxy classification tools found in the "Galaxy Zoo" project at the Zooniverse citizen science website.

  3. THE HISTORY AND ENVIRONMENT OF A FADED QUASAR: HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF HANNY'S VOORWERP AND IC 2497

    SciTech Connect

    Keel, William C.; Manning, Anna; Lintott, Chris J.; Schawinski, Kevin; Bennert, Vardha N.; Thomas, Daniel; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Van Arkel, Hanny; Lynn, Stuart

    2012-08-15

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging and spectroscopy, along with supporting Galaxy Evolution Explorer and ground-based data, for the extended high-ionization cloud known as Hanny's Voorwerp, near the spiral galaxy IC 2497. Wide Field Camera 3 images show complex dust absorption near the nucleus of IC 2497. The galaxy core in these data is, within the errors, coincident with the very long baseline interferometry core component marking the active nucleus. Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) optical spectra show the active galactic nucleus (AGN) to be a type 2 Seyfert galaxy of rather low luminosity. The derived ionization parameter log U = -3.5 is in accordance with the weak X-ray emission from the AGN. We find no high-ionization gas near the nucleus, adding to the evidence that the AGN is currently at a low radiative output (perhaps with the central black hole having switched to a mode dominated by kinetic energy). The nucleus is accompanied by an expanding ring of ionized gas Almost-Equal-To 500 pc in projected diameter on the side opposite Hanny's Voorwerp. Where sampled by the STIS slit, this ring has Doppler offset Almost-Equal-To 300 km s{sup -1} from the nucleus, implying a kinematic age <7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} years. Narrowband [O III] and H{alpha}+[N II] Advanced Camera for Surveys images show fine structure in Hanny's Voorwerp, including limb-brightened sections suggesting modest interaction with a galactic outflow and small areas where H{alpha} is strong. We identify these latter regions as regions ionized by recent star formation, in contrast to the AGN ionization of the entire cloud. These candidate 'normal' H II regions contain blue continuum objects, whose colors are consistent with young stellar populations; they appear only in a 2 kpc region toward IC 2497 in projection, perhaps meaning that the star formation was triggered by compression from a narrow outflow. The ionization-sensitive ratio [O III]/H{alpha} shows broad bands

  4. Extended X-ray emission in the IC 2497 - Hanny's Voorwerp system: energy injection in the gas around a fading AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Lia F.; Schawinski, Kevin; Koss, Michael; Treister, Ezequiel; Maksym, W. Peter; Keel, William C.; Urry, C. Megan; Lintott, Chris J.; Wong, O. Ivy

    2016-04-01

    We present deep Chandra X-ray observations of the core of IC 2497, the galaxy associated with Hanny's Voorwerp and hosting a fading AGN. We find extended soft X-ray emission from hot gas around the low intrinsic luminosity (unobscured) AGN (Lbol ˜ 1042-1044 erg s-1). The temperature structure in the hot gas suggests the presence of a bubble or cavity around the fading AGN ({{E}}_bub ˜ 10^{54}{-}10^{55} erg). A possible scenario is that this bubble is inflated by the fading AGN, which after changing accretion state is now in a kinetic mode. Other possibilities are that the bubble has been inflated by the past luminous quasar (Lbol ˜ 1046 erg s-1), or that the temperature gradient is an indication of a shock front from a superwind driven by the AGN. We discuss the possible scenarios and the implications for the AGN-host galaxy interaction, as well as an analogy between AGN and X-ray binaries lifecycles. We conclude that the AGN could inject mechanical energy into the host galaxy at the end of its lifecycle, and thus provide a source for mechanical feedback, in a similar way as observed for X-ray binaries.

  5. Homemade Solar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Through the use of NASA Tech Briefs, Peter Kask, was able to build a solarized domestic hot water system. Also by applying NASA's solar energy design information, he was able to build a swimming pool heating system with minimal outlay for materials.

  6. The Galazy Zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schawinski, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    When the Galaxy Zoo website calling for citizen scientists around the world to help classify galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey was launched, it brought down the servers hosting the images. The Galaxy Zoo tapped into the incredible desire of the public to get involved in and contribute to scientific research. With the he help of over a quarter million citizen scientists, we were able to map out the evolution of galaxy populations from star formation to quiescence and how this "quenching" is related to changes in morphology. Citizen scientists also discovered unusual objects in public data, such as "Hanny's Voorwerp", a quasar light echo which can constrain black hole accretion on timescales of 10-100 kyr. Finally, the work of citizen scientists taking part in Galaxy Zoo points to a future where machine learning and humans both contribute to systems capable of analyzing extremely large data sets.

  7. THE SUDDEN DEATH OF THE NEAREST QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Schawinski, Kevin; Virani, Shanil; Megan Urry, C.; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Coppi, Paolo; Evans, Daniel A.; Keel, William C.; Manning, Anna; Lintott, Chris J.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Bamford, Steven P.; Jozsa, Gyula I. G.; Garrett, Michael; Van Arkel, Hanny; Gay, Pamela; Fortson, Lucy

    2010-11-20

    Galaxy formation is significantly modulated by energy output from supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies which grow in highly efficient luminous quasar phases. The timescale on which black holes transition into and out of such phases is, however, unknown. We present the first measurement of the shutdown timescale for an individual quasar using X-ray observations of the nearby galaxy IC 2497, which hosted a luminous quasar no more than 70,000 years ago that is still seen as a light echo in 'Hanny's Voorwerp', but whose present-day radiative output is lower by at least two, and more likely by over four, orders of magnitude. This extremely rapid shutdown provides new insight into the physics of accretion in supermassive black holes and may signal a transition of the accretion disk to a radiatively inefficient state.

  8. Galaxy-scale Clouds Of Ionized Gas Around Agn - History And Obscuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnowski, Drew; Keel, W. C.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of Hanny's Voorwerp, a 45-kpc highly-ionized cloud near the spiral galaxy IC 2497, and accompanying evidence for strong variability of its AGN over 105 year scales, members of the Galaxy Zoo project have carried out surveys for similar (albeit smaller) ionized clouds around galaxies both with and without spectroscopic AGN. The color-composite SDSS images detect strong [OIII] in the g band at low z, allowing a useful color search of Galaxy Zoo targets. In addition, a targeted search was made of over 16,000 spectroscopic AGN and candidates. We used SDSS data to produce crude [OIII] images of the top candidates, and obtained long-slit optical spectra from KPNO and Lick for 30 of the most promising. Roughly half of the spectra showed extended [OIII]λ5007 emission, some exceeding 30 kpc in radial extent. Of the 16 extended clouds we identified, 11 lie in strongly interacting or merging systems, probably because these events leave cold gas out of the plane to be ionized. Most nuclei of extended cloud hosts are type 2 Seyferts. We consider the energy budgets, between ionizing luminosity required for the most distant line emission and the FIR output of the nucleus, to see whether any suggest strong variability rather than obscuration. Several galaxies have such strong mismatches that obscuration alone becomes implausible as an explanation for the strong ionizing continuum, and are candidates for fading events similar to that in IC 2497 and Hanny's Voorwerp. This project was funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program through grant NSF AST-1004872.

  9. Galaxy-Scale Clouds of Ionized Gas around AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnowski, S. Drew; Keel, William C.

    2012-02-01

    The serendipitous 2007 discovery of the object now known (even by NED) as "Hanny's Voorwerp" (Lintott et al. 2009) set into motion a search for more examples of galaxy-scale clouds of highly-ionized gas in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei (AGN). Using a sample assembled primarily by 'citizen scientists' via a dedicated thread in the Galaxy Zoo Forum, we carried out the first part of a larger long- slit spectroscopic survey of such objects with the 2.1m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Of the 30 objects targeted during seven nights (multiple exposures for several), extended emission clouds were observed in 15 objects, with [OIII]λ5007 emission occasionally extending >30 kpc from galaxy cores. A strong majority (11/15) of the extended emission clouds coincide with merging or otherwise violently disrupted systems, but more relevant to our search were the handful of clouds coinciding with isolated, symmetric galaxies lacking an obvious excitation mechanism. We present the results of part one in the hunt for Voorwerp analogues, much of which served to weed-out the more interesting objects to be targeted for future, multi-wavelength studies.

  10. Spatially Resolved Spectra of the "Teacup" Active Galactic Nucleus: Tracing the History of a Dying Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, J. P.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.; Keel, W. C.; Rafter, S.; Fischer, T. C.; Bennert, V. N.; Schawinski, K.

    2014-09-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Galaxy Zoo project has revealed a number of spectacular galaxies possessing extended emission-line regions (EELRs), the most famous being Hanny's Voorwerp galaxy. We present another EELR object discovered in the SDSS endeavor: the Teacup active galactic nucleus (AGN). Nicknamed for its EELR, which has a "handle"-like structure protruding 15 kpc into the northeast quadrant of the galaxy. We analyze the physical conditions of this galaxy with long-slit, ground-based spectroscopy from the Lowell, Lick, and KPNO observatories. With the Lowell 1.8 m Perkin's telescope we took multiple observations at different offset positions, allowing us to recover spatially resolved spectra across the galaxy. Line diagnostics indicate the ionized gas is photoionized primarily by the AGN. Additionally we are able to derive the hydrogen density from the [S II] λ6716/λ6731 ratio. We generated two-component photoionization models for each spatially resolved Lowell spectrum. These models allow us to calculate the AGN bolometric luminosity seen by the gas at different radii from the nuclear center of the Teacup. Our results show a drop in bolometric luminosity by more than two orders of magnitude from the EELR to the nucleus, suggesting that the AGN has decreased in luminosity by this amount in a continuous fashion over 46,000 yr, supporting the case for a dying AGN in this galaxy independent of any IR based evidence. We demonstrate that spatially resolved photoionization modeling could be applied to EELRs to investigate long timescale variability.

  11. Spatially resolved spectra of the 'teacup' active galactic nucleus: tracing the history of a dying quasar

    SciTech Connect

    Gagne, J. P.; Crenshaw, D. M.; Fischer, T. C.; Kraemer, S. B.; Schmitt, H. R.; Keel, W. C.; Rafter, S.; Bennert, V. N.; Schawinski, K.

    2014-09-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Galaxy Zoo project has revealed a number of spectacular galaxies possessing extended emission-line regions (EELRs), the most famous being Hanny's Voorwerp galaxy. We present another EELR object discovered in the SDSS endeavor: the Teacup active galactic nucleus (AGN). Nicknamed for its EELR, which has a 'handle'-like structure protruding 15 kpc into the northeast quadrant of the galaxy. We analyze the physical conditions of this galaxy with long-slit, ground-based spectroscopy from the Lowell, Lick, and KPNO observatories. With the Lowell 1.8 m Perkin's telescope we took multiple observations at different offset positions, allowing us to recover spatially resolved spectra across the galaxy. Line diagnostics indicate the ionized gas is photoionized primarily by the AGN. Additionally we are able to derive the hydrogen density from the [S II] λ6716/λ6731 ratio. We generated two-component photoionization models for each spatially resolved Lowell spectrum. These models allow us to calculate the AGN bolometric luminosity seen by the gas at different radii from the nuclear center of the Teacup. Our results show a drop in bolometric luminosity by more than two orders of magnitude from the EELR to the nucleus, suggesting that the AGN has decreased in luminosity by this amount in a continuous fashion over 46,000 yr, supporting the case for a dying AGN in this galaxy independent of any IR based evidence. We demonstrate that spatially resolved photoionization modeling could be applied to EELRs to investigate long timescale variability.

  12. THE [O III] NEBULA OF THE MERGER REMNANT NGC 7252: A LIKELY FAINT IONIZATION ECHO

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, Francois; Kelson, Daniel D.; Villanueva, Edward V.; Seitzer, Patrick; Walth, Gregory L.

    2013-08-20

    We present images and spectra of a {approx}10 kpc-sized emission-line nebulosity discovered in the prototypical merger remnant NGC 7252 and dubbed the ''[O III] nebula'' because of its dominant [O III] {lambda}5007 line. This nebula seems to yield the first sign of episodic active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity still occurring in the remnant, {approx}220 Myr after the coalescence of two gas-rich galaxies. Its location and kinematics suggest it belongs to a stream of tidal-tail gas falling back into the remnant. Its integrated [O III] {lambda}5007 luminosity is 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, and its spectrum features some high-excitation lines, including He II {lambda}4686. In diagnostic line-ratio diagrams, the nebula lies in the domain of Seyfert galaxies, suggesting that it is photoionized by a source with a power-law spectrum. Yet, a search for AGN activity in NGC 7252 from X-rays to radio wavelengths yields no detection, with the most stringent upper limit set by X-ray observations. The upper luminosity limit of L{sub 2-10{sub keV,0}}<5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1} estimated for the nucleus is {approx}10{sup 3} times lower than the minimum ionizing luminosity of {approx}> 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} necessary to excite the nebula. This large discrepancy suggests that the nebula is a faint ionization echo excited by a mildly active nucleus that has declined by {approx}3 orders of magnitude over the past 20,000-200,000 yr. In many ways this nebula resembles the prototypical ''Hanny's Voorwerp'' near IC 2497, but its size is 3 Multiplication-Sign smaller and its [O III] luminosity {approx}100 Multiplication-Sign lower. We propose that it be classified as an extended emission-line region (EELR). The [O III] nebula is then the lowest-luminosity ionization echo and EELR discovered so far, indicative of recent, probably sputtering AGN activity of Seyfert-like intensity in NGC 7252.

  13. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session (Day 1) The Galaxy Zoo(by Benny Tsang)Galaxy Zoo was so hot that the servers hosting the galaxy images got melted down soon after being launched.Kevin Schawinski from ETH Zurich took us on a tour ofhis wonderful Galaxy Zoo. It is a huge zoo with about a quarter million zookeepers, they are citizen astronomers who collaboratively classify galaxies by their looks as an attempt to understand galaxy evolution. The big question that is being answered is: how do blue, actively star-forming galaxies evolve into red, quiescent (non-star-forming) galaxies? The Zoo helped reveal that blue galaxies turn into red galaxies via two possible paths galaxies might run out of supply of gas and shut off star formation slowly; or they could merge with one another and turn off star formation by destroying the gas reservoir rapidly!The Galaxy Zoo project also led to the discoveries of:Green Peas: they are the living fossils of galaxy evolution; compact, bright, green galaxies that are actively forming starsOverlapping galaxies: they are pairs of galaxies that are separated physically but happen to lie on the same line of sight; they provide excellent laboratories for studying dust extinctionHannys Voorwerp: an unusual object named after Hanny the discoverer, which is believed to be the first detection of quasar light echoThe idea of Galaxy Zoo in getting help from citizen scientists was further extended into an award-winningproject known as the Zooniverse, which is an online platform for streamlined crowd-sourcing for scientific research that requires human input. The future of astronomy is going to be

  14. AAS 228: Day 2 morning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Along with a team ofauthors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting twiceeach day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Plenary Session (Day 1) The Galaxy Zoo(by Benny Tsang)Galaxy Zoo was so hot that the servers hosting the galaxy images got melted down soon after being launched.Kevin Schawinski from ETH Zurich took us on a tour ofhis wonderful Galaxy Zoo. It is a huge zoo with about a quarter million zookeepers, they are citizen astronomers who collaboratively classify galaxies by their looks as an attempt to understand galaxy evolution. The big question that is being answered is: how do blue, actively star-forming galaxies evolve into red, quiescent (non-star-forming) galaxies? The Zoo helped reveal that blue galaxies turn into red galaxies via two possible paths galaxies might run out of supply of gas and shut off star formation slowly; or they could merge with one another and turn off star formation by destroying the gas reservoir rapidly!The Galaxy Zoo project also led to the discoveries of:Green Peas: they are the living fossils of galaxy evolution; compact, bright, green galaxies that are actively forming starsOverlapping galaxies: they are pairs of galaxies that are separated physically but happen to lie on the same line of sight; they provide excellent laboratories for studying dust extinctionHannys Voorwerp: an unusual object named after Hanny the discoverer, which is believed to be the first detection of quasar light echoThe idea of Galaxy Zoo in getting help from citizen scientists was further extended into an award-winningproject known as the Zooniverse, which is an online platform for streamlined crowd-sourcing for scientific research that requires human input. The future of astronomy is going to be