Science.gov

Sample records for hansen raimo pirksaar

  1. Reply to Hansen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibert, Todd W.

    2012-01-01

    Hansen (2012a) and the author are both concerned about trends in the counseling culture toward oversimplification. Their disagreement is, principally, about the locus of debate. The author responds to Hansen's counterarguments with the ultimate hope of transferring the focus from scientific ideology to economic realities pervading professional…

  2. Rejoinder to Hansen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suthakaran, V.

    2012-01-01

    Hansen (2012b) reiterates his view that the humanities should form the ideological foundation of the counseling profession by challenging the validity of the central premises for the author's argument that the humanities and science should have equal ideological standing. The author attempts to explain the reasons for their conflicting ideas on…

  3. National Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... its facility at the Ochsner Medical Center in Baton Rouge. Oversees an ambulatory care network with clinics throughout ... National Hansen's Disease Programs 1770 Physicians Park Drive Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70816 1-800-642-2477 Online Courses ...

  4. [Hansen's disease in the laboratory].

    PubMed

    Nunes Sarno, Euzenir

    2003-01-01

    A physical doctor with a PhD in Pathology, Euzenir Nunes Sarno studies the immunology factors of Hansen's disease, one of the oldest chronic infections and that is an exclusively human disease. Staff member of an ambulatory that has become a reference on the disease in Brazil with 220 to 250 new patients per year, Euzenir emphasizes that the fact one cannot cultivate Mycobacterium leprae brings about some everlasting questions in relation to the transmission of and the sensitivity to the disease. There are also many epidemiology questions that remain unanswered. Estimates show that, among those who have contact with multi-bacilli patients, 90% are infected but only about 8% get sick. The high infection rate of those who live with multi-bacilli patients but never fall sick shows that just a small number of individuals are sensitive to Mycobacterium leprae. This is one of the questions immunology has not been able to answer. Why do some people resist to it and some don't? The figures are even lower when compared to those who are in contact with patients that are paucibacillus-infected, i.e. a manifestation of the disease with few bacilli. Hansen's disease is known as a skin malady. But, according to the specialist, its first damage is to the nerve, when the area becomes insensitive. Besides damaging the sensitive skin nerves, the disease can lead to motor disability and irreversible deformities, which sometimes lead to the amputation of limbs and protruded parts of the body. Mycobacterium leprae was one of the first pathogenic bacteria whose genome sequence has been entirely mapped. Only now we have the capacity to have more precise assessments. The disease is not inherited, and only in 1986 health services in Brazil began to take the responsibility for both the disease and its patients. During the twenty-year military dictatorship the country underwent, the health system was dismantled. In 1991, the one-year treatment with three drugs - Dapsone, Rifanpicine and

  5. A Reply to Hansen's Cultural Humanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemberger, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    Hansen (2012b) responds to the author's (Lemberger, 2012) critique of his humanistic vision by dividing their arguments as either individual or cultural in design. In this reply, the author contends that the individual cannot be extracted from her or his culture and, therefore, what is sufficient for a humanistic counseling culture must also be…

  6. Peter Andreas Hansen und die astronomische Gemeinschaft - eine erste Auswertung des Hansen-Nachlasses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, O.; Strumpf, M.

    The literary assets of Peter Andreas Hansen are deposited in the Staatsarchiv Hamburg, the Forschungs- und Landesbibliothek Gotha and the Thüringer Staatsarchiv Gotha. They were never systematically investigated. The authors present here some results of a first evaluation. It was possible to reconstruct the historical events with regard to the maintenance of the Astronomische Nachrichten and the Altona observatory in 1854. Hansen was a successful teacher for many young astronomers. His way of stimulating the evolution of astronomy followed Zach's tradition.

  7. W. W. Hansen, Microwave Physics, and Silicon Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeson, David

    2009-03-01

    The Stanford physicist W. W. Hansen (b. 1909, AB '29 and PhD '32, MIT post-doc 1933-4, Prof. physics '35-'49, d. 1949) played a seminal role in the development of microwave electronics. His contributions underlay Silicon Valley's postwar ``microwave'' phase, when numerous companies, acknowledging their unique scientific debt to Hansen, flourished around Stanford University. As had the prewar ``radio'' companies, they furthered the regional entrepreneurial culture and prepared the ground for the later semiconductor and computer developments we know as Silicon Valley. In the 1930's, Hansen invented the cavity resonator. He applied this to his concept of the radio-frequency (RF) linear accelerator and, with the Varian brothers, to the invention of the klystron, which made microwave radar practical. As WWII loomed, Hansen was asked to lecture on microwaves to the physicists recruited to the MIT Radiation Laboratory. Hansen's ``Notes on Microwaves,'' the Rad Lab ``bible'' on the subject, had a seminal impact on subsequent works, including the Rad Lab Series. Because of Hansen's failing health, his postwar work, and MIT-Stanford rivalries, the Notes were never published, languishing as an underground classic. I have located remaining copies, and will publish the Notes with a biography honoring the centenary of Hansen's birth. After the war, Hansen founded Stanford's Microwave Laboratory to develop powerful klystrons and linear accelerators. He collaborated with Felix Bloch in the discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance. Hansen experienced first-hand Stanford's evolution from its depression-era physics department to corporate, then government funding. Hansen's brilliant career was cut short by his death in 1949, after his induction in the National Academy of Sciences. His ideas were carried on in Stanford's two-mile long linear accelerator and the development of Silicon Valley.

  8. 42 CFR 32.91 - Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.91 Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients....

  9. 42 CFR 32.91 - Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.91 Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients....

  10. 42 CFR 32.91 - Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.91 Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients....

  11. 42 CFR 32.91 - Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.91 Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients....

  12. 42 CFR 32.91 - Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients... MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.91 Purchase of services for Hansen's disease patients....

  13. Von Tondern nach Gotha. Der Astronom Peter Andreas Hansen, 1795 - 1874.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strumpf, M.; Pehlemann, E.; Wolfschmidt, G.

    This companion booklet to an exposition in honor of Peter Andreas Hansen's 200th birthday contains three papers. Contents: 1. Peter Andreas Hansen - Leben und Wirken in Gotha (M. Strumpf). 2. Peter Andreas Hansens wissenschaftliches Werk (E. Pehlemann). 3. Beobachtungsinstrumente der Sternwarte Gotha zur Zeit Hansens (G. Wolfschmidt).

  14. Peter Andreas Hansen and the astronomical community - a first investigation of the Hansen papers. (German Title: Peter Andreas Hansen und die astronomische Gemeinschaft - eine erste Auswertung des Hansen-Nachlasses. )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Oliver; Strumpf, Manfred

    The literary assets of Peter Andreas Hansen are deposited in the Staatsarchiv Hamburg, the Forschungs- und Landesbibliothek Gotha and the Thüringer Staatsarchiv Gotha. They were never systematically investigated. We present here some results of a first evaluation. It was possible to reconstruct the historical events with regard to the maintenance of the Astronomische Nachrichten and the Altona observatory in 1854. Hansen was a successful teacher for many young astronomers. His way of stimulating the evolution of astronomy followed Zach's tradition.

  15. Hansen's Oral Life Histories and Healing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Lee

    2013-08-01

    The individual oral statement is human story based on experience. The personal experience forms unconsciousness which appears in a form of oral statement by ego that doesn't want to lose existence. Thus, the process which exposes a tormented hearts is the objectification of oneself. Through this step, oral person attains a healing. If this sort of individual oral is accrued, the undeserved personal affairs could be a history. In case of Hansen's disease patient, She could escape from negative understanding about herself and the world. Furthermore, She kept formating her values about meaningful life and future oriented value. Also, She wants to keep a record of her life. She comes to know that what she denied is actually what she should surmount over oral statement. As a result, She could attains a healing for oneself through oral statement. The oral statement made her look into she's problems. Therefore, oral statement is a self-realization. Through this, person could know what the problem is and solution. This research is about only one person, so there is need for more cases and studies. If this sort of individual oral statement is accrued, there could be a curative narration. This can suggest an curative alternative when we suffer from problem of life. The merit of this research is rendering this possibility. PMID:24005645

  16. Problems of millipound thrust measurement. The "Hansen Suspension"

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, David G.

    2014-03-31

    Considered in detail are problems which led to the need and use of the 'Hansen Suspension'. Also discussed are problems which are likely to be encountered in any low level thrust measuring system. The methods of calibration and the accuracies involved are given careful attention. With all parameters optimized and calibration techniques perfected, the system was found capable of a resolution of 10 {mu} lbs. A comparison of thrust measurements made by the 'Hansen Suspension' with measurements of a less sophisticated device leads to some surprising results.

  17. Hansen's disease and HIV coinfection with facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Gangane, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of HIV leprosy co infection in India in spite of having a large burden of both leprosy and HIV. Herein we are reporting a case of co-infection of Hansen's disease and HIV with facial nerve palsy. PMID:25883486

  18. Hansen's disease and HIV coinfection with facial nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Gangane, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of HIV leprosy co infection in India in spite of having a large burden of both leprosy and HIV. Herein we are reporting a case of co-infection of Hansen's disease and HIV with facial nerve palsy. PMID:25883486

  19. Peroneus longus transfer for drop foot in Hansen disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jose Carlos; de Freitas Cabral, Elifaz

    2012-09-01

    Leprosy or Hansen's disease is a chronic infectious disease caused by the Mycobacterium leprae. Nerve injury is a central feature of the pathogenesis of leprosy that results in autonomic, sensory and motor neuropathy. One of the most common secondary disabilities caused by Hansen's disease is the drop foot and it is found in 2% to 5% of newly-diagnosed leprosy patients. Unlike the clinical picture of traumatic injury of the common peroneal nerve where both of its branches (the deep peroneal nerve and the superficial peroneal nerve) are involved, in leprosy there is the possibility of isolated involvement of the deep peroneal nerve branch, sparing the superficial peroneal branch. The article discusses the advantages of using the peroneus longus tendon transfer to the dorsum of the foot instead of the posterior tibial tendon for the correction of dropfoot in selected cases where the peroneals tendons are intact. PMID:22938641

  20. Hansen's disease in association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

    PubMed Central

    George, Anju; Vidyadharan, Suja

    2016-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is characterized by a paradoxical worsening of an existing infection or disease process, soon after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The first case of leprosy presenting as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was published in 2003. Here we report a case of Hansen's disease borderline tuberculoid presenting with type 1 lepra reaction 5 months after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26955584

  1. Hansen's disease in association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

    PubMed

    George, Anju; Vidyadharan, Suja

    2016-01-01

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is characterized by a paradoxical worsening of an existing infection or disease process, soon after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The first case of leprosy presenting as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was published in 2003. Here we report a case of Hansen's disease borderline tuberculoid presenting with type 1 lepra reaction 5 months after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26955584

  2. The 1984 Campaign Rhetoric of Representative George Hansen: A Pentadic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Colleen E.

    1987-01-01

    Employs Kenneth Burke's pentad to examine rhetorical choices made by former U.S. Congressman George Hansen as he dramatized two situations: his felony conviction and his subsequent reelection bid. Suggests that Hansen's rhetoric was largely effective because it resulted in substantial identification with the voters of Idaho's Second Congressional…

  3. A Return to the Human in Humanism: A Response to Hansen's Humanistic Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemberger, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    In his extension of the humanistic vision, Hansen (2012) recommends that counseling practitioners and scholars adopt operations that are consistent with his definition of a multiple-perspective philosophy. Alternatively, the author of this article believes that Hansen has reduced the capacity of the human to interpret meaning through quantitative…

  4. Extending the Dialogue about Science and Humanities in Counseling: A Reply to Hansen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Clayton V.; Guterman, Jeffrey T.; Kopp, David M.

    2012-01-01

    This is a reply to Hansen's (2012b) rejoinder to the authors (Guterman, Martin, & Kopp, 2012), which is a response to Hansen's (2012a) keystone article about the relationship between humanities and science in counseling. In this reply, the authors provide remaining clarifications, points of disagreement, and suggestions for future directions in…

  5. Incidence of Hansen's Disease--United States, 1994-2011.

    PubMed

    Nolen, Leisha; Haberling, Dana; Scollard, David; Truman, Richard; Rodriguez-Lainz, Alfonso; Blum, Laura; Blaney, David

    2014-10-31

    Hansen's disease (HD), or leprosy, is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae and is reportable in many states. It is a chronic disease affecting the skin and nerves, commonly presenting as pale or reddish skin patches with diminished sensation. Without treatment, it can progress to a severely debilitating disease with nerve damage, tissue destruction, and functional loss. An important factor in limiting HD morbidity is early diagnosis and prompt initiation of therapy. Because HD is rare, clinicians in the United States are often unfamiliar with it; however, HD continues to cause morbidity in the United States. To better characterize at-risk U.S. populations, HD trends during 1994-2011 were evaluated by reviewing records from the National Hansen's Disease Program (NHDP). When the periods 1994-1996 and 2009-2011 were compared, a decline in the rate for new diagnoses from 0.52 to 0.43 per million was observed. The rate among foreign-born persons decreased from 3.66 to 2.29, whereas the rate among U.S.-born persons was 0.16 in both 1994-1996 and 2009-2011. Delayed diagnosis was more common among foreign-born persons. Clinicians throughout the United States should familiarize themselves with the signs and symptoms of HD and understand that HD can occur in the United States. PMID:25356604

  6. [Hansen's disease in the northern region of Brazil--1986].

    PubMed

    Britto, R da S

    1989-12-01

    Some general facts about Hansen's Disease are presented: in the world, in the Americas, in 1986, with the purpose to focalize on the Northern Region of Brazil (Amazon Valley) where an attempt is made to specify, State, the clinical forms in the active registry, the respective coefficients of Prevalence, about the cases detected during the year, by clinical forms and the correspondent Coefficient of Incidence, the age range of less than 15 years, and above 15 years; and to analyze according to the township in the State of Amazonas in a series of 8 years, from 1979 to 1986, the registered cases under control and also without control, the new cases, by clinical form and Coefficient of Incidence, the positive cases among students in the capital and also in the country, and with more details, still by township and by Public Health Registry, in 1986, with the population, new cases, and Coefficient of Incidence, cases of the active registry, cases under control, Coefficient of Incidence, the relationship between patients/inhabitants, cases according to the decreasing intensity as far as the Prevalence and Health Department Regions: all this to give an idea, in detail, inclusive statistics, of the real position of Hansen's Disease in the Northern Region (Amazon Valley), with the highest figures of Prevalence and even of Incidence, in comparison with other Regions of the country, and to stress the grave situation of the endemic proportions of the disease, in Brazil in general and in that Regions, in particular. PMID:2562591

  7. Hypnotherapy: A Useful Adjunctive Therapeutic Modality in Hansen's Disease.

    PubMed

    Abdul Latheef, En; Riyaz, Najeeba

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is a useful adjunctive psychotherapeutic procedure used in various conditions such as pain disorders, atopic dermatitis, and alopecia areata. However, it is less utilized in the field of dermatology. Only limited data exist on its role in the management of various skin diseases. There is dearth of literature on the role of hypnotherapy in Hansen's disease (HD). We report two cases of HD, one with very resistant neuralgia and the other with recurrent erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL). Both the patients were assessed using hospital anxiety and depression scale, dermatology life quality index and the neuralgia was assessed using the visual analog scale. Three sessions of hypnotherapy were given to both the patients. There was dramatic improvement in the incidence of ENL and neuralgia and we could rapidly reduce the dose of drugs used for both conditions. PMID:24700936

  8. Tinea Barbae: In Released from Treatment (RFT) Hansen's Disease Patient.

    PubMed

    Thangaraju, Pugazhenthan; Giri, Vc; Singh, Hosanna; Kumar, Vinod; Ali, Showkath

    2014-07-01

    Hansen Disease (leprosy) is a chronic inflammatory infectious disease that primarily targets skin, nerves and other internal organs (testis, liver etc.) caused by the acid fast intracellular bacilli, Mycobacterium leprae. Clinical presentation occurs with a wide spectrum including hypo pigmented anaesthetic patches, raised erythematous plaques and nodules and thickened peripheral nerves showing tenderness. The most important complication is the disability and deformity. The diagnosis of leprosy is frequently delayed because of its similarity with other more common skin conditions prevailing in some non endemic areas. We present a rare case report of tinea barbae in an old treated case of leprosy. This case is one of the rarest fungal infection in leprosy patient searched in PUBMED as there were other more tinea infection involving various sites in body which sometimes misdiagnosed as leprosy. PMID:25177622

  9. Indigenous Cases of Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) in Southern Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Luis A; Dobbs, Thomas; Walker, Sue; Waller, William; Stryjewska, Barbara M

    2015-07-01

    Hansen's disease or leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae. In the U.S., leprosy is mainly reported in immigrants, but indigenous leprosy cases have been also reported in this country, especially in semitropical southern states (i.e., Texas, Louisiana). The objective of this series of cases is to describe indigenous leprosy cases reported in southern Mississippi (MS) during the period 2012-2014. Information was collected from medical records at Hattiesburg Clinic and the MS Department of Health. Four cases were reported during the period of study (3 Caucasian males, 1 African-American woman). Non of visited endemic leprosy country. The age ranged from 60 to 83 years (median: 75.5 years). Of the four cases, three presented with a slowly progressive erythematous rash disseminated mainly on the thorax and abdomen, with a lesser degree on the extremities. The time between onset of rash until the diagnosis ranged from 5 to 16 months (median: 7 months). Only one case had direct contact with armadillos (blood exposure). Non of these patients had a history of immunosuppression. The most common symptoms were neuropathic pain (n=2), generalized pruritus (n=2) and loss of sensation in extremities (n=2). One case had severe peripheral neuropathy with muscle weakness, atrophy in left arm, and wasting on left hand. Skin biopsies showed diffuse granulomatous infiltrate with foamy histiocytes along with acid fast bacilli by Fite stain. By Ridley-Jopling classification system, three cases were diagnosis as lepromatous leprosy, and one, borderline lepromatous. Treatment included clofazimine, dapsone and rifampin that was offered free of charge by the National Hansen's Diseases Program, Baton Rouge, L.A. One patient did not tolerate therapy. In conclusion, a slowly progressive disseminated erythematous skin rash on the trunk should raise suspicion for leprosy in the elderly population in south MS. PMID:26434167

  10. Truth and opinion in climate change discourse: the Gore-Hansen disagreement.

    PubMed

    Russill, Chris

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, I discuss the "inconvenient truth" strategy of Al Gore. I argue that Gore's notion of truth upholds a conception of science and policy that narrows our understanding of climate change discourse. In one notable exchange, Gore and NASA scientist, James Hansen, disagreed about whether scientific statements based on Hansen's computer simulations were truth or opinion. This exchange is featured in An Inconvenient Truth, yet the disagreement is edited from the film and presented simply as an instance of Hansen speaking "inconvenient truth". In this article, I compare the filmic representation of Hansen's testimony with the congressional record. I place their exchange in a broader historical perspective on climate change disputation in order to discuss the implications of Gore's perspective on truth. PMID:22397086

  11. Combination of Hansen Robotic system with cryocatheter in a challenging parahisian accessory pathway ablation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Schurmann, Paul; Valderrábano, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    A perceived distinctive feature of cryoablation is the stability (cryoadherence) of the catheter tip during cold temperatures at the desired location, even during tachycardia. We report the case report of a young patient with a parahisian accessory pathway where stability of the ablation catheter was not achieved despite using the cryocatheter with a steerable sheath. Ultimately, stability at the desired location was achieved robotically by means of Hansen system (Hansen Medical, Mountain View, CA, USA).

  12. Chronicles of Gerhard-Henrik Armauer Hansen's Life and Work

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sangita; Chaudhuri, Soumik

    2015-01-01

    Gerhard-Henrik Armauer Hansen, a Norwegian scientist, discovered Mycobacterium leprae as the causative organism for leprosy, defying the hereditary affliction theory of the disease. He was born in Bergen, Norway in 1841 in a Danish family. After acquiring his medical degree in 1866 from the University of Oslo, he joined as an assistant physician in a leprosy hospital in Bergen. In 1873, he published his report claiming leprosy to be an infectious disease with a description of the infectious material in leprous tissue. His conviction of belief and an unstinted devotion to a lifetime of scientific research changed the way leprosy was approached as a disease. It was the fruit of his untiring work that the amended act of 1885 was passed, which resulted in steady decline in leprosy burden in Norway. In February 1912 he breathed his last, leaving behind an inspirational story of a brave heart scientist who fought all odds to unveil the truth for the benefit of mankind. PMID:26120145

  13. [What Hansen's disease research learned from tuberculosis research: from molecular biological aspect].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kim, Hyun; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Nakajima, Chie

    2014-12-01

    As for the Mycobacterium leprae which is a causative agent of Hansen's disease, many studies had been done since it was identified in 1873. However, those studies, at the same time, experienced many struggles because of the difficulty of culture of M. leprae on the artificial growth media. Hence, the study of Hansen's disease progressed by taking the knowledge from the study of tuberculosis caused by the bacteria belonging to the same genus, genus Mycobacterium. For instance, the knowledge of mutations in specific genes responsible for rifampicin- and quinolone-resistance in M. tuberculosis led the elucidation of drug-resistant acquisition mechanism of M. leprae. Similarly, it is necessary for the researcher of Hansen's disease to get important information from the latest topic of the tuberculosis study and utilize them to the study of the disease. PMID:25826852

  14. Hansen's disease in the state of Amazonas: policy and institutional treatment of a disease.

    PubMed

    Schweickardt, Julio Cesar; Xerez, Luena Matheus de

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the historical aspects of the policies for controlling Hansen's disease in the state of Amazonas from the second half of the nineteenth century until the dismantling of this model in 1978. We present the historical changes in the local institutions and policies, and their relationship with national policies. The history and policies related to Hansen's disease in the state of Amazonas are analyzed through the following institutions: Umirisal, the Oswaldo Cruz Dispensary, the Paricatuba Leprosarium, the Antônio Aleixo Colony, and the Gustavo Capanema Preventorium. We seek to show that these institutions cared for the people who suffered from Hansen's disease and those related to them, and were also responsible for carrying out the policies for fighting and controlling the disease. PMID:26625914

  15. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  16. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  17. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  18. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  19. 42 CFR 22.1 - Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. 22.1 Section 22.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Hansen's Disease Duty by Personnel Other Than Commissioned Officers § 22.1 Duty at a station of the Service devoted to the care of Hansen's disease patients; additional pay. (a) Non-commissioned...

  20. Further Extending the Humanistic Vision for the Future of Counseling: A Response to Hansen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady-Amoon, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    This article offers additional support for Hansen's (2012) position that humanism and a renewed respect for human complexity are essential to counseling. In the article, the author also speaks to the critical importance of continuing to ground the profession in art and science. Implications for the future of humanism and counseling are presented.

  1. Surviving the "School of Slavery": Acculturation in Sharon Draper's "Copper Sun" and Joyce Hansen's "The Captive"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Karen Michele

    2016-01-01

    Although children's literature has long alluded to cultural connections between Africans and African Americans, very few texts establish clear lines of influence between particular African ethnic groups and African American characters and communities. Joyce Hansen's "The Captive" (1994) and Sharon Draper's "Copper Sun" (2006)…

  2. Reaffirming the Role of Science and Diversity in Counseling: A Reply to Hansen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady-Amoon, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    Overall, Hansen (2012a) and the author (Brady-Amoon, 2012) share a humanistic vision for the future of counseling. In this continued dialogue, the author argues that a broad-based philosophy of science that encompasses renewed respect for diversity remains essential for the future of the profession.

  3. A review of Elocomosta Hansen with a description of a new species with reduced eyes from China (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae, Sphaeridiinae)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Renchao; Jia, Fenglong; Fikáček, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the genus Elocomosta Hansen, 1989 (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae: Sphaeridiinae: Coelostomatini), Elocomosta lilizheni sp. n., is described from Guangxi Province, China. It is compared in detail with the only other known species of the genus, Elocomosta nigra Hansen, 1989 from Borneo, and the genus is diagnosed from the remaining coelostomatine genera. The new species is unusual among Hydrophilidae by having extremely reduced eyes. PMID:27551232

  4. A Modified Hansen's Theory as Applied to the Motion of Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, Peter

    1960-01-01

    This report presents a theory of oblateness perturbations of the orbits of artificial satellites based on Hansen's theory, with modification for adaptation to fast machine computation. The theory permits the easy inclusion of any gravitational terms and is suitable for the deduction of geo-physical and geodetic data from orbit observations on artificial satellites. The computations can be carried out to any desired order compatible with the accuracy of the geodetic parameters.

  5. Sleep, Hansen's disease and the immune system--a not so harmonic triad.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Rachel Gimenes; Okazaki, Keity Mey; Hirotsu, Camila; Tomimori, Jane; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2015-05-01

    Hansen's disease is one of the oldest skin diseases in the world characterized by a spectrum of clinical manifestations that are associated with stigmatization and poor quality of life. It is also considered a model disease for investigating the human immune system because of its association with immune reactions, which are thought to be a reflection of the host's immunological response, promoting intense cellular activity or humoral secretion. This relationship between the cellular and microbial components of skin and their regulation by local immune responses may be modulated by a currently neglected behavior: sleep. Recent studies have demonstrated that sleep deprivation may aggravate the progression of chronic dermatological diseases, which in turn can lead to a non-restorative sleep pattern. Indeed, sleep is essential for immune and skin integrity. Thus, we propose here a hypothesis linking Hansen's disease, sleep and immunity in a bidirectional relationship. Hansen's disease patients may demonstrate a worse sleep quality than the general population through the modulation of immunological environment; and sleep restriction, a hallmark of modern society, being a possible predictor of the disease progression. PMID:25686506

  6. Validity of Hansen-Roach cross sections in low-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, R.D. ); O'Dell, R.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Within the nuclear criticality safety community, the Hansen-Roach 16 group cross section set has been the standard'' for use in k{sub eff} calculations over the past 30 years. Yet even with its widespread acceptance, there are still questions about its validity and adequacy, about the proper procedure for calculating the potential scattering cross section, {sigma}{sub p}, for uranium and plutonium, and about the concept of resonance self shielding and its impact on cross sections. This paper attempts to address these questions. It provides a brief background on the Hansen-Roach cross sections. Next is presented a review of resonances in cross sections, self shielding of these resonances, and the use of {sigma}{sub p} to characterize resonance self shielding. Three prescriptions for calculating {sigma}{sub p} are given. Finally, results of several calculations of k{sub eff} on low-enriched uranium systems are provided to confirm the validity of the Hansen-Roach cross sections when applied to such systems.

  7. Ankle fracture: radiographic approach according to the Lauge-Hansen classification.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Reginelli, A; Zappia, M; Rossi, C; Fabozzi, G; Fabozzi, O; Cerrato, M; Macarini, L; Coppolino, F

    2013-08-01

    Ankle fractures account for 9 % of fractures (Clare in Foot Ankle Clin 13(4):593-610, 1) representing a significant portion of the trauma workload; proximal femoral fractures are the only lower limb fracture to present more frequently. Ankle fractures have a bimodal age distribution with peaks in younger males and older females (Arimoto and Forrester in AJR Am J Roentgenol 135(5):1057-1063, 2). There has been threefold increase in the incidence among elderly females over the past three decades (Haraguchi and Armiger in J Bone Joint Surg Am 91(4):821-829, 3). In 1950, Lauge-Hansen devised a classification of ankle fractures based on the position of the foot and the deforming force at the time of injury. This has been widely accepted by orthopedists, but is not in general use by radiologists. Identification of the fractures and classification of the type of injury allows diagnosis of the otherwise occult ligamentous injuries. Three radiographic views of the ankle (anteroposterior, mortise, and lateral) are necessary to classify an injury with the Lauge-Hansen system. Two additional criteria are also necessary: the position of the foot at the time of injury and the direction of the deforming force. PMID:23949937

  8. Hildebrand and Hansen solubility parameters from molecular dynamics with applications to electronic nose polymer sensors.

    PubMed

    Belmares, M; Blanco, M; Goddard, W A; Ross, R B; Caldwell, G; Chou, S-H; Pham, J; Olofson, P M; Thomas, Cristina

    2004-11-30

    We introduce the Cohesive Energy Density (CED) method, a multiple sampling Molecular Dynamics computer simulation procedure that may offer higher consistency in the estimation of Hildebrand and Hansen solubility parameters. The use of a multiple sampling technique, combined with a simple but consistent molecular force field and quantum mechanically determined atomic charges, allows for the precise determination of solubility parameters in a systematic way (sigma = 0.4 hildebrands). The CED method yields first-principles Hildebrand parameter predictions in good agreement with experiment [root-mean-square (rms) = 1.1 hildebrands]. We apply the CED method to model the Caltech electronic nose, an array of 20 polymer sensors. Sensors are built with conducting leads connected through thin-film polymers loaded with carbon black. Odorant detection relies on a change in electric resistivity of the polymer film as function of the amount of swelling caused by the odorant compound. The amount of swelling depends upon the chemical composition of the polymer and the odorant molecule. The pattern is unique, and unambiguously identifies the compound. Experimentally determined changes in relative resistivity of seven polymer sensors upon exposure to 24 solvent vapors were modeled with the CED estimated Hansen solubility components. Predictions of polymer sensor responses result in Pearson R2 coefficients between 0.82 and 0.99. PMID:15389751

  9. Annual Report of the School Programs of Ballet West, the Hansen Planetarium, the Utah Opera Company, and the Utah Symphony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Avery L.; And Others

    The document evaluates the impact of four special fine arts programs in Utah elementary schools, including presentations by the Utah Symphony, Ballet West, the Utah Opera Company, and the Hansen Planetarium. It is divided into two parts. Part I provides an introduction, brief descriptions of the method of the evaluation and basic statistical…

  10. Family Health Strategy professionals' view on the effects of Hansen's disease training.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Lúcia Alves de; Feliciano, Katia Virginia de Oliveira; Mendes, Marina Ferreira de Medeiros

    2015-08-01

    OBJECTIVEEvaluating how professionals of family health teams from three municipalities of Pernambuco perceive and interpret the effects of Hansen's disease training.METHODSA qualitative study using the perspective of Habermas. Six focus groups, totaling 33 nurses and 22 doctors were formed. The guide consisted of: reactions to training, learning, transfer of knowledge and organizational results.RESULTSThere were recurrent positive opinions on instructor performance, course materials, and an alert attitude to the occurrence of cases; the negative points were about lack of practical teaching, a lot of information in a short period of time and little emphasis on basic content. Low perceived self-efficacy and low locus of control, ambiguity, conflict of skills and the lack of support for the learning application. Nurses showed greater dissatisfaction with the organizational support.CONCLUSIONThe low effectiveness of training reveals the need to negotiate structured training from work problematization, considering performance conditions. PMID:26353098

  11. Complex Type 2 Reactions in Three Patients with Hansen's Disease from a Southern United States Clinic.

    PubMed

    Leon, Kristoffer E; Salinas, Jorge L; McDonald, Robert W; Sheth, Anandi N; Fairley, Jessica K

    2015-11-01

    In non-endemic countries, leprosy, or Hansen's disease (HD), remains rare and is often underrecognized. Consequently, the literature is currently lacking in clinical descriptions of leprosy complications in the United States. Immune-mediated inflammatory states known as reactions are common complications of HD. Type 1 reactions are typical of borderline cases and occur in 30% of patients and present as swelling and inflammation of existing skin lesions, neuritis, and nerve dysfunction. Type 2 reactions are systemic events that occur at the lepromatous end of the disease spectrum, and typical symptoms include fever, arthralgias, neuritis, and classic painful erythematous skin nodules known as erythema nodosum leprosum. We report three patients with lepromatous leprosy seen at a U.S. HD clinic with complicated type 2 reactions. The differences in presentations and clinical courses highlight the complexity of the disease and the need for increased awareness of unique manifestations of lepromatous leprosy in non-endemic areas. PMID:26304919

  12. The Exile of Hansen's Disease Patients to Moloka'i: A Diffusion of Innovations Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pitman Harris, Adrea; Matusitz, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    This article analyzes the exile of patients with Hansen's disease (leprosy) to Moloka'i (Hawaii) by applying the diffusion of innovations (DoI) theory. Developed by Rogers, DoI posits that an innovation (i.e., idea, movement, or trend) is initiated within a culture. Then, it is diffused via particular channels across diverse cultures. Instead of evolving independently, innovations diffuse from one culture to another through various forms of contact and communication. In the context of this analysis, the objective is to examine how the diffusion of certain ideas, namely, abolishing the stigma associated with leprosy, could have improved the lives of Hawaiians. An important premise of this article is that the Hawaiian government barely applied the tenets of DoI, which is the reason why many people lost their lives. So, this article seeks to explore what could have been done to improve their situation and what pitfalls should be avoided in the future. PMID:27105179

  13. Morphologies in Solvent-Annealed Clotrimazole Thin Films Explained by Hansen-Solubility Parameters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The induction of different crystal morphologies is of crucial importance for many applications. In this work, the preparation of various crystal morphologies within clotrimazole films on glass substrates is demonstrated. Amorphous clotrimazole thin films were transformed via vapor annealing into crystalline structures; highly monodisperse/multidisperse crystallites, spherulite, or dendritic structures were obtained as the solvent was exchanged. X-ray diffraction experiments reveal that the same polymorph is present for all samples but with varying texture. The achieved morphologies are explained in terms of Hansen-solubility parameters and vapor pressures; thus, the different morphologies and crystal orientations can be explained by solvent—solid interaction strengths within the thin film samples. PMID:24624042

  14. Primary Neuritic Hansen's Disease presenting as Ulnar Nerve Abscess in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Patient.

    PubMed

    Karjigi, S; Herakal, K; Murthy, S C; Bathina, A; Kusuma, M R; Nikhil, K R Y

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy has been increasingly known to have an enigmatic relationship with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Co-infection may result in atypical manifestations of leprosy. A 45-year old human immunodeficiency virus-positive male; agricultural laborer presented with a swelling over right elbow, right hand deformity, generalized itching and recurrent vesicles overthe perinasal area. Clinical and investigational findings were consistent with mononeuritic type of Hansen's disease with right sided silent ulnar nerve abscess, partial claw hand. CD4+ count of the patientwas 430 cells/cmm. This patient also hadherpes simplex labialis, with HIV-associated pruritus. To the best of our knowledge such an atypical presentation has not been reported earlier. PMID:26999990

  15. Correlation of Paleocene Harmon and Hansen lignite beds, Adams, Billings, Bowman, Golden Valley, Hettinger, and Slope Counties, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Keighin, C.W.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.

    1998-12-31

    In southwestern North Dakota, minable lignite beds in the Paleocene Fort Union Formation include the Harmon and Hansen beds in the Bowman-Gascoyne area. Data from more than 700 drill holes penetrating these beds was used to construct stratigraphic cross sections. The Harmon and Hansen beds are the thickest and most laterally persistent lignites found under < 150 ft of overburden. The Harmon coal bed is as much as 34 ft thick, and is often split by claystone interbeds of variable thickness. The Hansen coal bed typically occurs 10--100 ft below the Harmon coal bed; it rarely attains a thickness of 15 ft, and averages 4 ft in thickness.

  16. Recurrence of strongyloides stercoralis infection in a patient with Hansen's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Joelma Nascimento; Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Teixeira, Márcia Cristina Aquino; Soares, Neci Matos

    2014-03-01

    In patients with immunosuppressive disorders, S. stercoralis infection may develop into a hyperinfection syndrome which, on rare occasions, may be a life-threatening condition. Therapy of S. stercoralis infection with thiabendazole has been limited, due to its numerous side effects, and has been replaced by albendazole and ivermectin. The present case report describes a case of Strongyloides Hyperinfection Syndrome (SHS) in a patient with Hansen's disease and lack of response to first-line anthelmintic treatment. A 38 year-old man was diagnosed as having borderline lepromatous leprosy. He developed Erythema Nodosum Leprosum and was treated with thalidomide and prednisone. In May 2010 he was diagnosed with S. stercoralis infection and was treated with albendazole. One year later, the stool examination showed continued presence of S. stercoralis larvae. He was treated with ivermectin (6 mg) in a double dose (given 1 month apart) which resulted in larvae excretion clearance. The absence of infection was confirmed three times during a 1 year followup period by stool examination and non-detection of anti-S. stercoralis IgG levels. PMID:24974444

  17. [Children born to Hansen's disease patients in Amami-Oshima, Kagoshima, Japan].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kazutaka; Kikuch, Ichiro; Ishii, Norihisa

    2009-09-01

    In the Japanese leprosaria, it was very difficult or almost impossible for leprosy patients to give birth to their children. There were various reasons for this situation. Leprosy in the women mostly worsened in pregnancy and some of the children developed leprosy. Because of the chronic nature of the disease, marriage was encouraged in Japanese leprosaria, so that vasectomy was usually enforced in men who were wed, while artificial abortion was enforced in pregnant women. The only one exception was the situation of the Amami Wako-en Leprosarium. The Wako-en Leprosarium was started in 1943, and between 1946 and 1953, it was under American rule. Later it was transferred to Japanese rule. Religions such as Buddhism, Christianity and other religions greatly helped with leprosy patients, and in the Wakoen, it was Catholicism which prevailed. Catholic believer Joan Matsubara (later the secretary of Wako-en), Father Patrick Finn, Kaoru Ohira (director) outlined how children born to Hansen's disease patients would be grown up and made the internal rules of the couples' dormitory, while this was impossible in other leprosaria. Between 1953 and 1954, children were brought up by Matsubara's family or nurses. And since November 1954, children were brought up at nurseries (firstly named "Children's House" and later at "Naze Engel House" and children between 2 and 3 years went to "White Lily House". The children could meet their parents at times and now they are full-fledged grown-up citizens. PMID:19803374

  18. [Intraepidermal mass of M. leprae in a case of seborrheic keratosis due to Hansen's disease (LLs)].

    PubMed

    Yajima, M; Suzuki, K; Wen, M; Yamada, N; Asano, G

    1995-11-01

    A 67-year-old patient has had exanthema in the lower right limb since 51 years ago (16 years old at onset), which underwent repeated remission and recurrence. At present, he has bilateral symmetrical widespread infiltrating exanthema and asymmetrical marked neuralhypertrophy, and has been diagnosed typical LLs (His father had the same disease). The exanthema recurred several years ago, and the patient is being treated for Hansen's disease. He had a dark brown flat elevation with a rough surface and the size of a small finger tip in his right abdominal skin for approximately 20 years. A biopsy was performed, and the specimen was fixed in 10% formalin and paraffin sections were prepared for histopathologic examination. A part of the specimen was processed forscanning electron microscopic examination. Seborrheic keratosis was diagnosed by H & E staining. Acid-fast (FITE) staining, immunohistochemical staining (keratin, S-100 protein, anti-PGL antibody and anti-BCG antibody) and scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of bacteria (M. leprae) in the dermal foam cells, the matrix with a banded structure and the squamous epithelial cells which normally lack phagocytosis function. Compared to the basal cells of normal epidermis, the basal cells located adjacent to the dermis affected with seborrheic keratosis showed increased proliferation and more marked characteristics of a germinative cell. The degree of differentiation of the basal cells appeared regressed, and they probably possessed augmented phagocytic activity. The phagocytosed bacteria were probably carried by the epidermal cell cycle toward the surface layer. However, bacteria could not be found in the stratum corneum, probably due to an association with the lysosome. PMID:8582883

  19. Computer-aided method for the determination of Hansen solubility parameters. Application to the miscibility of refrigerating lubricant and new refrigerant

    SciTech Connect

    Remigy, J.C.; Nakache, E.; Brechot, P.D.

    1999-11-01

    This article presents a method which allows one to find the Hansen solubility parameters by means of data processing. In the first part, the authors present the thermodynamical principle of Hansen parameters, and then they explain the model used to find parameters from experimental data. They validate the method by studying the solubility parameters of CFC-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane), HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane), neopentylglycol esters, trimethylolpropane esters, dipentaerythritol esters, and pentaerythritol esters. Then, the variation of Hansen parameters are studied as well as the relation between the miscibility temperature (the temperature at which a blend passes from the miscible state to the immiscible state) and the interaction distance. The authors establish the critical interaction distance of HFC-134a which determines the solubility limit and they study its variation with temperature.

  20. Correlation of Clinico-pathological Classification of Hansen's Disease in a South Indian City.

    PubMed

    Lobo, A C; Pai, R R; Gautam, K; Kuruvila, M

    2014-01-01

    Hansen's Disease (HD) presents itself in different forms depending on the individual's immune status, and based on this Ridley-Jopling classified the disease into five sub-groups. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of histopathology and bacteriological index (BI) in accurate staging of HD with clinical correlation. Fifty HD patients with clinical diagnosis confirmed by histopathology were included. Patients in reaction and on treatment were excluded. Case records and histopathological slides were viewed and BI was recorded. In 10/50 cases, a diagnosis of HD was made or suspected, but were not clinically classified. In these, histopathology proved useful in diagnosis and classification. Indeterminate HD was the most common histopathological diagnosis (6 cases). The remaining 40 patients, were clinically classified using the Ridley-Jopling classification, as Indeterminate Leprosy (IL) in 10/40 (25%), Tuberculoid Leprosy (TT) 5/40 (12.5%), Borderline Tuberculoid (BT) 16/40 (40%), Borderline Lepromatous (BL) 4/40 (10%) and Lepromatous Leprosy (LL) 5 (12.5%). HD was common in males with male to female ratio of 1.66:1 and affected the younger individuals (maximum in 21 to 30 years). On histopathology BT was the most common type (40%) followed by IL (27.5%), BL (12.5%), TT (10%) and LL (10%). No case of Mid-Borderline (BB) type was diagnosed clinically or histopathologically. Overall concordance between clinical and histopathological diagnosis was 65% (26/40 cases) and for each type was IL = 80%, TT = 20%, BT = 75%, BL = 50% and LL = 60%. Where classification seemed difficult as in cases of BT and BL, II played an important role. The overall concordance between clinical classification and histopathological diagnosis of DO is 65% in this study. Th *discordance that is observed is between BT and TT, the paucibacillary type and BL andILL the multibacillary type and hence the treatment is not affected. Overall, IL was a common diagnosis on histopathology in this

  1. The link between a negative high resolution resist contrast/developer performance and the Flory-Huggins parameter estimated from the Hansen solubility sphere

    SciTech Connect

    StCaire, Lorri; Olynick, Deirdre L.; Chao, Weilun L.; Lewis, Mark D.; Lu, Haoren; Dhuey, Scott D.; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2008-07-01

    We have implemented a technique to identify candidate polymer solvents for spinning, developing, and rinsing for a high resolution, negative electron beam resist hexa-methyl acetoxy calix(6)arene to elicit the optimum pattern development performance. Using the three dimensional Hansen solubility parameters for over 40 solvents, we have constructed a Hansen solubility sphere. From this sphere, we have estimated the Flory Huggins interaction parameter for solvents with hexa-methyl acetoxy calix(6)arene and found a correlation between resist development contrast and the Flory-Huggins parameter. This provides new insights into the development behavior of resist materials which are necessary for obtaining the ultimate lithographic resolution.

  2. THERAPIST PERCEPTIONS OF INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE: A REPLICATION OF HARWAY AND HANSEN2019;S STUDY AFTER MORE THAN A DECADE

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Desreen Raphael; McCloskey, Kathy; Kustron, Debora A.

    2014-01-01

    More than a decade ago, Hansen, Harway, and Cervantes (1991) and Harway and Hansen (1993) conducted a research study examining mental health providers’ ability to accurately perceive violence within couples presenting for therapy and to intervene in a manner in which to reduce the risk of danger to couples. The results were alarming, with 40% of therapists sampled failing to perceive intimate partner violence (IPV) and virtually no therapists intervening to reduce the risk of lethality. Harway and colleagues questioned how well-trained and informed therapists were in assessing IPV. The present study replicates Harway and colleagues’ study with the expectation that, over a decade later, therapists are better prepared to accurately identify IPV issues and intervene effectively to reduce the risk of lethality. Reproducing the two main procedures used in the original study, 111 psychologists, clinical social workers, and marriage and family therapists were asked to respond to a survey. Results show that therapists have indeed improved their ability to identify IPV issues. Twenty percent of therapists predicted an increase in conflict, compared to 4% in the original sample. However, almost no therapists accurately predicted lethality in either study. Implications concerning IPV training for therapists are discussed. PMID:24729677

  3. Delayed Diagnosis, Leprosy Reactions, and Nerve Injury Among Individuals With Hansen's Disease Seen at a United States Clinic.

    PubMed

    Leon, Kristoffer E; Jacob, Jesse T; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Wu, Henry M; Fairley, Jessica K

    2016-03-01

    Background.  Hansen's disease (HD), or leprosy, is uncommon in the United States. We sought to describe the characteristics of patients with HD in a US clinic, including an assessment of delays in diagnosis and HD reactions, which have both been associated with nerve damage. Methods.  A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients seen at an HD clinic in the southern United States between January 1, 2002 and January 31, 2014. Demographic and clinical characteristics were summarized, including delays in diagnosis, frequency of reactions, and other complications including peripheral neuropathy. Results.  Thirty patients were seen during the study time period. The majority of patients were male (73%) and had multibacillary disease (70%). Brazil, Mexico, and the United States were the most frequent of the 14 countries of origin. Hansen's disease "reactions", severe inflammatory complications, were identified among 75% of patients, and nerve damage was present at diagnosis in 36% of patients. The median length of time between symptom onset and diagnosis was long at 12 months (range, 1-96), but no single factor was associated with a delay in diagnosis. Conclusions.  The diagnosis of HD was frequently delayed among patients referred to our US clinic. The high frequency of reactions and neuropathy at diagnosis suggests that further efforts at timely diagnosis and management of this often unrecognized disease is needed to prevent the long-term sequelae associated with irreversible nerve damage. PMID:27186586

  4. Delayed Diagnosis, Leprosy Reactions, and Nerve Injury Among Individuals With Hansen's Disease Seen at a United States Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Kristoffer E.; Jacob, Jesse T.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Wu, Henry M.; Fairley, Jessica K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hansen's disease (HD), or leprosy, is uncommon in the United States. We sought to describe the characteristics of patients with HD in a US clinic, including an assessment of delays in diagnosis and HD reactions, which have both been associated with nerve damage. Methods. A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients seen at an HD clinic in the southern United States between January 1, 2002 and January 31, 2014. Demographic and clinical characteristics were summarized, including delays in diagnosis, frequency of reactions, and other complications including peripheral neuropathy. Results. Thirty patients were seen during the study time period. The majority of patients were male (73%) and had multibacillary disease (70%). Brazil, Mexico, and the United States were the most frequent of the 14 countries of origin. Hansen's disease “reactions”, severe inflammatory complications, were identified among 75% of patients, and nerve damage was present at diagnosis in 36% of patients. The median length of time between symptom onset and diagnosis was long at 12 months (range, 1–96), but no single factor was associated with a delay in diagnosis. Conclusions. The diagnosis of HD was frequently delayed among patients referred to our US clinic. The high frequency of reactions and neuropathy at diagnosis suggests that further efforts at timely diagnosis and management of this often unrecognized disease is needed to prevent the long-term sequelae associated with irreversible nerve damage. PMID:27186586

  5. Application of Hansen Solubility Parameters to predict drug-nail interactions, which can assist the design of nail medicines.

    PubMed

    Hossin, B; Rizi, K; Murdan, S

    2016-05-01

    We hypothesised that Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSPs) can be used to predict drug-nail affinities. Our aims were to: (i) determine the HSPs (δD, δP, δH) of the nail plate, the hoof membrane (a model for the nail plate), and of the drugs terbinafine HCl, amorolfine HCl, ciclopirox olamine and efinaconazole, by measuring their swelling/solubility in organic liquids, (ii) predict nail-drug interactions by comparing drug and nail HSPs, and (iii) evaluate the accuracy of these predictions using literature reports of experimentally-determined affinities of these drugs for keratin, the main constituent of the nail plate and hoof. Many solvents caused no change in the mass of nail plates, a few solvents deswelled the nail, while others swelled the nail to varying extents. Fingernail and toenail HSPs were almost the same, while hoof HSPs were similar, except for a slightly lower δP. High nail-terbinafine HCl, nail-amorolfine HCl and nail-ciclopirox olamine affinities, and low nail-efinaconazole affinities were then predicted, and found to accurately match experimental reports of these drugs' affinities to keratin. We therefore propose that drug and nail Hansen Solubility Parameters may be used to predict drug-nail interactions, and that these results can assist in the design of drugs for the treatment of nail diseases, such as onychomycosis and psoriasis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the application of HSPs in ungual research. PMID:26924329

  6. The rare mantis shrimp Areosquilla indica (Hansen, 1976) (Crustacea, Stomatopoda) from the Great Barrier Reef: first Australian records of the genus and species.

    PubMed

    Ahyong, Shane T; Wassenberg, Theodore J

    2015-01-01

    The rare mantis shrimp genus Areosquilla is recorded from Australia for the first time based on nine specimens of A. indica (Hansen, 1926) collected from the Great Barrier Reef. Morphological variation beyond that observed in previous accounts is reported. The present record and other recent discoveries bring the Australian stomatopod fauna to 152 species and 68 genera. PMID:26623740

  7. The Function of Scientific and Humanistic Ideologies in the Counseling Profession from the Perspective of Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory: A Response to Hansen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suthakaran, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this response, the author addresses Hansen's (2012) call for the counseling profession to substitute science with humanities as its primary ideology. The author uses Epstein's (1994) cognitive-experiential self-theory to show that an equal appreciation for science and humanities is more congruent with a holistic humanistic vision for…

  8. Isolated case of mucosal histoid Hansen's disease of the nasal cavity in a post-global elimination era.

    PubMed

    Swain, Santosh K; Jena, Ajay K; Panda, Maitreyee; Mohapatra, Debahuti; Patro, Nibedita; Sahu, Mahesh C

    2015-01-01

    Histoid Hansen's disease is a rare form of multibacillary leprosy with distinct clinical and histopathological features. This type of leprosy is a variant of lepromatous leprosy with a very high bacterial reserve. Of alarming concern is the discovery of an isolated mucosal histoid leprotic lesion inside the nasal cavity of a patient in the post-global leprosy elimination era. Our case had no history of leprosy or exposure to dapsone/multidrug therapy but had a heavy bacillary index. We are reporting this case to highlight the rarity of mucosal lesions due to histoid leprosy and involvement of the nasal cavity, as well as to create awareness and avoid misdiagnosis. This will help facilitate prompt treatment to minimize the complications and deformities of the patient and prevent its spread throughout the community. PMID:26096583

  9. Partial solubility parameters of lactose, mannitol and saccharose using the modified extended Hansen method and evaporation light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Peña, M A; Daali, Y; Barra, J; Bustamante, P

    2000-02-01

    The modified extended Hansen method was tested for the first time to determine partial solubility parameters of non-polymeric pharmaceutical excipients. The method was formerly tested with drug molecules, and is based upon a regression analysis of the logarithm of the mole fraction solubility of the solute against the partial solubility parameters of a series of solvents of different chemical classes. Two monosaccharides and one disaccharide (lactose monohydrate, saccharose and mannitol) were chosen. The solubility of these compounds was determined in a series of solvents ranging from nonpolar to polar and covering a wide range of the solubility parameter scale. Sugars do not absorb at the UV-vis region, and the saturated solutions were assayed with a recent chromatographic technique coupled to an evaporative light scattering detector. This technique was suitable to determine the concentration dissolved in most solvents. The modified extended Hansen method provided better results than the original approach. The best model was the four parameter equation, which includes the dispersion delta d, dipolar delta p, acidic delta a and basic delta b partial solubility parameters. The partial solubility parameters obtained, expressed as MPa1/2, were delta d = 17.6, delta p = 28.7, delta h = 19, delta a = 14.5, delta b = 12.4, delta T = 32.8 for lactose, delta d = 16.2, delta p = 24.5, delta h = 14.6, delta a = 8.7, delta b = 12.2, delta T = 32.8 for mannitol and delta d = 17.1, delta p = 18.5, delta h = 13, delta a = 11.3, delta b = 7.6, delta T = 28.4 for saccharose. The high total solubility parameters delta T obtained agree with the polar nature of the sugars. The dispersion parameters delta d are quite similar for the three sugars indicating that the polar delta p and hydrogen bonding parameters (delta h, delta a, delta b) are responsible for the variation in the total solubility parameters delta T obtained, as also found for drugs. The results suggest that the method

  10. [Power of music that moves mind and body--music therapy in the Hansen's disease sanatorium in Japan].

    PubMed

    Fukamizu, Yuu; En, Junichiro; Kano, Tatsuo; Arikawa, Isao

    2009-02-01

    Average age of residents living in National sanatorium Hoshizuka-Keiaien where people have past history of Hansen disease is around 80 years old at present, and many of them spend their whole days in watching TV or sleeping almost alone in their rooms. Therefore music therapy was introduced in order to improve their daily activities in our sanatorium. Singing, listening to music, playing the musical instruments, and dancing were performed, either in a group or individually. Reactivation of their brain function such as recollection, sense of unity and relaxation were expected. Improvement of cardiopulmonary function was also expected. Solidarity and relaxed state were observed by being with the other participants in the group therapy. For example, when using musical instruments, some participants with hesitation tried to use their instruments, and had good performance. They seemed to be satisfied and became confident with the musical instruments. Then their confidence and satisfaction activated the group. After the sessions, mutual conversation increased. These processes obtained a synergy effect, which means that a group affects of individuals at first and next alteration of individual behavior influences the group. We could observe a better effect in their motivation and activity in their daily life in the individual therapy. The music therapy was applied to the senior participants by the music therapist in this study. The participants could easily reinforce their mind and body through this therapy. Music therapy will be continued for the improvement of quality of life of residents in the sanatorium. PMID:19227147

  11. Achieving concentrated graphene dispersions in water/acetone mixtures by the strategy of tailoring Hansen solubility parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Min; Shen, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Shulin

    2013-01-01

    Although exfoliating graphite to give graphene paves a new way for graphene preparation, a general strategy of low-boiling-point solvents and high graphene concentration is still highly required. In this study, using the strategy of tailoring Hansen solubility parameters (HSP), a method based on exfoliation of graphite in water/acetone mixtures is demonstrated to achieve concentrated graphene dispersions. It is found that in the scope of blending two mediocre solvents, tailoring the HSP of water/acetone mixtures to approach the HSP of graphene could yield graphene dispersions at a high concentration of up to 0.21 mg ml-1. The experimentally determined optimum composition of the mixtures occurs at an acetone mass fraction of ˜75%. The trend of concentration varying with mixture compositions could be well predicated by the model, which relates the concentration to the mixing enthalpy within the scope of HSP theory. The resultant dispersion is highly stabilized. Atomic force microscopic statistical analysis shows that up to ˜50% of the prepared nanosheets are less than 1 nm thick after 4 h sonication and 114g centrifugation. Analyses based on diverse characterizations indicate the graphene sheets to be largely free of basal plane defects and oxidation. The filtered films are also investigated in terms of their electrical and optical properties to show reasonable conductivity and transparency. The strategy of tailoring HSP, which can be easily extended to various solvent systems, and water/acetone mixtures here, extends the scope for large-scale production of graphene in low-boiling-point solutions.

  12. Estimating hidden prevalence in Hansen's disease through diagnosis delay and grade of disability at time of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, J; Mengue, S S; Wagner, M B; Duncan, B B

    2000-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to propose a new method for the calculation of estimated hidden prevalence (EHP) in Hansen's disease (HD). We analyzed the records of 4142 HD patients diagnosed in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, between 1970 and 1991. Out of these 4142 cases, 3291 patients had their grade of disability (GD) evaluated at the time of diagnosis and provided information about the time elapsed between the appearance of the symptoms and the moment when HD was identified by a physician (diagnosis delay, DD). Mean DD for the sample (in years) was 1.51 for disability grade 0, 2.14 for grade 1, 4.46 for grade 2, and 9.64 for grade 2. EHP was calculated taking into account only two strata of GD using the formula HP = [(NC-GD 0/1) x 2.0 + (CN-GD 2/3) x 5.0]/(CGE x PCP), where: NC-GD 0/1 = mean annual number of newly detected grades 0 or 1 cases; CN-GD 2/3 = mean annual number of newly detected grades 2 or 3 cases; CGE = proportion of newly detected cases with GD evaluated; PCP = proportion of the population covered by the state HD control program; 2.0 and 5.0 correspond to an approximation of the mean time in years of DD in each respective stratum of GD. Applying this model, we found an EHP of 529 cases which translates to an excess of 0.58 cases/10,000 population. We also conducted a multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model. This analysis revealed that, in addition to DD, other variables such as clinical form, age group, sex and mode of detection were independent risk factors for the presence of disabilities. We also found two significant effect modification factors: DD versus clinical form and DD versus age group. Taking these findings into consideration, a more complex model was used to calculate the EHP with 16 strata (defined by clinical form of the disease, age group, and GD from 0 to 3). An EHP of 502 cases (excess of 0.55/10,000) was obtained with this more complex model. This result differs only 5% from that of the

  13. Leprosy (Hansen's Disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients Procedure for Accessing Lab Services Data Package Requirements AIDS Therapies Resource Guide In Vitro Efficacy Evaluations ... Assurances to Users Application and Approval Process User Requirements Malaria Vaccine Production Services Data Sharing and Release ...

  14. Meeting the Privacy Requirements for the Development of a Multi-Centre Patient Registry in Canada: The Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Vanessa K.; Thorogood, Nancy P.; Joshi, Phalgun B.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Craven, B. Catharine; Linassi, Gary; Fourney, Daryl R.; Kwon, Brian K.; Bailey, Christopher S.; Tsai, Eve C.; Drew, Brian M.; Ahn, Henry; Tsui, Deborah; Dvorak, Marcel F.

    2013-01-01

    Privacy legislation addresses concerns regarding the privacy of personal information; however, its interpretation by research ethics boards has resulted in significant challenges to the collection, management, use and disclosure of personal health information for multi-centre research studies. This paper describes the strategy used to develop the national Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) in accordance with privacy statutes and benchmarked against best practices. An analysis of the regional and national privacy legislation was conducted to determine the requirements for each of the 31 local RHSCIR sites and the national RHSCIR office. A national privacy and security framework was created for RHSCIR that includes a governance structure, standard operating procedures, training processes, physical and technical security and privacy impact assessments. The framework meets a high-water mark in ensuring privacy and security of personal health information nationally and may assist in the development of other national or international research initiatives. PMID:23968640

  15. Research ethics review practices: experiences of the Armauer Hansen Research Institute/All Africa Leprosy and Tuberculosis Rehabilitation and Training Center Ethics Review Committee, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Wassie, Liya; Woldeamanuel, Yimtubezinash; Gebre-Mariam, Senkenesh; Feleke, Yeweyenhareg; Temam, Fuad; Hailu, Abebe; Abay, Hiwot; Zerihun, Zeyin; Bussa, Solomon; Aberra, Lensa; Tarekegne, Geremew; Gebre-Yohannes, Asfawessen; Aseffa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    The need for ethics review committees (ERCs) is imperative in the conduct of research to ensure the protection of the rights, safety and well-being of research participants. However, the capacities of most ERCs in Africa are limited in terms of trained experts, competence, resources as well as standard operating procedures. The aim of this report is to share experiences of one of the local institutional ERCs, the Armauer Hansen Research Institute (AHRI)/All Africa Leprosy and Tuberculosis Rehabilitation and Training Center (ALERT) Ethics Review Committee (AAERC), to other ERCs found in academic and research institutions in the Country. In this report, we used an empirical approach to review archived documents of the AAERC Secretariat to assess the Committee's strengths and weaknesses. The experiences of the AAERC in terms of its composition, routine work activities, learning practices and pitfalls that require general attention are summarized. In spite of this summary, the Committee strongly acknowledges the functions and roles of other ERCs in the Country. In addition, an independent assessment of the Committee's activity in general is warranted to evaluate its performance and further assess the level of awareness or oversights among researchers about the roles of ERCs. PMID:25816497

  16. Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality program KENO IV and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group-cross sections for high-assay uranium systems. [KENO IV criticality code

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, G. R.; Masters, L. C.; Stachowiak, R. V.

    1981-04-10

    Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality code, KENO IV, and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group cross sections was accomplished by calculating the effective neutron multiplication constant, k/sub eff/, of 29 experimentally critical assemblies which had uranium enrichments of 92.6% or higher in the uranium-235 isotope. The experiments were chosen so that a large variety of geometries and of neutron energy spectra were covered. Problems, calculating the k/sub eff/ of systems with high-uranium-concentration uranyl nitrate solution that were minimally reflected or unreflected, resulted in the separate examination of five cases.

  17. Late Holocene earthquake history of the Brigham City segment of the Wasatch fault zone at the Hansen Canyon, Kotter Canyon, and Pearsons Canyon trench sites, Box Elder County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DuRoss, Christopher B.; Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; McDonald, Greg N.; Briggs, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Of the five central segments of the Wasatch fault zone (WFZ) having evidence of recurrent Holocene surface-faulting earthquakes, the Brigham City segment (BCS) has the longest elapsed time since its most recent surface-faulting event (~2.1 kyr) compared to its mean recurrence time between events (~1.3 kyr). Thus, the BCS has the highest time-dependent earthquake probability of the central WFZ. We excavated trenches at three sites––the Kotter Canyon and Hansen Canyon sites on the north-central BCS and Pearsons Canyon site on the southern BCS––to determine whether a surface-faulting earthquake younger than 2.1 ka occurred on the BCS. Paleoseismic data for Hansen Canyon and Kotter Canyon confirm that the youngest earthquake on the north-central BCS occurred before 2 ka, consistent with previous north-central BCS investigations at Bowden Canyon and Box Elder Canyon. At Hansen Canyon, the most recent earthquake is constrained to 2.1–4.2 ka and had 0.6–2.5 m of vertical displacement. At Kotter Canyon, we found evidence for two events at 2.5 ± 0.3 ka and 3.5 ± 0.3 ka, with an average displacement per event of 1.9–2.3 m. Paleoseismic data from Pearsons Canyon, on the previously unstudied southern BCS, indicate that a post-2 ka earthquake ruptured this part of the segment. The Pearsons Canyon earthquake occurred at 1.2 ± 0.04 ka and had 0.1–0.8 m of vertical displacement, consistent with our observation of continuous, youthful scarps on the southern 9 km of the BCS having 1–2 m of late Holocene(?) surface offset. The 1.2-ka earthquake on the southern BCS likely represents rupture across the Weber–Brigham City segment boundary from the penultimate Weber-segment earthquake at about 1.1 ka. The Pearsons Canyon data result in a revised length of the BCS that has not ruptured since 2 ka (with time-dependent probability implications), and provide compelling evidence of at least one segment-boundary failure and multi-segment rupture on the central WFZ. Our

  18. Comparison of the cohesion-adhesion balance approach to colloidal probe atomic force microscopy and the measurement of Hansen partial solubility parameters by inverse gas chromatography for the prediction of dry powder inhalation performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew D; Buckton, Graham

    2016-07-25

    The abilities of the cohesive-adhesive balance approach to atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the measurement of Hansen partial solubility parameters by inverse gas chromatography (IGC) to predict the performance of carrier-based dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations were compared. Five model drugs (beclometasone dipropionate, budesonide, salbutamol sulphate, terbutaline sulphate and triamcinolone acetonide) and three model carriers (erythritol, α-lactose monohydrate and d-mannitol) were chosen, giving fifteen drug-carrier combinations. Comparison of the AFM and IGC interparticulate adhesion data suggested that they did not produce equivalent results. Comparison of the AFM data with the in vitro fine particle delivery of appropriate DPI formulations normalised to account for particle size differences revealed a previously observed pattern for the AFM measurements, with a slightly cohesive AFM CAB ratio being associated with the highest fine particle fraction. However, no consistent relationship between formulation performance and the IGC data was observed. The results as a whole highlight the complexity of the many interacting variables that can affect the behaviour of DPIs and suggest that the prediction of their performance from a single measurement is unlikely to be successful in every case. PMID:27265314

  19. Response to Hansen: Economic Pressures, Not Science, Undermine Humanistic Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibert, Todd W.

    2012-01-01

    The author contends that it was economic interests, not reductionist scientific methods, that displaced the humanities as the basis for counseling profession. Attacking scientific methods may inadvertently marginalize humanistic counselors. Instead, science in counseling should be viewed more broadly and thereby support the humanities as a basis…

  20. Comparing Family Counseling and Group Counseling: An Interview with George Gazda, James Hansen, and Alan Hovestadt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Kathleen Y.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Contains edited excerpts from a panel discussion held at the 1984 American Association for Counseling and Development convention and sponsored by the Association for Specialists in Group Work. Focuses on the therapeutic process in family and group counseling and on the delineation of the similarities and differences in the group dynamics in the…

  1. Examining ERBB2 as a candidate gene for susceptibility to leprosy (Hansen's disease) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Sérgio Ricardo Fernandes; Jamieson, Sarra Elisabeth; Dupnik, Kathryn Margaret; Monteiro, Glória Regina; Nobre, Maurício Lisboa; Dias, Márcia Sousa; Trindade Neto, Pedro Bezerra; Queiroz, Maria do Carmo Palmeira; Gomes, Carlos Eduardo Maia; Blackwell, Jenefer Mary; Jeronimo, Selma Maria Bezerra

    2014-04-01

    Leprosy remains prevalent in Brazil. ErbB2 is a receptor for leprosy bacilli entering Schwann cells, which mediates Mycobacterium leprae-induced demyelination and the ERBB2 gene lies within a leprosy susceptibility locus on chromosome 17q11-q21. To determine whether polymorphisms at the ERBB2 locus contribute to this linkage peak, three haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) (rs2517956, rs2952156, rs1058808) were genotyped in 72 families (208 cases; 372 individuals) from the state of Pará (PA). All three tag-SNPs were associated with leprosy per se [best SNP rs2517959 odds ratio (OR) = 2.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-3.59; p = 0.001]. Lepromatous (LL) (OR = 3.25; 95% CI 1.37-7.70; p = 0.007) and tuberculoid (TT) (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.04-3.05; p = 0.034) leprosy both contributed to the association, which is consistent with the previous linkage to chromosome 17q11-q21 in the population from PA and supports the functional role of ErbB2 in disease pathogenesis. To attempt to replicate these findings, six SNPs (rs2517955, rs2517956, rs1810132, rs2952156, rs1801200, rs1058808) were genotyped in a population-based sample of 570 leprosy cases and 370 controls from the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN) and the results were analysed using logistic regression analysis. However, none of the associations were replicated in the RN sample, whether analysed for leprosy per se, LL leprosy, TT leprosy, erythema nodosum leprosum or reversal reaction conditions. The role of polymorphisms at ERBB2 in controlling susceptibility to leprosy in Brazil therefore remains unclear. PMID:24676663

  2. Epidermotropism of lepra bacilli in a patient with histoid Hansen's disease

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Rita V.; Pilani, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    Histoid leprosy is a rare form of multibacillary leprosy with distinct clinical and histopathological features. It is a variant of lepromatous leprosy with a very high bacillary load. It appears in patients as relapse after dapsone monotherapy and resistance or rarely, “de novo.” Although leprosy is slowly declining the exact mode of transmission is unclear. At least until recently, the most widely held belief was that the disease was transmitted by contact between cases of leprosy and healthy persons. Transmission by the respiratory route is also gaining ground. There are other possibilities such as transmission through insects, which cannot be completely ruled out. However, the present case report possibly suggests the role of skin as a portal of both exit and entry for the bacillus in histoid leprosy transmission. De novo form of histoid leprosy has numerous solid staining bacteria inside the epidermis. The reports show that these bacilli can be eliminated from the intact epidermis, which indicate an unusual role of the skin in the transmission of leprosy. PMID:25396142

  3. Epidermotropism of lepra bacilli in a patient with histoid Hansen's disease.

    PubMed

    Vora, Rita V; Pilani, Abhishek

    2014-10-01

    Histoid leprosy is a rare form of multibacillary leprosy with distinct clinical and histopathological features. It is a variant of lepromatous leprosy with a very high bacillary load. It appears in patients as relapse after dapsone monotherapy and resistance or rarely, "de novo." Although leprosy is slowly declining the exact mode of transmission is unclear. At least until recently, the most widely held belief was that the disease was transmitted by contact between cases of leprosy and healthy persons. Transmission by the respiratory route is also gaining ground. There are other possibilities such as transmission through insects, which cannot be completely ruled out. However, the present case report possibly suggests the role of skin as a portal of both exit and entry for the bacillus in histoid leprosy transmission. De novo form of histoid leprosy has numerous solid staining bacteria inside the epidermis. The reports show that these bacilli can be eliminated from the intact epidermis, which indicate an unusual role of the skin in the transmission of leprosy. PMID:25396142

  4. Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration in Hansen's disease: A retrospective analysis of our experience

    PubMed Central

    Prasoon, Dev; Mandal, Swapan Kumar; Agrawal, Parimal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy affects peripheral nerves. As Mycobacterium leprae has unique tropism for Schwann cells, thickened sensory cutaneous nerves provide an easy target for the detection of lepra bacilli and other changes associated with the disease. Materials and Methods: The data of patients with sensory cutaneous nerve involvement were retrieved from our record for the period January 2006 to December 2014. The hematoxylin and eosin (H and E)- and May-Grünwald-Giemsa (MGG)-stained slides were screened for Schwann cells, granuloma, and necrosis. Modified Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN)-stained smears were searched for lepra bacilli and globi. Morphological index was calculated in multibacillary lesions. Result: Twenty-nine sensory cutaneous nerves were aspirated in 23 patients. While 15 cases showed skin and nerve involvement, 8 cases showed only nerve involvement. Terminal cutaneous branch of the radial nerve was most often aspirated. No motor loss was observed after aspiration. Five cytologic pictures were seen — Epithelioid cell granuloma only in 6 cases, epithelioid cell granuloma with necrosis in 1 case, epithelioid cell granuloma with lepra bacilli in 3 cases, necrosis with lepra bacilli in 1 case, and only lepra bacilli in 12 cases. Morphological index ranged from 20% to 80%. Conclusion: Sensory cutaneous nerve fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a feasible, viable, effective, and safe procedure. It adds to diagnostic FNA yield in patients with concomitant skin involvement and offers a way to evaluate patients with only nerve involvement. Calculation of morphological index allows prognostication and may have a role in assessing response to therapy and/or relapse. PMID:26729977

  5. Phosphate uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hansen wild type and phenotypes exposed to space flight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Berry, D; Volz, P A

    1979-10-01

    Rates of phosphate uptake were approximately twice as great for Saccharomyces cerevisiae single-cell phenotypic isolates exposed to space parameters as for the wild-type ground control. Quantitative determination of 32P was performed by liquid scintillation spectrometry utilizing Cerenkov radiation counting techniques. PMID:395899

  6. A taxonomic catalogue of the Dyspnoi Hansen and Sørensen, 1904 (Arachnida: Opiliones).

    PubMed

    Schönhofer, Axel L

    2013-01-01

    An update of the systematics and determination key of the Opiliones suborder Dyspnoi is provided. The included catalogue represents the first comprehensive species and synonymy listing since Roewer (1923). It summarises all taxonomic changes to date and attempts to be a sound basis against the exponential growing number of online errors, for which examples are given. Species taxonomy features most obvious changes within the Nemastomatidae. The number of species in the collective genus Nemastoma is reduced from 96 (Hallan 2005) to its sensu stricto definition of 7, and the excluded names are transferred to other genera or considered as nomina dubia, predominantly in Paranemastoma. The systematics of the superfamily Ischyropsalidoidea is discussed and family-level diagnoses are renewed to support taxonomical changes: The morphological heterogeneity in the Sabaconidae is resolved by reverting the family to its original monogeneric state. Taracus and Hesperonemastoma are separated as Taracidae fam. n., and Crosbycus is tentatively transferred to this assembly. The remaining genera of Ceratolasmatidae, Acuclavella and Ceratolasma, are included as subfamily Ceratolasmatinae in the Ischyropsalididae and Ischyropsalis is assigned subfamily status, respectively. Other nomenclatural acts are restricted to species-group level with the following synonymies established: Sabacon jonesi Goodnight & Goodnight, 1942 syn. n. (=cavicolens (Packard, 1884)), Dicranolasma diomedeum Kulczyński, 1907 syn. n. (=hirtum Loman, 1894), Mitostoma (Mitostoma) sketi Hadži, 1973a syn. n. (=chrysomelas (Hermann, 1804)), Mitostoma asturicum Roewer, 1951 syn. n. (=pyrenaeum (Simon, 1879a)), Nemastoma formosum Roewer, 1951 syn. n. (=Nemastomella bacillifera bacillifera (Simon, 1879a)), Nemastoma reimoseri Roewer, 1951 syn. n. (=Paranemastoma bicuspidatum (C.L. Koch, 1835)), Nemastoma tunetanum Roewer, 1951 syn. n. (=Paranemastoma bureschi (Roewer, 1926)), Phalangium flavimanum C.L. Koch, 1835 syn. n. (=Paranemastoma quadripunctatum (Perty, 1833)), Crosbycus graecus Giltay, 1932 syn. n. (=Paranemastoma simplex (Giltay, 1932)), Nemastoma bimaculosum Roewer 1951 syn. n. (=Paranemastoma titaniacum (Roewer, 1914)), Trogulocratus tunetanus Roewer, 1950 syn. n. (=Calathocratus africanus (Lucas, 1849)), Trogulus albicerus Sø-rensen, 1873 syn. n. (=Calathocratus sinuosus (Sørensen, 1873)), Metopoctea exarata Simon, 1879a syn. n. (=Trogulus aquaticus Simon, 1879a), Trogulus galasensis Avram, 1971 syn. n. (=Trogulus nepaeformis (Scopoli, 1763)) and Trogulus roeweri Avram, 1971 syn. n. (=Trogulus nepaeformis (Scopoli, 1763)). Paranemastoma werneri (Kulczyński, 1903) is elevated from subspecies to species. Ischyropsalis luteipes Simon, 1872b is proposed as nomen protectum, taking precedence over Lhermia spinipes Lucas 1866 nomen oblitum. The same accounts for Anelasmocephalus cambridgei (Westwood, 1874) nomen protectum, taking precedence over Trogulus violaceus Gervais, 1844 nomen oblitum, Trogulus closanicus Avram, 1971 nomen protectum over Trogulus asperatus C.L. Koch, 1839a nomen oblitum, as well as Trogu-lus martensi Chemini, 1983 nomen protectum over Trogulus tuberculatus Canestrini, 1874 nomen oblitum. New combinations, all from Nemastoma, are Histricostoma anatolicum (Roewer, 1962), Mediostoma globuliferum (L. Koch, 1867), Nemastomella hankiewiczii (Kulczyński, 1909), Nemastomella maarebense (Simon, 1913), Nemastomella monchiquense (Kraus, 1961) and Paranemastoma simplex (Giltay, 1932); from Mitostoma: Nemastomella armatissima (Roewer, 1962). Revived combinations are Nemastomella cristinae (Rambla, 1969) (from Nemastoma) and Nemastomella sexmucronatum (Simon, 1911) (from Nemastoma). The following Nemastoma are transferred to Paranemastoma but suggested as nomina dubia: aeginum (Roewer, 1951), amuelleri (Roewer, 1951), bolei (Hadži, 1973a), caporiaccoi (Roewer, 1951), carneluttii (Hadži, 1973a), ferkeri (Roewer, 1951), gigas montenegrinum (Nosek, 1904), gostivarense (Hadži, 1973a), ikarium (Roewer, 1951), quadripunctatum ios (Roewer, 1917), kaestneri (Roewer, 1951), longipalpatum (Roewer, 1951), macedonicum (Hadži, 1973a), multisignatum (Hadži, 1973a), nigrum (Hadži, 1973a), perfugium (Roewer, 1951), santorinum (Roewer, 1951), senussium (Roewer, 1951), sketi (Hadži, 1973a), spinosulum (L. Koch, 1869). Further suggested nomina dubia are Trogulus coreiformis C.L. Koch, 1839a, Trogulus lygaeiformis C.L. Koch, 1839a and Trogulus templetonii Westwood, 1833. PMID:26146693

  7. [Identification of psychosocial problems in patients with Hansen's disease by analysis of computerized resources].

    PubMed

    Helene, L M; Rocha, M T

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify leprosy patients' psychosocial problems experienced after they were informed about their diagnosis. We focused attention upon concerns and behavioral changes related to their families, friends, jobs and to themselves. Data were obtained by a two opened questions interview and they were analysed with the aid of artificial intelligence techniques. These intelligence tools were used to discover the most frequent words, phrases and concepts existing in the interview reports. The results showed that after being informed about their diagnosis, the majority of the patients referred some concerns and behavioral changes related to their families, friends, jobs and to themselves. The main concerns of the population were related to the disease (transmission, the treatment extension, the possibility of hospitalization, the uncertainty about the cure). These facts induced some of the patients to avoid telling people about the disease they have. PMID:10188555

  8. 75 FR 49516 - Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and the Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... the refuges. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (71 FR 55214; September... notice of availability in the Federal Register (75 FR 6694; February 10, 2010). The Lewis and Clark..., gulls, terns, wading birds, shorebirds, and a variety of raptors and songbirds. The Lewis and...

  9. 76 FR 77247 - Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... process in a Federal Register notice (71 FR 55214; September 21, 2006). We released the draft CCP/EIS to... FR 6694; February 10, 2010). We announced the availability of the final CCP/EIS in the Federal Register (75 FR 49516) on August 13, 2010. The Lewis and Clark Refuge was established in 1972 to...

  10. 75 FR 6694 - Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Federal Register on September 21, 2006 (71 FR 55214), announcing our intention to complete a CCP/EIS for... otters; painted turtles, red-legged frogs, and other reptiles and amphibians; and several pairs...

  11. 42 CFR 32.89 - Discharge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.89 Discharge. Patients with Hansen's disease will be discharged when, in the opinion of the medical staff...

  12. [The frequency of the appearance of perforating foot ulcers in patients with Hansen's disease as a function of treatment with disulone alone or with polychemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Mane, I; Grauwin, M Y; Cartel, J L

    1995-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1989, in 5 departments of Senegal, 436 new cases of leprosy were detected, of whom 225 were put under dapsone monotherapy and 211 under multidrug therapy (MDT). Of them, 190 could be followed-up during 2 years by means of annual bacteriological and clinical examination, including neurological assessment. In 2 years, the onset of 10 (5.3%) chronic plantar ulcers (CPU) was observed: 4 (4%) among the 99 patients under dapsone monotherapy and 6 (6.6%) among the 91 under MDT (no significant difference). Of the 10 CPU, 3 (2%) appeared among the 149 patients without any disability at detection while 7 (17%) were observed among the 41 others who presented a grade 1 disability at detection (p < 0.01). Of the 6 CPU appeared in the patients under MDT, 5 (22%) were observed among the 23 who presented a grade 1 disability at detection and 1 (1.5%) among the 68 who did not (p < 0.01). This difference was not noted in the patients under dapsone monotherapy. Our results need to be confirmed by other studies including a higher number of patients followed-up during a longer period of time. Nevertheless, they suggest that MDT could prevent the onset of CPU, but only in patients without any disability at detection. Therefore, they reemphasize the importance of early detection of the disease in leprosy control programmes. PMID:7631583

  13. Utility of Bacillary Index in Slit Skin Smears in Correlation with Clinical and Histopathological Alterations in Hansen's Disease: An Attempt to Revive a Simple Useful Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Premalatha, P; Renuka, IV; Meghana, A; Devi, SI; Charyulu, PAVK; Sampoorna, G

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy, a relatively common chronic contagious disease having diverse modes of clinical presentation, can mimic a variety of unrelated diseases. For proper and adequate treatment, the diagnosis must be made accurately with subtyping which should be done with the help of bacillary index, histopathological features, and clinical correlation. This is extremely important in patient care as paucibacillary and multibacillary types have different modes of treatment. Our aim is to categorize leprosy into various types based on bacillary index, morphological findings both in slit skin smears, and biopsy along with clinical correlation. PMID:27398251

  14. Utility of Bacillary Index in Slit Skin Smears in Correlation with Clinical and Histopathological Alterations in Hansen's Disease: An Attempt to Revive a Simple Useful Procedure.

    PubMed

    Premalatha, P; Renuka, I V; Meghana, A; Devi, S I; Charyulu, Pavk; Sampoorna, G

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy, a relatively common chronic contagious disease having diverse modes of clinical presentation, can mimic a variety of unrelated diseases. For proper and adequate treatment, the diagnosis must be made accurately with subtyping which should be done with the help of bacillary index, histopathological features, and clinical correlation. This is extremely important in patient care as paucibacillary and multibacillary types have different modes of treatment. Our aim is to categorize leprosy into various types based on bacillary index, morphological findings both in slit skin smears, and biopsy along with clinical correlation. PMID:27398251

  15. Reconsolidation of Crushed Salt to 250°C Under Hydrostatic and Shear Stress Conditions Scott Broome, Frank Hansen, and SJ Bauer Sandia National Laboratories, Geomechanics Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broome, S. T.

    2012-12-01

    Design, analysis and performance assessment of potential salt repositories for heat-generating nuclear waste require knowledge of thermal, mechanical, and fluid transport properties of reconsolidating granular salt. Mechanical properties, Bulk (K) and Elastic (E) Moduli and Poisson's ratio (ν) are functions of porosity which decreases as the surrounding salt creeps inward and compresses granular salt within the rooms, drifts or shafts. To inform salt repository evaluations, we have undertaken an experimental program to determine K, E, and ν of reconsolidated granular salt as a function of porosity and temperature and to establish the deformational processes by which the salt reconsolidates. The experiments will be used to populate the database used in the reconsolidation model developed by Callahan (1999) which accounts for the effects of moisture through pressure solution and dislocation creep, with both terms dependent on effective stress to account for the effects of porosity. Mine-run salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Program (WIPP) was first dried at 105 °C for a few days. Undeformed right-circular cylindrical sample assemblies of unconsolidated granular salt with an initial porosity of ~ 40%, nominally 10 cm in diameter and 17.5 cm in length, are jacketed in lead. Samples are placed in a pressure vessel and kept at test temperatures of 100, 175 or 250 °C; samples are vented to the atmosphere during the entire test procedure. At these test conditions the consolidating salt is always creeping, the creep rate increases with increasing temperature and stress and decreases as porosity decreases. In hydrostatic tests, confining pressure is increased to 20 MPa with periodic unload/reload loops to determine K. Volume strain increases with increasing temperature. In shear tests at 2.5 and 5 MPa confining pressure, after confining pressure is applied, the crushed salt is subjected to a differential stress, with periodic unload/reload loops to determine E and ν. At predetermined differential stress levels the stress is held constant and the salt consolidates. Displacement gages mounted on the samples show little lateral deformation until the samples reach a porosity of ~10%. Interestingly, vapor is vented in tests at 250°C and condenses at the vent port. Release of water is not observed in the lower two test temperatures. It is hypothesized that the water originates from fluid inclusions, which were made accessible by intragranular deformational processes including decrepitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. A new genus of Stenetriidae Hansen, 1905 (Asellota: Isopoda: Crustacea) from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia and the southwestern Pacific.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Niel L; Cumming, R L

    2015-01-01

    Onychatrium gen. nov. is described, with five included species: Onychatrium forceps sp. nov., the type species and Onychatrium torosus sp. nov., both from the Great Barrier Reef; Onychatrium entale (Nordenstam, 1946) comb. nov., from Tapateuen (= Tabiteue Island), Gilbert Islands; Onychatrium thomasi (Bolstad & Kensley, 1999) comb. nov., from Madang, Papua New Guinea; and Onychatrium echiurum (Nobili, 1906) comb. nov., and species inquirenda from the Tumaotu Islands, Eastern French Polynesia. The primary distinguishing characters for Onychatrium gen. nov. are a trapezoid pseudosrostrum, the male pereopod 1 with elongate dactylus (4.7-7.3 as long as proximal width), propodus with strongly produced and acute lobe, carpus with a distally acute, flat, ventrally directed process (except O. torosus sp. nov., which has a short and truncate process) and the merus with a distally directed inferodistal lobe. The genus is known only from the southern Pacific, from the Tuamotus (eastern French Polynesia) to the Great Barrier Reef and northern Papua New Guinea. PMID:25947526

  17. The status of the species Lactobacillus casei (Orla-Jensen 1916) Hansen and Lessel 1971 and Lactobacillus paracasei Collins et al. 1989. Request for an opinion.

    PubMed

    Dellaglio, Franco; Felis, Giovanna E; Torriani, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of considerable published evidence, it is concluded that the species Lactobacillus casei is not correctly represented by the strain actually designated as the type strain ATCC 393. It is proposed that the Judicial Commission consider: (1) that ATCC 393T is scientifically unsuitable as the type strain of Lactobacillus casei and should be reclassified as Lactobacillus zeae; (2) that Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 and Lactobacillus paracasei strains are members of the same taxon and therefore can be united within the name Lactobacillus casei (Rules 42 and 23a), the name Lactobacillus paracasei being rejected; and (3) designating ATCC 334 as the neotype strain for the species PMID:11837314

  18. 42 CFR 32.86 - Admissions to Service facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.86 Admissions to Service facilities. Any person with Hansen's disease who presents... suitable for the accommodation of persons with Hansen's disease....

  19. Bile pigments: newcomers to the cell signaling arena.

    PubMed

    Maines, Mahin D

    2003-01-01

    The article highlighted in this issue is "2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-Induced Accumulation of Biliverdin and Hepatic Peliosis in Rats," by Marjo Nittynen, Jouni T. Tuomisto, Seppo Auriola, Raimo Pohjanvirta, Paula Syrjälä, Ulla Simanainen, Matti Viluksela, and Jouko Tuomisto (pp. 112-123). PMID:12520070

  20. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (31st, Seoul, Korea, July 8-13, 2007). Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Jeong-Ho, Ed.; Lew, Hee-Chan, Ed.; Park, Kyo-Sik Park, Ed.; Seo, Dong-Yeop, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This third volume of the 31st annual proceedings of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education conference presents research reports for author surnames beginning Han- through Miy-. Reports include: (1) Elementary Education Students' Memories of Mathematics in Family Context (Markku S. Hannula, Raimo Kaasila, Erkki…

  1. 42 CFR 32.90 - Notification to health authorities regarding discharged patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.90 Notification to health authorities regarding...

  2. "The Connoisseur of Pain: A Novel", and "A New and Sharper Vision": Sensuous Aesthetics as Theological Immersion in Terrence Malick's "The Tree of Life", Thomas Kinkade's Landscapes, and Ron Hansen's "Mariette in Ecstasy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busk, Michael Reid

    2013-01-01

    Creative Dissertation: "The Connoisseur of Pain" is a comic noir set in Hollywood in 1962, and its central conceit is that cartoons are real, live-action films starring anthropomorphic animals that cartoonists later replicate frame by frame in order to make the violent content palatable to children. The book's protagonist and narrator is…

  3. 42 CFR 32.87 - Confirmation of diagnosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with Hansen's Disease § 32.87 Confirmation of diagnosis. At the earliest practicable date, after the arrival... the medical staff shall confirm or disprove the diagnosis of Hansen's disease. If the diagnosis...

  4. 42 CFR 32.6 - Persons eligible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Beneficiaries § 32.6 Persons... hereinafter prescribed: (1) Persons afflicted with Hansen's disease; and (2) Non-beneficiaries for temporary... Public Health Service (see part 31 of this chapter); (2) Physical and mental examination of aliens...

  5. 42 CFR 32.87 - Confirmation of diagnosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with... the medical staff shall confirm or disprove the diagnosis of Hansen's disease. If the diagnosis...

  6. 42 CFR 32.87 - Confirmation of diagnosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with... the medical staff shall confirm or disprove the diagnosis of Hansen's disease. If the diagnosis...

  7. 42 CFR 32.87 - Confirmation of diagnosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with... the medical staff shall confirm or disprove the diagnosis of Hansen's disease. If the diagnosis...

  8. 42 CFR 32.87 - Confirmation of diagnosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with... the medical staff shall confirm or disprove the diagnosis of Hansen's disease. If the diagnosis...

  9. Humanities and Science: A Necessary Unity for the Counseling Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Jeffrey T.; Martin, Clayton V.; Kopp, David M.

    2012-01-01

    This article is a reply to Hansen's (2012) call for the counseling profession to embrace a purely humanistic ideology for counseling. The authors suggest the relationship between humanities and science set forth by Hansen does not emphasize the both-and aspects of these ideologies. An integrative framework is considered for counseling.

  10. Convergence of Personality and Interests: Meta-Analysis of the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire and the Strong Interest Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staggs, Gena D.; Larson, Lisa M.; Borgen, Fred H.

    2007-01-01

    Using meta-analysis, we revised Ackerman and Heggestad's (1997) identification of four trait complexes that propose personality and interest (P-I) linkages. Studies that had reported correlations between general and specific measures of vocational interests (Strong Interest Inventory [Strong; Hansen & Campbell, 1985; Harmon, Hansen, Borgen, &…

  11. 78 FR 77664 - Defense Policy Board (DPB); Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... Wednesday, January 15, 2014, from 7:00 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. ADDRESSES: The Pentagon, 2000 Defense Pentagon, Washington, DC 20301- 2000. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Ann Hansen, 2000 Defense Pentagon... classified material. Committee's Designated Federal Officer or Point of Contact: Ann Hansen,...

  12. History of Crested Wheatgrass (Agropyron) in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crested wheatgrass is indigenous to the Steppe region of European Russia and southwestern Siberia. It was first introduced into North America in 1892, by N. E. Hansen of the South Dakota Experiment Station. Dr. Hansen obtained five accessions, designated Pls 835, 837, 838, 1010, and 1012, from Val...

  13. 78 FR 40738 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Double H Pesticide Burial Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Double H Pesticide Burial Site AGENCY... incurred for the Double H Pesticide Burial Site in Grandview, Yakima County, Washington. Under this proposed settlement, the settling parties are Double H, L.P.; James T. Hansen; Linda L. Hansen; George...

  14. Neural Computation as a Tool to Differentiate Perceptual from Emotional Processes: The Case of Anger Superiority Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mermillod, Martial; Vermeulen, Nicolas; Lundqvist, Daniel; Niedenthal, Paula M.

    2009-01-01

    Research findings in social and cognitive psychology imply that it is easier to detect angry faces than happy faces in a crowd of neutral faces [Hansen, C. H., & Hansen, R. D. (1988). Finding the face in the crowd--An anger superiority effect. "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology," 54(6), 917-924]. This phenomenon has been held to have…

  15. HIV, HCV & Leprosy co-infection.

    PubMed

    George, A; Kanish, B

    2014-01-01

    In the era where Hansen's disease has achieved elimination status in India, co-infection with HIV can possibly cause a resurgence of this disease. A young intravenous drug abuser was found to have triple affliction, where HIV and HCV infection were discovered on testing after the patient was clinically diagnosed to have Hansen's disease. To our knowledge, there has been no case reported where leprosy was seen with HIV and HCV infection. We are reporting a patient with lepromatous Hansen's disease in type 2 reaction in whom HIV and HCV was incidentally diagnosed. PMID:26118224

  16. Operation IceBridge Field Update On a Day Off

    NASA Video Gallery

    On a day off from flights in Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, science writer Kathryn Hansen and video producer Jefferson Beck give an update on Operation IceBridge from the field. They interviewed NASA en...

  17. HiRISE Observations of Dynamical Phenomena on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Candice; Thomas, Nicolas; McEwen, Alfred

    Candice Hansen, candice.j.hansen@jpl.nasa.gov Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, United States Candice Hansen, candice.j.hansen@jpl.nasa.gov Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, United States Nicolas Thomas, nicolas.thomas@space.unibe.ch University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland Alfred McEwen, mcewen@pirl.lpl.arizona.edu Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona, United States The HiRISE Team Alan Delamere Eric Eliason John Grant Virginia Gulick Kenneth Herkenhoff Laszlo Keszthelyi Randolph Kirk Michael Mellon Steven Squyres Cathy Weitz Chris Okubo Shane Byrne Patrick Russell The presentation will provide a review of recent observations by the HiRISE imaging system onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Emphasis will be placed on dynamical phenomena such as avalanches, dune motion, and jet activity at the poles.

  18. Space Station - early concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Display model of space station concept--Manned Orbiting Research Laboratory in Saturn S-IVB Orbit configuration. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995).

  19. Space Station - early

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    'The MORL-Saturn IB launch combination undergoes aerodynamic testing in the 8-Foot Transonic Tunnel in October 1965.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 302.

  20. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    1/4 scale model of Apollo Heat Shield being prepared for testing. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 356.

  1. Space Station - early concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Wind tunnel model of Manned Orbiting Research Laboratory concept on sting. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995).

  2. Paraglider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Langley researchers layout of a 60 foot paraglider concept. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), pp. 380-387.

  3. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Israel Taback (left) and Clifford H. Nelson, head of LOPO, ponder the intricacies of the spacecraft design. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 323.

  4. 42 CFR 32.90 - Notification to health authorities regarding discharged patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN... patients. Upon the discharge of a patient the medical officer in charge shall give notification of...

  5. 42 CFR 32.90 - Notification to health authorities regarding discharged patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN... patients. Upon the discharge of a patient the medical officer in charge shall give notification of...

  6. 42 CFR 32.90 - Notification to health authorities regarding discharged patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN... patients. Upon the discharge of a patient the medical officer in charge shall give notification of...

  7. 42 CFR 32.90 - Notification to health authorities regarding discharged patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN... patients. Upon the discharge of a patient the medical officer in charge shall give notification of...

  8. Saccharomyces boulardii

    MedlinePlus

    ... believed to be a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast). Saccharomyces boulardii is used as medicine. Saccharomyces boulardii ... Hansen CBS 5926), Probiotic, Probiotique, Saccharomyces, Saccharomyces boulardii, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae, S. Boulardii.

  9. Martin XBM-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1939-01-01

    Martin XBM-1 equipped with experimental heated wing for icing research, 1939. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen. Page 484.

  10. Is Surgery Always Needed for Meniscal Tears of the Knee?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a team led by Nina Jullum Kise, an orthopedic surgeon at Martina Hansens Hospital in Sandvika, Norway, ... on the findings. Dr. Matthew Hepinstall is an orthopedic surgeon at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York ...

  11. Sting Supported Bell XS-2 in the 9 Inch Supersonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    A sting supported model of the Bell XS-2 was tested in the 9 Inch Supersonic Tunnel. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen. Page 316.

  12. Lipid Class, Carotenoid, and Toxin Dynamics of Karenia Brevis (Dinophyceae) During Diel Vertical Migration

    EPA Science Inventory

    Karenia brevis’ (Hansen and Moestrup) internal lipid, carotenoid, and toxin concentrations are influenced by its ability to use ambient light and nutrients for growth and reproduction. This project investigated changes of K. brevis toxicity, lipid class and carotenoid concentrat...

  13. Genetic Variation Within and Among Collections of Falata Alfalfas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yellow-flowered alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. falcata) persists in low precipitation rangeland and grassland environments. The origin of Medicago includes Russia, Mongolia, Scandinavia, and China (Hansen, 1909; Lesins and Lesins, 1979). The presence of legumes improves rangelands and grasslands ...

  14. Leprosy in children under fifteen years in Brazil, 2011.

    PubMed

    Levantezi, Magda; Moreira, Tadiana; Sena Neto, Sebastião; De Jesus, Aline Ludmila

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the occurrence of Hansen's disease in children under 15 years of age and to analyse the burden of disease in the same population in Brazil in 2011. This is a descriptive epidemiological study on the positive cases of Hansen's disease in minors below 15 years of age notified in Brazil. Data was collected from the Information System on Disease Notification for Hansen's disease cases, and the Brazilian Institute of Geographic Statistics for population data. The study's results showed that 2420 minors with Hansen's Disease in 2011 were distributed in 5565 cities, 692 cities registered the occurrence of 1-10 cases of the disease, a total of 1489 cases (61%); 35 cities showed 15 to 25 cases, 544 (22.5%); and eight cities notified 25 cases or more, totalling 87 cases (16%), therefore, about one third of the Hansen's disease cases in minors under 15 years in Brazil in the year of 2011 are concentrated in 43 Brazilian cities. PMID:25255615

  15. Leprosy in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    White, Cassandra; Franco-Paredes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in leprosy (Hansen's disease) treatment and outlook for patients since the introduction of multidrug therapy (MDT) 3 decades ago, the global incidence remains high, and patients often have long-term complications associated with the disease. In this article, we discuss recent findings related to genetics, susceptibility, and disease reservoirs and the implications of these findings for Hansen's disease control and health outcomes for patients. We describe the continued difficulties associated with treatment of inflammatory episodes known as "leprosy reactions," which cause much of the disability associated with the disease and can affect people for many years after MDT is complete. We also discuss some of the contemporary challenges for physicians and patients, including international and internal migration of people affected by the disease. We suggest some important areas of focus for future Hansen's disease research. PMID:25567223

  16. Leprosy in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite significant improvements in leprosy (Hansen's disease) treatment and outlook for patients since the introduction of multidrug therapy (MDT) 3 decades ago, the global incidence remains high, and patients often have long-term complications associated with the disease. In this article, we discuss recent findings related to genetics, susceptibility, and disease reservoirs and the implications of these findings for Hansen's disease control and health outcomes for patients. We describe the continued difficulties associated with treatment of inflammatory episodes known as “leprosy reactions,” which cause much of the disability associated with the disease and can affect people for many years after MDT is complete. We also discuss some of the contemporary challenges for physicians and patients, including international and internal migration of people affected by the disease. We suggest some important areas of focus for future Hansen's disease research. PMID:25567223

  17. Greater auricular nerve masquerading as lymph node.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shilpi; Deb, Prabal; Nijhawan, Vijay Shrawan; Kharayat, Veena; Verma, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Hansen's disease is on the verge of being eliminated from India and often missed by clinicians due to low index of suspicion. We present an unusual case in which greater auricular nerve thickening masqueraded as enlarged lymph node in the neck. The patient was referred for fine needle aspiration cytology, which revealed epithelioid cell granulomas suggestive of Hansen's disease. Further clinical examination and investigations including the skin biopsy confirmed the disease, highlighting the role of pathologist in the management of such unusual presentation of a common disease. PMID:26229249

  18. Greater auricular nerve masquerading as lymph node

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Shilpi; Deb, Prabal; Nijhawan, Vijay Shrawan; Kharayat, Veena; Verma, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Hansen's disease is on the verge of being eliminated from India and often missed by clinicians due to low index of suspicion. We present an unusual case in which greater auricular nerve thickening masqueraded as enlarged lymph node in the neck. The patient was referred for fine needle aspiration cytology, which revealed epithelioid cell granulomas suggestive of Hansen's disease. Further clinical examination and investigations including the skin biopsy confirmed the disease, highlighting the role of pathologist in the management of such unusual presentation of a common disease. PMID:26229249

  19. [Peculiar history to formation of 'Freely recuperate zone' in the National Sanatorium Kuryu Rakusen-en, Gunma, Japan (relation between the 'Old Yunosawa-ward' and 'Freely recuperate zone' in the National Sanatorium Kuryu Rakusen-en)].

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Makoto

    2011-09-01

    Hansen's disease sufferers had been visiting the hot spring, Kusatsu-Spa, in Gunma, Japan, for Toji (which means 'hot springs treatment' in Japanese) since the middle ages, as it was known reportedly for a long time to be effective in curing the disease. In 1869, Kusatsu-Spa was hit by a massive fire. The innkeepers, who suffered devastating damages, were trying to reconstruct the economy quickly by promoting the medical benefits of the hot spring. This made many Hansen's disease patients to visit and of which many stayed on a long term bases. They would use the hot spring with ordinary visitors. And, they had received the treatment of the spotted moxa cautery with the hot-spring treatment. Later on, Kusatsu- Spa became well known throughout Japan and as the numbers of ordinary visitors increased, they voiced their concerns in sharing the hot spring with the Hansen's disease patients. Therefore, the innkeepers decided to move the patients to another district called Yunosawa and suggested to make a special village of just the patients. In 1887, the representative of the patients came to an agreement with the mayor of Yunosawa to establish a treatment centre there. Yunosawa became part of an administrative area of Kusatsu Town. The area seemed to become a local-governing area mainly shaped by Hansen's disease sufferers and the first legal residential area where Hansen's disease sufferers were given citizenships and may convalesce freely. However, in 1931, leprosy prevention law was passed, and the Japanese government built a new medical treatment centre of Hansen's disease, 4km away from Kusatsu- Spa, which is called National Sanatorium Kuryu Rakusen-en. After deliberations with the representative of the Hansen's disease patients living in the Yunosawa area and the governor of Gunma Prefecture, who received the order from the Japanese government to move them, had agreed to the mass relocation in 1941. This is how Yunosawa had closed its 55 years history and many

  20. Work Values of University Students in Chinese Mainland, Taiwan, and Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Shui Wai; Yuen, Mantak

    2012-01-01

    Leuty and Hansen ("Journal of Vocational Behavior" 79:379-390, 2011) identified six domains of work values in undergraduate students in the West. The review undertaken in this paper suggests that the factor structure of work values of university students in Mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong essentially matches these six domains, except for the…

  1. Notes of a Progressive Educator from the Academy and the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semel, Susan F.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a review of three chapters in "Part III, Section F: Inquiring into Curriculum" of "The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction" (F. M. Connelly, M. F. He, J. I. Phillion, Eds.; Sage Publications, 2008). These chapters ["Reenvisioning the Progressive Tradition in Curriculum" (David T. Hansen, Rodino F. Anderson, Jeffrey…

  2. 42 CFR 32.111 - Conditions and extent of treatment; charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions and extent of treatment; charges. 32.111 Section 32.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN...

  3. Second Language Acquisition by Low-Literate Learners: An Understudied Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarone, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    Many adolescent and adult L2 learners in language classrooms, both in the US and other countries, have little or no alphabetic print literacy. Language teachers may turn to SLA research for assistance, yet almost all research on oral SLA has focused on educated, highly-literate learners (Bigelow & Tarone 2004; Tarone, Bigelow & Hansen 2009). The…

  4. Mycobacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID clinical studies on ClinicalTrials.gov . ​ Related Links Tuberculosis Leprosy (Hansen's Disease) National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus ... coats that can be found throughout the world. Tuberculosis and leprosy (Hansen’s disease) are the best known ...

  5. Employment and Disability: Trends and Issues for the 1990's. A Report on the 14th Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar (Washington, D.C., May 7-9, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Leonard G., Ed.; Hansen, Carl E., Ed.

    This report on the 14th Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar addresses trends and prospects for employment of persons with disabilities. The monograph begins with an introduction by Leonard G. Perlman and Carl E. Hansen, a foreword by Richard S. Materson, a list of seminar sponsors and Switzer scholars, a statement on the legacy of Mary Elizabeth…

  6. Each Belongs: The Remarkable Story of the First School System to Move to Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jim

    2012-01-01

    The Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board has just celebrated 30 Years of Fully Inclusive Education for All. Their mission statement: "EACH BELONGS". This remarkable book by Jim Hansen collects the history--including an extensive collection of documents and letters from teachers and families--that tell the stories of the struggles from…

  7. The Grief Account: Dimensions of a Contemporary Bereavement Genre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Michael Robert

    2008-01-01

    The genre of the grief account is identified to include published narratives of surviving grief. Thematic analysis of Andrew Holleran's (2006) "Grief: A Novel," Lolly Winston's (2004) "Good Grief: A Novel," Joan Didion's (2005) "The Year of Magical Thinking," and J. Canfield and M. V. Hansen's (2003) "Chicken Soup for the Grieving Soul: Stories…

  8. Ulcerating type 1 lepra reaction mimicking lazarine leprosy: an unusual presentation of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ramesh; Pinto, Malcolm; Dandakeri, Sukumar; Kambil, Srinath

    2013-12-01

    Leprosy maybe "unmasked" in the context of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and treating dermatologists, particularly in highly endemic areas for Hansen's disease, need to be cognizant to this possibility. It may also reflect emergence of a previously clinically silent infection in the course of immunologic restoration. PMID:24216029

  9. Type II lepra reaction--an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Ray, Avas Chandra; Sen, Sumit; Banerjee, Sabyasachi; Mukhopadhyay, Jotideb

    2012-06-01

    Type II lepra reaction usually present with skin lesions. We report a 23 years old male patient presented with fever for two weeks with no visible skin lesion suggestive of leprosy and with no history of either completion or concurrent anti leprosy drug treatment was eventually turned out to be a case of Hansen's presenting with type II lepra reaction. PMID:23409423

  10. Future Foreign Language Teachers' Social and Cognitive Collaboration in an Online Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Nike; Ducate, Lara

    2006-01-01

    Discussion boards provide an interactive venue where new and future language teachers can reflect, evaluate, solve problems or simply exchange ideas (e.g., Bonk, Hansen, Grabner-Hagen, Lazar, & Mirabelli, 1996; DeWert, Babinski, & Jones, 2003; Kumari, 2001; Pawan, Paulus, Yalcin, & Chang, 2003). In addition, encouraging future teachers to learn…

  11. The Influence of Career Indecision on the Strong Interest Inventory and the Self-Directed Search: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, R. Kevin

    A pilot study was conducted with 48 adults to determine if career indecision/dissatisfaction as indicated by flat Strong Interest Inventory (SII) (L. Harmon, J. Hansen, F. Borgen, and A. Hammer, 1994) profiles corresponded with flat profiles on the Self-Directed Search (SDS) and to determine if indecision affected scores on SII Personal Style…

  12. Mechanisms of Innovation Diffusion under Information Abundance and Information Scarcity--On the Contribution of Social Networks in Group vs. Individual Extension Approaches in Semi-Arid Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darr, Dietrich; Pretzsch, Jurgen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to assess the effectiveness of innovation diffusion under group-oriented and individual-oriented extension. Current theoretical notions of innovation diffusion in social networks shall be briefly reviewed, and the concepts of "search" and "innovation" vis-a-vis "transfer" and "imitation" mechanisms (Hansen,…

  13. Linking Leisure Interests to the RIASEC World of Work Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Patrick Ian; Rounds, James

    2008-01-01

    The present study presents an interpretive framework for linking leisure interests, measured by the Leisure Interest Questionnaire (LIQ), to J. L. Holland's (1997) circumplex model of the world of work. Published data representing correlations between the LIQ and Holland's RIASEC interest types were obtained from Hansen and Scullard (2002).…

  14. Collaborative Research in Allied Health. Proceedings of Collaborative Research in Allied Health Symposium (Columbus, Ohio, September 20, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, M. Rosita, Ed.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Consortia and Collaborative Research: Getting Started" (Hansen); "Coordination of the Health Care System in the State of Michigan" (Burian, Boyden, Herbert); "Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in Allied Health" (Doiron, Douglas); "Interprofessional Collaboration in the Analysis of Public Policy" (Dunn);…

  15. Benjamin's Angel of History and the Work of Mourning in Ethical Remembrance: Understanding the Effect of W.G. Sebald's Novels in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joldersma, Clarence W.

    2014-01-01

    The paper develops a conceptual framework for understanding the work of ethical remembrance in the classroom. Using David Hansen's recent example of using Sebald's novels in his classroom to do the work or remembrance, the paper argues that the effect of Sebald's novels is best understood using Walter Benjamin's figure of the…

  16. 104. View of TR antenna, workers on "hanging garden," official ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. View of TR antenna, workers on "hanging garden," official photograph BMEWS Project by Hansen, 11 February 1981, clear as negative no. A-17701. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. "Real" Books and Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, W. Lee

    1988-01-01

    Advocates the supplemental use of trade books with textbooks in introductory economics courses. States that students will learn how economists approach economic issues in the real world, building upon the organized textbook presentation of material. Acknowledging that textbooks are essential to instruction, Hansen lists several appropriate works…

  18. Space Station - early concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    'Langley's Otto Trout suggested as early as 1963 that zero-gravity activities could be simulated by immersing astronauts in a large tank of water. Years later, Marshall Space Flight Center turned Trout's abortive idea into a major component of NASA's astronaut training program.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 303.

  19. Scout Project - portrait of Eugene D. Schult

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Portrait of Eugene D. Schult who became head of Scout project in June 1963. Schult was part of the original nine members of the Scout Project Office. He, C.T. Brown, Jr., and William M. Moore were the project's three engineers. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, pp. 202, 211.

  20. Space Station - early concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Mock-up of Manned Space Laboratory. 'Two Langley engineers test an experimental air lock between an arriving spacecraft and a space station portal in January 1964.' : Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 299.

  1. Apollo Lunar Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Artist rendering of the Lunar Orbiter, the most successful of the pre-Apollo probes, which mapped the equatorial regions of the moon and gave NASA the data it needed to pinpoint ideal landing spots. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 314.

  2. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Lunar Orbiter's 'Typical Flight sequence of Events' turned out to be quite typical indeed, as all five spacecraft performed exactly as planned. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 340.

  3. Project Echo Task Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    'A technician assigned to the Project Echo Task Group separates the two hemispheres of the Echo 1 container for inspection. The charge that freed the balloon was placed inside of a ring encircling the canister at its equator.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 181.

  4. Space Station - early concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    'A Langley engineer takes a walk-in simulated zero gravity around a mock-up of a full-scale, 24-foot-diameter space station.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 282.

  5. Space Station - early concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    'William N. Gardner, head of the MORL Studies Office, explains the interior design of the space station at the 1964 NASA inspection.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 300.

  6. Scout Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Dress rehearsal in the control room. Controllers were practicing for the launch of S-159C which would be launched October 19, 1967. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 208.

  7. A Review of Physical Activity Levels during Elementary School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairclough, Stuart J.; Stratton, Gareth

    2006-01-01

    Regular physical activity participation throughout childhood provides benefits to physical (Malina, Bouchard, & Bar-Or, 2004), physiological (Andersen, Wedderkopp, Hansen, Cooper, & Froberg, 2003), and psychological health (Mutrie & Parfitt, 1998). In recognition of these benefits, guidelines have been published in the United States (Corbin &…

  8. New Directions for Learning Community Assessment and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    At the 12th Annual National Learning Communities Conference in November 2007, Juan Carlos Huerta, Gale Stuart, Lauren Chism, and Michele Hansen participated in a panel discussion about new directions in learning communities assessment and research. The intent of the panel discussion was to hear from those involved in learning community assessment,…

  9. 42 CFR 32.89 - Discharge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discharge. 32.89 Section 32.89 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR... Discharge. Patients with Hansen's disease will be discharged when, in the opinion of the medical staff...

  10. 42 CFR 32.88 - Examinations and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Examinations and treatment. 32.88 Section 32.88 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons...

  11. 42 CFR 32.86 - Admissions to Service facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....86 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with... himself for care or treatment or who is referred to the Service by the proper health authority of...

  12. 42 CFR 32.89 - Discharge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Discharge. 32.89 Section 32.89 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR... Discharge. Patients with Hansen's disease will be discharged when, in the opinion of the medical staff...

  13. 42 CFR 32.111 - Conditions and extent of treatment; charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 32.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES...) Persons not entitled to treatment by the Service may be provided temporary care and treatment at...

  14. 42 CFR 32.89 - Discharge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Discharge. 32.89 Section 32.89 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR... Discharge. Patients with Hansen's disease will be discharged when, in the opinion of the medical staff...

  15. 42 CFR 32.111 - Conditions and extent of treatment; charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Section 32.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES...) Persons not entitled to treatment by the Service may be provided temporary care and treatment at...

  16. 42 CFR 32.86 - Admissions to Service facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....86 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with... himself for care or treatment or who is referred to the Service by the proper health authority of...

  17. 42 CFR 32.89 - Discharge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discharge. 32.89 Section 32.89 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR... Discharge. Patients with Hansen's disease will be discharged when, in the opinion of the medical staff...

  18. 42 CFR 32.86 - Admissions to Service facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....86 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with... himself for care or treatment or who is referred to the Service by the proper health authority of...

  19. 42 CFR 32.111 - Conditions and extent of treatment; charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Section 32.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES...) Persons not entitled to treatment by the Service may be provided temporary care and treatment at...

  20. 42 CFR 32.111 - Conditions and extent of treatment; charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Section 32.111 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES...) Persons not entitled to treatment by the Service may be provided temporary care and treatment at...

  1. 42 CFR 32.86 - Admissions to Service facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....86 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS MEDICAL CARE FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Persons with... himself for care or treatment or who is referred to the Service by the proper health authority of...

  2. When Talent Is Not Enough: Why Technologically Talented Women Are Not Studying Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Autio, Ossi

    2013-01-01

    This article builds on two earlier studies. The first one defined and assessed technological competence among adolescents (Autio & Hansen, 2002). The second, traced three students who had achieved the best results in a measurement of technological competence given 15 years ago (Autio, 2011). This study showed that, in terms of technological…

  3. Narrating International and National Trends in US Science Education: An Autobiographical Approach Showcasing Dr. Robert Yager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Geeta; Martin-Hansen, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    This biographical piece is based on a conversation involving Bob Yager, Geeta Verma, and Lisa Martin-Hansen which took place at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) conference in March, 2008. The unique aspect of this autobiographical piece is that it highlights Dr. Yager's account about the emergence of the science…

  4. Prevention of back injuries and pain

    SciTech Connect

    Baptiste, B.

    1982-10-11

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in conjunction with Hansen and Associates (San Mateo, CA), developed an employee education and training class in back care. In three years about 1500 LLNL employees have attended this class. According to accident statistics and employee questionnaires, the class has been effective in reducing back injury and pain.

  5. Problems of Practice: Canadian Cases in Leadership and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Katina; Ryan, James

    2013-01-01

    One way to support aspiring and current administrators is through the use of case study teaching (Barnes, Christensen, & Hansen, 1994). Using case studies as a teaching and learning tool helps bring real-life situations into principal preparation and support programs. Case study approaches provide students with time to interrogate contemporary…

  6. Aging, Disability, and the Nation's Productivity. A Report on the Mary E. Switzer Memorial Seminar (15th, Washington, D.C., June 3-5, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Leonard G., Ed.; Hansen, Carl E., Ed.

    This monograph contains proceedings of a seminar focusing on the enhancement of the lives and independence of older Americans with disabilities. Introductory materials include: an Introduction (Leonard Perlman, Carl Hansen); Seminar Greeting (Richard Materson); Welcome (Harry Smith, Martin Sicker); a foreword, "Meeting the Changing Needs of an…

  7. Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cells differentiation using quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation via quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status Chandler KJ,Hansen JM, Knudsen T,and Hunter ES 1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  8. CONTINUOUS BLACK CARBON MEASUREMENTS INDOORS AND OUTDOORS AT AN OCCUPIED HOUSE FOR ONE YEAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Black carbon is one of the components of particulate matter, and is of importance because the only known source of aerosol black carbon in the atmosphere is the combustion of carbonaceous fuels (Hansen, 1997). Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formed in the combustion process ar...

  9. Understanding the Work Beliefs of Nonprofit Executives through Organizational Stories. [and] Invited Reaction: Understanding the Work Beliefs of Nonprofit Executives through Organizational Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilensky, Ava S.; Hansen, Carol D.; Rocco, Tonette S.

    2001-01-01

    Wilensky and Hansen report on interviews with 28 nonprofit executives revealing that they share beliefs, values, and assumptions that differ from the for-profit sector. Participants saw themselves operating in an ambiguous environment, balancing business requirements with a spiritual mission. Rocco's reaction questions whether the study…

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (76th, Kansas City, Missouri, August 11-14, 1993). Part VI: Media and Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Media and Law section of this collection of conference presentations contains the following 12 papers: "An Analysis of the Role of Insurance, Prepublication Review and Correction Policies in Threatened and Actual Libel Suits" (Elizabeth K. Hansen and Roy L. Moore); "Private Defamation Plaintiffs and Falsity since 'Philadelphia Newspapers, Inc.…

  11. From PE Experiences to PE Teaching Practices? Insights from Scottish Primary Teachers' Experiences of PE, Teacher Education, School Entry and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Dely L.; Atencio, Matthew; Campbell, Theresa; Jess, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Morgan and Hansen suggest that further research is needed to explore how non-specialist primary teachers approach and teach physical education (PE) based on their personal school PE backgrounds, teacher education experiences and ongoing professional development. This paper adopts Lawson's socialisation model, a theoretical framework…

  12. Organization Values. Symposium 10. [AHRD Conference, 2001].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This document contains three papers on organizational values. "Understanding the Work Beliefs of Nonprofit Executives through Organizational Stories" (Ava S. Wilensky, Carol D. Hansen) reports on a study during which qualitative interviews featuring a story component established that nonprofit executives constitute a diffuse managerial subculture…

  13. 132. FORKS DIVERSION, HIGH LINE AND LOW LINE CANALS, TWIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    132. FORKS DIVERSION, HIGH LINE AND LOW LINE CANALS, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF HANSEN, IDAHO; POWER GATES FOR HYDRO-ELECTRIC. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  14. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (75th, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, August 5-8, 1992). More Miscellaneous Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The More Miscellaneous Studies section of the proceedings contains the following 34 papers: "The Louisville Courier-Journal's News Content after Purchase by Gannett" (Hansen and Coulson); "Reflection of Cultural Values in Advertising: A Comparative Analysis of Taiwan and U.S. Advertising" (Zandpour and Qian); "Sex, Violence and…

  15. Focus: A Forum on Teaching and Learning in Utah Community and Technical Colleges, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Don A., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    A series of articles is presented on teaching and learning in Utah community and technical colleges. After an editorial comment by J. Marvin Higbee on the goals and purposes of the Utah Association of Community Colleges, V. Lowell Hansen discusses the role of the technical instructor in the information society of the 1980's. Next, Ace G.…

  16. Rejoinder to Lemberger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Lemberger (2012) argues that the author (Hansen, 2012) has no basis for recommending differential weightings or priorities to humanism and science, because those ideologies are only meaningful as they are subjectively interpreted within the counseling encounter. The author responds that their positions are completely compatible, but his focus was…

  17. 78 FR 37539 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ...: 07/15/2013, Contact: Dean A. Gould 559-297-0706. Revision to FR Notice Published 5/31/2013; Change..., Contact: Barry Hansen 406-883- 2888. EIS No. 20130176, Draft EIS, APHIS, TX, Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program--Tick Control Barrier, Comment Period Ends: 08/05/2013, Contact: Michelle Gray 301-851-3186....

  18. 42 CFR 32.1 - Meaning of terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Meaning of terms. 32.1 Section 32.1 Public Health... FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Definitions § 32.1 Meaning of terms. All terms not defined herein shall have the same meaning as given them in the Act. (a) Act means...

  19. 42 CFR 32.1 - Meaning of terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Meaning of terms. 32.1 Section 32.1 Public Health... FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Definitions § 32.1 Meaning of terms. All terms not defined herein shall have the same meaning as given them in the Act. (a) Act means...

  20. 42 CFR 32.1 - Meaning of terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Meaning of terms. 32.1 Section 32.1 Public Health... FOR PERSONS WITH HANSEN'S DISEASE AND OTHER PERSONS IN EMERGENCIES Definitions § 32.1 Meaning of terms. All terms not defined herein shall have the same meaning as given them in the Act. (a) Act means...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix to Part 246 - Recommended Bibliography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Belknap, M. Paper recycling: a business perspective. Subcommittee on Solid Waste, New York Chamber of... Publication SW-155. Washington, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1975. 26 p. Hansen, P. Solid waste recycling... Printing Office, 1973. 284 p. Lingle, S. A. Paper recycling in the United States. Washington,...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix to Part 246 - Recommended Bibliography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Belknap, M. Paper recycling: a business perspective. Subcommittee on Solid Waste, New York Chamber of... Publication SW-155. Washington, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1975. 26 p. Hansen, P. Solid waste recycling... Printing Office, 1973. 284 p. Lingle, S. A. Paper recycling in the United States. Washington,...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix to Part 246 - Recommended Bibliography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Belknap, M. Paper recycling: a business perspective. Subcommittee on Solid Waste, New York Chamber of... Publication SW-155. Washington, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1975. 26 p. Hansen, P. Solid waste recycling... Printing Office, 1973. 284 p. Lingle, S. A. Paper recycling in the United States. Washington,...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix to Part 246 - Recommended Bibliography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Belknap, M. Paper recycling: a business perspective. Subcommittee on Solid Waste, New York Chamber of... Publication SW-155. Washington, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1975. 26 p. Hansen, P. Solid waste recycling... Printing Office, 1973. 284 p. Lingle, S. A. Paper recycling in the United States. Washington,...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix to Part 246 - Recommended Bibliography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Belknap, M. Paper recycling: a business perspective. Subcommittee on Solid Waste, New York Chamber of... Publication SW-155. Washington, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1975. 26 p. Hansen, P. Solid waste recycling... Printing Office, 1973. 284 p. Lingle, S. A. Paper recycling in the United States. Washington,...

  6. 77 FR 56193 - Defense Policy Board; Federal Advisory Committee Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ...), and 41 CFR Parts 101-6 and 102-3 (Federal Advisory Committee Management). ADDRESSES: The Pentagon, 2000 Defense Pentagon, Washington, DC 20301- 2000. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Ann Hansen, 2000 Defense Pentagon, Washington, DC 20301-2000. Phone: (703) 571-9232. SUPPLEMENTARY...

  7. The Long Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Laura

    2007-01-01

    This article profiles six educators who have taught for as long as two generations. These educators are the following: (1) Hazel Wilson--teaching 47 years; (2) Agnes Zeiger--teaching 61 years; Rose Gilbert--teaching 51 years; (4) Ellie Johnson--teaching 52 years; (5) Roy Clare--teaching 48 years; and (6) Carrie Hansen--54 years in education. These…

  8. Extending the Principles of Intensive Writing to Large Macroeconomics Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docherty, Peter; Tse, Harry; Forman, Ross; McKenzie, Jo

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on the design and implementation of a pilot program to extend the principles of intensive writing outlined by W. Lee Hansen (1998), Murray S. Simpson and Shireen E. Carroll (1999) and David Carless (2006) to large macroeconomics classes. The key aspect of this program was its collaborative nature, with staff from two specialist…

  9. Community Partners' Perspectives of Community-University Partnerships that Support Service-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witchger Hansen, Anne Marie

    2010-01-01

    Community partner voices are important to understand because they provide the contexts in which occupational therapy students meet course objectives by applying clinical reasoning theory and developing clinical reasoning skills in a natural context (Witchger-Hansen et al., 2007; Provident, et al., 2011). To sustain these community-university…

  10. Organization Development. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains four papers on organization development and human resources. "Identification of Key Predictors of Rapid Change Adaptation in a Service Organization" (Constantine Kontoghiorghes, Carol Hansen) reports on the results of an exploratory study, which suggests that rapid change adaptation will be more likely to occur in an…

  11. Annual NASSGP/NCHELP Conference on Student Financial Aid Research (3rd, Chicago, Illinois, May 28-30, 1986). The Proceedings, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Scholarship Commission, Deerfield.

    The National Association of State Scholarship and Grant Programs/National Council of Higher Education Loan Programs conference on student aid is reported. Following the conference agenda and lists of registrants and conference speakers, the following papers are presented: (1) "Reinterpretation of Hansen's Census Data" (John B. Lee); (2)…

  12. The Relationship between First-Generation Students' Educational Background and Selected Academic and Non-Academic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summerville, Bernadette M.

    2009-01-01

    The door to college is open for increasing numbers of students for whom adapting to college may be a great challenge (Kamphoff, Hutson, Amundsen, & Atwood, 2007). Hansen (1998) noted that the overall academic preparation level has declined for students entering college and that academic disengagement in college has increased among many students.…

  13. 76 FR 7907 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... AIMEE GOBLET DARWIN ANGELA MARY BRUCE DAVID CARY RICHARD DAVID-PELLERIN STEPHANIE DE CANDIA FABRIZIO DE... GRANT S FRAZER LINDA C FRENKEL SHARON FREY ELIZABETH U FUNG PASCALE N GIBSON MATTHEW CHARLES GIBSON... GUERLAIN MARIE HA PATRICIA HABOLDT BOB P HAJEK LINDA ANETTE HANSEN PAUL ROBERT HARDWICK III CHARLES...

  14. "The Power to Develop Dispositions": Revisiting John Dewey's Democratic Claims for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldacchino, John

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews "John Dewey and Our Educational Prospect, A Critical Engagement with Dewey's Democracy and Education," edited and spearheaded by David T. Hansen, with contributions by Gert Biesta, Reba N. Page, Larry A. Hickman, Naoko Saito, Gary D. Fenstermacher, Herbert M. Kliebard, Sharon Fieman-Nemser and Elizabeth Minnich. This review…

  15. Lifelong Learning: Policies, Practices, and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Michael J., Ed.

    The 26 articles in this book focus on lifelong learning policies, practices, and programs in 13 Asia Pacific countries. The following papers are included: "Half a Revolution: A Brief Survey of Lifelong Learning in New Zealand" (P. Methven and J. Hansen); "HRD in a Multicultural Workplace: The Need for Lifelong Learning" (M. Ogisu-Kamiya);…

  16. Rejoinder to Guterman, Martin, and Kopp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James T.

    2012-01-01

    In their reply to the author's keystone article (Hansen, 2012), Guterman, Martin, and Kopp (2012) charge that the author's integrative framework was not sufficiently integrative. They also argue that his proposal results in logical contradictions and the mind-body problem. The author responds by noting that his proposal fully integrates the…

  17. The Precise Time Course of Lexical Activation: MEG Measurements of the Effects of Frequency, Probability, and Density in Lexical Decision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockall, Linnaea; Stringfellow, Andrew; Marantz, Alec

    2004-01-01

    Visually presented letter strings consistently yield three MEG response components: the M170, associated with letter-string processing (Tarkiainen, Helenius, Hansen, Cornelissen, & Salmelin, 1999); the M250, affected by phonotactic probability, (Pylkkanen, Stringfellow, & Marantz, 2002); and the M350, responsive to lexical frequency (Embick,…

  18. Franklin D. Roosevelt at Langley 1940

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited Langley Field on 29 July 1940. View of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in a car inside a NACA hangar, two unidentified men stand behind the car, and the wing of a plane is visible in the background. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen (page 147).

  19. The Impact of Desegregation on Achievement Test Scores of Black and White Students in Rural and an Urban County: Implications for Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Annie D.; Johnson, Constance

    This study's findings are consistent with the views and findings of others, such as Hansen(1960), Coleman (1966), and Maynor and Katzenmeyer (1974). Also, this study as well as others explicitly demonstrate to educators and those of us in the helping professions, such as school counselors and counselor educators, that the most studied group of…

  20. Vienna in the Early Twentieth Century: The Cultural Response to Modernization. Curriculum Units, NEH Institute, Summer 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene.

    These curriculum units were developed by participants in the National Endowment for the Humanities seminar at the University of Oregon in 1993. The lessons include: (1) "Schule, Freunde, Liebe: Wien um die Jahrhundertwende (School, Friends, Love: Vienna at the Turn of the Century)" (Linda Hansen; Glenn Tetterton-Opheim); (2) "Kultur in Wien um die…

  1. Scholarly Learning as Vocation: A Study of Community and Broad Access Liberal Arts College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terosky, Aimee LaPointe; Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we extended Neumann's scholarly learning theory (2009)?and Hansen's theory on vocation (1994, 1995) to explore the scholarly learning of faculty members employed at institutional types not typically recognized for faculty work beyond teaching. Through interviews with 22 participants, we studied the content of and reasons for…

  2. Leprosy situation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tomimori-Yamashita, Jane

    2006-09-01

    We present the situation of leprosy in Brazil, reporting about epidemiology, clinical criteria for classification, multidrugtherapy and special situations, as co-infection. This material was presented in the 79th Annual Meeting of Japanese Hansen's Disease Association in May 2006, during a discussion about the Japanese Guidelines for leprosy treatment. PMID:17037380

  3. 42 CFR 32.88 - Examinations and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Examinations and treatment. 32.88 Section 32.88... Hansen's Disease § 32.88 Examinations and treatment. Patients will be provided necessary clinical examinations which may be required for the diagnosis of primary or secondary conditions, and such treatment...

  4. 42 CFR 32.88 - Examinations and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Examinations and treatment. 32.88 Section 32.88... Hansen's Disease § 32.88 Examinations and treatment. Patients will be provided necessary clinical examinations which may be required for the diagnosis of primary or secondary conditions, and such treatment...

  5. 42 CFR 32.88 - Examinations and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Examinations and treatment. 32.88 Section 32.88... Hansen's Disease § 32.88 Examinations and treatment. Patients will be provided necessary clinical examinations which may be required for the diagnosis of primary or secondary conditions, and such treatment...

  6. 42 CFR 32.88 - Examinations and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Examinations and treatment. 32.88 Section 32.88... Hansen's Disease § 32.88 Examinations and treatment. Patients will be provided necessary clinical examinations which may be required for the diagnosis of primary or secondary conditions, and such treatment...

  7. Cosmopolitanism as Communication? On Conditions for Educational Conversations in a Globalized Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahlström, Ninni

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I explore the question of how a cosmopolitan perspective on education could be understood from curriculum-based activities in classrooms. Assuming that there is a cosmopolitan potential in curriculum content as such, I draw on David Hansen, Anthony Kwame Appiah and Donald Davidson to argue that cosmopolitanism at the classroom…

  8. Accelerated Program in Elementary-School Mathematics--The Fourth Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick; Ihrke, Constance

    Reported is the description of the fourth year (1966-67) of a longitudinal study of the accelerated program involving 30 bright students in elementary school mathematics. This report was written to be as homogeneous as possible with earlier reports by Suppes and Hansen (1965), Suppes (1966), and Suppes and Ihrke (1967). Tables and figures in this…

  9. ENHANCED HYDRODYNAMICAL-NUMERICAL MODEL FOR NEAR-SHORE PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An optimized version of a multilayer Hansen type Hydrodynamical-Numerical (HN) model is presented and discussed here as the basis for the following experimental extensions and enhancements developed to more appropriately handle near-shore processes: Non-linear term extension to f...

  10. USER GUIDE FOR THE ENHANCED HYDRODYNAMICAL-NUMERICAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This guide provides the documentation required for used of the Enhanced Hydrodynamical-Numerical Model on operational problems. The enhanced model is a multilayer Hansen type model extended to handle near-shore processes by including: Non-linear term extension to facilitate small...

  11. Scout Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Scout Launch. James Hansen wrote: 'As this sequence of photos demonstrates, the launch of ST-5 on 30 June 1961 went well; however, a failure of the rocket's third stage doomed the payload, a scientific satellite known as S-55 designed for micrometeorite studies in orbit.'

  12. Accuracy in Recalling Interest Inventory Information at Three Time Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Jane L.; Gore, Paul A., Jr.; Leuwerke, Wade; D'Achiardi, Catalina; Edwards, Jorie Hitch; Edwards, Jared

    2006-01-01

    Rates of accurate recall of the Strong Interest Inventory (SII; L. W. Harmon, J. C. Hansen, F. H. Borgen, & A. L. Hammer, 1994) profile information varied with the amount of time elapsed since the interpretation, the type of SII scale, and whether immediate recall was elicited, but rates did not vary with the strategy used to provide the…

  13. Portrait of Antonia Ferri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1945-01-01

    After fighting the Nazis as chief of a partisan brigade, Antonio Ferri brought important new information to Langley in 1944 about current German and Italian research in high speed aerodynamics. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen. Page 319.

  14. Use of Approximate Bayesian Computation to Assess and Fit Models of Mycobacterium leprae to Predict Outcomes of the Brazilian Control Program.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca Lee; Gröhn, Yrjö Tapio

    2015-01-01

    Hansen's disease (leprosy) elimination has proven difficult in several countries, including Brazil, and there is a need for a mathematical model that can predict control program efficacy. This study applied the Approximate Bayesian Computation algorithm to fit 6 different proposed models to each of the 5 regions of Brazil, then fitted hierarchical models based on the best-fit regional models to the entire country. The best model proposed for most regions was a simple model. Posterior checks found that the model results were more similar to the observed incidence after fitting than before, and that parameters varied slightly by region. Current control programs were predicted to require additional measures to eliminate Hansen's Disease as a public health problem in Brazil. PMID:26107951

  15. Leprous neuromyositis: A rare clinical entity and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Shubhanker; Gunasekaran, Karthik; Chacko, Geeta; Hansdak, Samuel George

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy (Hansen's disease), is a slow growing intracellular acid-fast bacillus that affects the skin, peripheral nerves and respiratory tract. In patients with suppressed cell-mediated immunity, the infiltration of the Bacilli can produce disseminated illness such as leprous neuromyositis. We reported a case of 56-year-old gentleman presenting with pyrexia of unknown origin, asymmetric sensory motor axonal polyneuropathy and was on chronic exogenous steroid therapy. On evaluation, his skin, muscle, nerve and bone marrow biopsy showed numerous globi of acid-fast Bacilli suggestive of leprous neuromyositis, a rare form of disseminated Hansen's disease. We reported this case in view of its rarity, atypical manifestation of a relatively rare disease and literature review on poor electrophysiological correlation in the diagnosis of leprous neuromyositis as compared to the histopathological examination. PMID:26776128

  16. Controlled formation of polymer nanocapsules with high diffusion-barrier properties and prediction of encapsulation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hofmeister, Ines; Landfester, Katharina; Taden, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Polymer nanocapsules with high diffusion-barrier performance were designed following simple thermodynamic considerations. Hindered diffusion of the enclosed material leads to high encapsulation efficiencies (EEs), which was demonstrated based on the encapsulation of highly volatile compounds of different chemical natures. Low interactions between core and shell materials are key factors to achieve phase separation and a high diffusion barrier of the resulting polymeric shell. These interactions can be characterized and quantified using the Hansen solubility parameters. A systematic study of our copolymer system revealed a linear relationship between the Hansen parameter for hydrogen bonding (δh ) and encapsulation efficiencies which enables the prediction of encapsulated amounts for any material. Furthermore EEs of poorly encapsulated materials can be increased by mixing them with a mediator compound to give lower overall δh values. PMID:25363542

  17. Developing a computational model of human hand kinetics using AVS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowitz, Mark S.

    1996-05-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop a finite element model of the human hand at the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR), this project extended existing computational tools for analyzing and visualizing hand kinetics. These tools employ a commercial, scientific visualization package called AVS. FORTRAN and C code, originally written by David Giurintano of the Gillis W. Long Hansen`s Disease Center, was ported to a different computing platform, debugged, and documented. Usability features were added and the code was made more modular and readable. When the code is used to visualize bone movement and tendon paths for the thumb, graphical output is consistent with expected results. However, numerical values for forces and moments at the thumb joints do not yet appear to be accurate enough to be included in ISCR`s finite element model. Future work includes debugging the parts of the code that calculate forces and moments and verifying the correctness of these values.

  18. The Curse of the Nine-Banded Armadillo: Case Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Galal; Elsayed, Mohammed; Clincea, Radu; Talley, James; Ignacio, Melissa; Thompson, Jennifer C

    2015-07-01

    Hansen's disease (leprosy) is an ancient condition characterized by hypopigmented patches that progress to become plaques with hypoesthesia. Several case reports suggest that armadillos may be a source of Mycobacterium leprae for clinical cases, and contact with armadillos has been shown to be a significant risk factor in several case-control studies. Early diagnosis and treatment result in an excellent prognosis and provide an effective means to prevent complications of peripheral nerve injury, social stigma, and disability. We present a case of Hansen's disease in a previously healthy veteran and provide an overview of the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of the condition. Clinicians should consider leprosy in the differential diagnosis when confronted with chronic skin lesions in the appropriate clinical setting. PMID:26126264

  19. [Leprosy assessment: experience report of nursing students].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sandra Valéria Martins; Bachion, Maria Márcia; Souza, Aliny Gracielly Crispim de; Vieira, Sâmia Maria Skaff

    2008-01-01

    Brazil is the second in the world in new cases of Leprosy. The eradication continues to be a defiant goal. It has sought describe the morphologic profile of lesion formations and analyze the procedures in the care of wounds from a group of people with sequelae of Hansen asylum in an institution non-governmental. The experience of teaching-learning was longitudinal, based on Scientific Methodology of Nursing Assistance, involving people with swellings and health repercussions of Hansen's disease, residents in an institution of Goiás State. All the residents presented disabling swellings and health repercussions associated to the Leprosy: visual impediment, swelling of the eyebrows; fall of the nasal pyramid, total reabsorption of fingers and toes, amputation of both legs, ulna grip, perforating plantar disease. Abrasive soaps and toxic antiseptic were applied directly on the lesion, causing damages to the scarring. PMID:19009123

  20. Collier Trophy Presentation 1929

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This photograph is a copy of President Herbert Hoover presenting the Collier Trophy to Joseph Ames, chairman of the NACA in 1929. Three years later, as part of his plan to increase efficiency in government, Hoover would sign an executive order to abolish the NACA. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen (page 130).

  1. IMPLICATIONS OF FISH MOVEMENT AND SEASONAL HABITAT DYNAMICS FOR RESTORATION PLANNING AND PRIORITIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    J. L. Ebersole1*, S.G. Leibowitz1, P.J. Wigington Jr. 1, J.P. Baker1, M.A. Cairns1, M.R. Church1, J. Compton1, B. Hansen2, B. Miller3 1 Environmental Protection Agency, 200 SW 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333, 541-754-4775 (w), 541-754-4799 (f), ebersole.joe@epa.gov 2 USDA, Fo...

  2. An unusual case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Vaishampayan, Sanjeev; Borde, Priyanka

    2012-08-01

    Cranial nerve involvement is not common in leprosy. The fifth and seventh cranial nerves are the most commonly affected in leprosy. Herein we present a patient with Hansen disease (BL) with type I reaction who developed isolated involvement of the sixth cranial nerve leading to lateral rectus muscle palsy. He responded to timely anti-reactional therapy and it produced a good response. Careful observation of patients with lepra reaction is needed to avoid damage to important organs. PMID:22948066

  3. Magnetoplasmadynamcis (MPD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Test section of a later coaxial version of a Hall-current plasma accelerator. The technician is wearing goggles to protect his eyes against the intense light created by the very bright, high-velocity plume from the MPD arc-jet exhausting into a vacuum tank. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 137.

  4. Lunar Orbiter I - Moon & Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    First view of the earth and moon from space. Published in: Spaceflight Revolution: Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, by James R. Hansen. NASA History Series. NASA SP ; 4308. p ii. Caption: 'The picture of the century was this first view of the earth from space. Lunar Orbiter I took the photo on 23 August 1966 on its 16th orbit just before it passed behind the moon. The photo also provided a spectacular dimensional view of the lunar surface.'

  5. Space Station - early

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    'North American selected this space station design in 1962 for final systems analysis. Incorporating all the advantages of a wheel configuration, it had rigid cylindrical modules arranged in a hexagonal shape with three rigid telescoping spokes. This configuration eliminated the need for exposed flexible fabric.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 284.

  6. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Representatives of NASA Langley and Boeing signed the Lunar Orbiter contract on 16 April 1964 and sent it to NASA headquarters for final review. Three weeks later, on 7 May, Administrator James E. Webb approved the $80-million incentives contract to build five Lunar Orbiter spacecraft. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 331.

  7. Marshallese COFA Migrants in Arkansas.

    PubMed

    McElfish, Pearl Anna

    2016-05-01

    Arkansas is home to one of the largest populations of Marshallese in the world. Marshallese communities suffer from a disproportionate incidence of chronic diseases, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and infectious diseases, such as Hansen's disease (leprosy), tuberculosis, and types of hepatitis. There are a number of structural, legal, economic, and social issues that must be addressed in order to reduce health disparities and increase access to health care for Marshallese living in Arkansas. PMID:27263176

  8. Bell X-1E and Vought XF-8U Dynamic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    A technician prepares dynamic models of the Bell X-1E and the Vought XF-8U Crusader for wind tunnel testing in 1957. The Crusader was then the navy's fastest aircraft- maximum speed Mach 1.75 at 35,000 Feet. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen. Page 307.

  9. Test Pilots with P-47 Thunderbolt Fighter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1945-01-01

    Langley test pilots (from left) Mel Gough, Herb Hoover, Jack Reeder, Steve Cavallo and Bill Gray stand in front of a P-47 Thunderbolt Fighter in this 1945 photo. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, by James Schultz (page 44). Also published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen (page 498).

  10. Radiation Chemistry of Potential Europa Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent detection of atomic hydrogen and atomic oxygen and their correlation to potential water plumes on Europa [Roth, Saur et al. 2014] invoked significant interest in further understanding of these potential/putative plumes on Europa. Unlike on Enceladus, Europa receives significant amount of electron and particle radiation. If the plumes come from trailing hemisphere and in the high radiation flux regions, then it is expected that the plume molecules be subjected to radiation processing. Our interest is to understand to what extent such radiation alterations occur and how they can be correlated to the plume original composition, whether organic or inorganic in nature. We will present laboratory studies [Henderson and Gudipati 2014] involving pulsed infrared laser ablation of ice that generates plumes similar to those observed on Enceladus [Hansen, Esposito et al. 2006; Hansen, Shemansky et al. 2011] and expected to be similar on Europa as a starting point; demonstrating the applicability of laser ablation to simulate plumes of Europa and Enceladus. We will present results from electron irradiation of these plumes to determine how organic and inorganic composition is altered due to radiation. Acknowledgments:This research was enabled through partial funding from NASA funding through Planetary Atmospheres, and the Europa Clipper Pre-Project. B.L.H. acknowledges funding from the NASA Postdoctoral Program for an NPP fellowship. Hansen, C. J., L. Esposito, et al. (2006). "Enceladus' water vapor plume." Science 311(5766): 1422-1425. Hansen, C. J., D. E. Shemansky, et al. (2011). "The composition and structure of the Enceladus plume." Geophysical Research Letters 38. Henderson, B. L. and M. S. Gudipati (2014). "Plume Composition and Evolution in Multicomponent Ices Using Resonant Two-Step Laser Ablation and Ionization Mass Spectrometry." The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 118(29): 5454-5463. Roth, L., J. Saur, et al. (2014). "Transient Water Vapor at Europa's South

  11. Charles Lindburgh and Fred Weick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    'In early 1930, Charles Lindburgh was pruning his new Lockheed Sirius for an attempt to break the cross-country record from Los Angeles to New York.' Quote from the book Engineer In Charge by James R. Hansen (page 52). This photograph is a copy and was originally photographed the early 1930's: NACA engineer Fred Weick is shown in the rear cockpit. Lindbergh in front. Tom Hamilton is standing.

  12. Case for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Mohallem, Dalila Filomena; Cardoso, Thaís Abrão; Lima Júnior, Cristiano Luiz Horta de; Tebcherani, Antonio Jose; Vidigal, Maria do Rosário

    2014-01-01

    Hansen's disease is a chronic infecto-contagious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The bacillus prefers low-temperature areas and the nose is usually the initial site of lesions. Transmission of the bacilli occurs by nasal and oropharyngeal secretions, and through solutions of continuity of the skin and/or mucosae. Nasal manifestations are found in the later stages of the disease. PMID:25184933

  13. Fast algorithm for computing the Abel inversion integral in broadband reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, F.D.

    1995-10-01

    The application of the Hansen--Jablokow recursive technique is proposed for the numerical computation of the Abel inversion integral which is used in ({ital O}-mode) frequency-modulated broadband reflectometry to evaluate plasma density profiles. Compared to the usual numerical methods the recursive algorithm allows substantial time savings that can be important when processing massive amounts of data aiming to control the plasma in real time. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  14. Bell XP-39 Airacobra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Bell XP-39 Airacobra: The Army's XP-39 Airacobra in flight over Langley Field, 1943. The pilot of the cobra sat on the front end of the gearbox with the engine behind him and the propeller shaft passing underneath his legs. The P-39 was one of the first military airplanes with tricycle landing gear. Photograph published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen. Page 200.

  15. Investigation of models for large-scale meteorological prediction experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to compute the contributions of various surface boundary conditions to the monthly mean states generated by the 7 layer, 8 x 10 GISS climate model (Hansen et al., 1980), and also to examine the influence of initial conditions on the model climate simulations. Obvious climatic controls as the shape and rotation of the Earth, the solar radiation, and the dry composition of the atmosphere are fixed, and only the surface boundary conditions are altered in the various climate simulations.

  16. 101. View of transmitter building no. 102, missile warning operation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    101. View of transmitter building no. 102, missile warning operation center, close up view of DRED (detection radar environmental display) console in operation showing target. Official photograph BMEWS Project by Hansen, 14 March 1963, clear as negative no. A-8803. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. Leprosy as a neglected disease and its stigma in the northeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, C A B; Albuquerque, V L M; Antunes, M F R

    2014-01-01

    Hansen's disease is an infectious and degenerative chronic disease with a high potential for incapacitation. Due to the explosive epidemic of leprosy cases worldwide (especially in Brazil), the social difficulties faced by these patients are an important subject for research. This work aimed to identify the stigma experienced by these patients. The qualitative research for this study was completed at the National Reference Centre in Dermatology in Fortaleza. The study took place in northeast Brazil from September 2010 to November 2012. The research subjects included 20 people with Hansen's disease of both sexes between 20 and 70 years old. The data collection consisted of a semi-structured interview. From the discourse analysis of the participants, several changes experienced by persons affected by leprosy were noted from the empiric categories emerged. Changes occurred in the family, the receptiveness of neighbours and co-workers and the patients' social lives were experienced by the persons affected after the diagnosis of Hansen's disease. From the data obtained, it was concluded that the patients are stigmatised. Sometimes they are forced to hide from relatives, friends, neighbours and co-workers. Despite their social exclusion, they believe their isolation is justified. Leprosy is a chronic, degenerative and curable infectious illness that continues to be a serious public health problem, mainly in the poorest region of Brazil. PMID:25591279

  18. Oropharyngeal leprosy in art, history, and medicine.

    PubMed

    Scollard, D M; Skinsnes, O K

    1999-04-01

    Advanced lesions of the face, nasopharynx, and oropharynx have played an important role in the medical and social history of Hansen's disease. Renaissance artists included detailed portrayals of these lesions in some of their paintings, a testimony not only to their artistic skill and powers of observation but also to the common presence of these patients in European cities and towns of the period. The disease is now understood as a broad immunologic spectrum of host responses to Mycobacterium leprae, with a variety of clinical and pathologic manifestations in nerve, soft tissues, and bone. This review incorporates the findings of 2 extraordinary studies (one from Europe and the other from Japan) of pharyngeal and facial lesions. In the 1950s, studies of skeletal remains from the churchyard of a Danish leprosarium revealed a triad of maxillofacial lesions unique to leprosy and designated facies leprosa. In pre-World War II Japan, before effective treatment had been discovered, a prominent otorhinolaryngologist studying oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal lesions prepared watercolor illustrations of the natural progression of untreated Hansen's disease. As a result of effective antimicrobial therapy, such advanced lesions are now rarely seen, but the presenting signs and symptoms of leprosy still occasionally arise in the nasal and oral mucosa. The nasopharynx and oropharynx may be important early sites of inoculation and infection by M leprae, and they require additional emphasis in worldwide efforts toward early diagnosis and treatment of Hansen's disease. PMID:10225629

  19. Stable Isotopes in Pocket Gopher Teeth as Evidence of a Late Matuyama Climate Shift in the Southern Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Karel L.; Wang, Yang

    2002-03-01

    Previous work in the San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado and northern New Mexico at the Hansen Bluff and SAM Cave localities has allowed reconstruction of the paleoclimate in the region during the interval from ∼0.6 myr to ∼2.6 myr. Surface exposures at Hansen Bluff have been correlated to deep-sea oxygen isotope core stages 18-23 and one of the glacial periods contained therein to the oldest "Nebraskan" till in southwestern Iowa. Deposits in SAM Cave correlate to Hansen Bluff on the basis of paleomagnetics, climate interpretation, and microtine rodent biochronology. In this paper, carbon and oxygen stable isotope data of herbivorous rodent teeth are used as indicators of change in the predominance of C3, C4, and CAM plants and of changes in temperature and precipitation. Taken together with other previously analyzed data from these localities, the evidence indicates a shift in the severity of glacial events that is mainly related to the hydrologic characteristics of the climate. This shift may have been caused by broad regional uplift that may have been instrumental in shifting global climate cycles from the 41,000-yr Matuyama cycles to the Brunhes 100,000-yr-dominated cycles.

  20. Dislocated interests and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2016-06-01

    The predicted effects of climate change on surface temperatures are now emergent and quantifiable. The recent letter by Hansen and Sato (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 034009) adds to a growing number of studies showing that warming over the past four decades has shifted the distribution of temperatures higher almost everywhere, with the largest relative effects on summer temperatures in developing regions such as Africa, South America, southeast Asia, and the Middle East (e.g., Diffenbaugh and Scherer 2011 Clim. Change 107 615–24 Anderson 2011 Clim. Change 108 581; Mahlstein et al 2012 Geophys. Res. Lett. 39 L21711). Hansen and Sato emphasize that although these regions are warming disproportionately, their role in causing climate change—measured by cumulative historical CO2 emissions produced—is small compared to the US and Europe, where the relative change in temperatures has been less. This spatial and temporal mismatch of climate change impacts and the burning of fossil fuels is a critical dislocation of interests that, as the authors note, has ‘substantial implications for global energy and climate policies.’ Here, we place Hansen and Sato’s ‘national responsibilities’ into a broader conceptual framework of problematically dislocated interests, and briefly discuss the related challenges for global climate mitigation efforts.

  1. High-Resolution Modelling of Health Impacts from Air Pollution for Denmark using the Integrated Model System EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Jørgen; Andersen, Mikael S.; Bønløkke, Jakob; Christensen, Jesper H.; Hansen, Kaj M.; Hertel, Ole; Im, Ulas; Jensen, Steen S.; Ketzel, Matthias; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth; Plejdrup, Marlene S.; Sigsgaard, Torben; Geels, Camilla

    2015-04-01

    , J., J. D. Silver, L. M. Frohn, C. Geels, A. Gross, A. B. Hansen, K. M. Hansen, G. B. Hedegaard, C. A. Skjøth, H. Villadsen, A. Zare, and J. H. Christensen, 2012: An integrated model study for Europe and North America using the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model with focus on intercontinental transport. Atmospheric Environment, Volume 53, June 2012, pp. 156-176, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2012.01.011 Brandt, J., J. D. Silver, J. H. Christensen, M. S. Andersen, J. Bønløkke, T. Sigsgaard, C. Geels, A. Gross, A. B. Hansen, K. M. Hansen, G. B. Hedegaard, E. Kaas and L. M. Frohn, 2013a: "Contribution from the ten major emission sectors in Europe to the Health-Cost Externalities of Air Pollution using the EVA Model System - an integrated modelling approach". Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 13, pp. 7725-7746, 2013. www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/7725/2013/, doi:10.5194/acp-13-7725-2013. Brandt, J., J. D. Silver, J. H. Christensen, M. S. Andersen, J. Bønløkke, T. Sigsgaard, C. Geels, A. Gross, A. B. Hansen, K. M. Hansen, G. B. Hedegaard, E. Kaas and L. M. Frohn, 2013b: "Assessment of Past, Present and Future Health-Cost Externalities of Air Pollution in Europe and the contribution from international ship traffic using the EVA Model System". Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. Vol. 13, pp. 7747-7764, 2013. www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/7747/2013/. doi:10.5194/acp-13-7747-2013. Plejdrup, M.S., Gyldenkærne, S., 2011. Spatial distribution of pollutants to air - the SPREAD model. NERI Technical Report No. 823.

  2. Pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy: a case report of electrodiagnostic, radiographic, and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Payne, Russell; Baccon, Jennifer; Dossett, John; Scollard, David; Byler, Debra; Patel, Akshal; Harbaugh, Kimberly

    2015-11-01

    Hansen's disease, or leprosy, is a chronic infectious disease with many manifestations. Though still a major health concern and leading cause of peripheral neuropathy in the developing world, it is rare in the United States, with only about 150 cases reported each year. Nevertheless, it is imperative that neurosurgeons consider it in the differential diagnosis of neuropathy. The causative organism is Mycobacterium leprae, which infects and damages Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, leading first to sensory and then to motor deficits. A rare presentation of Hansen's disease is pure neuritic leprosy. It is characterized by nerve involvement without the characteristic cutaneous stigmata. The authors of this report describe a case of pure neuritic leprosy presenting as ulnar nerve neuropathy with corresponding radiographic, electrodiagnostic, and histopathological data. This 11-year-old, otherwise healthy male presented with progressive right-hand weakness and numbness with no cutaneous abnormalities. Physical examination and electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings consistent with a severe ulnar neuropathy at the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse thickening and enhancement of the ulnar nerve and narrowing at the cubital tunnel. The patient underwent ulnar nerve decompression with biopsy. Pathology revealed acid-fast organisms within the nerve, which was pathognomonic for Hansen's disease. He was started on antibiotic therapy, and on follow-up he had improved strength and sensation in the ulnar nerve distribution. Pure neuritic leprosy, though rare in the United States, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of those presenting with peripheral neuropathy and a history of travel to leprosy-endemic areas. The long incubation period of M. leprae, the ability of leprosy to mimic other conditions, and the low sensitivity of serological tests make clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic evaluation necessary for diagnosis

  3. Cretaceous magmatism in the High Canadian Arctic: Implications for the nature and age of Alpha Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Richard; Tarduno, John; Singer, Brad

    2013-04-01

    Cretaceous magmatism in the High Arctic, best expressed on Axel Heiberg and Ellesmere Island, can provide clues to the nature and age of the adjacent Alpha Ridge, which is in turn a key to understanding the tectonic evolution of the Arctic Ocean. Although the incorporation of some continental crust cannot be excluded, the prevailing view is that Alpha Ridge is dominantly thickened oceanic crust, analogous to oceanic plateaus of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Together with the on-land volcanic exposures, Alpha Ridge composes the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (LIP), but the physical processes responsible for the magmatism remain unclear. Here we focus on two volcanic formations found on the Canadian Arctic margin. The Strand Fiord Formation is composed of a series of classic continental flood basalt flows, and represents the most voluminous expression of volcanism that has survived erosion. These basalts yield a 40Ar/39Ar age of ~95 Ma (Tarduno et al., Science, 1998) but this comes from the distant edge of the flood basalt exposures. The Hansen Point Volcanics consist of felsic and mafic rocks; previous age assignments range from the Maastrichtian (on the basis of palynomorphs, Falcon-Lang et al., Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 2004) to 80 Ma (Rb/Sr isochron, Estrada and Henjes-Kunst, Z. dt. Geol. Ges, 2004). Here we report new 40Ar/39Ar radioisotopic and paleomagnetic data from the Hansen Point Volcanics. In contrast to the latest Cretaceous/Paleogene dates, we find ages of ~95 Ma and 88-90 Ma. Because of the proximity of the landward extension of Alpha Ridge to Hansen Point, these new ages suggest that volcanism that contributed to the construction of Alpha Ridge may have extended over at least a 7 million interval (although it could have occurred in pulses). We will discuss the implications of these new data for candidate mantle processes that could have been responsible for the emplacement of Alpha Ridge and the High Arctic LIP.

  4. The effects of a STEM professional development intervention on elementary teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Deborah D.

    To improve and sustain science teaching and learning in the elementary grades, experts recommended school districts afford time in the day for science instruction, secure the necessary resources for an investigative classroom, and provide teachers with increased professional development opportunities that target content knowledge, pedagogical skills, and confidence in teaching science (e.g. Buczynski & Hansen, 2010; Brand & Moore, 2011; NSB, 2010). In particular, researchers recommended teachers receive quality professional development that is sustained over time and embedded in the real world of the classroom (e.g. Buczynski & Hansen, 2010; Cotabish & Robinson, 2012). The purpose of this dissertation was to examine changes in elementary teachers' science teaching perceptions, concerns, and science process skills during and after participation in a STEM-focused professional development intervention involving embedded support using peer coaching. The positive effects of sustained, embedded professional development programs on science instruction have been documented by multiple research studies (e.g. Buczynski & Hansen, 2010; Cotabish, Dailey, Hughes, & Robinson, 2011; Duran & Duran, 2005; Levitt, 2011); however, few studies have investigated the effects after removal of the professional development support (Johnson, Kahle, & Fargo, 2007; Shymansky, Yore, & Anderson, 2004). By examining the changes across three years (including one year after the conclusion of the professional development intervention), the researcher in the present study considered the dosage of intervention needed to bring about and preserve significant changes in the participant teachers. To measure the impact of the intervention on teachers, the researcher used quantitative data supported by qualitative interviews. Results indicated that changes in science teaching perceptions were realized after one year or 60 hours of intervention; however, it took two years or 120 hours of intervention to see

  5. Tales from scales: old DNA yields insights into contemporary evolutionary processes affecting fishes.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Thomas P; Seamons, Todd R

    2009-06-01

    Salmon and trout populations are suffering declines in abundance and diversity over much of their range around the Atlantic and Pacific rims as a consequence of many factors. One method of dealing with the decline has been to produce them in hatcheries but the wisdom of this approach has been hotly debated (e.g. Hilborn & Winton 1993; Waples 1999; Brannon et al. 2004). One concern is that domesticated hatchery strains will interbreed with locally adapted wild fish; but how do we study the genetic effects if the introgression might have occurred in the past? Hansen (2002) used DNA isolated from archived scales from brown trout, Salmo trutta (Fig. 1), to show that domesticated trout had, to varying degrees, genetically introgressed with wild, native trout in two Danish rivers. Extending that study, Hansen et al. (2009) have examined DNA from brown trout scales in six Danish rivers collected during historical (1927-1956) and contemporary (2000-2006) periods and from two hatchery source populations, to assess the effects of stocking nonlocal strains of hatchery trout and declining abundance on genetic diversity. Using 21 microsatellite loci, they revealed that genetic change occurred between the historic and contemporary time periods. Many populations appeared to have some low level of introgression from hatchery stocks and two populations apparently experienced high levels of introgression. Hansen et al. (2009) also showed that population structure persists in contemporary populations despite apparent admixture and migration among populations, providing evidence that the locally adapted populations have struggled against and, to some extent, resisted being overwhelmed by repeated introductions of and interbreeding with non-native, hatchery-produced conspecifics. PMID:19457205

  6. Morphology changes in stacking-disordered ice Ich as a function of time and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhs, Werner F.; Falenty, Andrzej; Hansen, Thomas C.

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that ice I crystallizing from water vapour [1] or undercooled liquid water [2] under atmospheric conditions initially forms a stacking disordered arrangement of high complexity; the stacking arrangement is different depending on the starting phase[1]. Both cubic and hexagonal components are locally present and various names of this form of ice have been proposed recently: so-called ice Ic or 'ice Ic'[1], ice Isd [2] or ice Ich[3]. It is has been shown that ice Ich undergoes a progressive transformation of cubic into hexagonal stackings with time and/or increasing temperature [1]. As a mechanisms for this annealing we had proposed the cooperative action of Bjerrrum defects and moving dislocations which become active on a time-scale of minutes at temperatures close to 240K [4]. Here we show from electron-microscopic images that the presence of stacking faults is linked to numerous kinks on the prismatic faces of the trigonal ice crystals of ice Ich [1]. We present details on the annealing kinetics in the temperature range between 170 and 240K and suggest that the kinks of ice Ich crystals may be responsible for the roughness deduced from some air-borne light-scattering experiments, an increased reactivity in particular at temperatures below ~ 200K as well as curvature-induced higher vapour pressures of ice Ich as compared to normal ice Ih. [1] W.F.Kuhs, C.Sippel, T.C.Hansen (2012) PNAS 109:21259-21264 [2] T.Malkin, B.J.Murray, A.V.Brukhno, J.Anwar, C.G.Salzmann (2012) PNAS 109: 1041-1045 [3] T.C.Hansen, C.Sippel, W.F.Kuhs (2014) Z.Krist. DOI 10.1515/zkri-2014-1780 [4] W.F.Kuhs, G.Genov, D.K.Staykova, T.Hansen (2004) 6:4917-4920

  7. Autochthonous borderline tuberculoid leprosy in a man from Florida.

    PubMed

    Villada, Gabriel; Zarei, Mina; Romagosa, Ricardo; Forgione, Patrizia; Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Romanelli, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Leprosy (Hansen's disease) is a chronic contagious granulomatous disease principally affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system, caused by Mycobacterium leprae. In this report, we present a case of autochthonous leprosy in a man from Florida as the first human case reported from this region. Authors believe dermatologists need to be aware of the possibility of autochthonous transmission of leprosy in the Eastern-Southern United States, and should consider leprosy in any patient with atypical skin lesions, even when a history of contact with armadillo is missing. PMID:27255063

  8. On the spectral expansion of the electric and magnetic dyadic Green's functions in cylindrical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, L. W.

    1983-04-01

    The expansions of the electric and magnetic dyadic Green's functions are constructed in terms of the solenoidal Hansen vector wave functions in cylindrical coordinates. A static term is shown to arise in the course of conducting the radial spectral integral. This pole term has apparently not been identified in previously published expansions and is similar to recently identified static terms in Cartesian and spherical wave function expansions. The integration in the longitudinal spectral variable is considered, too, and forms which offer two alternative integration paths are constructed.

  9. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, T.A.; Hansen, R.P.

    1998-08-01

    This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

  10. Interactions Between Neutral Gas Clouds and Plasma Near the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, M. H.

    2007-05-01

    Neutral gas clouds associated with icy satellites are intimately tied to the magnetospheric plasma in which they are formed and reside. Plasma interactions can create the clouds, remove material from them, and make it possible for us to observe them. At Europa, for example, energetic ions incident on the icy surface eject hydrogen and oxygen formed from the dissociation of water (Johnson et al. 1982). The hydrogen escapes, but the O2remains gravitationally bound, forming an atmosphere. This atmosphere then interacts with the thermal plasma in Jupiter's magneotpshere: the O2is dissociated by the electrons resulting in emissions from atomic oxygen which have been observed by HST and Cassini (Hall et al. 1995; Hansen et al. 2005). Charge exchange with magnetospheric ions and electron-impact ionization removes atoms and molecules from Europa's atmosphere and exosphere, and contributes fresh ions to the plasma (Saur et al. 1998; Shematovich et al 2005). At Enceladus, where 150-300 kg/s of H2O gas is supplied by the south pole plume (Hansen et al. 2006; Burger et al. 2007), charge exchange reactions between the plasma and H2O produce fresh pickup ions which slow and deflect the plasma (Tokar et al. 2006; Pontius and Hill 2006) and induce perturbations in Saturn's magnetic field (Dougherty et al. 2006; Khurana et al. 2006). The neutrals created in these charge exchange reactions either escape from Saturn entirely or are redistributed throughout the inner magnetosphere forming gas clouds which have been observed by HST and Cassini (Johnson et al. 2006). I will describe the interaction processes between the neutral atoms and molecules in icy satellite atmospheres and exospheres, and discuss differences between the processes imporant in Jupiter's magnetosphere, where the plasma content is greater than the neutral content, and Saturn's magnetosphere, which is dominated by neutrals. References: Burger et al., JGR, 2007, in press. Dougherty et al., Science, 311, 1406, 2006

  11. Test pilot and engineer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    Goggles at the ready, this Langley test pilot and engineer conducted research business high above the ground. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, by James Schultz (page 24). This photograph is also published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen (page 163). In the early years the flight research team was usually made up of a test pilot (Thomas Carroll, front cockpit) and an engineer (John W. Gus Crowley,Jr.).

  12. Explorer 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    'This satellite, Explorer 24, was a 12-foot-diameter inflatable sphere developed by an engineering team at Langley. It provided information on complex solar radiation/air-density relationships in the upper atmosphere.' Explorer satellites were inflatable satellites--or satelloons, like Echo, and were developed as a follow-on program. They were intended as a vehicle to study the density of air in the upper atmosphere. Explorer 24 was launched in November 1964. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, pp. 191-192.

  13. Newman-Penrose constants of the Kerr-Newman metric

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Xuefei; Shang Yu; Bai Shan; Cao Zhoujian; Lau, Y. K.; Luo Ziren

    2007-11-15

    The Newman-Unti formalism of the Kerr-Newman metric near future null infinity is developed, with which the Newman-Penrose constants for both the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the Kerr-Newman metric are computed and shown to be zero. The multipole structure near future null infinity in the sense of Janis-Newman of the Kerr-Newman metric is then further studied. It is found that up to the 2{sup 4}-pole, modulo a constant dependent upon the order of the pole, these multipole moments agree with those of Geroch-Hansen multipole moments defined at spatial infinity.

  14. Closing Note: A Tribute to Fridtjof Nansen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Untersteiner, Norbert

    The purpose of the Nansen symposium and volume has been to report the results of scientific research, to celebrate the memory of Fridtjof Nansen, and to remind ourselves of his exemplary life as a scientist and humanitarian. In this context it seems appropriate for the international community to remember that the Norwegian Sea and the Arctic Ocean were the cradle of modern oceanography. Mohn, Knudsen, Helland-Hansen, Nansen, Ekman, Fjeldstad, Sverdrup, and many others from this part of the world did their work in the North and became the "founding fathers" of oceanography.

  15. New records of Helophoridae, Hydrochidae, and Hydrophilidae (Coleoptera) from New Brunswick, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Reginald P.; Sweeney, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The following three species of Helophoridae are newly recorded for New Brunswick, Canada: Helophorus (Kyphohelophorus) turberculatus Gyllenhal, Helophorus (Rhopaleloporus) oblongus LeConte, Helophorus (Rhopaleloporus) marginicollis Smetana. Hydrochus subcupreus Randall, family Hydrochidae, and the following 15 species of Hydrophilidae are newly reported for the province: Berosus fraternus LeConte, Berosus peregrinus (Herbst), Berosus sayi Hansen, Paracymus despectus (LeConte), Chaetarthria atra (LeConte), Cymbiodyta acuminata Fall, Cymbiodyta blanchardi Horn, Cymbiodyta minima Notman, Enochrus (Lumetus) hamiltoni Horn, Enochrus (Methydrus) consors (LeConte), Enochrus (Methydrus) consortus Green, Enochrus (Methydrus) pygmaeus nebulosus (Say), Cercyon (Cercyon) cinctus Smetana, Cercyon (Cercyon) herceus frigidus Smetana, Cercyon (Dicyrtocercyon) ustulatus (Preyssler). PMID:27110166

  16. New service rig operates with two-man crew

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Two Bakersfield, California, entrepreneurs have developed a partially automated and remote-controlled workover rig that can complete tubing and rod jobs on relatively shallow, singles-rig type wells with a total crew of two people on the ground. The system, called Autorig, was developed by Louis Witte, president of Witte Enterprise, and James Hansen, Paragon Engineering, Bakersfield. Initial field tests in E and B Natural Resources Management Corp.`s Blackwells Corner oil field culminated two years of development work. The new system is described in this paper using photographs from a testwell demonstration.

  17. Analysis of a semiclassical model for rotational transition probabilities. [in highly nonequilibrium flow of diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, G. S.; Yoshikawa, K. K.

    1975-01-01

    A semiclassical model proposed by Pearson and Hansen (1974) for computing collision-induced transition probabilities in diatomic molecules is tested by the direct-simulation Monte Carlo method. Specifically, this model is described by point centers of repulsion for collision dynamics, and the resulting classical trajectories are used in conjunction with the Schroedinger equation for a rigid-rotator harmonic oscillator to compute the rotational energy transition probabilities necessary to evaluate the rotation-translation exchange phenomena. It is assumed that a single, average energy spacing exists between the initial state and possible final states for a given collision.

  18. 102. Interior view of utilidor passageway link between building nos. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    102. Interior view of utilidor passageway link between building nos. 101 and 102 showing waveguides on left and cable tray system on right sides. Note fire suppression water supply piping (upper center). Small maintenance 3-wheel vehicle at center (Note: similar vehicles still in use in 2001.) Official photograph BMEWS Project by Hansen, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-101123. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. Redescription and lectotype designation of Chasmogenus abnormalis (Sharp), with notes on its distribution.

    PubMed

    Devi, M Bhubaneshwari; Devi, O Sandhyarani; Fikáček, Martin; Minoshima, Yûsuke N; Wanghengbam, Leiphon

    2016-01-01

    Chasmogenus Sharp, 1882 is a relatively small genus of 43 described species of aquatic beetles assigned to the subfamily Acidocerinae of Hydrophilidae (Hansen 1999; Short & Hebauer 2006; Short & Fikáček 2011, 2013; Clarkson & Ferreira-Jr. 2014). It is distributed in all zoogeographic regions except the Nearctic, with the highest species richness known from the Afrotropical (18 spp.) and Neotropical (15 spp.) Regions. Only four species have been described from the Oriental Region: C. abnormalis (Sharp, 1890), C. rubricollis (Régimbart, 1903), C. larsi Hebauer, 1995, and C. cattienus Hebauer, 2002. Of these, only C. abnormalis was recorded multiple times after its description. PMID:27470857

  20. Analytical methods and apparatus for measuring the oil content of sponge core

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; DiFoggio, R.; Tutunjian, P.N.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes a method for use in determining the oil saturation of an earth formation by means of sponge coring, using polyurethane sponge. It comprises: dissolving substantially all of the oil and substantially none of the sponge, in a sponge core sample, into a solvent having a Hansen solubility parameter of different than that of the sponge and selected from the class consisting of: solvents having no protons in their structure, deuterated solvents, and solvents having no C-H bonds in their structure; extracting the solvent and solutes from the core sample; and measuring the resultant oil concentration in the solvent and solutes extracted from the core sample.

  1. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Industrial Forest Clearcuts in the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, L. Z.; Boschetti, L.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing has been widely used for mapping and characterizing changes in forest cover, but the available remote sensing forest change products are not discriminating between deforestation (permanent transition from forest to non forest) and industrial forest management (logging followed by regrowth, with no land cover/ land use class change) (Hansen et al, 2010). Current estimates of carbon-equivalent emissions report the contribution of deforestation as 12% of total anthropogenic carbon emissions (van der Werf et al., 2009), but accurate monitoring of forest carbon balance should discriminate between land use change related to forest natural disturbances, and forest management. The total change in forest cover (Gross Forest Cover Loss, GFLC) needs to be characterized based on the cause (natural/human) and on the outcome of the change (regeneration to forest/transition to non/forest)(Kurtz et al, 2010). This paper presents the methodology used to classify the forest loss detected by the University of Maryland Global Forest Change product (Hansen, 2013) into deforestation, disturbances (fires, insect outbreaks) and industrial forest clearcuts. The industrial forest clearcuts were subsequently analysed by converting the pixel based detections into objects, and applying patch level metrics (e.g. size, compactness, straightness of boundaries) and contextual measures. The analysis is stratified by region and by dominant forest specie, to highlight changes in the rate of forest resource utilization in the 2003-2013 period covered by the Maryland Forest Cover Change Product. References Hansen, M.C., Stehman, S.V., & Potapov, P.V. (2010). Reply to Wernick et al.: Global scale quantification of forest change. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107, E148-E148 Hansen, M.C., Potapov, P.V., Moore, R et al., (2013), "High resolution Global Maps for the 21stCentury Forest Cover Change", Science 342: 850-853 Kurz, W.A. (2010). An ecosystem context for global

  2. 103. View of transmitter building no. 102, missile warning operation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. View of transmitter building no. 102, missile warning operation center, overall view of center in operation with staff at consoles. Note defcon (defense condition) display panel (upper right) showing "simulated status"activity level. Also note fiber optic display panel at upper right-center. Official photograph BMEWS Project by Hansen 30 September, 1976, clear as negative no. A-14568. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. Experiments in monthly mean simulation of the atmosphere with a coarse-mesh general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, R. J.; Spar, J.

    1978-01-01

    The Hansen atmospheric model was used to compute five monthly forecasts (October 1976 through February 1977). The comparison is based on an energetics analysis, meridional and vertical profiles, error statistics, and prognostic and observed mean maps. The monthly mean model simulations suffer from several defects. There is, in general, no skill in the simulation of the monthly mean sea-level pressure field, and only marginal skill is indicated for the 850 mb temperatures and 500 mb heights. The coarse-mesh model appears to generate a less satisfactory monthly mean simulation than the finer mesh GISS model.

  4. Pinatubo global cooling on target

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1993-01-29

    When Pinatubo blasted millions of tons of debris into the stratosphere in June 1991, Hansen of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies used his computer climate model to predict that the shade cost by the debris would cool the globe by about half a degree C. Year end temperature reports for 1992 are now showing that the prediction was on target-confirming the tentative belief that volcanos can temporarily cool the climate and validating at least one component of the computer models predicting a greenhouse warming.

  5. Weber B Fracture of the Lateral Malleolus with Concomitant Anterior Talofibular Ligament Injury following an Ankle Supination Injury.

    PubMed

    Faqi, Mohammed Khalid; AlJawder, Abdulla; Alkhalifa, Fahad; Almajed, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The Lauge-Hansen (LH) classification attempts to predict patterns of ankle injuries based upon the preceding mechanism of injury. Although it is widely used in clinical practice, it has been criticized mainly due to numerous reports of cases conflicting the prediction system. Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. Critical review of the LH classification along with its shortcomings is discussed. PMID:27313928

  6. Weber B Fracture of the Lateral Malleolus with Concomitant Anterior Talofibular Ligament Injury following an Ankle Supination Injury

    PubMed Central

    AlJawder, Abdulla; Almajed, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    The Lauge-Hansen (LH) classification attempts to predict patterns of ankle injuries based upon the preceding mechanism of injury. Although it is widely used in clinical practice, it has been criticized mainly due to numerous reports of cases conflicting the prediction system. Here, we report a case of a 32-year-old male who sustained a Weber B fracture of the lateral malleolus following a supination ankle injury, which was treated conservatively, following which the patient presented with ankle instability and was found to have concurrent anterior talofibular ligament tear. Critical review of the LH classification along with its shortcomings is discussed. PMID:27313928

  7. [Results of 466 nerve decompressions in 123 leprosy patients during polychemotherapy with a minimum follow-up of one year. Value of preventive surgery in a leprosy control program].

    PubMed

    Ramarorazana, S; Di Schino, M; Rene, J P; Schwarz, L E

    1994-01-01

    The clinical expression of leprosy is primarily cutaneous but its serious neurologic manifestations are maiming. Mutilations mainly of limb ends are due to peripheric nerves compression and may appear before or during the clinical treatment of the illness. Their appearance which is not automatically related to multiple Hansen's bacilli, may be prevented surgically by nervous decompression. The authors report their experiences of 466 nervous decompressions of 123 patients (89 men and 34 women), among them, 14 were pauci-bacillary and 109 multi-bacillary. They conclude that very good results (complete recovery or improvement of sensitivity, disappearing of pain) have been obtained through simple and easy-to-learn surgeries. PMID:7575033

  8. A back-pack shocker for collecting lamprey ammocoetes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braem, Robert A.; Ebel, Wesley J.

    1961-01-01

    IN 1958, THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES began to use specific larvicides for sea lamprey control in streams tributary to the Great Lakes. The successful application of larvicides required treatment of all areas of the streams infested by sea lamprey ammocoetes. Intensive surveys were needed to determine distribution of the larvae. The use of electrical methods to determinelarval distribution has been described (Stauffer and Hansen 1958). A light portable shocker was needed for these surveys because of the difficulty of access to some of the watersheds tributary to Lake Superior.

  9. NON-GAUSSIANITIES IN THE LOCAL CURVATURE OF THE FIVE-YEAR WMAP DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Rudjord, Oeystein; Groeneboom, Nicolaas E.; Hansen, Frode K.; Cabella, Paolo

    2010-07-20

    Using the five-year WMAP data, we re-investigate claims of non-Gaussianities and asymmetries detected in local curvature statistics of the one-year WMAP data. In Hansen et al., it was found that the northern ecliptic hemisphere was non-Gaussian at the {approx}1% level testing the densities of hill, lake, and saddle points based on the second derivatives of the cosmic microwave background temperature map. The five-year WMAP data have a much lower noise level and better control of systematics. Using these, we find that the anomalies are still present at a consistent level. Also the direction of maximum non-Gaussianity remains. Due to limited availability of computer resources, Hansen et al. were unable to calculate the full covariance matrix for the {chi}{sup 2}-test used. Here, we apply the full covariance matrix instead of the diagonal approximation and find that the non-Gaussianities disappear and there is no preferred non-Gaussian direction. We compare with simulations of weak lensing to see if this may cause the observed non-Gaussianity when using a diagonal covariance matrix. We conclude that weak lensing does not produce non-Gaussianity in the local curvature statistics at the scales investigated in this paper. The cause of the non-Gaussian detection in the case of a diagonal matrix remains unclear.

  10. Cassini UVIS Results from Occultations of Stars by Saturn's Icy Moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Candice; Hendrix, A.

    2009-09-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed occultations of stars by Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea and Iapetus. Stellar occultations are a sensitive probe for gases and have been extremely valuable for understanding the composition (predominantly water), flux and structure of Enceladus’ plume [1, 2]. More recently we have been looking for trace gases in the plume such as ethylene and methanol. A much-anticipated solar occultation will be observed next year to quantify the existence and amount of N2. At Tethys and Iapetus upper limits are set for the column densities of local volatiles (water, O2, CO2, and CO), all of which have absorption features at far ultraviolet wavelengths. The Rhea occultation data, in addition to setting upper limits on surrounding gases, have been analyzed to look for the presence of the debris disk reported by Cassini's MIMI instrument [3]. No material was detected with 2 sigma certainty, however the low optical depth of the material suggests that the probability of its detection by UVIS is < 1 in 1000. An occultation of epsilon Canis Majoris by Dione will take place in September 2009. Results of that occultation will be presented. This work was partially supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. [1] Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422 (2006). [2] Hansen, C. J. et al., Nature 456 (2008). [3] Jones, G. H. et al., Science 319:1380 (2008).

  11. [The present conditions and future of National Sanatorium Kikuchi Keifuen].

    PubMed

    Nogami, Reiko

    2015-09-01

    National Sanatorium Kikuchi Keifuen (NSKK), housing 286 residents as of May 2015, is one of the biggest and oldest Hansen's disease sanatoriums in Japan. Located near the center of Kumamoto city, NSKK has maintained an excellent working relationship with Kumamoto University along with other neighboring medical institutions over the years. However, despite its advantages in standing, it may suffer the same problems as other sanatoriums: continually declining numbers of residents combined with the increasing frailty and dementia of existing residents due to aging and an increasing difficulty in maintaining a competent medical staff into the future. By placing our social exchange hall/historical museum as the focal point for the production and dissemination of information, we are producing an educational DVD that records an oral history through actual testimony on film as a cooperative effort between the residents' association and NSKK. Both perspectives are very important to verify the historical problems that Hansen's disease has encountered. One expected benefit of this project is the catharsis found in reminiscing over the past thus promoting the spiritual care of the residents; a matter which remains as a top priority in our sanatorium's "ending period". PMID:26630799

  12. [Leprosy and human rights: trends in Japan and in the world].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Yozo

    2014-12-01

    Leprosy, or Hansen's disease, has long been regarded as an incurable and dreadful contagious disease. The patients have been forcefully hospitalized and deprived of many basic human rights. Their family members have often been discriminated against due to stigma associated with this disease. Soon after the Second World War, a specific remedy called "multi-drug therapy" (MDT) was discovered and leprosy became a relatively easily curable disease. Despite this medical development, it took time to change the policy and legislation of forceful hospitalization of leprosy patients. The stigma surrounding leprosy and consequent discrimination have continued. In Japan, it was only in 1996 that the legislation requiring forceful hospitalization of leprosy patients was repealed. The Government decided to provide remedies to the former patients who had suffered from this policy. At the United Nations, the General Assembly adopted a resolution to eradicate discrimination against persons affected by leprosy and their family members. It is hoped that discrimination associated with Hansen's disease will soon be overcome by the efforts of all concerned, particularly doctors and nurses who are specialists of this disease. PMID:25826851

  13. Performance of PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay for detection of rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Hyunjung; Kim, Yeun; Bang, Hyeeun; Kim, Jong-Pill; Hwang, Joo Hwan; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kim, Tae Ue; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-10-01

    Drug resistance in Mycobacterium leprae is a significant problem in countries where leprosy is endemic. A sensitive, specific, and high-throughput reverse blot hybridization assay (REBA) for the detection of genotypic resistance to rifampicin (RIF) was designed and evaluated. It has been shown that resistance to RIF in M. leprae involves mutations in the rpoB gene encoding the -subunit of the RNA polymerase. The PCR-REBA simultaneously detects both 6 wild-type regions and 5 different mutations (507 AGC, 513 GTG, 516 TAT, 531 ATG, and 531 TTC) including the most prevalent mutations at positions 507 and 531. Thirty-one clinical isolates provided by Korea Institute of Hansen-s Disease were analyzed by PCR-REBA with RIF resistance of rpoB gene. As a result, missense mutations at codons 507 AGC and 531 ATG with 2-nucleotide substitutions were found in one sample, and a missense mutation at codon 516 TAT and ΔWT6 (deletion of 530-534) was found in another sample. These cases were confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. This rapid, simple, and highly sensitive assay provides a practical alternative to sequencing for genotypic evaluation of RIF resistance in M. leprae. PMID:26428919

  14. Effects of Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operations on sediment transport in the Browns Park reach of the Green River, Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.P.; Tomasko, D.; Cho, H.E.; Yin, S.C.L.

    1995-05-01

    Three methods for comparing sediment transport were applied to four proposed hydropower operational scenarios under study for Flaming Gorge Dam on the Green River in Utah. These methods were effective discharge, equilibrium potential, and cumulative sediment load with flow exceedance plots. Sediment loads transported by the Green River in the Browns Park reach were calculated with the Engelund-Hansen equation for three historical water years and four hydropower operational scenarios. A model based on the Engelund-Hansen equation was developed using site-specific information and validated by comparing predictions for a moderate water year with measured historical values. The three methods were used to assess the impacts of hydropower operational scenarios on sediment resources. The cumulative sediment load method provided the most useful information for impact evaluation. Effective discharge was not a useful tool because of the limited number of discrete flows associated with synthetic hydrographs for the hydropower operational scenarios. The equilibrium potential method was relatively insensitive to the variations in operating conditions, rendering it comparatively ineffective for impact evaluation.

  15. Determination of Solubility Parameters of Ibuprofen and Ibuprofen Lysinate.

    PubMed

    Kitak, Teja; Dumičić, Aleksandra; Planinšek, Odon; Šibanc, Rok; Srčič, Stanko

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in formulating solid dispersions, which purposes mainly include solubility enhancement, sustained drug release and taste masking. The most notable problem by these dispersions is drug-carrier (in)solubility. Here we focus on solubility parameters as a tool for predicting the solubility of a drug in certain carriers. Solubility parameters were determined in two different ways: solely by using calculation methods, and by experimental approaches. Six different calculation methods were applied in order to calculate the solubility parameters of the drug ibuprofen and several excipients. However, we were not able to do so in the case of ibuprofen lysinate, as calculation models for salts are still not defined. Therefore, the extended Hansen's approach and inverse gas chromatography (IGC) were used for evaluating of solubility parameters for ibuprofen lysinate. The obtained values of the total solubility parameter did not differ much between the two methods: by the extended Hansen's approach it was δt = 31.15 MPa(0.5) and with IGC it was δt = 35.17 MPa(0.5). However, the values of partial solubility parameters, i.e., δd, δp and δh, did differ from each other, what might be due to the complex behaviour of a salt in the presence of various solvents. PMID:26633347

  16. Echo 1 container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Echo 1 container: The design of this container was one of the most difficult technical tasks. Hansen writes: 'After several weeks of examining potential solutions to this problem, the Langley engineers narrowed the field of ideas to five. They then built working models of these five container designs, and 12-foot-diameter models of the satellite for simulation studies. With help from Langley's Engineering Service and Mechanical Service divisions, the Echo group built a special 41-foot-diameter spherical vacuum chamber equipped with pressure-proof windows. There the dynamics of opening the container and inflating the satelloon could be studies as the satelloon fell to the bottom of the tank.' 'The container-opening mechanism that eventually resulted from these vacuum tests was surely one of the oddest explosive devices ever contrived. The container was a sphere that opened at its equator into top and bottom hemispheres. the top half fit on the bottom half much like a lid fits snugly atop a kitchen pot. The joint between the two hemispheres, therefore, formed a sliding valve. The halves had to move apart an inch or two before the canister was actually open. It was in this joint between the hemispheres that the charge was placed.' The whole whole system was laced together with fishing line which resulted in many disdainful comments from visiting scientists and engineers but the system worked. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 180.

  17. Magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. Marc Feix: Dr. Marc Feix was a French nuclear scientist who worked a few years at Langley during the mid-1960s. 'Feix was nominally assigned to Robert Hess's Plasma Physics Section, but he actually worked with various people throughout the branch.' James Hansen stated: 'Most notable of [the new research fields] was magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD)--a genuine product of the space age and an esoteric field of scientific research for an engineering- and applications-oriented place like Langley. If any 'mad scientist' were working at Langley in the 1960s, they were the plasma physicists, nuclear fusion enthusiasts, and space-phenomena researchers found in the intense and, for a while, rather glamourous little group investigating MPD. No group of researchers in NASA moved farther away from classical aerodynamics or from the NACA's traditional focus on the problems of airplanes winging their way through the clouds than those involved with MPD.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 121.

  18. Volatile Transport Implications from the New Horizons Flyby of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Leslie; Grundy, William M.; Binzel, RIchard P.; Earle, Alissa M.; Linscott, Ivan R.; Hinson, David P.; Zangari, Amanda M.; McKinnon, William B.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Gladstone, G. Randall; Summers, Michael E.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Spencer, John R.

    2015-11-01

    The New Horizons flyby of Pluto has revealed a striking range of terrains, from the very bright region informally named Sputnik Planum, to very dark regions such as the informally named Cthulhu Regio. Such a variety was beyond the scope of recent models of Pluto's seasonal volatile cycle (Young 2013, ApJL 766, L22; Hansen, Paige and Young 2015, Icarus 246, 183), which assumed globally uniform substrate albedos. The "Exchange with Pressure Plateau (EPP)" class of models in Young (2013) and the favored runs from Hansen et al (2015) had long periods of exchange of volatiles between northern and southern hemispheres. In these models, the equators were largely devoid of volatiles; even though the equatorial latitudes received less insolation than the poles over a Pluto year, they were never the coldest place on the icy world. New models that include a variety of substrate albedos can investigate questions such as whether Sputnik Planum has an albedo that is high enough to act as a local cold trap for much of Pluto's year. We will present the implications of this and other assumption-busting revelations from the New Horizons flyby. This work was supported by NASA’s New Horizons project.

  19. A threat-detection advantage in those with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Krysko, Kristen M; Rutherford, M D

    2009-04-01

    Identifying threatening expressions is a significant social perceptual skill. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are impaired in social interaction, show deficits in face and emotion processing, show amygdala abnormalities and display a disadvantage in the perception of social threat. According to the anger superiority hypothesis, angry faces capture attention faster than happy faces in individuals with a history of typical development [Hansen, C. H., & Hansen, R. D. (1988). Finding the face in the crowd: An anger superiority effect. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54(6), 917-924]. We tested threat detection abilities in ASD using a facial visual search paradigm. Participants were asked to detect an angry or happy face image in an array of distracter faces. A threat-detection advantage was apparent in both groups: participants showed faster and more accurate detection of threatening over friendly faces. Participants with ASD showed similar reaction time, but decreased overall accuracy compared to controls. This provides evidence for less robust, but intact or learned implicit processing of basic emotions in ASD. PMID:19036491

  20. [Lactobacilli of freshwater fishes].

    PubMed

    Kvasnikov, E I; Kovalenko, N K; Materinskaia, L G

    1977-01-01

    Normal microflora in the intestinal tract of fishes inhabiting fresh-water reservoirs includes lactic bacteria. The number of the bacteria depends on the animal species, the composition of food, the age, and the season. The highest number of these microorganisms (hundreds of millions per gram of the intestinal content) is found in carps. Enterococci are most often encountered in fishes inhabiting ponds: Streptococcus faecalis Andrewes a. Horder, Str. faecium Orla-Jensen, Str. bovis Orla-Jensen. Lactobacilli are more typical of fishes in water reserviors: Lactobacillus plantarum (Orla-Jensen) Bergey et al., L. casei (Orla-Jensen) Hansen a. Lessel, L. casei var. casei, L. casei var. rhamnosus, L. Casei var. alactosus, L. leichmannii (Henneberg) Bergey et al., L. acidophillus (Moro) Hansen a. Mocquot, L. Fermenti Beijerinck, L. cellobiosus Rogosa et al., L. Buchneri (Henneberg) Bergey et al. The content of lactic bacteria varies in water reservoirs; their highest content is found in ooze (tens of thousands per gram). PMID:909475

  1. Questa Baseline and Pre-mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation, 7. A Pictorial Record of Chemical Weathering, Erosional Processes, and Potential Debris-flow Hazards in Scar Areas Developed on Hydrothermally Altered Rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Ludington, Steve; Vincent, Kirk R.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Caine, Jonathan S.; Livo, K. Eric

    2009-01-01

    Erosional scar areas developed along the lower Red River basin, New Mexico, reveal a complex natural history of mineralizing processes, rapid chemical weathering, and intense physical erosion during periodic outbursts of destructive, storm-induced runoff events. The scar areas are prominent erosional features with craggy headwalls and steep, denuded slopes. The largest scar areas, including, from east to west, Hottentot Creek, Straight Creek, Hansen Creek, Lower Hansen Creek, Sulfur Gulch, and Goat Hill Gulch, head along high east-west trending ridges that form the northern and southern boundaries of the lower Red River basin. Smaller, topographically lower scar areas are developed on ridge noses in the inner Red River valley. Several of the natural scar areas have been modified substantially as a result of large-scale open-pit and underground mining at the Questa Mine; for example, much of the Sulfur Gulch scar was removed by open pit mining, and several scars are now partially or completely covered by mine waste dumps.

  2. Multipole moments of bumpy black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Vigeland, Sarah J.

    2010-11-15

    General relativity predicts the existence of black holes, compact objects whose spacetimes depend only on their mass, spin, and charge in vacuum (the 'no-hair' theorem). As various observations probe deeper into the strong fields of black hole candidates, it is becoming possible to test this prediction. Previous work suggested that such tests can be performed by measuring whether the multipolar structure of black hole candidates has the form that general relativity demands, and introduced a family of 'bumpy black hole' spacetimes to be used for making these measurements. These spacetimes have generalized multipoles, where the deviation from the Kerr metric depends on the spacetime's 'bumpiness'. In this paper, we show how to compute the Geroch-Hansen moments of a bumpy black hole, demonstrating that there is a clean mapping between the deviations used in the bumpy black hole formalism and the Geroch-Hansen moments. We also extend our previous results to define bumpy black holes whose current moments, analogous to magnetic moments of electrodynamics, deviate from the canonical Kerr value.

  3. Effect of some nutritional and environmental parameters on the production of diacetyl and on starch consumption by Pediococcus pentosaceus and Lactobacillus acidophilus in submerged cultures.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, M L; Valdés, S E; Soriano, J; Tomasini, A

    2000-01-01

    Three series of 5-day submerged cultures with Pediococcus pentosaceus MITJ-10 and Lactobacillus acidophilus Hansen 1748 were carried out in starch-based media, and the effect of cultural factors on the changes of starch, diacetyl and amylase activity determined. In axenic cultures, Ped. pentosaceus MITJ-10 produced more diacetyl (63.27 mg l(-1)) by adding glucose, yeast extract and CaCO3 (P < 0.01), at 28 degrees C (P < 0.05); but more starch was consumed (18.4 g l(-1)) in the absence of glucose (P < 0.01). Lact. acidophilus Hansen 1748 consumed more starch (26.56 g l(-1)) at 28 degrees C, with CaCO3, glucose (P < 0.01) and yeast extract (P < 0.05); however, the amylolytic activity (10077U l(-1)) was favoured at 35 degrees C (P < 0.01). Little starch was consumed in mixed cultures due to the low pH; nevertheless, diacetyl content rose to 135.76 mg l(-1) at 32 degrees C (P < 0.01). Therefore, both studied strains might be useful to produce aromatic extensors from starchy substrates. These natural aromatic extensors are of interest to the food industry. PMID:10735253

  4. Is There Evidence of Multiple Equilibria in Planetary Wave Amplitude Statistics?.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Gregor; Wallace, John M.; Kooperberg, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Results obtained by Hansen and Sutera concerning the occurrence of bimodal probability density functions (PDFs) in a wave amplitude index (WAI) calculated from large-scale atmospheric flow data are re-examined. The PDFs are found to be highly sensitive to changes in the parameters used to calculate the WAI. The excessive sensitivity is suggestive of an insufficient number of degrees of freedom in the PDFs.The Monte Carlo test used by Hansen and Sutera to establish the statistical significance of their PDFs is reexamined, with emphasis on their attempt to compensate for the interdependence between neighboring data points in their time series of the WAI. Their random samples contained only one (independent) data point for each 4.5 data points in the WAI time series. It is shown that in order to generate PDFs with the same degree of smoothing as the WAI PDF, they should have simultaneously reduced the smoothing parameter in the maximum penalized likelihood (MPL) algorithm by the same factor. When this scaling factor is properly taken into account, more than half of the randomly generated samples exhibit multimodality: hence, the occurrence of bimodality in the PDFs calculated from the WAI data does not appear to be statistically significant. It is estimated that in order to distinguish between samples drawn from populations with a degree of bimodality comparable to that reported in the WAI data and samples drawn from a Gaussian population, a period of record of at least 150 years would be needed.

  5. Questa baseline and pre-mining ground-water quality investigation. 14. Interpretation of ground-water geochemistry in catchments other than the Straight Creek catchment, Red River Valley, Taos County, New Mexico, 2002-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Hunt, Andrew G.; Naus, Cheryl A.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Mexico Environment Department, is investigating the pre-mining ground-water chemistry at the Molycorp molybdenum mine in the Red River Valley, New Mexico. The primary approach is to determine the processes controlling ground-water chemistry at an unmined, off-site but proximal analog. The Straight Creek catchment, chosen for this purpose, consists of the same Tertiary-age quartz-sericite-pyrite altered andesite and rhyolitic volcanics as the mine site. Straight Creek is about 5 kilometers east of the eastern boundary of the mine site. Both Straight Creek and the mine site are at approximately the same altitude, face south, and have the same climatic conditions. Thirteen wells in the proximal analog drainage catchment were sampled for ground-water chemistry. Eleven wells were installed for this study and two existing wells at the Advanced Waste-Water Treatment (AWWT) facility were included in this study. Eight wells were sampled outside the Straight Creek catchment: one each in the Hansen, Hottentot, and La Bobita debris fans, four in a well cluster in upper Capulin Canyon (three in alluvial deposits and one in bedrock), and an existing well at the U.S. Forest Service Questa Ranger Station in Red River alluvial deposits. Two surface waters from the Hansen Creek catchment and two from the Hottentot drainage catchment also were sampled for comparison to ground-water compositions. In this report, these samples are evaluated to determine if the geochemical interpretations from the Straight Creek ground-water geochemistry could be extended to other ground waters in the Red River Valley , including the mine site. Total-recoverable major cations and trace metals and dissolved major cations, selected trace metals, anions, alkalinity; and iron-redox species were determined for all surface- and ground-water samples. Rare-earth elements and low-level As, Bi, Mo, Rb, Re, Sb, Se, Te, Th, U, Tl, V, W, Y, and Zr were

  6. More efficient evolutionary strategies for model calibration with watershed model for demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, J. S.; Skahill, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    Evolutionary strategies allow automatic calibration of more complex models than traditional gradient based approaches, but they are more computationally intensive. We present several efficiency enhancements for evolution strategies, many of which are not new, but when combined have been shown to dramatically decrease the number of model runs required for calibration of synthetic problems. To reduce the number of expensive model runs we employ a surrogate objective function for an adaptively determined fraction of the population at each generation (Kern et al., 2006). We demonstrate improvements to the adaptive ranking strategy that increase its efficiency while sacrificing little reliability and further reduce the number of model runs required in densely sampled parts of parameter space. Furthermore, we include a gradient individual in each generation that is usually not selected when the search is in a global phase or when the derivatives are poorly approximated, but when selected near a smooth local minimum can dramatically increase convergence speed (Tahk et al., 2007). Finally, the selection of the gradient individual is used to adapt the size of the population near local minima. We show, by incorporating these enhancements into the Covariance Matrix Adaption Evolution Strategy (CMAES; Hansen, 2006), that their synergetic effect is greater than their individual parts. This hybrid evolutionary strategy exploits smooth structure when it is present but degrades to an ordinary evolutionary strategy, at worst, if smoothness is not present. Calibration of 2D-3D synthetic models with the modified CMAES requires approximately 10%-25% of the model runs of ordinary CMAES. Preliminary demonstration of this hybrid strategy will be shown for watershed model calibration problems. Hansen, N. (2006). The CMA Evolution Strategy: A Comparing Review. In J.A. Lozano, P. Larrañga, I. Inza and E. Bengoetxea (Eds.). Towards a new evolutionary computation. Advances in estimation of

  7. How does the Danish Groundwater Monitoring Programme support statistical consistent nitrate trend analyses in groundwater?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Birgitte; Thorling, Lærke; Sørensen, Brian; Dalgaard, Tommy; Erlandsen, Mogens

    2013-04-01

    The overall aim of performing nitrate trend analyses in oxic groundwater is to document the effect of regulation of Danish agriculture on N pollution. The design of the Danish Groundwater Monitoring Programme is presented and discussed in relation to performance of statistical consistence nitrate trend analyses. Three types of data are crucial. Firstly, long and continuous time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 from Denmark Statistics is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge age determination are performed in order to allow linking of the first two dataset. Recent results published in Hansen et al. (2011 & 2012) will be presented. Since the 1980s, regulations implemented by Danish farmers have succeeded in optimizing the N (nitrogen) management at farm level. As a result, the upward agricultural N surplus trend has been reversed, and the N surplus has reduced by 30-55% from 1980 to 2007 depending on region. The reduction in the N surplus served to reduce the losses of N from agriculture, with documented positive effects on nature and the environment in Denmark. In groundwater, the upward trend in nitrate concentrations was reversed around 1980, and a larger number of downward nitrate trends were seen in the youngest groundwater compared with the oldest groundwater. However, on average, approximately 48% of the oxic monitored groundwater has nitrate concentrations above the groundwater and drinking water standards of 50 mg/l. Furthermore, trend analyses show that 33% of all the monitored groundwater has upward nitrate trends, while only 18% of the youngest groundwater has upward nitrate trends according to data sampled from 1988-2009. A regional analysis shows a correlation between a high level of N

  8. Pymiedap: a versatile radiative transfer code with polarization for terrestrial (exo)planets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Loïc; Stam, Daphne; Hogenboom, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Polarimetry promises to be an important method to detect exoplanets: the light of a star is usually unpolarized te{kemp1987} while scattering by gas and clouds in an atmosphere can generate high levels of polarization. Furthermore, the polarization of scattered light contains information about the properties of the atmosphere and surface of a planet, allowing a possible characterization te{stam2008}, a method already validated in the solar system with Venus te{hansen1974,rossi2015}. We present here Pymiedap (Python Mie Doubling-Adding Program): a set of Python objects interfaced with Fortran radiative transfer codes that allows to define a planetary atmosphere and compute the flux and polarization of the light that is scattered. Several different properties of the planet can be set interactively by the user through the Python interface such as gravity, distance to the star, surface properties, atmospheric layers, gaseous and aerosol composition. The radiative transfer calculations are then computed following the doubling-adding method te{deHaan1987}. We present some results of the code and show its possible use for different planetary atmospheres for both resolved and disk-integrated measurements. We investigate the effect of gas, clouds and aerosols composition and surface properties for horizontally homogeneous and inhomogenous planets, in the case of Earth-like planets. We also study the effect of gaseous absorption on the flux and polarization as a marker for gaseous abundance and cloud top altitude. [1]{kemp1987} Kemp et al. The optical polarization of the sun measured at a sensitivity of parts in ten million. Nature, 1987, 326, 270-273 [2]{stam2008} Stam, D. M. Spectropolarimetric signatures of Earth-like extrasolar planets. A&A, 2008, 482, 989-1007 [3]{hansen1974} Hansen, J. E. & Hovenier, J. W. Interpretation of the polarization of Venus. Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, 1974, 31, 1137-1160 [4]{rossi2015} Rossi et al. Preliminary study of Venus cloud layers

  9. Modeling of the Enceladus water vapor jets for interpreting UVIS star and solar occultation observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Esposito, Larry W.; Aye, Klaus-Michael; Hansen, Candice J.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the Cassini mission is jets emitting from the southern pole of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. The composition of the jets is water vapor and salty ice grains with traces of organic compounds. Jets, merging into a wide plume at a distance, are observed by multiple instruments on Cassini. Recent observations of the visible dust plume by the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) identified as many as 98 jet sources located along “tiger stripes” [Porco et al. 2014]. There is a recent controversy on the question if some of these jets are “optical illusion” caused by geometrical overlap of continuous source eruptions along the “tiger stripes” in the field of view of ISS [Spitale et al. 2015]. The Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observed occultations of several stars and the Sun by the water vapor plume of Enceladus. During the solar occultation separate collimated gas jets were detected inside the background plume [Hansen et al., 2006 and 2011]. These observations directly provide data about water vapor column densities along the line of sight of the UVIS instrument and could help distinguish between the presence of only localized or also continuous sources. We use Monte Carlo simulations and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) to model the plume of Enceladus with multiple (or continuous) jet sources. The models account for molecular collisions, gravitational and Coriolis forces. The models result in the 3-D distribution of water vapor density and surface deposition patterns. Comparison between the simulation results and column densities derived from UVIS observations provide constraints on the physical characteristics of the plume and jets. The specific geometry of the UVIS observations helps to estimate the production rates and velocity distribution of the water molecules emitted by the individual jets.Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422-1425 (2006); Hansen, C. J. et al, GRL 38:L11202 (2011

  10. Threshold expansion of the three-particle quantization condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Maxwell T.; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2016-05-01

    We recently derived a quantization condition for the energy of three relativistic particles in a cubic box [M. T. Hansen and S. R. Sharpe, Phys. Rev. D 90, 116003 (2014); M. T. Hansen and S. R. Sharpe, Phys. Rev. D 92, 114509 (2015)]. Here we use this condition to study the energy level closest to the three-particle threshold when the total three-momentum vanishes. We expand this energy in powers of 1 /L , where L is the linear extent of the finite volume. The expansion begins at O (1 /L3), and we determine the coefficients of the terms through O (1 /L6). As is also the case for the two-particle threshold energy, the 1 /L3, 1 /L4 and 1 /L5 coefficients depend only on the two-particle scattering length a . These can be compared to previous results obtained using nonrelativistic quantum mechanics [K. Huang and C. N. Yang, Phys. Rev. 105, 767 (1957); S. R. Beane, W. Detmold, and M. J. Savage, Phys. Rev. D 76, 074507 (2007); S. Tan, Phys. Rev. A 78, 013636 (2008)], and we find complete agreement. The 1 /L6 coefficients depend additionally on the two-particle effective range r (just as in the two-particle case) and on a suitably defined threshold three-particle scattering amplitude (a new feature for three particles). A second new feature in the three-particle case is that logarithmic dependence on L appears at O (1 /L6). Relativistic effects enter at this order, and the only comparison possible with the nonrelativistic result is for the coefficient of the logarithm, where we again find agreement. For a more thorough check of the 1 /L6 result, and thus of the quantization condition, we also compare to a perturbative calculation of the threshold energy in relativistic λ ϕ4 theory, which we have recently presented in [M. T. Hansen and S. R. Sharpe, Phys. Rev. D 93, 014506 (2016)]. Here, all terms can be compared, and we find full agreement.

  11. Comparing and Correlating Solubility Parameters Governing the Self-Assembly of Molecular Gels Using 1,3:2,4-Dibenzylidene Sorbitol as the Gelator

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Solvent properties play a central role in mediating the aggregation and self-assembly of molecular gelators and their growth into fibers. Numerous attempts have been made to correlate the solubility parameters of solvents and gelation abilities of molecular gelators, but a comprehensive comparison of the most important parameters has yet to appear. Here, the degree to which partition coefficients (log P), Henry’s law constants (HLC), dipole moments, static relative permittivities (εr), solvatochromic ET(30) parameters, Kamlet–Taft parameters (β, α, and π), Catalan’s solvatochromic parameters (SPP, SB, and SA), Hildebrand solubility parameters (δi), and Hansen solubility parameters (δp, δd, δh) and the associated Hansen distance (Rij) of 62 solvents (covering a wide range of properties) can be correlated with the self-assembly and gelation of 1,3:2,4-dibenzylidene sorbitol (DBS) gelation, a classic molecular gelator, is assessed systematically. The approach presented describes the basis for each of the parameters and how it can be applied. As such, it is an instructional blueprint for how to assess the appropriate type of solvent parameter for use with other molecular gelators as well as with molecules forming other types of self-assembled materials. The results also reveal several important insights into the factors favoring the gelation of solvents by DBS. The ability of a solvent to accept or donate a hydrogen bond is much more important than solvent polarity in determining whether mixtures with DBS become solutions, clear gels, or opaque gels. Thermodynamically derived parameters could not be correlated to the physical properties of the molecular gels unless they were dissected into their individual HSPs. The DBS solvent phases tend to cluster in regions of Hansen space and are highly influenced by the hydrogen-bonding HSP, δh. It is also found that the fate of this molecular gelator, unlike that of polymers, is influenced not only by the

  12. Deriving the Structure and Composition of Enceladus’ Plume from Cassini UVIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Candice; Esposito, Larry; Colwell, Josh; Hendrix, Amanda; Portyankina, Ganna; Shemansky, Don; West, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has observed 4 stellar and one solar occultation by Enceladus’ water vapor plume. The July 2005 occultation observation established that water is the primary constituent of the plume [1], and allowed us to calculate the flux of water coming from the plume; the 2007 occultation showed super-sonic jets of gas imbedded within the plume [2]. The solar occultation observation set upper limits for N2 as a constituent of the plume and provided higher resolution data on the jets [3]. On 19 October 2011, epsilon and zeta Orionis were simultaneously occulted by the plume. The stars were in separate pixels on the detector, separated by 24 mrad, or ~20 km, with the lower altitude star (epsilon Orionis) 18 km above the limb at its closest point. The profile at two altitudes shows evidence for a new gas jet location, possibly between dust jet #50 and #51 identified in [4].Results from the assemblage of these data sets, with implications for the composition and vertical structure of the plume and jets, will be described. Gas being expelled from the “tiger stripe” fissures is largely on a vertical escape trajectory away from Enceladus. Upper limits are set for water vapor near the limb at latitudes well away from the south pole at 3 x 1015 cm-2. Upper limits are set for the amount of ethylene and H2 in the plume, two species of interest to the chemistry of the plume [5]. No hydrogen or oxygen emission features have been observed from Enceladus’ water vapor plume, in contrast to the purported plumes at Europa, probably due to the very different plasma environment at Saturn. Data have now been processed consistently for all occultations with slightly different results for water vapor supply to the Saturn magnetosphere than previously reported. Overall, eruptive activity has been steady to within ~20% from 2005 to 2011.References: [1] Hansen, C. J. et al., Science 311:1422 (2006). Hansen, C. J. et al., Nature 456:477 (2008

  13. A new pan-tropical estimate of carbon loss in natural and managed forests in 2000-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukavina, A.; Baccini, A.; Hansen, M.; Potapov, P.; Stehman, S. V.; Houghton, R. A.; Krylov, A.; Turubanova, S.; Goetz, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Clearing of tropical forests, which includes semi-permanent conversion of forests to other land uses (deforestation) and more temporary forest disturbances, is a significant source of carbon emissions. The previous estimates of tropical forest carbon loss vary among studies due to the differences in definitions, methodologies and data inputs. The best currently available satellite-derived datasets, such as a 30-m forest cover loss map by Hansen et al. (2013), may be used to produce methodologically consistent carbon loss estimates for the entire tropical region, but forest cover loss area derived from maps is biased due to classification errors. In this study we produced an unbiased estimate of forest cover loss area from a validation sample, as suggested by good practice recommendations. Stratified random sampling was implemented with forest carbon stock strata defined based on Landsat-derived tree canopy cover, height, intactness (Potapov et al., 2008) and forest cover loss (Hansen et al., 2013). The largest difference between the sample-based and Hansen et al. (2013) forest loss area estimates occurred in humid tropical Africa. This result supports the earlier finding (Tyukavina et al., 2013) that Landsat-based forest cover loss maps may significantly underestimate loss area in regions with small-scale forest dynamics while performing well in regions with large industrial forest clearing, such as Brazil and Indonesia (where differences between sample-based and map estimates were within 10%). To produce final carbon loss estimates, sample-based forest loss area estimates for each stratum were related to GLAS-lidar derived forest biomass (Baccini et al., 2012). Our sample-based results distinguish gross losses of aboveground carbon from natural forests (0.59 PgC/yr), which include primary, mature secondary forests and natural woodlands, and from managed forests (0.43 PgC/yr), which include plantations, agroforestry systems and areas of subsistence agriculture

  14. Eponymous Dermatological Signs in Bullous Dermatoses

    PubMed Central

    Ganapati, Sentamilselvi

    2014-01-01

    Clinical signs are evolved by clinicians through their careful clinical examination. Medical professionals are generally familiar with these signs because of the emphasis given to them by the teaching faculty while they were students. Some of these signs are eponymously named after the clinicians giving credit to their observation. Eponymous signs in vesiculobullous diseases such as Nikolsky sign and Asboe Hansen sign (Bulla spread sign) are well known and were described during the 19th and 20th century, respectively. Cerebriform tongue in pemphigus vegetans was described by Premalatha (1981) three decades ago and is well recognized and cited in several text books and articles in leading journals. All these signs are revisited below with an emphasis on cerebriform tongue in pemphigus vegetans which could eponymously be called as Premalatha sign. PMID:24470655

  15. Insights into metabolic disease from studying genetics in isolated populations: stories from Greece to Greenland.

    PubMed

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Gloyn, Anna L; Hansen, Torben

    2016-05-01

    Over the last 10 years substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the genetic basis for type 2 diabetes and related traits. These developments have been facilitated by technological advancements that have allowed comprehensive genome-wide assessments of the impact of common genetic variation on disease risk. Current efforts are now focused on extending this to genetic variants in the rare and low-frequency spectrum by capitalising on next-generation sequencing technologies. This review discusses the important contributions that studies in isolated populations are making to this effort for diabetes and metabolic disease, drawing on specific examples from populations in Greece and Greenland. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Exciting news in genetics of diabetes' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD, with topics presented by Eleftheria Zeggini and Torben Hansen, and an overview by the Session Chair, Anna Gloyn. PMID:26993633

  16. Case of lepromatous leprosy misdiagnosed as systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Yong; Park, So Eun; Shin, Soo Jung; Kim, Chul Woo; Kim, Sang Seok

    2014-04-01

    Hansen's disease (HD) is a chronic granulomatous infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The worldwide prevalence rate of HD has decreased gradually over the years. The clinical manifestations of HD are extensive, with involvement of the skin and various organs, and these can resemble those of many rheumatic diseases. Our patient initially presented with gradual sclerotic skin change and slight sclerodactyly with Raynaud's phenomenon, which is frequently observed in systemic sclerosis. However, a skin biopsy with acid-fast stain later confirmed lepromatous leprosy. We report this case to emphasize the role of dermatologists for applying a systematic approach to the skin lesions of HD, which has become difficult to detect because of its rapidly declining prevalence rate. PMID:24480058

  17. Leprosy: a 'common' and curable cause of peripheral neuropathy with skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Breen, D P; Deeb, J; Vaidya, S; Lockwood, D N; Radunovic, A

    2015-03-01

    Leprosy (or Hansen's disease) is a curable chronic infectious disease caused by the acid-fast bacillus Mycobacterium leprae. While leprosy remains one of the most common causes of neuropathy worldwide, its rarity in the UK means that many doctors are unfamiliar with the typical clinical features. This is problematic because early recognition and treatment is vital in order to minimise disease-related complications such as nerve injury. We describe a 75-year-old man who presented with multiple mononeuropathy (mononeuritis multiplex, particularly affecting the ulnar nerves) and typical granulomatous skin lesions, in whom the diagnosis was made on the basis of skin biopsy. We highlight the clinical features, investigations and treatment of the patient, and provide information about the epidemiology and pathogenesis of leprosy. PMID:25874829

  18. Tibiotarsal fracture repair in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) using an interlocking nail.

    PubMed

    Hollamby, Simon; Dejardin, Loic M; Sikarskie, James G; Haeger, Jennifer

    2004-03-01

    A 14-yr-old, 5.13-kg bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was hit by a car and presented to the Michigan State University Small Animal Clinic with an open, grade II, transverse, midshaft, Winquist-Hansen type-II-comminuted left tibiotarsal fracture. The fracture was reduced and fixation established with a 4.7-mm-diameter, 112-mm-long, four-hole veterinary intramedullary interlocking nail maintained in position by single 2-mm transcortical screws placed in the main proximal and distal fragments. The bird was weight bearing on the bandaged limb 48 hr postoperatively. Radiographs obtained 4 wk postoperatively revealed bridging callus over three of four cortices. The bird was released after 5 mo of rehabilitation. PMID:15193078

  19. Field testing of CP current requirements at depths down to 1300m on the Norwegian continental shelf from 63 to 67 {degree} N

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, K.P.

    1999-07-01

    On the Norwegian Continental Shelf exploration has started in the area of the shelf between 63 and 67 N for water depths down to 1,500m. A field-testing program has been performed at depths from 100m down to 1,300m, which covered exposures at the blocks Helland Hansen, Moere West, Ormen Lange, Vema/Nyk and Gjallar. Testing has been done to establish the CP current demand for C- steel, thermally sprayed aluminium, stainless steel (6 Mo) and titanium (grade 5). The initial current demand in the zone from 100m down to 200m was found to be especially high ({gt} 0.22 A/m{sup 2}). While at depths from 600m and down to 1,300m depth an initial design current density of 0.22 A/m{sup 2} resulted in a polarization to the protective potential on C-steel within a two-month period.

  20. Solvent Selection for Pressurized Liquid Extraction of Polymeric Sorbents Used in Air Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Primbs, Toby; Genualdi, Susan; Simonich, Staci

    2014-01-01

    Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) was evaluated as a method for extracting semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) from air sampling media; including quartz fiber filter (QFF), polyurethane foam (PUF), and a polystyrene divinyl benzene copolymer (XAD-2). Hansen solubility parameter plots were used to aid in the PLE solvent selection in order to reduce both co-extraction of polyurethane and save time in evaluating solvent compatibility during the initial steps of method development. A PLE solvent composition of 75:25% hexane:acetone was chosen for PUF. The XAD-2 copolymer was not solubilized under the PLE conditions used. The average percent PLE recoveries (and percent relative standard deviations) of 63 SOCs, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorine, amide, triazine, thiocarbamate, and phosphorothioate pesticides, were 76.7 (6.2), 79.3 (8.1), and 93.4 (2.9) % for the QFF, PUF, and XAD-2, respectively. PMID:18220448

  1. SCARF SOCIAL FUNCTIONING INDEX

    PubMed Central

    Padmavathi, R.; Thara, R.; Srinivasan, Latha; Kumar, Shuba

    1995-01-01

    Several instruments measuring social functioning have been developed in the last four decades, as a result of the increasing interest in community care of the chronic mentally ill. SCARF Social Functioning Index (SSFI) was developed to meet the pressing need for an instrument which was easy to administer and which could be used by all mental health professionals. The SSFI comprises four main sections: self concern, occupational role, role in the family and other social roles. Each section has several subsections covering different areas of social functioning. Validity and reliability have been established for a group of normals, patients suffering from schizophrenia and from Hansen's disease. Internal consistencies of these factors were high Factor analysis derived four main factors, which included nearly all items of the SSFI. This paper reports on the development and standardization of the instrument. PMID:21743742

  2. Global Energy Issues and Alternate Fueling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes world energy issues and alternate fueling effects on aircraft design. The contents include: 1) US Uses about 100 Quad/year (1 Q = 10(exp 15) Btu) World Energy Use: about 433 Q/yr; 2) US Renewable Energy about 6%; 3) Nuclear Could Grow: Has Legacy Problems; 4) Energy Sources Primarily NonRenewable Hydrocarbon; 5) Notes; 6) Alternate Fuels Effect Aircraft Design; 7) Conventional-Biomass Issue - Food or Fuel; 8) Alternate fuels must be environmentally benign; 9) World Carbon (CO2) Emissions Problem; 10) Jim Hansen s Global Warming Warnings; 11) Gas Hydrates (Clathrates), Solar & Biomass Locations; 12) Global Energy Sector Response; 13) Alternative Renewables; 14) Stratospheric Sulfur Injection Global Cooling Switch; 15) Potential Global Energy Sector Response; and 16) New Sealing and Fluid Flow Challenges.

  3. Alternative bio-based solvents for extraction of fat and oils: solubility prediction, global yield, extraction kinetics, chemical composition and cost of manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Sicaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Vian, Maryline; Fine, Frédéric; Joffre, Florent; Carré, Patrick; Tostain, Sylvain; Chemat, Farid

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the performance of alternative bio-based solvents, more especially 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, obtained from crop's byproducts for the substitution of petroleum solvents such as hexane in the extraction of fat and oils for food (edible oil) and non-food (bio fuel) applications. First a solvent selection as well as an evaluation of the performance was made with Hansen Solubility Parameters and the COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Realistic Solvation (COSMO-RS) simulations. Experiments were performed on rapeseed oil extraction at laboratory and pilot plant scale for the determination of lipid yields, extraction kinetics, diffusion modeling, and complete lipid composition in term of fatty acids and micronutrients (sterols, tocopherols and tocotrienols). Finally, economic and energetic evaluations of the process were conducted to estimate the cost of manufacturing using 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MeTHF) as alternative solvent compared to hexane as petroleum solvent. PMID:25884332

  4. Evaluation in the 19th century - how astronomers were chosen for Gotha observatory. (German Title: Evaluation im 19. Jahrhundert - wie Astronomen für die Sternwarte Gotha ausgesucht wurden)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strumpf, Manfred

    In his testament, Duke Ernst II of Saxe Gotha and Altenburg instituted a foundation for the maintenance of an astronomical observatory. The interest from which the income of the only astronomer should be paid became insufficient in the course of time, especially after the death of Hansen. The government was not willing to increase the financial means but was nevertheless searching for the impossible, i.e. a reputable scientist who would accept a low salary. Scheibner in Leipzig was charged with the search. He missed two contrasting opportunities: on the one side a classical young astronomer in the tradition lines of Gotha (Leo de Ball) and on the other side a wealthy Hungarian amateur who would have brought the new astrophysics to Gotha (Nikolaus von Konkoly).

  5. Easy-Going On-Spectrometer Optimisation of Phase Modulated Homonuclear Decoupling Sequences in Solid-State NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimminck, Dennis L. A. G.; Vasa, Suresh K.; Meerts, W. Leo; Kentgens, P. M.

    2011-06-01

    A global optimisation scheme for phase modulated proton homonuclear decoupling sequences in solid-state NMR is presented. Phase modulations, parameterised by DUMBO Fourier coefficients, were optimized using a Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategies algorithm. Our method, denoted EASY-GOING homonuclear decoupling, starts with featureless spectra and optimises proton-proton decoupling, during either proton or carbon signal detection. On the one hand, our solutions closely resemble (e)DUMBO for moderate sample spinning frequencies and medium radio-frequency (rf) field strengths. On the other hand, the EASY-GOING approach resulted in a superior solution, achieving significantly better resolved proton spectra at very high 680 kHz rf field strength. N. Hansen, and A. Ostermeier. Evol. Comput. 9 (2001) 159-195 B. Elena, G. de Paepe, L. Emsley. Chem. Phys. Lett. 398 (2004) 532-538

  6. Morphologies of Phenytoin Crystals at Silica Model Surfaces: Vapor Annealing versus Drop Casting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The controlled preparation of different crystal morphologies with varying preferential orientation with respect to the substrate is of crucial importance in many fields of applications. In this work, the controlled preparation of different phenytoin morphologies and the dependency of the preferential orientation of those crystallites is related with the preparation method (solvent annealing vs drop casting), as well as the physical–chemical interaction with the solvents in use. While solvent annealing induces the formation of particular structures that are partially dewetted, the drop casting technique from various solvent results in the formation of needle-like and elongated structures, with each having a distinct morphology. The morphologies are explained via the Hansen solubility parameters and correlated with the solvent vapor pressures. X-ray diffraction experiments reveal preferential orientations with respect to the solid substrate and indicate the surface-mediated stabilization of an unknown polymorph of phenytoin with an elongated unit cell in the b-axis. PMID:24966892

  7. [Space perception: the history and its significance for art].

    PubMed

    Norn, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    Some aspects of the opthalmologic history of Denmark are briefly mentioned. Lens extraction in 1667 in Copenhagen, Edmund Hansen Gruts stereoophtalmoscopy in 1857, Ludvig Panums area in 1858 (single vision) space perception and outside this area double vision), squint treatment, Marius Tschernings periscopic spectacle lenses, Henning Rønnes stereoortograph and keiroscope and Gerhard Rønnes stereoscope. Space perception depends mostly on binocular function (convergens), but in fact some space perception occurs in vision due to perspective, accommodation, parallaxe, blurring, colours and shadows. The Danisk Poet, Hans Christian Andersen, has in his novels mentioned latent squint. The German poet Rainer Maria Rilke was much interested in perspective in connection with the development of impressionism, especially Paul Cézanne. Rilke in his later period developed the view that concentration on perspective removed those essential aspects from the world, in which he found God or a fourth dimension, as exemplified in the presence of ghosts. PMID:12564450

  8. Integrated hydrological SVAT model for climate change studies in Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollerup, M.; Refsgaard, J.; Sonnenborg, T. O.

    2010-12-01

    In a major Danish funded research project (www.hyacints.dk) a coupling is being established between the HIRHAM regional climate model code from Danish Meteorological Institute and the MIKE SHE distributed hydrological model code from DHI. The linkage between those two codes is a soil vegetation atmosphere transfer scheme, which is a module of MIKE SHE. The coupled model will be established for the entire country of Denmark (43,000 km2 land area) where a MIKE SHE based hydrological model already exists (Henriksen et al., 2003, 2008). The present paper presents the MIKE SHE SVAT module and the methodology used for parameterising and calibrating the MIKE SHE SVAT module for use throughout the country. As SVAT models previously typically have been tested for research field sites with comprehensive data on energy fluxes, soil and vegetation data, the major challenge lies in parameterisation of the model when only ordinary data exist. For this purpose annual variations of vegetation characteristics (Leaf Area Index (LAI), Crop height, Root depth and the surface albedo) for different combinations of soil profiles and vegetation types have been simulated by use of the soil plant atmosphere model Daisy (Hansen et al., 1990; Abrahamsen and Hansen, 2000) has been applied. The MIKE SHE SVAT using Daisy generated surface/soil properties model has been calibrated against existing data on groundwater heads and river discharges. Simulation results in form of evapotranspiration and percolation are compared to the existing MIKE SHE model and to observations. To analyse the use of the SVAT model in climate change impact assessments data from the ENSEMBLES project (http://ensembles-eu.metoffice.com/) have been analysed to assess the impacts on reference evapotranspiration (calculated by the Makkink and the Penmann-Monteith equations) as well as on the individual elements in the Penmann-Monteith equation (radiation, wind speed, humidity and temperature). The differences on the

  9. Poly-(3-hexylthiophene) Aggregate Formation in Binary Solvent Mixtures: An Excitonic Coupling Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, David; Johnson, Calynn

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the aggregation behavior of P3HT [Mn ~ 28.2 kDa, regioregularity >96 %, PDI ~ 1.3] in 96 solvent mixtures is studied using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. We used Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs) and Spano excitonic coupling analyses to identify correlations between the properties of the solvent mixtures and the extent of structural order of the aggregates. It is clear that the identity of the poor solvent used to drive aggregation has a significant impact on the excitonic coupling behavior and, hence, the structural order of the P3HT aggregates. However, solubility parameter theory does not account nor provide a predictive theory for the observed trends. Instead, qualitative arguments based on the nature of the interactions between the solvents and the polythiophene and hexyl side chain motifs are used to rationalize the kinetics of formation and the observed excitonic coupling characteristics of the P3HT aggregates.

  10. Artificial delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    A deltaic sedimentary system has a point source; sediment is carried over the delta plain by distributary channels away from the point source and deposited at the delta front by distributary mouth bars. The established methods to describe such a sedimentary system are "bedding analysis", "facies analysis", and "basin analysis". We shall call the ambient conditions "input" and the rock record "output". There exist a number of methods to deduce input from output, e.g. "Sequence stratigraphy" (a.o. Vail et al. 1977, Catuneanu et al. 2009), "Shoreline trajectory" (a.o. Helland-Hansen & Martinsen 1996, Helland-Hansen & Hampson 2009) on the one hand and the complex use of established techniques on the other (a.o. Miall & Miall 2001, Miall & Miall 2002). None of these deductive methods seems to be sufficient. I claim that the common errors in all these attempts are the following: (1) a sedimentary system is four-dimensional (3+1) and a lesser dimensional analysis is insufficient; (2) a sedimentary system is complex and any empirical/deductive analysis is non-unique. The proper approach to the problem is therefore the theoretical/inductive analysis. To that end we performed six scenarios of a scaled version of a passive margin delta in a flume tank. The scenarios have identical stepwise tectonic subsidence and semi-cyclic sealevel, but different supply curves, i.e. supply is: constant, highly-frequent, proportional to sealevel, inversely proportional to sealevel, lagging to sealevel, ahead of sealevel. The preliminary results are indicative. Lobe-switching occurs frequently and hence locally sedimentation occurs shortly and hiatuses are substantial; therefore events in 2D (+1) cross-sections don't correlate temporally. The number of sedimentary cycles disequals the number of sealevel cycles. Lobe-switching and stepwise tectonic subsidence cause onlap/transgression. Erosional unconformities are local diachronous events, whereas maximum flooding surfaces are regional

  11. Chinese equipment for US markets: traditional design, low cost

    SciTech Connect

    Kissel, P.C.; Hansen, J.C.; Shen, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Peter C. Kissel and James C. Hansen were members of a delegation of US businessmen invited to the People's Republic of China by the China Science and Technology Exchange Center and Carroway Engineering, Inc., to discuss China's small-scale hydroelectric equipment and the means of obtaining such equipment for exportation to the US. The delegation, led by Peter K. Shen, president of Carroway Engineering, visited with Chinese government officials in four cities and provinces in June 1985, and inspected two of the principal electrical machine factories that manufacture hydroelectric equipment for projects in the US. In this article, the authors discuss the negotiations necessary to obtain Chinese equipment and China's ability to supply the US market for turbine-generator equipment.

  12. Detection of the greenhouse gas signal from space - A progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, T. P.; Haskins, R.; Chahine, M.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the expected changes in the atmospheric water vapor content and cloud cover, as predicted by the transient greenhouse gas (GHG) simulation of Hansen et al. (1988), are examined to determine whether the signals would be large enough and unique enough to be useful in a GHG detection study. The nature of the predicted GHG signal was first examined using the transient CO2 run from the GISS ocean/atmosphere general circulation model. Next, the remotely sensed irradiance characteristics data (as the measure of water vapor content) supplied by the HIRS/MSU sensors for the area of the equatorial cold tongue region (the region in which there are no measurement stations). It is shown that HIRS/MSU signals can provide data necessary for detecting GHS signals in atmospheric moisture for regions where ground observations are not possible.

  13. Characterization of 2-(2-Methoxyethoxy)ethanol Substituted Phosphazene Polymers Using Pervaporation, Solubility Parameters and Sorption Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, Christopher Joseph; Klaehn, John Ray; Harrup, Mason Kurt; Lash, Robert Paul; Stewart, Frederick Forrest

    2005-05-01

    Two linear phosphazene polymers were synthesized with differing amounts of hydrophilic 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethanol (MEE) and hydrophobic 4-methoxyphenol (MEOP) substituted on the backbone. These high polymers were cast into membranes and their permeability to water, methanol, ethanol, and 2-propanol was evaluated as a function of temperature. An additional polymer with a low content of MEE was studied for water permeation and was characterized by trace flux. At higher levels of MEE on the backbone, fluxes of all solvents increased. Solubility also was found to increase with increasing MEE content for all solvents except water. Unexpectedly, water was found to be less soluble in the higher MEE polymer, although higher membrane fluxes were observed. Diffusion coefficients showed the following trend: methanol 2-propanol > ethanol water. Finally, the affinity of solvents and polymers was discussed in terms of Hansen solubility parameters.

  14. Riparian vegetation of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison River, Colorado: composition and response to selected hydrologic regimes based on a direct gradient assessment model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auble, Gregor T.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Scott, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    The Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Monument is located along the Gunnison River on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains in Montrose County, Colorado. The canyon is narrow because it is cut into resistant pre-Cambrian gneiss: it has a maximum depth of 900m and a minimum width of 300m from rim to rim (Hansen 1987). The watershed is 10,000 square km. A 450-m study reach was selected by the National Park Service (Fig. 1). The width of the canyon bottom within the study reach varies from 40 to 90 m, the gradient is 0.0128, and the elevation is approximately 1707 m. Average annual precipitation is 370 m (Colorado Climate Center 1984). Because of the steep canyon walls the study reach is inaccessible to livestock and has probably never been grazed.

  15. Drug development costs when financial risk is measured using the Fama-French three-factor model.

    PubMed

    Vernon, John A; Golec, Joseph H; Dimasi, Joseph A

    2010-08-01

    In a widely cited article, DiMasi, Hansen, and Grabowski (2003) estimate the average pre-tax cost of bringing a new molecular entity to market. Their base case estimate, excluding post-marketing studies, was $802 million (in $US 2000). Strikingly, almost half of this cost (or $399 million) is the cost of capital (COC) used to fund clinical development expenses to the point of FDA marketing approval. The authors used an 11% real COC computed using the capital asset pricing model (CAPM). But the CAPM is a single factor risk model, and multi-factor risk models are the current state of the art in finance. Using the Fama-French three factor model we find that the cost of drug development to be higher than the earlier estimate. PMID:19655335

  16. A study of fundamental limitations of small antennas: MIMO approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattigiri, S.; Warty, C.

    In this area of high performance systems and sophistication, the antenna size is shrinking drastically. This paper reviews the fundamental limitations in electrically instigated small antennas and their implications on multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. An optimum performance of the antenna can be obtained by considering three main factors. (1) maximum gain for given frequency (2) minimum Q factor (3) maximum ratio of G/Q. It is essential to understand the basic concepts of these small antennas to counter the limitations for next generational systems. In this paper works of three prominent scientists like Wheeler, Hansen and Chu have been studied to understand these limitations. This study can be further expanded to accumulate various space time diverse MIMO systems specified in long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A) standards. The impact of limitations of small antennas can be very significant on the performance of the given node.

  17. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    From Spaceflight Revolution: 'Top NASA officials listen to a LOPO briefing at Langley in December 1966. Sitting to the far right with his hand on his chin is Floyd Thompson. To the left sits Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for Manned Space Flight. On the wall is a diagram of the sites selected for the 'concentrated mission.' 'The most fundamental issue in the pre-mission planning for Lunar Orbiter was how the moon was to be photographed. Would the photography be 'concentrated' on a predetermined single target, or would it be 'distributed' over several selected targets across the moon's surface? On the answer to this basic question depended the successful integration of the entire mission plan for Lunar Orbiter.' The Lunar Orbiter Project made systematic photographic maps of the lunar landing sites. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 337.

  18. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Langley Center Director Floyd Thompson shows Ann Kilgore the 'picture of the century.' This was the first picture of the earth taken from space. From Spaceflight Revolution: 'On 23 August 1966 just as Lunar Orbiter I was about to pass behind the moon, mission controllers executed the necessary maneuvers to point the camera away from the lunar surface and toward the earth. The result was the world's first view of the earth from space. It was called 'the picture of the century' and 'the greatest shot taken since the invention of photography.' Not even the color photos of the earth taken during the Apollo missions superseded the impact of this first image of our planet as a little island of life floating in the black and infinite sea of space.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), pp. 345-346.

  19. Validation of KENO based criticality calculations at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Felsher, P.D.; McKamy, J.N.; Monahan, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    In the absence of experimental data it is necessary to rely on computer based computational methods in evaluating the criticality condition of a nuclear system. The validity of the computer codes is established in a two part procedure as outlined in ANSI/ANS 8.1. The first step, usually the responsibility of the code developer, involves verification that the algorithmic structure of the code is performing the intended mathematical operations correctly. The second step involves an assessment of the codes ability to realistically portray the governing physical processes in question. This is accomplished by determining the code's bias, or systematic error, through a comparison of computational results to accepted values obtained experimentally. In this paper we discuss the validation process for KENO and the Hansen-Roach cross sections in use at EG G Rocky Flats.

  20. Translating leprosy: the expert and the public in Stanley Stein's anti-stigmatization campaigns, 1931-60.

    PubMed

    John, Heather Varughese

    2013-10-01

    This article examines three campaigns through which patient activist Stanley Stein sought to combat the stigmatized connotations of the word "leprosy." In 1931, soon after starting the first patient newspaper at the U.S. national leprosy hospital at Carville, Stein became convinced of the necessity of finding an alternative to "leprosy." His ensuing campaign to promote the use of the words "Hansen's Disease" to describe the condition from which he and fellow Carville patients suffered became his most passionate and life-long project. In the 1950s, Stein became involved in efforts to change the translation of "leprosy" in the Bible. Finally, in 1960, he waged a campaign to de-stigmatize encyclopedia entries on leprosy. These campaigns illustrate how even elevation of the medical expert and a seeming disdain for the public can function as a protest of medical authority and reveal a presumption that a significant degree of authority actually resides with the public. PMID:24106217

  1. F8U-3 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Crusader on runway. Navy aircraft number 6340. L59-6101 caption: 'The navy's Vought XF8U-3 Supersonic Fighter was an entirely new design as compared to the earlier F8U Crusader series. This jet plane lost in competition with the McDonnell F4H, however, and was never put into production. Langley used the XF8U-3 in some of the first flight measurements of sonic boom intensity.' Photograph published in Engineer in Charge A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen. Page 507. Caption: 'Chance Vought F8U-3 airplane used in sonic boom investigation at Wallops, June-August 1959.' Photograph published in A New Dimension; Wallops Island Flight Test Range: The First Fifteen Years by Joseph Shortal - A NASA publication (page 672).

  2. Determination of the Sediment Carrying Capacity Based on Perturbed Theory

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Zhi-hui; Zeng, Qiang; Li-chun, Wu

    2014-01-01

    According to the previous studies of sediment carrying capacity, a new method of sediment carrying capacity on perturbed theory was proposed. By taking into account the average water depth, average flow velocity, settling velocity, and other influencing factors and introducing the median grain size as one main influencing factor in deriving the new formula, we established a new sediment carrying capacity formula. The coefficients were determined by the principle of dimensional analysis, multiple linear regression method, and the least square method. After that, the new formula was verified through measuring data of natural rivers and flume tests and comparing the verified results calculated by Cao Formula, Zhang Formula, Li Formula, Engelung-Hansen Formula, Ackers-White Formula, and Yang Formula. According to the compared results, it can be seen that the new method is of high accuracy. It could be a useful reference for the determination of sediment carrying capacity. PMID:25136652

  3. Leprosy: An Overview of Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ramesh Marne; Prakash, Chaitra

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy, also known as Hansen's disease, is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae, a microorganism that has a predilection for the skin and nerves. The disease is clinically characterized by one or more of the three cardinal signs: hypopigmented or erythematous skin patches with definite loss of sensation, thickened peripheral nerves, and acid-fast bacilli detected on skin smears or biopsy material. M. leprae primarily infects Schwann cells in the peripheral nerves leading to nerve damage and the development of disabilities. Despite reduced prevalence of M. leprae infection in the endemic countries following implementation of multidrug therapy (MDT) program by WHO to treat leprosy, new case detection rates are still high-indicating active transmission. The susceptibility to the mycobacteria and the clinical course of the disease are attributed to the host immune response, which heralds the review of immunopathology of this complex disease. PMID:22988457

  4. Thermodynamic approach to boron nitride nanotube solubility and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiano, A. L.; Gibbons, L.; Tsui, M.; Applin, S. I.; Silva, R.; Park, C.; Fay, C. C.

    2016-02-01

    Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to improve dispersion include surface functionalization, surfactants, polymer wrapping, and sonication. Although these approaches have proven effective, they often achieve dispersion by altering the surface or structure of the nanomaterial and ultimately, their intrinsic properties. Co-solvents are commonly utilized in the polymer, paint, and art conservation industries to selectively dissolve materials. These co-solvents are utilized based on thermodynamic interaction parameters and are chosen so that the original materials are not affected. The same concept was applied to enhance the dispersion of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to facilitate the fabrication of BNNT nanocomposites. Of the solvents tested, dimethylacetamide (DMAc) exhibited the most stable, uniform dispersion of BNNTs, followed by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), acetone, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Utilizing the known Hansen solubility parameters of these solvents in comparison to the BNNT dispersion state, a region of good solubility was proposed. This solubility region was used to identify co-solvent systems that led to improved BNNT dispersion in poor solvents such as toluene, hexane, and ethanol. Incorporating the data from the co-solvent studies further refined the proposed solubility region. From this region, the Hansen solubility parameters for BNNTs are thought to lie at the midpoint of the solubility sphere: 16.8, 10.7, and 9.0 MPa1/2 for δd, δp, and δh, respectively, with a calculated Hildebrand parameter of 21.8 MPa1/2.Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to

  5. Thermophysical properties of liquid Ni around the melting temperature from molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozas, R. E.; Demiraǧ, A. D.; Toledo, P. G.; Horbach, J.

    2016-08-01

    Thermophysical properties of liquid nickel (Ni) around the melting temperature are investigated by means of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, using three different embedded atom method potentials to model the interactions between the Ni atoms. Melting temperature, enthalpy, static structure factor, self-diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal diffusivity are compared to recent experimental results. Using ab initio MD simulation, we also determine the static structure factor and the mean-squared displacement at the experimental melting point. For most of the properties, excellent agreement is found between experiment and simulation, provided the comparison relative to the corresponding melting temperature. We discuss the validity of the Hansen-Verlet criterion for the static structure factor as well as the Stokes-Einstein relation between self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity. The thermal diffusivity is extracted from the autocorrelation function of a wavenumber-dependent temperature fluctuation variable.

  6. 360-deg-viewable flat hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, James; Hill, Jason R.; Honack, John; Roth, William F.; Roberts, Ron; Villasenor, Edward; Gonzales, Orlando; Baker, Everett

    1995-02-01

    Although many experiments and documents on 360 degree(s) viewable holograms have been successfully produced and documented prior to this paper, those most noteworthy and applicable to our work include U.S.S.R. patent SU1103194 issued in 1984 and patent 4,988,154 issued to Matthew Hansen in 1991. This paper discusses the development and implementation of 360 degree(s) viewable holograms on flat disk film based on the original concept proposed by Craig Newswanger of CFC Applied Holographics. Conventionally, 360 degree(s) holograms were viewable in cylindrical format. Our project involves a simple optical set-up and method, and it uses flat film, without altering its shape cylindrically.

  7. A Planetary Ring Around Earth as Source for the Ir-Enrichment at the KT-Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stage, M.; Rasmussen, K. L.

    1992-07-01

    Since the discovery of the Ir enrichment at the Cretaceous- Tertiary boundary a majority of the researchers have claimed a meteorite impact as origin of the event. But up till now the search for an impact crater has not been conclusive, and alternative explanations have been suggested, e.g., a volcanic origin (Hansen 1990). If, however, we maintain that the KT- boundary material is extraterrestrial, the missing crater constitutes a problem. The missing-crater-problem can be solved by postulating the existence of a temporary planetary ring around the Earth. We suggest the following scenario: an incoming asteroid is captured by the Earth inside the Roche limit, and the breakup of the asteroid creates a planetary ring. Atmospheric drag and partially inelastic collisions between particles cause the ring particles to lose energy and slowly accrete onto Earth. Once the asteroid is decomposed, the atmospheric drag on the ring particles will primarily drain the smaller particles from the ring. The figure shows residence times as a function of starting position. Each curve represents one particle size. Thus the needed amount of Ir is brought down to Earth as a gentle rain lasting perhaps thousands of years, without major crater production. Our 3D computer simulations of the ring dynamics show accretion profiles, which are comparable to the Ir profiles at the KT boundary. In our model partially inelastic collisions occur between ring particles (Brahic, 1976, 1977) and the particles experience a slight atmospheric drag (10^-14 atm at 0.75 Earth radii). The particles are injected into randomly oriented orbits near the Earth upper atmosphere, from 0.1 to 0.75 Earth radii. The number and the density profile of the inward spiralling particles are calculated, until the distance from the Earth is small enough to assure that they are lost to the Earth surface within a few hours. The profile reflects the composition of the ring, and thereby the asteroid. In conclusion we suggest that

  8. Non-parabolic model for InAs/GaAs quantum dot capacitance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filikhin, I.; Deyneka, E.; Vlahovic, B.

    2006-12-01

    InAs/GaAs quantum dot electron spectra obtained from the capacitance-voltage measurements by B.T. Miller et al. [B.T. Miller, W. Hansen, S. Manus, R.J. Luyken, A. Lorke, J.P. Kotthaus, S. Huant, G. Medeiros-Ribeiro, P.M. Petroff, Phys. Rev. B 56 (1997) 6764] are quantitatively interpreted by applying a three-dimensional model of a semiconductor quantum dot with energy-dependent electron effective mass and finite confinement potential. The Coulomb interaction between tunnelled electrons is taken into account by perturbation theory. The observed significant increase in the electron effective mass of the quantum dot in respect to its bulk value is explained by the non-parabolic effect.

  9. Corrections to vibrational transition probabilities calculated from a three-dimensional model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Corrections to the collision-induced vibration transition probability calculated by Hansen and Pearson from a three-dimensional semiclassical model are examined. These corrections come from the retention of higher order terms in the expansion of the interaction potential and the use of the actual value of the deflection angle in the calculation of the transition probability. It is found that the contribution to the transition cross section from previously neglected potential terms can be significant for short range potentials and for the large relative collision velocities encountered at high temperatures. The correction to the transition cross section obtained from the use of actual deflection angles will not be appreciable unless the change in the rotational quantum number is large.

  10. Dynamic subcriticality measurements using the CF neutron noise method: Videotape

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ragan, G.E.; Johnson, E.B.

    1987-01-01

    The capability to measure the subcriticality for a multiplying system with k-effective values as low as 0.3 was demonstrated for measurement times of approximately 10 s; the measured k-effective values obtained do not depend on the speed with which the solution height is changed or on whether the tank is filling or draining. As in previous experiments, the low-frequency ratios of spectral densities are all that are needed to obtain the k-effective value. This method's effectiveness for systems where conditions are changing with time as demonstrated, probably exceeds the dynamic requirements for most nuclear fuel plant processing applications. The calculated k-effective values using the KENO code and Hansen-Roach cross-sections compare well with the experimental values. Before the dynamic capability of the method can be considered fully explored, additional dynamic experiments are required for other geometries and fuel concentrations.

  11. Geologic controls of uranium mineralization in the Tallahassee Creek uranium district, Fremont County, Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    Two important orebodies have been defined by drilling in the Tallahassee Creek uranium district, Fremont County, Colorado, namely the Hansen and the Picnic Tree. Host rocks are respectively the upper Eocene Echo park Alluvium, and the lower Oligocene Tallahassee Creek Conglomerate. Average ore grade is about 0.08% U3O8. The principal source rock is the lower Oligocene Wall Mountain Tuff. Leaching and transportation of the uranium occurred in alkaline oxidizing ground water that developed during alteration of the ash in a semi-arid environment. The uranium was transported in the groundwater and deposited in a reducing environment controlled by carbonaceous material and associated pyrite. Localization of the ore was controlled by groundwater flow conditions and by the distribution of organic matter in the host rock. -from Author

  12. Solvent pre-wetting as an effective start-up method for point-of-use filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Toru; Sugiyama, Shinichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Momota, Makoto; Sevegney, Michael; Tsuzuki, Shuichi; Numaguchi, Toru

    2012-03-01

    An effective filter start-up method has been required by device manufacturers, mainly in order to reduce waste volume of lithography process chemicals, which become more expensive as lithography technology advances. Remaining air was monitored during static-pressure-driven filter start-up. As a result, 3500 ml of the resist was needed to eliminate remaining air. For improvement, cyclohexanone pre-wetting was applied prior to the resist introduction. As a result, the resist volume needed for the solvent displacement was 1900 ml, approximately half the volume required for staticpressure- driven start-up. Other solvents were evaluated for the pre-wetting start-up method. Results, in descending order of performance were PGME (best) < PGMEA = IPA < cyclohexanone (worst). Moreover, air displacement performance strongly correlated with Hansen solubility parameter distance between each solvent and nylon 6,6 material.

  13. Alternative Bio-Based Solvents for Extraction of Fat and Oils: Solubility Prediction, Global Yield, Extraction Kinetics, Chemical Composition and Cost of Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Sicaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Vian, Maryline; Fine, Frédéric; Joffre, Florent; Carré, Patrick; Tostain, Sylvain; Chemat, Farid

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the performance of alternative bio-based solvents, more especially 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, obtained from crop’s byproducts for the substitution of petroleum solvents such as hexane in the extraction of fat and oils for food (edible oil) and non-food (bio fuel) applications. First a solvent selection as well as an evaluation of the performance was made with Hansen Solubility Parameters and the COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Realistic Solvation (COSMO-RS) simulations. Experiments were performed on rapeseed oil extraction at laboratory and pilot plant scale for the determination of lipid yields, extraction kinetics, diffusion modeling, and complete lipid composition in term of fatty acids and micronutrients (sterols, tocopherols and tocotrienols). Finally, economic and energetic evaluations of the process were conducted to estimate the cost of manufacturing using 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MeTHF) as alternative solvent compared to hexane as petroleum solvent. PMID:25884332

  14. Nanocellular thermoplastic foam and process for making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lingbo; Costeux, Stephane; Patankar, Kshitish A.; Moore, Jonathan D.

    2015-09-29

    Prepare a thermoplastic polymer foam having a porosity of 70% or more and at least one of: (i) an average cell size of 200 nanometers or less; and (ii) a nucleation density of at least 1.times.1015 effective nucleation sites per cubic centimeter of foamable polymer composition not including blowing agent using a foamable polymer composition containing a thermoplastic polymer selected from styrenic polymer and (meth)acrylic polymers, a blowing agent comprising at least 20 mole-percent carbon dioxide based on moles of blowing agent and an additive having a Total Hansen Solubility Parameter that differs from that of carbon dioxide by less than 2 and that is present at a concentration of 0.01 to 1.5 weight parts per hundred weight parts thermoplastic polymer.

  15. The role of extruded disk material in thoracolumbar intervertebral disk disease: A retrospective study in 40 dogs

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study was to determine the effect of the dispersed or nondispersed form of the extruded disk material (EDM) on the neurological status and surgical outcomes in Hansen thoracolumbar intervertebral disk disease Type I (IVDD-I). Medical records of 40 dogs with IVDD-I were reviewed, including neurologic status on admission, findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), intraoperative findings, and surgical outcomes. In MRI evaluations, EDM was on the right in 16, on the left in 18, and centrally in 6 cases; in all cases, findings were confirmed by surgery. Extruded disk material was localized and classified as dispersed disk (DD) or nondispersed disk (NDD) according to its dispersion in the epidural space on MRI. Twenty-five dogs had DD and 15 had NDD on both MRI and surgery. There was no significant difference between DD and NDD in preoperative neurological status and surgical outcomes (P > 0.05). PMID:16231651

  16. Two-dimensional freezing criteria for crystallizing colloidal monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ziren; Han Yilong; Alsayed, Ahmed M.

    2010-04-21

    Video microscopy was employed to explore crystallization of colloidal monolayers composed of diameter-tunable microgel spheres. Two-dimensional (2D) colloidal liquids were frozen homogenously into polycrystalline solids, and four 2D criteria for freezing were experimentally tested in thermal systems for the first time: the Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, the Loewen-Palberg-Simon dynamical freezing criterion, and two other rules based, respectively, on the split shoulder of the radial distribution function and on the distribution of the shape factor of Voronoi polygons. Importantly, these freezing criteria, usually applied in the context of single crystals, were demonstrated to apply to the formation of polycrystalline solids. At the freezing point, we also observed a peak in the fluctuations of the orientational order parameter and a percolation transition associated with caged particles. Speculation about these percolated clusters of caged particles casts light on solidification mechanisms and dynamic heterogeneity in freezing.

  17. Using the coupled wake boundary layer model to evaluate the effect of turbulence intensity on wind farm performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard J. A. M.; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    We use the recently introduced coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model to predict the effect of turbulence intensity on the performance of a wind farm. The CWBL model combines a standard wake model with a “top-down” approach to get improved predictions for the power output compared to a stand-alone wake model. Here we compare the CWBL model results for different turbulence intensities with the Horns Rev field measurements by Hansen et al., Wind Energy 15, 183196 (2012). We show that the main trends as function of the turbulence intensity are captured very well by the model and discuss differences between the field measurements and model results based on comparisons with LES results from Wu and Porté-Agel, Renewable Energy 75, 945-955 (2015).

  18. Redox-responsive gels with tunable hydrophobicity for controlled solubilization and release of organics.

    PubMed

    Akhoury, Abhinav; Bromberg, Lev; Hatton, T Alan

    2011-04-01

    The hydrophobicity of the chemical environment within a redox-responsive polymer gel synthesized by copolymerization of hydroxybutyl methacrylate (HBMA) and vinylferrocene (VF) can be controlled by tuning the oxidation state of the redox-responsive moiety, ferrocene. When ferrocene is in the uncharged reduced state, the gel is hydrophobic and selectively extracts butanol from aqueous solution. Upon oxidation to ferricenium ions, charge is induced at the ferrocene sites making the gel hydrophilic, with a reduced capacity for butanol relative to water. Equilibrium distribution coefficients and separation factors provide quantitative evidence for this changing preference for butanol depending on oxidation state. The selection of the monomer constituting the polymer backbone, HBMA, was based on an initial screening using the Hansen solubility parameters of commercially available monomers. The effect of the various constituents of the gel on the gel's butanol extraction ability has been ascertained experimentally. PMID:21410169

  19. [The first to go--physicians who experimented on themselves].

    PubMed

    Rugstad, Hans Erik

    2005-09-01

    Since ancient times, there have been rules for experiments on humans. Some have claimed that if one thinks an experiment might involve danger, it should first be tried out on oneself. There are, in fact, numerous examples of doctors who have undergone daring experiments on themselves. Among them are Max von Pettenkofer, who drank cholera bacteria, Werner Forssmann who catheterized his own heart, John Paul Stapp, who sat in a rocket sled at almost the speed of sound, and then made an abrupt stop. Doctors from Walter Reed's research team infected themselves with yellow fever, Erik Jacobsen demonstrated the effect of antabuse and alcohol on himself, Barry J. Marshall drank helicobacter pylori bacteria, Klaus Hansen drank heavy water, and Ole Jakob Malm transplanted foreign tissue onto his own skin in order to discern among different tissue types. This article describes these various experiments, why they were done, and their consequences. The perspective of ethics in such experimental research is briefly discussed. PMID:16151505

  20. Cross sections for ionization of tetrahydrofuran by protons at energies between 300 and 3000 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingjie; Rudek, Benedikt; Bennett, Daniel; de Vera, Pablo; Bug, Marion; Buhr, Ticia; Baek, Woon Yong; Hilgers, Gerhard; Rabus, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Double-differential cross sections for ionization of tetrahydrofuran by protons with energies from 300 to 3000 keV were measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt ion accelerator facility. The electrons emitted at angles between 15∘ and 150∘ relative to the ion-beam direction were detected with an electrostatic hemispherical electron spectrometer. Single-differential and total ionization cross sections have been derived by integration. The experimental results are compared to the semiempirical Hansen-Kocbach-Stolterfoht model as well as to the recently reported method based on the dielectric formalism. The comparison to the latter showed good agreement with experimental data in a broad range of emission angles and energies of secondary electrons. The scaling property of ionization cross sections for tetrahydrofuran was also investigated. Compared to molecules of different size, the ionization cross sections of tetrahydrofuran were found to scale with the number of valence electrons at large impact parameters.

  1. Electron capture in carbon dwarf supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, T. J.; Truran, J. W.; Cameron, A. G. W.

    1974-01-01

    The rates of electron capture on heavier elements under the extreme conditions predicted for dwarf star supernovae have been computed, incorporating modifications that seem to be indicated by present experimental results. An estimate of the maximum possible value of such rates is also given. The distribution of nuclei in nuclear statistical equilibrium has been calculated for the range of expected supernovae conditions, including the effects of the temperature dependence of nuclear partition functions. These nuclide abundance distributions are then used to compute nuclear equilibrium thermodynamic properties. The effects of the electron capture on such equilibrium matter are discussed. In the context of the 'carbon detonation' supernova model, the dwarf central density required to ensure core collapse to a neutron star configuration is found to be slightly higher than that obtained by Bruenn (1972) with the electron capture rates of Hansen (1966).-

  2. Theoretical and experimental electrostatic potential around the m-nitrophenol molecule.

    PubMed

    Drissi, Mokhtaria; Benhalima, Nadia; Megrouss, Youcef; Rachida, Rahmani; Chouaih, Abdelkader; Hamzaoui, Fodil

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns a comparison of experimental and theoretical results of the electron charge density distribution and the electrostatic potential around the m-nitrophenol molecule (m-NPH) known for its interesting physical characteristics. The molecular experimental results have been obtained from a high-resolution X-ray diffraction study. Theoretical investigations were performed using the Density Functional Theory at B3LYP level of theory at 6-31G* in the Gaussian program. The multipolar model of Hansen and Coppens was used for the experimental electron charge density distribution around the molecule, while we used the DFT methods for the theoretical calculations. The electron charge density obtained in both methods allowed us to find out different molecular properties such us the electrostatic potential and the dipole moment, which were finally subject to a comparison leading to a good match obtained between both methods. The intramolecular charge transfer has also been confirmed by an HOMO-LUMO analysis. PMID:25741898

  3. Silylesterification of oxidized multi-wall carbon nanotubes by catalyzed dehydrogenative cross-coupling between carboxylic and hydrosilane functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffer, J.-F.; Detriche, S.; Nagy, J. B.; Delhalle, J.; Mekhalif, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Surface modification of oxidized carbon nanotubes (O-CNTs) with silicon based anchoring groups (R-SiR3) is a relatively uncommon approach of the CNTs functionalization. Hydrosilane derivatives constitute an attractive subclass of compounds for silanization reactions on the CNTs surface. In this work, we report on the ZnCl2 catalytically controlled reaction (hydrosilane dehydrogenative cross-coupling, DHCC) of fluorinated hydrosilane probes with the carboxylic functions present on the surface of oxidized multi-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes functionalized with essentially alcohol groups are also used to compare the selectivity of zinc chloride toward carboxylic groups. To assess the efficiency of functionalization, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy is used to determine the qualitative and quantitative composition of the different samples. Solubility tests on the oxidized and silanized MWNTs are also carried out in the framework of the Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSP) theory to apprehend at another scale the effect of DHCC.

  4. Mathematical model of the seismic electromagnetic signals (SEMS) in non crystalline substances

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, L. C. C.; Yahya, N.; Daud, H.; Shafie, A.

    2012-09-26

    The mathematical model of seismic electromagnetic waves in non crystalline substances is developed and the solutions are discussed to show the possibility of improving the electromagnetic waves especially the electric field. The shear stress of the medium in fourth order tensor gives the equation of motion. Analytic methods are selected for the solutions written in Hansen vector form. From the simulated SEMS, the frequency of seismic waves has significant effects to the SEMS propagating characteristics. EM waves transform into SEMS or energized seismic waves. Traveling distance increases once the frequency of the seismic waves increases from 100% to 1000%. SEMS with greater seismic frequency will give seismic alike waves but greater energy is embedded by EM waves and hence further distance the waves travel.

  5. Optimizing the surface density of polyethylene glycol chains by grafting from binary solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcot, Lokanathan; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Zhang, Shuai; Meyer, Rikke L.; Kingshott, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) brushes are very effective at controlling non-specific deposition of biological material onto surfaces, which is of paramount importance to obtaining successful outcomes in biomaterials, tissue engineered scaffolds, biosensors, filtration membranes and drug delivery devices. We report on a simple 'grafting to' approach involving binary solvent mixtures that are chosen based on Hansen's solubility parameters to optimize the solubility of PEG thereby enabling control over the graft density. The PEG thiol-gold model system enabled a thorough characterization of PEG films formed, while studies on a PEG silane-silicon system examined the versatility to be applied to any substrate-head group system by choosing an appropriate solvent pair. The ability of PEG films to resist non-specific adsorption of proteins was quantitatively assessed by full serum exposure studies and the binary solvent strategy was found to produce PEG films with optimal graft density to efficiently resist protein adsorption.

  6. PRISM 8 degrees X 10 degrees North Hemisphere paleoclimate reconstruction; digital data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, John A.; Cronin, Thomas M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Fleming, Farley R.; Holtz, Thomas R., Jr.; Ishman, Scott E.; Poore, Richard Z.; Thompson, Robert S.; Willard, Debra A.

    1994-01-01

    The PRISM 8?x10? data set represents several years of investigation by PRISM (Pliocene Research, Interpretation, and Synoptic Mapping) Project members. One of the goals of PRISM is to produce time-slice reconstructions of intervals of warmer than modern climate within the Pliocene Epoch. The first of these was chosen to be at 3.0 Ma (time scale of Berggren et al., 1985) and is published in Global and Planetary Change (Dowsett et al., 1994). This document contains the actual data sets and a brief explanation of how they were constructed. For paleoenvironmental interpretations and discussion of each data set, see Dowsett et al., in press. The data sets includes sea level, land ice distribution, vegetation or land cover, sea surface temperature and sea-ice cover matrices. This reconstruction of Middle Pliocene climate is organized as a series of datasets representing different environmental attributes. The data sets are designed for use with the GISS Model II atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) using an 8?x10? resolution (Hansen et al., 1983). The first step in documenting the Pliocene climate involves assigning an appropriate fraction of land versus ocean to each grid box. Following grid cell by grid cell, land versus ocean allocations, winter and summer sea ice coverage of ocean areas are assigned and then winter and summer sea surface temperatures are assigned to open ocean areas. Average land ice cover is recorded for land areas and then land areas not covered by ice are assigned proportions of six vegetation or land cover categories modified from Hansen et al. (1983).

  7. The impact of different sediment concentrations and sediment transport formulas on the simulated floodplain processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjankar, Rohan; Yager, Elowyn M.

    2012-07-01

    SummaryOverbank sedimentation is an important process in river floodplain ecosystems and is a component of the floodplain geomorphologic evolution. The impact of suspended sediment supply on floodplain processes is still unclear because sediment deposition can be influenced by many factors. We quantified the effect of sediment supply (suspended sediment) and transport formulas on simulated floodplain processes using a coupled two-dimensional hydrodynamic and sediment transport model (MIKE21C). Erosion and deposition depths, net sedimentation depth and total volume were quantified based on the last time step of the simulation period. The MIKE21C model was validated by comparing simulated water surface elevations to those from a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model. We compared the sediment transport model simulated suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) to measured concentrations at a gage station. Erosion and deposition processes were simulated using five hydrograph scenarios as a function of high and low SSC and two sediment transport equations, Van Rijn (1984) and Engelund and Hansen (1967). A specific location could be an erosional or depositional zone at different time steps of the simulation. Thus, floodplain deposition is a discontinuous function of river discharge and varies spatially and temporally over the floodplain. Large flows with high SSC were more effective for floodplain deposition than lower discharges, which dominantly caused sediment scour. Coupled hydrodynamic and sediment transport models that account for feedback processes between topography and hydraulics should be given first preference for future floodplain restoration projects. From a restoration perspective, larger flows are required for greater floodplain deposition rates and maintenance of dynamic processes. The Engelund and Hansen (1967) equation simulated higher transport rates than the Van Rijn equation (1984). For future studies, transport equations should be selected based on the

  8. Ultraviolet Photodissociation Action Spectroscopy of Protonated Azabenzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Christopher S.; Blanksby, Stephen J.; Bieske, Evan; Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Trevitt, Adam J.

    2014-06-01

    Azabenzenes are derivatives of benzene containing between one and six nitrogen atoms. Protonated azabenzenes are the fundamental building blocks of many biomolecules, charge-transfer dyes, ionic liquids and fluorescent tags. However, despite their ubiquity, there exists limited spectroscopic data that reveals the structure, behaviour and stability of these systems in their excited states. For the case of pyridinium (C_5H_5N-H^+), the simplest azabenzene, the electronic spectroscopy is complicated by short excited state lifetimes, efficient non-radiative deactivation methods and limited fluorescence. Ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation (PD) action spectroscopy provides new insight into the spectroscopic details, excited state behaviour and photodissociation processes of a series of protonated azabenzenes including pyridinium, diazeniums and their substituted derivatives. The room-temperature UV PD action spectra, often exhibiting vibronic detail,^b will be presented alongside PD mass spectra and the kinetic data from structurally-diagnostic ion-molecule reaction kinetics. Analysis of the spectra, with the aid of quantum chemical calculations, reveal that many azabenzenes prefer a non-planar excited state geometry reminiscent of the structures encountered in 'channel 3'-like deactivation of aromatics. The normal modes active in this isomerization contribute largely to the spectroscopy of the N-pyridinium ion as they build upon totally-symmetric vibronic transitions leading to repeating sets of closely-spaced spectral features. Hansen, C.S. et al.; J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 24:932-940 (2013) Hansen, C.S. et al.; J. Phys. Chem. A 117:10839-10846 (2013)

  9. Formation of Close-in Super-Earths by Giant Impacts: Effects of Initial Eccentricities and Inclinations of Protoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yuji; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    Recent exoplanet observations are revealing the eccentricity and inclination distributions of exoplanets. Most of observed super-Earths have small eccentricities ~ 0.01 - 0.1 and small inclinations ~ 0.03 rad (e.g., Fabrycky et al., 2014). These distributions are results of their formation processes. N-body simulations have been used to investigate accretion of close-in super-Earths (e.g., Hansen & Murray 2012, Ogihara et al. 2015). Hansen & Murray (2013) showed that the averaged eccentricity of close-in super-Earths formed through giant impacts in gas-free and no planetesimal environment is around 0.1. In the giant impact stage, the eccentricities and inclinations are pumped up by gravitational scattering and damped by collisions. Matsumoto et al. (2015) found that the eccentricity damping rate by a collision depends on the eccentricity and inclination and thus affects the eccentricity and inclination of planets. We investigate the effect of initial eccentricities and inclinations of protoplanets on eccentricities and inclinations of planets. We perform N-body simulations with systematically changing initial eccentricities and inclinations of protoplanets independently. We find that the eccentricities and inclinations of planets barely depend on the initial eccentricities of protoplanets although the collision timescale is changed. This means that initial eccentricities of protoplanets are well relaxed through scattering and collisions. On the other hand, the initial inclinations of protoplanets affect the inclination of planets since they are not relaxed during the giant impact stage. Since the collisional timescale increases with inclinations, protoplanets with high inclinations tend to interact longer until they collide with each other. As a result, planets get large eccentricities, and the number of planets becomes small. The observed eccentricities and inclinations of super-Earths can be reproduced by giant impacts of protoplanets with inclinations ~ 10-3 -10

  10. No Ocean Source for the Enceladus Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Schneider, N. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Kargel, J. S.; Schaller, E. L.; Brown, M. E.

    2007-12-01

    One surprising discovery of the Cassini mission to Saturn has been the presence of geyser-like plumes at the south pole of the icy moon Enceladus ejecting >300; kg/s of water into Saturn's magnetosphere. In situ and remote observations (Waite et al. 2006; Hansen et al. 2006) have shown that the primary plume constituent is H2O, and thermal measurements indicate intense heating in cracks believed to be plume vents on the surface (Spencer et al. 2006). These observations have led to speculation that the plumes are fed from a liquid water reservoir beneath Enceladus' surface. We present results from an extremely sensitive, high-resolution spectroscopic search using the Keck and Anglo-Australian Telescopes which place a stringent upper limit on sodium emission in the Enceladus plumes. Large amounts of sodium would be expected if Enceladus' plume material were derived directly from a subsurface liquid reservoir in contact with rocky material. Chemical models predict that sodium would dissolve into such an ocean at mixing ratios relative to water of 10-4 to 10-1 (Zolotov et al., 2007). Our numerical plume models show that such high sodium concentrations would form a detectable torus encircling Saturn. Our detection upper limits fall orders of magnitude below these models, leading us to conclude that the Enceladus plumes do not originate in an ocean or sea. These observations support the alternative theories that the plumes are generated by shear heating of the icy crust resulting in sublimation or melting, or the decomposition of clathrates. This work has been supported by the NASA Postdoctoral Program and the NSF's Planetary Astronomy Program. References: Hansen et al., Science, 311, 1422, 2006. Spencer et al., Science, 311, 1401, 2006. Waite et al., Science, 311, 1419, 2006. Zolotov et al., Presented to the "Enceladus Focus Group Workshop," Boulder, CO, 2007.

  11. Establishing the importance of oil-membrane interactions on the transmembrane diffusion of physicochemically diverse compounds.

    PubMed

    Najib, Omaima N; Martin, Gary P; Kirton, Stewart B; Sallam, Al-Sayed; Murnane, Darragh

    2016-06-15

    The diffusion process through a non-porous barrier membrane depends on the properties of the drug, vehicle and membrane. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether a series of oily vehicles might have the potential to interact to varying degrees with synthetic membranes and to determine whether any such interaction might affect the permeation of co-formulated permeants: methylparaben (MP); butylparaben (BP) or caffeine (CF). The oils (isopropyl myristate (IPM), isohexadecane (IHD), hexadecane (HD), oleic acid (OA) and liquid paraffin (LP)) and membranes (silicone, high density polyethylene and polyurethane) employed in the study were selected such that they displayed a range of different structural, and physicochemical properties. Diffusion studies showed that many of the vehicles were not inert and did interact with the membranes resulting in a modification of the permeants' flux when corrected for membrane thickness (e.g. normalized flux of MP increased from 1.25±0.13μgcm(-1)h(-1) in LP to 17.94±0.25μgcm(-1)h(-1)in IPM). The oils were sorbed differently to membranes (range of weight gain: 2.2±0.2% for polyurethane with LP to 105.6±1.1% for silicone with IHD). Membrane interaction was apparently dependent upon the physicochemical properties including; size, shape, flexibility and the Hansen solubility parameter values of both the membranes and oils. Sorbed oils resulted in modified permeant diffusion through the membranes. No simple correlation was found to exist between the Hansen solubility parameters of the oils or swelling of the membrane and the normalized fluxes of the three compounds investigated. More sophisticated modelling would appear to be required to delineate and quantify the key molecular parameters of membrane, permeant and vehicle compatibility and their interactions of relevance to membrane permeation. PMID:27012979

  12. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White further described LOLA in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; From Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  13. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White described the simulator as follows: 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  14. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Track, Model 2 and Model 1, the 20-foot sphere. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) From Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966. 'The model system is designed so that a television camera is mounted on a camera boom on each transport cart and each cart system is shared by two models. The cart's travel along the tracks represents longitudinal motion along the plane of a nominal orbit, vertical travel of the camera boom represents latitude on out-of-plane travel, and horizontal travel of the camera boom represents altitude changes.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379.

  15. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White further described LOLA in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  16. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Construction of Model 1 used in the LOLA simulator. This was a twenty-foot sphere which simulated for the astronauts what the surface of the moon would look like from 200 miles up. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote: 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  17. Thermodynamic approach to boron nitride nanotube solubility and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Tiano, A L; Gibbons, L; Tsui, M; Applin, S I; Silva, R; Park, C; Fay, C C

    2016-02-21

    Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to improve dispersion include surface functionalization, surfactants, polymer wrapping, and sonication. Although these approaches have proven effective, they often achieve dispersion by altering the surface or structure of the nanomaterial and ultimately, their intrinsic properties. Co-solvents are commonly utilized in the polymer, paint, and art conservation industries to selectively dissolve materials. These co-solvents are utilized based on thermodynamic interaction parameters and are chosen so that the original materials are not affected. The same concept was applied to enhance the dispersion of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to facilitate the fabrication of BNNT nanocomposites. Of the solvents tested, dimethylacetamide (DMAc) exhibited the most stable, uniform dispersion of BNNTs, followed by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), acetone, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Utilizing the known Hansen solubility parameters of these solvents in comparison to the BNNT dispersion state, a region of good solubility was proposed. This solubility region was used to identify co-solvent systems that led to improved BNNT dispersion in poor solvents such as toluene, hexane, and ethanol. Incorporating the data from the co-solvent studies further refined the proposed solubility region. From this region, the Hansen solubility parameters for BNNTs are thought to lie at the midpoint of the solubility sphere: 16.8, 10.7, and 9.0 MPa(1/2) for δd, δp, and δh, respectively, with a calculated Hildebrand parameter of 21.8 MPa(1/2). PMID:26839175

  18. Do stress-whitening and optical clearing of collagenous tissue occur by the same mechanism?

    PubMed

    Hardisty, M R; Soicher, M A; Garcia, T C; Stover, S M; Fyhrie, D P

    2013-09-27

    Bone is biphasic with an organic matrix and an inorganic mineral component. As we age bone's susceptibility to fracture increases. It has been shown that there is no change in mean mineralization with aging, but bone nevertheless becomes less tough. This aging effect is therefore likely related to the organic phase. Under mechanical loading, immediately prior to failure, bone has been observed to visually become more opaque and has been termed stress-whitening. Stress-whitening is known to make materials tougher. The goal of this investigation was to investigate stress-whitening in the collagenous matrix of bone. Hydrogen bonds play a key role in collagen stability and we hypothesize that changes in hydrogen bonding will significantly affect matrix stiffness, toughness and stress whitening. Demineralized bone specimens were loaded in tension and stress-whitening was monitored. The effect of hydrogen bonding on mechanical properties and stress-whitening process was probed by altering the Hansen's hydrogen bonding parameter (δh) of the immersing solution. The Hansen's hydrogen bonding parameter of the immersing fluid affected the morphology, mechanical properties and stress whitening of specimens. Specimens were visually whiter in the absence of mechanical load in low δh solvents (the specimens solvent-whitened). Both the observed stress-whitening and solvent-whitening were reversible and repeatable processes. The observed solvent-whitening that occurred without the presence of load was consistent with solvent-induced optical clearing (the opposite of whitening) in skin caused by collagen fibril swelling. Stress whitening and solvent whitening can be explained by a common mechanism, collagen fibril densification and thinning, leading to an increased distinction between the collagen fibrillar phase and immersing fluid, ultimately leading to more scattering. Bones may be at a greater risk for fracture as we age because solubility of the matrix changes, thus making

  19. Apollo Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Construction of Model 2 used in the LOLA simulator: Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote in his paper, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  20. Apollo Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Construction of the track which runs in front of Model 3: Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'The model system is designed so that a television camera is mounted on a camera boom on each transport cart and each cart system is shared by two models. The cart's travel along the tracks represents longitudinal motion along the plane of a nominal orbit, vertical travel of the camera boom represents latitude on out-of-plane travel, and horizontal travel of the camera boom represents altitude changes.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  1. Apollo Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Construction of the track which runs in front of Model 2. Technicians work on Model 1, the 20-foot sphere. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'The model system is designed so that a television camera is mounted on a camera boom on each transport cart and each cart system is shared by two models. The cart's travel along the tracks represents longitudinal motion along the plane of a nominal orbit, vertical travel of the camera boom represents latitude on out-of-plane travel, and horizontal travel of the camera boom represents altitude changes.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  2. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White further described LOLA in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution, NASA SP-4308, p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  3. Apollo Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Construction of Model 1 used in the LOLA simulator. This was a twenty-foot sphere which simulated for the astronauts what the surface of the moon would look like from 200 miles up. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  4. Geologic controls of uranium mineralization in the Tallahassee Creek uranium district, Fremont County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, K.A.

    1981-10-01

    Two important orebodies have been defined by drilling in the Tallahassee Creek uranium district, Fremont County, Colorado. They are the Hansen orebody, which contains about 12 million kg of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, and the Picnic Tree orebody, which contains about 1 million kg of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. Host rock for the Hansen is the upper Eocene Echo Park Alluvium, and host rock for the Picnic Tree is the lower Oligocene Tallahassee Creek onglomerate. Average ore grade for both deposits is about 0.08 percent U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. The principal source rock for the uranium depsoits is the lower Oligocene Wall Mountain Tuff, although a younger volcanic rock, the Oligocene Thirtynine Mile Andesite, and Precambrian granitic rocks probably also contributed some uranium. Leaching and transportation of the uranium occurred in alkaline oxidizing ground water that developed during alteration of the ash in a semi-arid environment. The uranium was transported in the ground water to favorable sites where it was deposited in a reducing environment controlled by carbonaceous material and associated pyrite. Localization of the ore was controlled by ground-water flow conditions and by the distribution of organic matter in the host rock. Ground-water flow, which was apparently to the southeast in Echo Park Alluvium that is confined in the Echo Park graben, was impeded by a fault that offsets the southern end of the graben. This offset prevented efficient discharge into the ancestral Arkansas River drainage, and protected chemically reducing areas from destruction by the influx of large amounts of oxidizing ground water. The location of orebodies in the Echo Park Alluvium also may be related to areas where overlying rocks of low permeability were breached by erosion during deposition of the fluvial Tallahassee Creek Conglomerate allowing localized entry of uranium-bearing water.

  5. Ionic asymmetry and solvent excluded volume effects on spherical electric double layers: A density functional approach

    PubMed Central

    Medasani, Bharat; Ovanesyan, Zaven; Thomas, Dennis G.; Sushko, Maria L.; Marucho, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a classical density functional theory for electrical double layers of spherical macroions that extends the capabilities of conventional approaches by accounting for electrostatic ion correlations, size asymmetry, and excluded volume effects. The approach is based on a recent approximation introduced by Hansen-Goos and Roth for the hard sphere excess free energy of inhomogeneous fluids [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154506 (2006); Hansen-Goos and Roth, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 8413 (2006)]. It accounts for the proper and efficient description of the effects of ionic asymmetry and solvent excluded volume, especially at high ion concentrations and size asymmetry ratios including those observed in experimental studies. Additionally, we utilize a leading functional Taylor expansion approximation of the ion density profiles. In addition, we use the mean spherical approximation for multi-component charged hard sphere fluids to account for the electrostatic ion correlation effects. These approximations are implemented in our theoretical formulation into a suitable decomposition of the excess free energy which plays a key role in capturing the complex interplay between charge correlations and excluded volume effects. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in various scenarios to validate the proposed approach, obtaining a good compromise between accuracy and computational cost. We use the proposed computational approach to study the effects of ion size, ion size asymmetry, and solvent excluded volume on the ion profiles, integrated charge, mean electrostatic potential, and ionic coordination number around spherical macroions in various electrolyte mixtures. Our results show that both solvent hard sphere diameter and density play a dominant role in the distribution of ions around spherical macroions, mainly for experimental water molarity and size values where the counterion distribution is characterized by a tight binding to the macroion, similar to that

  6. Density- and wavefunction-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ≤ 20.

    PubMed

    Michael, J Robert; Volkov, Anatoliy

    2015-03-01

    The widely used pseudoatom formalism [Stewart (1976). Acta Cryst. A32, 565-574; Hansen & Coppens (1978). Acta Cryst. A34, 909-921] in experimental X-ray charge-density studies makes use of real spherical harmonics when describing the angular component of aspherical deformations of the atomic electron density in molecules and crystals. The analytical form of the density-normalized Cartesian spherical harmonic functions for up to l ≤ 7 and the corresponding normalization coefficients were reported previously by Paturle & Coppens [Acta Cryst. (1988), A44, 6-7]. It was shown that the analytical form for normalization coefficients is available primarily for l ≤ 4 [Hansen & Coppens, 1978; Paturle & Coppens, 1988; Coppens (1992). International Tables for Crystallography, Vol. B, Reciprocal space, 1st ed., edited by U. Shmueli, ch. 1.2. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers; Coppens (1997). X-ray Charge Densities and Chemical Bonding. New York: Oxford University Press]. Only in very special cases it is possible to derive an analytical representation of the normalization coefficients for 4 < l ≤ 7 (Paturle & Coppens, 1988). In most cases for l > 4 the density normalization coefficients were calculated numerically to within seven significant figures. In this study we review the literature on the density-normalized spherical harmonics, clarify the existing notations, use the Paturle-Coppens (Paturle & Coppens, 1988) method in the Wolfram Mathematica software to derive the Cartesian spherical harmonics for l ≤ 20 and determine the density normalization coefficients to 35 significant figures, and computer-generate a Fortran90 code. The article primarily targets researchers who work in the field of experimental X-ray electron density, but may be of some use to all who are interested in Cartesian spherical harmonics. PMID:25727874

  7. Investigating the Dispersion Behavior in Solvents, Biocompatibility, and Use as Support for Highly Efficient Metal Catalysts of Exfoliated Graphitic Carbon Nitride.

    PubMed

    Ayán-Varela, M; Villar-Rodil, S; Paredes, J I; Munuera, J M; Pagán, A; Lozano-Pérez, A A; Cenis, J L; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2015-11-01

    The liquid-phase exfoliation of graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) to afford colloidal dispersions of two-dimensional flakes constitutes an attractive route to facilitate the processing and implementation of this novel material toward different technological applications, but quantitative knowledge about its dispersibility in solvents is lacking. Here, we investigate the dispersion behavior of exfoliated g-C3N4 in a wide range of solvents and evaluate the obtained results on the basis of solvent surface energy and Hildebrand/Hansen solubility parameters. Estimates of the three Hansen parameters for exfoliated g-C3N4 from the experimentally derived data yielded δD ≈ 17.8 MPa(1/2), δP ≈ 10.8 MPa(1/2), and δH ≈ 15.4 MPa(1/2). The relatively high δH value suggested that, contrary to the case of other two-dimensional materials (e.g., graphene or transition metal dichalcogenides), hydrogen-bonding plays a substantial role in the efficient interaction, and thus dispersibility, of exfoliated g-C3N4 with solvents. Such an outcome was attributed to a high density of primary and/or secondary amines in the material, the presence of which was associated with incomplete condensation of the structure. Furthermore, cell proliferation tests carried out on thin films of exfoliated g-C3N4 using murine fibroblasts suggested that this material is highly biocompatible and noncytotoxic. Finally, the exfoliated g-C3N4 flakes were used as supports in the synthesis of Pd nanoparticles, and the resulting hybrids exhibited an exceptional catalytic activity in the reduction of nitroarenes. PMID:26465228

  8. How do liquid mixtures solubilize insoluble gelators? Self-assembly properties of pyrenyl-linker-glucono gelators in tetrahydrofuran-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ni; Xu, Zhiyan; Diehn, Kevin K; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Fang, Yu; Weiss, Richard G

    2013-06-19

    The self-assembly behavior of a series of glucono-appended 1-pyrenesulfonyl derivatives containing α,ω-diaminoalkane spacers (Pn, where n, the number of methylene units separating the amino groups, is 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8) in v:v tetrahydrofuran (THF):water mixtures is examined at room temperature. The Pn at 2 w/v % concentrations do not dissolve in either THF or water at room temperature. However, the Pn can be dissolved in some THF:water mixtures, and they form gels spontaneously in other compositions without dissolving completely. The self-assembly of the Pn in the liquid mixtures has been investigated using a variety of techniques. The particle sizes of the Pn in their solutions/sols, critical gelation concentrations, microstructures, thermal and mechanical stabilities of the gels, and molecular packing modes of Pn molecules in their gel networks are found to be very dependent on the composition of the liquid mixtures. Correlations between the self-assembly behavior of the Pn and the polarity of the liquid mixtures, as probed by E(T)(30) and Hansen solubility parameters, yield both qualitative and quantitative insights into why self-assembly of the Pn can or cannot be achieved in different liquid compositions. As revealed by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy studies, π-π stacking of the pyrenyl groups occurs as part of the aggregation process. Correlations between the rheological properties of the gels and the Hansen solubility parameters of the Pn and the solvent mixtures indicate that hydrogen-bonding interactions are a major contributor to the mechanical stability. Overall, the results of this study offer a new strategy to investigate the balance between dissolution and aggregation of molecular gelators. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of the spontaneous formation of molecular gels without heating by placing gelators in mixtures of liquids in which they are insoluble in the neat components. PMID:23735009

  9. Climate forcing growth rates: doubling down on our Faustian bargain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; Sato, Makiko

    2013-03-01

    Rahmstorf et al 's (2012) conclusion that observed climate change is comparable to projections, and in some cases exceeds projections, allows further inferences if we can quantify changing climate forcings and compare those with projections. The largest climate forcing is caused by well-mixed long-lived greenhouse gases. Here we illustrate trends of these gases and their climate forcings, and we discuss implications. We focus on quantities that are accurately measured, and we include comparison with fixed scenarios, which helps reduce common misimpressions about how climate forcings are changing. Annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions have shot up in the past decade at about 3% yr-1, double the rate of the prior three decades (figure 1). The growth rate falls above the range of the IPCC (2001) 'Marker' scenarios, although emissions are still within the entire range considered by the IPCC SRES (2000). The surge in emissions is due to increased coal use (blue curve in figure 1), which now accounts for more than 40% of fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Figure 1. Figure 1. CO2 annual emissions from fossil fuel use and cement manufacture, an update of figure 16 of Hansen (2003) using data of British Petroleum (BP 2012) concatenated with data of Boden et al (2012). The resulting annual increase of atmospheric CO2 (12-month running mean) has grown from less than 1 ppm yr-1 in the early 1960s to an average ~2 ppm yr-1 in the past decade (figure 2). Although CO2 measurements were not made at sufficient locations prior to the early 1980s to calculate the global mean change, the close match of global and Mauna Loa data for later years suggests that Mauna Loa data provide a good approximation of global change (figure 2), thus allowing a useful estimate of annual global change beginning with the initiation of Mauna Loa measurements in 1958 by Keeling et al (1973). Figure 2. Figure 2. Annual increase of CO2 based on data from the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL 2012). CO2 change

  10. Reticence vs. Responsibility: Why Climate Scientists Sometimes Need to Think Like Emergency Room Doctors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, K.

    2013-12-01

    Hansen (2007), Brysse et al (2012), and Oreskes (2013) have drawn attention to the too-frequent reticence of climate scientists---the unwillingness to err on the side of predicting extreme outcomes or recommend strong action to prevent those outcomes. In Hansen's words, this may hinder 'communication with the public about dangers of global warming' and thereby lessen the chance of effective responses to this urgent threat. Scientists may be reticent about the kinds of extreme outcomes that could occur (ice sheet collapse, oceanic anoxia, killer heat waves, etc.), the probabilities of such outcomes, or the options for preventing or mitigating such outcomes. I will review the reasons, some understandable and some regrettable, for such reticence. (The latter could include the 'seepage' into professional discourse of the often-poisonous atmosphere of climate science denialism; Lewandowsky 2013.) My major aim will be to argue that scientists need a clearly defined ethical framework that coheres with the scientific ethos, and I will suggest that the place to look for such an ethical framework is in the realm of professional ethics. I will review key features of the learned professions such as medicine and engineering, where practitioners (such as emergency room physicians) are necessarily attuned to the imperative of making life-or-death decisions and recommendations in real time, under conditions of uncertainty. I hardly mean to suggest that pure science does not have a professional ethos of its own, but research science as such is not a legally constituted profession (like medicine) and it is focussed on the disinterested search for reliable knowledge above all other goals. Medicine and engineering depend upon and contribute to scientific knowledge but they are aimed at practical ends as well---the welfare of patients or protection of the public as a whole. Also, it is in the nature of engineering and other learned professions that (like pure science) they often

  11. IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. quinlan; A. Wylie

    2006-06-01

    Recycled CO2 is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO2 injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and has produced at an average rate of 61 BOPD (Jan-Dec, 2005). The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 29 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO2 injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO2 injection volume has reached approximately 2.18 BCF. The CO2 injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been stabilized at an average rate of 57 BOPD (July-Dec, 2005). Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization was completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves are showing trends that indicate significant

  12. Implementing A Novel Cyclic CO2 Flood In Paleozoic Reefs

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

    2005-03-31

    Recycled CO{sub 2} is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO{sub 2} injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and is presently producing 52 BOPD. The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 21 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO{sub 2} injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO{sub 2} injection volume has reached approximately 1.6 BCF. The CO{sub 2} injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been successfully increased to a stable rate of 73 BOPD. Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant

  13. Modelling the circular polarisation of Earth-like exoplanets: constraints on detecting homochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogenboom, Michael; Stam, Daphne; Rossi, Loic; Snik, Frans

    2016-04-01

    The circular polarisation of light is a property of electromagnetic radiation from which extensive information can be extracted. It is oft-neglected due to its small signal relative to linear polarisation and the need for advanced instrumentation in measuring it. Additionally, numerical modelling is complex as the full Stokes vector must always be computed. Circular polarisation is commonly induced through the multiple scattering of light by aerosols te{hansen} and multiple reflections of light by rough surfaces te{circplanets}. Most interestingly, distinctive spectral circular polarimetric behaviour is exhibited by light reflected by organisms due to the homochiral molecular structure of all known organisms te{chiralbailey}. Especially fascinating is the unique circular polarimetric behaviour of light reflected by photosynthesising organisms at the absorption wavelength of the chlorophyll pigment te{circpolchar}. This presents the previously unexplored possibility of circular polarimetry as a method for identifying and characterising the presence of organisms, a method which could be applied in the hunt for extraterrestrial life. To date, few telescopes exist that measure circular polarisation and none that have been deployed in space. Observations of the circular polarisation reflected by other planets in the solar system have been made with ground-based telescopes, with significant results te{circplanets}. However, none of these observations have been made at the phase angles at which exoplanets will be observed. Also, none have been made of the Earth, which is the logical starting point for the study of biologically induced circular polarisation signals. This introduces the need for numerical modelling to determine the extent to which circular polarisation is present in light reflected by exoplanets or the Earth. In this study, we model the multiple scattering and reflection of light using the doubling-adding method te{dehaan}. We will present circular

  14. How to use The National Gallery as a cross curricular approach to weather and climate studies at primary level.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, P. J. K.

    2009-09-01

    How to use The National Gallery as a cross curricular approach to weather and climate studies at primary level. Pål J. Kirkeby Hansen Faculty of Education and International Studies, Oslo University College (PalKirkeby.Hansen@lui.hio.no) Weather and climate are topics in natural science and geography in primary and secondary education in most countries. The pupils are often doing own weather observations and measurements and are presenting the results oral, by posters or with digital aids. They also use the Internet with all its relevant resources in their studies to develop vocabulary, practical and conceptual knowledge. Knowledge about weather and climate is parts of liberal education and could be projected to other topics in science and to topics in other subjects, for instance: history, social geography, literature and arts. This article reports from a case study in grade 3 classes (age 9 year) during their Weather Week. Their science teacher was, quite untypical, also educated in art history. She arranged a visited to The National Gallery with the double agenda: 1. To introduce the pupils to Norwegian canon paintings from the national romantic period, our so-called "golden age”. 2. To look for and discuss weather elements in this paintings. For one hour the museum curator guided the pupils around the water cycle by using the paintings. While the pupils' own observations of weather, clouds and wind and measurements of temperature and precipitation during the Weather Week only are point checks, the guided tour in The National Gallery gave literally "the whole picture” of the Norwegian weather and climate and of the water cycle. During the tour, the curator constantly invited the pupils to tell about and discuss what weather and water elements they were looking at when standing in front of a painting. The pupils were responsive and interested all the time. Back at school, they demonstrated that they had learned much about both weather elements, the water

  15. INCREASING EVIDENCE FOR HEMISPHERICAL POWER ASYMMETRY IN THE FIVE-YEAR WMAP DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Hoftuft, J.; Eriksen, H. K.; Hansen, F. K.; Lilje, P. B.; Banday, A. J.; Gorski, K. M.

    2009-07-10

    Motivated by the recent results of Hansen et al. concerning a noticeable hemispherical power asymmetry in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data on small angular scales, we revisit the dipole-modulated signal model introduced by Gordon et al.. This model assumes that the true cosmic microwave background signal consists of a Gaussian isotropic random field modulated by a dipole, and is characterized by an overall modulation amplitude, A, and a preferred direction, p-hat. Previous analyses of this model have been restricted to very low resolution (i.e., 3.{sup 0}6 pixels, a smoothing scale of 9 deg. FWHM, and l {approx}< 40) due to computational cost. In this paper, we double the angular resolution (i.e., 1.{sup 0}8 pixels and 4.{sup 0}5 FWHM smoothing scale), and compute the full corresponding posterior distribution for the five-year WMAP data. The results from our analysis are the following: the best-fit modulation amplitude for l {<=} 64 and the ILC data with the WMAP KQ85 sky cut is A = 0.072 {+-} 0.022, nonzero at 3.3{sigma}, and the preferred direction points toward Galactic coordinates (l, b) = (224 deg., - 22 deg.) {+-} 24 deg. The corresponding results for l {approx}< 40 from earlier analyses were A = 0.11 {+-} 0.04 and (l, b) = (225 deg. - 27 deg.). The statistical significance of a nonzero amplitude thus increases from 2.8{sigma} to 3.3{sigma} when increasing l{sub max} from 40 to 64, and all results are consistent to within 1{sigma}. Similarly, the Bayesian log-evidence difference with respect to the isotropic model increases from {delta}ln E = 1.8 to {delta}ln E = 2.6, ranking as 'strong evidence' on the Jeffreys' scale. The raw best-fit log-likelihood difference increases from {delta}ln L = 6.1 to {delta}ln L = 7.3. Similar, and often slightly stronger, results are found for other data combinations. Thus, we find that the evidence for a dipole power distribution in the WMAP data increases with l in the five-year WMAP data set, in agreement

  16. The effect of the 2008 Mw 7.9 Sichuan earthquake on regional landslide patterns between 2001 and 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Kerry; Krammel, Lisa; Krautblatter, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Large earthquakes have a major impact on patterns of regional landsliding. Here, we utilise a twelve-year record of forest cover change in the region of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake in order to assess geomorphic factors contributing to slope instability in years prior to, during, and after the earthquake. The satellite-based catalogue of forest cover change developed by Hansen et al. (2013) compares favourably with results from a study of earthquake-induced slope instability undertaken by Parker et al. (2011), indicating that our correlation of tree loss with regional landsliding is reasonable. While we cannot account for slope stability on unvegetated slopes, the temporal nature of the dataset allows us to account for the presence of pre-existing landslides or barren rock slopes which have complicated previous studies. We assess a number of geomorphic factors including slope, aspect, curvature, ruggedness, height and distance from river channels, and the hydrological slope (calculated using the downslope distance to river channels). In order to account for spatial distributions as a result of local seismicity, interpreted landslide locations were normalised against a randomly generated distribution of points seeded using observed landslide concentrations within 1 km x 1 km cells. We find that while few metrics allow us to distinguish the 2008 data from the random dataset, aspect played an important role in determining susceptibility, and slopes with a greater hydrological slope demonstrate a greater susceptibility for failure. In addition, we observe a notable decrease in the elevation of landslides in the year of the earthquake, and progressive increase in elevations in successive years following. This may either be a result of retrogressive slope failure, or a return to 'normal' stability conditions in the four years following the earthquake. Hansen, M. C., Potapov, P. V., Moore, R., Hancher, M., Turubanova, S. A., Tyukavina, A., Thau, D., Stehman, S. V., Goetz

  17. Magnetoplasmadynamcis - Portrait of Macon C. 'Mike' Ellis, Jr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Portrait of Macon C. 'Mike' Ellis, Jr. James Hansen described Mike Ellis as 'the first and only person to be in charge of Langley's Magnetoplasmadynamcis (MPD) Branch.' He was 'an NACA veteran who was 42 years old when the branch was organized. Ellis had come to work at Langley in 1939, and over the course of his career at the laboratory, he had been involved in pioneering work on the aerodynamics of jet engines, ramjets, and supersonic inlets and nozzles. Fittingly, Ellis had worked for Eastman Jacobs and with Arthur Kantrowitz in the early 1940s, and he had heard firsthand accounts of his former colleagues' attempts to design a fusion reactor in the spring of 1938. By the late 1950s, Ellis was one of Langley's most outspoken believers in MPD's promise of technological benefits. Ellis encouraged Floyd Thompson's enthusiasm for MPD and persuaded Langley's senior staff of mostly engineers that MPD was a field of research vital to the future of NASA. When the time came to pick someone to head the new branch, Ellis was unquestionably the person for the job. 'Ellis was no extraordinary 'scientific brain.' As an aeronautical engineer, his talents were quite respectable, but he possessed no special competency in the physics of fluids beyond his experience in aerodynamics or gas dynamics. He was always the first to admit that the complexities of plasma physics and MPD were such that 'there was no way' that he personally could conduct basic MPD research. That challenge he would leave to minds more suited for it. But Ellis could bring the MPD researchers together as a unit, serve as their strong external advocate, shield them from front-office pressures, and make sure that they received the support they needed to carry out their work. 'I just tried to keep my head above water,' Ellis explains, 'and keep these *mad scientists' from going off on too many tangents, or going mad myself.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From

  18. Mapping faults and intrusions onshore Disko Island by use of Vibroseismic data, shallow marine seismic data and electromagnetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Ole R.; Nørmark, Egon; Gulbrandsen, Pelle; Sabra, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    The west Greenland margin is characterized by sedimentary basins containing high density of intrusions (dikes and sills) originating from the Cenozoic breakup and separation of Greenland and North American. The magmatic rocks have lately attracted interest due to observations of hydrocarbons associated to the intrusions but here due to the ore potential associated to the same intrusions. In 2000 a marine seismic campaign by GEUS in the coastal areas of West Greenland showed that it is possible to identify magmatic intrusions in the sedimentary succession as well as map normal faults, and that the intrusions are heterogeneous distributed and probably related to the normal faults. The presence of normal faults is known from the regional onshore geological mapping campaigns performed by GEUS. However, the marine seismic data indicate a much more complicated structural pattern than presented in the onshore maps, which is a well-known phenomenon (Marcussen et al., 2002). In 2012 and 2013 seismic data were acquired onshore on the northern coast of Disko as part of a research project funded by Avannaa Resources . The objective was initially to test whether it is possible to acquire data of a quality enabling the observation and mapping of intrusions in the subsurface. Later it was followed by a more extensive survey where it was attempted to map the depth to and geometry of the intrusions. The relatively dense seismic grid onshore -compared to the marine seismic data offshore west Greenland- enable the identification and more important the mapping of several intrusions. They show some of the same characteristics as intrusions observed at e.q. the Norwegian margin of the North Atlantic (Hansen et al., 2004). The preliminary results which integrate both marine and onshore seismic data revise the structural understanding of the area and indicate a close relation between the intrusions and the rift related normal faults. The results are consistent with remote sensing methods

  19. Sedimentary and crustal structure from the Ellesmere Island and Greenland continental shelves onto the Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl-Jensen, T.; Jackson, H. R.; Lorita Working Group

    2009-04-01

    Two wide-angle refraction/reflection lines were acquired jointly by the geological surveys of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) and Canada (GCS) on the sea ice north of Ellesmere Island and Greenland. The aim was to investigate the junction of the Lomonosov Ridge with the polar margin, crossing from the continental shelf over a bathymetric trough out onto the Lomonosov Ridge. A 14 km deep sedimentary basin consisting of two layers interpreted to be part of the Arctic Continental Terrace Wedge and under these a 9 km thick layer interpreted the to be continuation offshore of the Mesozoic to Paleozoic Sverdrup Basin sequence were found. Underneath the basin a layer with velocities consistent with metasedimentary rocks from the lower Paleozoic Franklinian Basin was modeled. The sedimentary basin and underlying metasedimentary rocks continue from the shelf out onto the Lomonosov Ridge. The underlying crust has velocities consistent with continental crust. On the shallow section of the Lomonosov Ridge, a basement high approaches the seafloor, creating the 220 km broad foot of the Ridge. Consistent with the wide-angle results, two short seismic reflection profiles in the vicinity penetrated only a thin veneer of sediments overlying basement. Furthermore, a pattern of radiating linear magnetic anomalis emanating from a circular high is coincident with the shallow basement. Onshore magnetic anomalies near north-western Ellesmere Island are reminiscent in pattern and amplitude to the anomaly on the southern end of the Ridge suggesting a similar source. In addition, the velocity structure is similar to that on the foot of the Ridge. Onshore, the anomalies are produced by the Hansen Point volcanic rocks. The proposed volcanic structure on the foot of the Ridge is by analogy to the Hansen Point volcanics and by its position in the velocity model is assumed to be intruded through continental crust, possibly as part of a failed rift zone proceeding opening of the Eurasia Basin. The

  20. Subsurface Gas Flow and Ice Grain Acceleration within Enceladus and Europa Fissures: 2D DSMC Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, O. J.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.

    2014-12-01

    The ejection of material from geysers is a ubiquitous occurrence on outer solar system bodies. Water vapor plumes have been observed emanating from the southern hemispheres of Enceladus and Europa (Hansen et al. 2011, Roth et al. 2014), and N2plumes carrying ice and ark particles on Triton (Soderblom et al. 2009). The gas and ice grain distributions in the Enceladus plume depend on the subsurface gas properties and the geometry of the fissures e.g., (Schmidt et al. 2008, Ingersoll et al. 2010). Of course the fissures can have complex geometries due to tidal stresses, melting, freezing etc., but directly sampled and inferred gas and grain properties for the plume (source rate, bulk velocity, terminal grain velocity) can be used to provide a basis to constrain characteristic dimensions of vent width and depth. We used a 2-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique to model venting from both axi-symmetric canyons with widths ~2 km and narrow jets with widths ~15-40 m. For all of our vent geometries, considered the water vapor source rates (1027­ - 1028 s-1) and bulk gas velocities (~330 - 670 m/s) obtained at the surface were consistent with inferred values obtained by fits of the data for the plume densities (1026 - 1028 s-1, 250 - 1000 m/s) respectively. However, when using the resulting DSMC gas distribution for the canyon geometries to integrate the trajectories of ice grains we found it insufficient to accelerate submicron ice grains to Enceladus' escape speed. On the other hand, the gas distributions in the jet like vents accelerated grains > 10 μm significantly above Enceladus' escape speed. It has been suggested that micron-sized grains are ejected from the vents with speeds comparable to the Enceladus escape speed. Here we report on these results including comparisons to results obtained from 1D models as well as discuss the implications of our plume model results. We also show preliminary results for similar considerations applied to Europa

  1. Apollo Project - LLRF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Looking down from the top of the gantry on to the simulated Lunar Surface. James Hansen writes: 'To make the simulated landings more authentic, [Donald] Hewes and his men filled the base of the huge eight-legged, red-and-white structure with dirt and modeled it to resemble the moon's surface. They erected floodlights at the proper angles to simulate lunar light and installed a black screen at the far end of the gantry to mimic the airless lunar 'sky.' Hewes personally climbed into the fake craters with cans of everyday black enamel to spray them so that the astronauts could experience the shadows that they would see during the actual moon landing.' (p. 375) From A.W. Vigil, 'Piloted Space-Flight Simulation at Langley Research Center,' Paper presented at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 1966 Winter Meeting, New York, NY, November 27 - December 1, 1966. 'Ground-based simulators are not very satisfactory for studying the problems associated with the final phases of landing. This is due primarily to the fact that the visual scene cannot be simulated with sufficient realism. For this reason it is preferable to go to some sort of flight-test simulator which can provide real-life visual cues. One research facility designed to study the final phases of lunar landing is in operation at Langley. ... The facility is an overhead crane structure about 250 feet tall and 400 feet long. The crane system supports five-sixths of the vehicle's weight through servo-driven vertical cables. The remaining one-sixth of the vehicle weight pulls the vehicle downward simulating the lunar gravitational force. During actual flights the overhead crane system is slaved to keep the cable near vertical at all times. A gimbal system on the vehicle permits angular freedom for pitch, roll, and yaw. The facility is capable of testing vehicles up to 20,000 pounds. A research vehicle, weighing 10,500 pounds fully loaded, is being used and is shown [in this picture]. This vehicle is provided

  2. Apollo Project - LOLA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Test subject sitting at the controls: Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) From Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966. 'A typical mission would start with the first cart positioned on model 1 for the translunar approach and orbit establishment. After starting the descent, the second cart is readied on model 2 and, at the proper time, when superposition occurs, the pilot's scene is switched from model 1 to model 2. then cart 1 is moved to and readied on model 3. The procedure continues until an altitude of 150 feet is obtained. The cabin of the LM vehicle has four windows which represent a 45 degree field of view. The projection screens in front of each window represent 65 degrees which allows limited head motion before the edges of the display can be seen. The lunar scene is presented to the pilot by rear projection on the screens with four Schmidt television

  3. Seasonal Aerosol Distributions at Summit, Greenland: EC, OC, 14C and Individual Particle Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klouda, G. A.; Conny, J. M.; McNichol, A. P.; Dibb, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol is known to affect the Earth's atmosphere and surface albedo thus having an influence on climate. In the case of carbonaceous aerosol, organic carbon (OC) tends to scatter sunlight while elemental (soot) carbon (EC) aerosol absorbs light. Considering the importance of these aerosols on snow and ice albedo (Hansen and Nazarenko, 2004), PM2.5, PM2.5-10 and snow-melt filters were collected weekly at Summit, Greenland from August 2000 to August 2002 to measure particulate EC, OC, and 14C of total carbon; the latter to quantify natural and anthropogenic source contributions. The pattern of PM2.5 shows a spring-summer maxima in EC (~10 ng m-3) and OC (~ 100 ng m-3); with levels consistent with summer 2006 measurements reported by Hagler et al. (2007). For a subset of filters over the two year period, the average biogenic contribution to PM2.5 OC was estimated to be 20 ng m-3 considering an average percent modern carbon of 46 % (SD=18 %; n=21) and an average total carbon concentration of 50 ng m-3. A summer maximum was observed in PM2.5-10 OC (~ 1000 ng m-3), while for the most part EC concentrations were below detection (< 300 ng m-3; limited primarily by the volume of air sampled). To provide insight into scattering and absorption properties of aerosols at Summit, we used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the size, shape, and chemistry of particle populations as well as individual particles from selected filters. Particles were migrated from the filters to polished silicon or germanium wafers using an electrostatically-assisted centrifugation technique. Particle populations were studied by employing secondary electron imaging and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) with automated SEM and associated particle analysis software. The size, shape, and composition of individual particles were studied with field-emission SEM employing secondary and backscatter electron imaging, bright-field and dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy

  4. Semi-automatic measures of activity in selected south polar regions of Mars using morphological image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aye, Klaus-Michael; Portyankina, Ganna; Pommerol, Antoine; Thomas, Nicolas

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been used to monitor the seasonal evolution of several regions at high southern latitudes. Of particular interest have been jet-like activities that may result from the process described by Kieffer (2007), involving translucent CO2 ice. These jets are assumed to create fan-shaped ground features, as studied e.g. in Hansen et.al. (2010) and Portyankina et.al. (2010). In Thomas et.al. (2009), a small region of interest (ROI) inside the south polar Inca City region (81° S, 296° E) was defined for which the seasonal change of the number of fans was determined. This ROI was chosen for its strong visual variability in ground features. The mostly manual counting work showed, that the number of apparent fans increases monotonously for a considerable amount of time from the beginning of the spring time observations at Ls of 178° until approx. 230° , following the increase of available solar energy for the aforementioned processes of the Kieffer model. This fact indicates that the number of visual fan features can be used as an activity measure for the seasonal evolution of this area, in addition to commonly used evolution studies of surface reflectance. Motivated by these results, we would like to determine the fan count evolution for more south polar areas like Ithaca, Manhattan, Giza and others. To increase the reproducibility of the results by avoiding potential variability in fan shape recognition by human eye and to increase the production efficiency, efforts are being undertaken to automise the fan counting procedure. The techniques used, cleanly separated in different stages of the procedure, the difficulties for each stage and an overview of the tools used at each step will be presented. After showing a proof of concept in Aye et.al. (2010), for a ROI that is comparable to the one previously used for manual counting in Thomas et.al. (2009), we now will show

  5. DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

    2011-04-25

    Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and

  6. IONOTOMO: A new approach for ionospheric tomography using OTH radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Corinna; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Boschi, Lapo; Moliné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Most of the recent methods in ionospheric tomography are based on the inversion of the Total Electron Content (TEC) measured by ground-based GPS receivers [e.g., Garcia et al. 2008]. As a consequence of the high frequency of the GPS, the electron density structure is principally well reconstructed at the F2 region, where the ionosphere reaches the maximum of ionization, neglecting the lower ionosphere. Here, we develop a new 3D ionospheric tomography method based on the full analysis of over-the-horizon (OTH) radar data. Previous studies in ionospheric tomography by OTH radar (Fridman and Fridman, 1994; Ruelle and Landeau, 1994; Landeau et al., 1997; Fridman, 1998) are all based on the inversion of the leading edge echo curve, consequently an important amount of valuable information present in the data is necessarily neglected. To overcome this limit, we set up a new method, based on the ray-tracing tool TDR [Occhipinti, 2006], to invert the propagation time of electromagnetic waves emitted by monostatic OTH radars. The major advance of our methodology is taking into account, numerically and jointly, not only the speed variation of EM wave induced by the electron density variation (solved analytically with a linear inversion) but also the perturbation in the raypath (nonlinear numerical method). As the present problem is an ill posed problem we calculate the matrix inversion numerically, using a regularisation method (Tikhonov, 1963). We determine the best regularisation parameter using the Lcurve method (Hansen, 2000). We present here the originality and the advantage of our method with a full set of synthetic benchmark highlighting the sensitivity of our tomography to the plasma heterogeneities. Some preliminary test on real data will be presented with a full coverage over Europe. Indeed, the ionospheric tomography by OTH radar, jointly with GPS, could open new exciting perspective in the plasma density estimation with a good resolution to the entire ionosphere

  7. Direct Monte Carlo Simulations of Gas Flow from Enceladus’ Nozzle-like Vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Orenthal; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.

    2013-10-01

    Collective observations by the Cassini spacecraft indicate that the gas plumes emanating from Enceladus’ south pole contain micrometer sized ice grains that travel at speeds 50-80% lower than the bulk gas speed (Kempf et al., 2008, Hedman et al., 2009, Teolis et al., 2010). Previous studies indicate the difference in velocity originates below the surface, and the gas flow to the surface occurs supersonically suggestive of nozzle like vents (Schmidt et al., 2008, Hansen et al., 2011). Here we use a 2D Direct Monte Carlo Simulation (DSMC) technique (Bird, 1994) to model gas flow and grain acceleration in nozzle like fissures for Enceladus’ vent geometries. First, we use the DSMC technique to model the transition of the gas flow from inside the highly collisional vent to a couple of meters above the surface where the gas flow becomes essentially collisionless. Then the DSMC results for gas density, temperature and velocity are used with an equation of motion for the drag force on a grain entrenched in a gas. The flow is tracked in both the vertical direction from the vent opening, and the radial direction from the vent axis. It is impossible to consider every type of vent geometry, but using Cassini data for grain sizes and velocities within the plumes we consider a few vent geometries of different width, length, and opening angle with respect to the surface. The Enceladus vents are not likely to be axially symmetric, but the simulations provide insight into possible vent geometries, and the effect of the vent wall geometry on gas flow and grain acceleration for suggested plume water production rates (0.5 - 1×1028 s-1) inferred using Cassini data (Tenishev et al., 2010). We obtain density and velocity distributions at the vent exit for the gas and grains that can serve as parameters for plume models and be used as comparisons for interpretation of various Cassini measurements. Kempf, S., et al., 2008, Icarus 193, 2. Hedman, M.M., et al., 2009, AJ 693. Teolis, B

  8. 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    Interior view of the slotted throat test section installed in the 8-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST) in 1950. The slotted region is about 160 inches in length. In this photograph, the sting-type model support is seen straight on. In a NASA report, the test section is described as follows: 'The test section of the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel is dodecagonal in cross section and has a cross-sectional area of about 43 square feet. Longitudinal slots are located between each of the 12 wall panels to allow continuous operation through the transonic speed range. The slots contain about 11 percent of the total periphery of the test section. Six of the twelve panels have windows in them to allow for schlieren observations. The entire test section is enclosed in a hemispherical shaped chamber.' John Becker noted that the tunnel's 'final achievement was the development and use in routine operations of the first transonic slotted throat. The investigations of wing-body shapes in this tunnel led to Whitcomb's discovery of the transonic area rule.' James Hansen described the origins of the the slotted throat as follows: 'In 1946 Langley physicist Ray H. Wright conceived a way to do transonic research effectively in a wind tunnel by placing slots in the throat of the test section. The concept for what became known as the slotted-throat or slotted-wall tunnel came to Wright not as a solution to the chronic transonic problem, but as a way to get rid of wall interference (i.e., the mutual effect of two or more meeting waves or vibrations of any kind caused by solid boundaries) at subsonic speeds. For most of the year before Wright came up with this idea, he had been trying to develop a theoretical understanding of wall interference in the 8-Foot HST, which was then being repowered for Mach 1 capability.' When Wright presented these ideas to John Stack, the response was enthusiastic but neither Wright nor Stack thought of slotted-throats as a solution to the transonic problem, only

  9. Paratrooper's Ankle Fracture: Posterior Malleolar Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Young, Ki Won; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Seuk; Cho, Hun Ki; Lee, Kyung Tai

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the frequency and types of ankle fractures that frequently occur during parachute landings of special operation unit personnel and analyzed the causes. Methods Fifty-six members of the special force brigade of the military who had sustained ankle fractures during parachute landings between January 2005 and April 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. The injury sites and fracture sites were identified and the fracture types were categorized by the Lauge-Hansen and Weber classifications. Follow-up surveys were performed with respect to the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score, patient satisfaction, and return to preinjury activity. Results The patients were all males with a mean age of 23.6 years. There were 28 right and 28 left ankle fractures. Twenty-two patients had simple fractures and 34 patients had comminuted fractures. The average number of injury and fractures sites per person was 2.07 (116 injuries including a syndesmosis injury and a deltoid injury) and 1.75 (98 fracture sites), respectively. Twenty-three cases (41.07%) were accompanied by posterior malleolar fractures. Fifty-five patients underwent surgery; of these, 30 had plate internal fixations. Weber type A, B, and C fractures were found in 4, 38, and 14 cases, respectively. Based on the Lauge-Hansen classification, supination-external rotation injuries were found in 20 cases, supination-adduction injuries in 22 cases, pronation-external rotation injuries in 11 cases, tibiofibular fractures in 2 cases, and simple medial malleolar fractures in 2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 23.8 months, and the average follow-up American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot score was 85.42. Forty-five patients (80.36%) reported excellent or good satisfaction with the outcome. Conclusions Posterior malleolar fractures occurred in 41.07% of ankle fractures sustained in parachute landings. Because most of the ankle fractures in parachute injuries were

  10. Slab Ice and Snow Flurries in the Mars Northern Polar Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the 1970s, spacecraft observations of the polar regions of Mars revealed polar brightness temperatures that were significantly below the expected kinetic temperatures for CO_2 sublimation. For the past few decades, we have speculated as to the nature of these Martian polar cold spots. Are the cold spots surface or atmospheric effects? Do the cold spots behave as blackbodies, or do they have emissivities less than unity? Two developments have allowed us to answer these questions: (1) the measurement of the optical constants of CO_2 by Gary Hansen (1997) and (2) direct thermal spectroscopy of the north polar cap by MGS TES (Kieffer et al., 1998).

    With a few possible excepts, cold spots are surface effects. The CO_2 frost in cold regions of the polar cap show a strong absorption feature at 25 microns that is indicative of fine-grained CO_2, thus explaining the low brightness temperatures observed by the Viking IRTM. Brightness temperatures at 18 microns are usually consistent with expected kinetic surface temperatures. In many cases, the brightness temperatures at 15 microns reveals an atmosphere that is too warm for CO_2 condensation to occur.

    Cold spot formation is strongly dependent on topography, forming preferentially near craters and on slopes of the perennial cap. While cold spots are surface effects, the formation of the fine-grained CO_2 deposits is not entirely restricted to surface formation. TES data, combined with MOLA cloud data (Ivanov and Muhleman, 1999), suggest that at least a few of these cold spots were formed from atmospheric condensates.

    Another major component to the north polar cap composition is slab CO_2 ice. Slab ice has near unity spectral emissivity (Kieffer et al.,1999; Hansen, 1998) and appears to have a low albedo. Two explanations for the low albedo are that the slab ice is intrinsically dark or the slab ice is transparent and we are seeing through to the underlying substrate. Regions of the cap where T_18-T_25 <5

  11. GNSS Monitoring of Deformation within heavy civil infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montillet, Jean-Philippe; Melbourne, Timothy; Szeliga, Walter; Schrock, Gavin

    2015-04-01

    The steady increase in precision simultaneous with the decreasing of continuous GPS monitoring has enabled the deployment of receivers for a host of new activities. Here we discuss the precision obtained from several multi-station installations operated over a five-year period on several heavy civil-engineered structures, including two earthen-fill dams and subsiding highway overpass damaged by seismic shaking. In the past 5 years, the Cascadia Hazards Institute (Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array) at Central Washington University together with the Washington department of public utilities (Land Survey) have been monitoring several structures around Seattle area including two dams (Howard Hansen and Tolt). One aim of this study is to test the use of continuous GNSS in order to detect any deformations due to rapid pool level rises or to monitor the safety of a structure when an Earthquake strikes it. In this study, data is processed using Real Time Kinematic GPS with short baseline (d < 500 m) and GPS daily position (PPP). However, multipath is the most limiting factor on accuracy for very precise positioning applications with GPS. It is very often present indoors and outdoors, especially in narrow valleys with a limited view of the sky. As a result, multipath can amount to an error of a few centimetres. Unfortunately, the accuracy requirements of precision deformation monitoring are generally at the sub centimetre level, which is presently a big challenge on an epoch-by-epoch basis with regular, carrier phase techniques. Thus, it needs to be properly mitigated. In this study, several stations are set up on the dams (4 stations on the Tolt reservoir and 10 stations on the Howard Hansen dam), and spatial filtering can then be used to mitigate multipath. In addition, several signal processing techniques are also investigated (i.e. Empirical mode decomposition, sidereal filtering, adaptive filtering). RTK GPS should allow to monitor rapid deformations, whereas GPS daily

  12. Water use demand in the Crans-Montana-Sierre region (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonriposi, M.; Reynard, E.

    2012-04-01

    between the various uses. All this confirms the necessity of modelling the future demand of water, which would allow prediction of possible future use conflicts. In a second phase of the project, the collected data will be introduced into WEAP (the Water Evaluation And Planning system) model, in order to estimate the future water demand of the Crans-Montana-Sierre region. This hydrologic model is distinct from most similar models because of its ability to integrate climate and socio-economic scenarios (Hansen, 1994). Reference Hansen, E. 1994. WEAP - A system for tackling water resource problems. In Water Management Europe 1993/94: An Annual Review of the European Water and Wastewater Industry. Stockholm Environment Institute: Stockholm.

  13. Study of Venus cloud layers with polarimetric data from SPICAV/VEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Loïc; Marcq, Emmanuel; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Fedorova, Anna; Stam, Daphne

    2014-05-01

    The study of Venus's cloud layers is important in order to understand the structure, radiative balance and dynamics of the Venusian atmosphere. The main cloud layers between 50 and 70km are thought to consist in ~ 1 μm radius droplets of a H2SO4-H2O solution. Nevertheless, the composition and the size distribution of the droplets are difficult to constrain more precisely. Polarization measurements have given great results in the determination of the constituents of the haze. In the early 1980s, Kawabata et al.(1980) used the polarization data from the OCPP instrument on the spacecraft Pioneer Venus to constrain the properties of the haze. They obtained a refractive index of 1.45 ± 0.04 at Λ = 550nm effective radius of 0.23 ± 0.04μm, with a normalized size distribution variance of 0.18 ± 0.1. We introduce here new polarimetric measurements from the SPICAV-IR spectrometer onboard ESA's Venus Express. Observing Venus in the visible and IR from 650 nm to 1625 nm with a good spatial and temporal converage, SPICAV gives us an opportunity to put better constraints on haze and cloud particles at Venus cloud top, as well as their spatial and temporal variability. Our analysis is based on a polarized radiative transfer code similar to the one used by Hansen and Hovenier (1974). Using the particle size distribution from Kawabata et al.(1980) and a simple two-layered cloud model, we try to retrieve particle size and refrative index from nadir observations. We are interested in particular by the glory which is also visible in polarization and whose linear degree of polarization as a function of observation geometry is dependent on the cloud parameters. The polarization measured at higher latitudes provides constrains on the hazes, in particular their optical thickness. We will discuss the first results of our modeling of the glory. In the future we aim to characterize the cloud droplets on the planet along with their temporal and spatial variability. A comparison with the

  14. Immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing for in-flight experiments under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Unruh, Eckehardt

    Life Sciences as Related to Space (F) Influence of Spaceflight Environment on Biological Systems (F44) Immunotoxicity and genotoxicity testing for In-flight experiments under microgravity Sensing approaches for ecosystem and human health Author: Peter D. Hansen Technische Universit¨t Berlin, Faculty VI - Planen, Bauen, Umwelt, a Institute for Ecological Research and Technology, Department for Ecotoxicology, Berlin, Germany Peter-diedrich.hansen@tu-berlin.de Eckehardt Unruh Technische Universit¨t Berlin, Faculty VI - Planen, Bauen, Umwelt, Institute a for Ecological Research and Technology, Department for Ecotoxicology, Berlin, Germany An immune response by mussel hemocytes is the selective reaction to particles which are identified as foreign by its immune system shown by phagocytosis. Phagocytotic activity is based on the chemotaxis and adhesion, ingestion and phagosome formation. The attachment at the surface of the hemocytes and consequently the uptake of the particles or bacteria can be directly quantified in the format of a fluorescent assay. Another relevant endpoint of phagocytosis is oxidative burst measured by luminescence. Phagocytosis-related production of ROS will be stimulated with opsonised zymosan. The hemocytes will be stored frozen at -80oC and reconstituted in-flight for the experiment. The assay system of the TRIPLELUX-B Experiment has been performed with a well-defined quantification and evaluation of the immune function phagocytosis. The indicator cells are the hemocytes of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). The signals of the immuno cellular responses are translated into luminescence as a rapid optical reporter system. The results expected will determine whether the observed responses are caused by microgravity and/or radiation (change in permeability, endpoints in genotoxicity: DNA unwinding). The samples for genotoxicity will be processed after returning to earth. The immune system of invertebrates has not been studied so far in space. The

  15. Assesing Ecohydrological Impacts of Forest Disturbance using Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovette, J. P.; Chang, T.; Treglia, M.; Gan, T.; Duncan, J.

    2014-12-01

    In the past 30 years, land management protocols, climate change, and land use have radically changed the frequency and magnitudes of disturbance regimes. Landscape scale disturbances can change a forest structure, resulting in impacts on adjacent watersheds that may affect water amount/quality for human and natural resource use. Our project quantifies hydrologic changes from of a suite of disturbance events resulting in vegetation cover shifts at watersheds across the continental United States. These disturbance events include: wildfire, insect/disease, deforestation(logging), hurricanes, ice storms, and human land use. Our major question is: Can the effects of disturbance on ecohydrology be generalized across regions, time scales, and spatial scales? Using a workflow of open source tools, and utilizing publicly available data, this work could be extended and leveraged by other researchers. Spatial data on disturbance include the MODIS Global Disturbance Index (NTSG), Landsat 7 Global Forest Change (Hansen dataset), and the Degree of Human Modification (Theobald dataset). Ecohydrologic response data includes USGS NWIS, USFS-LTER climDB/hydroDB, and the CUAHSI HIS.

  16. Quaternion regularization and trajectory motion control in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelnokov, Yu. N.

    2014-07-01

    Problems of regularization in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are considered, and basic regular quaternion models for celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are presented. It is shown that the effectiveness of analytical studies and numerical solutions to boundary value problems of controlling the trajectory motion of spacecraft can be improved by using quaternion models of astrodynamics. In this second part of the paper, specific singularity-type features (division by zero) are considered. They result from using classical equations in angular variables (particularly in Euler variables) in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics and can be eliminated by using Euler (Rodrigues-Hamilton) parameters and Hamilton quaternions. Basic regular (in the above sense) quaternion models of celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are considered; these include equations of trajectory motion written in nonholonomic, orbital, and ideal moving trihedrals whose rotational motions are described by Euler parameters and quaternions of turn; and quaternion equations of instantaneous orbit orientation of a celestial body (spacecraft). New quaternion regular equations are derived for the perturbed three-dimensional two-body problem (spacecraft trajectory motion). These equations are constructed using ideal rectangular Hansen coordinates and quaternion variables, and they have additional advantages over those known for regular Kustaanheimo-Stiefel equations.

  17. Aprotic solvents effect on the UV-visible absorption spectra of bixin.

    PubMed

    Rahmalia, Winda; Fabre, Jean-François; Usman, Thamrin; Mouloungui, Zéphirin

    2014-10-15

    We describe here the effects of aprotic solvents on the spectroscopic characteristics of bixin. Bixin was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, acetone, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, dimethyl carbonate, cyclohexane and hexane, separately, and its spectra in the resulting solutions were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometry at normal pressure and room temperature. We analyzed the effect of aprotic solvents on λmax according to Onsager cavity model and Hansen theory, and determined the approximate absorption coefficient with the Beer-Lambert law. We found that the UV-visible absorption spectra of bixin were found to be solvent dependent. The S0→S2 transition energy of bixin in solution was dependent principally on the refractive index of the solvents and the bixin-solvent dispersion interaction. There was a small influence of the solvents dielectric constant, permanent dipole interaction and hydrogen bonding occurred between bixin and solvents. The absorbance of bixin in various solvents, with the exception of hexane, increased linearly with concentration. PMID:24840486

  18. Particle Physics at the University of Pittsburgh Summary Report for Proposal Period FY'09-11

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, Joe; Dytman, Steven; Mueller, James; Naples, Donna; Paolone, Vittorio; Savinov, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    Presented is the final summary report for grant DOE-FG02-91ER40646. The HEP group at the University consists of three tasks: B,D and L. Task B supports Pitt's CDF group at the energy frontier which includes Joe Boudreau and Paul Shepard. Work of the group includes Hao Song's thesis on the measurement of the B_c lifetime using exclusive J/psi+pion decays, and an update of the previous B_c semi-leptonic analyses under the supervision of Paul Shepard. Task D supports Pitt's neutrino group at the intensity frontier which includes PIs Dytman, Naples and Paolone. The group also includes postdoctoral research associate Danko, and thesis students Isvan (MINOS), Eberly (Minerva ), Ren (Minerva )and Hansen (T2K). This report summarizes their progress on ongoing experiments which are designed to make significant contributions to a detailed understanding of the neutrino mixing matrix. Task L supports Pitt's ATLAS group at the energy frontier and includes investigators Vladimir Savinov, James Mueller and Joe Boudreau. This group contributed both to hardware (calorimeter electronics, Savinov) and to software (Simulation, Detector Description, and Visualization: Boudreau and Mueller; MC generators: Savinov) and a summary of their progress is presented.

  19. Discrimination And Biophysical Characterization Of Brazilian Cerrado Physiognomies With Eo-1 Hyperspectral Hyperion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miura, Tomoaki; Huete, Alfredo R.; Ferreira, Laerte G.; Sano, Edson E.

    2004-01-01

    The savanna, typically found in the sub-tropics and seasonal tropics, are the dominant vegetation biome type in the southern hemisphere, covering approximately 45% of the South America. In Brazil, the savanna, locally known as "cerrado," is the most intensely stressed biome with both natural environmental pressures (e.g., the strong seasonality in weather, extreme soil nutrient impoverishment, and widespread fire occurrences) and rapid/aggressive land conversions (Skole et al., 1994; Ratter et al., 1997). Better characterization and discrimination of cerrado physiognomies are needed in order to improve understanding of cerrado dynamics and its impact on carbon storage, nutrient dynamics, and the prospect for sustainable land use in the Brazilian cerrado biome. Satellite remote sensing have been known to be a useful tool for land cover and land use mapping (Rougharden et al., 1991; Hansen et al., 2000). However, attempts to discriminate and classify Brazilian cerrado using multi-spectral sensors (e.g., Landsat TM) and/or moderate resolution sensors (e.g., NOAA AVHRR NDVI) have often resulted in a limited success due partly to small contrasts depicted in their multiband, spectral reflectance or vegetation index values among cerrado classes (Seyler et al., 2002; Fran a and Setzer, 1998). In this study, we aimed to improve discrimination as well as biophysical characterization of the Brazilian cerrado physiognomies with hyperspectral remote sensing. We used Hyperion, the first satellite-based hyperspectral imager, onboard the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) platform.

  20. The Impact of Deviation from Michaelis-Menten Saturation on Mathematical Model Stability Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, Charles; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Based on purely abstract ecological theory, it has been argued that a system composed of two or more consumers competing for the same resource cannot persist. By analysis on a Monod format mathematical model, Hubble and others demonstrated that this assertion is true for all but very special cases of such competing organisms which are determined by an index formed by a grouping of. the parameters which characterize the biological processes of the competing organisms. In the laboratory, using a bioreactor, Hansen and Hubble obtained confirmatory results for several cases of two competing species, and they characterized it as "qualitative confirmation" of the assertion. This result is amazing, since the analysis required the exact equality of the hey index, and it seems certain that no pair of organism species could have exactly equal values. It is quite plausible, however, that pairs of organism species could have approximately equal indices, and the question of how different they could be and still have coexistence of the two (or more) presents itself. In this paper, the pursuit of this question and a compatible resolution is presented.

  1. Griffe cubitale d'origine lépreuse traitée par transfert tendineux de Lasso Zancolli: à propos d'un cas

    PubMed Central

    El Alaoui, Adil; Sbiyaa, Mouhcine; Bah, Aliou; Rabhi, Ilyas; mezzani, Amine; Marzouki, Amine; Boutayeb, Fawzi

    2015-01-01

    La lèpre est une maladie infectieuse due à une mycobactérie (M. Leprae, Bacille de Hansen, ou BH) dont le tropisme nerveux est destructeur pour les cellules de Schwann. La localisation préférentielle des neuropathies tronculaire secondaire à la lèpre restent dominé par les zones ou les troncs nerveux traversent les défilés ostéo-ligamentaires inextensibles comme le défilé rétro-épitrochléen ou passe le nerf ulnaire. De nombreux travaux ont été consacrés à la souffrance nerveuse secondaire à la lèpre et surtout l'atteinte du nerf ulnaire qui se manifeste par une griffe des doigts. Le traitement dans ce cas est palliatif et fait appel à plusieurs techniques décrites dans la littérature. Nous rapportons dans ce travail un cas de griffe cubitale chez un patient lépreux traité par transfert tendineux de Lasso Zancolli. PMID:26985277

  2. Project REENCONTRO: ethical aspects of genetic identification in families separated by the compulsory isolation of leprosy patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Claudia Lee Williams; Biondi, Flávia Costa; Maricato, Glaucia Cristina; Schuler-Faccini, Lavínia

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the experience of a team of geneticists, working in partnership with a Brazilian social movement aimed at promoting the rights of victims of Hansen's disease. These university researchers propose to use DNA test results to ascertain kinship connections and thereby reunite families that were sundered apart by draconian state policies of the mid-twentieth century that decreed the forced segregation of leprosy patients and the institutionalization of their children. The team's aim is to help revert stigma and reinforce positive group identity as well as to facilitate judicial claims to moral and financial reparation from the Brazilian state. We will discuss how, notwithstanding the voluntary nature of tests, mediated at all times through the social movement, the geneticists take care to follow clear ethical guidelines in the collection and stocking of DNA samples as well as in the devolution of test results. The subsequent inclusion of anthropologists in the team brings to the fore new ethical dilemmas ranging from procedures in field research to the possible consequences of research results. PMID:25966990

  3. Prevalence of leprous neuropathy determined by neurosensory testing in an endemic zone in Ecuador: Development of an algorithm to identify patients benefiting from early neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Baltodano, Pablo A; Rochlin, Danielle H; Noboa, Jonathan; Sarhane, Karim A; Rosson, Gedge D; Dellon, A Lee

    2016-07-01

    The success of a microneurosurgical intervention in leprous neuropathy (LN) depends on the diagnosis of chronic compression before irreversible paralysis and digital loss occurs. In order to determine the effectiveness of a different approach for early identification of LN, neurosensory testing with the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device™ (PSSD), a validated and sensitive test, was performed in an endemic zone for leprosy. A cross-sectional study was conducted to analyze a patient sample meeting the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for Hansen's disease. The prevalence of LN was based on the presence of ≥1 abnormal PSSD pressure threshold for a two-point static touch. A total of 312 upper and lower extremity nerves were evaluated in 39 patients. The PSSD found a 97.4% prevalence of LN. Tinel's sign was identified in 60% of these patients. An algorithm for early identification of patients with LN was proposed using PSSD testing based on the unilateral screening of the ulnar and deep peroneal nerves. PMID:27156203

  4. Mathematical modelling of leprosy and its control.

    PubMed

    Blok, David J; de Vlas, Sake J; Fischer, Egil A J; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    Leprosy or Hansen's disease is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae. The annual number of new leprosy cases registered worldwide has remained stable over the past years at over 200,000. Early case finding and multidrug therapy have not been able interrupt transmission completely. Elimination requires innovation in control and sustained commitment. Mathematical models can be used to predict the course of leprosy incidence and the effect of intervention strategies. Two compartmental models and one individual-based model have been described in the literature. Both compartmental models investigate the course of leprosy in populations and the long-term impact of control strategies. The individual-based model focusses on transmission within households and the impact of case finding among contacts of new leprosy patients. Major improvement of these models should result from a better understanding of individual differences in exposure to infection and developing leprosy after exposure. Most relevant are contact heterogeneity, heterogeneity in susceptibility and spatial heterogeneity. Furthermore, the existing models have only been applied to a limited number of countries. Parameterization of the models for other areas, in particular those with high incidence, is essential to support current initiatives for the global elimination of leprosy. Many challenges remain in understanding and dealing with leprosy. The support of mathematical models for understanding leprosy epidemiology and supporting policy decision making remains vital. PMID:25765193

  5. THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF CONVECTIVE MIXING WHITE DWARFS, THE NON-DA GAP, AND WHITE DWARF COSMOCHRONOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Eugene Y.; Hansen, Brad M. S. E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.edu

    2012-07-01

    The spectral distribution of field white dwarfs shows a feature called the 'non-DA gap'. As defined by Bergeron et al., this is a temperature range (5100-6100 K) where relatively few non-DA stars are found, even though such stars are abundant on either side of the gap. It is usually viewed as an indication that a significant fraction of white dwarfs switch their atmospheric compositions back and forth between hydrogen-rich and helium-rich as they cool. In this Letter, we present a Monte Carlo model of the Galactic disk white dwarf population, based on the spectral evolution model of Chen and Hansen. We find that the non-DA gap emerges naturally, even though our model only allows white dwarf atmospheres to evolve monotonically from hydrogen-rich to helium-rich through convective mixing. We conclude by discussing the effects of convective mixing on the white dwarf luminosity function and the use thereof for Cosmochronology.

  6. The Fate of the Forest in Brazil, 2000 to 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalles, V.; Potapov, P.; Hansen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Better understanding the drivers of tropical deforestation is essential to research on global climate change and biodiversity loss, and would be particularly informative to ongoing international climate change negotiations. Geographically explicit maps of post-forest land cover can provide valuable information about the extent and spatial distribution of the major drivers of deforestation. Brazil is the country with the largest extent of tropical forest in the world and the one with the most tropical forest cover loss since the turn of this century. This fate of the forest study aims to determine which land covers have replaced forest cover in Brazil. Using a classification tree algorithm, we determined pasture and cropland extent in areas of forest cover loss in Brazil circa 2012. We used 30 m resolution Landsat data for the 2000-2013 time period as well as tree cover loss data from the Global Forest Change (GFC) maps published by Hansen et al. (2013). The GFC data was used to mask out areas not categorized as forest cover lost between 2000 and 2013. Additionally, the year of loss layer was used to disaggregate pasture and cropland extent by year. Our results comprehensively demonstrate the extent to which pasture is the dominant post-forest land cover in Brazil. More broadly, the product reveals spatiotemporal patterns of forest conversion to pasture and cropland in Brazil, which could lead to a better understanding of the underlying drivers of deforestation.

  7. POWER ASYMMETRY IN COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS FROM FULL SKY TO SUB-DEGREE SCALES: IS THE UNIVERSE ISOTROPIC?

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, F. K.; Eriksen, H. K.; Lilje, P. B.; Banday, A. J.; Gorski, K. M. E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.n E-mail: banday@MPA-Garching.MPG.D

    2009-10-20

    We repeat and extend the analysis of Eriksen et al. and Hansen et al., testing the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background fluctuations. We find that the hemispherical power asymmetry previously reported for the largest scales l = 2-40 extends to much smaller scales. In fact, for the full multipole range l = 2-600, significantly more power is found in the hemisphere centered at (theta = 107{sup 0} +- 10{sup 0}, phi = 226{sup 0} +- 10{sup 0}) in galactic co-latitude and longitude than in the opposite hemisphere, consistent with the previously detected direction of asymmetry for l = 2-40. We adopt a model selection test where the direction and amplitude of asymmetry, as well as the multipole range, are free parameters. A model with an asymmetric distribution of power for l = 2-600 is found to be preferred over the isotropic model at the 0.4% significance level, taking into account the additional parameters required to describe it. A similar direction of asymmetry is found independently in all six subranges of 100 multipoles between l = 2-600. None of our 9800 isotropic simulated maps show a similarly consistent direction of asymmetry over such a large multipole range. No known systematic effects or foregrounds are found to be able to explain the asymmetry.

  8. Toward Uniformly Dispersed Battery Electrode Composite Materials: Characteristics and Performance.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yo Han; Huie, Matthew M; Choi, Dalsu; Chang, Mincheol; Marschilok, Amy C; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Takeuchi, Esther S; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2016-02-10

    Battery electrodes are complex mesoscale systems comprised of electroactive components, conductive additives, and binders. In this report, methods for processing electrodes with dispersion of the components are described. To investigate the degree of material dispersion, a spin-coating technique was adopted to provide a thin, uniform layer that enabled observation of the morphology. Distinct differences in the distribution profile of the electrode components arising from individual materials physical affinities were readily identified. Hansen solubility parameter (HSP) analysis revealed pertinent surface interactions associated with materials dispersivity. Further studies demonstrated that HSPs can provide an effective strategy to identify surface modification approaches for improved dispersions of battery electrode materials. Specifically, introduction of surfactantlike functionality such as oleic acid (OA) capping and P3HT-conjugated polymer wrapping on the surface of nanomaterials significantly enhanced material dispersity over the composite electrode. The approach to the surface treatment on the basis of HSP study can facilitate design of composite electrodes with uniformly dispersed morphology and may contribute to enhancing their electrical and electrochemical behaviors. The conductivity of the composites and their electrochemical performance was also characterized. The study illustrates the importance of considering electronic conductivity, electron transfer, and ion transport in the design of environments incorporating active nanomaterials. PMID:26765041

  9. Experimental validation of candidate schizophrenia gene ZNF804Aas target for hsa-miR-137

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Vernell; McMichael, Gowon O.; Fanous, Ayman H.; Vladimirov, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that mainly function as negative regulators of gene expression (Lai, 2002) and have been shown to be involved in schizophrenia etiology through genetic and expression studies (Burmistrova et al., 2007; Hansen et al., 2007a; Perkins et al., 2007; Beveridge et al., 2010; Kim et al., 2010). In a mega analysis of genome-wide association study (GWAS) of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorders (BP), a polymorphism (rs1625579) located in the primary transcript of a miRNA gene, hsa-miR-137, was reported to be strongly associated with SZ. Four SZ loci (CACNA1C, TCF4, CSMD1, C10orf26) achieving genome-wide significance in the same study were predicted and later experimentally validated (Kwon et al., 2011) as hsa-miR-137 targets. Here, using in silico, cellular and luciferase based approaches we also provide evidence that another well replicated candidate schizophrenia gene, ZNF804A, is also target for hsa-miR-137. PMID:22883350

  10. Aspherical-atom modeling of coordination compounds by single-crystal X-ray diffraction allows the correct metal atom to be identified.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Birger; Wandtke, Claudia M; Meents, Alke; Pröpper, Kevin; Mondal, Kartik Chandra; Samuel, Prinson P; Amin Sk, Nurul; Singh, Amit Pratap; Roesky, Herbert W; Sidhu, Navdeep

    2015-02-01

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) is often considered the gold standard in analytical chemistry, as it allows element identification as well as determination of atom connectivity and the solid-state structure of completely unknown samples. Element assignment is based on the number of electrons of an atom, so that a distinction of neighboring heavier elements in the periodic table by XRD is often difficult. A computationally efficient procedure for aspherical-atom least-squares refinement of conventional diffraction data of organometallic compounds is proposed. The iterative procedure is conceptually similar to Hirshfeld-atom refinement (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. A- 2008, 64, 383-393; IUCrJ. 2014, 1,61-79), but it relies on tabulated invariom scattering factors (Acta Crystallogr. Sect. B- 2013, 69, 91-104) and the Hansen/Coppens multipole model; disordered structures can be handled as well. Five linear-coordinate 3d metal complexes, for which the wrong element is found if standard independent-atom model scattering factors are relied upon, are studied, and it is shown that only aspherical-atom scattering factors allow a reliable assignment. The influence of anomalous dispersion in identifying the correct element is investigated and discussed. PMID:25393218

  11. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO[sub 2]F[sub 2] and H[sub 2]O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF[sub 6] and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % [sup 235]U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  12. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF{sub 6} and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  13. Histoid leprosy: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sunil Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous inflammation primarily of the peripheral nervous system, skin, and reticuloendothelial system caused by Mycobacterium leprae. It presents clinically as an erythematous or hypopigmented anesthetic patch and a thickened and/or tender cutaneous nerve trunk. Leprosy is also called Hansen disease. Leprosy is a great imitator of other skin diseases, and it can present with different morphological lesions, which is why an expert eye is needed to diagnose it. One of the important clinical presentations of leprosy is histoid leprosy, which is very difficult to diagnose due to different clinical and histopathological findings that mimic, e.g., a fibromatous disorder. Histoid leprosy is a very rare clinicopathological variant of leprosy. It is clinically characterized by skin-colored, soft, succulent nodules, and plaques on apparently normal skin and histologically by a dense bundle of histiocytes arranged in storiform. Though histoid leprosy is a very rare type of leprosy, the higher load of lepra bacilli in these cases makes it a concern as a reservoir for leprosy. PMID:26094829

  14. Are you a collaborative leader?

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Herminia; Hansen, Morten T

    2011-01-01

    Social media and technologies have put connectivity on steroids and made collaboration more integral to business than ever. But without the right leadership, collaboration can go astray. Employees who try to collaborate on everything may wind up stuck in endless meetings, struggling to reach agreement. On the other side of the coin, executives who came of age during the heyday of "command and control" management can have trouble adjusting their style to fit the new realities. In their research on top-performing CEOs, Insead professors Ibarra and Hansen have examined what it takes to be a collaborative leader. They've found that it requires connecting people and ideas outside an organization to those inside it, leveraging diverse talent, modeling collaborative behavior at the top, and showing a strong hand to keep teams from getting mired in debate. In this article, they describe tactics that executives from Akamai, GE, Reckitt Benckiser, and other firms use in those four areas and how they foster high-performance collaborative cultures in their organizations. PMID:21800471

  15. Tar Management and Recycling in Biomass Gasification and Syngas Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Zach

    Removal of tars is critical to the design and operation of biomass gasification systems as most syngas utilization processing equipment (e.g. internal combustion engines, gas turbines, fuel cells, and liquid fuel synthesis reactors) have a low tolerance for tar. Capturing and disposal of tar is expensive due to equipment costs, high hazardous waste disposal costs where direct uses cannot be found, and system energy losses incurred. Water scrubbing is an existing technique commonly used in gasification plants to remove contaminants and tar; however using water as the absorbent is non-ideal as tar compounds have low or no water solubility. Hydrophobic solvents can improve scrubber performance and this study evaluated tar solubility in selected solvents using slip-streams of untreated syngas from a laboratory fluidized bed reactor operated on almond composite feedstock using both air and steam gasification. Tar solubility was compared with Hansen's solubility theory to examine the extent to which the tar removal can be predicted. As collection of tar without utilization leads to a hazardous waste problem, the study investigated the effects of recycling tars back into the gasifier for destruction. Prior to experiments conducted on tar capture and recycle, characterizations of the air and steam gasification of the almond composite mix were made. This work aims to provide a better understanding of tar collection and solvent selection for wet scrubbers, and to provide information for designing improved tar management systems for biomass gasification.

  16. The Copenhagen City Heart Study (Østerbroundersøgelsen)

    PubMed Central

    Aguib, Yasmine; Al Suwaidi, Jassim

    2015-01-01

    The Copenhagen City Heart Study, also known as “Østerbroundersøgelsen”, is a large prospective cardio-vascular population study of 20,000 women and men that was launched in 1975 by Dr Peter Schnohr and Dr Gorm Jensen together with statistician Jørgen Nyboe and Prof. A. Tybjærg Hansen. The original purpose of the study was to focus on prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke. During the years many other aspects have been added to the study: pulmonary diseases, heart failure, arrhythmia, alcohol, arthrosis, eye diseases, allergy, epilepsia, dementia, stress, vital exhaustion, social network, sleep-apnoe, ageing and genetics. In this review we highlight unique aspects of the Copenhagen City Heat Study (CCHS) and its outcome in investigations of clinical and molecular aspects of health and disease in the regional and global population. To increase the impact of population studies with a focus on risk and prevention of cardiovascular and related diseases and to maximize the likelihood of identifying disease causes and effective therapeutics, lessons learned from past research should be applied to the design, implementation and interpretation of future studies. PMID:26779513

  17. A Label-Free Microfluidic Biosensor for Activity Detection of Single Microalgae Cells Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junsheng; Sun, Jinyang; Song, Yongxin; Xu, Yongyi; Pan, Xinxiang; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Dongqing

    2013-01-01

    Detection of living microalgae cells is very important for ballast water treatment and analysis. Chlorophyll fluorescence is an indicator of photosynthetic activity and hence the living status of plant cells. In this paper, we developed a novel microfluidic biosensor system that can quickly and accurately detect the viability of single microalgae cells based on chlorophyll fluorescence. The system is composed of a laser diode as an excitation light source, a photodiode detector, a signal analysis circuit, and a microfluidic chip as a microalgae cell transportation platform. To demonstrate the utility of this system, six different living and dead algae samples (Karenia mikimotoi Hansen, Chlorella vulgaris, Nitzschia closterium, Platymonas subcordiformis, Pyramidomonas delicatula and Dunaliella salina) were tested. The developed biosensor can distinguish clearly between the living microalgae cells and the dead microalgae cells. The smallest microalgae cells that can be detected by using this biosensor are 3 μm ones. Even smaller microalgae cells could be detected by increasing the excitation light power. The developed microfluidic biosensor has great potential for in situ ballast water analysis. PMID:24287532

  18. Research ethics--a brief historical review to 1965.

    PubMed

    Lock, S

    1995-12-01

    Most discussions on modern research ethics--particularly the formation of research ethics committees (institutional review boards)--focus on the revelations of the dreadful practices in the Nazi concentration camps at the Nuremberg trial after the second world war, with the subsequent production of the Nuremberg and Helsinki Codes. In fact, however, these trials were not pivotal: there was a long history of such concerns, going back at least to the 1830s, when William Beaumont introduced a contract with his patient Alexis St Martin, as well as the later part of the century when the celebrated leprosy worker Hansen was prosecuted in Bergen for having experimented on a patient without her consent, losing his post as a result. Probably, had it not been for the entry of the USA into the First World War, public indignation at the growing number of reports of unethical experimentation in public hospitals would have resulted in regulations, while official codes were introduced in Prussia at the turn of the century and in Berlin again in 1931. Nevertheless, the impetus for modern developments came principally from the furore aroused by the proselytising of two physicians: Henry Beecher, an anesthesiologist at Harvard, and Maurice Pappworth in London, whose respective books Experimentation in Man and Human Guinea Pigs, documented case histories of egregiously less than ethical research practices that went largely unquestioned by other clinical research workers. Here I shall discuss the reactions to and influence of some of these episodes, as well as more recent developments. PMID:9422037

  19. Water masers in the Kronian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebenko, Sergei V.; Gurvits, Leonid I.; Elitzur, Moshe; Cosmovici, Cristiano B.; Avruch, Ian M.; Pluchino, Salvatore; Montebugnoli, Stelio; Salerno, Emma; Maccaferri, Giuseppe; Mujunen, Ari; Ritakari, Jouko; Molera, Guifre; Wagner, Jan; Uunila, Minttu; Cimo, Giuseppe; Schilliro, Francesco; Bartolini, Marco

    The presence of water has been considered for a long time as a key condition for life in planetary environments. The Cassini mission discovered water vapour in the Kronian system by detecting absorption of UV emission from a background star (Hansen et al. 2006). Prompted by this discovery, we started an observational campaign for search of another manifestation of the water vapour in the Kronian system, its maser emission at the frequency of 22 GHz (1.35 cm wavelength). Observations with the 32 m Medicina radio telescope (INAF-IRA, Italy) started in 2006 using Mk5A data recording and the JIVE-Huygens software correlator. Later on, an on-line spectrometer was used at Medicina. The 14 m Metsähovi radio telescope (TKK-MRO, Finland) joined the observational campaign in 2008 using a locally developed data capture unit and software spectrometer. More than 300 hours of observations were collected in 2006-2008 campaign with the two radio telescopes. The data were analysed at JIVE using the Doppler tracking technique to compensate the observed spectra for the radial Doppler shift for various bodies in the Kronian system (Pogrebenko et al. 2009). Here we report the observational results for Hyperion, Titan, Enceladus and Atlas, and their physical interpretation. Encouraged by these results we started a campaign of follow up observations including other radio telescopes.

  20. Tensorial density functional theory for non-spherical hard-body fluids.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Mecke, Klaus

    2010-09-15

    In a recent publication (Hansen-Goos and Mecke 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 018302) we constructed a free energy functional for the inhomogeneous hard-body fluid, which reduces to Rosenfeld's fundamental measure theory (Rosenfeld 1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 63 980) when applied to hard spheres. The new functional is able to yield the isotropic-nematic transition for the hard-spherocylinder fluid in contrast to Rosenfeld's fundamental measure theory for non-spherical particles (Rosenfeld 1994 Phys. Rev. E 50 R3318). The description of inhomogeneous isotropic fluids is also improved when compared with data from Monte Carlo simulations for hard spherocylinders in contact with a planar hard wall. However, the new functional for the inhomogeneous fluid in general does not comply with the exact second order virial expansion. We introduced the ζ correction in order to minimize the deviation from Onsager's exact result in the isotropic bulk fluid. In this article we give a detailed account of the construction of the new functional. An extension of the ζ correction makes the latter better suited for non-isotropic particle distributions. The extended ζ correction is shown to improve the description of the isotropic-nematic bulk phase diagram while it has little effect on the results for the isotropic but inhomogeneous hard-spherocylinder fluid. We argue that the gain from using higher order tensorial weighted densities in the theory is likely to be inferior to the associated increase in complexity. PMID:21386523

  1. Fundamental measure density functional theory for hard spherocylinders in static and time-dependent aligning fields.

    PubMed

    Härtel, A; Löwen, H

    2010-03-17

    The recently developed fundamental measure density functional theory (Hansen-Goos and Mecke 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 018302) for an inhomogeneous anisotropic hard body fluid is used as a basic ingredient in treating the Brownian dynamics of hard spherocylinders. After discussing the relevance of a free parameter in the fundamental measure density functional for the isotropic-nematic transition in equilibrium, we discuss the equilibrium phase behaviour of hard spherocylinders in a static external potential which couples only to the orientations. For external potentials favouring rod orientations along the poles of the unit sphere, there is a well-known paranematic-nematic transition which ceases to exist above a threshold of the strength V(0) of the external potential. However, when orientations along the equator are more favoured, in the plane of the potential energy V(0) and density, there is a phase transition from paranematic to nematic for any strength, which becomes second order above a critical threshold of V(0). The full equilibrium phase diagram in the V(0)-density plane is computed for a fixed rod aspect ratio of 5. For the equatorial cases, strength V(0) is then oscillating in time and dynamical density functional theory is used to compute the evolution of the orientational distribution. A subtle resonance for increasing oscillation frequencies is detected if the oscillating V(0) crosses the paranematic-nematic phase transition. PMID:21389446

  2. Functional Comparison of Immediate and Late Weight Bearing after Ankle Bimalleolar Fracture Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ağır, İsmail; Tunçer, Nejat; Küçükdurmaz, Fatih; Gümüstaş, Seyitali; Akgül, Esra Demirel; Akpinar, Fuat

    2015-01-01

    Aim : The aim of the study is to compare immediate weight bearing with below-knee cast or immobilization with plaster splint in 6 weeks in patients after operative treatment for ankle bimalleolar fractures. Methods : Fifty-three patients with ankle bimalleolar fractures were treated operatively in 2005 to 2010 and then were randomly allocated to two groups. Immediately weight bearing in a below-knee cast (26 patients) and immobilization in a plaster splint for the first six postoperative weeks (27 patients). A mean age 37.9 (min 17; max 72). An average follow-up 26.1 months. (min 14; max 55). All fractures were classified with Lauge-Hansen classification. Functional results of both groups were evaluated with AOFAS for the postoperative one year after surgical treatment. Results : According to the AOFAS scoring system, results were excellent and good in 17 patients in group 1. On the other hand, results were excellent and good in 14 patients in group 2. Conclusion : As a result we think that weight bearing protocol should be advantaged for patients with ankle bimalleolar fractures after surgical treatment immediately. PMID:26069513

  3. Exploring the structure-solubility relationship of asphaltene models in toluene, heptane, and amphiphiles using a molecular dynamic atomistic methodology.

    PubMed

    Aray, Yosslen; Hernández-Bravo, Raiza; Parra, José G; Rodríguez, Jesús; Coll, David S

    2011-10-27

    The solubility parameters, δ, of several asphaltene models were calculated by mean of an atomistic NPT ensemble. Continental and archipelago models were explored. A relationship between the solubility parameter and the molecule structure was determined. In general, increase of the fused-rings number forming the aromatic core and the numbers of heteroatoms such as oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur produces an increase of the solubility parameter, while increases of the numbers and length of the aliphatic chains yield a systematic decrease of this parameter. Molecules with large total carbon atom number at the tails, n(c), and small aromatic ring number, n(r), exhibit the biggest values of δ, while molecules with small n(c) and large n(r) show the smallest δ values. A good polynomial correlation δ = 5.967(n(r)/n(c)) - 3.062(n(r)/n(c))(2) + 0.507(n(r)/n(c))(3) + 16.593 with R(2) = 0.965 was found. The solubilities of the asphaltene models in toluene, heptane, and amphiphiles were studied using the Scatchard-Hildebrand and the Hansen sphere methodologies. Generally, there is a large affinity between the archipelago model and amphiphiles containing large aliphatic tails and no aromatic rings, while continental models show high affinity for amphiphiles containing an aromatic ring and small aliphatic chains. PMID:21905686

  4. Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia: An update.

    PubMed

    Munde, Anita; Karle, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Proliferative verrucous leukoplakia (PVL) is a rare form of oral leukoplakia, which was first described in 1985 by Hansen et al. Since then, various published case series have presented PVL as a disease with aggressive biological behavior due to its high probability of recurrence and a high rate of malignant transformation, usually higher than 70%. PVL is a long-term progressive condition, which is observed more frequently in elderly women, over 60 years at the time of diagnosis. The buccal mucosa and tongue are the most frequently involved sites. It develops initially as a white plaque of hyperkeratosis that eventually becomes a multifocal disease with confluent, exophytic and proliferative features with a progressive deterioration of the lesions, making it more and more difficult to control. Tobacco use does not seem to have a significant influence on the appearance or progression of PVL and may occur both in smokers and nonsmokers. Prognosis is poor for this seemingly harmless-appearing white lesion of the oral mucosa. At present, the etiology of PVL remains unclear as well as its management and diagnosis, which is still retrospective, late and poorly defined, lacking consensus criteria. This short review discusses the clinical and histopathological features, diagnosis, traditional treatment and the current management of the disease. PMID:27461595

  5. Constraints on sea to air emissions from methane clathrates in the vicinity of Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisso, Ignacio; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Platt, Stephen Matthew; Eckhardt, Sabine; Allen, Grant; Pitt, Joseph; Silyakova, Anna; Hermansen, Ove; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Mienert, Jurgen; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Methane stored in the seabed in the form of clathrates has the potential to be released into the atmosphere due to ongoing ocean warming. The Methane Emissions from Arctic Ocean to Atmosphere (MOCA, http://moca.nilu.no/) proje sct conducted measurement campaigns in the vicinity of Svalbard during the summers of 2014 and 2015 in collaboration with the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate (CAGE, https://cage.uit.no/) and the MAMM (https://arcticmethane.wordpress.com) project . The extensive set of measurements includes air (BAe 146) and ship (RV Helmer Hansen) borne methane concentrations, complemented with the nearby monitoring site at Zeppelin mountain. In order to assess the atmospheric impact of emissions from seabed methane hydrates, we characterised the local and long range atmospheric transport during the aircraft campaign and different scenarios for the emission sources. We present a range of upper bounds for the CH4 emissions during the campaign period as well as the methodologies used to obtain them. The methodologies include a box model, Lagrangian transport and elementary inverse modelling. We emphasise the analysis of the aircraft data. We discuss in detail the different methodologies used for determining the upper flux bounds as well as its uncertainties and limitations. The additional information provided by the ship and station observations will be briefly mentioned.

  6. DROMO propagator revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutxua, Hodei; Sanjurjo-Rivo, Manuel; Peláez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000 an in-house orbital propagator called DROMO (Peláez et al. in Celest Mech Dyn Astron 97:131-150, 2007. doi: 10.1007/s10569-006-9056-3) was developed by the Space Dynamics Group of the Technical University of Madrid, based in a set of redundant variables including Euler-Rodrigues parameters. An original deduction of the DROMO propagator is carried out, underlining its close relation with the ideal frame concept introduced by Hansen (Abh der Math-Phys Cl der Kon Sachs Ges der Wissensch 5:41-218, 1857). Based on the very same concept, Deprit (J Res Natl Bur Stand Sect B Math Sci 79B(1-2):1-15, 1975) proposed a formulation for orbit propagation. In this paper, similarities and differences with the theory carried out by Deprit are analyzed. Simultaneously, some improvements are introduced in the formulation, that lead to a more synthetic and better performing propagator. Also, the long-term effect of the oblateness of the primary is studied in terms of DROMO variables, and new numerical results are presented to evaluate the performance of the method.

  7. Predicting the perceived sound quality of frequency-compressed speech.

    PubMed

    Huber, Rainer; Parsa, Vijay; Scollie, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The performance of objective speech and audio quality measures for the prediction of the perceived quality of frequency-compressed speech in hearing aids is investigated in this paper. A number of existing quality measures have been applied to speech signals processed by a hearing aid, which compresses speech spectra along frequency in order to make information contained in higher frequencies audible for listeners with severe high-frequency hearing loss. Quality measures were compared with subjective ratings obtained from normal hearing and hearing impaired children and adults in an earlier study. High correlations were achieved with quality measures computed by quality models that are based on the auditory model of Dau et al., namely, the measure PSM, computed by the quality model PEMO-Q; the measure qc, computed by the quality model proposed by Hansen and Kollmeier; and the linear subcomponent of the HASQI. For the prediction of quality ratings by hearing impaired listeners, extensions of some models incorporating hearing loss were implemented and shown to achieve improved prediction accuracy. Results indicate that these objective quality measures can potentially serve as tools for assisting in initial setting of frequency compression parameters. PMID:25402456

  8. Global Bare Ground Gain in the First Decade of 21st Century from Landsat Data: the Preliminary Results on Estimation and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Q.; Potapov, P.; Wang, L.; Hansen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Bare ground gain (BGG) is one of the most intensive land surface transformation because of the complete alteration of ecosystem functioning, the complex nature of temporal nonlinearity and spatial heterogeneity, the fast growing trend along with the global population boom and urbanization. However, it is not yet clear that what are the global dynamics of BGG and how it is spatially distributed. It is therefore important to monitor BGG as an essential component of land cover change on a locally relevant and globally consistent base. In this study, we try to answer these questions using over-a-decade Landsat satellite observations. Recent developments in optical remote sensing hold tremendous promise for global BGG detection. One data source is the legacy of annual Landsat mosaics from the research of Hansen et al. on global forest dynamics. Following previous research by Hansen et al., BGG observed by Landsat data is defined as a process of land cover change featuring permanent or semi-permanent clearing of vegetation cover by human land use or natural disturbances at the 30-m Landsat pixel scale. A sophisticated method has been developed to capture the change signal from high dimension metrics derived from time series of Landsat spectral bands and continuous bare ground field. By examining the contribution of each metric to the effectiveness of BGG detection, 140 metrics were selected and put into a supervised machine learning algorithm, the bagged classification tree. A recursive strategy was adopted to complete training data and improve result. A global BGG training data set counting to around 27.5 million pixels was produced. Additional training was obtained from regional sources like the bare ground gain layer of Web-enabled Landsat data (WELD) and the impervious surface layer of National Land Cover Database (NLCD). Independent validation was performed by interpreting stratified samples on Google Earth high resolution images. The preliminary results of the

  9. A semi-empirical model to simplify the synthesis of homogeneous and transparent cross-linked polymers and their application in the preparation of optical sensing films.

    PubMed

    Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; Fernandez-Sanchez, Jorge F; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto

    2009-10-15

    We propose a simple, semi-empirical model based on Hansen's solubility parameters for simplifying the synthesis and the optimization of homogeneous and transparent cross-linked polymers in order to obtain optical sensing films. More than 740 experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the reliability of the model and several applications are proposed. We have demonstrated that our model can help in the synthesis and optimization (percentage of cross-linker, changes in hydrophilicity, selection of porogens, quantity of template etc.) of homogeneous and transparent MIPs and NIPs (molecularly imprinted polymers) with VOCs; after the synthesis of 440 polymers in the homogeneity zone only 4.32% of them (19 samples out of 440) were heterogeneous. We suggest a role for its use in the development of novel polymeric resins for detecting volatile organic compounds in water by measuring intrinsic fluorescence, in simplifying the synthesis of imprinted polymers and in decreasing the number of experiments required to optimize optical sensing membranes. In addition, it might also be used for synthesizing and optimizing MIPs with a non-volatile template. PMID:19717295

  10. Influence of matching solubility parameter of polymer matrix and CNT on electrical conductivity of CNT/rubber composite

    PubMed Central

    Ata, Seisuke; Mizuno, Takaaki; Nishizawa, Ayumi; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Futaba, Don N.; Hata, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We report a general approach to fabricate elastomeric composites possessing high electrical conductivity for applications ranging from wireless charging interfaces to stretchable electronics. By using arbitrary nine kinds of rubbers as matrices, we experimentally demonstrate that the matching the solubility parameter of CNTs and the rubber matrix is important to achieve higher electrical conductivity in CNT/rubber composite, resulting in continuous conductive pathways leading to electrical conductivities as high as 15 S/cm with 10 vol% CNT in fluorinated rubber. Further, using thermodynamic considerations, we demonstrate an approach to mix CNTs to arbitrary rubber matrices regardless of solubility parameter of matrices by adding small amounts of fluorinated rubber as a polymeric-compatibilizer of CNTs. We thereby achieved electrical conductivities ranging from 1.2 to 13.8 S/cm (10 vol% CNTs) using nine varieties of rubber matrices differing in chemical structures and physical properties. Finally, we investigated the components of solubility parameter of CNT by using Hansen solubility parameters, these findings may useful for controlling solubility parameter of CNTs. PMID:25434701

  11. Two new species of the genus Anisomysis (Anisomysis) (Crustacea, Mysida, Mysidae) from coral reef waters in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, Mitsuyasu; Srinui, Khwanruan; Sawamoto, Shozo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of Anisomysis Hansen, 1910 (Mysida, Mysidae), Anisomysis (Anisomysis) spinaintus sp. n. and Anisomysis (Anisomysis) phuketensis sp. n., from coral-reef waters in Thailand are described. Anisomysis (Anisomysis) spinaintus, collected in the Chaolao Beach, Chanthaburi Province, is distinguished from the closely allied species Anisomysis (Anisomysis) incisa Tattersall, 1936, and Anisomysis (Anisomysis) hawaiiensis Murano, 1995, by the presence of 6–9 spines on the apical cleft of telson, which are absent in the latter two allied species. The new species can also be distinguished from Anisomysis (Anisomysis) aikawai Ii, 1964, by the presence of a deep telson cleft and a large number of spines on the lateral margin of telson. Anisomysis (Anisomysis) phuketensis sp. n., collected in Ko Lon, Phuket, is distinguished from the allied species Anisomysis (Anisomysis) robustispina Panampunnayil, 1984, by having a short telson and a pair of long spines on the apical part of the telson. Keys to the subgenera and species of Anisomysis, including the two new species, are presented. PMID:26487820

  12. Paving the Path for Human Space Exploration: The Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Lauri Hansen, Director of Engineering at NASA Johnson Space Center will discuss the challenges of human space exploration. The future of human exploration begins with our current earth reliant missions in low earth orbit. These missions utilize the International Space Station to learn how to safely execute deep space missions. In addition to serving as an exploration test bed and enabling world class research, the International Space Station enables NASA to build international and commercial partnerships. NASA's next steps will be to enable the commercialization of low earth orbit while concentrating on developing the spacecraft and infrastructure necessary for deep space exploration and long duration missions. The Orion multi-purpose crew vehicle and the Space Launch System rocket are critical building blocks in this next phase of exploration. There are many challenges in designing spacecraft to perform these missions including safety, complex vehicle design, and mass challenges. Orion development is proceeding well, and includes a significant partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop and build the Service Module portion of the spacecraft. Together, NASA and ESA will provide the capability to take humans further than we have ever been before - 70,000 km past the moon. This will be the next big step in expanding the frontiers of human exploration, eventually leading to human footprints on Mars.

  13. Retrostructural model to predict biomass formulations for barrier performance.

    PubMed

    Zhu Ryberg, Y Z; Edlund, U; Albertsson, A-C

    2012-08-13

    Barrier performance and retrostructural modeling of the macromolecular components demonstrate new design principles for film formulations based on renewable wood hydrolysates. Hardwood hydrolysates, which contain a fair share of lignin coexisting with poly- and oligosaccharides, offer excellent oxygen-barrier performance. A Hansen solubility parameter (HSP) model has been developed to convert the complex hydrolysate structural compositions into relevant matrix oxygen-permeability data allowing a systematic prediction of how the biomass should be formulated to generate an efficient barrier. HSP modeling suggests that the molecular packing ability plays a key role in the barrier performance. The actual size and distribution of free volume holes in the matrices were quantified in the subnanometer scale with Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) verifying the affinity-driven assembly of macromolecular segments in a densely packed morphology and regulating the diffusion of small permeants through the matrix. The model is general and can be adapted to determine the macromolecular affinities of any hydrolysate biomass based on chemical composition. PMID:22804452

  14. Conceptual approach to renewable barrier film design based on wood hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Zhu Ryberg, Y Z; Edlund, U; Albertsson, A-C

    2011-04-11

    Biomass is converted to oxygen barriers through a conceptually unconventional approach involving the preservation of the biomass native interactions and macromolecular components and enhancing the effect by created interactions with a co-component. A combined calculation/assessment model is elaborated to understand, quantify, and predict which compositions that provide an intermolecular affinity high enough to mediate the molecular packing needed to create a functioning barrier. The biomass used is a wood hydrolysate, a polysaccharide-rich but not highly refined mixture where a fair amount of the native intermolecular and intramolecular hemicelluloses-lignin interactions are purposely preserved, resulting in barriers with very low oxygen permeabilities (OP) both at 50 and 80% relative humidity and considerably lower OPs than coatings based on the corresponding highly purified spruce hemicellulose, O-acetyl galactoglucomannan (AcGGM). The component interactions and mutual affinities effectively mediate an immobilization of the chain segments in a dense disordered structure, modeled through the Hansen's solubility parameter concept and quantified on the nanolength scale by positron annihilation lifetime spectrum (PALS). PMID:21366288

  15. Poly(N-vinylimidazole/ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) for the purification and isolation of phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Schemeth, Dieter; Noël, Jean-Christophe; Jakschitz, Thomas; Rainer, Matthias; Tessadri, Richard; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2015-07-23

    In this study we report the novel polymeric resin poly(N-vinyl imidazole/ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) for the purification and isolation of phenolic acids. The monomer to crosslinker ratio and the porogen composition were optimized for isolating phenolic acids diluted in acetonitrile at normal phase chromatography conditions, first. Acetonitrile serves as polar, aprotic solvent, dissolving phenolic acids but not interrupting interactions with the stationary phase due to the approved Hansen solubility parameters. The optimized resin demonstrated high loading capacities and adsorption abilities particularly for phenolic acids in both, acetonitrile and aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior of aqueous standards can be attributed to ion exchange effects due to electrostatic interactions between protonated imidazole residues and deprotonated phenolic acids. Furthermore, adsorption experiments and subsequent curve fittings provide information of maximum loading capacities of single standards according to the Langmuir adsorption model. Recovery studies of the optimized polymer in the normal-phase and ion-exchange mode illustrate the powerful isolation properties for phenolic acids and are comparable or even better than typical, commercially available solid phase extraction materials. In order to prove the applicability, a highly complex extract of rosemary leaves was purified by poly(N-vinyl imidazole/ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) and the isolated compounds were identified using UHPLC-qTOF-MS. PMID:26231906

  16. High-resolution modelling of health impacts from air pollution using the integrated model system EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Jørgen; Andersen, Mikael S.; Bønløkke, Jakob; Christensen, Jesper H.; Geels, Camilla; Hansen, Kaj M.; Jensen, Steen S.; Ketzel, Matthias; Plejdrup, Marlene S.; Sigsgaard, Torben; Silver, Jeremy D.

    2014-05-01

    we have used a coupling of two chemistry transport models to calculate the air pollution concentration at different scales; the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model to calculate the air pollution levels with a resolution down to 5.6 km x 5.6 km and the Urban Background Model to further calculate the air pollution at 1 km x 1 km resolution using results from DEHM as boundary conditions. Both the emission data as well as the population density has been represented in the model system with the same high resolution. Previous health impact assessments related to air pollution have been made on a lower resolution. In this study, the integrated model system, EVA, has been used to estimate the health impacts and related external cost for Denmark over a 20 year period (1990-2010) at a 1 km x 1 km resolution. Furthermore, a sensitivity study of the health impact using coarse and fine resolutions in the model system has been carried out to evaluate the effect of improved description of the geographical population distribution with respect to location of local emissions. Brandt, J., J. D. Silver, J. H. Christensen, M. S. Andersen, J. Bønløkke, T. Sigsgaard, C. Geels, A. Gross, A. B. Hansen, K. M. Hansen, G. B. Hedegaard, E. Kaas and L. M. Frohn, 2013. Contribution from the ten major emission sectors in Europe to the Health-Cost Externalities of Air Pollution using the EVA Model System - an integrated modelling approach. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 13, pp. 7725-7746, 2013. Brandt, J., J. D. Silver, J. H. Christensen, M. S. Andersen, J. Bønløkke, T. Sigsgaard, C. Geels, A. Gross, A. B. Hansen, K. M. Hansen, G. B. Hedegaard, E. Kaas and L. M. Frohn, 2013. Assessment of Past, Present and Future Health-Cost Externalities of Air Pollution in Europe and the contribution from international ship traffic using the EVA Model System. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics. Vol. 13, pp. 7747-7764, 2013.

  17. Slip flow in graphene nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Todd, B. D.; Hansen, J. S.; Daivis, Peter J.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic boundary condition for simple nanofluidic systems such as argon and methane flowing in graphene nanochannels using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (EMD) in conjunction with our recently proposed method [J. S. Hansen, B. D. Todd, and P. J. Daivis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 016313 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.016313]. We first calculate the fluid-graphene interfacial friction coefficient, from which we can predict the slip length and the average velocity of the first fluid layer close to the wall (referred to as the slip velocity). Using direct nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD) we then calculate the slip length and slip velocity from the streaming velocity profiles in Poiseuille and Couette flows. The slip lengths and slip velocities from the NEMD simulations are found to be in excellent agreement with our EMD predictions. Our EMD method therefore enables one to directly calculate this intrinsic friction coefficient between fluid and solid and the slip length for a given fluid and solid, which is otherwise tedious to calculate using direct NEMD simulations at low pressure gradients or shear rates. The advantages of the EMD method over the NEMD method to calculate the slip lengths/flow rates for nanofluidic systems are discussed, and we finally examine the dynamic behaviour of slip due to an externally applied field and shear rate.

  18. Criticality safety validation: Simple geometry, single unit {sup 233}U systems

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, V.L.

    1997-06-01

    Typically used LMITCO criticality safety computational methods are evaluated for suitability when applied to INEEL {sup 233}U systems which reasonably can be modeled as simple-geometry, single-unit systems. Sixty-seven critical experiments of uranium highly enriched in {sup 233}U, including 57 aqueous solution, thermal-energy systems and 10 metal, fast-energy systems, were modeled. These experiments include 41 cylindrical and 26 spherical cores, and 41 reflected and 26 unreflected systems. No experiments were found for intermediate-neutron-energy ranges, or with interstitial non-hydrogenous materials typical of waste systems, mixed {sup 233}U and plutonium, or reflectors such as steel, lead, or concrete. No simple geometry experiments were found with cubic or annular cores, or approximating infinite sea systems. Calculations were performed with various tools and methodologies. Nine cross-section libraries, based on ENDF/B-IV, -V, or -VI.2, or on Hansen-Roach source data, were used with cross-section processing methods of MCNP or SCALE. The k{sub eff} calculations were performed with neutral-particle transport and Monte Carlo methods of criticality codes DANT, MCNP 4A, and KENO Va.

  19. Illiquidity premium and expected stock returns in the UK: A new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiaqi; Sherif, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the relative importance of liquidity risk for the time-series and cross-section of stock returns in the UK. We propose a simple way to capture the multidimensionality of illiquidity. Our analysis indicates that existing illiquidity measures have considerable asset specific components, which justifies our new approach. Further, we use an alternative test of the Amihud (2002) measure and parametric and non-parametric methods to investigate whether liquidity risk is priced in the UK. We find that the inclusion of the illiquidity factor in the capital asset pricing model plays a significant role in explaining the cross-sectional variation in stock returns, in particular with the Fama-French three-factor model. Further, using Hansen-Jagannathan non-parametric bounds, we find that the illiquidity-augmented capital asset pricing models yield a small distance error, other non-liquidity based models fail to yield economically plausible distance values. Our findings have important implications for managing the liquidity risk of equity portfolios.

  20. [Thalidomide in Brazil: monitoring with shared responsibility?].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M A; Bermudez, J A; Souza, A C

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses issues related to the regulation and rational use of thalidomide in Brazil, by means of a historical approach comprising three different stages. The first part is a historical review of the controversial drug since it was first synthesized, then marketed and subsequently banned during the 1950s and 60s, until the present, when an apparently irreversible process of rehabilitating the drug is under way. Brazilian experience with the use of thalidomide is described, emphasizing legal, political, and institutional work led by two social movements, the Brazilian Association of People with Thalidomide Syndrome (ABPST) and the Movement for Reintegration of People with Hansen's Disease (Morhan). The article describes the results and analyzes an active search of new cases in what is a second generation of thalidomide syndrome in Brazil. Finally, based on clinical and scientific evidence of thalidomide's therapeutic efficacy, the growth of social movements struggling both for and against authorization of the drug, and a restrictive regulation proposed by the Ministry of Health, the article discusses the implementation of policies for the regulation and rational use of thalidomide in Brazil. PMID:10203451

  1. Investigation of a rotary valving system with variable valve timing for internal combustion engines: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, P.C.; Hansen, C.N.

    1994-11-18

    The objective of the program was to provide a functional demonstration of the Hansen Rotary Valving System with Variable Valve timing (HRVS/VVT), capable of throttleless inlet charge control, as an alternative to conventional poppet-valves for use in spark ignited internal combustion engines. The goal of this new technology is to secure benefits in fuel economy, broadened torque band, vibration reduction, and overhaul accessibility. Additionally, use of the variable valve timing capability to vary the effective compression ratio is expected to improve multi-fuel tolerance and efficiency. Efforts directed at the design of HRVS components proved to be far more extensive than had been anticipated, ultimately requiring that proof-trial design/development work be performed. Although both time and funds were exhausted before optical or ion-probe types of in-cylinder investigation could be undertaken, a great deal of laboratory data was acquired during the course of the design/development work. This laboratory data is the basis for the information presented in this Final Report.

  2. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E.

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  3. Predicted Atmospheric Temperature Retrievals for the New Horizons Encounter with Pluto.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalucha, Angela M.

    2014-11-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft will flyby Pluto this July. Three opportunities for observing the temperature vs. height will present themselves: A radio occultaion of radio signals transmitted from Earth to the Radio Science Experiment (REX) instrument, a stellar occultation of a background star as seen by Alice, and a stellar occultation of the Sun as seen by Alice. The temperature vs. height profiles will be generated using the Pluto version of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model, which now includes radiative-conductive forcing from the Strobel et al. (1996) model, a multilayer subsurface, and a volatile cycle. The simulations begin in the year 1986 and end at the date of the New Horizons encounter. The Pluto conditions that will be discussed are (1) a surface albedo pattern taken from Buie et al. (2010), (2) a "best case" surface N2 ice distribution and temperature from the Hansen and Paige (1996) model, (3) a configuration where there is initially no surface N2 ice, and (4) a configuration where there is effectively infinitely deep surface N2 ice.

  4. Accuracy Assessment of Landsat-Derived Continuous Fields of Tree Cover Products Using Airborne LIDAR Data in the Eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X. P.; Tang, H.

    2015-08-01

    Knowing the detailed error structure of a land cover map is crucial for area estimation. Facilitated by the opening of the Landsat archive, global land cover mapping at 30-m resolution has become possible in recent years. Two global Landsat-based continuous fields of tree cover maps have been generated by Sexton et al. (2013) and Hansen et al. (2013) but the accuracy of which have not been comprehensively evaluated. Here we used canopy cover derived from airborne small-footprint Lidar data as a reference to evaluate the accuracy of these two datasets as well as the National Land Cover Database 2001 canopy cover layer (Homer et al. 2004) in two entire counties in Maryland, United States. Our results showed that all three Landsat datasets captured well the spatial variations of tree cover in the study area with an r2 ranging between 0.54 and 0.58, a mean bias error ranging between -15% and 5% tree cover, and a root mean square error ranging between 27% and 29% tree cover. When the continuous tree cover maps were converted to binary forest/nonforest maps, all three products were proved to have an overall accuracy >= 80% but with significant differences in producer's accuracy and user's accuracy. Data users are thus suggested to beware of these accuracy patterns when selecting the most appropriate dataset for their specific applications.

  5. Combined Computational Approach Based on Density Functional Theory and Artificial Neural Networks for Predicting The Solubility Parameters of Fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Perea, J Darío; Langner, Stefan; Salvador, Michael; Kontos, Janos; Jarvas, Gabor; Winkler, Florian; Machui, Florian; Görling, Andreas; Dallos, Andras; Ameri, Tayebeh; Brabec, Christoph J

    2016-05-19

    The solubility of organic semiconductors in environmentally benign solvents is an important prerequisite for the widespread adoption of organic electronic appliances. Solubility can be determined by considering the cohesive forces in a liquid via Hansen solubility parameters (HSP). We report a numerical approach to determine the HSP of fullerenes using a mathematical tool based on artificial neural networks (ANN). ANN transforms the molecular surface charge density distribution (σ-profile) as determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculations within the framework of a continuum solvation model into solubility parameters. We validate our model with experimentally determined HSP of the fullerenes C60, PC61BM, bisPC61BM, ICMA, ICBA, and PC71BM and through comparison with previously reported molecular dynamics calculations. Most excitingly, the ANN is able to correctly predict the dispersive contributions to the solubility parameters of the fullerenes although no explicit information on the van der Waals forces is present in the σ-profile. The presented theoretical DFT calculation in combination with the ANN mathematical tool can be easily extended to other π-conjugated, electronic material classes and offers a fast and reliable toolbox for future pathways that may include the design of green ink formulations for solution-processed optoelectronic devices. PMID:27070101

  6. Lucio's Phenomenon: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Roverano, S; Paira, S; Somma, F

    2000-08-01

    Hansen's disease is a chronic granulomatous disease of infectious origin. It has a worldwide distribution and a variety of clinical manifestations often involving the skin, nasal mucosa, and peripheral nerves. Lepromatous leprosy characterizes the condition of a large group of patients with little or no resistence to the infection. Several forms of lepromatous leprosy are recognized, including macular, nodular, and diffuse. Lucio's phenomenon is a rare but distinctive skin eruption seen in patients with diffuse lepromatous leprosy. The diffuse lesions of Lucio's phenomenon have a predilection for the extremities, can include nodules, and heal with atrophic stellate scars; histologically, a necrotizing vasculitis accompanied by a nonspecific inflammatory reaction may be seen. We describe two patients with Lucio's phenomenon who presented with nontender, painless, skin lesions with nodules in part perceptible only by palpation. Both patients were treated with multidrug therapy, and immunosuppressive doses of steroids as the suggested optimal treatment for this reactional state. However, Lucio's phenomenon is frequently fatal as a result of bacterial infection or sepsis, and both patients reported here died. We call attention to this particular and unusual skin manifestation of lepromatous leprosy, which can mimic rheumatic disease and other causes of vasculitis. This is especially likely to be unrecognized in nonendemic countries but cases will occasionally be seen in this age of extensive international travel. PMID:19078473

  7. Global mean sea level - Indicator of climate change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robock, A.; Hansen, J.; Gornitz, V.; Lebedeff, S.; Moore, E.; Etkins, R.; Epstein, E.

    1983-01-01

    A critical discussion is presented on the use by Etkins and Epstein (1982) of combined surface air temperature and sea level time series to draw conclusions concerning the discharge of the polar ice sheets. It is objected by Robock that they used Northern Hemisphere land surface air temperature records which are unrepresentative of global sea surface temperature, and he suggests that externally imposed volcanic dust and CO2 forcings can adequately account for observed temperature changes over the last century, with global sea level changing in passive response to sea change as a result of thermal expansion. Hansen et al. adduce evidence for global cooling due to ice discharge that has not exceeded a few hundredths of a degree centigrade in the last century, precluding any importance of this phenomenon in the interpretation of global mean temperature trends for this period. Etkins and Epstein reply that since their 1982 report additional evidence has emerged for the hypothesis that the polar ice caps are diminishing. It is reasserted that each of the indices discussed, including global mean sea surface temperature and sea level, polar ice sheet mass balance, water mass characteristics, and the spin rate and axis of rotation displacement of the earth, are physically linked and can be systematically monitored, as is currently being planned under the auspices of the National Climate Program.

  8. Two-temperature models for nitrogen dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, M. Lino; Guerra, V.; Loureiro, J.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate sets of nitrogen state-resolved dissociation rates have been reduced to two-temperature (translational T and vibrational Tv) dissociation rates. The analysis of such two-temperature dissociation rates shows evidence of two different dissociation behaviors. For Tv < 0.3 T dissociation proceeds predominantly from the lower-lying vibrational levels, whereas for Tv > 0.3 T dissociation proceeds predominantly form the near-dissociative vibrational levels, with an abrupt change of behavior at Tv = 0.3 T. These two-temperature sets have then been utilized as a benchmark for the comparison against popular multitemperature dissociation models (Park, Hansen, Marrone-Treanor, Hammerling, Losev-Shatalov, Gordiets, Kuznetsov, and Macheret-Fridman). This has allowed verifying the accuracy of each theoretical model, and additionally proposing adequate values for any semi-empirical parameters present in the different theories. The Macheret-Fridman model, who acknowledges the existence of the two aforementioned dissociation regimes, has been found to provide significantly more accurate results than the other models. Although these different theoretical approaches have been tested and validated solely for nitrogen dissociation processes, it is reasonable to expect that the general conclusions of this work, regarding the adequacy of the different dissociation models, could be extended to the description of arbitrary diatomic dissociation processes.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of alkyl substituted nanographene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziogos, Orestis George; Theodorou, Doros Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Discotic polyaromatic molecules, similar to nanometric graphene flakes, constitute an interesting class of materials for organic electronic applications. Grafting flexible side chains around the periphery of such molecules enhances their processability and gives rise to diverse behaviours, such as the manifestation of liquid-crystalline character and anisotropic mechanical response. In this work, we examine by means of molecular dynamics simulations the properties of molecular crystals comprised of alkyl-substituted hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene mesogens. Pristine and mono-substituted systems by hydrogen or iodine atoms are modelled, with variable side chain length. A general structural and mechanical robustness to peripheral substitution is reported, with the mesogens forming tightly packed molecular wires even at elevated temperature and pressure. In their discotic ordering, the molecules present relatively low translational mobility, a beneficial phenomenon for charge transport. A thermotropic dependence of the mechanical response is identified, with the systems behaving differently in their room-temperature crystalline phase and in their liquid-crystalline phase at elevated temperatures. The melting process is also examined, elucidating an initial negative expansion along a high symmetry direction and the existence of a metastable state, before falling into the final liquid-crystalline state. Dedicated to Professor Jean-Pierre Hansen, with deepest appreciation of his outstanding contributions to liquid and soft matter theory.

  10. Dissolved organic phosphorus utilization and alkaline phosphatase activity of the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium impudicum isolated from the South Sea of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seok Jin; Kwon, Hyeong Kyu; Noh, Il Hyeon; Yang, Han-Soeb

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated alkaline phosphatase (APase) activity and dissolved organic and inorganic phosphorus utilization by the harmful dinoflagellate Gymnodinium impudicum (Fraga et Bravo) Hansen et Moestrup isolated from the South Sea of Korea. Under conditions of limited phosphorus, observation of growth kinetics in batch culture yielded a maximum growth rate (μmax) of 0.41 /day and a half saturation constant (Ks) of 0.71 μM. In time-course experiments, APase was induced as dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations fell below 0.83 μM, a threshold near the estimated Ks; APase activity increased with further DIP depletion to a maximum of 0.70 pmol/cell/h in the senescent phase. Thus, Ks may be an important index of the threshold DIP concentration for APase induction. G. impudicum utilizes a wide variety of dissolved organic phosphorus compounds in addition to DIP. These results suggest that DIP limitation in the Southern Sea of Korea may have led to the spread of G. impudicum along with the harmful dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides in recent years.

  11. Space Station - early concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    'The $2.3 million Integrative Life Support System (ILSS) arrives at Langley by barge (right) from its manufacturer, the Convair Division of General Dynamics, in August 1965.' 'Test subjects occupied this facility for as long as 28 days at a time.' 'The unique structure stood 18 feet tall, weighted 30 tons, and was housed in a cylindrical tank 18 feet in diameter.' 'In the years following its long-anticipated arrival, manned and unmanned tests in the big test chamber provided a wealth of new information about how various life-support systems would work individually and together. The longest human occupancy experiment lasted 28 days. The ILSS test program even included microbiological experiments on possible toxic contaminants in space. Langley management heartily supported the ILSS program, thus allowing it to encompass the efforts of dozens of Langley staff members in the Space systems and Instrument Research divisions.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), pp. 304-305.

  12. Validation of KENO-based criticality calculations at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Felsher, P.D.; McKamy, J.N.; Monahan, S.P. )

    1992-01-01

    In the absence of experimental data, it is necessary to rely on computer-based computational methods in evaluating the criticality condition of a nuclear system. The validity of the computer codes is established in a two-part procedure as outlined in ANSI/ANS 8.1. The first step, usually the responsibility of the code developer, involves verification that the algorithmic structure of the code is performing the intended mathematical operations correctly. The second step involves an assessment of the code's ability to realistically portray the governing physical processes in question. This is accomplished by determining the code's bias, or systematic error, through a comparison of computational results to accepted values obtained experimentally. In this paper, the authors discuss the validation process for KENO and the Hansen-Roach cross sections in use at EG and G Rocky Flats. The validation process at Rocky Flats consists of both global and local techniques. The global validation resulted in a maximum k{sub eff} limit of 0.95 for the limiting-accident scanarios of a criticality evaluation.

  13. Thalidomide and the Titanic: reconstructing the technology tragedies of the twentieth century.

    PubMed Central

    Annas, G J; Elias, S

    1999-01-01

    The Titanic has become a metaphor for the disastrous consequences of an unqualified belief in the safety and invincibility of new technology. Similarly, the thalidomide tragedy stands for all of the "monsters" that can be inadvertently or negligently created by modern medicine. Thalidomide, once banned, has returned to the center of controversy with the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) announcement that thalidomide will be placed on the market for the treatment of erythema nodosum leprosum, a severe dermatological complication of Hansen's disease. Although this indication is very restricted, thalidomide will be available for off-label uses once it is on the market. New laws regarding abortion and a new technology, ultrasound, make reasonable the approval of thalidomide for patients who suffer from serious conditions it can alleviate. In addition, the FDA and the manufacturer have proposed the most stringent postmarketing monitoring ever used for a prescription drug, including counseling, contraception, and ultrasonography in the event of pregnancy. The Titanic/thalidomide lesson for the FDA and public health is that rules and guidelines alone are not sufficient to guarantee safety. Continuous vigilance will be required to ensure that all reasonable postmarketing monitoring steps are actually taken to avoid predictable and preventable teratogenic disasters. PMID:9987477

  14. Effect of the solvent on the size of clay nanoparticles in solution as determined using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy methodology.

    PubMed

    Alin, Jonas; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy methodology was developed and utilized for the in situ nanoscale measurement of the size of mineral clay agglomerates in various liquid suspensions. The clays studied were organomodified and unmodified montmorillonite clays (I.44p, Cloisite 93a, and PGN). The methodology was compared and validated against dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis. The method was able to measure clay agglomerates in solvents in situations where DLS analysis was unsuccessful due to the shapes, polydispersity, and high aspect ratios of the clay particles and the complexity of the aggregates, or dispersion medium. The measured clay agglomerates in suspension were found to be in the nanometer range in the more compatible solvents, and their sizes correlated with the Hansen solubility parameter space distance between the clay modifiers and the solvents. Mass detection limits for size determination were in the range from 1 to 9 mg/L. The methodology thus provides simple, rapid, and inexpensive characterization of clays or particles in the nano- or microsize range in low concentrations in various liquid media, including complex mixtures or highly viscous fluids that are difficult to analyze with DLS. In addition, by combining UV-VIS spectroscopy with DLS it was possible to discern flocculation behavior in liquids, which otherwise could result in false size measurements by DLS alone. PMID:25955412

  15. PATTERNS OF MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE INFECTION IN WILD NINE-BANDED ARMADILLOS (DASYPUS NOVEMCINCTUS) IN MISSISSIPPI, USA.

    PubMed

    Perez-Heydrich, Carolina; Loughry, W J; Anderson, Corey Devin; Oli, Madan K

    2016-07-01

    The nine-banded armadillo ( Dasypus novemcinctus ) is the only known nonhuman reservoir of Mycobacterium leprae , the causative agent of Hansen's disease or leprosy. We conducted a 6-yr study on a wild population of armadillos in western Mississippi that was exposed to M. leprae to evaluate the importance of demographic and spatial risk factors on individual antibody status. We found that spatially derived covariates were not predictive of antibody status. Furthermore, analyses revealed no evidence of clustering by antibody-positive individuals. Lactating females and adult males had higher odds of being antibody positive than did nonlactating females. No juveniles or yearlings were antibody positive. Results of these analyses support the hypothesis that M. leprae infection patterns are spatially homogeneous within this armadillo population. Further research related to movement patterns, contact among individuals, antibody status, and environmental factors could help address hypotheses related to the role of environmental transmission on M. leprae infection and the mechanisms underlying the differential infection patterns among demographic groups. PMID:27195687

  16. The armadillo: a model for the neuropathy of leprosy and potentially other neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Lahiri, Ramanuj; Scollard, David M; Pena, Maria; Williams, Diana L; Adams, Linda B; Figarola, John; Truman, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's disease) is an infectious peripheral neurological disorder caused by Mycobacterium leprae that even today leaves millions of individuals worldwide with life-long disabilities. The specific mechanisms by which this bacterium induces nerve injury remain largely unknown, mainly owing to ethical and practical limitations in obtaining affected human nerve samples. In addition to humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only other natural host of M. leprae, and they develop a systemically disseminated disease with extensive neurological involvement. M. leprae is an obligate intracellular parasite that cannot be cultivated in vitro. Because of the heavy burdens of bacilli they harbor, nine-banded armadillos have become the organism of choice for propagating large quantities of M. leprae, and they are now advancing as models of leprosy pathogenesis and nerve damage. Although armadillos are exotic laboratory animals, the recently completed whole genome sequence for this animal is enabling researchers to undertake more sophisticated molecular studies and to develop armadillo-specific reagents. These advances will facilitate the use of armadillos in piloting new therapies and diagnostic regimens, and will provide new insights into the oldest known infectious neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:23223615

  17. Integrative literature review of the reported uses of serological tests in leprosy management.

    PubMed

    Fabri, Angélica da Conceição Oliveira Coelho; Carvalho, Ana Paula Mendes; Vieira, Nayara Figueiredo; Bueno, Isabela de Caux; Rodrigues, Rayssa Nogueira; Monteiro, Thayenne Barrozo Mota; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Duthie, Malcolm S; Lana, Francisco Carlos Félix

    2016-04-01

    An integrative literature review was conducted to synthesize available publications regarding the potential use of serological tests in leprosy programs. We searched the databases Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, Índice Bibliográfico Espanhol em Ciências da Saúde, Acervo da Biblioteca da Organização Pan-Americana da Saúde, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, Hanseníase, National Library of Medicine, Scopus, Ovid, Cinahl, and Web of Science for articles investigating the use of serological tests for antibodies against phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I), ML0405, ML2331, leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (LID-1), and natural disaccharide octyl-leprosy IDRI diagnostic-1 (NDO-LID). From an initial pool of 3.514 articles, 40 full-length articles fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Based on these papers, we concluded that these antibodies can be used to assist in diagnosing leprosy, detecting neuritis, monitoring therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring household contacts or at-risk populations in leprosy-endemic areas. Thus, available data suggest that serological tests could contribute substantially to leprosy management. PMID:27192583

  18. Dermal dendrocytes FXIIIa+ are essential antigen-presenting cells in indeterminate leprosy.

    PubMed

    de Alvarenga Lira, Marcia Lanzoni; Pagliari, Carla; de Lima Silva, Aline Alves; de Andrade, Heitor Franco; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas

    2015-04-01

    Indeterminate leprosy (IL) is the early phase of Hansen disease and reword (APCs). Langerhans cells and dermal dendrocytes FXIIIa positive (DDFXIIIa) are the major APCs in the skin and can be identified by the expression of CD1a and FXIIIa, respectively, by immunohistochemical techniques. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) are another type of dermal dendrocytes with a questionable antigen-presenting function and can be highlighted by anti-CD123 expression. To our knowledge, there are no studies evaluating DDFXIIIa and PDC in IL. The purpose was to investigate the involvement of these cells in the pathogenesis of IL. The authors performed a retrospective study on 18 cases of IL (10 confirmed and 8 suspected) to investigate expression of FXIIIa, CD1a, and CD123. The results were compared with normal skin (for CD1a and FXIIIa only). A higher amount of FXIIIa-positive cells (P , 0.05) in confirmed and suspected IL cases was noted when comparing with normal skin. However, CD1a showed no quantitative differences in the epidermis of IL lesions when comparing with normal skin and CD123 expression was negligible. Based on these findings, the authors postulate that Langerhans cells and PDCs do not have a major role in IL and that DDFXIIIa may be the main APCs in IL. Further study is required to establish this. PMID:25365500

  19. The armadillo as a model for peripheral neuropathy in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Truman, Richard W; Ebenezer, Gigi J; Pena, Maria T; Sharma, Rahul; Balamayooran, Gayathriy; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Scollard, David M; McArthur, Justin C; Rambukkana, Anura

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy (also known as Hansen's Disease) is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that primarily targets the peripheral nervous system; skin, muscle, and other tissues are also affected. Other than humans, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) are the only natural hosts of M. leprae, and they are the only laboratory animals that develop extensive neurological involvement with this bacterium. Infection in the armadillo closely recapitulates many of the structural, physiological, and functional aspects of leprosy seen in humans. Armadillos can be useful models of leprosy for basic scientific investigations into the pathogenesis of leprosy neuropathy and its associated myopathies, as well as for translational research studies in piloting new diagnostic methods or therapeutic interventions. Practical and ethical constraints often limit investigation into human neuropathies, but armadillos are an abundant source of leprotic neurologic fibers. Studies with these animals may provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in leprosy that also might benefit the understanding of other demyelinating neuropathies. Although there is only a limited supply of armadillo-specific reagents, the armadillo whole genomic sequence has been completed, and gene expression studies can be employed. Clinical procedures, such as electrophysiological nerve conduction testing, provide a functional assessment of armadillo nerves. A variety of standard histopathological and immunopathological procedures including Epidermal Nerve Fiber Density (ENFD) analysis, Schwann Cell Density, and analysis for other conserved cellular markers can be used effectively with armadillos and will be briefly reviewed in this text. PMID:24615444

  20. Lignin dissolution in dialkylimidazolium-based ionic liquid-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yantao; Wei, Ligang; Li, Kunlan; Ma, Yingchong; Ma, Ningning; Ding, Shan; Wang, Linlin; Zhao, Deyang; Yan, Bing; Wan, Wenying; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Xin; Wang, Junmei; Li, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Lignin dissolution in dialkylimidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL)-water mixtures (40wt%-100wt% IL content) at 60°C was investigated. The IL content and type are found to considerably affect lignin solubility. For the IL-water mixtures except 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([C4C1im]BF4), the maximum lignin solubility can be achieved at 70wt% IL content. Lignin solubility in IL-water mixtures with different cations follows the order 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([C4C1im](+))>1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium ([C6C1im](+))>1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ([C2C1im](+))>1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium ([C8C1im](+))>1-butyl-3-ethylimidazolium ([C4C2im](+))>1-butyl-3-propylimidazolium ([C4C3im](+)). For IL mixtures with different anions, lignin solubility decreases in the following order: methanesulfonate (MeSO3(-))>acetate (MeCO2(-))>bromide (Br(-))>dibutylphosphate (DBP(-)). Evaluation using the theory of Hansen solubility parameter (HSP) is consistent with the experimental results, suggesting that HSP can aid in finding the appropriate range of IL content for IL-water mixtures. However, HSP cannot be used to evaluate the effect of IL type on lignin solubility. PMID:25164342

  1. IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

    2004-07-01

    Recycled CO2 will be used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 pinnacle reef (Otsego County) in the Michigan Basin. We began injecting CO2 in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well on May 6, 2004. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography animations and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in three reefs, the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, and Dover 35 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric of the rocks. Digital and hard copy data continues to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the heterogeneity of the Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshop, Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, and Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting. A technical paper was submitted to the Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

  2. Quantifying Methane Emissions from the Arctic Ocean Seabed to the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Stephen; Pisso, Ignacio; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Hermansen, Ove; Silyakova, Anna; Ferré, Benedicte; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Myhre, Gunnar; Mienert, Jürgen; Stohl, Andreas; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2016-04-01

    Large quantities of methane are stored under the seafloor in the shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean. Some of this is in the form of hydrates which may be vulnerable to deomposition due to surface warming. The Methane Emissions from Arctic Ocean to Atmosphere MOCA, (http://moca.nilu.no/) project was established in collaboration with the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate (CAGE, https://cage.uit.no/). In summer 2014, and summer and autumn 2015 we deployed oceanographic CTD (Conductivity, Temperature, Depth) stations and performed state-of-the-art atmospheric measurements of CH4, CO2, CO, and other meteorological parameters aboard the research vessel Helmer Hanssen west of Prins Karl's Forland, Svalbard. Air samples were collected for isotopic analysis (13C, 2H) and quantification of other hydrocarbons (ethane, propane, etc.). Atmospheric measurements are also available from the nearby Zeppelin Observatory at a mountain close to Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. We will present data from these measurements that show an upper constraint of the methane flux in measurement area in 2014 too low to influence the annual CH4 budget. This is further supported by top-down constraints (maximum release consistent with observations at the Helmer Hansen and Zeppelin Observatory) determined using FLEXPART foot print sensitivities and the OsloCTM3 model. The low flux estimates despite the presence of active seeps in the area (numerous gas flares were observed using echo sounding) were apparently due to the presence of a stable ocean pycnocline at ~50 m.

  3. A new analysis of variability and predictability of seasonal rainfall of central southern Africa for 1950-94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwale, Davison; Yew Gan, Thian; Shen, Samuel S. P.

    2004-10-01

    Using wavelet analysis and wavelet-based empirical orthogonal function analysis on scale-averaged-wavelet power and individual scale power, we identified the non-stationary sea-surface temperature (SST) fields of the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans that are associated with coherent regions of rainfall variability in central southern Africa (CSA). The dominant mode of CSA rainfall is out of phase between the coastal areas and the centre of CSA and has been decreasing consistently since 1970. The frequencies associated with this mode are between 2-2.4 and 5.6-8 years. The Benguela ocean current SSTs form the dominant spatial pattern of the South Atlantic Ocean, and the Brazil and Guinea ocean current SSTs form the second leading mode. The Benguela spatial patterns were found to migrate seasonally between Africa's west coast and South America's east coast. The northern Indian Ocean SST forms the leading mode of variability, followed by the south Indian Ocean SST. Using predictor fields identified from both oceans, we achieved encouraging results of predicted CSA rainfall using a non-linear statistical teleconnection artificial neural network-genetic algorithm model. At 3 month lead time, correlations of between 0.8 and 0.9, root-mean-square errors of between 0.4 and 0.9 and Hansen Kuipers skill scores of between 0.4 and 0.8 were obtained between observed and predicted CSA rainfall.

  4. Intercomparison of measurement techniques for black or elemental carbon under urban background conditions in wintertime: influence of biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, P; Wonaschütz, A; Hitzenberger, R; Petzold, A; Bauer, H; Jankowski, N; Puxbaum, H; Chi, X; Maenhaut, W

    2008-02-01

    A generally accepted method to measure black carbon (BC) or elemental carbon (EC) still does not exist. An earlier study in the Vienna area comparing practically all measurement methods in use in Europe gave comparable BC and EC concentrations under summer conditions (Hitzenberger et al., 2006a). Under summer conditions, Diesel traffic is the major source for EC or BC in Vienna. Under winter conditions, space heating (also with biomass as fuel) is another important source (Caseiro et al., 2007). The present study compares the response of thermal methods (a modified Cachier method, Cachier et al., 1989; a thermal-optical method, Schmid et al., 2001; and two thermal-optical (TOT) methods using Sunset instruments, Birch and Cary, 1996 and Schauer et al., 2003) and optical methods (a light transmission method, Hansen et al., 1984; the integrating sphere method, Hitzenberger et al., 1996; and the multiangle absorption photometer MAAP, Petzold and Schönlinner, 2004). Significant differences were found between the TOT methods on the one hand and all other methods on the other. The TOT methods yielded EC concentrations that were lower by 44 and 17% than the average of all measured concentrations (including the TOT data). The largest discrepancy was found when the contribution of brown carbon (measured with the integrating sphere method) was largest. PMID:18323117

  5. Efficient exfoliation of MoS2 with volatile solvents and their application for humidity sensor. .

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Lin; Jung, Hyun; Huh, Jeung-Soo; Yu, Joon-Boo; Yang, Woo-Chul

    2014-11-01

    Liquid-phase exfoliation is likely to be feasible for practical fabrication of few-layer MoS2 nanosheets in large quantities. However, this method generally involves the organic solvents with high boiling point; new strategy using low-boiling-point solvents to obtain high MoS2 concentration is still highly required. In this study, using the strategy of Hansen solubility parameters (HSP), a method based on exfoliation of MoS2 in chloroform/acetonitrile mixtures is demonstrated to fabricate high concentration MoS2 nanosheet solution. The highest concentration of few-layer MoS2 nanosheets and nanoparticles up to 0.4 mg/ml is achieved with the optimum composition of mixture. The MoS2 nanosheet thin film is also investigated in terms of their sensing properties towards humidity. The exfoliated MoS2 based thin film sensor exhibited excellent sensitivity, quick response and recovery, and good reproducibility comparing to their bulk counterpart. The excellent sensing performance of exfoliated MoS2 is generally attributed to the high surface-to-volume-ratio and increased ratio of edge sites and basal plane sites after exfoliation. PMID:25958556

  6. Transport of pure components in pervaporation through a microporous silica membrane.

    PubMed

    Bettens, Ben; Dekeyzer, Sofie; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Degrève, Jan; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2005-03-24

    The pervaporation mechanism of pure components through a commercial microporous silica membrane was studied by performing experiments using water, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and n-propanol in the 40-80 degrees C temperature range. Experimental fluxes were correlated to feed temperature and viscosity. It was found that the permeation mechanism obeys the adsorption-diffusion description, covering both the microscopic models based on configurational (micropore) diffusion and on activated surface diffusion. The contribution of convection was negligible. Size parameters for the permeating molecules such as molecular weight, kinetic diameter, and effective diameter, which are expected to have an influence on diffusion, did not correlate with the flux, thus strongly emphasizing the importance of sorption as the rate-determining step for transport in the pervaporation process. This was confirmed by correlating parameters reflecting polarity with flux: an exponential relation between the Hansen polarity (especially the hydrogen bonding component) and the flux was observed. A similar correlation was found between the dielectric constant and the flux. Furthermore, the flux increases in the same direction as the hydrophilicity of the pure components (log P). The effects of membrane surface tension and contact angles are less outspoken, but experiments performed on glass supported and silica supported membrane top layers suggest an important influence of the sublayers on the flux. PMID:16863187

  7. Understanding dissolution behavior of 193nm photoresists in organic solvent developers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Park, Jong Keun; Cardolaccia, Thomas; Sun, Jibin; Andes, Cecily; O'Connell, Kathleen; Barclay, George G.

    2012-03-01

    Herein, we investigate the dissolution behavior of 193-nm chemically amplified resist in different organic solvents at a mechanistic level. We previously reported the effect of solvent developers on the negative tone development (NTD) process in both dry and immersion lithography, and demonstrated various resist performance parameters such as photospeed, critical dimension uniformity, and dissolution rate contrast are strongly affected by chemical nature of the organic developer. We further pursued the investigation by examining the dependence of resist dissolution behavior on their solubility properties using Hansen Solubility Parameter (HSP). The effects of monomer structure, and resist composition, and the effects of different developer chemistry on dissolution behaviors were evaluated by using laser interferometry and quartz crystal microbalance. We have found that dissolution behaviors of methacrylate based resists are significantly different in different organic solvent developers such as OSDTM-1000 Developer* and n-butyl acetate (nBA), affecting their resist performance. This study reveals that understanding the resist dissolution behavior helps to design robust NTD materials for higher resolution imaging.

  8. The demystification of leprosy: a multifactorial problem.

    PubMed

    Kato, L

    1990-01-01

    Abolishment of misbeliefs and misconceptions, unfounded fear and prejudice are factors as important in leprosy control as prevention, early detection and therapy. Concrete measures of demystification are proposed. Identify and divulge the absolute truth about leprosy. Calling leprosy "Hansen's disease" did not result in demystification. Patients know that the two terms are identical. Treating them as human beings attracts more patients to the healers than the Hansenologian ritual. Contrary to statements, no major advances are being made in the field of bacteriology, immunology, molecular biology, mode of transmission and epidemiology of leprosy. Not a single new drug has been discovered in 26 years. Vaccination is a dubious venture. The question arises as to whether the right priorities are promoted in leprosy research. Cultivation of the leprosy bacillus is the sine qua non of any further progress. This field of research is a lost and totally neglected priority. Consequently we have no pharmacological model for badly needed of ultrapotent antileprosy drugs. Syphilis is now cured with a single dose of penicillin. A drug as potent against leprosy should not be a mission impossible if an appropriate pharmacological model--the in vitro culture--is available. The multifactorial problem of demystification is a difficult but not an impossible task. Less sensationalism, more real progress in research, selecting the right priorities, achieving the "ultimate drug", shelter, food, shoes, soap and broom for every human on this planet constitute the road to demystification. PMID:2220303

  9. [Leprosy--a stigma in the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Falus, Orsolya

    2011-02-13

    For the initiation of the French journalist Raoul Follereau in 1954 the UNO inaugurated the Leprosy Day (Martyr's Day) that is celebrated on the last Sunday of January every year. Although the bacterium that causes leprosy was isolated by the Norwegian scientist Gerhard Henrik Armauer Hansen in 1873 and from 1982 this disease can be cured with a special pharmaceutical complex, still 219.826 new leprous are detected on Earth every year, according to the data published in August, 2010 by WHO-experts. Ancient Chinese and Hindu source-strings from 600 B. C. are referring to leprosy, however, the disease was imported by the army of Alexander the Great from India around 327-326 B. C. Even the Old and the New Testament from the Holy Bible are mentioning leprosy in several details. During the Middle Ages the Military and Hospitaller Order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem, established in the Holy Land in 72 A. D., did pioneer work in nursing leprous. In the process of time the medical attendance concerning leprous was organized in special hospitals called "leprosoriums" built on river-banks. Special office and even services were organized for the treatment and isolation of the people infected. Although medical science has prevailed against leprosy, and almost simultaneously even jurisprudence defended the patients' rights via legislation, still mankind can regrettably not get rid of this disease that stigmatizes seriously. PMID:21296733

  10. Assessing clinical significance of treatment outcomes using the DASS-21.

    PubMed

    Ronk, Fiona R; Korman, James R; Hooke, Geoffrey R; Page, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    Standard clinical significance classifications are based on movement between the "dysfunctional" and "functional" distributions; however, this dichotomy ignores heterogeneity within the "dysfunctional" population. Based on the methodology described by Tingey, Lambert, Burlingame, and Hansen (1996), the present study sought to present a 3-distribution clinical significance model for the 21-item version of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21; P. F. Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995) using data from a normative sample (n = 2,914), an outpatient sample (n = 1,000), and an inpatient sample (n = 3,964). DASS-21 scores were collected at pre- and post-treatment for both clinical samples, and patients were classified into 1 of 5 categories based on whether they had made a reliable change and whether they had moved into a different functional range. Evidence supported the validity of the 3-distribution model for the DASS-21, since inpatients who were classified as making a clinically significant change showed lower symptom severity, higher perceived quality of life, and higher clinician-rated functioning than those who did not make a clinically significant change. Importantly, results suggest that the new category of recovering is an intermediate point between recovered and making no clinically significant change. Inpatients and outpatients have different treatment goals and therefore use of the concept of clinical significance needs to acknowledge differences in what constitutes a meaningful change. PMID:23730826

  11. Visualising Plasma Flow in Current-carrying Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Setthivoine; Bellan, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    Laboratory experiments at Caltech [1], designed to study the formation and dynamics of spheromaks, solar prominences [2] and astrophysical jets, have motivated a theory for plasma flow within current-carrying magnetic flux tubes [3]. The spheromak and jet plasmas studied are formed by the merging of several plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes. These flux tubes ingest gas puffed in by pulsed gas valves and have current driven along a bias field. The apparatus is now being modified to permit injection of two different gas species into the same flux tube from different ports, corresponding to opposite footpoints of the flux tube. The new gas delivery system allows for simultaneous injection of various combinations of gas species (H, D, He, N, Ne, Ar, Kr) through various gas nozzle locations (inner or outer gun electrodes, left hand side or right hand side series). During the discharge, the multi-species plasmas are to be imaged with high speed, single- and multiple-frame, intensified CCD cameras and will be differentiated by narrow band optical filters. Other diagnostics include a magnetic probe array, soft x-ray diodes and an optical multichannel analyser to monitor the magnetic field evolution, particle velocities and energies. [1] S. C. Hsu and P. M. Bellan, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 334, 257-261 (2000). [2] J. F. Hansen and P. M. Bellan, Astrophys. J., 563, L183-L186, (2001). [3] P. M. Bellan, Phys. Plasmas, 10, 1999-2008 (2003).

  12. Lateral circulation driven by axial winds in an idealized, partially mixed estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Sanford, L. P.; Ralston, D. K.

    2008-12-01

    A 3D hydrodynamic model (ROMS) is used to investigate lateral circulation driven by axial wind events in a partially mixed estuary. The channel is straight with a triangular cross-section. The model results suggest that driving mechanisms for lateral circulation during axial wind events are different between stratified and unstratified conditions. When the water column is stratified, the lateral flow and salinity structures below the halocline closely resemble those driven by boundary mixing, and rotational effects are important. When the water column mixes vertically, rotational effects do not drive significant lateral circulation. Instead, differential advection of the axial salinity gradient by wind-driven axial flow is responsible for controlling lateral salinity gradients that in turn drive bottom-divergent lateral circulation during down-estuary wind and bottom- convergent lateral circulation during up-estuary winds. The wind-induced and tidally-induced lateral shear interacts to drive the variability of lateral flow. A Hansen-Rattray-like scaling is applied and shows good predictive skills for lateral flows under unstratified conditions. Supporting observations from the Hudson River estuary is provided.

  13. Acid glycosaminoglycans in plasma. I. Determination.

    PubMed

    Friman, C; Juvani, M

    1977-01-01

    Plasma glycosaminoglycans (GAG) were isolated from 10 ml of plasma by a modification of the method of Calatroni et al. (3). DE-52 anion-exchange cellulose was used in the isolation of the fraction operationally defined as free GAG. Chondroitin sulphate and heparin added to plasma were quantitatively recovered in this fraction. After proteolysis with papain the fraction operationally defined as bound GAG was isolated using anion-exchange resin AG 1 X 2. GAG were measured as hexuronate with the m-hydroxydiphenyl method of Blumenkrantz and Asboe-Hansen (7) which was superior to various modifications of the carbazole/borate carbazole procedures. In 15 healthy females and in 15 healthy males the concentrations of the free GAG (mean +/- S.D., expressed as microgram per 10 ml of plasma) were: 12.2 +/- 2.8 and 16.8 +/- 3.8 (P less than 0.001); of the bound GAG 40.4 +/- 7.7, and 40.2 +/- 11.6; and of the total GAG 52.7 +/- 9.0 and 57.0 +/- 10.4, respectively. With the isolation procedures used, plasma GAG were obtained in sufficient quantity for their electrophoretic characterization. Assay of plasma GAG can be performed with satisfactory accuracy and precision within two days by the present method. In clinical chemistry its application to the study of proteoglycan and GAG metabolism in various diseases may prove valuable. PMID:897589

  14. Predicting the Perceived Sound Quality of Frequency-Compressed Speech

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Rainer; Parsa, Vijay; Scollie, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The performance of objective speech and audio quality measures for the prediction of the perceived quality of frequency-compressed speech in hearing aids is investigated in this paper. A number of existing quality measures have been applied to speech signals processed by a hearing aid, which compresses speech spectra along frequency in order to make information contained in higher frequencies audible for listeners with severe high-frequency hearing loss. Quality measures were compared with subjective ratings obtained from normal hearing and hearing impaired children and adults in an earlier study. High correlations were achieved with quality measures computed by quality models that are based on the auditory model of Dau et al., namely, the measure PSM, computed by the quality model PEMO-Q; the measure qc, computed by the quality model proposed by Hansen and Kollmeier; and the linear subcomponent of the HASQI. For the prediction of quality ratings by hearing impaired listeners, extensions of some models incorporating hearing loss were implemented and shown to achieve improved prediction accuracy. Results indicate that these objective quality measures can potentially serve as tools for assisting in initial setting of frequency compression parameters. PMID:25402456

  15. Evaluation of psychodynamic psychotherapy in a community mental health center.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, William; Roseborough, David; Pahwa, Rohini; Jordan, James

    2009-01-01

    This study describes an evaluation of the effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapy provided in an outpatient community mental health clinic. The study used a single group pretest-posttest design involving 78 clients. Clinical outcomes included overall psychosocial functioning and quality of life, level of subjective distress, interpersonal functioning and role functioning, measured by the Outcome Questionnaire (Lambert, Hansen, Umpress, Lunnen Okilshi, & Burlingame, 2000). Clients showed statistically significant improvement from pretest (first sessions) to completion of treatment in overall functioning, and quality of life, level of subjective distress, interpersonal functioning and role functioning. Eighty-five percent of clients made statistically and clinically significant change. Calculation of effect sizes for each outcome found moderate to strong change effects ranging from d = .4 to .9. The study illustrates a method of intervention research that therapists and agencies can use to integrate practical evaluation methods into their clinical services in order to improve mental health service to clients, to demonstrate the effectiveness of interventions, and to provide data to support coverage for needed services for clients. PMID:20001199

  16. Experiment to Study Alfven Wave Propagation in Plasma Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Mark; Bellan, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Arched plasma-filled twisted magnetic flux tubes are generated in the laboratory using pulsed power techniques (J.F. Hansen, S.K.P. Tripathi, P.M. Bellan, 2004). Their structure and time evolution exhibit similarities with both solar coronal loops and spheromaks. We are now developing a method to excite propagating torsional Alfven wave modes in such plasma loops by superposing a ˜10kA, ˜100ns current pulse upon the ˜50kA, 10μs main discharge current that flows along the ˜20cm long, 2cm diameter arched flux tube. To achieve this high power 100ns pulse, a magnetic pulse compression technique based on saturable reactors is employed. A low power prototype has been successfully tested, and design and construction of a full-power device is nearing completion. The full-power device will compress an initial 2μs pulse by a factor of nearly 20; the final stage utilizes a water-filled transmission line with ultra-low inductance to attain the final timescale. This new pulse device will subsequently be used to investigate interactions between Alfven waves and the larger-scale loop evolution; one goal will be to directly image the wave using high-speed photography. Attention will be paid to wave propagation including dispersion and reflection, as well as dissipation mechanisms and possible energetic particle generation.

  17. Sediment Transport Modeling Along the Gravel-Sand Transition Zone of the Snohomish River, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVries, P.; Huang, C.; Aldrich, R.

    2014-12-01

    Long term sediment trapping efficiency was modeled for 1000-2000 ft long analysis segments of the tidally influenced, diked Snohomish River, upstream, along, and downstream of the ~3.5 mile long gravel-sand transition zone. A depth-averaged 2-dimensional hydrodynamic model was calibrated to a recent flood with a ~25 year recurrence interval, and the output used to extract parameters used to estimate shear stress over a range of high flows. Shear stress was estimated using (i) a roughness relation and (ii) the uniform flow approximation. Riverbed grain size distributions were estimated using pebble counts upstream, and Ponar grab samples within and downstream of the transition zone. Four different gravel and sand transport equations (Engelund-Hansen, Ackers-White, Wilcock-Crowe, and Yang) were applied to estimate transport rates at each flow level analyzed. The resulting rates were integrated over a 50 year period to compute total load entering and exiting each analysis segment to evaluate long term trends in bed elevation profiles. Results were sensitive to the choice of shear stress and bedload transport estimator with most method-dependent variation in trends apparent for segments within the transition zone.

  18. Siegel[JMMM 7,312(`78)] FIRST EXPERIMENTAL DISCOVERY of Giant-Magnetoresistance Decade Pre ``Fert'' and ``Gruenberg'' ['88 - `78] = 10-Years = One-Decade Sounds, for Nuclear-Power Naïve ``Panacea'' for Global-Warming/Climate-Chan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Masterace; Siegel, Edward

    Siegel[JMMM 7,312(`78); Monju (12/'95) LMFBR PREDICTION!!!] following: Wigner[JAP 17,857(`46)]-(Alvin)Weinberg(ANL/ORNL/ANS)-(Sidney)Siegel(ANL/ORNL/ANS)-Seitz-Overhauser-Rollnick-Pollard-Lofaro-Markey-Pringle[Nuclear-PowerFrom Physics to Politics(`79)] FIRST EXPERIMENTAL DISCOVERY [Siegel<<<''Fert''-''Gruenberg'':2007-Physics-Nobel/2006:-Wolf/Japan-prizes:[`88 -`78] =10-years =1-decade precedence!!!] of granular giant-magnetoresistance(GMR) [Google: ``EDWARD SIEGEL GIANT-MAGNETORESISTANCE ICMAO 1977 FLICKER''] [Google: ``Ana Mayo If LEAKS`Could' KILL''] in austenitic/FCC Ni/Fe-based (so MIScalled)''super''alloy-182/82 transition-welds GENERIC ENDEMIC EXTANT detrimental (SYNONYMS): Wigner's-disease/Ostwald-ripening/spinodal-decompositio/OVERageing-EMBRITTLEMENT/THERMAL-leading-to-mechanical (TLTM)-INstability/``sensitization'' in: nuclear-reactors/spent-fuel dry-casks/refineries/jet/missile/rocket-engines/...SOUNDS A DIRE WARNING FOR NAIVE Hansen-Sommerville-Holdren-DOE-NRC-OSTP-WNA-NEI-AIP-APS-...calls/media-hype/P.R./spin-doctoring for carbon-``free'' nuclear-power as a SUPPOSED ``panacea'' for climate-change/global-warming: ``TRUST BUT VERIFY!!!'' ; a VERY LOUD CAVEAT EMPTOR!!!

  19. Structural and electron charge density studies of a nonlinear optical compound 4,4 di-methyl amino cyano biphenyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naima, Boubegra; Abdelkader, Chouaih; Mokhtaria, Drissi; Fodil, Hamzaoui

    2014-01-01

    The 4,4 dimethyl amino cyano biphenyl crystal (DMACB) is characterized by its nonlinear activity. The intra molecular charge transfer of this molecule results mainly from the electronic transmission of the electro-acceptor (cyano) and electro-donor (di-methyl-amino) groups. An accurate electron density distribution around the molecule has been calculated based on a high-resolution X-ray diffraction study. The data were collected at 123 K using graphite-monochromated Mo K α radiation to sin(β)/λ = 1.24 Å-1. The integrated intensities of 13796 reflections were measured and reduced to 6501 independent reflections with I >= 3σ(I). The crystal structure was refined using the experimental model of Hansen and Coppens (1978). The crystal structure has been validated and deposited at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre with the deposition number CCDC 876507. In this article, we present the thermal motion and the structural analysis obtained from the least-square refinement based on F2 and the electron density distribution obtained from the multipolar model.

  20. Aprotic solvents effect on the UV-visible absorption spectra of bixin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmalia, Winda; Fabre, Jean-François; Usman, Thamrin; Mouloungui, Zéphirin

    2014-10-01

    We describe here the effects of aprotic solvents on the spectroscopic characteristics of bixin. Bixin was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, acetone, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, dimethyl carbonate, cyclohexane and hexane, separately, and its spectra in the resulting solutions were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometry at normal pressure and room temperature. We analyzed the effect of aprotic solvents on λmax according to Onsager cavity model and Hansen theory, and determined the approximate absorption coefficient with the Beer-Lambert law. We found that the UV-visible absorption spectra of bixin were found to be solvent dependent. The S0 → S2 transition energy of bixin in solution was dependent principally on the refractive index of the solvents and the bixin-solvent dispersion interaction. There was a small influence of the solvents dielectric constant, permanent dipole interaction and hydrogen bonding occurred between bixin and solvents. The absorbance of bixin in various solvents, with the exception of hexane, increased linearly with concentration.