Science.gov

Sample records for harboring t315i mutation

  1. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Grzegorz W.; Soverini, Simona; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mauro, Michael J.; Müller, Martin C.; Hochhaus, Andreas; Chuah, Charles; Dufva, Inge H.; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; Saglio, Giuseppe; Michallet, Mauricette; Labussière, Hélène; Morisset, Stéphane; Hayette, Sandrine; Etienne, Gabriel; Olavarria, Eduardo; Zhou, Wei; Peter, Senaka; Apperley, Jane F.; Cortes, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    T315I+ Philadelphia chromosome–positive leukemias are inherently resistant to all licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and therapeutic options remain limited. We report the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in 64 patients with documented BCR-ABLT315I mutations. Median follow-up was 52 months from mutation detection and 26 months from transplantation. At transplantation, 51.5% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia were in the chronic phase and 4.5% were in advanced phases. Median overall survival after transplantation was 10.3 months (range 5.7 months to not reached [ie, still alive]) for those with chronic myeloid leukemia in the blast phase and 7.4 months (range 1.4 months to not reached [ie, still alive]) for those with Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia but has not yet been reached for those in the chronic and accelerated phases of chronic myeloid leukemia. The occurrence of chronic GVHD had a positive impact on overall survival (P = .047). Transplant-related mortality rates were low. Multivariate analysis identified only blast phase at transplantation (hazard ratio 3.68, P = .0011) and unrelated stem cell donor (hazard ratio 2.98, P = .011) as unfavorable factors. We conclude that allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents a valuable therapeutic tool for eligible patients with BCR-ABLT315I mutation, a tool that may or may not be replaced by third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:21926354

  2. Clinical outcome of 27 imatinib mesylate-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia patients harboring a T315I BCR-ABL mutation.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Franck E; Hayette, Sandrine; Corm, Selim; Bachy, Emmanuel; Bories, Dominique; Tulliez, Michel; Guilhot, François; Legros, Laurence; Maloisel, Frédéric; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Mahon, François-Xavier; Lê, Quoc-Hung; Michallet, Mauricette; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Preudhomme, Claude

    2007-09-01

    We analyzed 27 CML patients treated with imatinib (IM) who developed a BCR-ABLT315I mutation. These patients had poor prognostic features: High or intermediate Sokal index (82%), and lack of CCyR under IM (59%). At T315I discovery, patients were in advanced phase (59%), with clonal evolution (84%). Median time since diagnosis was 39 months, and progression occurred 13 months after IM initiation, regardless of disease phase. Overall survival since IM initiation was 42.5 months for chronic, and 17.5 months for advanced phases, and all patients progressed. This mutation seems related to or (partially?) responsible for progression and poor survival. PMID:17768119

  3. Dasatinib combined with interferon-alfa induces a complete cytogenetic response and major molecular response in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia harboring the T315I BCR-ABL1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, A Megan; Welch, Mary-Alma; Koller, Charles; Jabbour, Elias

    2011-06-01

    Mutations of BCR-ABL1 are observed in 50% of patients with imatinib-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The T315I mutation is resistant to imatinib and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). We report the case of a 57-year-old man diagnosed with CML in 2003 in whom imatinib therapy failed after which he acquired the T315I mutation. He was treated sequentially with an anti-T315I-specific agent, KW-2449, that led to eradication of the mutation without any further improvement. Subsequent introduction of combination therapy that included dasatinib and pegylated interferon led to the achievement of a sustained complete cytogenetic and major molecular response (MMR). This case illustrates the benefit of combination therapy that includes a TKI and a second agent with a different mechanism of action, either sequentially (TKI followed by KW-2449) or concomitantly (TKI + interferon), in eradicating resistant disease with the T315I clone. PMID:22035739

  4. Epidemiologic study on survival of chronic myeloid leukemia and Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Michael J.; Martinelli, Giovanni; Kim, Dong-Wook; Soverini, Simona; Müller, Martin C.; Hochhaus, Andreas; Cortes, Jorge; Chuah, Charles; Dufva, Inge H.; Apperley, Jane F.; Yagasaki, Fumiharu; Pearson, Jay D.; Peter, Senaka; Sanz Rodriguez, Cesar; Preudhomme, Claude; Giles, Francis; Goldman, John M.; Zhou, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The BCR–ABL T315I mutation represents a major mechanism of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The objectives of this retrospective observational study were to estimate overall and progression-free survival for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic-phase (CP), accelerated-phase (AP), or blastic-phase (BP) and Philadelphia chromosome—positive (Ph)+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients with T315I mutation. Medical records of 222 patients from 9 countries were reviewed; data were analyzed using log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard models. Median age at T315I mutation detection was 54 years; 57% cases were men. Median time between TKI treatment initiation and T315I mutation detection was 29.2, 15.4, 5.8, and 9.1 months, respectively, for CP, AP, BP, and Ph+ ALL patients. After T315I mutation detection, second-generation TKIs were used in 56% of cases, hydroxyurea in 39%, imatinib in 35%, cytarabine in 26%, MK-0457 in 11%, stem cell transplantation in 17%, and interferon-α in 6% of cases. Median overall survival from T315I mutation detection was 22.4, 28.4, 4.0, and 4.9 months, and median progression-free survival was 11.5, 22.2, 1.8, and 2.5 months, respectively, for CP, AP, BP, and Ph+ ALL patients. These results confirm that survival of patients harboring a T315I mutation is dependent on disease phase at the time of mutation detection. PMID:19843886

  5. Effective killing of Gleevec-resistant CML cells with T315I mutation by a natural compound PEITC through redox-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H; Trachootham, D; Lu, W; Carew, J; Giles, FJ; Keating, MJ; Arlinghaus, RB; Huang, P

    2008-01-01

    Mutation of Bcr-Abl is an important mechanism by which chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells become resistant to Gleevec. The T315I mutation is clinically significant since CML cells harboring this mutation are insensitive to Gleevec and other Bcr-Abl-targeted drugs. Identification of new agents capable of effectively killing CML cells with T315I mutation would have important therapeutic implications in Gleevec-resistant CML. Here, we showed that β-phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a natural compound found in vegetables, is effective in killing CML cells expressing T315I BCR-ABL. Treatment of leukemia cell lines harboring wild-type or mutant Bcr-Abl with 10 μm PEITC resulted in an elevated ROS stress and a redox-mediated degradation of the BCR-ABL protein, leading to massive death of the leukemia cells. Antioxidant NAC attenuated the PEITC-induced oxidative stress in CML cells and prevented the degradation of BCR-ABL, caspase-3 activation and cell death. We further showed that the ROS-induced degradation of BCR-ABL was mediated partially by caspase-3 and the proteasome pathway. The ability of PEITC to effectively kill T315I-positive CML cells was further confirmed using primary leukemia cells isolated from CML patients. Our results suggest that PEITC is a promising compound capable of killing Gleevec-resistant CML cells through a ROS-mediated mechanism and warrants further investigations. PMID:18385754

  6. Eradication of T315I mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia without third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Venton, Geoffroy; Colle, Julien; Mercier, Cedric; Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Ciccolini, Joseph; Ivanov, Vadim; Suchon, Pierre; Sebahoun, Gerard; Beaufils, Nathalie; Gabert, Jean; Hadjaj, Djamal; Costello, Regis

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a patient bearing a T315I-mutant chronic myeloid leukemia resistant to nilotinib, successfully treated with omacetaxine and then with dasatinib. After 9 months of nilotinib, the patient achieved a major molecular response but relapsed 3 months later due to the T315I mutation. Because third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor was not available and the patient refused bone marrow transplantation, he received two cycles of omacetaxine. This treatment had been stopped after two cycles because of clinical intolerance, but a major molecular response and total disappearance of the T315I clone was obtained. Treatment with dasatinib was then started and after 34-month follow-up the patient is still in major molecular response, thus suggesting that eradication of the T315I mutation could be achieved without third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:25950190

  7. Phase 2 study of subcutaneous omacetaxine mepesuccinate after TKI failure in patients with chronic-phase CML with T315I mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Jeff H.; Rea, Delphine; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Chuah, Charles; Nanda, Nisha; Benichou, Annie-Claude; Craig, Adam R.; Michallet, Mauricette; Nicolini, Franck E.; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients with the BCR-ABL T315I mutation do not benefit from therapy with currently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate is a protein synthesis inhibitor that has demonstrated activity in cells harboring the T315I mutation. This phase 2 trial assessed the efficacy of omacetaxine in CML patients with T315I and tyrosine kinase inhibitor failure. Patients received subcutaneous omacetaxine 1.25 mg/m2 twice daily, days 1-14, every 28 days until hematologic response or a maximum of 6 cycles, and then days 1-7 every 28 days as maintenance. Results for patients treated in chronic phase are reported here. Patients (n = 62) received a median of 7 (range, 1-41) cycles. Complete hematologic response was achieved in 48 patients (77%; 95% lower confidence limit, 65%); median response duration was 9.1 months. Fourteen patients (23%; 95% lower confidence limit, 13%) achieved major cytogenetic response, including complete cytogenetic response in 10 (16%). Median progression free-survival was 7.7 months. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity included thrombocytopenia (76%), neutropenia (44%), and anemia (39%) and was typically manageable by dose reduction. Nonhematologic adverse events were mostly grade 1/2 and included infection (42%), diarrhea (40%), and nausea (34%). Omacetaxine may provide a safe and effective treatment for CML patients with T315I mutation. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00375219. PMID:22896000

  8. HS-438, a new inhibitor of imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL T315I mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sun-Mi; Jung, Kyung Hee; Kim, Soo Jung; Fang, Zhenghuan; Son, Mi Kwon; Yan, Hong Hua; Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, JinHee; Shin, Sanghye; Hong, Sungwoo; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-06-28

    Imatinib is a selective breakpoint cluster region-Abelson (BCR-ABL) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that has significantly improved the prognosis of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, T315I gene mutations of the BCR-ABL kinase domain have been shown to confer resistance to imatinib. In the present study, we synthesized a novel BCR-ABL inhibitor, HS-438, and identified its anti-leukemic effects in vitro and in vivo. We found that HS-438 strongly inhibited the expression of BCR-ABL signaling pathways in wild-type BCR-ABL (BaF3/WT) cells as well as T315I-mutated BCR-ABL (BaF3/T315I) cells with resistance to imatinib. HS-438 induced cell cycle arrest, particularly during the G0/G1 cell cycle phase, and induced apoptosis. In BaF3/T315I xenograft models, HS-438 significantly delayed tumor growth, unlike imatinib. In summary, we suggest that HS-438 may be a novel drug candidate with the therapeutic potential to target BCR-ABL and overcome imatinib resistance in patients with CML. PMID:24657654

  9. Ultra-deep sequencing leads to earlier and more sensitive detection of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance mutation T315I in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baer, Constance; Kern, Wolfgang; Koch, Sarah; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Schindela, Sonja; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten

    2016-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia cells acquire resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors through mutations in the ABL1 kinase domain. The T315I mutation mediates resistance to imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and bosutinib, whereas sensitivity to ponatinib remains. Mutation detection by conventional Sanger sequencing requires 10%-20% expansion of the mutated subclone. We studied the T315I mutation development by ultra-deep sequencing on the 454 XL+ platform (Roche) in comparison to Sanger sequencing. By ultra-deep sequencing, mutations were detected at loads of 1%-2%. We selected 40 patients who had failed first-line to third-line treatment (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib) and had high loads of the T315I mutation detected by Sanger sequencing. We confirmed T315I mutations by ultra-deep sequencing and investigated the mutation dynamics by backtracking earlier samples. In 20 of 40 patients, we identified the T315I three months (median) before Sanger sequencing detection limits were reached. To exclude sporadic low percentage mutation development without subsequent mutation outgrowth, we selected 42 patients without resistance mutations detected by Sanger sequencing but loss of major molecular response. Here, no mutation was detected by ultradeep sequencing. Additional non-T315I resistance mutations were found in 20 of 40 patients. Only 15% had two mutations per cell; the other cases showed multiple independently mutated clones and the T315I clone demonstrated a rapid outgrowth. In conclusion, T315I mutations could be detected earlier by ultra-deep sequencing compared to Sanger sequencing in a selected group of cases. Earlier mutation detection by ultra-deep sequencing might allow treatment to be changed before clonal increase of cells with the T315I mutation. PMID:27102501

  10. Ultra-deep sequencing leads to earlier and more sensitive detection of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance mutation T315I in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Constance; Kern, Wolfgang; Koch, Sarah; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Schindela, Sonja; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia cells acquire resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors through mutations in the ABL1 kinase domain. The T315I mutation mediates resistance to imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib and bosutinib, whereas sensitivity to ponatinib remains. Mutation detection by conventional Sanger sequencing requires 10%–20% expansion of the mutated subclone. We studied the T315I mutation development by ultra-deep sequencing on the 454 XL+ platform (Roche) in comparison to Sanger sequencing. By ultra-deep sequencing, mutations were detected at loads of 1%–2%. We selected 40 patients who had failed first-line to third-line treatment (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib) and had high loads of the T315I mutation detected by Sanger sequencing. We confirmed T315I mutations by ultra-deep sequencing and investigated the mutation dynamics by backtracking earlier samples. In 20 of 40 patients, we identified the T315I three months (median) before Sanger sequencing detection limits were reached. To exclude sporadic low percentage mutation development without subsequent mutation outgrowth, we selected 42 patients without resistance mutations detected by Sanger sequencing but loss of major molecular response. Here, no mutation was detected by ultradeep sequencing. Additional non-T315I resistance mutations were found in 20 of 40 patients. Only 15% had two mutations per cell; the other cases showed multiple independently mutated clones and the T315I clone demonstrated a rapid outgrowth. In conclusion, T315I mutations could be detected earlier by ultra-deep sequencing compared to Sanger sequencing in a selected group of cases. Earlier mutation detection by ultra-deep sequencing might allow treatment to be changed before clonal increase of cells with the T315I mutation. PMID:27102501

  11. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients with T315I BCR-ABL Mutated Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lan-Ping; Xu, Zheng-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Han, Wei; Chen, Yao; Wang, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Mo, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is currently the only curative treatment option for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutations. We report the outcome of SCT in 22 patients with T315I(+) CML, most (n = 16) from haploidentical family donors (HID-SCT). At the time the mutation was detected, 8 patients were in the chronic phase (CP), 7 in the accelerated phase (AP), and 7 in the blast phase (BP). At the time of SCT 7 were in the CP, 8 in the AP or returning to the CP post-AP (AP/AP-CPn), and 7 in the BP or returning to CP post-BP (BP/BP-CPn). The cumulative incidence of grades III to IV acute graft-versus-host disease was 9.1%. Chronic graft-versus-host disease was observed in 60.0% of patients, including 25.0% who suffered from severe disease. Four patients died of transplant-related complications at a median interval from SCT of 16.3 months. The estimated 2-year leukemia-free survival rate was 80.0%, 72.9%, and 0% in CP, AP/AP-CPn and BP/BP-CPn groups at the time of SCT, respectively. After a median follow-up of 17.3 months from SCT, 14 patients are alive, including 13 in complete molecular response and 1 with an extramedullary relapse. In conclusion, HID-SCT is a potentially curative treatment for T315I + CML patients. For patients in CP/AP, immediate SCT might result in promising survival. The outcome of patients in BP with T315I(+) mutation remains very poor. PMID:26995693

  12. AP24534, a Pan-BCR-ABL Inhibitor for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Potently Inhibits the T315I Mutant and Overcomes Mutation-Based Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    O’Hare, Thomas; Shakespeare, William C.; Zhu, Xiaotian; Eide, Christopher A.; Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Frank; Adrian, Lauren T.; Zhou, Tianjun; Huang, Wei-Sheng; Xu, Qihong; Metcalf, III, Chester A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wardwell, Scott; Ning, Yaoyu; Keats, Jeffrey A.; Wang, Yihan; Sundaramoorthi, Raji; Thomas, Mathew; Zhou, Dong; Snodgrass, Joseph; Commodore, Lois; Sawyer, Tomi K.; Dalgarno, David C.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Druker, Brian J.; Clackson, Tim

    2010-09-07

    Inhibition of BCR-ABL by imatinib induces durable responses in many patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but resistance attributable to kinase domain mutations can lead to relapse and a switch to second-line therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib. Despite three approved therapeutic options, the cross-resistant BCR-ABL{sup T315I} mutation and compound mutants selected on sequential inhibitor therapy remain major clinical challenges. We report design and preclinical evaluation of AP24534, a potent, orally available multitargeted kinase inhibitor active against T315I and other BCR-ABL mutants. AP24534 inhibited all tested BCR-ABL mutants in cellular and biochemical assays, suppressed BCR-ABL{sup T315I}-driven tumor growth in mice, and completely abrogated resistance in cell-based mutagenesis screens. Our work supports clinical evaluation of AP24534 as a pan-BCR-ABL inhibitor for treatment of CML.

  13. Ponatinib in the leukemia world: why a reevaluation is necessary for Philadelphia chromosome-positive patients with T315I mutation.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Angelina Daisy

    2014-10-01

    Strategic drug design is used to meet the needs of numerous diseases for which there is no other recourse. Take the T315I mutation, for example, which occurs in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias and renders all currently available tissue kinase inhibitors useless. The US FDA therefore saw it fit to avail ponatinib, the therapeutic result of careful drug design, to patients based on early data. However, its sales and marketing were later suspended due to emerging safety concerns. This drug has now returned to market albeit with tighter labeling. While the lesson for early approvals may be to restrict the drug to as narrow a patient population as possible, the potential benefits of this drug for the target population must not be lost amidst the controversy. PMID:25199408

  14. Metabolic characterization of imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL T315I chronic myeloid leukemia cells indicates down-regulation of glycolytic pathway and low ROS production.

    PubMed

    Ko, Byung Woong; Han, Jeongsu; Heo, Jun Young; Jang, Yunseon; Kim, Soo Jeong; Kim, Jungim; Lee, Min Joung; Ryu, Min Jeong; Song, Ik Chan; Jo, Young Suk; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2016-09-01

    Long-term imatinib treatment induces drug-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells harboring T315I gate keeper mutation of breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-ABL oncogenic kinase. However, although cell proliferation is coupled with cellular energy status in CML carcinogenesis, the metabolic characteristics of T315I-mutant CML cells have never been investigated. Here, we analyzed cell proliferation activities and metabolic phenotypes, including cell proliferation, oxygen consumption, lactate production, and redox state in the KBM5 (imatinib-sensitive) and KBM5-T315I (imatinib-resistant) CML cell lines. Interestingly, KBM5-T315I cells showed decreased cell proliferation, lactate production, fatty acid synthesis, ROS production, and down regulation of mRNA expression related to ROS scavengers, such as SOD2, catalase, GCLm, and GPx1. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the lower growth ability of KBM5-T315I CML cells might be related to the decreased expression of glycolysis-related genes and ROS levels, and this will be used to identify therapeutic targets for imatinib resistance in CML. PMID:26854822

  15. Characterizing of Four Common BCR-ABL Kinase Domain Mutations (T315I, Y253H, M351T and E255K) in Iranian Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Patients With Imatinib Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rejali, Leili; Poopak, Behzad; Hasanzad, Mandana; Sheikhsofla, Fatemeh; Varnoosfaderani, Ameneh Saadat; Safari, Nazila; Rabieipoor, Saghar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a kind of hematopoietic stem-cell cancer. A significant number of CML patients who do not achieve an acceptable response to therapy, show acquired resistance against Imatinib. One of the most considerable causes of resistance against Imatinib as the first line of therapy, are BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations. Objectives: One of the most considerable causes of resistance against Imatinib as the first line of therapy, are BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations. Patients and Methods: The study was performed on 39 CML patients with Imatinib resistance. Basic hematologic parameters in blood samples were checked to identify hematologic response. To identify molecular response, BCR-ABL/ABL ratio was assessed by Real-time PCR. The ABL kinase domain amplification was performed by PCR. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was performed to detect four common mutations (T315I, Y253H, E255K and M351T). Finally the results were approved by direct sequencing. Results: In this study, the Y253H mutation, detected by RFLP method and confirmed by direct sequencing, was the prevalent ABL kinase domain mutation in these 39 CML patients. The G250E, V379I and L384M mutations were found in three different cases with failure molecular response. CML patients with these four ABL kinase domain mutations cannot achieve major molecular response (MMR). In addition, complete hematologic response (CHR) was observed only in the V379I mutated case and not in other mutated patients. Conclusions: Identification of ABL kinase domain mutations may be used as a proper and useful method for improving therapeutic strategies, avoiding delay in treatment and excessive expenditure in CML patients with Imatinib resistance. PMID:26413254

  16. Detailed conformation dynamics and activation process of wild type c-Abl and T315I mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Hua; Liu, Qian

    2014-10-01

    Bcr-Abl is an important target for therapy against chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The synergistic effect between myristyl pocket and the ATP pocket has been found. But its detailed information based on molecular level still has not been achieved. In this study, conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) and target molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations were performed to explore the effect of T315I mutation on dynamics and activation process of Abl containing the N-terminal cap (Ncap). The CMD simulation results reveal the increasing flexibility of ATP pocket in kinase domain (KD) after T315I mutation which confirms the disability of ATP-pocket inhibitors to the Abl-T315I mutant. On the contrary, the T315I mutation decreased the flexibility of remote helix αI which suggests the synergistic effect between them. The mobility of farther regions containing Ncap, SH3, SH2 and SH2-KD linker were not affected by T315I mutation. The TMD simulation results show that the activation process of wild type Abl and Abl-T315I mutant experienced global conformation change. Their differences were elucidated by the activation motion of subsegments including A-loop, P-loop and Ncap. Besides, the T315I mutation caused decreasing energy barrier and increasing intermediate number in activation process, which results easier activation process. The TMD and CMD results indicate that a drug targeting only the ATP pocket is not enough to inhibit the Abl-T315I mutant. An effective way to inhibit the abnormal activity of Abl-T315I mutant is to combine the ATP-pocket inhibitors with inhibitors binding at non-ATP pockets mainly related to Ncap, SH2-KD linker and myristyl pocket.

  17. The chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box inhibits the growth of imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML by targeting the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Yi; Wang, Qinhao; Liu, Xiping; Zhang, Mei; Zhong, Daixing; Ye, Mingxiang; Li, Yuanchun; Han, Hua; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by constitutively active fusion protein tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL. Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) against BCR-ABL, imatinib, is the first-line therapy for CML, acquired resistance almost inevitably emerges. The underlying mechanism are point mutations within the BCR-ABL gene, among which T315I is notorious because it resists to almost all currently available inhibitors. Here we took use of a previously generated chimeric ubiquitin ligase, SH2-U-box, in which SH2 from the adaptor protein Grb2 acts as a binding domain for activated BCR-ABL, while U-box from CHIP functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, so as to target the ubiquitination and degradation of both native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL. As such, SH2-U-box significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in CML cells harboring either the wild-type or T315I-mutant BCR-ABL (K562 or K562R), with BCR-ABL-dependent signaling pathways being repressed. Moreover, SH2-U-box worked in concert with imatinib in K562 cells. Importantly, SH2-U-box-carrying lentivirus could markedly suppress the growth of K562-xenografts in nude mice or K562R-xenografts in SCID mice, as well as that of primary CML cells. Collectively, by degrading the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL, the chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box may serve as a potential therapy for both imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML. PMID:27329306

  18. The chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box inhibits the growth of imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML by targeting the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL.

    PubMed

    Ru, Yi; Wang, Qinhao; Liu, Xiping; Zhang, Mei; Zhong, Daixing; Ye, Mingxiang; Li, Yuanchun; Han, Hua; Yao, Libo; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by constitutively active fusion protein tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL. Although the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) against BCR-ABL, imatinib, is the first-line therapy for CML, acquired resistance almost inevitably emerges. The underlying mechanism are point mutations within the BCR-ABL gene, among which T315I is notorious because it resists to almost all currently available inhibitors. Here we took use of a previously generated chimeric ubiquitin ligase, SH2-U-box, in which SH2 from the adaptor protein Grb2 acts as a binding domain for activated BCR-ABL, while U-box from CHIP functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain, so as to target the ubiquitination and degradation of both native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL. As such, SH2-U-box significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in CML cells harboring either the wild-type or T315I-mutant BCR-ABL (K562 or K562R), with BCR-ABL-dependent signaling pathways being repressed. Moreover, SH2-U-box worked in concert with imatinib in K562 cells. Importantly, SH2-U-box-carrying lentivirus could markedly suppress the growth of K562-xenografts in nude mice or K562R-xenografts in SCID mice, as well as that of primary CML cells. Collectively, by degrading the native and T315I-mutant BCR-ABL, the chimeric ubiquitin ligase SH2-U-box may serve as a potential therapy for both imatinib-sensitive and resistant CML. PMID:27329306

  19. SGX393 inhibits the CML mutant Bcr-Abl[superscript T315I] and preempts in vitro resistance when combined with nilotinib or dasatinib

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hare, Thomas; Eide, Christopher A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Corbin, Amie S.; Wong, Matthew J.; Buchanan, Sean; Holme, Kevin; Jessen, Katayoun A.; Tang, Crystal; Lewis, Hal A.; Romero, Richard D.; Burley, Stephen K.; Deininger, Michael W.

    2010-01-12

    Imatinib inhibits Bcr-Abl, the oncogenic tyrosine kinase that causes chronic myeloid leukemia. The second-line inhibitors nilotinib and dasatinib are effective in patients with imatinib resistance resulting from Bcr-Abl kinase domain mutations. Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}, however, is resistant to all Abl kinase inhibitors in clinical use and is emerging as the most frequent cause of salvage therapy failure. SGX393 is a potent inhibitor of native and T315I-mutant Bcr-Abl kinase that blocks the growth of leukemia cell lines and primary hematopoietic cells expressing Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}, with minimal toxicity against Bcr-Abl-negative cell lines or normal bone marrow. A screen for Bcr-Abl mutants emerging in the presence of SGX393 revealed concentration-dependent reduction in the number and range of mutations. Combining SGX393 with nilotinib or dasatinib preempted emergence of resistant subclones, including Bcr-Abl{sup T315I}. These findings suggest that combination of a T315I inhibitor with the current clinically used inhibitors may be useful for reduction of Bcr-Abl mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemia.

  20. A phase 2 study of MK-0457 in patients with BCR-ABL T315I mutant chronic myelogenous leukemia and philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Seymour, J F; Kim, D W; Rubin, E; Haregewoin, A; Clark, J; Watson, P; Hughes, T; Dufva, I; Jimenez, J L; Mahon, F-X; Rousselot, P; Cortes, J; Martinelli, G; Papayannidis, C; Nagler, A; Giles, F J

    2014-01-01

    Aurora kinase overexpression has been observed in patients with hematologic malignancies. MK-0457, a pan-aurora kinase inhibitor that also inhibits the ABL T315I mutant, was evaluated to treat patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with the T315I mutation. Adults with Ph+ chronic phase (CP)-, accelerated phase (AP)- or blast phase (BP)-CML, or ALL and documented BCR-ABL T315I mutation were treated with a 5-day continuous infusion of MK-0457 administered every 14 days at 40 mg/m(2)/h, 32 mg/m(2)/h or 24 mg/m(2)/h. Fifty-two patients (CP, n=15; AP, n=14; BP, n=11; Ph+ ALL, n=12) were treated. Overall, 8% of patients achieved major cytogenetic response; 6% achieved unconfirmed complete or partial response; 39% had no response. Two patients (CP CML) achieved complete hematologic response. No patients with advanced CML or Ph+ ALL achieved major hematologic response. The most common adverse event (AE) was neutropenia (50%). The most common grade 3/4 AEs were neutropenia (46%) and febrile neutropenia (35%). MK-0457 demonstrated minimal efficacy and only at higher, intolerable doses; lower doses were tolerated and no unexpected toxicities were observed. These data will assist in the development of future aurora kinase inhibitors and in the selection of appropriate target patient populations. PMID:25127392

  1. Hybrid pyrimidine alkynyls inhibit the clinically resistance related Bcr-Abl(T315I) mutant.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Zhang; Ren, Xiaomei; Pan, Xiaofeng; Wang, Deping; Zhuang, Xiaoxi; Luo, Jingfeng; Yu, Rongmin; Ding, Ke

    2015-09-01

    A series of pyrimidine alkynyl derivatives were designed and synthesized as new Bcr-Abl inhibitors by hybriding the structural moieties from GNF-7, ponatinib and nilotinib. One of the most potent compounds 4e strongly suppresses Bcr-Abl(WT) and Bcr-Abl(T315I) kinase with IC50 values of 5.0 and 9.0 nM, and inhibits the proliferation of K562 and murine Ba/F3 cells ectopically expressing Bcr-Abl(T315I) cells with IC50 values of 2 and 50 nM, respectively. It also displays good pharmacokinetics properties with an oral bioavailability of 35.3% and T(1/2) value of 48.7 h, and demonstrates significantly suppression on tumor growth in xenografted mice of K562 and Ba/F3 cells expressing Bcr-Abl(T315I). These inhibitors may serve as lead compounds for further developing new anticancer drugs overcoming the clinically acquired resistance against current Bcr-Abl inhibitors. PMID:26195136

  2. Identification of novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors for drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL: a virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulations study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banavath, Hemanth Naick; Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh; Baskaran, R.

    2014-11-01

    BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase plays a major role in the pathogenesis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and is a proven target for drug development. Currently available drugs in the market are effective against CML; however, side-effects and drug-resistant mutations in BCR-ABL limit their full potential. Using high throughput virtual screening approach, we have screened several small molecule databases and docked against wild-type and drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL. Drugs that are currently available, such as imatinib and ponatinib, were also docked against BCR-ABL protein to set a cutoff value for our screening. Selected lead compounds were further evaluated for chemical reactivity employing density functional theory approach, all selected ligands shows HLG value > 0.09900 and the binding free energy between protein-ligand complex interactions obtained was rescored using MM-GBSA. The selected compounds showed least ΔG score -71.53 KJ/mol to maximum -126.71 KJ/mol in both wild type and drug resistant T315I mutant BCR-ABL. Following which, the stability of the docking complexes were evaluated by molecular dynamics simulation (MD) using GROMACS4.5.5. Results uncovered seven lead molecules, designated with Drug-Bank and PubChem ids as DB07107, DB06977, ST013616, DB04200, ST007180 ST019342, and DB01172, which shows docking scores higher than imatinib and ponatinib.

  3. A cascade screening approach for the identification of Bcr-Abl myristate pocket binders active against wild type and T315I mutant.

    PubMed

    Radi, Marco; Schneider, Ralf; Fallacara, Anna Lucia; Botta, Lorenzo; Crespan, Emmanuele; Tintori, Cristina; Maga, Giovanni; Kissova, Miroslava; Calgani, Alessia; Richters, André; Musumeci, Franesca; Rauh, Daniel; Schenone, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    The major clinical challenge in drug-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is currently represented by the Bcr-Abl T315I mutant, which is unresponsive to treatment with common first and second generation ATP-competitive tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Allosteric inhibition of Bcr-Abl represent a new frontier in the fight against resistant leukemia and few candidates have been identified in the last few years. Among these, myristate pocket (MP) binders discovered by Novartis (e.g. GNF2/5) showed promising results, although they proved to be active against the T315I mutant only in combination with first and second generation ATP-competitive inhibitors. Here we used a cascade screening approach based on sequential fluorescence polarization (FP) screening, in silico docking/dynamics studies and kinetic-enzymatic studies to identify novel MP binders. A pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine derivative (6) has been identified as a promising allosteric inhibitor active on 32D leukemia cell lines (expressing Bcr-Abl WT and T315I) with no need of combination with any ATP-competitive inhibitor. PMID:27374241

  4. Interferon-α Revisited: Individualized Treatment Management Eased the Selective Pressure of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors on BCR-ABL1 Mutations Resulting in a Molecular Response in High-Risk CML Patients

    PubMed Central

    Polivkova, Vaclava; Rohon, Peter; Klamova, Hana; Cerna, Olga; Divoka, Martina; Curik, Nikola; Zach, Jan; Novak, Martin; Marinov, Iuri; Soverini, Simona; Faber, Edgar; Machova Polakova, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation or ponatinib treatment are currently recommended strategies for management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) harboring the T315I mutation and compound or polyclonal mutations. However, in some individual cases, these treatment scenarios cannot be applied. We used an alternative treatment strategy with interferon-α (IFN-α) given solo, sequentially or together with TKI in a group of 6 cases of high risk CML patients, assuming that the TKI-independent mechanism of action may lead to mutant clone repression. IFN-α based individualized therapy decreases of T315I or compound mutations to undetectable levels as assessed by next-generation deep sequencing, which was associated with a molecular response in 4/6 patients. Based on the observed results from immune profiling, we assumed that the principal mechanism leading to the success of the treatment was the immune activation induced with dasatinib pre-treatment followed by restoration of immunological surveillance after application of IFN-α therapy. Moreover, we showed that sensitive measurement of mutated BCR-ABL1 transcript levels augments the safety of this individualized treatment strategy. PMID:27214026

  5. Interferon-α Revisited: Individualized Treatment Management Eased the Selective Pressure of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors on BCR-ABL1 Mutations Resulting in a Molecular Response in High-Risk CML Patients.

    PubMed

    Polivkova, Vaclava; Rohon, Peter; Klamova, Hana; Cerna, Olga; Divoka, Martina; Curik, Nikola; Zach, Jan; Novak, Martin; Marinov, Iuri; Soverini, Simona; Faber, Edgar; Machova Polakova, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation or ponatinib treatment are currently recommended strategies for management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) harboring the T315I mutation and compound or polyclonal mutations. However, in some individual cases, these treatment scenarios cannot be applied. We used an alternative treatment strategy with interferon-α (IFN-α) given solo, sequentially or together with TKI in a group of 6 cases of high risk CML patients, assuming that the TKI-independent mechanism of action may lead to mutant clone repression. IFN-α based individualized therapy decreases of T315I or compound mutations to undetectable levels as assessed by next-generation deep sequencing, which was associated with a molecular response in 4/6 patients. Based on the observed results from immune profiling, we assumed that the principal mechanism leading to the success of the treatment was the immune activation induced with dasatinib pre-treatment followed by restoration of immunological surveillance after application of IFN-α therapy. Moreover, we showed that sensitive measurement of mutated BCR-ABL1 transcript levels augments the safety of this individualized treatment strategy. PMID:27214026

  6. Floating-Harbor syndrome and polycystic kidneys associated with SRCAP mutation.

    PubMed

    Reschen, Michael; Kini, Usha; Hood, Rebecca L; Boycott, Kym M; Hurst, Jane; O'Callaghan, Christopher A

    2012-12-01

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare genetic disorder recently shown to be caused by mutations in the Snf2-related CREB-binding protein activator protein gene (SRCAP). It comprises three key clinical features of characteristic facies, expressive and receptive speech impairment and short stature. We report on a patient with this syndrome associated with early adult-onset hypertension and bilateral polycystic kidneys. Family screening for polycystic kidney disease was negative and mutations in polycystic kidney disease 1 and 2 genes (PKD1 and PKD2) were absent. Sequencing of the SRCAP gene demonstrated a de novo mutation matching one of the known FHS-associated mutations. The patient required treatment with anti-hypertensives and will require lifelong renal monitoring. We suggest this patient's presentation may be due to the pleiotropic effects of SRCAP mutations. Further, the protein encoded by SRCAP is known to interact with CREB-binding protein, the product of the gene mutated in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, which is associated with renal abnormalities. A literature review of the renal findings in patients with Floating-Harbor syndrome identified another patient with possible polycystic kidneys, two patients with early onset hypertension, and a young patient with a ruptured intracranial aneurysm, which can be a feature of classic adult polycystic kidney disease. Collectively, these findings suggest that all patients with Floating-Harbor syndrome should undergo regular blood pressure monitoring and screening for polycystic kidneys by ultrasound at the time of the FHS diagnosis with imaging to be repeated during adulthood if a childhood ultrasound was negative. PMID:23165645

  7. Malignant pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas harbor mutations in transport and cell adhesion genes.

    PubMed

    Wilzén, Annica; Rehammar, Anna; Muth, Andreas; Nilsson, Ola; Tešan Tomić, Tajana; Wängberg, Bo; Kristiansson, Erik; Abel, Frida

    2016-05-01

    One out of ten patients with pheochromocytoma (PCC) and paraganglioma (PGL) develop malignant disease. Today there are no reliable pathological methods to predict malignancy at the time of diagnosis. Tumors harboring mutations in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) gene often metastasize but the sequential genetic events resulting in malignant progression are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify somatic mutations that contribute to the malignant transformation of PCC/PGL. We performed pair-wise (tumor-normal) whole-exome sequencing to analyze the somatic mutational landscape in five malignant and four benign primary PCC/sympathetic PGL (sPGL), including two biological replicates from each specimen. In total, 225 unique somatic mutations were identified in 215 genes, with an average mutation rate of 0.54 mutations/megabase. Malignant tumors had a significantly higher number of mutations compared to benign tumors (p < 0.001). Three novel genes were identified as recurrently mutated; MYCN, MYO5B and VCL, and mutations in these genes were exclusively found in malignant sPGL tumors. Mutations in the MYO5B gene could be verified in two publicly available data sets. A gene ontology analysis of mutated genes showed enrichment of cellular functions related to cytoskeletal protein binding, myosin complex and motor activity, many of which had functions in Rab and Rac/Rho GTPase pathways. In conclusion, we have identified recurrent mutations in genes related to intracellular transport and cell adhesion, and we have confirmed MYO5B to be recurrently mutated in PCC/PGL cases with malignant potential. Our study suggests that deregulated Rab and Rac/Rho pathways may be important in PCC/PGL tumorigenesis. PMID:26650627

  8. Mutations in SRCAP, encoding SNF2-related CREBBP activator protein, cause Floating-Harbor syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hood, Rebecca L; Lines, Matthew A; Nikkel, Sarah M; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Beaulieu, Chandree; Nowaczyk, Małgorzata J M; Allanson, Judith; Kim, Chong Ae; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Moilanen, Jukka S; Lacombe, Didier; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Whiteford, Margo L; Quaio, Caio Robledo D C; Gomy, Israel; Bertola, Debora R; Albrecht, Beate; Platzer, Konrad; McGillivray, George; Zou, Ruobing; McLeod, D Ross; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Marcadier, Janet; Majewski, Jacek; Bulman, Dennis E; White, Susan M; Boycott, Kym M

    2012-02-10

    Floating-Harbor syndrome (FHS) is a rare condition characterized by short stature, delayed osseous maturation, expressive-language deficits, and a distinctive facial appearance. Occurrence is generally sporadic, although parent-to-child transmission has been reported on occasion. Employing whole-exome sequencing, we identified heterozygous truncating mutations in SRCAP in five unrelated individuals with sporadic FHS. Sanger sequencing identified mutations in SRCAP in eight more affected persons. Mutations were de novo in all six instances in which parental DNA was available. SRCAP is an SNF2-related chromatin-remodeling factor that serves as a coactivator for CREB-binding protein (CREBBP, better known as CBP, the major cause of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome [RTS]). Five SRCAP mutations, two of which are recurrent, were identified; all are tightly clustered within a small (111 codon) region of the final exon. These mutations are predicted to abolish three C-terminal AT-hook DNA-binding motifs while leaving the CBP-binding and ATPase domains intact. Our findings show that SRCAP mutations are the major cause of FHS and offer an explanation for the clinical overlap between FHS and RTS. PMID:22265015

  9. Porocarcinomas harbor recurrent HRAS-activating mutations and tumor suppressor inactivating mutations.

    PubMed

    Harms, Paul W; Hovelson, Daniel H; Cani, Andi K; Omata, Kei; Haller, Michaela J; Wang, Michael L; Arps, David; Patel, Rajiv M; Fullen, Douglas R; Wang, Min; Siddiqui, Javed; Andea, Aleodor; Tomlins, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Porocarcinomas are a rare eccrine carcinoma with significant metastatic potential. Oncogenic drivers of porocarcinomas have been underexplored, with PIK3CA-activating mutation reported in 1 case. We analyzed 5 porocarcinomas by next-generation sequencing using the DNA component of the Oncomine Comprehensive Assay, which provides data on copy number changes and mutational events in 126 cancer-relevant genes through multiplex polymerase chain reaction. We detected an average of 3.3 high-confidence nonsynonymous mutations per tumor (range, 1-6), including a spectrum of oncogenic activation and tumor suppressor inactivation events. Tumor suppressor mutations included TP53 (4/5, 80%), RB1 (3/5, 60%), ATM (2/5, 40%), ARID1A (1/5, 20%), and CDKN2A (1/5, 20%). In 4 (80%) of 5 tumors, at least 1 potential oncogenic driver was identified. Activating HRAS mutations were detected in 2 (40%) of 5, including G13D and Q61L hotspot mutations. Mutations of EGFR were identified in 2 (40%) of 5; these mutations have been previously reported in cancer but did not affect classic activation hotspot sites. EGFR and HRAS mutations were mutually exclusive. HRAS mutations were detected by targeted sequencing in a minority of benign eccrine poromas (2/17; 11.7%), suggesting that HRAS activation may rarely be an early event in sweat gland neoplasia. Together, our data suggest roles for HRAS and EGFR as drivers in a subset of poroma and porocarcinoma. TP53 and RB1 inactivation events are also likely to contribute to tumorigenesis. These findings suggest that porocarcinomas display diversity with respect to oncogenic drivers, which may have implications for targeted therapy in metastatic or unresectable cases. PMID:27067779

  10. Fitness Conferred by BCR-ABL Kinase Domain Mutations Determines the Risk of Pre-Existing Resistance in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Skaggs, Brian; Gorre, Mercedes; Sawyers, Charles L.; Michor, Franziska

    2011-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is the first human malignancy to be successfully treated with a small molecule inhibitor, imatinib, targeting a mutant oncoprotein (BCR-ABL). Despite its successes, acquired resistance to imatinib leads to reduced drug efficacy and frequent progression of disease. Understanding the characteristics of pre-existing resistant cells is important for evaluating the benefits of first-line combination therapy with second generation inhibitors. However, due to limitations of assay sensitivity, determining the existence and characteristics of resistant cell clones at the start of therapy is difficult. Here we combined a mathematical modeling approach using branching processes with experimental data on the fitness changes (i.e., changes in net reproductive rate) conferred by BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations to investigate the likelihood, composition, and diversity of pre-existing resistance. Furthermore, we studied the impact of these factors on the response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Our approach predicts that in most patients, there is at most one resistant clone present at the time of diagnosis of their disease. Interestingly, patients are no more likely to harbor the most aggressive, pan-resistant T315I mutation than any other resistance mutation; however, T315I cells on average establish larger-sized clones at the time of diagnosis. We established that for patients diagnosed late, the relative benefit of combination therapy over monotherapy with imatinib is significant, while this benefit is modest for patients with a typically early diagnosis time. These findings, after pre-clinical validation, will have implications for the clinical management of CML: we recommend that patients with advanced-phase disease be treated with combination therapy with at least two tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:22140458

  11. The impact of multiple low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations on response to ponatinib.

    PubMed

    Parker, Wendy T; Yeung, David T O; Yeoman, Alexandra L; Altamura, Haley K; Jamison, Bronte A; Field, Chani R; Hodgson, J Graeme; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Rivera, Victor M; Hughes, Timothy P; Branford, Susan

    2016-04-14

    The third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) ponatinib shows activity against all common BCR-ABL1 single mutants, including the highly resistant BCR-ABL1-T315I mutant, improving outcome for patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, responses are variable, and causal baseline factors have not been well-studied. The type and number of low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations present after imatinib resistance has prognostic significance for subsequent treatment with nilotinib or dasatinib as second-line therapy. We therefore investigated the impact of low-level mutations detected by sensitive mass-spectrometry before ponatinib initiation (baseline) on treatment response in 363 TKI-resistant patients enrolled in the PONATINIB for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Evaluation and Ph(+)Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia trial, including 231 patients in chronic phase (CP-CML). Low-level mutations were detected in 53 patients (15%, including low-level T315I in 14 patients); most, however, did not undergo clonal expansion during ponatinib treatment and, moreover, no specific individual mutations were associated with inferior outcome. We demonstrate however, that the number of mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance is associated with response to ponatinib treatment and could be used to refine the therapeutic approach. Although CP-CML patients with T315I (63/231, 27%) had superior responses overall, those with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry (20, 32%) had substantially inferior responses compared with those with T315I as the sole mutation detected (43, 68%). In contrast, for CP-CML patients without T315I, the inferior responses previously observed with nilotinib/dasatinib therapy for imatinib-resistant patients with multiple mutations were not seen with ponatinib treatment, suggesting that ponatinib may prove to be particularly advantageous for patients with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance

  12. The impact of multiple low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations on response to ponatinib

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, David T. O.; Yeoman, Alexandra L.; Altamura, Haley K.; Jamison, Bronte A.; Field, Chani R.; Hodgson, J. Graeme; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Rivera, Victor M.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Branford, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) ponatinib shows activity against all common BCR-ABL1 single mutants, including the highly resistant BCR-ABL1-T315I mutant, improving outcome for patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, responses are variable, and causal baseline factors have not been well-studied. The type and number of low-level BCR-ABL1 mutations present after imatinib resistance has prognostic significance for subsequent treatment with nilotinib or dasatinib as second-line therapy. We therefore investigated the impact of low-level mutations detected by sensitive mass-spectrometry before ponatinib initiation (baseline) on treatment response in 363 TKI-resistant patients enrolled in the PONATINIB for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Evaluation and Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia trial, including 231 patients in chronic phase (CP-CML). Low-level mutations were detected in 53 patients (15%, including low-level T315I in 14 patients); most, however, did not undergo clonal expansion during ponatinib treatment and, moreover, no specific individual mutations were associated with inferior outcome. We demonstrate however, that the number of mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance is associated with response to ponatinib treatment and could be used to refine the therapeutic approach. Although CP-CML patients with T315I (63/231, 27%) had superior responses overall, those with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry (20, 32%) had substantially inferior responses compared with those with T315I as the sole mutation detected (43, 68%). In contrast, for CP-CML patients without T315I, the inferior responses previously observed with nilotinib/dasatinib therapy for imatinib-resistant patients with multiple mutations were not seen with ponatinib treatment, suggesting that ponatinib may prove to be particularly advantageous for patients with multiple mutations detectable by mass spectrometry after TKI resistance

  13. Antitumor effects and molecular mechanisms of ponatinib on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hee; Kwak, Yeonui; Kim, Nam Doo; Sim, Taebo

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant mutational activation of FGFR2 is associated with endometrial cancers (ECs). AP24534 (ponatinib) currently undergoing clinical trials has been known to be an orally available multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our biochemical kinase assay showed that AP24534 is potent against wild-type FGFR1-4 and 5 mutant FGFRs (V561M-FGFR1, N549H-FGFR2, K650E-FGFR3, G697C-FGFR3, N535K-FGFR4) and possesses the strongest kinase-inhibitory activity on N549H-FGFR2 (IC50 of 0.5 nM) among all FGFRs tested. We therefore investigated the effects of AP24534 on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. AP24534 significantly inhibited the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells bearing activating FGFR2 mutations (N549K, K310R/N549K, S252W) and mainly induced G1/S cell cycle arrest leading to apoptosis. AP24534 also diminished the kinase activity of immunoprecipitated FGFR2 derived from MFE-296 and MFE-280 cells and reduced the phosphorylation of FGFR2 and FRS2 on MFE-296 and AN3CA cells. AP24534 caused substantial reductions in ERK phosphorylation, PLCγ signaling and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs bearing FGFR2 activating mutations. Akt signaling pathway was also deactivated by AP24534. AP24534 causes the chemotherapeutic effect through mainly the blockade of ERK, PLCγ and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs. Moreover, AP24534 inhibited migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells with FGFR2 mutations. In addition, AP24534 significantly blocked anchorage-independent growth of endometrial cancer cells. We, for the first time, report the molecular mechanisms by which AP24534 exerts antitumor effects on ECs with FGFR2 activating mutations, which would provide mechanistic insight into ongoing clinical investigations of AP24534 for ECs. PMID:26574622

  14. Response to MET inhibitors in patients with stage IV lung adenocarcinomas harboring MET mutations causing exon 14 skipping

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Paul K.; Drilon, Alexander; Fan, Pang-Dian; Yu, Helena; Rekhtman, Natasha; Ginsberg, Michelle S.; Borsu, Laetitia; Schultz, Nikolaus; Berger, Michael F.; Rudin, Charles M.; Ladanyi, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the MET exon 14 RNA splice acceptor and donor sites, which lead to exon skipping, deletion of the juxtamembrane domain containing the Cbl E3-ubiquitin ligase binding site, and decreased turnover of the resultant aberrant MET protein, were previously reported to be oncogenic in preclinical models. We now report responses to the MET inhibitors crizotinib and cabozantinib in four patients with stage IV lung adenocarcinomas harboring mutations leading to MET exon 14 skipping, highlighting a new therapeutic strategy for the 4% of lung adenocarcinoma patients whose tumors harbor this previously underappreciated genetic alteration. PMID:25971939

  15. Efficacy of multimodal treatment for leptomeningeal metastases in a lung cancer harboring an EGFR mutation

    PubMed Central

    Morichika, Daisuke; Kubo, Toshio; Gotoda, Hiroko; Tamura, Tomoki; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    For lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, the advent of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has prolonged survival rates. Even though disease sites have been well controlled by EGFR-TKIs, some patients develop carcinomatous meningitis, which reduces their quality of life drastically. Although multidisciplinary approaches have improved patient survival and quality of life, the outcomes are not yet satisfactory. We report the case of a 54-year-old Japanese woman diagnosed with leptomeningeal metastases (LM) from a lung adenocarcinoma harboring an EGFR exon 21 L858R point mutation. She was treated with gefitinib for 2 months, and symptoms of LM emerged during the treatment period. Although the treatment was switched to erlotinib, disturbance of consciousness worsened because of progressive hydrocephalus. Because all extracranial lesions remained responsive to treatment, and the exon 20 T790M point mutation was not detected in cerebrospinal fluid, we placed a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The patient’s disturbed consciousness improved dramatically after the shunt was placed; however, the optic and auditory nerve impairments due to direct invasion of LM lesions into nerve canals persisted. Administration of bevacizumab subsequent to whole-brain radiotherapy reduced the cranial nerve impairment, and the patient survived for 10 months. In conclusion, a combination of erlotinib and ventriculoperitoneal shunt was effective for hydrocephalus, and the immediate administration of additional therapies, including bevacizumab and radiation therapy, was useful in a patient suffering from LM. PMID:27042125

  16. Efficacy of multimodal treatment for leptomeningeal metastases in a lung cancer harboring an EGFR mutation.

    PubMed

    Morichika, Daisuke; Kubo, Toshio; Gotoda, Hiroko; Tamura, Tomoki; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tabata, Masahiro; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    For lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, the advent of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has prolonged survival rates. Even though disease sites have been well controlled by EGFR-TKIs, some patients develop carcinomatous meningitis, which reduces their quality of life drastically. Although multidisciplinary approaches have improved patient survival and quality of life, the outcomes are not yet satisfactory. We report the case of a 54-year-old Japanese woman diagnosed with leptomeningeal metastases (LM) from a lung adenocarcinoma harboring an EGFR exon 21 L858R point mutation. She was treated with gefitinib for 2 months, and symptoms of LM emerged during the treatment period. Although the treatment was switched to erlotinib, disturbance of consciousness worsened because of progressive hydrocephalus. Because all extracranial lesions remained responsive to treatment, and the exon 20 T790M point mutation was not detected in cerebrospinal fluid, we placed a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The patient's disturbed consciousness improved dramatically after the shunt was placed; however, the optic and auditory nerve impairments due to direct invasion of LM lesions into nerve canals persisted. Administration of bevacizumab subsequent to whole-brain radiotherapy reduced the cranial nerve impairment, and the patient survived for 10 months. In conclusion, a combination of erlotinib and ventriculoperitoneal shunt was effective for hydrocephalus, and the immediate administration of additional therapies, including bevacizumab and radiation therapy, was useful in a patient suffering from LM. PMID:27042125

  17. Human Ovarian Cancer Stroma Contains Luteinized Theca Cells Harboring Tumor Suppressor Gene GT198 Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Min; Zhang, Hao; Jaafar, Lahcen; Risinger, John I.; Huang, Shuang; Mivechi, Nahid F.; Ko, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a highly lethal gynecological cancer, and its causes remain to be understood. Using a recently identified tumor suppressor gene, GT198 (PSMC3IP), as a unique marker, we searched for the identity of GT198 mutant cells in ovarian cancer. GT198 has germ line mutations in familial and early onset breast and ovarian cancers and recurrent somatic mutations in sporadic fallopian tube cancers. GT198 protein has been shown as a steroid hormone receptor coregulator and also as a crucial factor in DNA repair. In this study, using GT198 as a marker for microdissection, we find that ovarian tumor stromal cells harboring GT198 mutations are present in various types of ovarian cancer including high and low grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, and granulosa cell carcinomas and in precursor lesions such as inclusion cysts. The mutant stromal cells consist of a luteinized theca cell lineage at various differentiation stages including CD133+, CD44+, and CD34+ cells, although the vast majority of them are differentiated overexpressing steroidogenic enzyme CYP17, a theca cell-specific marker. In addition, wild type GT198 suppresses whereas mutant GT198 protein stimulates CYP17 expression. The chromatin-bound GT198 on the human CYP17 promoter is decreased by overexpressing mutant GT198 protein, implicating the loss of wild type suppression in mutant cells. Together, our results suggest that GT198 mutant luteinized theca cells overexpressing CYP17 are common in ovarian cancer stroma. Because first hit cancer gene mutations would specifically mark cancer-inducing cells, the identification of mutant luteinized theca cells may add crucial evidence in understanding the cause of human ovarian cancer. PMID:24097974

  18. Imatinib for Melanomas Harboring Mutationally Activated or Amplified KIT Arising on Mucosal, Acral, and Chronically Sun-Damaged Skin

    PubMed Central

    Hodi, F. Stephen; Corless, Christopher L.; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Zhu, Meijun; Marino-Enriquez, Adrian; Friedlander, Philip; Gonzalez, Rene; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; O'Day, Steven J.; Kim, Kevin B.; Lawrence, Donald; Flaherty, Keith T.; Luke, Jason J.; Collichio, Frances A.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Beadling, Carol; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Yap, Jeffrey T.; Van den Abbeele, Annick D.; Demetri, George D.; Fisher, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Amplifications and mutations in the KIT proto-oncogene in subsets of melanomas provide therapeutic opportunities. Patients and Methods We conducted a multicenter phase II trial of imatinib in metastatic mucosal, acral, or chronically sun-damaged (CSD) melanoma with KIT amplifications and/or mutations. Patients received imatinib 400 mg once per day or 400 mg twice per day if there was no initial response. Dose reductions were permitted for treatment-related toxicities. Additional oncogene mutation screening was performed by mass spectroscopy. Results Twenty-five patients were enrolled (24 evaluable). Eight patients (33%) had tumors with KIT mutations, 11 (46%) with KIT amplifications, and five (21%) with both. Median follow-up was 10.6 months (range, 3.7 to 27.1 months). Best overall response rate (BORR) was 29% (21% excluding nonconfirmed responses) with a two-stage 95% CI of 13% to 51%. BORR was significantly greater than the hypothesized null of 5% and statistically significantly different by mutation status (7 of 13 or 54% KIT mutated v 0% KIT amplified only). There were no statistical differences in rates of progression or survival by mutation status or by melanoma site. The overall disease control rate was 50% but varied significantly by KIT mutation status (77% mutated v 18% amplified). Four patients harbored pretreatment NRAS mutations, and one patient acquired increased KIT amplification after treatment. Conclusion Melanomas that arise on mucosal, acral, or CSD skin should be assessed for KIT mutations. Imatinib can be effective when tumors harbor KIT mutations, but not if KIT is amplified only. NRAS mutations and KIT copy number gain may be mechanisms of therapeutic resistance to imatinib. PMID:23775962

  19. Subjects harboring presenilin familial Alzheimer’s disease mutations exhibit diverse white matter biochemistry alterations

    PubMed Central

    Roher, Alex E; Maarouf, Chera L; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Wilson, Jeffrey; Kokjohn, Tyler A; Daugs, Ian D; Whiteside, Charisse M; Kalback, Walter M; Macias, MiMi P; Jacobson, Sandra A; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Ghetti, Bernardino; Beach, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia impacts all facets of higher order cognitive function and is characterized by the presence of distinctive pathological lesions in the gray matter (GM). The profound alterations in GM structure and function have fostered the view that AD impacts are primarily a consequence of GM damage. However, the white matter (WM) represents about 50% of the cerebrum and this area of the brain is substantially atrophied and profoundly abnormal in both sporadic AD (SAD) and familial AD (FAD). We examined the WM biochemistry by ELISA and Western blot analyses of key proteins in 10 FAD cases harboring mutations in the presenilin genes PSEN1 and PSEN2 as well as in 4 non-demented control (NDC) individuals and 4 subjects with SAD. The molecules examined were direct substrates of PSEN1 such as Notch-1 and amyloid precursor protein (APP). In addition, apolipoproteins, axonal transport molecules, cytoskeletal and structural proteins, neurotrophic factors and synaptic proteins were examined. PSEN-FAD subjects had, on average, higher amounts of WM amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides compared to SAD, which may play a role in the devastating dysfunction of the brain. However, the PSEN-FAD mutations we examined did not produce uniform increases in the relative proportions of Aβ42 and exhibited substantial variability in total Aβ levels. These observations suggest that neurodegeneration and dementia do not depend solely on enhanced Aβ42 levels. Our data revealed additional complexities in PSEN-FAD individuals. Some direct substrates of γ-secretase, such as Notch, N-cadherin, Erb-B4 and APP, deviated substantially from the NDC group baseline for some, but not all, mutation types. Proteins that were not direct γ-secretase substrates, but play key structural and functional roles in the WM, likewise exhibited varied concentrations in the distinct PSEN mutation backgrounds. Detailing the diverse biochemical pathology spectrum of PSEN mutations may offer valuable

  20. Two Clinical Isolates of Candida glabrata Exhibiting Reduced Sensitivity to Amphotericin B Both Harbor Mutations in ERG2

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Claire M.; Bader, Oliver; Parker, Josie E.; Weig, Michael; Gross, Uwe; Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Kelly, Diane E.

    2012-01-01

    Two novel isolates of Candida glabrata exhibiting reduced sensitivity to amphotericin B (MIC, 8 μg ml−1) were found to be ERG2 mutants, wherein Δ8-sterol intermediates comprised >90% of the total cellular sterol fraction. Both harbored an alteration at Thr121 in ERG2; the corresponding residue (Thr119) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is essential for sterol Δ8-Δ7 isomerization. This constitutes the first report of C. glabrata harboring mutations in ERG2 and exhibiting reduced sensitivity to amphotericin B. PMID:23027188

  1. Impact of Baseline BCR-ABL Mutations on Response to Nilotinib in Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy; Saglio, Giuseppe; Branford, Susan; Soverini, Simona; Kim, Dong-Wook; Müller, Martin C.; Martinelli, Giovanni; Cortes, Jorge; Beppu, Lan; Gottardi, Enrico; Kim, Dongho; Erben, Philipp; Shou, Yaping; Haque, Ariful; Gallagher, Neil; Radich, Jerald; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Nilotinib is a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP; CML-CP) and accelerated phase (AP; CML-AP) who are resistant to or intolerant of prior imatinib therapy. In this subanalysis of a phase II study of nilotinib in patients with imatinib-resistant or imatinib-intolerant CML-CP, the occurrence and impact of baseline and newly detectable BCR-ABL mutations were assessed. Patients and Methods Baseline mutation data were assessed in 281 (88%) of 321 patients with CML-CP in the phase II nilotinib registration trial. Results Among imatinib-resistant patients, the frequency of mutations at baseline was 55%. After 12 months of therapy, major cytogenetic response (MCyR) was achieved in 60%, complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) in 40%, and major molecular response (MMR) in 29% of patients without baseline mutations versus 49% (P = .145), 32% (P = .285), and 22% (P = .366), respectively, of patients with mutations. Responses in patients who harbored mutations with high in vitro sensitivity to nilotinib (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] ≤ 150 nM) or mutations with unknown nilotinib sensitivity were equivalent to those responses for patients without mutations (not significant). Patients with mutations that were less sensitive to nilotinib in vitro (IC50 > 150 nM; Y253H, E255V/K, F359V/C) had less favorable responses, as 13%, 43%, and 9% of patients with each of these mutations, respectively, achieved MCyR; none achieved CCyR. Conclusion For most patients with imatinib resistance and with mutations, nilotinib offers a substantial probability of response. However, mutational status at baseline may influence response. Less sensitive mutations that occurred at three residues defined in this study, as well as the T315I mutation, may be associated with less favorable responses to nilotinib. PMID:19652056

  2. Adaptive Responses to Dasatinib-Treated Lung Squamous Cell Cancer Cells Harboring DDR2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Watters, January M.; Fang, Bin; Kinose, Fumi; Song, Lanxi; Koomen, John M.; Teer, Jamie K.; Fisher, Kate; Chen, Yian Ann; Rix, Uwe; Haura, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    DDR2 mutations occur in ~4% of lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) where the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib has emerged as a new therapeutic option. We found that ERK and AKT phosphorylation was weakly inhibited by dasatinib in DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells, suggesting that dasatinib inhibits survival signals distinct from other oncogenic RTKs and/or compensatory signals exist that dampen dasatinib activity. To gain better insight into dasatinib’s action in these cells, we assessed altered global tyrosine phosphorylation (pY) after dasatinib exposure, employing a mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach. Overlaying protein-protein interaction relationships upon this dasatinib-regulated pY network revealed decreased phosphorylation of Src family kinases and their targets. Conversely, dasatinib enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation in a panel of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and their signaling adaptor complexes, including EGFR, MET/GAB1, and IGF-1R/IRS2, implicating a RTK-driven adaptive response associated with dasatinib. To address the significance of this observation, these results were further integrated with results from a small molecule chemical library screen. We found that dasatinib combined with MET and IGF-1R inhibitors had a synergistic effect and ligand stimulation of EGFR and MET rescued DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells from dasatinib-induced loss of cell viability. Importantly, we observed high levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR and MET in a panel of human lung SCC tissues harboring DDR2 mutations. Our results highlight potential RTK-driven adaptive resistant mechanisms upon DDR2 targeting, and they suggest new, rationale co-targeting strategies for DDR2-mutant lung SCC. PMID:25348954

  3. Degeneration of proprioceptive sensory nerve endings in mice harboring amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sydney K; Kemp, Zachary; Hatzipetros, Theo; Vieira, Fernando; Valdez, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily targets the motor system. Although much is known about the effects of ALS on motor neurons and glial cells, little is known about its effect on proprioceptive sensory neurons. This study examines proprioceptive sensory neurons in mice harboring mutations associated with ALS, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. In both transgenic lines, we found fewer proprioceptive sensory neurons containing fluorescently tagged cholera toxin in their soma five days after injecting this retrograde tracer into the tibialis anterior muscle. We asked whether this is due to neuronal loss or selective degeneration of peripheral nerve endings. We found no difference in the total number and size of proprioceptive sensory neuron soma between symptomatic SOD1(G93A) and control mice. However, analysis of proprioceptive nerve endings in muscles revealed early and significant alterations at Ia/II proprioceptive nerve endings in muscle spindles before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Although these changes occur alongside those at α-motor axons in SOD1(G93A) mice, Ia/II sensory nerve endings degenerate in the absence of obvious alterations in α-motor axons in TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. We next asked whether proprioceptive nerve endings are similarly affected in the spinal cord and found that nerve endings terminating on α-motor neurons are affected during the symptomatic phase and after peripheral nerve endings begin to degenerate. Overall, we show that Ia/II proprioceptive sensory neurons are affected by ALS-causing mutations, with pathological changes starting at their peripheral nerve endings. PMID:26136049

  4. Mutation status and clinical outcome of 89 imatinib mesylate-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia patients: a retrospective analysis from the French intergroup of CML (Fi(phi)-LMC GROUP).

    PubMed

    Nicolini, F E; Corm, S; Lê, Q-H; Sorel, N; Hayette, S; Bories, D; Leguay, T; Roy, L; Giraudier, S; Tulliez, M; Facon, T; Mahon, F-X; Cayuela, J-M; Rousselot, P; Michallet, M; Preudhomme, C; Guilhot, F; Roche-Lestienne, C

    2006-06-01

    The emergence of ABL point mutations is the most frequent cause for imatinib resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients and can occur during any phase of the disease; however, their clinical impact remains controversial. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the predictive impact of 94 BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations (18 T315I, 26 P-loop, 50 in other sites) found in 89 imatinib-resistant CML patients. At imatinib onset, 64% of patients (57/89) were in chronic phase (CP), 24% (21/89) in accelerated phase (AP) and 12% (11/89) in blastic phase (BP). T315I and P-loop mutations were preferentially discovered in accelerated phase of BP CML, and other types of mutations in CP (P=0.003). With a median follow-up of 39.2 months (6.3-67.2), since imatinib initiation, overall survival (OS) was significantly worse for P-loop (28.3 months) and for T315I (12.6 months), and not reached for other mutations (P=0.0004). For CP only, multivariate analysis demonstrated a worse OS for P-loop mutations (P=0.014), and a worse progression-free survival (PFS) for T315I mutations (P=0.014). Therefore, P-loop and T315I mutations selectively impair the outcome of imatinib-resistant CML patients, in contrast to other mutations, which may benefit from dose escalation of imatinib, able to improve or stabilize disease response. PMID:16642048

  5. Different spectra of recurrent gene mutations in subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia harboring stereotyped B-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Young, Emma; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Hadzidimitriou, Anastasia; Moysiadis, Theodoros; Plevova, Karla; Rossi, Davide; Kminkova, Jana; Stalika, Evangelia; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Malcikova, Jitka; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Davis, Zadie; Mansouri, Larry; Scarfò, Lydia; Boudjoghra, Myriam; Navarro, Alba; Muggen, Alice F.; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Larrayoz, Marta; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Belessi, Chrysoula; Campo, Elias; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Langerak, Anton W.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davi, Frederic; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We report on markedly different frequencies of genetic lesions within subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients carrying mutated or unmutated stereotyped B-cell receptor immunoglobulins in the largest cohort (n=565) studied for this purpose. By combining data on recurrent gene mutations (BIRC3, MYD88, NOTCH1, SF3B1 and TP53) and cytogenetic aberrations, we reveal a subset-biased acquisition of gene mutations. More specifically, the frequency of NOTCH1 mutations was found to be enriched in subsets expressing unmutated immunoglobulin genes, i.e. #1, #6, #8 and #59 (22–34%), often in association with trisomy 12, and was significantly different (P<0.001) to the frequency observed in subset #2 (4%, aggressive disease, variable somatic hypermutation status) and subset #4 (1%, indolent disease, mutated immunoglobulin genes). Interestingly, subsets harboring a high frequency of NOTCH1 mutations were found to carry few (if any) SF3B1 mutations. This starkly contrasts with subsets #2 and #3 where, despite their immunogenetic differences, SF3B1 mutations occurred in 45% and 46% of cases, respectively. In addition, mutations within TP53, whilst enriched in subset #1 (16%), were rare in subsets #2 and #8 (both 2%), despite all being clinically aggressive. All subsets were negative for MYD88 mutations, whereas BIRC3 mutations were infrequent. Collectively, this striking bias and skewed distribution of mutations and cytogenetic aberrations within specific chronic lymphocytic leukemia subsets implies that the mechanisms underlying clinical aggressiveness are not uniform, but rather support the existence of distinct genetic pathways of clonal evolution governed by a particular stereotyped B-cell receptor selecting a certain molecular lesion(s). PMID:27198719

  6. BCR-ABL mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors and impact on survival.

    PubMed

    Pagnano, Katia Borgia Barbosa; Bendit, Israel; Boquimpani, Carla; De Souza, Carmino Antonio; Miranda, Eliana C M; Zalcberg, Ilana; Larripa, Irene; Nardinelli, Luciana; Silveira, Rosana Antunes; Fogliatto, Laura; Spector, Nelson; Funke, Vaneuza; Pasquini, Ricardo; Hungria, Vania; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio; Clementino, Nelma; Conchon, Monika; Moiraghi, Elena Beatriz; Lopez, Jose Luis; Pavlovsky, Carolina; Pavlovsky, Miguel A; Cervera, Eduardo E; Meillon, Luis Antonio; Simões, Belinda; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Bozzano, Alicia Helena Magarinos; Mayta, Ernesto; Cortes, Jorge; Bengió, Raquel M

    2015-01-01

    This is the largest Latin American study of BCR-ABL mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, resistant to imatinib (IM). In 195/467 (41%) patients, mutations were detected. The most frequent mutation was T315I (n = 31, 16%). Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were lower in patients with BCR-ABL mutations (43% vs. 65%, p = 0.07 and 47% vs. 72%, p = 0.03, respectively) and in those with the T315I mutation (p = 0.003 and p = 0.03). OS and PFS were superior in subgroup who switched to second generation inhibitors (SGIs) after IM failure (OS: 50% vs. 39% p = 0.01; PFS: 48% vs. 30% p = 0.02). BCR-ABL mutations conferred a significant poor prognosis in CML patients. PMID:26288116

  7. Decreased heat shock protein 27 expression and altered autophagy in human cells harboring A8344G mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Yi; Chen, Hsueh-Fu; Gi, Siao-Jhen; Chi, Tang-Hao; Cheng, Che-Kun; Hsu, Chi-Fu; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wei, Yau-Huei; Liu, Chin-Shan; Hsieh, Mingli

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are responsible for human neuromuscular diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Myoclonus epilepsy associated with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) is a maternally inherited mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with various syndromes involving both muscular and nervous systems. The most common mutation in MERRF syndrome, A8344G mutation in mtDNA, has been associated with severe defects in protein synthesis. This defect impairs assembly of complexes in electron transport chain and results in decreased respiratory function of mitochondria. In this study, we showed a significant decrease of the heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a MERRF patient and in cybrid cells harboring MERRF A8344G mutation. However, normal cytoplasmic distributions of Hsp27 and normal heat shock responses were observed in both wild type and mutant cybrids. Furthermore, overexpression of wild type Hsp27 in mutant MERRF cybrids significantly decreased cell death under staurosporine (STS) treatment, suggesting a protective function of Hsp27 in cells harboring the A8344G mutation of mtDNA. Meanwhile, reverse transcriptase PCR showed no difference in the mRNA level between normal and mutant cybrids, indicating that alterations may occur at the protein level. Evidenced by the decreased levels of Hsp27 upon treatment with proteasome inhibitor, starvation and rapamycin and the accumulation of Hsp27 upon lysosomal inhibitor treatment; Hsp27 may be degraded by the autophagic pathway. In addition, the increased formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes was found in MERRF cybrids under the basal condition, indicating a constitutively-activated autophagic pathway. It may explain, at least partially, the faster turnover of Hsp27 in MERRF cybrids. This study provides information for us to understand that Hsp27 is degraded through the autophagic pathway and that Hsp27 may have a protective role in MERRF cells. Regulating Hsp27 and the autophagic pathway

  8. Combined "Infiltrating Astrocytoma/Pleomorphic Xanthoastrocytoma" Harboring IDH1 R132H and BRAF V600E Mutations.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Seiji; Kipp, Benjamin R; Voss, Jesse S; Giannini, Caterina; Raghunathan, Aditya

    2016-02-01

    Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) has rarely been reported in combination with infiltrating glioma, historically interpreted as a "collision tumor." Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and BRAF V600E mutations are usually not concurrent. The former is typical of adult infiltrating gliomas, and the latter is identified in a variety of primary central nervous system neoplasms, including PXA, ganglioglioma, pilocytic astrocytoma, and rarely infiltrating gliomas. We report the case of a 56-year-old man presenting with seizures and headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large right temporal lobe mass with low T1 and high T2/FLAIR signal and a discrete contrast-enhancing focus. Histologically, the tumor showed 2 distinct components: an infiltrating astrocytoma harboring 5 mitoses/10 high-power fields and a relatively circumscribed focus, resembling PXA with, at most, 2 mitoses/10 high-power fields. No microvascular proliferation or necrosis was present in either component. The infiltrating astrocytoma component contained numerous axons, whereas the PXA-like component had sparse axons, as demonstrated by the neurofilament immunostain. Both components were positive for the mutant IDH1 R132H and showed loss of ATRX expression, whereas BRAF V600E was restricted to the PXA-like component. On sequencing of the 2 components separately after microdissection, both showed identical IDH1 R132H and TP53 R273C point mutations, whereas the BRAF V600E mutation was limited to the PXA-like component. These findings are consistent with clonal expansion of a morphologically distinct focus, harboring a private BRAF V600E mutation within an IDH1-mutant glioma. Intratumoral heterogeneity and clonal evolution, as seems to have occurred here, suggest reevaluation of "collision tumors" as a concept. PMID:26414224

  9. Spectrum of HNF1B Mutations in a Large Cohort of Patients Who Harbor Renal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Decramer, Stéphane; Pawtowski, Audrey; Morinière, Vincent; Bandin, Flavio; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Lebre, Anne-Sophie; Faguer, Stanislas; Guigonis, Vincent; Antignac, Corinne; Salomon, Rémi

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1β (HNF1β) is a transcription factor that is critical for the development of kidney and pancreas. In humans, mutations in HNF1B lead to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, pancreas atrophy, and maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 and genital malformations. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We report HNF1B screening in a cohort of 377 unrelated cases with various kidney phenotypes (hyperechogenic kidneys with size not more than +3 SD, multicystic kidney disease, renal agenesis, renal hypoplasia, cystic dysplasia, or hyperuricemic tubulointerstitial nephropathy not associated with UMOD mutation). Results: We found a heterozygous mutation in 75 (19.9%) index cases, consisting of a deletion of the whole gene in 42, deletion of one exon in one, and small mutations in 32. Eighteen mutations were novel. De novo mutations accounted for 66% of deletions and 40% of small mutations. In patients who carried HNF1B mutation and for whom we were able to study prenatal ultrasonography (56 probands), isolated hyperechogenic kidneys with normal or slightly enhanced size were the more frequent (34 of 56) phenotype before birth. Various other prenatal renal phenotypes were associated with HNF1B mutations, at a lesser frequency. Diabetes developed in four probands. Hyperuricemia and hypomagnesemia, although not systematically investigated, were frequently associated. Conclusions: This large series showed that the severity of the renal disease associated with HNF1B mutations was extremely variable (from prenatal renal failure to normal renal function in adulthood) and was not correlated with the genotype. PMID:20378641

  10. Prolonged Response to Trastuzumab in a Patient With HER2-Nonamplified Breast Cancer With Elevated HER2 Dimerization Harboring an ERBB2 S310F Mutation.

    PubMed

    Chumsri, Saranya; Weidler, Jodi; Ali, Siraj; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Wallweber, Gerald; DeFazio-Eli, Lisa; Chenna, Ahmed; Huang, Weidong; DeRidder, Angela; Goicocheal, Lindsay; Perez, Edith A

    2015-09-01

    In the current genomic era, increasing evidence demonstrates that approximately 2% of HER2-negative breast cancers, by current standard testings, harbor activating mutations of ERBB2. However, whether patients with HER2-negative breast cancer with activating mutations of ERBB2 also experience response to anti-HER2 therapies remains unclear. This case report describes a patient with HER2-nonamplified heavily pretreated breast cancer who experienced prolonged response to trastuzumab in combination with pertuzumab and fulvestrant. Further molecular analysis demonstrated that her tumors had an elevated HER2 dimerization that corresponded to ERBB2 S310F mutation. Located in the extracellular domain of the HER2 protein, this mutation was reported to promote noncovalent dimerization that results in the activation of the downstream signaling pathways. This case highlights the fact that HER2-targeted therapy may be valuable in patients harboring an ERBB2 S310F mutation. PMID:26358791

  11. Classic Architecture with Multicentricity and Local Recurrence, and Absence of TERT Promoter Mutations are Correlates of BRAF (V600E) Harboring Pediatric Papillary Thyroid Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Onder, Semen; Ozturk Sari, Sule; Yegen, Gulcin; Sormaz, Ismail Cem; Yilmaz, Ismail; Poyrazoglu, Sukran; Sanlı, Yasemin; Giles Senyurek, Yasemin; Kapran, Yersu; Mete, Ozgur

    2016-06-01

    This study is aimed to investigate the BRAF (V600E) and TERT promoter mutation profile of 50 pediatric papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) to refine their clinicopathological correlates. The median age at the time of surgery was 16 years (range, 6-18). No TERT promoter mutations were identified in this series. The BRAF (V600E) mutation was present in 15 (30 %) tumors. From genotype-histologic variant correlation perspective, 13 of 24 classic variant PTCs and 2 of 7 diffuse sclerosing variant PTCs were found to harbor BRAF (V600E) mutation. One cribriform-morular variant, 3 solid variant, and 15 follicular variant PTCs were BRAF wild type. While tumors with distant metastasis were BRAF wild type, two of five tumors with extrathyroidal extension (ETE) harbored BRAF (V600E) mutation. Nine of 15 BRAF (V600E) harboring tumors had central lymph node metastases. There was no significant correlation with BRAF (V600E) mutation and age, gender, tumor size, ETE, central lymph node metastasis, the status of pT, pN1a-b, and distant metastasis. An adverse correlation between BRAF (V600E) mutation and disease-free survival (DFS) was noted in the entire cohort; however, the predictive value of BRAF (V600E) mutation disappeared within the group of tumors displaying classic architecture as well as classic variant PTCs. The present cohort identifies that the classic architecture with multicentricity and local recurrence are correlates of BRAF (V600E) harboring pediatric PTCs. While the small size of this cohort is one of the limitations, neither the BRAF mutation status nor the classic tumor architecture does seem to be an independent prognosticator of DFS in this series. Evidence also suggests that TERT promoter mutations do not seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of pediatric PTCs. PMID:26951110

  12. Docetaxel for non-small-cell lung cancer harboring the activated EGFR mutation with T790M at initial presentation.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Hiromichi; Ochi, Nobuaki; Yasugi, Masayuki; Tabayashi, Takayuki; Yamagishi, Tomoko; Monobe, Yasumasa; Hisamoto, Akiko; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Takigawa, Nagio

    2013-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with Stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chest computed tomography revealed a mass in the upper lobe of the right lung, with pleural effusion. Cytologic examination identified adenocarcinoma cells in the right pleural effusion. Furthermore, both a deletion mutation in exon 19 and a threonine-methionine substitution mutation at position 790 in exon 20 (T790M) were detected in the epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in the malignant cells. As systemic chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and pemetrexed or erlotinib proved ineffective, docetaxel monotherapy was initiated as a third-line treatment. Following salvage chemotherapy, her Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status improved from 3 to 1, with tumor regression over 5 months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful docetaxel treatment for a patient with NSCLC harboring the T790M EGFR-activating mutation identified before treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23493804

  13. Docetaxel for non-small-cell lung cancer harboring the activated EGFR mutation with T790M at initial presentation

    PubMed Central

    Yamane, Hiromichi; Ochi, Nobuaki; Yasugi, Masayuki; Tabayashi, Takayuki; Yamagishi, Tomoko; Monobe, Yasumasa; Hisamoto, Akiko; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Takigawa, Nagio

    2013-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with Stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chest computed tomography revealed a mass in the upper lobe of the right lung, with pleural effusion. Cytologic examination identified adenocarcinoma cells in the right pleural effusion. Furthermore, both a deletion mutation in exon 19 and a threonine–methionine substitution mutation at position 790 in exon 20 (T790M) were detected in the epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in the malignant cells. As systemic chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin and pemetrexed or erlotinib proved ineffective, docetaxel monotherapy was initiated as a third-line treatment. Following salvage chemotherapy, her Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status improved from 3 to 1, with tumor regression over 5 months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful docetaxel treatment for a patient with NSCLC harboring the T790M EGFR-activating mutation identified before treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23493804

  14. Altered zinc sensitivity of NMDA receptors harboring clinically-relevant mutations.

    PubMed

    Serraz, Benjamin; Grand, Teddy; Paoletti, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Recent human genetic studies have identified a surprisingly high number of alterations in genes encoding NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits in several common brain diseases. Among NMDAR subunits, the widely-expressed GluN2A subunit appears particularly affected, with tens of de novo or inherited mutations associated with neurodevelopmental conditions including childhood epilepsies and cognitive deficits. Despite the increasing identification of NMDAR mutations of clinical interest, there is still little information about the effects of the mutations on receptor and network function. Here we analyze the impact on receptor expression and function of nine GluN2A missense (i.e. single-point) mutations targeting the N-terminal domain, a large regulatory region involved in subunit assembly and allosteric signaling. While several mutations produced no or little apparent effect on receptor expression, gating and pharmacology, two showed a drastic expression phenotype and two resulted in marked alterations in the sensitivity to zinc, a potent allosteric inhibitor of GluN1/GluN2A receptors and modulator of excitatory synaptic transmission. Surprisingly, both increase (GluN2A-R370W) and decrease (GluN2A-P79R) of zinc sensitivity were observed on receptors containing either one or two copies of the mutated subunits. Overexpression of the mutant subunits in cultured rat neurons confirmed the results from heterologous expression. These results, together with previously published data, indicate that disease-causing mutations in NMDARs produce a wide spectrum of receptor alterations, at least in vitro. They also point to a critical role of the zinc-NMDAR interaction in neuronal function and human health. PMID:27288002

  15. Gene Coexpression Analyses Differentiate Networks Associated with Diverse Cancers Harboring TP53 Missense or Null Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oros Klein, Kathleen; Oualkacha, Karim; Lafond, Marie-Hélène; Bhatnagar, Sahir; Tonin, Patricia N.; Greenwood, Celia M. T.

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of solid cancers, missense mutations in the well-established TP53 tumor suppressor gene may lead to the presence of a partially-functioning protein molecule, whereas mutations affecting the protein encoding reading frame, often referred to as null mutations, result in the absence of p53 protein. Both types of mutations have been observed in the same cancer type. As the resulting tumor biology may be quite different between these two groups, we used RNA-sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) from four different cancers with poor prognosis, namely ovarian, breast, lung and skin cancers, to compare the patterns of coexpression of genes in tumors grouped according to their TP53 missense or null mutation status. We used Weighted Gene Coexpression Network analysis (WGCNA) and a new test statistic built on differences between groups in the measures of gene connectivity. For each cancer, our analysis identified a set of genes showing differential coexpression patterns between the TP53 missense- and null mutation-carrying groups that was robust to the choice of the tuning parameter in WGCNA. After comparing these sets of genes across the four cancers, one gene (KIR3DL2) consistently showed differential coexpression patterns between the null and missense groups. KIR3DL2 is known to play an important role in regulating the immune response, which is consistent with our observation that this gene's strongly-correlated partners implicated many immune-related pathways. Examining mutation-type-related changes in correlations between sets of genes may provide new insight into tumor biology. PMID:27536319

  16. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a child harboring a founder Hirschsprung RET mutation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Valentina; Mosconi, Manuela; Nozza, Paolo; Murgia, Daniele; Mattioli, Girolamo; Ceccherini, Isabella; Pini Prato, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo obstruction (CIPO) is a rare clinical entity characterized by symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction without either recognizable anatomical abnormalities or intestinal aganglionosis. A Chinese female infant presented to our institution with a clinical diagnosis of CIPO. Aganglionosis was ruled out by full thickness colonic and ileal biopsies and by rectal suction biopsies. Unexpectedly, direct sequencing and PCR amplification of RET proto-oncogene from peripheral blood extracted DNA identified a RET R114H mutation. This mutation has already been reported as strongly associated with Asian patients affected by Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) and is considered a founder mutation in Asia. The same mutation has never been reported in patients with CIPO, so far. These findings support the role of RET in the development of the enteric nervous system but underline the importance of other genetic or environmental factors contributing to the gastrointestinal phenotype of the disease. Somehow, this RET R114H mutation proved to have a role in the etiology of both CIPO and HSCR and could contribute to a more diffuse imbalance of gut dysmotility. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27273837

  17. Ampullary cancers harbor ELF3 tumor suppressor gene mutations and exhibit frequent WNT dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R.; Chang, David K.; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Gill, Anthony J.; Ittmann, Michael M.; Creighton, Chad J.; Johns, Amber L.; Shinbrot, Eve; Dewal, Ninad; Fisher, William E.; Pilarsky, Christian; Grützmann, Robert; Overman, Michael J.; Jamieson, Nigel B.; Van Buren, George; Drummond, Jennifer; Walker, Kimberly; Hampton, Oliver A.; Xi, Liu; Muzny, Donna M.; Doddapaneni, Harsha; Lee, Sandra L.; Bellair, Michelle; Hu, Jianhong; Han, Yi; Dinh, Huyen H.; Dahdouli, Mike; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Bailey, Peter; Waddell, Nicola; Pearson, John V.; Harliwong, Ivon; Wang, Huamin; Aust, Daniela; Oien, Karin A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Hodges, Sally E.; McElhany, Amy; Saengboonmee, Charupong; Duthie, Fraser R.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Biankin, Andrew V.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The ampulla of Vater is a complex cellular environment from which adenocarcinomas arise to form a group of histopathologically heterogenous tumors. To evaluate the molecular features of these tumors, 98 ampullary adenocarcinomas, were evaluated and compared to 44 distal bile duct and 18 duodenal adenocarcinomas. Genomic analyses revealed mutations in the WNT signaling pathway among half of the patients and in all three adenocarcinomas irrespective of their origin and histological morphology. These tumors were characterized by a high frequency of inactivating mutations of ELF3, a high rate of microsatellite instability, and common focal deletions and amplifications, suggesting common attributes in the molecular pathogenesis are at play in these tumors. The high frequency of WNT pathway activating mutation, coupled with small molecule inhibitors of beta catenin in clinical trials, suggests future treatment decisions for these patients may be guided by genomic analysis. PMID:26804919

  18. Ampullary Cancers Harbor ELF3 Tumor Suppressor Gene Mutations and Exhibit Frequent WNT Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Marie-Claude; Covington, Kyle R; Chang, David K; Donehower, Lawrence A; Gill, Anthony J; Ittmann, Michael M; Creighton, Chad J; Johns, Amber L; Shinbrot, Eve; Dewal, Ninad; Fisher, William E; Pilarsky, Christian; Grützmann, Robert; Overman, Michael J; Jamieson, Nigel B; Van Buren, George; Drummond, Jennifer; Walker, Kimberly; Hampton, Oliver A; Xi, Liu; Muzny, Donna M; Doddapaneni, Harsha; Lee, Sandra L; Bellair, Michelle; Hu, Jianhong; Han, Yi; Dinh, Huyen H; Dahdouli, Mike; Samra, Jaswinder S; Bailey, Peter; Waddell, Nicola; Pearson, John V; Harliwong, Ivon; Wang, Huamin; Aust, Daniela; Oien, Karin A; Hruban, Ralph H; Hodges, Sally E; McElhany, Amy; Saengboonmee, Charupong; Duthie, Fraser R; Grimmond, Sean M; Biankin, Andrew V; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    The ampulla of Vater is a complex cellular environment from which adenocarcinomas arise to form a group of histopathologically heterogenous tumors. To evaluate the molecular features of these tumors, 98 ampullary adenocarcinomas were evaluated and compared to 44 distal bile duct and 18 duodenal adenocarcinomas. Genomic analyses revealed mutations in the WNT signaling pathway among half of the patients and in all three adenocarcinomas irrespective of their origin and histological morphology. These tumors were characterized by a high frequency of inactivating mutations of ELF3, a high rate of microsatellite instability, and common focal deletions and amplifications, suggesting common attributes in the molecular pathogenesis are at play in these tumors. The high frequency of WNT pathway activating mutation, coupled with small-molecule inhibitors of β-catenin in clinical trials, suggests future treatment decisions for these patients may be guided by genomic analysis. PMID:26804919

  19. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Harboring an Activating KRAS K117N Missense Mutation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Vignesh; Margolskee, Elizabeth; Kluk, Michael; Giorgadze, Tamara; Orazi, Attilio

    2016-09-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) or sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy is a rare histiocytic proliferation that is generally considered to be reactive with a benign clinical course. The etiology of RDD is very poorly understood. Recent studies have shown frequent BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, and PIK3CA activating mutations in several histiocytic neoplasms highlighting the emerging importance of the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Here we report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease involving the submandibular salivary gland with a KRAS K117N missense mutation discovered by next-generation sequencing. These results suggest that at least a subset of RDD cases may be clonal processes. Further mutational studies on this rare histiocytic disease should be undertaken to better characterize its pathogenesis as well as open up potential avenues for therapy. PMID:26922062

  20. Do Long-Term Survivor Primary Glioblastoma Patients Harbor IDH1 Mutations?

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, J Manuel; Mukherjee, Debraj; Black, Keith L; Fan, Xuemo; Hu, Jethro L; Nuno, Miriam Aracely; Patil, Chirag G

    2016-05-01

    Background Approximately 3 to 16% of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients are considered long-term survivors (LTS: 3+ years). Objective Given the improved survival conferred by IDH1 mutations and the fact that these mutations are detected in 12% of newly diagnosed GBM cases, could long-term survivorship be explained by IDH1 mutation status? Our aim was to describe GBM LTS with IDH1 mutations and explore its association with overall survival (OS). Methods Records of 453 newly diagnosed adult GBM patients treated at a single institution from 2004 to 2010 were reviewed retrospectively for patients who survived at least 36 months postsurgery. Descriptive statistics for clinical characteristics, treatments received, and tumor biomarkers were reported. Estimates for progression-free survival (PFS) and OS were provided. Results Forty (8.8%) LTS GBM patients were identified, with a median age of 50 years and a median preoperative Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) of 80. Most patients underwent near-total/gross-total resection (72.5%), postoperative radiation (97.5%), and adjuvant temozolomide (95%). PFS rates at 12, 36, 48, and 72 months were 67.5%, 40%, 32.7%, and 26.2%, respectively. Median OS has not yet been reached; however, the survival rate at 48 months was 62.1%. Among 35 patients with available tumor samples, only 8 (22.9%) had IDH1 mutations. No significant difference in median PFS was found between IDH1 mutation and wild-type patients (46.6 versus 26.3 months; p =0.45). Conclusions Less than a quarter of our patients' long-term survivorship was associated with favorable IDH1 status. Therefore, IDH1 status does not explain most of the long-term survivorship in the temozolomide era. PMID:26935296

  1. Lung cancers with acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors occasionally harbor BRAF gene mutations but lack mutations in KRAS, NRAS, or MEK1.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kadoaki; Sequist, Lecia V; Arcila, Maria E; Moran, Teresa; Chmielecki, Juliann; Lin, Ya-Lun; Pan, Yumei; Wang, Lu; de Stanchina, Elisa; Shien, Kazuhiko; Aoe, Keisuke; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Fidias, Panos; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Miller, Vincent A; Riely, Gregory J; Kris, Mark G; Engelman, Jeffrey A; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2012-07-31

    Acquired resistance to EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is inevitable in metastatic EGFR-mutant lung cancers. Here, we modeled disease progression using EGFR-mutant human tumor cell lines. Although five of six models displayed alterations already found in humans, one harbored an unexpected secondary NRAS Q61K mutation; resistant cells were sensitive to concurrent EGFR and MEK inhibition but to neither alone. Prompted by this finding and because RAS/RAF/MEK mutations are known mediators of acquired resistance in other solid tumors (colon cancers, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and melanomas) responsive to targeted therapies, we analyzed the frequency of secondary KRAS/NRAS/BRAF/MEK1 gene mutations in the largest collection to date of lung cancers with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. No recurrent NRAS, KRAS, or MEK1 mutations were found in 212, 195, or 146 patient samples, respectively, but 2 of 195 (1%) were found to have mutations in BRAF (G469A and V600E). Ectopic expression of mutant NRAS or BRAF in drug-sensitive EGFR-mutant cells conferred resistance to EGFR TKIs that was overcome by addition of a MEK inhibitor. Collectively, these positive and negative results provide deeper insight into mechanisms of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs in lung cancer and inform ongoing clinical trials designed to overcome resistance. In the context of emerging knowledge about mechanisms of acquired resistance to targeted therapies in various cancers, our data highlight the notion that, even though solid tumors share common signaling cascades, mediators of acquired resistance must be elucidated for each disease separately in the context of treatment. PMID:22773810

  2. Impact of physical size on gefitinib efficacy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR mutations.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Eiki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Takigawa, Nagio; Kudo, Kenichiro; Kato, Yuka; Honda, Yoshihiro; Hayakawa, Hiromi; Minami, Daisuke; Sato, Akiko; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2013-09-01

    Gefitinib is an essential drug for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. The approved dosage is 250 mg/body/day without adjustment for physical size such as body surface area (BSA), and the impact of physical size on the efficacy of gefitinib has not been evaluated. Here, we sought to clarify this issue using a retrospective cohort. We reviewed the medical records of patients with consecutive advanced NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations who underwent gefitinib monotherapy at Okayama University Hospital. In total, 101 patients were included in this study, and the median BSA in this cohort was 1.5 m(2). The median progression-free survival (PFS) of the patients with higher BSA (≥1.5 m(2)) was significantly worse than that of those with lower BSA (< 1.5 m(2)) (10.4 vs. 18.0 months; p = 0.019, log-rank test). Multivariate analysis also showed a significant impact of BSA on PFS (hazards ratio, 2.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.78-2.89; p = 0.002). By contrast, no significant association between BSA and PFS was observed in those undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy (4.0 vs. 5.1 months; p = 0.989, log-rank test), suggesting that BSA is a predictive, rather than a prognostic, marker for gefitinib therapy in EGFR-mutated NSCLC. In conclusion, BSA affected PFS in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC who underwent gefitinib monotherapy, suggesting the need for appraisal of BSA-based dose adjustment, even for this molecular target-based therapy. PMID:23809059

  3. Biased signaling through G-protein-coupled PROKR2 receptors harboring missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Oualid; Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Various missense mutations in the gene coding for prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome. However, the functional consequences of these mutations on the different signaling pathways of this receptor have not been studied. We first showed that the wild-type PROKR2 can activate different G-protein subtypes (Gq, Gs, and Gi/o) and recruit β-arrestins in transfected HEK-293 cells. We then examined, for each of these signaling pathways, the effects of 9 mutations that did not significantly impair cell surface targeting or ligand binding of the receptor. Four mutant receptors showing defective Gq signaling (R85C, R85H, R164Q, and V331M) could still recruit β-arrestins on ligand activation, which may cause biased signaling in vivo. Conversely, the R80C receptor could activate the 3 types of G proteins but could not recruit β-arrestins. Finally, the R268C receptor could recruit β-arrestins and activate the Gq and Gs signaling pathways but could not activate the Gi/o signaling pathway. Our results validate the concept that mutations in the genes encoding membrane receptors can bias downstream signaling in various ways, possibly leading to pathogenic and, perhaps in some cases, protective (e.g., R268C) effects. PMID:24830383

  4. The protist Trichomonas vaginalis harbors multiple lineages of transcriptionally active Mutator-like elements

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Fabrício R; Silva, Joana C; Benchimol, Marlene; Costa, Gustavo GL; Pereira, Gonçalo AG; Carareto, Claudia MA

    2009-01-01

    Background For three decades the Mutator system was thought to be exclusive of plants, until the first homolog representatives were characterized in fungi and in early-diverging amoebas earlier in this decade. Results Here, we describe and characterize four families of Mutator-like elements in a new eukaryotic group, the Parabasalids. These Trichomonas vaginalis Mutator- like elements, or TvMULEs, are active in T. vaginalis and patchily distributed among 12 trichomonad species and isolates. Despite their relatively distinctive amino acid composition, the inclusion of the repeats TvMULE1, TvMULE2, TvMULE3 and TvMULE4 into the Mutator superfamily is justified by sequence, structural and phylogenetic analyses. In addition, we identified three new TvMULE-related sequences in the genome sequence of Candida albicans. While TvMULE1 is a member of the MuDR clade, predominantly from plants, the other three TvMULEs, together with the C. albicans elements, represent a new and quite distinct Mutator lineage, which we named TvCaMULEs. The finding of TvMULE1 sequence inserted into other putative repeat suggests the occurrence a novel TE family not yet described. Conclusion These findings expand the taxonomic distribution and the range of functional motif of MULEs among eukaryotes. The characterization of the dynamics of TvMULEs and other transposons in this organism is of particular interest because it is atypical for an asexual species to have such an extreme level of TE activity; this genetic landscape makes an interesting case study for causes and consequences of such activity. Finally, the extreme repetitiveness of the T. vaginalis genome and the remarkable degree of sequence identity within its repeat families highlights this species as an ideal system to characterize new transposable elements. PMID:19622157

  5. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid.

    PubMed

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-06-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5'-CpApG-3' trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  6. Mechanisms of resistance to RAF inhibition in melanomas harboring a BRAF mutation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Paul B

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of V600E/K BRAF-mutated melanomas with RAF inhibitors (either vemurafenib or dabrafenib) results in rapid and dramatic responses in most patients-results that are associated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) and in the case of vemurafenib, overall survival (OS). However, resistance develops at a median time of approximately 6 months. Understanding the mechanisms of resistance is critical to develop strategies to prolong PFS and OS. Negative feedback mechanisms inherent in the MAPK pathway serve to modulate responses to these drugs. However, genetic changes develop within the tumor, which lead to reactivation of the MAPK and resistance to these drugs. The mechanisms that have been demonstrated in many patients by multiple investigators are (1) development of an activating mutation in NRAS, and (2) appearance of a BRAFV600E splice variant that encourages RAF dimerization. Several other mechanisms of resistance have also been described in individual patients or in preclinical models of resistance. In addition, there is evidence that activation of parallel pathways, such as the PI3K/AKT pathway, may represent another mechanism of resistance. Understanding the various mechanisms of resistance will inform our attempts to prevent resistance to RAF inhibitors. PMID:23714462

  7. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid

    PubMed Central

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5′-CpApG-3′ trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  8. PURIFICATION AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN MITOCHONDRIAL DNA POLYMERASE GAMMA HARBORING DISEASE MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Kasiviswanathan, Rajesh; Longley, Matthew J.; Young, Matthew J.; Copeland, William C.

    2010-01-01

    More than 150 different point mutations in POLG, the gene encoding the human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (pol γ), cause a broad spectrum of childhood and adult onset diseases like Alpers syndrome, Ataxia-Neuropathy syndrome and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. These disease mutations can affect the pol γ enzyme’s properties in numerous ways, thus potentially influencing the severity of the disease. Hence, a detailed characterization of disease mutants will greatly assist researchers and clinicians to develop a clear understanding of the functional defects caused by these mutant enzymes. Experimental approaches for characterizing the wild type (WT) and mutant pol γ enzymes are extensively described in this manuscript. The methods start with construction and purification of the recombinant wild type and mutant forms of pol γ protein, followed by assays to determine its structural integrity and thermal stability. Next, the biochemical characterization of these enzymes is described in detail, which includes measuring the purified enzyme’s catalytic activity, its steady state kinetic parameters and DNA binding activity, and determining the physical and functional interaction of these pol γ proteins with its p55 accessory subunit. PMID:20176107

  9. BCR-ABL1 compound mutations combining key kinase domain positions confer clinical resistance to ponatinib in Ph chromosome-positive leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, Matthew S; Eide, Christopher A; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Vellore, Nadeem A; Estrada, Johanna; Nicolini, Franck E; Khoury, Hanna J; Larson, Richard A; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge E; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias J; Kornblau, Steven M; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Rea, Delphine; Stenke, Leif; Barbany, Gisela; Lange, Thoralf; Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Press, Richard D; Chuah, Charles; Goldberg, Stuart L; Wetzler, Meir; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Etienne, Gabriel; Baccarani, Michele; Soverini, Simona; Rosti, Gianantonio; Rousselot, Philippe; Friedman, Ran; Deininger, Marie; Reynolds, Kimberly R; Heaton, William L; Eiring, Anna M; Pomicter, Anthony D; Khorashad, Jamshid S; Kelley, Todd W; Baron, Riccardo; Druker, Brian J; Deininger, Michael W; O'Hare, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Ponatinib is the only currently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that suppresses all BCR-ABL1 single mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) leukemia, including the recalcitrant BCR-ABL1(T315I) mutant. However, emergence of compound mutations in a BCR-ABL1 allele may confer ponatinib resistance. We found that clinically reported BCR-ABL1 compound mutants center on 12 key positions and confer varying resistance to imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, ponatinib, rebastinib, and bosutinib. T315I-inclusive compound mutants confer high-level resistance to TKIs, including ponatinib. In vitro resistance profiling was predictive of treatment outcomes in Ph(+) leukemia patients. Structural explanations for compound mutation-based resistance were obtained through molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings demonstrate that BCR-ABL1 compound mutants confer different levels of TKI resistance, necessitating rational treatment selection to optimize clinical outcome. PMID:25132497

  10. Epithelial-Myoepithelial Carcinoma of the Salivary Gland Harboring HRAS Codon 61 Mutations With Lung Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Shu; Chen, Jin-Shing; Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Chou, Yueh-Hung

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report a case involving a 43-year-old man diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma in 2007. At the same time, 2 small lung nodules were incidentally found; however, they presented no indication of growth throughout the follow-up period. However, a 1.5-cm nodule located in the right parotid gland in 2010 gradually increased in size to 2.8 cm by 2012. A parotidectomy revealed an epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma, characterized by biphasic tubular structures and solid areas presenting myoepithelial overgrowth. Tumor necrosis and regional lymph node invasion were also observed. During clinical follow-up in 2013, a new 1.3-cm nodule was identified in the left lower lobe of the lung, which enlarged to 3 cm by 2014. Wedge resection of the left lung nodules revealed round nodes with well-defined borders. Histologically, these lung tumors predominantly comprised spindle-shaped myoepithelial cells with occasional tubular structures. Numerous cleft-like spaces lined by entrapped TTF-1-immunoreactive pneumocytes were observed inside the nodules. The lung nodules were characterized by a morphology similar to that of the parotid cancer. Epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma with lung metastasis was confirmed by molecular testing, which revealed identical HRAS codon 61 (Q61K) mutations in the primary parotid tumor as well as in the lung metastases. PMID:26675036

  11. Anti-tumor activity of ESX1 on cancer cells harboring oncogenic K-ras mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Junta; Ishikawa, Susumu; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Yanagihara, Masatomo; Koike, Takao; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2008-05-23

    Human ESX1 is a 65-kilodalton (kDa) paired-like homeoprotein that is proteolytically processed into N-terminal 45-kDa and C-terminal 20-kDa fragments. The N-terminal ESX1 fragment, which contains the homeodomain, localizes to the nucleus and represses mRNA transcription from the K-ras gene. When we inoculated human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 constitutive expressing N-terminal region of ESX1 (N-ESX1) into nude mice, transfectant cells uniformly showed decreased tumor-forming activity compared with that of the parental cells. Furthermore, pretreatment of HCT116 carcinoma cells with a fusion protein consisting of N-ESX1 and the protein-transduction domain derived from the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 TAT protein gave rise to a dramatic reduction in the tumorigenicity of HCT116 cells in nude mice. Our results provide first in vivo evidence for the molecular targeting therapeutic application of the K-ras repressor ESX1, especially TAT-mediated transduction of N-ESX1, in the treatment of human cancers having oncogenic K-ras mutations.

  12. Icotinib combined whole brain radiotherapy for patients with brain metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Rui; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain is a metastatic organ that is most prone to lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). However, the prognosis of patients with brain metastasis remains very poor. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of icotinib plus whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for treating patients with brain metastasis from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated LAC. Methods All patients received standard WBRT administered to the whole brain in 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. Each patient was also instructed to take 125 mg icotinib thrice per day beginning from the first day of the WBRT. After completing the WBRT, maintenance icotinib was administered until the disease progressed or intolerable adverse effects were observed. Cranial progression-free survival (CPFS) and overall survival (OS) times were the primary endpoints. Results A total of 43 patients were enrolled in this study. Two patients (4.7%) presented a complete response (CR), whereas 20 patients (46.5%) presented a partial response (PR). The median CPFS and OS times were 11.0 and 15.0 months, respectively. The one-year CPFS rate was 40.0% for the patients harboring EGFR exon 19 deletion and 16.7% for the patients with EGFR exon 21 L858R (P=0.027). Conclusions The concurrent administration of icotinib and WBRT exhibited favorable effects on the patients with brain metastasis. EGFR exon 19 deletion was predictive of a long CPFS following icotinib plus WBRT. PMID:27499937

  13. Increased co-expression of genes harboring the damaging de novo mutations in Chinese schizophrenic patients during prenatal development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Miaoxin; Yang, Zhenxing; Hu, Xun; Wu, Hei-Man; Ni, Peiyan; Ren, Hongyan; Deng, Wei; Li, Mingli; Ma, Xiaohong; Guo, Wanjun; Zhao, Liansheng; Wang, Yingcheng; Xiang, Bo; Lei, Wei; Sham, Pak C; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a heritable, heterogeneous common psychiatric disorder. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that de novo variants (DNVs) contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. We performed exome sequencing in Chinese patients (N = 45) with schizophrenia and their unaffected parents (N = 90). Forty genes were found to contain DNVs. These genes had enriched transcriptional co-expression profile in prenatal frontal cortex (Bonferroni corrected p < 9.1 × 10−3), and in prenatal temporal and parietal regions (Bonferroni corrected p < 0.03). Also, four prenatal anatomical subregions (VCF, MFC, OFC and ITC) have shown significant enrichment of connectedness in co-expression networks. Moreover, four genes (LRP1, MACF1, DICER1 and ABCA2) harboring the damaging de novo mutations are strongly prioritized as susceptibility genes by multiple evidences. Our findings in Chinese schizophrenic patients indicate the pathogenic role of DNVs, supporting the hypothesis that schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disease. PMID:26666178

  14. Characterization of acid flux in osteoclasts from patients harboring a G215R mutation in ClC-7

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, Kim Gram, Jeppe Neutzsky-Wulff, Anita Vibsig Jensen, Vicki Kaiser Dziegiel, Morten H. Bollerslev, Jens Karsdal, Morten A.

    2009-01-23

    The chloride-proton antiporter ClC-7 has been speculated to be involved in acidification of the lysosomes and the resorption lacunae in osteoclasts; however, neither direct measurements of chloride transport nor acidification have been performed. Human osteoclasts harboring a dominant negative mutation in ClC-7 (G215R) were isolated, and used these to investigate bone resorption measured by CTX-I, calcium release and pit scoring. The actin cytoskeleton of the osteoclasts was also investigated. ClC-7 enriched membranes from the osteoclasts were isolated, and used to test acidification rates in the presence of a V-ATPase and a chloride channel inhibitor, using a H{sup +} and Cl{sup -} driven approach. Finally, acidification rates in ClC-7 enriched membranes from ADOII osteoclasts and their corresponding controls were compared. Resorption by the G215R osteoclasts was reduced by 60% when measured by both CTX-I, calcium release, and pit area when comparing to age and sex matched controls. In addition, the ADOII osteoclasts showed no differences in actin ring formation. Finally, V-ATPase and chloride channel inhibitors completely abrogated the H{sup +} and Cl{sup -} driven acidification. Finally, the acid influx was reduced by maximally 50% in the ClC-7 deficient membrane fractions when comparing to controls. These data demonstrate that ClC-7 is essential for bone resorption, via its role in acidification of the lysosomes and resorption lacunae in osteoclasts.

  15. The Dual MEK/FLT3 Inhibitor E6201 Exerts Cytotoxic Activity against Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells Harboring Resistance-Conferring FLT3 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguo; Borthakur, Gautam; Gao, Chen; Chen, Ye; Mu, Hong; Ruvolo, Vivian R; Nomoto, Kenichi; Zhao, Nanding; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-03-15

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) inhibition has elicited encouraging responses in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) therapy. Unfortunately, unless combined with a bone marrow transplant, disease relapse is frequent. In addition to the acquired point mutations in the FLT3 kinase domain that contribute to FLT3 inhibitor resistance, MEK/ERK signaling is persistently activated in AML cells even when FLT3 phosphorylation is continually suppressed. Thus, concomitant targeting of FLT3 and MAPK may potentially exert synergistic activity to counteract the resistance of AML cells to FLT3-targeted therapy. In this study, we investigated the antileukemia activity of a MEK1 and FLT3 dual inhibitor, E6201, in AML cells resistant to FLT3 inhibition. We found that E6201 exerted profound apoptogenic effects on AML cells harboring resistance-conferring FLT3 mutations. This activity appeared to be p53 dependent, and E6201-induced cytotoxicity was retained under hypoxic culture conditions and during coculture with mesenchymal stem cells that mimic the AML microenvironment. Furthermore, E6201 markedly reduced leukemia burden and improved the survival of mice in a human FLT3-mutated AML model. Collectively, our data provide a preclinical basis for the clinical evaluation of E6201 in AML patients harboring FLT3 mutations, including those who relapse following FLT3-targeted monotherapy. PMID:26822154

  16. BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations, including 2 novel mutations in imatinib resistant Malaysian chronic myeloid leukemia patients-Frequency and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Elias, Marjanu Hikmah; Baba, Abdul Aziz; Azlan, Husin; Rosline, Hassan; Sim, Goh Ai; Padmini, Menon; Fadilah, S Abdul Wahid; Ankathil, Ravindran

    2014-04-01

    Discovery of imatinib mesylate (IM) as the targeted BCR-ABL protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has resulted in its use as the frontline therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) across the world. Although high response rates are observed in CML patients who receive IM treatment, a significant number of patients develop resistance to IM. Resistance to IM in patients has been associated with a heterogeneous array of mechanisms of which point mutations within the ABL tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) are the frequently documented. The types and frequencies of mutations reported in different population studies have shown wide variability. We screened 125 Malaysian CML patients on IM therapy who showed either TKI refractory or resistance to IM to investigate the frequency and pattern of BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations among Malaysian CML patients undergoing IM therapy and to determine the clinical significance. Mutational screening using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC) followed by DNA sequencing was performed on 125 IM resistant Malaysian CML patients. Mutations were detected in 28 patients (22.4%). Fifteen different types of mutations (T315I, E255K, G250E, M351T, F359C, G251E, Y253H, V289F, E355G, N368S, L387M, H369R, A397P, E355A, D276G), including 2 novel mutations were identified, with T315I as the predominant type of mutation. The data generated from clinical and molecular parameters studied were correlated with the survival of CML patients. Patients with Y253H, M351T and E355G TKD mutations showed poorer prognosis compared to those without mutation. Interestingly, when the prognostic impact of the observed mutations was compared inter-individually, E355G and Y253H mutations were associated with more adverse prognosis and shorter survival (P=0.025 and 0.005 respectively) than T315I mutation. Results suggest that apart from those mutations occurring in the three crucial regions (catalytic domain, P-loop and activation-loop), other rare

  17. Intact Cohesion, Anaphase, and Chromosome Segregation in Human Cells Harboring Tumor-Derived Mutations in STAG2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Sik; He, Xiaoyuan; Orr, Bernardo; Wutz, Gordana; Hill, Victoria; Peters, Jan-Michael; Compton, Duane A.; Waldman, Todd

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations of the cohesin complex subunit STAG2 are present in diverse tumor types. We and others have shown that STAG2 inactivation can lead to loss of sister chromatid cohesion and alterations in chromosome copy number in experimental systems. However, studies of naturally occurring human tumors have demonstrated little, if any, correlation between STAG2 mutational status and aneuploidy, and have further shown that STAG2-deficient tumors are often euploid. In an effort to provide insight into these discrepancies, here we analyze the effect of tumor-derived STAG2 mutations on the protein composition of cohesin and the expected mitotic phenotypes of STAG2 mutation. We find that many mutant STAG2 proteins retain their ability to interact with cohesin; however, the presence of mutant STAG2 resulted in a reduction in the ability of regulatory subunits WAPL, PDS5A, and PDS5B to interact with the core cohesin ring. Using AAV-mediated gene targeting, we then introduced nine tumor-derived mutations into the endogenous allele of STAG2 in cultured human cells. While all nonsense mutations led to defects in sister chromatid cohesion and a subset induced anaphase defects, missense mutations behaved like wild-type in these assays. Furthermore, only one of nine tumor-derived mutations tested induced overt alterations in chromosome counts. These data indicate that not all tumor-derived STAG2 mutations confer defects in cohesion, chromosome segregation, and ploidy, suggesting that there are likely to be other functional effects of STAG2 inactivation in human cancer cells that are relevant to cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26871722

  18. Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) in two Mexican brothers harboring a novel mutation in the ECGF1 gene.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Nancy; Macías Kauffer, Luis R; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the thymidine phosphorylase gene located on chromosome 22q13.32-ter, causing defective functioning of the enzyme. At present 87 sporadic or familial cases have been reported and 52 different mutations identified. We present herein the clinical, neuromuscular and molecular findings of two affected brothers from an indigenous Mexican family living in a very small village not far from Mexico City, both brothers being homozygous for a novel mutation (Leu133Pro) in exon 3 of the ECGF1 gene. PMID:18280229

  19. A compound heterozygote harboring novel and recurrent DTDST mutations with intermediate phenotype between atelosteogenesis type II and diastrophic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Koichi; Miyamoto, Yoshinari; Sawai, Hideaki; Karniski, Lawrence P; Nakashima, Eiji; Nishimura, Gen; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2006-06-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) is a sulfate transporter required for the synthesis of sulfated proteoglycans in the cartilage. Over 30 mutations have been described in the DTDST gene, which result in a continuous clinical spectrum of recessively inherited chondrodysplasias, including, in order of increasing severity, a recessive form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED), diastrophic dysplasia (DTD), atelosteogenesis type II (AO-II) and achondrogenesis 1B (ACG-1B). Correlation between disease severity and residual sulfate transport activity has been reported. Here we report a patient with DTDST mutations, whose manifestations fell in a range between AO-II and DTD. The patient was a compound heterozygote for the recurrent c.835C>T (p.R279W) and novel c.1987G>A (p.G663R) mutations. Immunocytochemical analysis in HEK293 cells showed that the p.G663R mutation was localized within the cytoplasm, and not to the cell membrane, suggesting p.G663R is a loss-of-function mutation. Our case supports the previously described correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the putative level of residual transport function. PMID:16642506

  20. Prognostic implications of immunohistochemistry markers for EGFR-TKI therapy in Chinese patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma harboring EGFR mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruiguang; Li, Yan; Nie, Xiu; Dong, Xiaorong; Wu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer predict dramatic clinical responses to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. The conclusion on EGFR mutation-specific antibodies by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is not consistent. We evaluated the clinical availability of EGFR mutation-specific antibodies, investigating the prediction role of mutant EGFRs and other IHC markers in TKI therapy in patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods We analyzed 637 primary lung adenocarcinomas from an unselected Chinese population. For IHC, antibodies against EGFR exon 19 E746_A750 deletions, exon 21 L858R mutations, thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), and Napsin-A were applied. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Results Specificities of E746_A750 and L858R antibodies were 99.6% and 99.3%, while sensitivities were 86.0% and 82.7%, respectively. Tumors with Napsin-A positivity, TTF-1 positivity, EGFR mutations, and lepidic pattern showed a lower marker of proliferation index (Ki67). Higher expression scores of mutant EGFR protein, TTF-1 positivity, lower Ki67 proliferation index, and lepidic pattern were associated with longer progression-free survival. Conclusion High scores of mutant EGFR, Napsin-A positivity, TTF-1 positivity, lower Ki67 index, and lepidic pattern were favorable predictors for TKI therapy in patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26848271

  1. The protective roles of phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 in human cells harboring myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibers A8344G mtDNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsueh-Fu; Chen, Chin-Yi; Lin, Ting-Hui; Huang, Zhao-Wei; Chi, Tang-Hao; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wu, Shi-Bei; Wei, Yau-Huei; Hsieh, Mingli

    2012-08-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are associated with a large number of neuromuscular diseases. Myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome is a mitochondrial disease inherited through the maternal lineage. The most common mutation in MERRF syndrome, the A8344G mutation of mtDNA, is associated with severe defects in mitochondrial protein synthesis, which impair the assembly and function of the respiratory chain. We have previously shown that there is a decreased level of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a MERRF patient and in cytoplasmic hybrids (cybrids) harboring the A8344G mutation of mtDNA. In the present study, we found a dramatic decrease in the level of phosphorylated HSP27 (p-HSP27) in the mutant cybrids. Even though the steady-state level of p-HSP27 was reduced in the mutant cybrids, normal phosphorylation and dephosphorylation were observed upon exposure to stress, indicating normal kinase and phosphatase activities. To explore the roles that p-HSP27 may play, transfection experiments with HSP27 mutants, in which three specific serines were replaced with alanine or aspartic acid, showed that the phosphomimicking HSP27 desensitized mutant cybrids to apoptotic stress induced by staurosporine (STS). After heat shock stress, p-HSP27 was found to enter the nucleus immediately, and with a prolonged interval of recovery, p-HSP27 returned to the cytoplasm in wild-type cybrids but not in mutant cybrids. The translocation of p-HSP27 was correlated with cell viability, as shown by the increased number of apoptotic cells after p-HSP27 returned to the cytoplasm. In summary, our results demonstrate that p-HSP27 provides significant protection when cells are exposed to different stresses in the cell model of MERRF syndrome. Therapeutic agents targeting anomalous HSP27 phosphorylation might represent a potential treatment for mitochondrial diseases. PMID:22742457

  2. JAK2-related pathway induces acquired erlotinib resistance in lung cancer cells harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor-activating mutation.

    PubMed

    Harada, Daijiro; Takigawa, Nagio; Ochi, Nobuaki; Ninomiya, Takashi; Yasugi, Masayuki; Kubo, Toshio; Takeda, Hiromasa; Ichihara, Eiki; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Takata, Saburo; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2012-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as gefitinib and erlotinib, are effective for non-small cell lung cancer with activating EGFR mutations. However, even in patients with an initial dramatic response to such a drug, acquired resistance develops after 6-12 months. A secondary mutation of T790M in EGFR and amplification of the MET gene account for this resistance; however, the mechanism(s) of approximately 30% of acquired resistance cases remain unknown. We established an erlotinib-resistant lung cancer cell line named PC-9/ER3 that harbors an EGFR mutation after continuously exposing PC-9 cells to erlotinib. PC-9/ER3 cells were 136-fold more resistant to erlotinib than the parental cells. Although the PC-9/ER3 cells did not carry the T790M mutation or MET amplification and had similar levels of phosphorylated (p) STAT3, pJAK2 increased in the resistant cells. It was found in the present study that 3-12 h of exposure to erlotinib in both cell lines did not affect pJAK2 expression, but did result in increased pSTAT3 expression. pAkt in PC-9/ER3 cells was less suppressed than in PC-9 cells, although pEGFR and pMAPK were markedly suppressed in both cell lines. The combined treatment of erlotinib plus a JAK2 inhibitor (JSI-124) suppressed pAkt in PC-9/ER3 cells. Similarly, the combination of erlotinib plus JSI-124 or siRNA against JAK2 restored sensitivity to erlotinib in PC-9/ER3 cells. The combination of erlotinib plus JSI-124 was also effective for reducing PC-9/ER3 tumors in a murine xenograft model. Our results suggest that the activation of JAK2 partially accounts for acquired erlotinib resistance. PMID:22712764

  3. Lip cancer and pre-cancerous lesions harbor TP53 mutations, exhibit allelic loss at 9p, 9q, and 17p, but no BRAFV600E mutations.

    PubMed

    Correa, Gefter Thiago Batista; Bernardes, Vanessa Fátima; de Sousa, Silvia Ferreira; Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Salles, José Maria Porcaro; Souza, Renan Pedra; De-Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavalieri

    2015-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms of lip squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and actinic cheilitis (AC) are unclear. We aimed at assessing loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and TP53 and BRAF V600E mutations in these lesions. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples of 17 LSCC and 16 AC were included, with additional 5 fresh LSCC genotyped for TP53 mutations. LOH was assessed by six polymorphic markers located at 9p22, 9q22, and 17p13 and correlated with cell proliferation (Ki-67) and P53 immunostaining. Direct sequencing of TP53 exons 2-11 (fresh samples), and exons 5-9 (FFPE samples) was carried out. BRAF V600E mutation was genotyped in eight LSCC. LOH occurred in at least one marker in 15/17 LSCC and in 9/16 AC. The marker exhibiting the highest frequency of allelic loss (FAL) in LSCC was D9S157 (8/12 informative cases) and D9S287 in AC (4/11 informative cases). Cell proliferation was not correlated with LOH or with the FAL and no correlation between P53 IHC and 17p LOH was observed. We found TP53 missense mutations in both lesions and nonsense in LSCC, including CC>TT transition, which is a marker of UV damage. BRAF V600E mutation was not detected. LOH and TP53 mutations detected in LSCC and AC may be associated with tumorigenesis, whereas BRAF V600E mutation does not seem to significantly contribute to LSCC pathogenesis. PMID:26084614

  4. Retigabine, a Kv7.2/Kv7.3-Channel Opener, Attenuates Drug-Induced Seizures in Knock-In Mice Harboring Kcnq2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Yukiko; Tomonoh, Yuko; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Zhang, Bo; Uchida, Taku; Ishii, Atsushi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The hetero-tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.2/Kv7.3, which is encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, plays an important role in limiting network excitability in the neonatal brain. Kv7.2/Kv7.3 dysfunction resulting from KCNQ2 mutations predominantly causes self-limited or benign epilepsy in neonates, but also causes early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Retigabine (RTG), a Kv7.2/ Kv7.3-channel opener, seems to be a rational antiepileptic drug for epilepsies caused by KCNQ2 mutations. We therefore evaluated the effects of RTG on seizures in two strains of knock-in mice harboring different Kcnq2 mutations, in comparison to the effects of phenobarbital (PB), which is the first-line antiepileptic drug for seizures in neonates. The subjects were heterozygous knock-in mice (Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+) bearing the Y284C or A306T Kcnq2 mutation, respectively, and their wild-type (WT) littermates, at 63–100 days of age. Seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA, 12mg/kg) were recorded using a video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring system. Effects of RTG on KA-induced seizures of both strains of knock-in mice were assessed using seizure scores from a modified Racine’s scale and compared with those of PB. The number and total duration of spike bursts on EEG and behaviors monitored by video recording were also used to evaluate the effects of RTG and PB. Both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice showed significantly more KA-induced seizures than WT mice. RTG significantly attenuated KA-induced seizure activities in both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice, and more markedly than PB. This is the first reported evidence of RTG ameliorating KA-induced seizures in knock-in mice bearing mutations of Kcnq2, with more marked effects than those observed with PB. RTG or other Kv7.2-channel openers may be considered as first-line antiepileptic treatments for epilepsies resulting from KCNQ2 mutations. PMID:26910900

  5. Knock-in mice harboring a Ca2+ desensitizing mutation in cardiac troponin C develop early onset dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Bradley K.; Singh, Sonal; Fan, Qiying; Hernandez, Adriana; Portillo, Jesus P.; Reiser, Peter J.; Tikunova, Svetlana B.

    2015-01-01

    The physiological consequences of aberrant Ca2+ binding and exchange with cardiac myofilaments are not clearly understood. In order to examine the effect of decreasing Ca2+ sensitivity of cTnC on cardiac function, we generated knock-in mice carrying a D73N mutation (not known to be associated with heart disease in human patients) in cTnC. The D73N mutation was engineered into the regulatory N-domain of cTnC in order to reduce Ca2+ sensitivity of reconstituted thin filaments by increasing the rate of Ca2+ dissociation. In addition, the D73N mutation drastically blunted the extent of Ca2+ desensitization of reconstituted thin filaments induced by cTnI pseudo-phosphorylation. Compared to wild-type mice, heterozygous knock-in mice carrying the D73N mutation exhibited a substantially decreased Ca2+ sensitivity of force development in skinned ventricular trabeculae. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that median survival time for knock-in mice was 12 weeks. Echocardiographic analysis revealed that knock-in mice exhibited increased left ventricular dimensions with thinner walls. Echocardiographic analysis also revealed that measures of systolic function, such as ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS), were dramatically reduced in knock-in mice. In addition, knock-in mice displayed electrophysiological abnormalities, namely prolonged QRS and QT intervals. Furthermore, ventricular myocytes isolated from knock-in mice did not respond to β-adrenergic stimulation. Thus, knock-in mice developed pathological features similar to those observed in human patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). In conclusion, our results suggest that decreasing Ca2+ sensitivity of the regulatory N-domain of cTnC is sufficient to trigger the development of DCM. PMID:26379556

  6. Claudin-1 Expression Is Elevated in Colorectal Cancer Precursor Lesions Harboring the BRAF V600E Mutation12

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Maria; Fung, Kim Y.C.; Moore, James; Brierley, Gemma V.; Cosgrove, Leah J.; Thomas, Michelle; Cheetham, Glenice; Brook, Emma; Fraser, Louise M.; Tin, Teresa; Tran, Ha; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/P) are now recognised precursors of colorectal cancer (CRC) including cancers harbouring somatic BRAF (V600E) mutations. While the morphological diagnostic criteria of SSA/P have been established, distinguishing between small/early SSA/P and microvesicular hyperplastic polyps (MVHP) is challenging and may not be possible in routine practice. METHODS: Gene expression profiling of MVHP (n=5, all BRAF V600E wild-type) and SSA/P (n=5, all BRAF V600E mutant) samples was performed. Quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analysis was performed to verify the expression of claudin 1 (CLDN1) in MVHP and SSA/P. RESULTS: Gene expression profiling studies conducted between MVHP and SSA/P identified CLDN1 as the most statistically significant differentially expressed gene (p<0.05). Validation with qRT-PCR confirmed an up-regulation of CLDN1 in BRAF V600E mutant polyps regardless of polyp type (p<0.0005). Immunohistochemical analysis of CLDN1 expression in BRAF V600E mutant SSA/Ps (n=53) and MVHPs (n=111) and BRAF wild-type MVHPs (n=58), demonstrated a strong correlation between CLDN1 expression and the BRAF V600E mutation in both SSA/P and MVHP samples when compared to wild-type polyps (p<0.0001). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates an up regulation of CLDN1 protein in serrated colorectal polyps including MVHP harbouring the BRAF V600E mutation. Our results demonstrated an apparent heterogeneity on the molecular level within the MVHP group and suggest that MVHP with somatic BRAF V600E mutation and up-regulated expression of CLDN1 are closely related to SSA/P and may in fact represent a continuous spectrum of the same neoplastic process within the serrated pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:24954356

  7. MM-151 overcomes acquired resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab in colorectal cancers harboring EGFR extracellular domain mutations.

    PubMed

    Arena, Sabrina; Siravegna, Giulia; Mussolin, Benedetta; Kearns, Jeffrey D; Wolf, Beni B; Misale, Sandra; Lazzari, Luca; Bertotti, Andrea; Trusolino, Livio; Adjei, Alex A; Montagut, Clara; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Nering, Rachel; Bardelli, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab are used to treat RAS wild-type colorectal cancers (CRCs), but their efficacy is limited by the emergence of acquired drug resistance. After EGFR blockade, about 20% of CRCs develop mutations in the EGFR extracellular domain (ECD) that impair antibody binding and are associated with clinical relapse. We hypothesized that EGFR ECD-resistant variants could be targeted by the recently developed oligoclonal antibody MM-151 that binds multiple regions of the EGFR ECD. MM-151 inhibits EGFR signaling and cell growth in preclinical models, including patient-derived cells carrying mutant EGFR. Upon MM-151 treatment, EGFR ECD mutations decline in circulating cell-free tumor DNA (ctDNA) of CRC patients who previously developed resistance to EGFR blockade. These data provide molecular rationale for the clinical use of MM-151 in patients who become resistant to cetuximab or panitumumab as a result of EGFR ECD mutations. PMID:26843189

  8. Ovarian Cancers Harboring Inactivating Mutations in CDK12 Display a Distinct Genomic Instability Pattern Characterized by Large Tandem Duplications.

    PubMed

    Popova, Tatiana; Manié, Elodie; Boeva, Valentina; Battistella, Aude; Goundiam, Oumou; Smith, Nicholas K; Mueller, Christopher R; Raynal, Virginie; Mariani, Odette; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Stern, Marc-Henri

    2016-04-01

    CDK12 is a recurrently mutated gene in serous ovarian carcinoma, whose downregulation is associated with impaired expression of DNA damage repair genes and subsequent hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and PARP1/2 inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the genomic landscape associated with CDK12 inactivation in patients with serous ovarian carcinoma. We show that CDK12 loss was consistently associated with a particular genomic instability pattern characterized by hundreds of tandem duplications of up to 10 megabases (Mb) in size. Tandem duplications were characterized by a bimodal (∼0.3 and ∼3 Mb) size distribution and overlapping microhomology at the breakpoints. This genomic instability, denoted as the CDK12 TD-plus phenotype, is remarkably distinct from other alteration patterns described in breast and ovarian cancers. The CDK12 TD-plus phenotype was associated with a greater than 10% gain in genomic content and occurred at a 3% to 4% rate in The Cancer Genome Atlas-derived and in-house cohorts of patients with serous ovarian carcinoma. Moreover, CDK12-inactivating mutations together with the TD-plus phenotype were also observed in prostate cancers. Our finding provides new insight toward deciphering the function of CDK12 in genome maintenance and oncogenesis. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1882-91. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26787835

  9. AON-mediated Exon Skipping Restores Ciliation in Fibroblasts Harboring the Common Leber Congenital Amaurosis CEP290 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Gerard, Xavier; Perrault, Isabelle; Hanein, Sylvain; Silva, Eduardo; Bigot, Karine; Defoort-Delhemmes, Sabine; Rio, Marlèene; Munnich, Arnold; Scherman, Daniel; Kaplan, Josseline; Kichler, Antoine; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for congenital or early-onset blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (>10%) is located deep in intron 26 of the CEP290 gene (c.2991+1655A>G). It creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. In the present study, we show that the use of antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) allow an efficient skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients. These data support the feasibility of an AON-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing. PMID:23344081

  10. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy dynamics in a kindred harboring a novel pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA glutamate gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, C.T.; Hao, H.; Bonilla, E.; DiMauro, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a novel mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation in a 32-year-old male with a myopathy (without progressive external ophthalmoplegia) and mild pyramidal involvement. This A{yields}G transition at mtDNA position 14709 alters an evolutionary conserved nucleotide in a region coding for the anticodon loop of the mitcohondrial tRNA{sup Glu}. The 14709 mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic but present at very high levels in the patient`s muscle (95%), white blood cells (81%) and hair follicles (90%). The same mutant mtDNA population was observed in white blood cells and hair follicles of all maternal relatives, but a lesser percentage (25-80%). The patient`s muscle showed many ragged-red fibers and a severe focal defect in cytochrome c oxidase activity, accompanied by the absence of cross-reacting material for mitochondrially synthesized polypeptides (ND 1 and COX II). The percentage of mutant mtDNA was not preferentially increased over two generations. Rather, the percentage of mutant mtDNA observed in siblings seemed to follow a normal distribution around the percentage observed in their mothers. Single hair PCR/RFLP analysis showed that the intercellular fluctuation in the percentage of mutant mtDNA differs among family members. Younger generations tend to have a more homogeneous distribution of mutant mtDNA in different hair follicles. The highest degree of variability between individual hair follicles was observed in the patient`s grandmother. These results suggest that the intercellular distribution of the mutant and wild-type mtDNA populations may drift towards homogeneity in subsequent generations.

  11. NVP-BKM120, a novel PI3K inhibitor, shows synergism with a STAT3 inhibitor in human gastric cancer cells harboring KRAS mutations

    PubMed Central

    PARK, EUNJU; PARK, JINAH; HAN, SAE-WON; IM, SEOCK-AH; KIM, TAE-YOU; OH, DO-YOUN; BANG, YUNG-JUE

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations of Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling are frequently observed in many types of cancer, promoting its emergence as a promising target for cancer treatment. PI3K can become activated by various pathways, one of which includes RAS. RAS can not only directly activate the PI3K/AKT pathway via binding to p110 of PI3K, but also regulates mTOR via ERK or RSK independently of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Thus, actively mutated RAS can constitutively activate PI3K signaling. Additionally, in RAS tumorigenic transformation, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been known also to be required. In this study, we examined the efficacy of NVP-BKM120, a pan-class I PI3K inhibitor in human gastric cancer cells and hypothesized that the combined inhibition of PI3K and STAT3 would be synergistic in KRAS mutant gastric cancer cells. NVP-BKM120 demonstrated anti-proliferative activity in 11 human gastric cancer cell lines by decreasing mTOR downstream signaling. But NVP-BKM120 treatment increased p-AKT by subsequent abrogation of feedback inhibition by stabilizing insulin receptor substrate-1. In KRAS mutant gastric cancer cells, either p-ERK or p-STAT3 was also increased upon treatment of NVP-BKM120. The synergistic efficacy study demonstrated that dual PI3K and STAT3 blockade showed a synergism in cells harboring mutated KRAS by inducing apoptosis. The synergistic effect was not seen in KRAS wild-type cells. Together, these findings suggest for the first time that the dual inhibition of PI3K and STAT3 signaling may be an effective therapeutic strategy for KRAS mutant gastric cancer patients. PMID:22159814

  12. Acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in EGFR mutant lung cancer: Distinct natural history of patients with tumors harboring the T790M mutation

    PubMed Central

    Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Arcila, Maria E.; Sima, Camelia S.; Riely, Gregory J.; Chmielecki, Juliann; Kris, Mark G.; Pao, William; Ladanyi, Marc; Miller, Vincent A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma develop acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) after a median of 10–16 months. In half of these cases a second EGFR mutation, T790M, underlies acquired resistance. We undertook this study to examine the clinical course of patients harboring the T790M mutation following progression on TKI. Experimental design EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs were identified as part of a prospective re-biopsy protocol where post-progression tumor specimens were collected for molecular analysis. Post-progression survival and characteristics of disease progression were compared in patients with and without T790M. Results We identified T790M in the initial re-biopsy specimens from 58/93 patients (62%, 95% confidence interval 52%–72%). T790M was more common in biopsies of lung/pleura tissue and lymph nodes than in more distant sites (p=0.014). Median post-progression survival was 16 months (interquartile range 9–29 months); patients with T790M had a significantly longer post-progression survival (p=0.036). Patients without T790M more often progressed in a previously uninvolved organ system (p=0.014) and exhibited a poorer performance status at time of progression (p=0.007). Conclusions Among patients with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs, the presence of T790M defines a clinical subset with a relatively favorable prognosis and more indolent progression. Knowledge of T790M status is therefore important for the clinical care of these patients as well as for the optimal design and interpretation of clinical trials in this setting. PMID:21135146

  13. Integrated genomic approaches identify upregulation of SCRN1 as a novel mechanism associated with acquired resistance to erlotinib in PC9 cells harboring oncogenic EGFR mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Cho, Ahye; Watanabe, Hideo; Choi, Yoon-La; Aziz, Meraj; Kassner, Michelle; Joung, Je-Gun; Park, Angela KJ; Francis, Joshua M.; Bae, Joon Seol; Ahn, Soo-min; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Woong-Yang; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Koo, Jaehyung; Yin, Hongwei Holly; Cho, Jeonghee

    2016-01-01

    Therapies targeting the tyrosine kinase activity of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) have been proven to be effective in treating a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring activating EGFR mutations. Inevitably these patients develop resistance to the EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Here, we performed integrated genomic analyses using an in vitro system to uncover alternative genomic mechanisms responsible for acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs. Specifically, we identified 80 genes whose expression is significantly increased in the erlotinib-resistant clones. RNAi-based systematic synthetic lethal screening of these candidate genes revealed that suppression of one upregulated transcript, SCRN1, a secernin family member, restores sensitivity to erlotinib by enhancing inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis revealed increased levels of SCRN1 in 5 of 11 lung tumor specimens from EGFR-TKIs resistant patients. Taken together, we propose that upregulation of SCRN1 is an additional mechanism associated with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and that its suppression serves as a novel therapeutic strategy to overcome drug resistance in these patients. PMID:26883194

  14. Human breast cancer cells harboring a gatekeeper T798M mutation in HER2 overexpress EGFR ligands and are sensitive to dual inhibition of EGFR and HER2

    PubMed Central

    Rexer, Brent N.; Ghosh, Ritwik; Narasanna, Archana; Estrada, Mónica Valeria; Chakrabarty, Anindita; Song, Youngchul; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes can confer resistance to receptor-targeted therapies. A T798M mutation in the HER2 oncogene has been shown to confer resistance to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) lapatinib. We studied the mechanisms of HER2-T798M-induced resistance to identify potential strategies to overcome that resistance. Experimental Design HER2-T798M was stably expressed in BT474 and MCF10A cells. Mutant cells and xenografts were evaluated for effects of the mutation on proliferation, signaling, and tumor growth after treatment with combinations of inhibitors targeting the EGFR-HER2-HER3-PI3K axis. Results A low 3% allelic frequency of the T798M mutant shifted10-fold the IC50 of lapatinib. In mutant-expressing cells, lapatinib did not block basal phosphorylation of HER2, HER3, AKT and ERK1/2. In vitro kinase assays showed increased autocatalytic activity of HER2-T798M. HER3 association with PI3K p85 was increased in mutant-expressing cells. BT474-T798M cells were also resistant to the HER2 antibody trastuzumab. These cells were sensitive to the pan-PI3K inhibitors BKM120 and XL147 and the irreversible HER2/EGFR TKI afatinib but not the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040, suggesting continued dependence of the mutant cells on ErbB receptors and downstream PI3K signaling. BT474-T798M cells showed increased expression of the EGFR ligands EGF, TGFα, amphiregulin and HB-EGF. Addition of the EGFR neutralizing antibody cetuximab or lapatinib restored trastuzumab sensitivity of BT474-T798M cells and xenografts, suggesting increased EGFR ligand production was causally associated with drug resistance. Conclusions Simultaneous blockade of HER2 and EGFR should be an effective treatment strategy against HER2 gene-amplified breast cancer cells harboring T798M mutant alleles. PMID:23948973

  15. mTOR Co-Targeting in Cetuximab Resistance in Head and Neck Cancers Harboring PIK3CA and RAS Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiyong; Martin, Daniel; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Patel, Vyomesh; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Sol Degese, Maria; Vitale-Cross, Lynn; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Background Cetuximab, a monoclonal blocking antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR, has been approved for the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC). However, only few patients display long-term responses, prompting the search for cetuximab resistance mechanisms and new therapeutic options enhancing cetuximab effectiveness. Methods Cetuximab-sensitive HNSCC cells were retro-engineered to express PIK3CA and RAS oncogenes. These cells and HNSCC cells harboring endogenous PIK3CA and RAS oncogenes were xenografted into mice (n = 10 per group) and studied for their biochemical, antitumor, antiangiogenic, and antilymphangiogenic responses to cetuximab and mTOR targeting agents. All P values are two-sided. Results Cetuximab treatment of PIK3CA- and RAS-expressing HNSCC xenografts promoted an initial antitumor response, but all tumors relapsed within few weeks. In these tumors, cetuximab did not decrease the activity of mTOR, a downstream signaling target of EGFR, PIK3CA, and RAS. The combined administration of cetuximab and mTOR inhibitors exerted a remarkably increased antitumor activity, particularly in HNSCC cells that are resistant to cetuximab as a single agent. Indeed, cotargeting mTOR together with cetuximab caused a rapid tumor collapse of both PIK3CA- and RAS-expressing HNSCC xenografts (P < .001), concomitant with reduced proliferation (P < .001) and lymphangiogenesis (P < .001). Conclusion The presence of PIK3CA and RAS mutations and other alterations affecting the mTOR pathway activity in HNSCC could be exploited to predict the potential resistance to cetuximab, and to select the patients that may benefit the most from the concomitant administration of cetuximab and PI3K and/or mTOR inhibitors as a precision molecular therapeutic option for HNSCC patients. PMID:25099740

  16. [Pearl Harbor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Jennifer, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "Loblolly Magazine" was written in observance of the 50th anniversary of the U.S. entrance into World War II. The publication features interviews conducted by East Texas high school students with Clarence Otterman, one of the few survivors of the crew of the USS Arizona, which was bombed during the attack on Pearl Harbor, and with a…

  17. Clinical efficacy of first-generation EGFR-TKIs in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer harboring EGFR exon 20 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dan; Song, Zhengbo; Cheng, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Subsets of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations carry uncommon subtypes. We evaluated the efficacy of first-generation EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs; erlotinib, gefitinib, and icotinib) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer carrying insertions and T790M and S768I mutations in EGFR exon 20. Patients and methods Patients carrying EGFR exon 20 insertion/T790M/S768I mutations and treated with EGFR-TKIs were evaluated from 2005 to 2014 in Zhejiang Cancer Hospital. The efficacy was evaluated using the Kaplan–Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results Sixty-two patients with exon 20 insertion/T790M/S768I mutations were enrolled. Mutations including exon 20 insertions and T790M and S768I mutations were observed in 29, 23, and ten patients, respectively. In total, the response rate and median progression-free survival (PFS) were 8.1% and 2.1 months, respectively. Patients with S768I mutation manifested the longest median PFS (2.7 months), followed by those with T790M (2.4 months) and exon 20 insertions (1.9 months; P=0.022). Patients with complex mutations show a better PFS than those with single mutations (2.7 months vs 1.9 months; P=0.034). Conclusion First-generation EGFR-TKIs are less effective in patients with exon 20 uncommon mutations than in those with common mutations. Patients with complex mutations benefited more from first-generation EGFR-TKIs than those with single mutations.

  18. Acquired EGFR C797S mutation mediates resistance to AZD9291 in non-small cell lung cancer harboring EGFR T790M.

    PubMed

    Thress, Kenneth S; Paweletz, Cloud P; Felip, Enriqueta; Cho, Byoung Chul; Stetson, Daniel; Dougherty, Brian; Lai, Zhongwu; Markovets, Aleksandra; Vivancos, Ana; Kuang, Yanan; Ercan, Dalia; Matthews, Sarah E; Cantarini, Mireille; Barrett, J Carl; Jänne, Pasi A; Oxnard, Geoffrey R

    2015-06-01

    Here we studied cell-free plasma DNA (cfDNA) collected from subjects with advanced lung cancer whose tumors had developed resistance to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) AZD9291. We first performed next-generation sequencing of cfDNA from seven subjects and detected an acquired EGFR C797S mutation in one; expression of this mutant EGFR construct in a cell line rendered it resistant to AZD9291. We then performed droplet digital PCR on serial cfDNA specimens collected from 15 AZD9291-treated subjects. All were positive for the T790M mutation before treatment, but upon developing AZD9291 resistance three molecular subtypes emerged: six cases acquired the C797S mutation, five cases maintained the T790M mutation but did not acquire the C797S mutation and four cases lost the T790M mutation despite the presence of the underlying EGFR activating mutation. Our findings provide insight into the diversity of mechanisms through which tumors acquire resistance to AZD9291 and highlight the need for therapies that are able to overcome resistance mediated by the EGFR C797S mutation. PMID:25939061

  19. Noddy, a mouse harboring a missense mutation in protocadherin-15, reveals the impact of disrupting a critical interaction site between tip-link cadherins in inner ear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ruishuang; Sotomayor, Marcos; Kinder, Kimberly J; Gopal, Suhasini R; Gerka-Stuyt, John; Chen, Daniel H-C; Hardisty-Hughes, Rachel E; Ball, Greg; Parker, Andy; Gaudet, Rachelle; Furness, David; Brown, Steve D; Corey, David P; Alagramam, Kumar N

    2013-03-01

    In hair cells of the inner ear, sound or head movement increases tension in fine filaments termed tip links, which in turn convey force to mechanosensitive ion channels to open them. Tip links are formed by a tetramer of two cadherin proteins: protocadherin 15 (PCDH15) and cadherin 23 (CDH23), which have 11 and 27 extracellular cadherin (EC) repeats, respectively. Mutations in either protein cause inner ear disorders in mice and humans. We showed recently that these two cadherins bind tip-to-tip in a "handshake" mode that involves the EC1 and EC2 repeats of both proteins. However, a paucity of appropriate animal models has slowed our understanding both of the interaction and of how mutations of residues within the predicted interface compromise tip link integrity. Here, we present noddy, a new mouse model for hereditary deafness. Identified in a forward genetic screen, noddy homozygotes lack inner ear function. Mapping and sequencing showed that noddy mutant mice harbor an isoleucine-to-asparagine (I108N) mutation in the EC1 repeat of PCDH15. Residue I108 interacts with CDH23 EC2 in the handshake and its mutation impairs the interaction in vitro. The noddy mutation allowed us to determine the consequences of blocking the handshake in vivo: tip link formation and bundle morphology are disrupted, and mechanotransduction channels fail to remain open at rest. These results offer new insights into the interaction between PCDH15 and CDH23 and help explain the etiology of human deafness linked to mutations in the tip-link interface. PMID:23467356

  20. Discovery of a small molecule targeting SET-PP2A interaction to overcome BCR-ABLT315I mutation of chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan; Liu, Nan; Dai, Wen; Wang, Yang; Wang, Zongqiang; Yang, Yong; Chen, Yijun

    2015-01-01

    Despite the great success in using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the frequent development of multi-drug resistance, particularly the T315I mutation of BCR-ABL, remains a challenging issue. Enhancement of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by dissociating its endogenous inhibitor SET is an effective approach to combat TKI-based resistance. Here, we report the identification of a novel 2-phenyloxypyrimidine compound TGI1002 to specifically disrupt SET-PP2A interaction. By binding to SET, TGI1002 inhibits SET-PP2A interaction and increases PP2A activity. In addition, knocking-down SET expression decreases tumor cell sensitivity to TGI1002. TGI1002 treatments also markedly increase dephosphorylation of BCR-ABL. Moreover, TGI1002 significantly inhibits tumor growth and prolongs survival of xenografted mice implanted with BaF3-p210T315I cells. These findings demonstrate that TGI1002 is a novel SET inhibitor with important therapeutic potential for the treatment of drug-resistant CML. PMID:25900240

  1. Impaired interactions between mouse Eyal harboring mutations found in patients with branchio-oto-renal syndrome and Six, Dach, and G proteins.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Hidenori; Watanabe, Yoko; Ikeda, Keiko; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the EYA1 gene are responsible for branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome as well as for other ocular defects. Most of the mutations are located within or in the vicinity of the EYA domain, which is highly conserved in the EYA protein family. The EYA domain is required for protein-protein interactions, which are important to the biological function of EYA proteins. To determine how EYA1 mutations cause BOR syndrome and/or ocular defects, we tested the effects of Eya1 mutations on interactions with Six. Dach, and G proteins by mammalian two-hybrid and GST-pulldown assays. Defective interactions were noted between BOR-type mutations S486P and L504R of Eya1 and Dach1, G proteins, and some Six proteins. These mutations impaired the activation of transcription from a Six-responsive gene, myogenin, with Six5. S486P and L504R showed an altered digestion pattern with trypsin, and L504R also decreased the sensitivity to V8 protease digestion and produced a peptide fragment with a different M(r). Our results suggest that defective protein-protein interactions of the mutations in the EYA domain underlie BOR syndrome and that SIX, DACH, and/or G proteins are possibly involved in the pathogenic processes. PMID:11950062

  2. The human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene in European patients with advanced colorectal cancer harbors infrequent mutations in its tyrosine kinase domain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a member of the ErbB family of receptors, is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase (TK) activated by the binding of extracellular ligands of the EGF-family and involved in triggering the MAPK signaling pathway, which leads to cell proliferation. Mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain are frequent in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, to date, only very few, mainly non-European, studies have reported rare EGFR mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods We screened 236 clinical tumor samples from European patients with advanced CRC by direct DNA sequencing to detect potential, as yet unknown mutations, in the EGFR gene exons 18 to 21, mainly covering the EGFR TK catalytic domain. Results EGFR sequences showed somatic missense mutations in exons 18 and 20 at a frequency of 2.1% and 0.4% respectively. Somatic SNPs were also found in exons 20 and 21 at a frequency of about 3.1% and 0.4% respectively. Of these mutations, four have not yet been described elsewhere. Conclusions These mutation frequencies are higher than in a similarly sized population characterized by Barber and colleagues, but still too low to account for a major role played by the EGFR gene in CRC. PMID:22026926

  3. Mutation screening of the EYA1, SIX1, and SIX5 genes in a large cohort of patients harboring branchio-oto-renal syndrome calls into question the pathogenic role of SIX5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Krug, Pauline; Morinière, Vincent; Marlin, Sandrine; Koubi, Valérie; Gabriel, Heinz D; Colin, Estelle; Bonneau, Dominique; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Heidet, Laurence

    2011-02-01

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by branchial, ear, and renal anomalies. Over 80 mutations in EYA1 have been reported in BOR. Mutations in SIX1, a DNA binding protein that associates with EYA1, have been reported less frequently. One group has recently described four missense mutations in SIX5 in five unrelated patients with BOR. Here, we report a screening of these three genes in a cohort of 140 patients from 124 families with BOR. We identified 36 EYA1 mutations in 42 unrelated patients, 2 mutations, and 1 change of unknown significance in SIX1 in 3 unrelated patients, but no mutation in SIX5. We did not find correlation between genotype and phenotype, and observed a high phenotypic variability between and within BOR families. We show the difficulty in establishing a molecular diagnosis strategy in BOR syndrome: the screening focusing on patients with typical BOR would detect a mutation rate of 76%, but would also miss mutations in 9% of patients with atypical BOR. We detected a deletion removing three EYA1 exons in a patient who was previously reported to carry the SIX5 Thr552Met mutation. This led us to reconsider the role of SIX5 in the development of BOR. PMID:21280147

  4. Afatinib versus cisplatin plus pemetrexed in Japanese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer harboring activating EGFR mutations: Subgroup analysis of LUX-Lung 3.

    PubMed

    Kato, Terufumi; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Okamoto, Isamu; Yokoyama, Akira; Hida, Toyoaki; Seto, Takashi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Massey, Dan; Seki, Yoko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    In LUX-Lung 3, afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) versus cisplatin/pemetrexed in EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma patients and overall survival (OS) in Del19 patients. Preplanned analyses in Japanese patients from LUX-Lung 3 were performed. Patients were randomized 2:1 to afatinib or cisplatin/pemetrexed, stratified by mutation type (Del19/L858R/Other). Primary endpoint was PFS (independent review). Secondary endpoints included OS, objective response, and safety. Median PFS (data cut-off: February 2012) for afatinib versus cisplatin/pemetrexed was 13.8 vs 6.9 months (hazard ratio [HR], 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20-0.70; P = 0.0014) in all Japanese patients (N = 83), with more pronounced improvements in those with common mutations (Del19/L858R; HR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.15-0.52; P < 0.0001) and Del19 mutations (HR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.06-0.39; P < 0.0001). PFS was also improved in L858R patients (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.20-1.25; P = 0.1309). Median OS (data cut-off: November 2013) with afatinib versus cisplatin/pemetrexed was 46.9 vs 35.8 months (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.40-1.43; P = 0.3791) in all Japanese patients, with greater benefit in patients with common mutations (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.29-1.12; P = 0.0966) and Del19 mutations (HR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.13-0.87; P = 0.0181); OS was not significantly different in L858R patients (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.40-3.21; P = 0.8212). Following study treatment discontinuation, most patients (93.5%) received subsequent anticancer therapy. The most common treatment-related adverse events were diarrhea, rash/acne, nail effects and stomatitis with afatinib and nausea, decreased appetite, neutropenia, and leukopenia with cisplatin/pemetrexed. Afatinib significantly improved PFS versus cisplatin/pemetrexed in Japanese EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma patients and OS in Del19 but not L858R patients (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00949650). PMID:26094656

  5. Afatinib versus cisplatin plus pemetrexed in Japanese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer harboring activating EGFR mutations: Subgroup analysis of LUX-Lung 3

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Terufumi; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Okamoto, Isamu; Yokoyama, Akira; Hida, Toyoaki; Seto, Takashi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Massey, Dan; Seki, Yoko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    In LUX-Lung 3, afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) versus cisplatin/pemetrexed in EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma patients and overall survival (OS) in Del19 patients. Preplanned analyses in Japanese patients from LUX-Lung 3 were performed. Patients were randomized 2:1 to afatinib or cisplatin/pemetrexed, stratified by mutation type (Del19/L858R/Other). Primary endpoint was PFS (independent review). Secondary endpoints included OS, objective response, and safety. Median PFS (data cut-off: February 2012) for afatinib versus cisplatin/pemetrexed was 13.8 vs 6.9 months (hazard ratio [HR], 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20–0.70; P = 0.0014) in all Japanese patients (N = 83), with more pronounced improvements in those with common mutations (Del19/L858R; HR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.15–0.52; P < 0.0001) and Del19 mutations (HR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.06–0.39; P < 0.0001). PFS was also improved in L858R patients (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.20–1.25; P = 0.1309). Median OS (data cut-off: November 2013) with afatinib versus cisplatin/pemetrexed was 46.9 vs 35.8 months (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.40–1.43; P = 0.3791) in all Japanese patients, with greater benefit in patients with common mutations (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.29–1.12; P = 0.0966) and Del19 mutations (HR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.13–0.87; P = 0.0181); OS was not significantly different in L858R patients (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.40–3.21; P = 0.8212). Following study treatment discontinuation, most patients (93.5%) received subsequent anticancer therapy. The most common treatment-related adverse events were diarrhea, rash/acne, nail effects and stomatitis with afatinib and nausea, decreased appetite, neutropenia, and leukopenia with cisplatin/pemetrexed. Afatinib significantly improved PFS versus cisplatin/pemetrexed in Japanese EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma patients and OS in Del19 but not L858R patients (www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00949650). PMID:26094656

  6. Effect of FLT3 Ligand on Survival and Disease Phenotype in Murine Models Harboring a FLT3 Internal Tandem Duplication Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Emily J; Duffield, Amy S; Greenblatt, Sarah M; Aplan, Peter D; Small, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Many of the mutations contributing to leukemogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia have been identified. A common activating mutation is an internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation in the FLT3 gene that is found in approximately 25% of patients and confers a poor prognosis. FLT3 inhibitors have been developed and have some efficacy, but patients often relapse. Levels of FLT3 ligand (FL) are significantly elevated in patients during chemotherapy and may be an important component contributing to relapse. We used a mouse model to investigate the possible effect of FL expression on leukemogenesis involving FLT3-ITD mutations in an in vivo system. FLT3ITD/ITD FL−/− (knockout) mice had a statistically significant increase in survival compared with FLT3ITD/ITD FL+/+ (wildtype) mice, most of which developed a fatal myeloproliferative neoplasm. These findings suggest that FL levels may have prognostic significance in human patients. We also studied the effect of FL expression on survival in a FLT3-ITD NUP98–HOX13 (NHD13) fusion mouse model. These mice develop an aggressive leukemia with short latency. We asked whether FL expression played a similar role in this context. The NUP98-HOX13 FLT3ITD/wt FL−/− mice did not have a survival advantage, compared with NUP98-HOX13 FLT3ITD/wt FL+/+ mice (normal FL levels). The loss of the survival advantage of the FL knockout group in the NUP98–HOX13 model suggests that adding a second mutation changes the effect of FL expression in the context of more aggressive disease. PMID:23759524

  7. Dasatinib treatment of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia: analysis of responses according to preexisting BCR-ABL mutations

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martin C.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Druker, Brian J.; Erben, Philipp; Pasquini, Ricardo; Branford, Susan; Hughes, Timothy P.; Radich, Jerald P.; Ploughman, Lynn; Mukhopadhyay, Jaydip

    2009-01-01

    Dasatinib is a BCR-ABL inhibitor with 325-fold higher potency than imatinib against unmutated BCR-ABL in vitro. Imatinib failure is commonly caused by BCR-ABL mutations. Here, dasatinib efficacy was analyzed in patients recruited to phase 2/3 trials with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia with or without BCR-ABL mutations after prior imatinib. Among 1043 patients, 39% had a preexisting BCR-ABL mutation, including 48% of 805 patients with imatinib resistance or suboptimal response. Sixty-threedifferent BCR-ABL mutations affecting 49 amino acids were detected at baseline, with G250, M351, M244, and F359 most frequently affected. After 2 years of follow-up, dasatinib treatment of imatinib-resistant patients with or without a mutation resulted in notable response rates (complete cytogenetic response: 43% vs 47%) and durable progression-free survival (70% vs 80%). High response rates were achieved with different mutations except T315I, including highly imatinib-resistant mutations in the P-loop region. Impaired responses were observed with some mutations with a dasatinib median inhibitory concentration (IC50) greater than 3nM; among patients with mutations with lower or unknown IC50, efficacy was comparable with those with no mutation. Overall, dasatinib has durable efficacy in patients with or without BCR-ABL mutations. All trials were registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00123474, NCT00101660, and NCT00103844. PMID:19779040

  8. A human coronavirus OC43 variant harboring persistence-associated mutations in the S glycoprotein differentially induces the unfolded protein response in human neurons as compared to wild-type virus

    SciTech Connect

    Favreau, Dominique J.; Desforges, Marc; St-Jean, Julien R.; Talbot, Pierre J.

    2009-12-20

    We have reported that human respiratory coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is neurotropic and neuroinvasive in humans and mice, and that neurons are the primary target of infection in mice, leading to neurodegenerative disabilities. We now report that an HCoV-OC43 mutant harboring two persistence-associated S glycoprotein point mutations (H183R and Y241H), induced a stronger unfolded protein response (UPR) and translation attenuation in infected human neurons. There was a major contribution of the IRE1/XBP1 pathway, followed by caspase-3 activation and nuclear fragmentation, with no significant role of the ATF6 and eIF2-alpha/ATF4 pathways. Our results show the importance of discrete molecular viral S determinants in virus-neuronal cell interactions that lead to increased production of viral proteins and infectious particles, enhanced UPR activation, and increased cytotoxicity and cell death. As this mutant virus is more neurovirulent in mice, our results also suggest that two mutations in the S glycoprotein could eventually modulate viral neuropathogenesis.

  9. Biomarkers of erlotinib response in non-small cell lung cancer tumors that do not harbor the more common epidermal growth factor receptor mutations

    PubMed Central

    López-Ayllón, Blanca D; de Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Rodriguez, Carlos; Pernía, Olga; de Cáceres, Inmaculada Ibañez; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents approximately 85% of all lung cancers, which are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as erlotinib represent one therapeutic options presently recommended for tumors produced by activating mutations in the gene coding of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The aim of this study is the identification of possible biomarkers for tumor sensitivity to erlotinib in the absence of the main EGFR mutations. The erlotinib sensitivity of cells isolated from 41 untreated NSCLC patients was determined and compared with the presence of the more frequent EGFR mutations. Several patients had tumor cells highly sensitive to erlitinib in the absence of the EGFR mutations analyzed. The gene expression profile of 3 erlotinib-sensitive tumors was compared with that of 4 resistant tumors by DNA microarray hybridization. Sixteen genes were expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant tumors than in the sensitive tumors. The possible correlation between erlotinib sensitivity and the expression of these genes was further analyzed using the data for the NSCLC, breast cancer and colon cancer cell lines of the NCI60 collection. The expression of these genes was correlated with the overall survival of 5 patients treated with erlotinib, according to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Overlapping groups of 7, 5 and 3 genes, including UGT1A6, TRIB3, MET, MMP7, COL17A1, LCN2 and PTPRZ1, whose expression correlated with erlotinib activity was identified. In particular, low MET expression levels showed the strongest correlation. PMID:26045797

  10. Biomarkers of erlotinib response in non-small cell lung cancer tumors that do not harbor the more common epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    PubMed

    López-Ayllón, Blanca D; de Castro-Carpeño, Javier; Rodriguez, Carlos; Pernía, Olga; Ibañez de Cáceres, Inmaculada; Belda-Iniesta, Cristobal; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents approximately 85% of all lung cancers, which are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as erlotinib represent one therapeutic options presently recommended for tumors produced by activating mutations in the gene coding of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The aim of this study is the identification of possible biomarkers for tumor sensitivity to erlotinib in the absence of the main EGFR mutations. The erlotinib sensitivity of cells isolated from 41 untreated NSCLC patients was determined and compared with the presence of the more frequent EGFR mutations. Several patients had tumor cells highly sensitive to erlitinib in the absence of the EGFR mutations analyzed. The gene expression profile of 3 erlotinib-sensitive tumors was compared with that of 4 resistant tumors by DNA microarray hybridization. Sixteen genes were expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant tumors than in the sensitive tumors. The possible correlation between erlotinib sensitivity and the expression of these genes was further analyzed using the data for the NSCLC, breast cancer and colon cancer cell lines of the NCI60 collection. The expression of these genes was correlated with the overall survival of 5 patients treated with erlotinib, according to The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Overlapping groups of 7, 5 and 3 genes, including UGT1A6, TRIB3, MET, MMP7, COL17A1, LCN2 and PTPRZ1, whose expression correlated with erlotinib activity was identified. In particular, low MET expression levels showed the strongest correlation. PMID:26045797

  11. CHARLOTTE HARBOR IR, 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2002 Charlotte Harbor Implementation Review (IR) summarizes the progress and challenges ahead for the Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program (CHNEP). The implementation review report requires seven components: Status of CCMP implementation (programmatic progress); Environm...

  12. Severe Soft Tissue Infection Caused by a Non-Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes Strain Harboring a Premature Stop Mutation in the sagC Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Roman G.; Ensser, Armin; Dahesh, Samira; Popp, Isabel; Heeg, Christiane; Bleiziffer, Oliver; Merz, Thomas; Schulz, Theresia; Horch, Raymund E.; Bogdan, Christian; Nizet, Victor; van der Linden, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We recovered a non-beta-hemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes strain from a severe soft tissue infection. In this isolate, we detected a premature stop codon within the sagC gene of the streptolysin S (SLS) biosynthetic operon. Reintroduction of full-length sagC gene on a plasmid vector restored the beta-hemolytic phenotype to our clinical isolate, indicating that the point mutation in sagC accounted for loss of hemolytic activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that a severe soft tissue infection can be caused by a non-beta-hemolytic S. pyogenes strain lacking a functional SagC. PMID:23515542

  13. Sensitivity to Low-Dose/Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in Mammalian Cells Harboring Mutations in Succinate Dehydrogenase Subunit C is Governed by Mitochondria-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Slane, Benjamin G.; Liu, Annie T. Y.; Owens, Kjerstin M.; O'Malley, Malinda S.; Smith, Brian J.; Domann, Frederick E.; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that ionizing radiation-induced disruptions in mitochondrial O2 metabolism lead to persistent heritable increases in steady-state levels of intracellular superoxide (O2•−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) that contribute to the biological effects of radiation. Hamster fibroblasts (B9 cells) expressing a mutation in the gene coding for the mitochondrial electron transport chain protein succinate dehydrogenase subunit C (SDHC) demonstrate increases in steady-state levels of O2•− and H2O2. When B9 cells were exposed to low-dose/low-LET radiation (5–50 cGy), they displayed significantly increased clonogenic cell killing compared with parental cells. Clones derived from B9 cells overexpressing a wild-type human SDHC (T4, T8) demonstrated significantly increased surviving fractions after exposure to 5–50 cGy relative to B9 vector controls. In addition, pretreatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated CuZn superoxide dismutase and catalase as well as adenoviral-mediated overexpression of MnSOD and/or mitochondria-targeted catalase resulted in significantly increased survival of B9 cells exposed to 10 cGy ionizing radiation relative to vector controls. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of either MnSOD or mitochondria-targeted catalase alone was equally as effective as when both were combined. These results show that mammalian cells over expressing mutations in SDHC demonstrate low-dose/low-LET radiation sensitization that is mediated by increased levels of O2•− and H2O2. These results also support the hypothesis that mitochondrial O2•− and H2O2 originating from SDH are capable of playing a role in low-dose ionizing radiation-induced biological responses. PMID:21268708

  14. Kinase Domain Point Mutations in Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Emerge Following Therapy with BCR-ABL Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dan; Thomas, Deborah; Yin, C. Cameron; O'Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge E.; Jabbour, Elias; Breeden, Megan; Giles, Francis J.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2008-01-01

    Background BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD) mutations are detected in approximately 45% of imatinib-resistant CML. Patterns of KD mutations in Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are less well-studied. Methods We assessed KD mutations in relapsed Ph+ ALL following treatments that included one or more kinase inhibitors (n = 24) or no prior KI therapy (n = 12). Results ABL KD mutations were detected by direct sequencing in 15 of 17 (88%) relapsed Ph+ ALL with prior imatinib (n = 16) or dasatinib (n = 1) treatment, and in 6 of 7 (86%) resistant/relapsed tumors treated with 2 or more KIs, compared with 0 of 12 relapsed Ph+ ALL never treated with KI. A restricted set of mutations was seen, mostly Y253H and T315I, detected on average 13 months following KI initiation, and mutations were not detected in the initial tumor samples prior to KI therapy in 12 patients assessed. Using a more sensitive pyrosequencing method, we did not detect mutations at codons 315 and 253 in the diagnostic samples from these 12 patients or in 30 Ph+ ALL patients who never relapsed. Conclusions ABL KD mutations, especially at codons 315 and 253, emerge upon relapse in the vast majority of patients with Ph+ ALL receiving maintenance KI therapy. Ongoing KI exposure may thus alter the patterns of relapse and favor outgrowth of clones with KI-resistant mutations. PMID:18615627

  15. Favorable outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring a low-allelic burden FLT3-ITD mutation and concomitant NPM1 mutation: relevance to post-remission therapy.

    PubMed

    Pratcorona, Marta; Brunet, Salut; Nomdedéu, Josep; Ribera, Josep Maria; Tormo, Mar; Duarte, Rafael; Escoda, Lourdes; Guàrdia, Ramon; Queipo de Llano, M Paz; Salamero, Olga; Bargay, Joan; Pedro, Carmen; Martí, Josep Maria; Torrebadell, Montserrat; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Camós, Mireia; Colomer, Dolors; Hoyos, Montserrat; Sierra, Jorge; Esteve, Jordi

    2013-04-01

    Risk associated to FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may depend on mutational burden and its interaction with other mutations. We analyzed the effect of FLT3-ITD/FLT3 wild-type (FLT3wt) ratio depending on NPM1 mutation (NPM1mut) in 303 patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics AML treated with intensive chemotherapy. Among NPM1mut patients, FLT3wt and low ratio (<0.5) subgroups showed similar overall survival, relapse risk, and leukemia-free survival, whereas high ratio (≥0.5) patients had a worse outcome. In NPM1wt AML, FLT3-ITD subgroups showed a comparable outcome, with higher risk of relapse and shortened overall survival than FLT3wt patients. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in CR1 was associated with a reduced relapse risk in all molecular subgroups with the exception of NPM1mut AML with absent or low ratio FLT3-ITD. In conclusion, effect of FLT3 burden is modulated by NPM1 mutation, especially in patients with a low ratio. PMID:23377436

  16. Drug resistance originating from a TGF-β/FGF-2-driven epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and its reversion in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines harboring an EGFR mutation

    PubMed Central

    KURIMOTO, RYOTA; IWASAWA, SHUNICHIRO; EBATA, TAKAHIRO; ISHIWATA, TSUKASA; SEKINE, IKUO; TADA, YUJI; TATSUMI, KOICHIRO; KOIDE, SHUHEI; IWAMA, ATSUSHI; TAKIGUCHI, YUICHI

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a malignant cancer phenotype characterized by augmented invasion and metastasis, chemoresistance, and escape from host-immunity. This study sought to identify efficient methods for inducing EMT reversion, to evaluate alterations in chemosensitivity and immune-protectiveness, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines PC-9 and HCC-827, harboring an EGFR mutation, were treated with TGF-β and FGF-2 to induce EMT. The phenotypic alterations were evaluated by RT-PCR, fluorescent immunohistochemistry, cell-mobility, and flow cytometry. Chemosensitivity to gefitinib and cisplatin was evaluated using an MTT assay and apoptosis. Immune-protectiveness was evaluated by PD-L1 expression. A combination of TGF-β and FGF-2 efficiently induced EMT in both cell lines: through Smad3 pathway in PC-9, and through Smad3, MEK/Erk, and mTOR pathways in HCC-827. The mTOR inhibitor PP242, metformin, and DMSO reverted EMT to different extent and through different pathways, depending on the cell lines. EMT induction reduced the sensitivity to gefitinib in both cell lines and to cisplatin in HCC-827, and it increased PD-L1 expression in both cell lines. EMT reversion using each of the 3 agents partly restored chemosensitivity and suppressed PD-L1 expression. Thus, chemoresistance and increased PD-L1 expression caused by EMT can be successfully reverted by EMT-reverting agents. PMID:26984042

  17. Drug resistance originating from a TGF-β/FGF-2-driven epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and its reversion in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines harboring an EGFR mutation.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Ryota; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Ebata, Takahiro; Ishiwata, Tsukasa; Sekine, Ikuo; Tada, Yuji; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Koide, Shuhei; Iwama, Atsushi; Takiguchi, Yuichi

    2016-05-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a malignant cancer phenotype characterized by augmented invasion and metastasis, chemoresistance, and escape from host-immunity. This study sought to identify efficient methods for inducing EMT reversion, to evaluate alterations in chemosensitivity and immune-protectiveness, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines PC-9 and HCC-827, harboring an EGFR mutation, were treated with TGF-β and FGF-2 to induce EMT. The phenotypic alterations were evaluated by RT-PCR, fluorescent immunohistochemistry, cell-mobility, and flow cytometry. Chemosensitivity to gefitinib and cisplatin was evaluated using an MTT assay and apoptosis. Immune-protectiveness was evaluated by PD-L1 expression. A combination of TGF-β and FGF-2 efficiently induced EMT in both cell lines: through Smad3 pathway in PC-9, and through Smad3, MEK/Erk, and mTOR pathways in HCC-827. The mTOR inhibitor PP242, metformin, and DMSO reverted EMT to different extent and through different pathways, depending on the cell lines. EMT induction reduced the sensitivity to gefitinib in both cell lines and to cisplatin in HCC-827, and it increased PD-L1 expression in both cell lines. EMT reversion using each of the 3 agents partly restored chemosensitivity and suppressed PD-L1 expression. Thus, chemoresistance and increased PD-L1 expression caused by EMT can be successfully reverted by EMT-reverting agents. PMID:26984042

  18. Port and Harbor Security

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T; Guthmuller, H; DeWeert, M

    2004-12-15

    Port and Harbor Security is a daunting task to which optics and photonics offers significant solutions. We are pleased to report that the 2005 Defense and Security Symposium (DSS, Orlando, FL) will include reports on active and passive photonic systems operating from both airborne and subsurface platforms. In addition to imaging techniques, there are various photonic applications, such as total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), which can be used to ''sniff'' for traces of explosives or contaminants in marine. These non-imaging technologies are beyond the scope of this article, but will also be represented at DSS 2005. We encourage colleagues to join our technical group to help us to make our ports and harbors safer and more secure.

  19. Compound mutations in BCR-ABL1 are not major drivers of primary or secondary resistance to ponatinib in CP-CML patients

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Shah, Neil P.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Kim, Dong-Wook; Nicolini, Franck E.; Talpaz, Moshe; Baccarani, Michele; Müller, Martin C.; Li, Jin; Parker, Wendy T.; Lustgarten, Stephanie; Clackson, Tim; Haluska, Frank G.; Guilhot, Francois; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Soverini, Simona; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hughes, Timothy P.; Rivera, Victor M.; Branford, Susan

    2016-01-01

    BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations can confer resistance to first- and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). In preclinical studies, clinically achievable concentrations of the third-generation BCR-ABL1 TKI ponatinib inhibit T315I and all other single BCR-ABL1 mutants except T315M, which generates a single amino acid exchange, but requires 2 sequential nucleotide exchanges. In addition, certain compound mutants (containing ≥2 mutations in cis) confer resistance. Initial analyses based largely on conventional Sanger sequencing (SS) have suggested that the preclinical relationship between BCR-ABL1 mutation status and ponatinib efficacy is generally recapitulated in patients receiving therapy. Thus far, however, such analyses have been limited by the inability of SS to definitively identify compound mutations or mutations representing less than ∼20% of total alleles (referred to as “low-level mutations”), as well as limited patient follow-up. Here we used next-generation sequencing (NGS) to define the baseline BCR-ABL1 mutation status of 267 heavily pretreated chronic phase (CP)-CML patients from the PACE trial, and used SS to identify clonally dominant mutants that may have developed on ponatinib therapy (30.1 months median follow-up). Durable cytogenetic and molecular responses were observed irrespective of baseline mutation status and included patients with compound mutations. No single or compound mutation was identified that consistently conferred primary and/or secondary resistance to ponatinib in CP-CML patients. Ponatinib is effective in CP-CML irrespective of baseline mutation status. PMID:26603839

  20. Resistant mutations in CML and Ph+ALL – role of ponatinib

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Geoffrey D; Bruno, Benjamin J; Lim, Carol S

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, ponatinib (Iclusig®), an orally available pan-BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) developed by ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc., was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in resistant or intolerant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ALL). Ponatinib is the only approved TKI capable of inhibiting BCR-ABL with the gatekeeper T315I kinase domain mutation, known to be the cause for 20% of resistant or relapsed CML cases. In 2013, ponatinib sales were temporarily suspended due to serious side effects seen in nearly 12% of the patient population. These side effects are thought to stem from the potent nature and pan-activity of this TKI. ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has since been permitted to resume sales and marketing of ponatinib to a limited patient population with an expanded black box warning. In the following review, the use of ponatinib in CML and Ph+ALL will be discussed. Mechanisms of resistance in CML are discussed, which provide insight and background into the need for this third generation TKI, followed by the molecular design and pharmacology of ponatinib, which lead to its success as a therapeutic. Finally, the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of ponatinib will be highlighted, including summaries of the important clinical trials involving ponatinib as well as its current place in therapy. PMID:25349473

  1. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... N. A family harboring a germ-line N-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation and development of acute myeloid leukemia with an additional somatic C-terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar; ...

  2. Clinicopathological and Targeted Exome Gene Features of a Patient with Metastatic Acinic Cell Carcinoma of the Parotid Gland Harboring an ARID2 Nonsense Mutation and CDKN2A/B Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Wayne A.; Wong, Deborah J.; Palma-Diaz, Fernando; Shibuya, Terry Y.; Momand, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    We describe the presentation, treatment, clinical outcome, and targeted genome analysis of a metastatic salivary acinic cell carcinoma (AciCC). A 71-year-old male presented with a 3 cm right tail of a parotid lesion, first detected as a nodule by the patient seven months earlier. He had a right total parotidectomy with cranial nerve VII resection, right facial nerve resection and grafting, resection of the right conchal cartilage, and right modified radical neck dissection. The primary tumor revealed AciCC with two distinct areas: a well-differentiated component with glandular architecture and a dedifferentiated component with infiltrative growth pattern associated with prominent stromal response, necrosis, perineural invasion, and cellular pleomorphism. Tumor staging was pT4 N0 MX. Immunohistochemistry staining showed pankeratin (+), CD56 (−), and a Ki67 proliferation index of 15%. Upon microscopic inspection, 49 local lymph nodes resected during parotidectomy were negative for cancer cells. Targeted sequencing of the primary tumor revealed deletions of CDKN2A and CDKN2B, a nonsense mutation in ARID2, and single missense mutations of unknown significance in nine other genes. Despite postoperative localized radiation treatment, follow-up whole body PET/CT scan showed lung, soft tissue, bone, and liver metastases. The patient expired 9 months after resection of the primary tumor. PMID:26634163

  3. Spectrum of mutations and genotype-phenotype analysis in Noonan syndrome patients with RIT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Yaoita, Masako; Niihori, Tetsuya; Mizuno, Seiji; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Shion; Watanabe, Atsushi; Yokozawa, Masato; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Akihiko; Nakano, Yusuke; Hokosaki, Tatsunori; Ohmori, Ayumi; Sawada, Hirofumi; Migita, Ohsuke; Mima, Aya; Lapunzina, Pablo; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Ogata, Tsutomu; Kawame, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Matsubara, Yoichi; Kure, Shigeo; Aoki, Yoko

    2016-02-01

    RASopathies are autosomal dominant disorders caused by mutations in more than 10 known genes that regulate the RAS/MAPK pathway. Noonan syndrome (NS) is a RASopathy characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and congenital heart defects. We have recently identified mutations in RIT1 in patients with NS. To delineate the clinical manifestations in RIT1 mutation-positive patients, we further performed a RIT1 analysis in RASopathy patients and identified 7 RIT1 mutations, including two novel mutations, p.A77S and p.A77T, in 14 of 186 patients. Perinatal abnormalities, including nuchal translucency, fetal hydrops, pleural effusion, or chylothorax and congenital heart defects, are observed in all RIT1 mutation-positive patients. Luciferase assays in NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated that the newly identified RIT1 mutants, including p.A77S and p.A77T, and the previously identified p.F82V, p.T83P, p.Y89H, and p.M90I, enhanced Elk1 transactivation. Genotype-phenotype correlation analyses of previously reported NS patients harboring RIT1, PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, and KRAS revealed that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (56 %) was more frequent in patients harboring a RIT1 mutation than in patients harboring PTPN11 (9 %) and SOS1 mutations (10 %). The rates of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were similar between patients harboring RIT1 mutations and patients harboring RAF1 mutations (75 %). Short stature (52 %) was less prevalent in patients harboring RIT1 mutations than in patients harboring PTPN11 (71 %) and RAF1 (83 %) mutations. These results delineate the clinical manifestations of RIT1 mutation-positive NS patients: high frequencies of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrial septal defects, and pulmonary stenosis; and lower frequencies of ptosis and short stature. PMID:26714497

  4. 33 CFR 207.480 - Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. 207.480 Section 207.480 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. (a) All boats, barges, and...

  5. 33 CFR 207.480 - Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. 207.480 Section 207.480 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. (a) All boats, barges, and...

  6. 33 CFR 207.480 - Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. 207.480 Section 207.480 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. (a) All boats, barges, and...

  7. 33 CFR 207.480 - Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. 207.480 Section 207.480 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. (a) All boats, barges, and...

  8. 33 CFR 207.480 - Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. 207.480 Section 207.480 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... Huron, Mich.; Harbor of refuge, Harbor Beach; use and navigation. (a) All boats, barges, and...

  9. Design of substrate-based BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors using the cyclotide scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Henriques, Sónia T.; Wang, Conan K.; Thorstholm, Louise; Daly, Norelle L.; Kaas, Quentin; Craik, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The constitutively active tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL is the underlying cause of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Current CML treatments rely on the long-term use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which target the ATP binding site of BCR-ABL. Over the course of treatment, 20–30% of CML patients develop TKI resistance, which is commonly attributed to point mutations in the drug-binding region. We design a new class of peptide inhibitors that target the substrate-binding site of BCR-ABL by grafting sequences derived from abltide, the optimal substrate of Abl kinase, onto a cell-penetrating cyclotide MCoTI-II. Three grafted cyclotides show significant Abl kinase inhibition in vitro in the low micromolar range using a novel kinase inhibition assay. Our work also demonstrates that a reengineered MCoTI-II with abltide sequences grafted in both loop 1 and 6 inhibits the activity of [T315I]Abl in vitro, a mutant Abl kinase harboring the “gatekeeper” mutation which is notorious for being multidrug resistant. Results from serum stability and cell internalization studies confirm that the MCoTI-II scaffold provides enzymatic stability and cell-penetrating properties to the lead molecules. Taken together, our study highlights that reengineered cyclotides incorporating abltide-derived sequences are promising substrate-competitive inhibitors for Abl kinase and the T315I mutant. PMID:26264857

  10. Emergence of fatal avian influenza in New England harbor seals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, S.J.; St. Leger, J. A.; Pugliares, K.; Ip, H.S.; Chan, J.M.; Carpenter, Z.W.; Navarrete-Macias, I.; Sanchez-Leon, M.; Saliki, J.T.; Pedersen, J.; Karesh, W.; Daszak, P.; Rabadan, R.; Rowles, T.; Lipkin, W.I.

    2012-01-01

    From September to December 2011, 162 New England harbor seals died in an outbreak of pneumonia. Sequence analysis of postmortem samples revealed the presence of an avian H3N8 influenza A virus, similar to a virus circulating in North American waterfowl since at least 2002 but with mutations that indicate recent adaption to mammalian hosts. These include a D701N mutation in the viral PB2 protein, previously reported in highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses infecting people. Lectin staining and agglutination assays indicated the presence of the avian-preferred SAα-2,3 and mammalian SAα-2,6 receptors in seal respiratory tract, and the ability of the virus to agglutinate erythrocytes bearing either the SAα-2,3 or the SAα-2,6 receptor. The emergence of this A/harbor seal/Massachusetts/1/2011 virus may herald the appearance of an H3N8 influenza clade with potential for persistence and cross-species transmission.

  11. 33 CFR 100.109 - Winter Harbor Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Winter Harbor Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME. 100.109 Section 100.109 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Lobster Boat Race, Winter Harbor, ME. (a) Regulated area. The regulated area includes all waters of...

  12. 31 CFR 212.10 - Safe harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safe harbor. 212.10 Section 212.10... PAYMENTS § 212.10 Safe harbor. (a) Protection during examination and pending review. A financial... failing to honor a garnishment order, for account activity during: (1) The two business days following...

  13. 31 CFR 212.10 - Safe harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safe harbor. 212.10 Section 212.10... PAYMENTS § 212.10 Safe harbor. (a) Protection during examination and pending review. A financial... failing to honor a garnishment order, for account activity during: (1) The two business days following...

  14. 33 CFR 117.1061 - Tacoma Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tacoma Harbor. 117.1061 Section 117.1061 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1061 Tacoma Harbor. (a) When...

  15. 33 CFR 117.1061 - Tacoma Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tacoma Harbor. 117.1061 Section 117.1061 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1061 Tacoma Harbor. (a) When...

  16. 33 CFR 117.1061 - Tacoma Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tacoma Harbor. 117.1061 Section 117.1061 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1061 Tacoma Harbor. (a) When...

  17. 33 CFR 117.1061 - Tacoma Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tacoma Harbor. 117.1061 Section 117.1061 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1061 Tacoma Harbor. (a) When...

  18. 33 CFR 117.1061 - Tacoma Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tacoma Harbor. 117.1061 Section 117.1061 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1061 Tacoma Harbor. (a) When...

  19. 33 CFR 117.811 - Tonawanda Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tonawanda Harbor. 117.811 Section 117.811 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.811 Tonawanda Harbor. The draw of...

  20. 33 CFR 117.811 - Tonawanda Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tonawanda Harbor. 117.811 Section 117.811 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.811 Tonawanda Harbor. The draw of...

  1. 33 CFR 117.603 - Manchester Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manchester Harbor. 117.603... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.603 Manchester Harbor. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Bridge at mile 1.0 in Manchester, shall operate as follows: (a)...

  2. Dissecting Genomic Aberrations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms by Multiplex-PCR and Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Claudia; Chatain, Nicolas; Sontag, Stephanie; Isfort, Susanne; Ortiz-Brüchle, Nadina; Schmitt, Karla; Krüger, Luisa; Zerres, Klaus; Zenke, Martin; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Koschmieder, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess the feasibility of amplicon-based parallel next generation sequencing (NGS) for the diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), we investigated multiplex-PCR of 212 amplicons covering genomic mutational hotspots in 48 cancer-related genes. Samples from 64 patients with MPN and five controls as well as seven (myeloid) cell lines were analyzed. Healthy donor and reactive erythrocytosis samples showed several frequent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) but no known pathogenic mutation. Sequencing of the cell lines confirmed the presence of the known mutations. In the patient samples, JAK2 V617F was present in all PV, 4 of 10 ET, and 16 of 19 MF patients. The JAK2 V617F allele burden was different in the three groups (ET, 33+/-22%; PV 48+/-28% and MF 68+/- 29%). Further analysis detected both previously described and undescribed mutations (i.e., G12V NRAS, IDH1 R132H, E255G ABL, and V125G IDH1 mutations). One patient with lymphoid BC/Ph+ ALL who harbored a T315I ABL mutation and was treated with ponatinib was found to have developed a newly acquired V216M TP53 mutation (12% of transcripts) when becoming resistant to ponatinib. Ponatinib led to a decrease of ABL T315I positive transcripts from 47% before ponatinib treatment to 16% at the time of ponatinib resistance in this patient, suggesting that both TP53 and ABL mutations were present in the same clone and that the newly acquired TP53 mutation might have caused ponatinib resistance in this patient. In conclusion, amplicon-sequencing-based NGS allows simultaneous analysis of multiple MPN associated genes for diagnosis and during treatment and measurement of the mutant allele burden. PMID:25894969

  3. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  4. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1122 - Channel Islands Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Channel Islands Harbor, CA. 80... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1122 Channel Islands Harbor, CA. (a) A line drawn from Channel Islands Harbor South Jetty Light 2 to Channel Islands Harbor...

  8. 33 CFR 110.30 - Boston Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boston Harbor, Mass. 110.30... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.30 Boston Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of South Boston... the local Harbor Master, Hull, Mass. (m) Hingham Harbor Area 1. Beginning at position latitude...

  9. 33 CFR 110.30 - Boston Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boston Harbor, Mass. 110.30... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.30 Boston Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of South Boston... the local Harbor Master, Hull, Mass. (m) Hingham Harbor Area 1. Beginning at position latitude...

  10. 33 CFR 110.30 - Boston Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boston Harbor, Mass. 110.30... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.30 Boston Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of South Boston... the local Harbor Master, Hull, Mass. (m) Hingham Harbor Area 1. Beginning at position latitude...

  11. 33 CFR 110.30 - Boston Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boston Harbor, Mass. 110.30... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.30 Boston Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of South Boston... the local Harbor Master, Hull, Mass. (m) Hingham Harbor Area 1. Beginning at position latitude...

  12. 33 CFR 110.30 - Boston Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boston Harbor, Mass. 110.30... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.30 Boston Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of South Boston... the local Harbor Master, Hull, Mass. (m) Hingham Harbor Area 1. Beginning at position latitude...

  13. 33 CFR 80.1140 - Pillar Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pillar Point Harbor, CA. 80.1140... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1140 Pillar Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Pillar Point Harbor Light 6 to Pillar Point Harbor Entrance Light....

  14. 33 CFR 80.1140 - Pillar Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pillar Point Harbor, CA. 80.1140... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1140 Pillar Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Pillar Point Harbor Light 6 to Pillar Point Harbor Entrance Light....

  15. 78 FR 54392 - Security Zone, Baltimore Harbor, Baltimore's Inner Harbor; Baltimore, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary security zone encompassing certain waters of Baltimore Harbor, Baltimore's Inner Harbor, at Baltimore, Maryland. This action is necessary to safeguard persons and property, and prevent terrorist acts or incidents. This rule prohibits vessels and people from entering the security zone and requires vessels and persons in the security zone to depart the......

  16. 33 CFR 165.904 - Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone. 165.904 Section 165.904 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.904 Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor—Safety and Security Zone... waters including Burnham Park Harbor and the southern part of Chicago Harbor, Lake Michigan, bounded...

  17. 33 CFR 165.904 - Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone. 165.904 Section 165.904 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.904 Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor—Safety and Security Zone... waters including Burnham Park Harbor and the southern part of Chicago Harbor, Lake Michigan, bounded...

  18. Phenylbutyrate increases pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity in cells harboring a variety of defects

    PubMed Central

    Ferriero, Rosa; Boutron, Audrey; Brivet, Michele; Kerr, Douglas; Morava, Eva; Rodenburg, Richard J; Bonafé, Luisa; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Anikster, Yair; Braverman, Nancy E; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Objective Deficiency of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) is the most common genetic disorder leading to lactic acidosis. PDHC deficiency is genetically heterogenous and most patients have defects in the X-linked E1-α gene but defects in the other components of the complex encoded by PDHB, PDHX, DLAT, DLD genes or in the regulatory enzyme encoded by PDP1 have also been found. Phenylbutyrate enhances PDHC enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo by increasing the proportion of unphosphorylated enzyme through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases and thus, has potential for therapy of patients with PDHC deficiency. In the present study, we investigated response to phenylbutyrate of multiple cell lines harboring all known gene defects resulting in PDHC deficiency. Methods Fibroblasts of patients with PDHC deficiency were studied for their enzyme activity at baseline and following phenylbutyrate incubation. Drug responses were correlated with genotypes and protein levels by Western blotting. Results Large deletions affecting PDHA1 that result in lack of detectable protein were unresponsive to phenylbutyrate, whereas increased PDHC activity was detected in most fibroblasts harboring PDHA1 missense mutations. Mutations affecting the R349-α residue were directed to proteasome degradation and were consistently unresponsive to short-time drug incubation but longer incubation resulted in increased levels of enzyme activity and protein that may be due to an additional effect of phenylbutyrate as a molecular chaperone. Interpretation PDHC enzyme activity was enhanced by phenylbutyrate in cells harboring missense mutations in PDHB, PDHX, DLAT, DLD, and PDP1 genes. In the prospect of a clinical trial, the results of this study may allow prediction of in vivo response in patients with PDHC deficiency harboring a wide spectrum of molecular defects. PMID:25356417

  19. 16 CFR 312.10 - Safe harbors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safe harbors. 312.10 Section 312.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS CHILDREN'S ONLINE..., issued by representatives of the marketing or online industries, or by other persons, that, after...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Floating-Harbor syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arpin S, Afenjar A, Dubern B, Toutain A, Cabrol S, Héron D. Floating-Harbor Syndrome: report on a case ... G, Whiteford ML, Quaio CR, Gomy I, Bertola DR, Albrecht B, Platzer K, McGillivray G, Zou R, ...

  1. New Bedford Harbor Long Term Monitoring Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    New Bedford Harbor (NBH), located in southeastern Massachusetts, was designated as a Superfund site in 1983 due to unacceptably high levels of sediment contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Based on human health and environmental concerns, the decision was made to d...

  2. Sediment bioaccumulation testing: Manistique Harbor sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manistique Harbor AOC public meeting and availability session on August 28th in Manistique, MI. This meeting/session is organized by GLNPO; they are EPA's lead on AOC restoration efforts. The goal of the meeting is to engage with the community with all the work that has been d...

  3. HARBOR ISLAND REMEDIAL INVESTIGATION, MARINE SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The data set contains marine sediment data from a remedial investigation of Harbor Island, a National Priority List (NPL) Superfund site in Washington State. Both surface and subsurface marine sediments were collected. A station data set contain sampling station location and desc...

  4. 76 FR 8653 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, New Orleans Harbor, Inner Harbor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... Seeber/Claiborne Avenue) vertical lift bridge across the Inner Harbor Navigational Canal, mile 0.9, (Gulf... deviation from the published regulation for the SR 39 (Judge Seeber/Claiborne Avenue) vertical lift...

  5. 8. NEW YORK HARBOR MODEL. VIEW FACING DOWN EAST RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NEW YORK HARBOR MODEL. VIEW FACING DOWN EAST RIVER TO NEW YORK HARBOR, WITH LOWER MANHATTAN ISLAND AT RIGHT. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  6. 7. NEW YORK HARBOR MODEL. VIEW FACING DOWN NEW YORK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. NEW YORK HARBOR MODEL. VIEW FACING DOWN NEW YORK HARBOR, WITH LOWER MANHATTAN ISLAND AT LEFT. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  7. 33 CFR 110.205 - Chicago Harbor, Ill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chicago Harbor, Ill. 110.205... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.205 Chicago Harbor, Ill. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1...) Anchorage D, Chicago Harbor Lock South. Beginning at a point 35.5 feet South (16 feet South of the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... fail to be satisfied merely because safe harbor matching contributions are made on both elective... contribution requirement of this paragraph (c) will not fail to be satisfied merely because safe harbor... paragraph (c) will not fail to be satisfied merely because the plan provides that safe harbor...

  9. 49 CFR 578.7 - Criminal safe harbor provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Criminal safe harbor provision. 578.7 Section 578... Criminal safe harbor provision. (a) Scope. This section sets forth the requirements regarding the reasonable time and the manner of correction for a person seeking safe harbor protection from...

  10. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... plan will not fail to satisfy the safe harbor matching contribution requirements of this section merely... rule. A plan that provides for safe harbor matching contributions will not fail to satisfy the... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(m)-3 Section...

  11. 49 CFR 578.7 - Criminal safe harbor provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Criminal safe harbor provision. 578.7 Section 578... Criminal safe harbor provision. (a) Scope. This section sets forth the requirements regarding the reasonable time and the manner of correction for a person seeking safe harbor protection from...

  12. 33 CFR 110.95 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Beach Harbor Ordinance No. 543 for recreational and small craft of such size and alignment as permitted.... Fore and aft moorings will be allowed in this area conforming to the City of Newport Beach Harbor... moorings will be allowed in this area conforming to the City of Newport Beach Harbor Ordinance No. 543...

  13. 33 CFR 110.95 - Newport Bay Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Beach Harbor Ordinance No. 543 for recreational and small craft of such size and alignment as permitted.... Fore and aft moorings will be allowed in this area conforming to the City of Newport Beach Harbor... moorings will be allowed in this area conforming to the City of Newport Beach Harbor Ordinance No. 543...

  14. 33 CFR 117.272 - Boot Key Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boot Key Harbor. 117.272 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.272 Boot Key Harbor. The draw of the Boot Key Harbor drawbridge, mile 0.13, between Marathon and Boot Key, will open as necessary on...

  15. 33 CFR 117.272 - Boot Key Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boot Key Harbor. 117.272 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.272 Boot Key Harbor. The draw of the Boot Key Harbor drawbridge, mile 0.13, between Marathon and Boot Key, will open as necessary on...

  16. 33 CFR 117.272 - Boot Key Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boot Key Harbor. 117.272 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.272 Boot Key Harbor. The draw of the Boot Key Harbor drawbridge, mile 0.13, between Marathon and Boot Key, will open as necessary on...

  17. 33 CFR 117.272 - Boot Key Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boot Key Harbor. 117.272 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.272 Boot Key Harbor. The draw of the Boot Key Harbor drawbridge, mile 0.13, between Marathon and Boot Key, will open as necessary on...

  18. 33 CFR 117.272 - Boot Key Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boot Key Harbor. 117.272 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.272 Boot Key Harbor. The draw of the Boot Key Harbor drawbridge, mile 0.13, between Marathon and Boot Key, will open as necessary on...

  19. 7. Photocopy of c 1837 map of Cleveland Harbor with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of c 1837 map of Cleveland Harbor with two plans for additonal harbor. This is the first map to show the Cleveland Breakwater. Original in the Corps' files, Buffalo District. - Cleveland Breakwater at Cleveland Harbor, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  4. 33 CFR 80.1136 - Moss Landing Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Moss Landing Harbor, CA. 80.1136... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1136 Moss Landing Harbor, CA. A line drawn from the seaward extremity of the pier located 0.3 mile south of Moss Landing Harbor Entrance to...

  5. Decadal Changes In Benthic Community Measures In New York Harbor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring in New York Harbor, NY, as part of the Regional Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program has spanned a decade, and includes habitat and water quality measures and sediment contaminant levels from four sub-basins (Upper NY Harbor, Lower NY Harbor, Newark Bay, and...

  6. 33 CFR 110.130 - Bar Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bar Harbor, Maine. 110.130... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.130 Bar Harbor, Maine. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Anchorage “A” is that portion of Frenchman Bay, Bar Harbor, ME enclosed by a rhumb line connecting the...

  7. 33 CFR 110.130 - Bar Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bar Harbor, Maine. 110.130... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.130 Bar Harbor, Maine. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Anchorage “A” is that portion of Frenchman Bay, Bar Harbor, ME enclosed by a rhumb line connecting the...

  8. 33 CFR 110.130 - Bar Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bar Harbor, Maine. 110.130... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.130 Bar Harbor, Maine. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Anchorage “A” is that portion of Frenchman Bay, Bar Harbor, ME enclosed by a rhumb line connecting the...

  9. 33 CFR 110.130 - Bar Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bar Harbor, Maine. 110.130... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.130 Bar Harbor, Maine. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Anchorage “A” is that portion of Frenchman Bay, Bar Harbor, ME enclosed by a rhumb line connecting the...

  10. 33 CFR 110.130 - Bar Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bar Harbor, Maine. 110.130... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.130 Bar Harbor, Maine. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Anchorage “A” is that portion of Frenchman Bay, Bar Harbor, ME enclosed by a rhumb line connecting the...

  11. Beryllium in sediments of Nagoya harbor estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, K.

    1986-06-01

    Beryllium occurs naturally in minerals and oils. Other than the natural sources, considerable quantity of beryllium has been discharged from its smelting industry. Soil pollutants caused by beryllium in the circumference of its smelting industry on the banks of Nagoya harbor estuaries have been reported. Several methods for the spectroscopic determination of beryllium can not eliminate the interference caused by fluoride ion which remains in the digestion solution when hydrofluoric acid is used to degradate the silicate lattice. Accordingly, the authors attempted to improve the pretreatment in order to eliminate the effect of fluoride ion, and to make the procedure simpler and faster with high precision. A simple and sensitive method is presented for the determination of beryllium in sediments by atomic absorption spectroscopy using methylisobutylketone extraction with acetylacetone. They have carried out an extensive investigation on the pollution of sea water and sediments of Nagoya harbor estuaries, which is located in one of the most active industrial areas in Japan.

  12. Optokinetic nystagmus in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina).

    PubMed

    Hanke, Frederike D; Hanke, Wolf; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Dehnhardt, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Harbor seals experience motion due to self-motion and to movement in the external world. However, motion vision has not been studied yet in marine mammals moving in the underwater world. To open up this research, optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) as a basic motion sensing and retinal image stabilizing reflex was studied in four harbor seals during stimulation with moving black-and-white stripe patterns. All seals responded with optokinetic eye movements. Detailed measurements obtained with one animal revealed a moderate gain for horizontal binocular OKN. Monocularly stimulated, the seal displayed a symmetrical OKN with slightly stronger responses to leftward moving stimuli, and, surprisingly, a symmetrical OKN was found in the vertical domain. PMID:18160091

  13. Boson shells harboring charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta; Laemmerzahl, Claus; List, Meike

    2010-11-15

    We consider boson shells in scalar electrodynamics coupled to Einstein gravity. The interior of the shells can be empty space, or harbor a black hole or a naked singularity. We analyze the properties of these types of solutions and determine their domains of existence. We investigate the energy conditions and present mass formulae for the composite black hole-boson shell systems. We demonstrate that these types of solutions violate black hole uniqueness.

  14. Light, Compact Pumper for Harbor Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Report describes development of new transportable water-pumping unit for fire-fighting. Compact, self-contained unit provides fire protection at coastal and inland ports and is lighter than standard firetruck pumper of same capacity. Used to fight fires in harbors, cities, forests, refineries, chemical plants, and offshore drilling platforms. Other possible applications include cleaning up oilspills, pumping out ships, and flood control pumping.

  15. Old Harbor Scammon Bay Hydro Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Petrie

    2007-06-27

    The grantee, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative (AVEC), is a non-profit member owned rural electric generation and distribution cooperative. The proposed Project is located near the community of Old Harbor, Alaska. Old Harbor is on the southeastern coast of Kodiak Island, approximately 70 miles southwest of the City of Kodiak and 320 miles southwest of Anchorage. In 1998 sufficient information had been developed to apply for a license to construct the project and the cost was estimated to be $2,445,000 for a 500 KW project on Lagoon Creek. Major features of the project included an eight-foot high diversion dam on Mountain Creek, a desander box, a 9,800-foot long penstock to the powerhouse on Lagoon Creek, and a 5,500-foot long access road. It was also anticipated that the project could provide an additional source of water to Old Harbor. The report details the history and lessons learned in designing and permiting the proposed hydroelectric facility.

  16. Braf V600E mutation in melanoma: translational current scenario.

    PubMed

    Guadarrama-Orozco, J A; Ortega-Gómez, A; Ruiz-García, E B; Astudillo-de la Vega, H; Meneses-García, A; Lopez-Camarillo, C

    2016-09-01

    Melanoma was one of the translational cancer examples in clinic, including target therapy related to specific biomarkers impacting in the outcome of melanoma patients. Melanomagenesis involved a wide variety of mutations during his evolution; many of these mutated proteins have a kinase activity. One of the most cited proteins in melanoma is BRAF (about 50-60 % of melanomas harbors activating BRAF mutations), for these the most common is a substitution of valine to glutamic acid at codon 600 (p.V600E). Therefore, the precise identification of this underlying somatic mutation is essential; knowing the translational implications has opened a wide view of melanoma biology and therapy. PMID:26825657

  17. Na channel gene mutations in epilepsy--the functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Kazuhiro

    2006-08-01

    Mutations of voltage-gated sodium channel genes SCN1A, SCN2A, and SCN1B have been identified in several types of epilepsies including generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (SMEI). In both SCN1A and SCN2A, missense mutations tend to result in benign idiopathic epilepsy, whereas truncation mutations lead to severe and intractable epilepsy. However, the results obtained by the biophysical analyses using cultured cell systems still remain elusive. Now studies in animal models harboring sodium channel gene mutations should be eagerly pursued. PMID:16806834

  18. A Landscape of Driver Mutations in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hodis, Eran; Watson, Ian R.; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Arold, Stefan T.; Imielinski, Marcin; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Auclair, Daniel; Li, Liren; Place, Chelsea; DiCara, Daniel; Ramos, Alex H.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Voet, Douglas; Saksena, Gordon; Stransky, Nicolas; Onofrio, Robert C.; Winckler, Wendy; Ardlie, Kristin; Wagle, Nikhil; Wargo, Jennifer; Chong, Kelly; Morton, Donald L.; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Chen, Guo; Noble, Michael; Meyerson, Matthew; Ladbury, John E.; Davies, Michael A.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Wagner, Stephan N.; Hoon, Dave S.B.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Getz, Gad; Garraway, Levi A.; Chin, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite recent insights into melanoma genetics, systematic surveys for driver mutations are challenged by an abundance of passenger mutations caused by carcinogenic ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. We developed a permutation-based framework to address this challenge, employing mutation data from intronic sequences to control for passenger mutational load on a per gene basis. Analysis of large-scale melanoma exome data by this approach discovered six novel melanoma genes (PPP6C, RAC1, SNX31, TACC1, STK19 and ARID2), three of which - RAC1, PPP6C and STK19 - harbored recurrent and potentially targetable mutations. Integration with chromosomal copy number data contextualized the landscape of driver mutations, providing oncogenic insights in BRAF- and NRAS-driven melanoma as well as those without known NRAS/BRAF mutations. The landscape also clarified a mutational basis for RB and p53 pathway deregulation in this malignancy. Finally, the spectrum of driver mutations provided unequivocal genomic evidence for a direct mutagenic role of UV light in melanoma pathogenesis. PMID:22817889

  19. 77 FR 59551 - Safety Zone, Changes to Original Rule; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Zone; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA'' (77 FR 50916). This new... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking COTP Captain of the... Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ] ACTION:...

  20. 33 CFR 165.904 - Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone. 165.904 Section 165.904 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.904 Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor—Safety and Security Zone. (a) Location. All waters of Lake Michigan within Burnham Park Harbor shoreward of a line across...

  1. 33 CFR 165.904 - Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone. 165.904 Section 165.904 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.904 Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor—Safety and Security Zone. (a) Location. All waters of Lake Michigan within Burnham Park Harbor shoreward of a line across...

  2. 33 CFR 165.904 - Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... & Burnham Park Harbor-Safety and Security Zone. 165.904 Section 165.904 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.904 Lake Michigan at Chicago Harbor & Burnham Park Harbor—Safety and Security Zone. (a) Location. All waters of Lake Michigan within Burnham Park Harbor shoreward of a line across...

  3. Prognostic impact of mutation profiling in patients with stage II and III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yinchen; Han, Xiaohong; Wang, Jianfei; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Hongying; Lu, Shih-Hsin; Shi, Yuankai

    2016-01-01

    Development of colorectal cancer (CRC) associates with accumulation of genetic mutations include the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway. However, whether mutations in KRAS together with downstream factors BRAF, PIK3CA and NRAS impact prognosis is still unclear for stage II-III colon cancer. In the present study a total of 228 stage II-III colon cancer samples were retrospectively collected, KRAS (codons 12, 13 and 61), BRAF (exon 11 and exon 15), PIK3CA (exon 9 and exon 20) and NRAS (codons 12, 13 and 61) status was detected by Sanger sequencing, 37.89% (86/227) tumors harbored a KRAS mutation, 7.02% (16/228) harbored a BRAF mutation, 13.18% (29/220) harbored a PIK3CA mutation and 0.89% (2/224) harbored a NRAS mutation. NRAS mutations existed only in stage II colon cancer. Older groups harbored a higher KRAS and BRAF mutation (P < 0.05), PIK3CA (exon9) mutations appeared more common in worse differentiation tumors (P = 0.032). Moreover, PIK3CA (E545K) mutation was significantly associated with tumor recurrence (P = 0.031) and acted independently prognostic for poor OS (P = 0.044), while only in stage III colon cancer. KRAS, BRAF and NRAS mutations do not have major prognostic value in stage II and III colon cancer, subtypes of gene mutations should be further investigated for a better understanding in CRC. PMID:27074743

  4. Evaluation of sediment contamination in Pearl Harbor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grovhoug, J.G.

    1992-06-01

    Pearl Harbor demonstrates remarkable resilience to natural and human-induced contaminant stresses. A review of more than fifty harbor-specific data sets reveals a complex contamination and recovery history. Siltation is a major contaminant pathway in Pearl Harbor. Dredging operations, which are necessary due to high siltation rates, reduce contaminant loading by periodically removing the upper harbor sediment layers. The response of test organisms during sediment toxicity and bioaccumulation studies showed negligible effects from sediment toxicity. The environmental quality at an offshore dredge disposal site for the harbor is not measurable affected. Urban runoff via storm drains and tributaries is an important nonpoint source of contaminant exposure to the Pearl Harbor ecosystem. Most contaminants experience extensive physical, chemical, and biological, modification after entering the harbor environment. Certain contaminants, including PCBs, petroleum hydrocarbons, and silver, were reported at sufficiently elevated sediment concentrations to warrant environmental concern in some harbor regions and may warrant further evaluation. The overall sediment quality in Pearl Harbor, however, is less degraded than that of many U.S. mainland coastal harbors. Further detailed study of the abundance and distribution of important marine resources in Pearl Harbor is recommended.

  5. KRAS Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Wilbur A.; Haney, Jerry; Sugita, Michio; Bemis, Lynne; Jimeno, Antonio; Messersmith, Wells A.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of colon carcinoma with the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibody Cetuximab is reported to be ineffective in KRAS-mutant tumors. Mutation testing techniques have therefore become an urgent concern. We have compared three methods for detecting KRAS mutations in 59 cases of colon carcinoma: 1) high resolution melting, 2) the amplification refractory mutation system using a bifunctional self-probing primer (ARMS/Scorpion, ARMS/S), and 3) direct sequencing. We also evaluated the effects of the methods of sectioning and coring of paraffin blocks to obtain tumor DNA on assay sensitivity and specificity. The most sensitive and specific combination of block sampling and mutational analysis was ARMS/S performed on DNA derived from 1-mm paraffin cores. This combination of tissue sampling and testing method detected KRAS mutations in 46% of colon tumors. Four samples were positive by ARMS/S, but initially negative by direct sequencing. Cloned DNA samples were retested by direct sequencing, and in all four cases KRAS mutations were identified in the DNA. In six cases, high resolution melting abnormalities could not be confirmed as specific mutations either by ARMS/S or direct sequencing. We conclude that coring of the paraffin blocks and testing by ARMS/S is a sensitive, specific, and efficient method for KRAS testing. PMID:20007845

  6. A sensitive mutation screening method supporting cell line development for biotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Valisheva, Ildana; Harris, Reed J; Zhu-Shimoni, Judith

    2016-07-15

    Random genetic mutations, which can occur during cell line development, can lead to sequence variants that comprise pharmaceutical product quality generated by recombinant technology. Mutation screening can minimize the probability of selecting clones harboring sequence variants. Here we report a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based mutation screening approach using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis combined with a mutation enrichment step using limiting dilution to detect low-level mutations at 0.5%. The method allows unknown mutation discovery regardless of its location in a transgene as well as independent of its position in an HRM fragment, ranging from approximately 200 to 300 bp in size. PMID:27108188

  7. Oncogene mutation profiling reveals poor prognosis associated with FGFR1/3 mutation in liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengfang; Shen, Yaoyuan; Ren, Yan; Liu, Wei; Li, Man; Liang, Weihua; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is one of the most prevalent soft tissue sarcomas. LPS shows a poor response to radiation and chemotherapy. The causes of death in patients with LPS include locally recurrent and metastatic disease. We sought to examine novel gene mutations and pathways in primary and matched recurrent LPSs to identify potential therapeutic targets. We conducted a high-throughput analysis of 238 known mutations in 19 oncogenes using Sequenom MassARRAY technology. Nucleic acids were extracted from 19 primary and recurrent LPS samples, encompassing 9 dedifferentiated LPSs (DDLPS), 9 myxoid/round cell LPSs, and 1 pleomorphic LPS. Mutation screening revealed missense mutations in 21.1% (4/19) of the LPS specimens, including 4 different genes (FGFR1, FGFR3, PIK3CA, and KIT). Based on histologic subtypes, 22.2% DDLPS (2/9) and 22.2% myxoid cell LPS (2/9) contained gene mutations. Specifically, 3 (23.1%) of 13 primary tumors harbored mutations. Furthermore, although gene mutations were identified in 1 (11.1%) of 9 recurrent LPS samples, the difference between the primary and the recurrence was not statistically significant. Analysis of patient survival data indicated that patients harboring FGFR1/3 mutations experienced reduced overall survival (P<.05). Despite the limited number of samples, our findings provide the first evidence of FGFR1/3 mutations in DDLPS, which were associated with poor clinical outcomes. The FGFR pathway may play an important role in the development and progression of DDLPS and warrants further investigation; moreover, PIK3CA mutation is a common event (11.1%) in myxoid cell LPS. PMID:27237367

  8. Early Onset and Severe Clinical Course Associated with the m.5540G>A Mutation in MT-TW.

    PubMed

    Granadillo, Jorge L; Moss, Timothy; Lewis, Richard A; Austin, Elise G; Kelfer, Howard; Wang, Jing; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Scaglia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    We report a patient harboring a de novo m.5540G>A mutation affecting the MT-TW gene coding for the mitochondrial tryptophan-transfer RNA. This patient presented with atonic-myoclonic epilepsy, bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, ataxia, motor regression, ptosis, and pigmentary retinopathy. Our proband had an earlier onset and more severe phenotype than the first reported patient harboring the same mutation. We discuss her clinical presentation and compare it with the only previously published case. PMID:25302159

  9. Understanding the referral services safe harbor.

    PubMed

    Tomes, J

    1994-02-01

    In today's competitive healthcare environment, healthcare facilities and individual providers must form new relationships to safeguard their market positions and compete efficiently. But while such relationships are necessary and serve legitimate goals, those entering into such arrangements must be concerned that in so doing they do not run afoul of the Medicare and Medicaid fraud and abuse statute. This article examines the potential dangers of remuneration for referrals, and explains how one of the many so-called "safe harbor" provisions of the fraud and abuse statute applies to this practice. PMID:10145951

  10. Multi-azole resistant Aspergillus fumigatus harboring Cyp51A TR46/Y121F/T289A isolated in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hiroki; Fujimoto, Masanori; Sugahara, Mai; Misawa, Yoshiki; Gonoi, Tohru; Itoyama, Satoru; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Multi-azole resistant Aspergillus fumigatus carrying TR46/Y121F/T289A was isolated from a patient in Japan in Dec 2013. This strain grouped into the same clade of the ones which were clinically isolated in France and Germany. A. fumigatus harboring this mutation could be rapidly diffused outside the Eurasian continent. PMID:26898666

  11. A metastatic colon adenocarcinoma harboring BRAF V600E has a durable major response to dabrafenib/trametinib and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Williams, Casey B; McMahon, Caitlin; Ali, Siraj M; Abramovitz, Mark; Williams, Kirstin A; Klein, Jessica; McKean, Heidi; Yelensky, Roman; George, Thomas J; Elvin, Julia A; Soman, Salil; Lipson, Doron; Chmielecki, Juliann; Morosini, Deborah; Miller, Vincent A; Stephens, Philip J; Ross, Jeffrey S; Leyland-Jones, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The subset of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas that harbor BRAF V600E mutations are aggressive tumors with significantly shortened survival and limited treatment options. Here we present a colorectal cancer patient whose disease progressed through standard chemotherapy and who developed liver metastasis. Comprehensive genomic profiling (FoundationOne(®)) identified a BRAF V600E mutation in the liver lesion, as well as other genomic alterations consistent with colorectal cancers. Combination therapy of dabrafenib and trametinib with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy resulted in a durable major ongoing response for the patient. This report illustrates the utility of comprehensive genomic profiling with personalized targeted therapy for aggressive metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:26664139

  12. A metastatic colon adenocarcinoma harboring BRAF V600E has a durable major response to dabrafenib/trametinib and chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Casey B; McMahon, Caitlin; Ali, Siraj M; Abramovitz, Mark; Williams, Kirstin A; Klein, Jessica; McKean, Heidi; Yelensky, Roman; George, Thomas J; Elvin, Julia A; Soman, Salil; Lipson, Doron; Chmielecki, Juliann; Morosini, Deborah; Miller, Vincent A; Stephens, Philip J; Ross, Jeffrey S; Leyland-Jones, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The subset of metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas that harbor BRAF V600E mutations are aggressive tumors with significantly shortened survival and limited treatment options. Here we present a colorectal cancer patient whose disease progressed through standard chemotherapy and who developed liver metastasis. Comprehensive genomic profiling (FoundationOne®) identified a BRAF V600E mutation in the liver lesion, as well as other genomic alterations consistent with colorectal cancers. Combination therapy of dabrafenib and trametinib with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy resulted in a durable major ongoing response for the patient. This report illustrates the utility of comprehensive genomic profiling with personalized targeted therapy for aggressive metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. PMID:26664139

  13. 77 FR 50916 - Safety Zone; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project... Engineers rock removal project. Entering into, transiting through, mooring or anchoring within this...

  14. 77 FR 39411 - Safety Zone; Village of Sackets Harbor, Lake Ontario, Sackets Harbor, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... Sector Buffalo; telephone 716- 843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarineSafety@uscg.mil . If you have questions... be held on Lake Ontario in Sackets Harbor, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined that... Buffalo has determined that this temporary safety zone is necessary to ensure the safety of spectators...

  15. Familial Essential Thrombocythemia Associated with MPL W515L Mutation in Father and JAK2 V617F Mutation in Daughter

    PubMed Central

    Trifa, Adrian P.; Cucuianu, Andrei; Popp, Radu A.

    2014-01-01

    Familial essential thrombocythemia features the acquisition of somatic mutations and an evolution similar to the sporadic form of the disease. Here we report two patients—father and daughter—with essential thrombocythemia who displayed a heterogeneous pattern of somatic mutations. The JAK2 V617F mutation was found in the daughter, while the father harbored the MPL W515L mutation. This case report may constitute further proof that in familial essential thrombocythemia there are other, still undefined, constitutional, inherited genetic factors predisposing to the acquisition of various somatic mutations (e.g., JAK2 V617F and MPL). PMID:25525531

  16. Tide- and wind-driven flushing of Boston Harbor, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The flushing of Boston Harbor, a shallow, tidally dominated embayment with little fresh water input, is investigated using a depth-averaged model. The modeled tidal currents exhibit strong spatial variability and ebb/flood asymmetry due to complex topography and coastline geometry and were verified by shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements. At the inlets to the harbor, the asymmetry between flood and ebb gives rise to a net exchange of water, which acts over successive tidal cycles to flush the harbor. The flushing is examined by tracking water that starts out in Boston Harbor for 40 M2 tidal cycles. The tidal flushing is very efficient at mixing water in the vicinity of the inlets over several tidal cycles, but efficiency decreases with time as ``tidal mixing regions'' form on either side of the harbor inlets. When wind forcing is included, the wind-driven currents act to flush the tidal mixing regions, giving rise to more efficient flushing. The exception is when the wind is from the southwest, which confines the jet-like ebb flow from the harbor and therefore reduces the flushing efficiency. In general, flushing is shown to be a two-step process: (1) rapid exchange due to tides over a large region in the vicinity of the harbor inlets and (2) flushing of this region by wind-driven flow. The model also demonstrates that flushing is not uniform over the entire harbor but occurs rapidly in the deep tidal channels and slowly in the regions of weak tidal currents around the harbor periphery. Although the depth-averaged approach to flushing is appropriate over most of the harbor due to the harbor's shallow depth and broad depth distribution, the lack of bathymetric variability and the presence of locally important density driven currents in the Boston Inner Harbor indicates that flushing of this localized area must be approached with a three-dimensional model.

  17. IDH Mutation Analysis in Ewing Sarcoma Family Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Na, Ki Yong; Noh, Byeong-Joo; Sung, Ji-Youn; Kim, Youn Wha; Santini Araujo, Eduardo; Park, Yong-Koo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) with production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Dysfunctional IDH leads to reduced production of α-KG and NADH and increased production of 2-hydroxyglutarate, an oncometabolite. This results in increased oxidative damage and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor α, causing cells to be prone to tumorigenesis. Methods: This study investigated IDH mutations in 61 Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs), using a pentose nucleic acid clamping method and direct sequencing. Results: We identified four cases of ESFTs harboring IDH mutations. The number of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations was equal and the subtype of IDH mutations was variable. Clinicopathologic analysis according to IDH mutation status did not reveal significant results. Conclusions: This study is the first to report IDH mutations in ESFTs. The results indicate that ESFTs can harbor IDH mutations in previously known hot-spot regions, although their incidence is rare. Further validation with a larger case-based study would establish more reliable and significant data on prevalence rate and the biological significance of IDH mutations in ESFTs. PMID:26018518

  18. [BRAF V600E mutation in thyroid nodules in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Ilera, Verónica; Dourisboure, Ricardo; Colobraro, Antonio; Silva Croome, María Del Carmen; Olstein, Gustavo; Gauna, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    This prospective study analyzed the frequency of V600E mutation of oncogene BRAF in patients operated for benign thyroid nodules and for papillary thyroid cancer in an Argentine population. In patients with papillary thyroid cancer we compared clinicopathological characteristics between those harboring BRAF mutation and those without it. Twenty five consecutive patients operated for benign nodules and for papillary carcinoma were prospectively included. Fresh tissue samples of thyroid nodules and of adjacent thyroid parenchyma were obtained. DNA was extracted and amplified by amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction (ARMS PCR). Direct sequencing was performed in four samples. Of those patients operated for papillary thyroid cancer, 77% harbored BRAF mutation. All samples from adjacent thyroid parenchyma and from patients operated for benign nodules tested negative for the mutation. Direct sequencing confirmed the results obtained by ARMS PCR. Patients with BRAF mutation were significantly older at the time of diagnosis (BRAF+ 47.7 ± 12.7 years vs. BRAF- 24.7 ± 8.1 years, p < 0.01). Nine out of ten papillary carcinomas with BRAF mutation corresponded to the classic histological subtype, which was not observed in BRAF negative tumors (p < 0.02). In conclusion, we found a high frequency of BRAF V600E mutation in this population of patients operated for papillary thyroid carcinoma in Argentina. These results are consistent with those reported in the literature. PMID:27576281

  19. Novel Insight into Mutational Landscape of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Mambo, Elizabeth; Choudhary, Ashish; Houghton, Jeffery; Buddavarapu, Kalyan; Sanford, Tiffany; Darden, Will; Adai, Alex; Hadd, Andrew; Latham, Gary; Danilova, Ludmila V.; Bishop, Justin; Li, Ryan J.; Westra, William H.; Hennessey, Patrick; Koch, Wayne M.; Ochs, Michael F.; Califano, Joseph A.; Sun, Wenyue

    2014-01-01

    Development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is characterized by accumulation of mutations in several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We have formerly described the mutation pattern of HNSCC and described NOTCH signaling pathway alterations. Given the complexity of the HNSCC, here we extend the previous study to understand the overall HNSCC mutation context and to discover additional genetic alterations. We performed high depth targeted exon sequencing of 51 highly actionable cancer-related genes with a high frequency of mutation across many cancer types, including head and neck. DNA from primary tumor tissues and matched normal tissues was analyzed for 37 HNSCC patients. We identified 26 non-synonymous or stop-gained mutations targeting 11 of 51 selected genes. These genes were mutated in 17 out of 37 (46%) studied HNSCC patients. Smokers harbored 3.2-fold more mutations than non-smokers. Importantly, TP53 was mutated in 30%, NOTCH1 in 8% and FGFR3 in 5% of HNSCC. HPV negative patients harbored 4-fold more TP53 mutations than HPV positive patients. These data confirm prior reports of the HNSCC mutational profile. Additionally, we detected mutations in two new genes, CEBPA and FES, which have not been previously reported in HNSCC. These data extend the spectrum of HNSCC mutations and define novel mutation targets in HNSCC carcinogenesis, especially for smokers and HNSCC without HPV infection. PMID:24667986

  20. Familial multiple symmetric lipomatosis associated with the A8344G mutation of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Gámez, J; Playán, A; Andreu, A L; Bruno, C; Navarro, C; Cervera, C; Arbós, M A; Schwartz, S; Enriquez, J A; Montoya, J

    1998-07-01

    We describe familial multiple symmetric lipomatosis in a pedigree harboring the 8344 mutation in the tRNA(Lys) gene of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The proband showed neuromuscular involvement but lacked the typical manifestations of myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibers disease. The distribution of the mutation was unusual because the proportion of mutated genomes was higher in blood and lipomas than in muscle tissue. PMID:9674814

  1. Phase II Study of Nilotinib in Melanoma Harboring KIT Alterations Following Progression to Prior KIT Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Richard D.; Lawrence, Donald P.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Gonzalez, Rene; Lutzky, Jose; O’Day, Steven J.; Hamid, Omid; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chapman, Paul B.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Teitcher, Jerrold B.; Ramaiya, Nikhil; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Heinrich, Michael C.; Bastian, Boris C.; Corless, Christopher L.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Hodi, F. Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although durable responses can be achieved with tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib in melanomas harboring KIT mutations, the efficacy of alternative inhibitors after progression to imatinib and the activity of these agents on brain metastases is unknown. Experimental Design We conducted a phase II study of nilotinib 400 mg BID in two cohorts of patients with melanomas harboring KIT mutations or amplification: A) those refractory or intolerant to a prior KIT inhibitor; and B) those with brain metastases. The primary endpoint was 4-month disease control rate. Secondary endpoints included response rate, time-to-progression and overall survival. A Simon two-stage and a single-stage design was planned to assess for the primary endpoint in Cohorts A and B, respectively. Results Twenty patients were enrolled and 19 treated (11-Cohort A; 8-Cohort B). Three patients on Cohort A (27%; 95% CI, 8% – 56%) and 1 on Cohort B (12.5%; 90% CI, 0.6% – 47%) achieved the primary endpoint. Two partial responses were observed in Cohort A (18.2%, 90% CI, 3% – 47%); none were observed in Cohort B. The median time-to-progression and overall survival was 3·3 (90% CI, 2.1 – 3.9 months) and 9.1 months (90% CI, 4.3 – 14.2 months), respectively, in all treated patients. Conclusion Nilotinib may achieve disease control in patients with melanoma harboring KIT alterations and whose disease progressed after imatinib therapy. The efficacy of this agent in KIT altered melanoma with brain metastasis is limited. PMID:25695690

  2. TP53 Mutational Spectrum in Endometrioid and Serous Endometrial Cancers.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Anne M; Martelotto, Luciano G; De Filippo, Maria R; Piscuglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Hussein, Yaser R; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Soslow, Robert A; Weigelt, Britta

    2016-07-01

    Endometrial carcinomas (ECs) are heterogeneous at the genetic level. Although TP53 mutations are highly recurrent in serous endometrial carcinomas (SECs), these are also present in a subset of endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (EECs). Here, we sought to define the frequency, pattern, distribution, and type of TP53 somatic mutations in ECs by performing a reanalysis of the publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). A total of 228 EECs (n=186) and SECs (n=42) from the TCGA data set, for which an integrated genomic characterization was performed, were interrogated for the presence and type of TP53 mutations, and for mutations in genes frequently mutated in ECs. TP53 mutations were found in 15% of EECs and 88% of SECs, and in 91% of copy-number-high and 35% of polymerase (DNA directed), epsilon, catalytic subunit (POLE) integrative genomic subtypes. In addition to differences in prevalence, variations in the type and pattern of TP53 mutations were observed between histologic types and between integrative genomic subtypes. TP53 hotspot mutations were significantly more frequently found in SECs (46%) than in EECs (15%). TP53-mutant EECs significantly more frequently harbored a co-occurring PTEN mutation than TP53-mutant SECs. Finally, a subset of TP53-mutant ECs (22%) was found to harbor frameshift or nonsense mutations. Given that nonsense and frameshift TP53 mutations result in distinct p53 immunohistochemical results that require careful interpretation, and that EECs and SECs display different patterns, types, and distributions of TP53 mutations, the use of the TP53/p53 status alone for the differential diagnosis of EECs and SECs may not be sufficient. PMID:26556035

  3. Mutational and Haplotype Analyses of Families with Familial Partial Lipodystrophy (Dunnigan Variety) Reveal Recurrent Missense Mutations in the Globular C-Terminal Domain of Lamin A/C

    PubMed Central

    Speckman, Rebecca A.; Garg, Abhimanyu; Du, Fenghe; Bennett, Lynda; Veile, Rose; Arioglu, Elif; Taylor, Simeon I.; Lovett, Michael; Bowcock, Anne M.

    2000-01-01

    Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), Dunnigan variety, is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by marked loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue from the extremities and trunk but by excess fat deposition in the head and neck. The disease is frequently associated with profound insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. We have localized a gene for FPLD to chromosome 1q21-q23, and it has recently been proposed that nuclear lamin A/C is altered in FPLD, on the basis of a novel missense mutation (R482Q) in five Canadian probands. This gene had previously been shown to be altered in autosomal dominant Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD-AD) and in dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction-system disease. We examined 15 families with FPLD for mutations in lamin A/C. Five families harbored the R482Q alteration that segregated with the disease phenotype. Seven families harbored an R482W alteration, and one family harbored a G465D alteration. All these mutations lie within exon 8 of the lamin A/C gene—an exon that has also been shown to harbor different missense mutations that are responsible for EDMD-AD. Mutations could not be detected in lamin A/C in one FPLD family in which there was linkage to chromosome 1q21-q23. One family with atypical FPLD harbored an R582H alteration in exon 11 of lamin A. This exon does not comprise part of the lamin C coding region. All mutations in FPLD affect the globular C-terminal domain of the lamin A/C protein. In contrast, mutations responsible for dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction-system disease are observed in the rod domain of the protein. The FPLD mutations R482Q and R482W occurred on different haplotypes, indicating that they are likely to have arisen more than once. PMID:10739751

  4. Role of the pks15/1 gene in the biosynthesis of phenolglycolipids in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Evidence that all strains synthesize glycosylated p-hydroxybenzoic methyl esters and that strains devoid of phenolglycolipids harbor a frameshift mutation in the pks15/1 gene.

    PubMed

    Constant, Patricia; Perez, Esther; Malaga, Wladimir; Lanéelle, Marie-Antoinette; Saurel, Olivier; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe

    2002-10-11

    Diesters of phthiocerol and phenolphthiocerol are important virulence factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae, the two main mycobacterial pathogens in humans. They are both long-chain beta-diols, and their biosynthetic pathway is beginning to be elucidated. Although the two classes of molecules share a common lipid core, phthiocerol diesters have been found in all the strains of the M. tuberculosis complex examined although phenolphthiocerol diesters are produced by only a few groups of strains. To address the question of the origin of this diversity 8 reference strains and 10 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were analyzed. We report the presence of glycosylated p-hydroxybenzoic acid methyl esters, structurally related to the type-specific phenolphthiocerol glycolipids, in the culture media of all reference strains of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that the strains devoid of phenolphthiocerol derivatives are unable to elongate the putative p-hydroxybenzoic acid precursor. We also show that all the strains of M. tuberculosis examined and deficient in the production of phenolphthiocerol derivatives are natural mutants with a frameshift mutation in pks15/1 whereas a single open reading frame for pks15/1 is found in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, M. leprae, and strains of M. tuberculosis that produce phenolphthiocerol derivatives. Complementation of the H37Rv strain of M. tuberculosis, which is devoid of phenolphthiocerol derivatives, with the fused pks15/1 gene from M. bovis BCG restored phenolphthiocerol glycolipids production. Conversely, disruption of the pks15/1 gene in M. bovis BCG led to the abolition of the synthesis of type-specific phenolphthiocerol glycolipid. These data indicate that Pks15/1 is involved in the elongation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid to give p-hydroxyphenylalkanoates, which in turn are converted, presumably by the PpsA-E synthase, to phenolphthiocerol derivatives. PMID:12138124

  5. Quantification of Colonic Stem Cell Mutations.

    PubMed

    Whetstone, Ryan D; Gold, Barry

    2015-01-01

    The ability to measure stem cell mutations is a powerful tool to quantify in a critical cell population if, and to what extent, a chemical can induce mutations that potentially lead to cancer. The use of an enzymatic assay to quantify stem cell mutations in the X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene has been previously reported.(1) This method requires the preparation of frozen sections and incubation of the sectioned tissue with a reaction mixture that yields a blue color if the cells produce functional glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme. If not, the cells appear whitish. We have modified the reaction mixture using Optimal Cutting Temperature Compound (OCT) medium in place of polyvinyl alcohol. This facilitates pH measurement, increases solubilization of the G6PD staining components and restricts diffusion of the G6PD enzyme. To demonstrate that a mutation occurred in a stem cell, the entire crypt must lack G6PD enzymatic activity. Only if a stem cell harbors a phenotypic G6PD mutation will all of the progeny in the crypt lack G6PD enzymatic activity. To identify crypts with a stem cell mutation, four consecutive adjacent frozen sections (a level) were cut at 7 µm thicknesses. This approach of making adjacent cuts provides conformation that a crypt was fully mutated since the same mutated crypt will be observed in adjacent sections. Slides with tissue samples that were more than 50 µm apart were prepared to assess a total of >10(4) crypts per mouse. The mutation frequency is the number of observed mutated (white) crypts÷by the number of wild type (blue) crypts in a treatment group. PMID:26436534

  6. 33 CFR 80.1152 - Crescent City Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Crescent City Harbor, CA. 80.1152... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1152 Crescent City Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Crescent City Entrance Light to the southeasternmost extremity of Whaler Island....

  7. 33 CFR 80.1152 - Crescent City Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Crescent City Harbor, CA. 80.1152... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1152 Crescent City Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Crescent City Entrance Light to the southeasternmost extremity of Whaler Island....

  8. 33 CFR 80.1152 - Crescent City Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Crescent City Harbor, CA. 80.1152... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1152 Crescent City Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Crescent City Entrance Light to the southeasternmost extremity of Whaler Island....

  9. 33 CFR 80.1152 - Crescent City Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Crescent City Harbor, CA. 80.1152... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1152 Crescent City Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Crescent City Entrance Light to the southeasternmost extremity of Whaler Island....

  10. 33 CFR 110.134 - Portland Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Portland Harbor, Maine. 110.134 Section 110.134 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.134 Portland Harbor, Maine. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Anchorage A (general). Beginning...

  11. 78 FR 9730 - Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... National Park Service Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: National Park Service... Islands Advisory Council. The agenda includes a presentation by Sally Snowman, 70th keeper of Boston Light... Jacobson, DFO, Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, 408 Atlantic Avenue, Suite 228, Boston,...

  12. 78 FR 52783 - Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... National Park Service Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: National Park Service... Islands Advisory Council. The agenda includes discussion of 2016 celebration planning for the 300th Anniversary of Boston Light, 20th Anniversary of Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area (NRA),...

  13. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  14. 78 FR 28619 - Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council. The agenda includes a presentation by author John Galluzzo, ``Peddocks Island, As Seen from Pemberton...

  15. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  16. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  19. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  20. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  1. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  2. 18 CFR 1304.404 - Commercial marina harbor limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commercial marina... ALTERATIONS Miscellaneous § 1304.404 Commercial marina harbor limits. The landward limits of commercial marina... of harbors at commercial marinas will be designated by TVA on the basis of the size and extent...

  3. 33 CFR 117.722 - Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Great Egg Harbor Bay. 117.722 Section 117.722 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.722 Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw...

  4. 33 CFR 117.722 - Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Great Egg Harbor Bay. 117.722 Section 117.722 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.722 Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw...

  5. 33 CFR 117.722 - Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Great Egg Harbor Bay. 117.722 Section 117.722 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.722 Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw...

  6. 33 CFR 117.722 - Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Great Egg Harbor Bay. 117.722 Section 117.722 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.722 Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw...

  7. 33 CFR 117.722 - Great Egg Harbor Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Great Egg Harbor Bay. 117.722 Section 117.722 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.722 Great Egg Harbor Bay. The draw...

  8. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  9. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  10. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  11. 33 CFR 110.32 - Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. 110.32 Section 110.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.32 Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. (a) Area...

  12. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  13. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  14. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  15. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  16. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  17. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  18. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  19. 33 CFR 110.32 - Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. 110.32 Section 110.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.32 Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. (a) Area...

  20. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  1. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  2. 33 CFR 110.32 - Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. 110.32 Section 110.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.32 Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. (a) Area...

  3. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  4. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  5. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  6. 33 CFR 110.32 - Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. 110.32 Section 110.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.32 Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. (a) Area...

  7. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  8. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  9. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  10. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  11. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  12. 77 FR 73889 - National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-30056 Filed 12-10... December 11, 2012 Part V The President Proclamation 8914--National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2012... Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation...

  13. 33 CFR 110.83 - Chicago Harbor, Ill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., 1940, along the West side of the harbor, said harbor line runs parallel to the overall alignment of... the Grant Park bulkhead's overall alignment between its North and South ends, said bulkhead runs... to the overall alignment of the Grant Park bulkhead between its North and South ends,...

  14. 33 CFR 110.83 - Chicago Harbor, Ill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., 1940, along the West side of the harbor, said harbor line runs parallel to the overall alignment of... the Grant Park bulkhead's overall alignment between its North and South ends, said bulkhead runs... to the overall alignment of the Grant Park bulkhead between its North and South ends,...

  15. 33 CFR 110.83 - Chicago Harbor, Ill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., 1940, along the West side of the harbor, said harbor line runs parallel to the overall alignment of... the Grant Park bulkhead's overall alignment between its North and South ends, said bulkhead runs... to the overall alignment of the Grant Park bulkhead between its North and South ends,...

  16. 33 CFR 110.83 - Chicago Harbor, Ill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 1940, along the West side of the harbor, said harbor line runs parallel to the overall alignment of... the Grant Park bulkhead's overall alignment between its North and South ends, said bulkhead runs... to the overall alignment of the Grant Park bulkhead between its North and South ends,...

  17. 33 CFR 110.83 - Chicago Harbor, Ill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., 1940, along the West side of the harbor, said harbor line runs parallel to the overall alignment of... the Grant Park bulkhead's overall alignment between its North and South ends, said bulkhead runs... to the overall alignment of the Grant Park bulkhead between its North and South ends,...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1152 - Crescent City Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crescent City Harbor, CA. 80.1152... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1152 Crescent City Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Crescent City Entrance Light to the southeasternmost extremity of Whaler Island....

  19. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Explosives Anchorage A. Inside the south...

  20. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1110 - Dana Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dana Point Harbor, CA. 80.1110... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1110 Dana Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Dana Point Jetty Light 6 to Dana Point Breakwater Light 5....

  2. 33 CFR 110.207 - Cleveland Harbor, Ohio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cleveland Harbor, Ohio. 110.207 Section 110.207 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.207 Cleveland Harbor, Ohio. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) West anchorage. The northwesterly...

  3. 33 CFR 162.120 - Harbors on Lake Michigan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., White Lake, Pentwater, Ludington, Manistee, Portage Lake (Manistee County), Frankfort, Charlevois, and... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Harbors on Lake Michigan. 162.120...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.120 Harbors on Lake...

  4. 33 CFR 162.120 - Harbors on Lake Michigan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., White Lake, Pentwater, Ludington, Manistee, Portage Lake (Manistee County), Frankfort, Charlevoix, and... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Harbors on Lake Michigan. 162.120...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.120 Harbors on Lake...

  5. 33 CFR 162.120 - Harbors on Lake Michigan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., White Lake, Pentwater, Ludington, Manistee, Portage Lake (Manistee County), Frankfort, Charlevois, and... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Harbors on Lake Michigan. 162.120...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.120 Harbors on Lake...

  6. 33 CFR 162.120 - Harbors on Lake Michigan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., White Lake, Pentwater, Ludington, Manistee, Portage Lake (Manistee County), Frankfort, Charlevoix, and... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Harbors on Lake Michigan. 162.120...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.120 Harbors on Lake...

  7. 33 CFR 162.120 - Harbors on Lake Michigan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., White Lake, Pentwater, Ludington, Manistee, Portage Lake (Manistee County), Frankfort, Charlevoix, and... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Harbors on Lake Michigan. 162.120...) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.120 Harbors on Lake...

  8. 76 FR 26311 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Harbor Maintenance Fee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Harbor Maintenance... concerning the Harbor Maintenance Fee (CBP Forms 349 and 350). This request for comment is being made... keepers from the collection of information (a total capital/startup costs and operations and...

  9. 78 FR 21597 - Marine Mammals: Alaska Harbor Seal Habitats

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... measures to protect glacially-associated harbor seal habitats in Alaska (78 FR 15669; March 12, 2013.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 12, 2013, NMFS published an ANPR in the Federal Register (78 FR 15669) to... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-BB71 Marine Mammals: Alaska Harbor Seal...

  10. 33 CFR 110.29 - Boston Inner Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. 110.29 Section 110.29 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.29 Boston Inner Harbor, Mass. (a) Vicinity of...

  11. 33 CFR 110.32 - Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. 110.32 Section 110.32 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.32 Hingham Harbor, Hingham, Mass. (a) Area...

  12. 33 CFR 110.38 - Edgartown Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Edgartown Harbor, Mass. 110.38 Section 110.38 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.38 Edgartown Harbor, Mass. An area in the inner...

  13. 33 CFR 110.142 - Nantucket Harbor, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nantucket Harbor, Mass. 110.142 Section 110.142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.142 Nantucket Harbor, Mass. (a) The anchorage grounds. In...

  14. 33 CFR 110.37 - Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. 110.37 Section 110.37 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.37 Sesuit Harbor, Dennis, Mass. All the...

  15. 33 CFR 110.26 - Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marblehead Harbor, Marblehead, Mass. 110.26 Section 110.26 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mass. The area comprises that portion of the harbor lying between the extreme low water line...

  16. 6. FOUNDATION PLAN OF HARBOR MASTER'S BUILDING ON PIER #4, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FOUNDATION PLAN OF HARBOR MASTER'S BUILDING ON PIER #4, DWG. NO. 185, 3/8" = 1'0", MADE BY J.L.R. - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 4, South side of Pratt Street between Frederick Street & Market Place, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  17. 49 CFR 578.7 - Criminal safe harbor provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Criminal safe harbor provision. 578.7 Section 578... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) CIVIL AND CRIMINAL PENALTIES § 578.7 Criminal safe harbor provision. (a) Scope. This section sets forth the requirements regarding...

  18. 33 CFR 80.130 - Boston Harbor entrance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boston Harbor entrance. 80.130... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.130 Boston Harbor entrance. A line drawn from....6′ W., to Boston Lighted Horn Buoy “B”; thence to the esternmost radio tower at Hull, charted...

  19. 33 CFR 80.130 - Boston Harbor entrance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boston Harbor entrance. 80.130... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.130 Boston Harbor entrance. A line drawn from....6′ W., to Boston Lighted Horn Buoy “B”; thence to the esternmost radio tower at Hull, charted...

  20. 33 CFR 80.130 - Boston Harbor entrance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boston Harbor entrance. 80.130... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.130 Boston Harbor entrance. A line drawn from....6′ W., to Boston Lighted Horn Buoy “B”; thence to the esternmost radio tower at Hull, charted...

  1. 33 CFR 80.130 - Boston Harbor entrance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boston Harbor entrance. 80.130... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.130 Boston Harbor entrance. A line drawn from....6′ W., to Boston Lighted Horn Buoy “B”; thence to the esternmost radio tower at Hull, charted...

  2. 49 CFR 578.7 - Criminal safe harbor provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Criminal safe harbor provision. 578.7 Section 578... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) CIVIL AND CRIMINAL PENALTIES § 578.7 Criminal safe harbor provision. (a) Scope. This section sets forth the requirements regarding...

  3. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Floats for marking anchors in place will be allowed; stakes or mooring piles are prohibited. 33 CFR Ch. I... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  4. 33 CFR 110.255 - Ponce Harbor, P.R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Floats for marking anchors in place will be allowed; stakes or mooring piles are prohibited. 33 CFR Ch. I... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ponce Harbor, P.R. 110.255... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.255 Ponce Harbor, P.R. (a) Small-craft anchorage. On...

  5. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  6. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  7. 33 CFR 110.147 - New London Harbor, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false New London Harbor, Conn. 110.147... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.147 New London Harbor, Conn. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... Thames River southward of New London, bounded by lines connecting points which are the following...

  8. 78 FR 63381 - Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register A. Regulatory History and... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors, HI.... 14-1414 Safety Zones; Hawaiian Islands Commercial Harbors; HI. (a) Location. The following...

  9. 33 CFR 110.50d - Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn. 110.50d Section 110.50d Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.50d Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn. (a) The...

  10. 33 CFR 110.50d - Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn. 110.50d Section 110.50d Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.50d Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn. (a) The...

  11. 33 CFR 110.50d - Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn. 110.50d Section 110.50d Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.50d Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn. (a) The...

  12. 33 CFR 110.50d - Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn. 110.50d Section 110.50d Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.50d Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn. (a) The...

  13. 33 CFR 110.50d - Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn. 110.50d Section 110.50d Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.50d Mystic Harbor, Noank, Conn. (a) The...

  14. 77 FR 22489 - Special Anchorage Regulations, Newport Bay Harbor, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ...The Coast Guard is expanding the boundaries of the special anchorage areas in Newport Bay Harbor, California, to encompass and replace temporary anchorage grounds C-1 and C-2, and anchorage ground C-3. This rule realigns anchorage boundaries to reflect the way the harbor currently is...

  15. 46 CFR 7.30 - New York Harbor, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false New York Harbor, NY. 7.30 Section 7.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.30 New York Harbor, NY. A line drawn from East Rockaway Inlet Breakwater Light to Ambrose...

  16. 33 CFR 80.165 - New York Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New York Harbor. 80.165 Section 80.165 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.165 New York Harbor. A line drawn from...

  17. 33 CFR 80.165 - New York Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New York Harbor. 80.165 Section 80.165 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Atlantic Coast § 80.165 New York Harbor. A line drawn from...

  18. 46 CFR 7.30 - New York Harbor, NY.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false New York Harbor, NY. 7.30 Section 7.30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.30 New York Harbor, NY. A line drawn from East Rockaway Inlet Breakwater Light to Ambrose...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1138 - Santa Cruz Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. 80.1138 Section 80.1138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1138 Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1126 - Santa Barbara Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. 80.1126 Section 80.1126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1126 Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. A line...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1116 - Redondo Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Redondo Harbor, CA. 80.1116 Section 80.1116 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1116 Redondo Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1104 - San Diego Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Harbor, CA. 80.1104 Section 80.1104 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1104 San Diego Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1375 - Grays Harbor, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grays Harbor, WA. 80.1375 Section 80.1375 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1375 Grays Harbor, WA. A line...

  4. 33 CFR 80.730 - Miami Harbor, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miami Harbor, FL. 80.730 Section 80.730 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.730 Miami Harbor, FL. A line drawn...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1134 - Monterey Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monterey Harbor, CA. 80.1134 Section 80.1134 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1134 Monterey Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  6. 33 CFR 80.710 - Charleston Harbor, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Charleston Harbor, SC. 80.710 Section 80.710 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Seventh District § 80.710 Charleston Harbor, SC. (a) A line...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1108 - Oceanside Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oceanside Harbor, CA. 80.1108 Section 80.1108 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1108 Oceanside Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1142 - San Francisco Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Francisco Harbor, CA. 80.1142 Section 80.1142 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1142 San Francisco Harbor, CA. A straight...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  11. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  12. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  13. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  14. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  15. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  16. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  20. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1470 - Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1470 Section 80.1470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1470 Kawaihae Harbor, Hawaii,...

  4. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1460 - Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. 80.1460 Section 80.1460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1460 Kahului Harbor, Maui, HI. A line...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1480 - Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. 80.1480 Section 80.1480 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1480 Hilo Harbor, Hawaii, HI. A line...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1450 - Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai, HI. 80.1450 Section 80.1450 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1450 Nawiliwili Harbor, Kauai,...

  9. 26 CFR 1.475(a)-4 - Valuation safe harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... method—(1) Sufficient consistency. An eligible method is a mark-to-market method that is sufficiently... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Valuation safe harbor. 1.475(a)-4 Section 1.475... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Inventories § 1.475(a)-4 Valuation safe harbor. (a) Overview—(1)...

  10. 26 CFR 1.475(a)-4 - Valuation safe harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... method—(1) Sufficient consistency. An eligible method is a mark-to-market method that is sufficiently... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Valuation safe harbor. 1.475(a)-4 Section 1.475... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Inventories § 1.475(a)-4 Valuation safe harbor. (a) Overview—(1)...

  11. 33 CFR 80.1110 - Dana Point Harbor, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dana Point Harbor, CA. 80.1110... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1110 Dana Point Harbor, CA. A line drawn from Dana Point Jetty Light 6 to Dana Point Breakwater Light 5....

  12. 33 CFR 110.208 - Buffalo Harbor, N.Y.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. 110.208 Section 110.208 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.208 Buffalo Harbor, N.Y. (a) The anchorage...

  13. Analysis of SDHD promoter mutations in various types of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Simone L.; Horn, Susanne; Murali, Rajmohan; Möller, Inga; Sucker, Antje; Sondermann, Wiebke; Stiller, Mathias; Schilling, Bastian; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Zimmer, Lisa; Reis, Henning; Metz, Claudia H.; Zeschnigk, Michael; Paschen, Annette; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Schadendorf, Dirk; Westekemper, Henrike; Griewank, Klaus G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Recently, recurrent mutations in regulatory DNA regions, such as promoter mutations in the TERT gene were identified in melanoma. Subsequently, Weinhold et al. reported SDHD promoter mutations occurring in 10% of melanomas and being associated with a lower overall survival rate. Our study analyzes the mutation rate and clinico-pathologic associations of SDHD promoter mutations in a large cohort of different melanoma subtypes. Methods 451 melanoma samples (incl. 223 non-acral cutaneous, 38 acral, 33 mucosal, 43 occult, 43 conjunctival and 51 uveal melanoma) were analyzed for the presence of SDHD promoter mutations by Sanger-sequencing. Statistical analysis was performed to screen for potential correlations of SDHD promoter mutation status with various clinico-pathologic criteria. Results The SDHD promoter was successfully sequenced in 451 tumor samples. ETS binding site changing SDHD promoter mutations were identified in 16 (4%) samples, of which 5 mutations had not been described previously. Additionally, 5 point mutations not located in ETS binding elements were identified. Mutations in UV-exposed tumors were frequently C>T. One germline C>A SDHD promoter mutation was identified. No statistically significant associations between SDHD promoter mutation status and various clinico-pathologic variables or overall patient survival were observed. Conclusions Melanomas harbor recurrent SDHD promoter mutations, which occur primarily as C>T alterations in UV-exposed melanomas. In contrast to the initial report and promoter mutations in the TERT gene, our analysis suggests that SDHD promoter mutations are a relatively rare event in melanoma (4% of tumors) of unclear clinical and prognostic relevance. PMID:26327518

  14. R132C IDH1 mutations are found in spindle cell hemangiomas and not in other vascular tumors or malformations.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Kyle C; Pansuriya, Twinkal C; van Ruler, Maayke A J H; van den Akker, Brendy; Luks, Valerie L; Verbeke, Sofie L J; Kozakewich, Harry P; Sciot, Raf; Lev, Dina; Lazar, Alexander J; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2013-05-01

    Spindle cell hemangioma (SCH) is a rare, benign vascular tumor of the dermis and subcutis. The lesions can be multifocal and are overrepresented in Maffucci syndrome, in which patients also have multiple enchondromas. Somatic mosaic R132C IDH1 hotspot mutations were recently identified in Maffucci syndrome. We evaluated the presence of mutations in solitary and multiple SCHs in patients without multiple enchondromas and tested a range of other vascular lesions that enter into the differential diagnosis. The R132C IDH1 mutation was identified by hydrolysis probes assay and confirmed by Sanger sequencing in 18 of 28 (64%) SCHs; of the 10 negative cases, 2 harbored a mutation in IDH2 (R172T and R172M) by Sanger sequencing. None of 154 other vascular malformations and tumors harbored an IDH1 R132C mutation, and R132H IDH1 mutations were absent in all 182 cases. All 16 SCHs examined by immunohistochemistry were negative for expression of HIF-1α. In conclusion, 20 of 28 (71%) SCHs harbored mutations in exon 4 of IDH1 or IDH2. Given that mutations were absent in 154 other vascular lesions, the mutation seems to be highly specific for SCH. The mutation does not induce expression of HIF-1α in SCH, and therefore the exact mechanism by which mutations in IDH1 or IDH2 lead to vascular tumorigenesis remains to be established. PMID:23485734

  15. Identification of recurrent SMO and BRAF mutations in ameloblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Robert T; McClary, Andrew C; Myers, Benjamin R; Biscocho, Jewison; Neahring, Lila; Kwei, Kevin A; Qu, Kunbin; Gong, Xue; Ng, Tony; Jones, Carol D; Varma, Sushama; Odegaard, Justin I; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Koyota, Souichi; Rubin, Brian P; Troxell, Megan L; Pelham, Robert J; Zehnder, James L; Beachy, Philip A; Pollack, Jonathan R; West, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the discovery of oncogenic mutations in the Hedgehog and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in over 80% of ameloblastomas, locally destructive odontogenic tumors of the jaw, by genomic analysis of archival material. Mutations in SMO (encoding Smoothened, SMO) are common in ameloblastomas of the maxilla, whereas BRAF mutations are predominant in tumors of the mandible. We show that a frequently occurring SMO alteration encoding p.Leu412Phe is an activating mutation and that its effect on Hedgehog-pathway activity can be inhibited by arsenic trioxide (ATO), an anti-leukemia drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that is currently in clinical trials for its Hedgehog-inhibitory activity. In a similar manner, ameloblastoma cells harboring an activating BRAF mutation encoding p.Val600Glu are sensitive to the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. Our findings establish a new paradigm for the diagnostic classification and treatment of ameloblastomas. PMID:24859340

  16. Novel somatic mutations and distinct molecular signature in aldosterone-producing adenomas.

    PubMed

    Åkerström, Tobias; Willenberg, Holger Sven; Cupisti, Kenko; Ip, Julian; Backman, Samuel; Moser, Ana; Maharjan, Rajani; Robinson, Bruce; Iwen, K Alexander; Dralle, Henning; D Volpe, Cristina; Bäckdahl, Martin; Botling, Johan; Stålberg, Peter; Westin, Gunnar; Walz, Martin K; Lehnert, Hendrik; Sidhu, Stan; Zedenius, Jan; Björklund, Peyman; Hellman, Per

    2015-10-01

    Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) are found in 1.5-3.0% of hypertensive patients in primary care and can be cured by surgery. Elucidation of genetic events may improve our understanding of these tumors and ultimately improve patient care. Approximately 40% of APAs harbor a missense mutation in the KCNJ5 gene. More recently, somatic mutations in CACNA1D, ATP1A1 and ATP2B3, also important for membrane potential/intracellular Ca(2) (+) regulation, were observed in APAs. In this study, we analyzed 165 APAs for mutations in selected regions of these genes. We then correlated mutational findings with clinical and molecular phenotype using transcriptome analysis, immunohistochemistry and semiquantitative PCR. Somatic mutations in CACNA1D in 3.0% (one novel mutation), ATP1A1 in 6.1% (six novel mutations) and ATP2B3 in 3.0% (two novel mutations) were detected. All observed mutations were located in previously described hotspot regions. Patients with tumors harboring mutations in CACNA1D, ATP1A1 and ATP2B3 were operated at an older age, were more often male and had tumors that were smaller than those in patients with KCNJ5 mutated tumors. Microarray transcriptome analysis segregated KCNJ5 mutated tumors from ATP1A1/ATP2B3 mutated tumors and those without mutation. We observed significant transcription upregulation of CYP11B2, as well as the previously described glomerulosa-specific gene NPNT, in ATP1A1/ATP2B3 mutated tumors compared to KCNJ5 mutated tumors. In summary, we describe novel somatic mutations in proteins regulating the membrane potential/intracellular Ca(2) (+) levels, and also a distinct mRNA and clinical signature, dependent on genetic alteration. PMID:26285814

  17. Distribution of MED12 mutations in fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumors of the breast--implications for tumor biology and pathological diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pfarr, Nicole; Kriegsmann, Mark; Sinn, Peter; Klauschen, Frederick; Endris, Volker; Herpel, Esther; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Jesinghaus, Moritz; Klosterhalfen, Bernd; Penzel, Roland; Lennerz, Jochen K; Weichert, Wilko; Stenzinger, Albrecht

    2015-07-01

    Somatic mutations in exon 2 of MED12 have been described in benign and malignant smooth muscle cell tumors suggesting a functional role in these neoplasms. Recently fibroadenomas of the breast were also reported to harbor MED12 mutations. Hence, we explored MED12 mutations in fibroepithelial tumors of the breast, histological subtypes of fibroadenomas and phyllodes tumors, to validate and extend previous efforts. Using conventional Sanger sequencing, we profiled 39 cases of fibroepithelial breast tumors comprising classic histological subtypes of fibroadenomas as well as benign and malignant phyllodes tumors for mutations in exon 2 of MED12. MED12 mutations were detected in 60% of all tumor samples with the majority being missense mutations affecting codon 44. Additionally, we report novel in-frame deletions that have not been described previously. Sixty-two percent of the fibroadenomas harbored mutated MED12 with intracanalicular fibroadenomas being the most frequently mutated histological subtype (82%). Of note, 8/11 of benign phyllodes tumors had MED12 mutations while only 1/5 of malignant phyllodes tumors showed mutations in exon 2 of MED12. In conclusion, we confirm the frequent occurrence of MED12 mutations in fibroadenomas, provide evidence that most intracanalicular fibroadenomas closely resembling benign phyllodes as well as benign phyllodes tumors harbor MED12 mutations, and conclude that MED12 mutations in malignant phyllodes tumors appear to be relatively rare. PMID:25931199

  18. Mutation Profile of Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Shin; Lim, Jung Ah

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to significant insights into the genetic basis of thyroid tumorigenesis. Among the mutations commonly seen in thyroid cancers, the vast majority are associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. B-Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF) mutations are the most common mutations observed in papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs), followed by RET/PTC rearrangements and RAS mutations, while follicular thyroid cancers are more likely to harbor RAS mutations or PAX8/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) rearrangements. Beyond these more common mutations, alterations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter have recently been associated with clinicopathologic features, disease prognosis, and tumorigenesis in thyroid cancer. While the mutations underlying thyroid tumorigenesis are well known, the frequency of these mutations is strongly associated with geography, with clear differences reported between Asian and Western countries. Of particular interest is the prevalence of BRAF mutations, with Korean patients exhibiting the highest rate of BRAF-associated thyroid cancers in the world. Here, we review the prevalence of each of the most common mutations in Asian and Western countries, and identify the characteristics of well-differentiated thyroid cancer in Asians. PMID:26435130

  19. Impact of genetic profiles on the efficacy of anti-EGFR antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer with KRAS mutation.

    PubMed

    Kishiki, Tomokazu; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Masaki, Tadahiko; Ohtsuka, Kouki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Furuse, Jyunji; Sugiyama, Masanori; Watanabe, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Reports indicate that, even in KRAS-mutated colon cancer, there are subsets of patients who benefit from anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) treatment. The aim of the present study was to identify genetic profiles that contribute to the responsiveness of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) to anti-EGFR MoAb. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy of anti-EGFR MoAb in mCRC patients with KRAS mutations according to KRAS mutational subtypes, BRAF and PIK3CA mutational status and PTEN and MET expression. Among 21 patients with KRAS-mutant tumors, 8 (38%) harbored p.G13D, 7 (33%) harbored p.G12V, 5 (24%) harbored p.G12D, and 1 (5%) harbored p.G12C mutation. Patients with the p.G13D mutation exhibited a significantly higher disease control rate than patients with other KRAS mutations (P=0.042), and tended to show a longer progression-free survival (PFS) than patients with other KRAS mutations with marginal significance (P=0.074). Patients with loss of PTEN had significantly shorter PFS than those with normal PTEN expression in patients with KRAS mutations (P=0.044). MET overexpression was significantly associated with shorter PFS compared to normal MET expression in patients with KRAS mutations (P=0.016). Our data demonstrated the potential utility of alterations in PTEN and MET expression as predictive markers for response to anti-EGFR MoAbs in mCRC patients with KRAS mutations. In addition, we confirmed the predictive value of the KRAS p.G13D mutation for better response to anti-EGFR therapies in comparison with other KRAS mutations. PMID:24839940

  20. The Complete Genome Sequences, Unique Mutational Spectra, and Developmental Potency of Adult Neurons Revealed by Cloning.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Jennifer L; Faust, Gregory G; Rodriguez, Alberto R; Ferguson, William C; Shumilina, Svetlana; Clark, Royden A; Boland, Michael J; Martin, Greg; Chubukov, Pavel; Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Torkamani, Ali; Kupriyanov, Sergey; Hall, Ira M; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2016-03-16

    Somatic mutation in neurons is linked to neurologic disease and implicated in cell-type diversification. However, the origin, extent, and patterns of genomic mutation in neurons remain unknown. We established a nuclear transfer method to clonally amplify the genomes of neurons from adult mice for whole-genome sequencing. Comprehensive mutation detection and independent validation revealed that individual neurons harbor ∼100 unique mutations from all classes but lack recurrent rearrangements. Most neurons contain at least one gene-disrupting mutation and rare (0-2) mobile element insertions. The frequency and gene bias of neuronal mutations differ from other lineages, potentially due to novel mechanisms governing postmitotic mutation. Fertile mice were cloned from several neurons, establishing the compatibility of mutated adult neuronal genomes with reprogramming to pluripotency and development. PMID:26948891

  1. Ground-water status report, Pearl Harbor area, Hawaii, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soroos, Ronald L.; Ewart, Charles J.

    1979-01-01

    Increasing demand for freshwater in Hawaii has placed heavy stress on many of the State 's basal aquifer systems. The most heavily stressed of these systems is the Pearl Harbor on Oahu. The Pearl Harbor basal aquifer supplies as much as 277 million gallons per day. Since early in this century, spring discharge has been declining while pumpage has been increasing. Total ground-water discharge has remained steady despite short-term fluctuations. Some wells show general increases in chloride concentration while others remain steady. Chloride concentrations throughout the area show no apparent increase since 1970. Basal water head maps of the Pearl Harbor area clearly reflect the natural discharge points, which are the springs located along the shore near the center of Pearl Harbor. Basal-water hydrographs show a general decline of about 0.09 foot per year. This implies depletion of storage at a rate of about 25 million gallons per day. (USGS).

  2. CONTAMINANT LEVELS IN HARBOR SEALS FROM THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD), and mercury (Hg) were determined in blubber and liver tissues of harbor seal...

  3. BLDG 47, FRONT ELEVATION DETAIL OF NE END OF HARBOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 47, FRONT ELEVATION DETAIL OF NE END OF HARBOR SIDE WITH POLE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Explosive & Small Train Depot, Main wharf area adjacent to Wharf No. 3, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. BLDG 47, ELEVATION DETAIL AT NE END OF HARBOR SIDE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 47, ELEVATION DETAIL AT NE END OF HARBOR SIDE. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, West Loch Branch, Explosive & Small Train Depot, Main wharf area adjacent to Wharf No. 3, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. GEOCHEMICAL STUDY OF SEDIMENT CONTAMINATION IN NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical analyses of sediment samples collected along a transect in New Bedford harbor revealed a gradient of increasing concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polycyclic aromatic hydro...

  6. 24. Looking E toward Boston harbor along NEC; Berkley Avenue ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Looking E toward Boston harbor along NEC; Berkley Avenue Bridge in foreground. Boston, Suffolk Co., MA. Sec. 4116, MP 227.99. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between RI/MA State Line & South Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  7. ADSORPTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN AGED HARBOR SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of hydrophobic organic contaminants which have low aqueous solubilities and are common pollutants in harbor sediments. Adsorption and desorption isotherms for PAHs are conducted to study the abiotic sorption of PAHs in uncontami...

  8. 33 CFR 117.802 - New Rochelle Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.802 New Rochelle Harbor. (a) The draw of the Glen Island Bridge, mile 0.8, at New Rochelle, New York, shall open on signal, except...

  9. 33 CFR 117.802 - New Rochelle Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.802 New Rochelle Harbor. (a) The draw of the Glen Island Bridge, mile 0.8, at New Rochelle, New York, shall open on signal, except...

  10. 9. NEW YORK HARBOR MODEL. VIEW FACING OUT LONG ISLAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. NEW YORK HARBOR MODEL. VIEW FACING OUT LONG ISLAND SOUND, SHOWING LA GUARDIA AIRPORT AT CENTER. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  11. 78 FR 68867 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background: The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs, (OWCP) administers...

  12. Calreticulin (CALR) mutation in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs)

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenyi

    2015-01-01

    As a heterogeneous group of disease, myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have confused hematologists and hematopathologists with their protean clinical presentations and myriads of morphologies. A thought of classifying MPNs based on molecular alterations has gained popularity because there is increasing evidence that molecular or chromosomal alterations have a better correlation with clinical presentation, response to therapies, and prognosis than conventional morphological classification. This type of efforts has been facilitated by the advancement of molecular technologies. A significant number of gene mutations have been identified in MPNs with JAK2 and MPL being the major ones. However, a significant gap is present in that many cases of MPNs do not harbor any of these mutations. This gap is recently filled by the discovery of Calreticulin (CALR) mutation in MPNs without JAK2 or MPL mutation and since then, the clinical and molecular correlation in MPNs has become a hot research topic. There seems to be a fairly consistent correlation between CALR mutation and certain hematological parameters such as a high platelet count and a better prognosis in MPNs with CALR mutation. However, controversies are present regarding the risks of thrombosis, interactions of CALR with other gene mutation, the role of CALR in the pathogenesis, and the optimal treatment strategies. In addition, there are many questions remain to be answered, which all boiled down to the molecular mechanisms by which CALR causes or contributes to MPNs. Here, we summarized current published literatures on CALR mutations in MPNs with an emphasis on the clinical-molecular correlation. We also discussed the controversies and questions remain to be answered. PMID:27358884

  13. Comprehensive sediment quality of the NY/NJ harbor estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; O`Connor, J.

    1995-12-31

    The New York/New Jersey Harbor estuary is in the center of the most populated and industrialized area in the US. It provides habitat and sanctuary for many fish, shellfish, and birds, Years of accumulated and recent toxics contamination, primarily in sediments, has resulted in fishing bans, consumption advisories and controversy regarding disposal of dredge spoils. As part of a Management Plan for the Harbor, a strategy to manage the contaminated sediments was a necessity. Existing contaminant data for the Harbor was not sufficient to develop this strategy. The existing data had several shortcomings: biased collection locations precluded determination of areal estimates of contamination; conclusions regarding biological effects could not be made, because toxicity, chemistry and benthos usually were not determined concurrently, and large areas of the system lacked information. Additionally, datasets from the Harbor could not be aggregated, either due to incompatible gear or methods or lack of documentation as to procedures employed. To address these shortcomings, EPA Region 2, in partnership with the NY/NJ Harbor Estuary Program, NOAA and EMAP, designed a two-year program to characterize surficial sediment quality in the Harbor system. This program provides information on the extent and magnitude of sediment degradation throughout the system and within specific sub-basins. The characterization is based on the EMAP probability-based approach for describing ecological condition. Synoptic measurements of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages, toxicity and chemistry were made at 168 stations in 6 sub-basins, along with water column profiles. Areal estimates of conditions were made for each sub-basin and for the Harbor as a whole. The authors will present an overview of the current status of surficial sediment contamination, toxicity and benthic macroinvertebrate conditions in the Harbor.

  14. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 341, 62 Stat. 799; 18 U.S.C. 2152, 33 U.S.C. 475; E.O. 8143, 4 FR 2179, 3 CFR 1943 Cum. Supp. 504) ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander,...

  15. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 341, 62 Stat. 799; 18 U.S.C. 2152, 33 U.S.C. 475; E.O. 8143, 4 FR 2179, 3 CFR 1943 Cum. Supp. 504) ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander,...

  16. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 341, 62 Stat. 799; 18 U.S.C. 2152, 33 U.S.C. 475; E.O. 8143, 4 FR 2179, 3 CFR 1943 Cum. Supp. 504) ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander,...

  17. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 341, 62 Stat. 799; 18 U.S.C. 2152, 33 U.S.C. 475; E.O. 8143, 4 FR 2179, 3 CFR 1943 Cum. Supp. 504) ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander,...

  18. 32 CFR 765.6 - Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 341, 62 Stat. 799; 18 U.S.C. 2152, 33 U.S.C. 475; E.O. 8143, 4 FR 2179, 3 CFR 1943 Cum. Supp. 504) ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. 765.6... RULES RULES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC § 765.6 Regulations for Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The Commander,...

  19. Radiological survey results at Beverly Harbor, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB025)

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1992-08-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at Beverly Harbor, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in may 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to the harbor and neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil and biological samples for radionuclide analyses.

  20. Safe harbor: protecting ports with shipboard fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, David A

    2006-04-01

    With five of the largest harbors in the United States, California is beginning to take steps to manage the large amounts of pollution generated by these bustling centers of transport and commerce. One option for reducing diesel emissions is the use of fuel cells, which run cleaner than diesel and other internal combustion engines. Other technologies being explored by harbor officials are diesel-electric hybrid and gas turbine locomotives for moving freight within port complexes. PMID:16581531

  1. HHS Inspector General publishes final safe harbor regulations.

    PubMed

    Valiant, C

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General has finally published the long-awaited Medicare/Medicaid final safe harbor regulations. The regulations, implementing the Medicare and Medicaid Patient and Program Protection Act of 1987, protect from criminal and civil sanctions certain payment practices that could otherwise be proscribed under the Medicare/Medicaid antikickback statute. Unfortunately, the final safe harbors appear not to reach many common business arrangements among health care providers currently in place. PMID:10114719

  2. High-throughput mutation profiling improves diagnostic stratification of sporadic medullary thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Simbolo, Michele; Mian, Caterina; Barollo, Susi; Fassan, Matteo; Mafficini, Andrea; Neves, Diogo; Scardoni, Maria; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Rugge, Massimo; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Cavedon, Elisabetta; Fugazzola, Laura; Scarpa, Aldo

    2014-07-01

    Sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) harbors RET gene somatic mutations in up to 50 % of cases, and RAS family gene mutations occur in about 10 %. A timely and comprehensive characterization of molecular alterations is needed to improve MTC diagnostic stratification and design-tailored therapeutic approaches. Twenty surgically resected sporadic MTCs, previously analyzed for RET mutations by Sanger sequencing using DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, were investigated for intragenic mutations in 50 cancer-associated genes applying a multigene Ion AmpliSeq next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Thirteen (65 %) MTCs harbored a RET mutation; 10 were detected at both Sanger and NGS sequencing, while 3 undetected by Sanger were revealed by NGS. One of the 13 RET-mutated cases also showed an F354L germline mutation in STK11. Of the seven RET wild-type MTCs, four cases (57.1 %) harbored a RAS mutation: three in HRAS (all Q61R) and one in KRAS (G12R). The three remaining MTCs (15 %) resulted as wild-type for all the 50 cancer-related genes. Follow-up was available in all but one RET-mutated case. At the end of follow-up, 7 of 12 (58 %) RET-mutated patients had relapsed, while the 4 RAS-mutated MTC patients were disease-free. Two of the three patients with MTC wild-type for all 50 genes relapsed during the follow-up period. Detection of mutations by NGS has the potential to improve the diagnostic stratification of sporadic MTC. PMID:24828033

  3. Estimating mutation rate: how to count mutations?

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yun-Xin; Huai, Haying

    2003-01-01

    Mutation rate is an essential parameter in genetic research. Counting the number of mutant individuals provides information for a direct estimate of mutation rate. However, mutant individuals in the same family can share the same mutations due to premeiotic mutation events, so that the number of mutant individuals can be significantly larger than the number of mutation events observed. Since mutation rate is more closely related to the number of mutation events, whether one should count only independent mutation events or the number of mutants remains controversial. We show in this article that counting mutant individuals is a correct approach for estimating mutation rate, while counting only mutation events will result in underestimation. We also derived the variance of the mutation-rate estimate, which allows us to examine a number of important issues about the design of such experiments. The general strategy of such an experiment should be to sample as many families as possible and not to sample much more offspring per family than the reciprocal of the pairwise correlation coefficient within each family. To obtain a reasonably accurate estimate of mutation rate, the number of sampled families needs to be in the same or higher order of magnitude as the reciprocal of the mutation rate. PMID:12807798

  4. Evaluation of upland disposal of Oakland Harbor, California, sediment. Volume 2: Inner and outer harbor sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.R.; Brandon, D.L.; Tatem, H.E.; Simmers, J.W.; Skogerboe, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes testing and evaluation performed by the Environmental Laboratory of the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station on sediment from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbor, California. Test protocols from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Technical Framework for the Management of Dredged Material were used in the present evaluation to determine the potential for migration of contaminants into effluent, surface runoff, leachate, plants, and animals at an undetermined upland disposal site. One composite sediment each from Oakland Inner Harbor and Oakland Outer Harbor was tested. The composite sample consisted of sediment cores taken from the mud line to 44-ft depth. Both Oakland Harbor sediments had clayey sand textures. Total organic carbon concentrations in sediment from Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors were 3,364 and 6,042 mg/kg, respectively. Based on test results, Oakland Harbor sediments will require management of suspended solids in effluent and surface runoff and a mixing zone of at least 20 to 1 to meet the strictest assumed water quality criteria or standards. Management controls should be considered at the upland site, since plants grew poorly and contained elevated cadmium, lead, and selenium and earthworms accumulated arsenic, cadmium, and nickel. Contaminant migration, Sediment testing, Contaminated sediments, Upland disposal, Dredged material.

  5. SERPINA1 Full-Gene Sequencing Identifies Rare Mutations Not Detected in Targeted Mutation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rondell P; Dina, Michelle A; Howe, Sarah C; Butz, Malinda L; Willkomm, Kurt S; Murray, David L; Snyder, Melissa R; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Halling, Kevin C; Highsmith, W Edward

    2015-11-01

    Genetic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is characterized by low serum AAT levels and the identification of causal mutations or an abnormal protein. It needs to be distinguished from deficiency because of nongenetic causes, and diagnostic delay may contribute to worse patient outcome. Current routine clinical testing assesses for only the most common mutations. We wanted to determine the proportion of unexplained cases of AAT deficiency that harbor causal mutations not identified through current standard allele-specific genotyping and isoelectric focusing (IEF). All prospective cases from December 1, 2013, to October 1, 2014, with a low serum AAT level not explained by allele-specific genotyping and IEF were assessed through full-gene sequencing with a direct sequencing method for pathogenic mutations. We reviewed the results using American Council of Medical Genetics criteria. Of 3523 cases, 42 (1.2%) met study inclusion criteria. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations not identified through clinical testing were detected through full-gene sequencing in 16 (38%) of the 42 cases. Rare mutations not detected with current allele-specific testing and IEF underlie a substantial proportion of genetic AAT deficiency. Full-gene sequencing, therefore, has the ability to improve accuracy in the diagnosis of AAT deficiency. PMID:26321041

  6. Tech Talk for Social Studies Teachers Lest We Forget: Remembering Pearl Harbor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Tim

    2001-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography that provides Web sites about Pearl Harbor (Hawaii). Includes Web sites that cover Pearl Harbor history, a live view of Pearl Harbor, stories from people who remember where they were during the attack, information on the naval station at Pearl Harbor, and a virtual tour of the USS Arizona. (CMK)

  7. Parkinson disease (PARK) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Yardena; Azizi, Esther; Qutob, Nouar; Inzelberg, Lilah; Domany, Eytan; Schechtman, Edna; Friedman, Eitan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether Parkinson disease (PD) genes are somatically mutated in cutaneous melanoma (CM) tissue, because CM occurs in patients with PD at higher rates than in the general population and PD is more common than expected in CM cohorts. Methods: We cross-referenced somatic mutations in metastatic CM detected by whole-exome sequencing with the 15 known PD (PARK) genes. We computed the empirical distribution of the sum of mutations in each gene (Smut) and of the number of tissue samples in which a given gene was mutated at least once (SSampl) for each of the analyzable genes, determined the 90th and 95th percentiles of the empirical distributions of these sums, and verified the location of PARK genes in these distributions. Identical analyses were applied to adenocarcinoma of lung (ADENOCA-LUNG) and squamous cell carcinoma of lung (SQUAMCA-LUNG). We also analyzed the distribution of the number of mutated PARK genes in CM samples vs the 2 lung cancers. Results: Somatic CM mutation analysis (n = 246) detected 315,914 mutations in 18,758 genes. Somatic CM mutations were found in 14 of 15 PARK genes. Forty-eight percent of CM samples carried ≥1 PARK mutation and 25% carried multiple PARK mutations. PARK8 mutations occurred above the 95th percentile of the empirical distribution for SMut and SSampl. Significantly more CM samples harbored multiple PARK gene mutations compared with SQUAMCA-LUNG (p = 0.0026) and with ADENOCA-LUNG (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The overrepresentation of somatic PARK mutations in CM suggests shared dysregulated pathways for CM and PD. PMID:27123489

  8. Low Prevalence of Somatic TERT Promoter Mutations in Classic Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Soyoung; Lim, Seonhee; Kwon, Hyemi; Kim, Tae Yong; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background Transcriptional activating mutations of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) are associated with more aggressive thyroid cancer. We evaluated the significance of TERT promoter mutations in Korean patients with classic papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). Methods Genomic DNA was isolated from four thyroid cancer cell lines and 35 fresh-frozen PTC tissues. TERT promoter mutations (C228T and C250T) and the BRAF V600E mutation were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Results The CC228229TT mutation in the TERT promoter was detected in BCPAP cells and the C250T mutation was found in 8505C cells. No TERT promoter mutation was observed in Cal-62 or ML-1 cells. The C228T mutation was found in only 1 of 35 (2.8%) PTCs and no C250T mutations were detected in any of the study subjects. The BRAF V600E mutation was found in 20 of 35 (57.1%) PTCs. One patient with the C228T TERT mutation also harbored the BRAF V600E mutation and developed a recurrence. Conclusion The prevalence of somatic TERT promoter mutations was low in Korean patients with classic PTC. Therefore, the prognostic role of TERT promoter mutations might be limited in this patient cohort. PMID:26676331

  9. Frequent Mutation of BAP1 in Metastasizing Uveal Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Harbour, J. William; Onken, Michael D.; Roberson, Elisha D.O.; Duan, Shenghui; Cao, Li; Worley, Lori A.; Council, M. Laurin; Matatall, Katie A.; Helms, Cynthia; Bowcock, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Metastasis is a defining feature of malignant tumors and is the most common cause of cancer-related death, yet the genetics of metastasis are poorly understood. We used massively parallel exome sequencing coupled with Sanger re-sequencing to search for metastasis-related mutations in highly metastatic uveal melanomas of the eye. Inactivating somatic mutations were identified in the gene encoding BRCA1-associated protein 1 (BAP1) on chromosome 3p21.1 in 26 of 31 (84%) metastasizing tumors, including 15 mutations causing premature protein termination, and six affecting its ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCH) domains. One tumor harbored a frameshift mutation that was germline in origin, thus representing a susceptibility allele. These findings implicate loss of BAP1 in uveal melanoma metastasis and suggest the BAP1 pathway as a therapeutic target. PMID:21051595

  10. Immunogenicity of somatic mutations in human gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Tran, Eric; Ahmadzadeh, Mojgan; Lu, Yong-Chen; Gros, Alena; Turcotte, Simon; Robbins, Paul F; Gartner, Jared J; Zheng, Zhili; Li, Yong F; Ray, Satyajit; Wunderlich, John R; Somerville, Robert P; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2015-12-11

    It is unknown whether the human immune system frequently mounts a T cell response against mutations expressed by common epithelial cancers. Using a next-generation sequencing approach combined with high-throughput immunologic screening, we demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from 9 out of 10 patients with metastatic gastrointestinal cancers contained CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cells that recognized one to three neo-epitopes derived from somatic mutations expressed by the patient's own tumor. There were no immunogenic epitopes shared between these patients. However, we identified in one patient a human leukocyte antigen-C*08:02-restricted T cell receptor from CD8(+) TILs that targeted the KRAS(G12D) hotspot driver mutation found in many human cancers. Thus, a high frequency of patients with common gastrointestinal cancers harbor immunogenic mutations that can potentially be exploited for the development of highly personalized immunotherapies. PMID:26516200

  11. Role of Duplicate Genes in Robustness against Deleterious Human Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Tzu-Lin; Vitkup, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that robustness is an inherent property of biological systems [1],[2],[3]. The contribution of close sequence homologs to genetic robustness against null mutations has been previously demonstrated in simple organisms [4],[5]. In this paper we investigate in detail the contribution of gene duplicates to back-up against deleterious human mutations. Our analysis demonstrates that the functional compensation by close homologs may play an important role in human genetic disease. Genes with a 90% sequence identity homolog are about 3 times less likely to harbor known disease mutations compared to genes with remote homologs. Moreover, close duplicates affect the phenotypic consequences of deleterious mutations by making a decrease in life expectancy significantly less likely. We also demonstrate that similarity of expression profiles across tissues significantly increases the likelihood of functional compensation by homologs. PMID:18369440

  12. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia--Prognostic Value of Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kaleem, Bushra; Shahab, Sadaf; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Shamsi, Tahir Sultan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a stem cell disorder characterized by unrestricted proliferation of the myeloid series that occurs due to the BCR-ABL fusion oncogene as a result of reciprocal translocation t(9;22) (q34;q11). This discovery has made this particular domain a target for future efforts to cure CML. Imatinib revolutionized the treatment options for CML and gave encouraging results both in case of safety as well as tolerability profile as compared to agents such as hydroxyurea or busulfan given before Imatinib. However, about 2-4% of patients show resistance and mutations have been found to be one of the reasons for its development. European Leukemianet gives recommendations for BCR-ABL mutational analysis along with other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that should be administered according to the mutations harbored in a patient. The following overview gives recommendations for monitoring patients on the basis of their mutational status. PMID:26625737

  13. High incidence of TERT mutation in brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Johanns, Tanner M; Fu, Yujie; Kobayashi, Dale K; Mei, Yu; Dunn, Ian F; Mao, Diane D; Kim, Albert H; Dunn, Gavin P

    2016-07-01

    TERT promoter gene mutations are highly recurrent in malignant glioma. However, little information exists regarding their presence in experimental brain tumor models. To better characterize systems in which TERT mutation studies could be appropriately modeled experimentally, the TERT promoter was examined by conventional sequencing in primary brain tumor initiating cells (BTIC), two matched recurrent BTIC lines, a panel of established malignant glioma cell lines, and two meningioma cell lines. Telomerase gene expression was examined by quantitative PCR. We found that all glioblastoma BTIC lines harbored a TERT mutation, which was retained in two patient-matched recurrent BTIC. The TERT C228T or C250T mutation was found in 33/35 (94 %) of established malignant glioma cell lines and both meningioma cell lines examined. Brain tumor cell lines expressed variably high telomerase levels. Thus, a high percentage of glioma cell lines, as well as two meningioma cell lines, harbors TERT mutations. These data characterize tractable, accessible models with which to further explore telomerase biology in these tumor types. PMID:26960334

  14. Lethal Keratitis, Ichthyosis, and Deafness Syndrome Due to the A88V Connexin 26 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Esmer, Carmen; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Fajardo-Ramirez, Oscar R; Ramírez, Brenda; Hua, Rong; Choate, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome is a well-characterized disease that has been related to mutations in the GJB6 gene. Clinical features such as erythrokeratoderma, palmoplantar keratoderma, alopecia, and progressive vascularizing keratitis, among others, are well known in this entity. In this report we describe a newborn female patient diagnosed with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome with a lethal outcome due to sepsis. The patient harbored the mutation A88V that has been previously reported in lethal cases. PMID:27409001

  15. Mutations of KRAS/NRAS/BRAF predict cetuximab resistance in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hung-Chih; Thiam, Tan Kien; Lu, Yen-Jung; Yeh, Chien Yuh; Tsai, Wen-Sy; You, Jeng Fu; Hung, Hsin Yuan; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Hsu, An; Chen, Hua-Chien; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yang, Tsai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 45% of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients with wild-type KRAS exon 2 are resistant to cetuximab treatment. We set out to identify additional genetic markers that might predict the response to cetuximab treatment. Fifty-three wild-type KRAS exon 2 mCRC patients were treated with cetuximab/irinotecan-based chemotherapy as a first- or third-line therapy. The mutational statuses of 10 EGFR pathway genes were analyzed in primary tumors using next-generation sequencing. BRAF, PIK3CA, KRAS (exons 3 and 4), NRAS, PTEN, and AKT1 mutations were detected in 6, 6, 5, 4, 1, and 1 patient, respectively. Four of the BRAF mutations were non-V600 variants. Four tumors harbored multiple co-existing (complex) mutations. All patients with BRAF mutations or complex mutation patterns were cetuximab non-responders. All patients but one harboring KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF mutations were non-responders. Mutations in any one of these three genes were associated with a poor response rate (7.1%) and reduced survival (PFS = 8.0 months) compared to wild-type patients (74.4% and 11.6 months). Our data suggest that KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF mutations predict response to cetuximab treatment in mCRC patients. PMID:26989027

  16. Detection of mutations associated with isoniazid resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Yue, Jun; Yang, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Lei, Jian-Qiang; Jin, Rui-Liang; Zhang, Xue-Lian; Wang, Hong-Hai

    2005-11-01

    Nine structural genes (furA, katG, inhA, kasA, Rv0340, iniB, iniA, iniC, and efpA) and two regulatory regions (the oxyR-ahpC intergenic region and the promoter of mabA-inhA) in 87 isoniazid (INH)-monoresistant and 50 INH-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates collected from five provinces of China were analyzed by sequencing. Eighty-two (94.3%) INH-resistant isolates had mutations in the katG gene, with the katG Ser315Thr mutation predominant (55.2%). No mutation at codon 463 of katG was detected among the 50 INH-susceptible isolates with different IS6110 fingerprints. In addition, there were 35 (40.2%) INH-resistant isolates that had a mutation at codon 463 of katG. Of the INH-resistant strains, 20 (23.0%) isolates harbored double mutations at two separate loci of katG. Mutations in the inhA promoter region occurred in 13 (14.9%) isolates; 4.6% of the isolates had inhA structural gene mutations, and 11.5% harbored mutations in the oxyR-ahpC intergenic region. Drug resistance-associated mutations were detected in the iniBAC region and efpA. PMID:16272473

  17. CEBPA mutations in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia: data analysis in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Su, Long; Gao, SuJun; Liu, XiaoLiang; Tan, YeHui; Wang, Lu; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was aimed to explore the clinical characteristics and prognoses of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with CEBPA mutations. Patients and methods Three hundred and forty-five patients with de novo AML were retrospectively analyzed with regard to CEBPA mutations, clinical characteristics, therapeutic responses, and long-term outcomes. Results CEBPA mutations were detected in 59 patients (17.10%), with 47 cases harboring double mutations and 12 cases harboring single mutations. In those with a normal karyotype (NK), 44 cases (25.29%) were detected with CEBPA mutations. The following characteristics were observed in CEBPA-mutated patients: most (66.10%) of them were M1 or M2; they presented with higher peripheral white blood cell counts (23.71 [12.6, 60.02] ×109/L versus 7.34 [2.38, 26.63] ×109/L; u=4.944, P<0.001) and higher hemoglobin levels (89.64±23.05 g/L versus 75.65±23.65 g/L; t=4.156, P<0.001) than those observed in patients without the mutation; and the expression of CD7 and HLA-DR was higher, whereas that of CD34 and CD56 was lower in patients with the mutation than in those without the mutation. Compared with those without the mutation, patients with CEBPA mutations had a superior complete remission rate (75.0% versus 56.54%; χ2=6.185, P=0.013) and superior overall survival (P=0.034). Conclusion The frequency of CEBPA mutations may be higher in Chinese patients with AML than has been reported in populations of western countries, and the presence of CEBPA mutations is an indication of favorable prognoses for these patients. PMID:27350755

  18. 12 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G - Higher-Priced Mortgage Loan Appraisal Safe Harbor Review To qualify for the safe harbor provided...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Review 7. Indicates that a physical property visit of the interior of the property was performed, as... Harbor Review To qualify for the safe harbor provided in § 34.203(c)(2), a creditor must confirm that... Review To qualify for the safe harbor provided in § 34.203(c)(2), a creditor must confirm that...

  19. Severe congenital neutropenia with neurological impairment due to a homozygous VPS45 p.E238K mutation: A case report suggesting a genotype-phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Meerschaut, Ilse; Bordon, Victoria; Dhooge, Catharina; Delbeke, Patricia; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Simon, Amos; Klein, Christoph; Kooy, R Frank; Somech, Raz; Callewaert, Bert

    2015-12-01

    VPS45 mutations cause severe congenital neutropenia (SCN). We report on a girl with SCN and neurological impairment harboring a homozygous p.E238K mutation in VPS45 (vacuolar sorting protein 45). She successfully underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Our findings delineate the phenotype and indicate a possible genotype-phenotype correlation for neurological involvement. PMID:26358756

  20. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in human colonic crypt stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert W.; Barron, Martin J.; Borthwick, Gillian M.; Gospel, Amy; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Samuels, David C.; Taylor, Geoffrey A.; Plusa, Stefan M.; Needham, Stephanie J.; Greaves, Laura C.; Kirkwood, Thomas B.L.; Turnbull, Douglass M.

    2003-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome encodes 13 essential subunits of the respiratory chain and has remarkable genetics based on uniparental inheritance. Within human populations, the mitochondrial genome has a high rate of sequence divergence with multiple polymorphic variants and thus has played a major role in examining the evolutionary history of our species. In recent years it has also become apparent that pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations play an important role in neurological and other diseases. Patients harbor many different mtDNA mutations, some of which are mtDNA mutations, some of which are inherited, but others that seem to be sporadic. It has also been suggested that mtDNA mutations play a role in aging and cancer, but the evidence for a causative role in these conditions is less clear. The accumulated data would suggest, however, that mtDNA mutations occur on a frequent basis. In this article we describe a new phenomenon: the accumulation of mtDNA mutations in human colonic crypt stem cells that result in a significant biochemical defect in their progeny. These studies have important consequences not only for understanding of the finding of mtDNA mutations in aging tissues and tumors, but also for determining the frequency of mtDNA mutations within a cell. PMID:14597761

  1. A Novel Technique to Detect EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanbin; Lei, Ting; Liu, Zhiyu; Kuang, Yanbin; Lyu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations occur in multiple human cancers; therefore, the detection of EGFR mutations could lead to early cancer diagnosis. This study describes a novel EGFR mutation detection technique. Compared to direct DNA sequencing detection methods, this method is based on allele-specific amplification (ASA), recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and SYBR Green I (SYBR), referred to as the AS-RPA-PNA-SYBR (ARPS) system. The principle of this technique is based on three continuous steps: ASA or ASA combined with PNA to prevent non-target sequence amplification (even single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs), the rapid amplification advantage of RPA, and appropriate SYBR Green I detection (the samples harboring EGFR mutations show a green signal). Using this method, the EGFR 19Del(2) mutation was detected in 5 min, while the EGFR L858R mutation was detected in 10 min. In this study, the detection of EGFR mutations in clinical samples using the ARPS system was compatible with that determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. Thus, this newly developed methodology that uses the ARPS system with appropriate primer sets is a rapid, reliable, and practical way to assess EGFR mutations in clinical samples. PMID:27223277

  2. A Novel Technique to Detect EGFR Mutations in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanbin; Lei, Ting; Liu, Zhiyu; Kuang, Yanbin; Lyu, Jianxin; Wang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations occur in multiple human cancers; therefore, the detection of EGFR mutations could lead to early cancer diagnosis. This study describes a novel EGFR mutation detection technique. Compared to direct DNA sequencing detection methods, this method is based on allele-specific amplification (ASA), recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA), peptide nucleic acid (PNA), and SYBR Green I (SYBR), referred to as the AS-RPA-PNA-SYBR (ARPS) system. The principle of this technique is based on three continuous steps: ASA or ASA combined with PNA to prevent non-target sequence amplification (even single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs), the rapid amplification advantage of RPA, and appropriate SYBR Green I detection (the samples harboring EGFR mutations show a green signal). Using this method, the EGFR 19Del(2) mutation was detected in 5 min, while the EGFR L858R mutation was detected in 10 min. In this study, the detection of EGFR mutations in clinical samples using the ARPS system was compatible with that determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. Thus, this newly developed methodology that uses the ARPS system with appropriate primer sets is a rapid, reliable, and practical way to assess EGFR mutations in clinical samples. PMID:27223277

  3. Patterns in the vocalizations of male harbor seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Parijs, Sofie M.; Corkeron, Peter J.; Harvey, James; Hayes, Sean A.; Mellinger, David K.; Rouget, Philippe A.; Thompson, Paul M.; Wahlberg, Magnus; Kovacs, Kit M.

    2003-06-01

    Comparative analyses of the roar vocalization of male harbor seals from ten sites throughout their distribution showed that vocal variation occurs at the oceanic, regional, population, and subpopulation level. Genetic barriers based on the physical distance between harbor seal populations present a likely explanation for some of the observed vocal variation. However, site-specific vocal variations were present between genetically mixed subpopulations in California. A tree-based classification analysis grouped Scottish populations together with eastern Pacific sites, rather than amongst Atlantic sites as would be expected if variation was based purely on genetics. Lastly, within the classification tree no individual vocal parameter was consistently responsible for consecutive splits between geographic sites. Combined, these factors suggest that site-specific variation influences the development of vocal structure in harbor seals and these factors may provide evidence for the occurrence of vocal dialects.

  4. Clinical Manifestations in Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia Patients with Proline-Rich Transmembrane Protein 2 Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Jinyoung; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Munhyang; Lee, Jeehun; Roh, Hakjae

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Given the diverse phenotypes including combined non-dyskinetic symptoms in patients harboring mutations of the gene encoding proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2), the clinical significance of these mutations in paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is questionable. In this study, we investigated the clinical characteristics of PKD patients with PRRT2 mutations. Methods Familial and sporadic PKD patients were enrolled and PRRT2 gene sequencing was performed. Demographic and clinical data were compared between PKD patients with and without a PRRT2 mutation. Results Among the enrolled PKD patients (8 patients from 5 PKD families and 19 sporadic patients), PRRT2 mutations were detected in 3 PKD families (60%) and 2 sporadic cases (10.5%). All familial patients with a PRRT2 gene mutation had the c.649dupC mutation, which is the most commonly reported mutation. Two uncommon mutations (c.649delC and c.629dupC) were detected only in the sporadic cases. PKD patients with PRRT2 mutation were younger at symptom onset and had more non-dyskinetic symptoms than those without PRRT2 mutation. However, the characteristics of dyskinetic movement did not differ between the two groups. Conclusions This is the first study of PRRT2 mutations in Korea. The presence of a PRRT2 mutation was more strongly related to familial PKD, and was clinically related with earlier age of onset and common non-dyskinetic symptoms in PKD patients. PMID:24465263

  5. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Emperador, Sonia; Pacheu-Grau, David; Bayona-Bafaluy, M. Pilar; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; Martín-Navarro, Antonio; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative. Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys) harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal. In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, this species also carries a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. PMID:25642242

  6. Mutation and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L. ); Albertini, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is organized under the following headings: Plenary lectures; Brook mutational mechanisms; Adduction and DNA damage; Recombination and gene conversion; Repair: Prokoyote mechanisms and induction; Repair: Lower eukaryote and plant mechanisms; Repair: Higher eukaryote mechanisms and selectivity; Repair: Human genes and mechanisms; Mutation: Spectra and mechanisms; Mutation: Shuttle vectors; Mutation: Transgenic animals; New methods: Polymerase chain reaction.

  7. Pituitary blastoma: a pathognomonic feature of germ-line DICER1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    de Kock, Leanne; Sabbaghian, Nelly; Plourde, François; Srivastava, Archana; Weber, Evan; Soglio, Dorothée Bouron-Dal; Hamel, Nancy; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Park, Sung-Hye; Deal, Cheri L.; Kelsey, Megan M.; Dishop, Megan K.; Esbenshade, Adam; Kuttesch, John F.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Perry, Arie; Leichter, Heinz; Maeder, Philippe; Brundler, Marie-Anne; Warner, Justin; Neal, James; Zacharin, Margaret; Korbonits, Márta; Cole, Trevor; Traunecker, Heidi; McLean, Thomas W.; Rotondo, Fabio; Lepage, Pierre; Albrecht, Steffen; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman; Priest, John R.; Foulkes, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals harboring germ-line DICER1 mutations are predisposed to a rare cancer syndrome, the DICER1 Syndrome or pleuropulmonary blastoma-familial tumor and dysplasia syndrome [online Mendelian inheritance in man (OMIM) #601200]. In addition, specific somatic mutations in the DICER1 RNase III catalytic domain have been identified in several DICER1-associated tumor types. Pituitary blastoma (PitB) was identified as a distinct entity in 2008, and is a very rare, potentially lethal early childhood tumor of the pituitary gland. Since the discovery by our team of an inherited mutation in DICER1 in a child with PitB in 2011, we have identified 12 additional PitB cases. We aimed to determine the contribution of germ-line and somatic DICER1 mutations to PitB. We hypothesized that PitB is a pathognomonic feature of a germ-line DICER1 mutation and that each PitB will harbor a second somatic mutation in DICER1. Lymphocyte or saliva DNA samples ascertained from ten infants with PitB were screened and nine were found to harbor a heterozygous germ-line DICER1 mutation. We identified additional DICER1 mutations in nine of ten tested PitB tumor samples, eight of which were confirmed to be somatic in origin. Seven of these mutations occurred within the RNase IIIb catalytic domain, a domain essential to the generation of 5p miRNAs from the 5′ arm of miRNA-precursors. Germ-line DICER1 mutations are a major contributor to PitB. Second somatic DICER1 “hits” occurring within the RNase IIIb domain also appear to be critical in PitB pathogenesis. PMID:24839956

  8. Vaginal calculi in a juvenile harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena).

    PubMed

    Norman, Stephanie A; Garner, Michael M; Berta, Susan; Dubpernell, Sandra; Klope, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    A large number of vaginal calculi were observed in a juvenile harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) stranded on Whidbey Island, Washington. Vaginal calculi have been reported in other species, but not in harbor porpoises. Histologic examination of the urinary tract revealed mucosal hyperplasia most likely attributable to the calculi. The calculi were numerous (>30), composed completely of struvite (magnesium ammonium phosphate), and on culture yielded Enterococcus spp., a bacterium not usually associated with struvite urolith formation in domestic animals. The only other lesion of note was severe hepatic lipidosis, and its relationship to the development of the vaginal calculi is unknown. PMID:22946417

  9. Bcl-6 mutation status provides clinically valuable information in early-stage B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sarsotti, E; Marugan, I; Benet, I; Terol, M J; Sanchez-Izquierdo, D; Tormo, M; Rubio-Moscardo, F; Martinez-Climent, J A; García-Conde, J

    2004-04-01

    In B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), somatic mutation of IgVH genes defines a subgroup with favorable prognosis, whereas the absence of IgVH mutations is correlated with a worse outcome. Mutations of the BCL-6 gene are also observed in a subset of B-CLL, but the clinical significance of this molecular alteration remains uncertain. We examined the distribution of IgVH and BCL-6 gene mutations in 95 well-characterized patients with Binet stage A B-CLL, and correlated them with clinical, laboratory, cytogenetic findings and disease progression. Mutations of the BCL-6 gene were observed only in cases harboring mutated IgVH. Unexpectedly, coexistence of IgVH and BCL-6 mutations was correlated with shorter treatment-free interval (TFI) compared to cases harboring only IgVH mutation (median, 55 months vs not reached; P=0.01), resembling the clinical course of unmutated IgVH cases (median TFI, 44 months). As expected, deletions of 17p13 (P53 locus) and 11q22 (ATM locus) were observed in cases with unmutated IgVH, except one patient who showed mutations of both IgVH and BCL-6. No other statistically significant differences were observed among the genetic subgroups. Our data indicate that BCL-6 mutations identify a subgroup of Binet stage A B-CLL patients with a high risk of progression despite the presence of mutated IgVH gene. PMID:14961033

  10. Concurrent loss of the PTEN and RB1 tumor suppressors attenuates RAF dependence in melanomas harboring V600EBRAF

    PubMed Central

    Xing, F; Persaud, Y; Pratilas, CA; Taylor, BS; Janakiraman, M; She, Q-B; Gallardo, H; Liu, C; Merghoub, T; Hefter, B; Dolgalev, I; Viale, A; Heguy, A; De Stanchina, E; Cobrinik, D; Bollag, G; Wolchok, J; Houghton, A; Solit, DB

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the spectrum of genetic alterations that cooperate with critical oncogenes to promote transformation provides a foundation for understanding the diversity of clinical phenotypes observed in human cancers. Here, we performed integrated analyses to identify genomic alterations that co-occur with oncogenic BRAF in melanoma and abrogate cellular dependence upon this oncogene. We identified concurrent mutational inactivation of the PTEN and RB1 tumor suppressors as a mechanism for loss of BRAF/MEK dependence in melanomas harboring V600EBRAF mutations. RB1 alterations were mutually exclusive with loss of p16INK4A, suggesting that whereas p16INK4A and RB1 may have overlapping roles in preventing tumor formation, tumors with loss of RB1 exhibit diminished dependence upon BRAF signaling for cell proliferation. These findings provide a genetic basis for the heterogeneity of clinical outcomes in patients treated with targeted inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Our results also suggest a need for comprehensive screening for RB1 and PTEN inactivation in patients treated with RAF and MEK-selective inhibitors to determine whether these alterations are associated with diminished clinical benefit in patients whose cancers harbor mutant BRAF. PMID:21725359

  11. GNAS mutation as an alternative mechanism of activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryosuke; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Mitomi, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Yasuhiro; Lee, Se-yong; Watanabe, Sumio; Yao, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type (GAFG) is a rare variant of gastric tumor. We have recently reported the frequent accumulation of β-catenin in GAFGs and showed that approximately half of the cases studied harbored at least 1 mutation in CTNNB1/AXINs/APC, leading to the constitutive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. However, the mechanisms of Wnt signaling activation in the remaining cases are unknown. Accumulating evidence showed that the activating mutation in GNAS promotes tumorigenesis via the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway or the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Therefore, we analyzed the mutations in GNAS (exons 8 and 9) and in KRAS (exon 2) in 26 GAFGs. Immunohistochemistry revealed nuclear β-catenin expression in 22 of 26 GAFGs, and 10 (38.5%) of 26 cases harbored at least 1 mutation in CTNNB1/AXINs/APC. Activating mutations in GNAS were found in 5 (19.2%) of 26 GAFGs, all of which harbored R201C mutations. Activating mutations in KRAS were found in 2 (7.7%) of 26 GAFGs, and both of these also contained GNAS activating mutations. Four of 5 cases with GNAS mutation showed nuclear β-catenin expression, and presence of GNAS mutation was associated with β-catenin nuclear expression (P = .01). Furthermore, 3 of these 4 cases did not harbor mutations in CTNNB1, APC, or AXINs, suggesting that mutations in the Wnt component genes and those in GNAS occur almost exclusively. These results suggest that GNAS mutation might occur in a small subset of GAFG as an alternative mechanism of activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:25288233

  12. A novel somatic MAPK1 mutation in primary ovarian mixed germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yang; Deng, Wei; Wang, Feng; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Fa-Ying; Yang, Bi-Cheng; Huang, Mei-Zhen; Guo, Jiu-Bai; Xie, Qiu-Hua; He, Ming; Huang, Ou-Ping

    2016-02-01

    A recent exome-sequencing study revealed prevalent mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) p.E322K mutation in cervical carcinoma. It remains largely unknown whether ovarian carcinomas also harbor MAPK1 mutations. As paralogous gene mutations co‑occur frequently in human malignancies, we analyzed here a total of 263 ovarian carcinomas for the presence of MAPK1 and paralogous MAPK3 mutations by DNA sequencing. A previously unreported MAPK1 p.D321N somatic mutation was identified in 2 out of 18 (11.1%) ovarian mixed germ cell tumors, while no other MAPK1 or MAPK3 mutation was detected in our samples. Of note, OCC‑115, the MAPK1‑mutated sample with bilateral cancerous ovaries affected, harbored MAPK1 mutation in the right ovary while retained the left ovary intact, implicating that the genetic alterations underlying ovarian mixed germ cell tumor may be different, even in patients with similar genetic backgrounds and tumor microenvironments. The results of evolutionary conservation and protein structure modeling analysis implicated that MAPK1 p.D321N mutation may be pathogenic. Additionally, mutations in protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit α (PPP2R1A), ring finger protein 43 (RNF43), DNA directed polymerase ε (POLE1), ribonuclease type III (DICER1), CCCTC‑binding factor (CTCF), ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22), DNA methyltransferase 3α (DNMT3A), transformation/transcription domain‑associated protein (TRRAP), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 and IDH2 were not detected in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors, implicating these genetic alterations may be not associated with MAPK1 mutation in the development of this malignancy. The present study identified a previously unreported MAPK1 mutation in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors for the first time, and this mutation may be actively involved in the tumorigenesis of this disease. PMID:26548627

  13. Somatic LKB1 Mutations Promote Cervical Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wingo, Shana N.; Gallardo, Teresa D.; Akbay, Esra A.; Liang, Mei-Chi; Contreras, Cristina M.; Boren, Todd; Shimamura, Takeshi; Miller, David S.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Schorge, John O.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2009-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the etiologic agent for cervical cancer. Yet, infection with HPV is not sufficient to cause cervical cancer, because most infected women develop transient epithelial dysplasias that spontaneously regress. Progression to invasive cancer has been attributed to diverse host factors such as immune or hormonal status, as no recurrent genetic alterations have been identified in cervical cancers. Thus, the pressing question as to the biological basis of cervical cancer progression has remained unresolved, hampering the development of novel therapies and prognostic tests. Here we show that at least 20% of cervical cancers harbor somatically-acquired mutations in the LKB1 tumor suppressor. Approximately one-half of tumors with mutations harbored single nucleotide substitutions or microdeletions identifiable by exon sequencing, while the other half harbored larger monoallelic or biallelic deletions detectable by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA). Biallelic mutations were identified in most cervical cancer cell lines; HeLa, the first human cell line, harbors a homozygous 25 kb deletion that occurred in vivo. LKB1 inactivation in primary tumors was associated with accelerated disease progression. Median survival was only 13 months for patients with LKB1-deficient tumors, but >100 months for patients with LKB1-wild type tumors (P = 0.015, log rank test; hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.083 to 0.77). LKB1 is thus a major cervical tumor suppressor, demonstrating that acquired genetic alterations drive progression of HPV-induced dysplasias to invasive, lethal cancers. Furthermore, LKB1 status can be exploited clinically to predict disease recurrence. PMID:19340305

  14. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in single human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2015-09-01

    Determination mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from extremely small amounts of DNA extracted from tissue of limited amounts and/or degraded samples is frequently employed in medical, forensic, and anthropologic studies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by DNA cloning is a routine method, especially to examine heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations. In this review, we compare the mtDNA mutation patterns detected by three different sequencing strategies. Cloning and sequencing methods that are based on PCR amplification of DNA extracted from either single cells or pooled cells yield a high frequency of mutations, partly due to the artifacts introduced by PCR and/or the DNA cloning process. Direct sequencing of PCR product which has been amplified from DNA in individual cells is able to detect the low levels of mtDNA mutations present within a cell. We further summarize the findings in our recent studies that utilized this single cell method to assay mtDNA mutation patterns in different human blood cells. Our data show that many somatic mutations observed in the end-stage differentiated cells are found in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors within the CD34(+) cell compartment. Accumulation of mtDNA variations in the individual CD34+ cells is affected by both aging and family genetic background. Granulocytes harbor higher numbers of mutations compared with the other cells, such as CD34(+) cells and lymphocytes. Serial assessment of mtDNA mutations in a population of single CD34(+) cells obtained from the same donor over time suggests stability of some somatic mutations. CD34(+) cell clones from a donor marked by specific mtDNA somatic mutations can be found in the recipient after transplantation. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the lineage tracing of HSCs, aging effect on accumulation of mtDNA mutations and the usage of mtDNA sequence in forensic identification. PMID:26149767

  15. Comprehensive analysis of targetable oncogenic mutations in chinese cervical cancers

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Libing; Li, Jiajia; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Xuxia; Yang, Wentao; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in 16 targetable oncogenic genes were examined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct sequencing in 285 Chinese cervical cancers. Their clinicopathological relevance and prognostic significance was assessed. Ninety-two nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified in 29.8% of the cancers. The mutation rates were as follows: PIK3CA (12.3%), KRAS (5.3%), HER2 (4.2%), FGFR3-TACC3 fusions (3.9%), PTEN (2.8%), FGFR2 (1.8%), FGFR3 (0.7%), NRAS (0.7%), HRAS (0.4%) and EGFR (0.4%). No mutations were detected in AKT1 or BRAF, and the fusions FGFR1-TACC1, EML4-ALK, CCDC6-RET and KIF5B-RET were not found in any of the cancers. RTK and RAS mutations were more common in non-squamous carcinomas than in squamous carcinomas (P=0.043 and P=0.042, respectively). RAS mutations were more common in young patients (<45 years) (13.7% vs. 7.7%, P=0.027). RTK mutations tended to be more common in young patients, whereas PIK3CA/PTEN/AKT mutations tended to be more common in old patients. RAS mutations were significantly associated with disease relapse. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of major targetable oncogenic mutations in a large cohort of cervical cancer cases. Our data reveal that a considerable proportion of patients with cervical cancers harbor known druggable mutations and might benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:25669975

  16. Shared and unique mutational gene co-occurrences in cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junqi; Zhao, Di; Fan, Ruitai

    2015-10-01

    Cancers are often associated with mutations in multiple genes; thus, studying the distributions of genes that harbor cancer-promoting mutations in cancer samples and their co-occurrences could provide insights into cancer diagnostics and treatment. Using data from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), we found that mutated genes in cancer samples followed a power-law distribution. For instance, a few genes were mutated in a large number of samples (designated as high-frequent genes), while a large number of genes were only mutated in a few samples. This power-law distribution can be found in samples of all cancer types as well as individual cancers. In samples where two or more mutated genes are found, the high-frequent genes, i.e., those that were frequently mutated, often did not co-occur with other genes, while the other genes often tended to co-occur. Co-occurrences of mutated genes were often unique to a certain cancer; however, some co-occurrences were shared by multiple cancer types. Our results revealed distinct patterns of high-frequent genes and those that were less-frequently mutated in the cancer samples in co-occurring and anti-co-occurring networks. Our results indicated that distinct treatment strategies should be adopted for cancer patients with known high-frequent gene mutations and those without. The latter might be better treated with a combination of drugs targeting multiple genes. Our results also suggested that possible cross-cancer treatments, i.e., the use of the same drug combinations, may treat cancers of different histological origins. PMID:26315265

  17. Impact of bevacizumab in combination with erlotinib on EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer xenograft models with T790M mutation or MET amplification.

    PubMed

    Furugaki, Koh; Fukumura, Junko; Iwai, Toshiki; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yanagisawa, Mieko; Moriya, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Kaname; Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Harada, Naoki

    2016-02-15

    Erlotinib (ERL), an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, shows notable efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR mutations. Bevacizumab (BEV), a humanized monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), in combination with ERL (BEV+ERL) significantly extended progression-free survival in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC compared with ERL alone. However, the efficacy of BEV+ERL against EGFR-mutated NSCLC harboring T790M mutation or MET amplification, is unclear. Here, we examined the antitumor activity of BEV+ERL in four xenograft models of EGFR-mutated NSCLC (three harboring ERL resistance mutations). In the HCC827 models (exon 19 deletion: DEL), ERL significantly inhibited tumor growth by blocking EGFR signal transduction. Although there was no difference between ERL and BEV+ERL in maximum tumor growth inhibition, BEV+ERL significantly suppressed tumor regrowth during a drug-cessation period. In the HCC827-EPR model (DEL+T790M) and HCC827-vTR model (DEL+MET amplification), ERL reduced EGFR signal transduction and showed less pronounced but still significant tumor growth inhibition than in the HCC827 model. In these models, tumor growth inhibition was significantly stronger with BEV+ERL than with each single agent. In the NCI-H1975 model (L858R+T790M), ERL did not inhibit growth or EGFR signal transduction, and BEV+ERL did not inhibit growth more than BEV. BEV alone significantly decreased microvessel density in each tumor. In conclusion, addition of BEV to ERL did not enhance antitumor activity in primarily ERL-resistant tumors with T790M mutation; however, BEV+ERL enhanced antitumor activity in T790M mutation- or MET amplification-positive tumors as long as their growth remained significantly suppressed by ERL. PMID:26370161

  18. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(k)-3 Section 1.401(k)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-3...

  19. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(k)-3 Section 1.401(k)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-3...

  20. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(k)-3 Section 1.401(k)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-3...

  1. DYNAMICS OF PORT ANGELES HARBOR AND APPROACHES, WASHINGTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historical oceanographic data in Port Angeles Harbor, located behind a spit on the northern coast of Washington, have been analyzed with emphasis on the physical processes that transport and disperse spilled oil. The data base spans 1932-1979 and includes observations of tides, c...

  2. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT THE NEW LONDON HARBOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A radiological survey done to assess levels of environmental radioactivity in and around navy harbor facilities located on the Thames River near New London, Connecticut. These facilities include the New London Submarine Base at Groton, the Electric Boat Company at Groton, Sound ...

  3. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT THE HAMPTON ROADS HARBOR FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A radiological survey done to assess levels of environmental radioactivity in and around harbor facilities located in the Hampton Roads Area in southeastern Virginia. The facilities surveyed were the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, the Norfolk Naval Station, and the Newport News Shipbui...

  4. 33 CFR 110.45a - Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass. 110.45a Section 110.45a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mattapoisett, Mass. (a) Area No. 1 beginning at a point on the shore at latitude 41°39′23″ N., longitude...

  5. 33 CFR 110.45a - Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass. 110.45a Section 110.45a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mattapoisett, Mass. (a) Area No. 1 beginning at a point on the shore at latitude 41°39′23″ N., longitude...

  6. 33 CFR 110.45a - Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass. 110.45a Section 110.45a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mattapoisett, Mass. (a) Area No. 1 beginning at a point on the shore at latitude 41°39′23″ N., longitude...

  7. 33 CFR 110.45a - Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass. 110.45a Section 110.45a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mattapoisett, Mass. (a) Area No. 1 beginning at a point on the shore at latitude 41°39′23″ N., longitude...

  8. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31 Section 705.31 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial,...

  9. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31 Section 705.31 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial,...

  10. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31 Section 705.31 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial,...

  11. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31 Section 705.31 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial,...

  12. 32 CFR 705.31 - USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false USS Arizona Memorial, Pearl Harbor. 705.31 Section 705.31 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.31 USS Arizona Memorial,...

  13. 78 FR 68735 - Reduction or Suspension of Safe Harbor Contributions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ...This document contains amendments to regulations relating to certain cash or deferred arrangements under section 401(k) and matching contributions and employee contributions under section 401(m). These regulations provide guidance on permitted mid-year reductions or suspensions of safe harbor nonelective contributions in certain circumstances for amendments adopted after May 18, 2009. These......

  14. Conjoined Fetal Twins in a Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina).

    PubMed

    Olson, Jennifer K; Gaydos, Joseph K; McKlveen, Tori; Poppenga, Robert; Wicinas, Kay; Anderson, Elizabeth; Raverty, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    In July 2013, a stranded harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) died giving birth to conjoined fetuses. The twins were joined at the abdomen and thoracolumbar spine with the vertebral axis at 180°. The cause of this unique anomaly--a first for this species--was not identified. PMID:26528575

  15. 4. Overview of grade south of Skunk Harbor Road, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Overview of grade south of Skunk Harbor Road, looking southwest. 1.8 miles east from southern end of railroad grade. - Slaughterhouse Canyon Railroad Grade, South of State Highway 28 on East shore of Lake Tahoe, Carson City, Carson City, NV

  16. 76 FR 50489 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Harbor Maintenance Fee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... previously published in the Federal Register (76 FR 26311) on May 6, 2011, allowing for a 60-day comment... Fee AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION: 30-Day Notice... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Harbor Maintenance Fee (CBP Forms 349 and...

  17. 33 CFR 110.45a - Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mattapoisett Harbor, Mattapoisett, Mass. 110.45a Section 110.45a Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Mattapoisett, Mass. (a) Area No. 1 beginning at a point on the shore at latitude 41°39′23″ N., longitude...

  18. 26 CFR 1.475(a)-4 - Valuation safe harbor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...(a)-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Inventories § 1.475(a)-4 Valuation safe harbor. (a) Overview—(1) Purpose... the extent that portions of the payments have been recognized for tax purposes before the...

  19. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(m)-3 Section 1.401(m)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(m)-3...

  20. 26 CFR 1.401(m)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(m)-3 Section 1.401(m)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(m)-3 Safe...

  1. White Sands Space Harbor Area 1, Microwave Scanning Beam Landing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    White Sands Space Harbor Area 1, Microwave Scanning Beam Landing Ground Stations, 1,500' to the south of the north end of Runway 17/35; 1,500' to the west of the east end of Runway 23/05; and 1,500' southwest of the northeast end of Runway 20/02., White Sands, Dona Ana County, NM

  2. 78 FR 29089 - Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors, HI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ...) 366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal... regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zones; Hawaiian Island Commercial Harbors,...

  3. SEAFOOD PROCESSING PERMITTING, ALASKA - UNALASKA BAY - DUTCH HARBOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unalaska Bay - Dutch Harbor was digitized from NOAA Marine Charts #16528, #16529, and #16530. Map details include water depth and land. This map was created for EPA Region 10 Water Division to evaluate NPDES permit sites and environmental quality. Visual illustration facilitates ...

  4. 27. VIEW TO NORTHEAST FROM BOSTON HARBOR, DEER ISLAND PUMPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW TO NORTHEAST FROM BOSTON HARBOR, DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION, CA. 1895 Photocopy of photograph (Massachusetts State Archives, Environmental Affairs, MDC, Construction, 313 V 193 1-5 Box 8, Deer Island Pumping Station) - Deer Island Pumping Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  5. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-3 - Safe harbor requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Safe harbor requirements. 1.401(k)-3 Section 1.401(k)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-3 Safe...

  6. SEAFOOD PROCESSING PERMITTING, ALASKA - KODIAK & ST, PAUL HARBORS - CHART #16595

    EPA Science Inventory

    Kodiak & St, Paul Harbors was digitized from NOAA Marine Chart #16595. Map details include water depth and land. This map was created for EPA Region 10 Water Division to evaluate NPDES permit sites and environmental quality. Visual illustration facilitates the evaluation of the e...

  7. 33 CFR 110.79a - Neenah Harbor, Neenah, Wis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Second Street extended meets the north edge of the harbor, thence south to intersect the north edge of the channel at latitude 44°11′04.2″ North, longitude 88°27′13.2″ West, thence northwesterly...

  8. 6. NEW YORK HARBOR MODEL. VIEW FACING UP MANHATTAN ISLAND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. NEW YORK HARBOR MODEL. VIEW FACING UP MANHATTAN ISLAND. NOTE TIDE GENERATOR AT RIGHT. (BRIGHT SPOT AT LEFT CAUSED BY SPARKLERS PLACED ON LIBERTY ISLAND) - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  9. 18 CFR 1304.404 - Commercial marina harbor limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Commercial marina harbor limits. 1304.404 Section 1304.404 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...

  10. 18 CFR 1304.404 - Commercial marina harbor limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Commercial marina harbor limits. 1304.404 Section 1304.404 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND...

  11. Identification of a novel mutation in the presenilin 1 gene in a Chinese Alzheimer's disease family.

    PubMed

    Deng, Bo; Lian, Yan; Wang, Xin; Zeng, Fan; Jiao, Bin; Wang, Ye-Ran; Liang, Chun-Rong; Liu, Yu-Hui; Bu, Xian-Le; Yao, Xiu-Qing; Zhu, Chi; Shen, Lu; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2014-10-01

    This study has identified a gene mutation in a Chinese family with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Family members were screened by a set of medical examinations and neuropsychological tests. Their DNA was extracted from blood cells and sequenced for gene mutation in the amyloid precursor protein (APP), the presenilin 1 (PS1) and the presenilin 2 (PS2) genes. Genetic analysis showed that the AD patients in the family harbored a T to G missense mutation at the position 314 in exon 4 of the PS1 gene, resulting in a change of F105C in amino acid sequence. Clinical manifestation of these patients included memory loss, counting difficulty, personality change, disorientation, dyscalculia, agnosia, aphasia, and apraxia, which was similar to that of the familial AD (FAD) patients harboring other PS1 mutations. We intend to add a novel mutation F105C of the PS1 gene to the pool of FAD mutations. With the current available genetic data, mutations of the PS1 gene account for the majority of gene mutations in Chinese FAD. PMID:24737487

  12. BRAF L597 mutations in melanoma are associated with sensitivity to MEK inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dahlman, Kimberly Brown; Xia, Junfeng; Hutchinson, Katherine; Ng, Charles; Hucks, Donald; Jia, Peilin; Atefi, Mohammad; Su, Zengliu; Branch, Suzanne; Lyle, Pamela L.; Hicks, Donna J.; Bozon, Viviana; Glaspy, John A.; Rosen, Neal; Solit, David B.; Netterville, James L.; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Ribas, Antoni; Zhao, Zhongming; Pao, William

    2012-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors are accepted treatment for metastatic melanomas that harbor specific driver mutations in BRAF or KIT, but only 40–50% of cases are positive. To uncover other potential targetable mutations, we performed whole-genome sequencing of a highly aggressive BRAF (V600) and KIT (W557, V559, L576, K642, D816) wildtype melanoma. Surprisingly, we found a somatic BRAF L597R mutation in exon 15. Analysis of BRAF exon 15 in 49 tumors negative for BRAF V600 mutations as well as driver mutations in KIT, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11, showed that 2 (4%) harbored L597 mutations and another 2 involved BRAF D594 and K601 mutations. In vitro signaling induced by L597R/S/Q mutants was suppressed by MEK inhibition. A patient with BRAF L597S mutant metastatic melanoma responded significantly to treatment with the MEK inhibitor, TAK-733. Collectively, these data demonstrate clinical significance to BRAF L597 mutations in melanoma. PMID:22798288

  13. BRAF Mutation (V600E) Prevalence in Mexican Patients Diagnosed with Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda-Lopez, Priscilla Denise; Salas-Alanis, Julio Cesar; Toussaint-Caire, Sonia; Gutierrez-Mendoza, Daniela; Vega-Memije, Elisa; Silva, Saúl Lino; Fajardo-Ramírez, Oscar Raul; Alcazar, Gregorio; Moreno-Treviño, María Guadalupe; Saldaña, Hugo Alberto Barrera

    2016-01-01

    Background B-Raf is a serine/threonine protein kinase activating the MAP kinase/ERK-signaling pathway. It has been shown that 50% of melanomas harbor activating BRAF mutations, with over 90% being the V600E mutation. Objective The goal of this research was to determine the prevalence of the BRAF V600E mutation in patients from Central Mexico diagnosed with primary melanoma. Methods Skin biopsies from 47 patients with melanoma were obtained from the dermatology department of the Hospital General ‘Dr. Manuel Gea González’ in Mexico City. For BRAF mutation determination, after DNA isolation, the gene region where the mutation occurs was amplified by PCR. Subsequently, the presence or absence of the V600E mutation was detected by Sanger sequencing performed at the private molecular diagnostic laboratory Vitagénesis in Monterrey, Mexico. Results Of the 47 patients sampled, 6.4% harbored the V600E mutation. No statistical significance was found between mutations and the type of tumor. PMID:27194985

  14. Novel allelic mutations in murine Serca2 induce differential development of squamous cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Toki, Hideaki; Minowa, Osamu; Inoue, Maki; Motegi, Hiromi; Karashima, Yuko; Ikeda, Ami; Kaneda, Hideki; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Saiki, Yuriko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Gondo, Yoichi; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Noda, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Dominant mutations in the Serca2 gene, which encodes sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase, predispose mice to gastrointestinal epithelial carcinoma [1-4] and humans to Darier disease (DD) [14-17]. In this study, we generated mice harboring N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced allelic mutations in Serca2: three missense mutations and one nonsense mutation. Mice harboring these Serca2 mutations developed tumors that were categorized as either early onset squamous cell tumors (SCT), with development similar to null-type knockout mice [2,4] (aggressive form; M682, M814), or late onset tumors (mild form; M1049, M1162). Molecular analysis showed no aberration in Serca2 mRNA or protein expression levels in normal esophageal cells of any of the four mutant heterozygotes. There was no loss of heterozygosity at the Serca2 locus in the squamous cell carcinomas in any of the four lines. The effect of each mutation on Ca(2+)-ATPase activity was predicted using atomic-structure models and accumulated mutated protein studies, suggesting that putative complete loss of Serca2 enzymatic activity may lead to early tumor onset, whereas mutations in which Serca2 retains residual enzymatic activity result in late onset. We propose that impaired Serca2 gene product activity has a long-term effect on squamous cell carcinogenesis from onset to the final carcinoma stage through an as-yet unrecognized but common regulatory pathway. PMID:27131742

  15. BRAF V600E and TERT Promoter Mutations in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Ren, Xinyu; Teng, Lianghong; Duan, Huanli; Lin, Yansong; Li, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Bo; Liang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Background The BRAF V600E and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations have been reported in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to add further information regarding the prevalence of the BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations in Chinese PTC and their clinicopathological associations. Methods We detected the BRAF V600E mutation and TERT promoter mutations in 455 Chinese PTC patients and analyzed the association of these mutations with several clinicopathological features. Results The BRAF V600E mutation was detected in 343 (75.4%) of 455 cases and was significantly associated with older age (p<0.001) and conventional subtype (p = 0.003). TERT promoter mutations were detected in 19 (4.4%) of 434 PTCs and were associated with older age (p<0.001), larger tumor size (p = 0.024), and advanced TNM stage(p<0.001). Of the 19 patients that were positive for TERT promoter mutations, 18 (94.7%) also harbored the BRAF V600E mutation. Conclusion We determined the prevalence and clinicopathological associations of BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations in Chinese PTC patients. TERT promoter mutations but not the BRAF V600E mutation were associated with more advanced TNM stage upon diagnosis. PMID:27064992

  16. Somatic mutations in 33 benign and malignant hot thyroid nodules in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Eszlinger, Markus; Niedziela, Marek; Typlt, Eva; Jaeschke, Holger; Huth, Sandra; Schaarschmidt, Jörg; Aigner, Thomas; Trejster, Ewa; Krohn, Knut; Bösenberg, Eileen; Paschke, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    Hot thyroid nodules (HTNs) in children are rare. Their reported malignancy rate is higher than in adults. However molecular data are rare. We present clinical and molecular data for 33 consecutive (29 benign and 4 malignant) HTNs. 17/29 Benign HTNs (59%) harbored somatic TSHR mutations. The most commonly observed mutation was M453T (in 8/29 samples). T632I and D633Y mutations were each detected twice. All other TSHR mutations were each found in one sample, including the new A538T mutation. One NRAS mutation was detected in a benign HTN with a M453T mutation. A PAX8/PPARG rearrangement was found in one malignant HTN. A T632I mutation was detected in one hot papillary thyroid carcinoma. The percentage of TSHR mutation positive HTNs in children and adolescents is within the range observed in adults. Contrary to adults, the M453T mutation is the predominant TSHR mutation in HTNs of children and adolescents. The increased malignancy rate of HTNs of children does not appear to be associated with RAS, BRAF, PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC mutations. PMID:24915144

  17. Oncogenic mutations in melanomas and benign melanocytic nevi of the female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Diane; Kim, Julie; Warrick, Andrea; Nelson, Dylan; Pukay, Marina; Beadling, Carol; Heinrich, Michael; Selim, Maria Angelica; Corless, Christopher L.; Nelson, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Background The genetic heterogeneity of melanomas and melanocytic nevi of the female genital tract is poorly understood. Objective We aim to characterize the frequency of mutations of the following genes: BRAF, NRAS, KIT, GNA11, and GNAQ in female genital tract melanomas. We also characterize the frequency of BRAF mutations in female genital tract melanomas compared with melanocytic nevi. Methods Mutational screening was performed on the following female genital tract melanocytic neoplasms: 25 melanomas, 7 benign melanocytic nevi, and 4 atypical melanocytic nevi. Results Of the 25 female genital tract melanoma specimens queried, KIT mutations were detected in 4 (16.0%), NRAS mutations in 4 (16.0%), and BRAF mutations in 2 (8.0%) samples. Two of the tumors with KIT mutations harbored double mutations in the same exon. No GNAQ or GNA11 mutations were identified among 11 melanomas screened. BRAF V600E mutations were detected in 7 of 7 benign melanocytic genital nevi (100%) and 3 of 4 atypical genital nevi (75%). Limitations Our study is limited by the small sample size of this rare subset of melanomas. Conclusion KIT, NRAS, and BRAF mutations are found in a subset of female genital tract melanomas. Screening for oncogenic mutations is important for developing and applying clinical therapies for melanomas of the female genital tract. PMID:24842760

  18. Identification of Genetic Mutations in Human Lung Cancer by Targeted Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hongxiang; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhenrong; Tang, Chuanning; Ye, Hua; Jones, Lindsey; Lou, Feng; Zhang, Dandan; Jiang, Shouwen; Sun, Hong; Dong, Haichao; Zhang, Guangchun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Dong, Zhishou; Guo, Baishuai; Yan, He; Yan, Chaowei; Wang, Lu; Su, Ziyi; Li, Yangyang; Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi; Liu, Deruo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most prevalent malignancy and the primary cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Unique mutations patterns can be found in lung cancer subtypes, in individual cancers, or within a single tumor, and drugs that target these genetic mutations and signal transduction pathways are often beneficial to patients. In this study, we used the Ion Torrent AmpliSeq Cancer Panel to sequence 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes and oncogenes to identify genetic mutations in 48 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human lung cancer samples from Chinese patients. We found frequent mutations in EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and TP53 genes. Moreover, we observed that a portion of the lung cancer samples harbored two or more mutations in these key genes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the Ion Torrent sequencing to efficiently identify genetic mutations in individual tumors for targeted lung cancer therapy. PMID:26244006

  19. Modeling tidal exchange and dispersion in Boston Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard P.; Butman, Bradford

    1992-01-01

    Tidal dispersion and the horizontal exchange of water between Boston Harbor and the surrounding ocean are examined with a high-resolution (200 m) depth-averaged numerical model. The strongly varying bathymetry and coastline geometry of the harbor generate complex spatial patterns in the modeled tidal currents which are verified by shipboard acoustic Doppler surveys. Lagrangian exchange experiments demonstrate that tidal currents rapidly exchange and mix material near the inlets of the harbor due to asymmetry in the ebb/flood response. This tidal mixing zone extends roughly a tidal excursion from the inlets and plays an important role in the overall flushing of the harbor. Because the tides can only efficiently mix material in this limited region, however, harbor flushing must be considered a two step process: rapid exchange in the tidal mixing zone, followed by flushing of the tidal mixing zone by nontidal residual currents. Estimates of embayment flushing based on tidal calculations alone therefore can significantly overestimate the flushing time that would be expected under typical environmental conditions. Particle-release simulations from point sources also demonstrate that while the tides efficiently exchange material in the vicinity of the inlets, the exact nature of dispersion from point sources is extremely sensitive to the timing and location of the release, and the distribution of particles is streaky and patchlike. This suggests that high-resolution modeling of dispersion from point sources in these regions must be performed explicitly and cannot be parameterized as a plume with Gaussian-spreading in a larger scale flow field.

  20. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  1. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-08-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  2. Towards a Molecular Understanding of the Link between Imatinib Resistance and Kinase Conformational Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lovera, Silvia; Morando, Maria; Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco L.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its inhibition of the Abl kinase domain in the BCR-ABL fusion protein, imatinib is strikingly effective in the initial stage of chronic myeloid leukemia with more than 90% of the patients showing complete remission. However, as in the case of most targeted anti-cancer therapies, the emergence of drug resistance is a serious concern. Several drug-resistant mutations affecting the catalytic domain of Abl and other tyrosine kinases are now known. But, despite their importance and the adverse effect that they have on the prognosis of the cancer patients harboring them, the molecular mechanism of these mutations is still debated. Here by using long molecular dynamics simulations and large-scale free energy calculations complemented by in vitro mutagenesis and microcalorimetry experiments, we model the effect of several widespread drug-resistant mutations of Abl. By comparing the conformational free energy landscape of the mutants with those of the wild-type tyrosine kinases we clarify their mode of action. It involves significant and complex changes in the inactive-to-active dynamics and entropy/enthalpy balance of two functional elements: the activation-loop and the conserved DFG motif. What is more the T315I gatekeeper mutant has a significant impact on the binding mechanism itself and on the binding kinetics. PMID:26606374

  3. First Report of the 23S rRNA Gene A2058G Point Mutation Associated With Macrolide Resistance in Treponema pallidum From Syphilis Patients in Cuba.

    PubMed

    Noda, Angel A; Matos, Nelvis; Blanco, Orestes; Rodríguez, Islay; Stamm, Lola Virginia

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the presence of macrolide-resistant Treponema pallidum subtypes in Havana, Cuba. Samples from 41 syphilis patients were tested for T. pallidum 23S rRNA gene mutations. Twenty-five patients (61%) harbored T. pallidum with the A2058G mutation, which was present in all 8 subtypes that were identified. The A2059G mutation was not detected. PMID:27100771

  4. Underwater noise from three types of offshore wind turbines: estimation of impact zones for harbor porpoises and harbor seals.

    PubMed

    Tougaard, Jakob; Henriksen, Oluf Damsgaard; Miller, Lee A

    2009-06-01

    Underwater noise was recorded from three different types of wind turbines in Denmark and Sweden (Middelgrunden, Vindeby, and Bockstigen-Valar) during normal operation. Wind turbine noise was only measurable above ambient noise at frequencies below 500 Hz. Total sound pressure level was in the range 109-127 dB re 1 microPa rms, measured at distances between 14 and 20 m from the foundations. The 1/3-octave noise levels were compared with audiograms of harbor seals and harbor porpoises. Maximum 1/3-octave levels were in the range 106-126 dB re 1 microPa rms. Maximum range of audibility was estimated under two extreme assumptions on transmission loss (3 and 9 dB per doubling of distance, respectively). Audibility was low for harbor porpoises extending 20-70 m from the foundation, whereas audibility for harbor seals ranged from less than 100 m to several kilometers. Behavioral reactions of porpoises to the noise appear unlikely except if they are very close to the foundations. However, behavioral reactions from seals cannot be excluded up to distances of a few hundred meters. It is unlikely that the noise reaches dangerous levels at any distance from the turbines and the noise is considered incapable of masking acoustic communication by seals and porpoises. PMID:19507958

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in small cell lung cancers: Two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Siegele, Bradford J; Shilo, Konstantin; Chao, Bo H; Carbone, David P; Zhao, Weiqiang; Ioffe, Olga; Franklin, Wilbur A; Edelman, Martin J; Aisner, Dara L

    2016-05-01

    Activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are exceedingly rare in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We present two cases of SCLC harboring EGFR mutations, one in an 82 year-old male smoker with a combined SCLC and adenocarcinoma with a novel D855H point mutation in exon 21, and the second in a 68 year-old female never smoker with the L858R point mutation in exon 21. The cases, accompanied by a review of the literature, highlight the importance of integration of clinicopathologic considerations and adherence to recently promulgated Guideline recommendations for molecular testing in lung cancer. PMID:27040854

  6. Echinocandin failure case due to a previously unreported FKS1 mutation in Candida krusei.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Rewes, Annika; Perlin, David S; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling

    2014-06-01

    Echinocandins are the preferred therapy for invasive infections due to Candida krusei. We present here a case of clinical failure involving C. krusei with a characteristic FKS1 hot spot mutation not previously reported in C. krusei that was isolated after 14 days of treatment. Anidulafungin MICs were elevated by ≥ 5 dilution steps above the clinical breakpoint but by only 1 step for a Candida albicans isolate harboring the corresponding mutation, suggesting a notable species-specific difference in the MIC increase conferred by this mutation. PMID:24687511

  7. Type and frequency of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are related to astrocytic and oligodendroglial differentiation and age: a study of 1,010 diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christian; Meyer, Jochen; Balss, Jörg; Capper, David; Mueller, Wolf; Christians, Arne; Felsberg, Jörg; Wolter, Marietta; Mawrin, Christian; Wick, Wolfgang; Weller, Michael; Herold-Mende, Christel; Unterberg, Andreas; Jeuken, Judith W M; Wesseling, Peter; Reifenberger, Guido; von Deimling, Andreas

    2009-10-01

    Somatic mutations in the IDH1 gene encoding cytosolic NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase have been shown in the majority of astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas of WHO grades II and III. IDH2 encoding mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase is also mutated in these tumors, albeit at much lower frequencies. Preliminary data suggest an importance of IDH1 mutation for prognosis showing that patients with anaplastic astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas harboring IDH1 mutations seem to fare much better than patients without this mutation in their tumors. To determine mutation types and their frequencies, we examined 1,010 diffuse gliomas. We detected 716 IDH1 mutations and 31 IDH2 mutations. We found 165 IDH1 (72.7%) and 2 IDH2 mutations (0.9%) in 227 diffuse astrocytomas WHO grade II, 146 IDH1 (64.0%) and 2 IDH2 mutations (0.9%) in 228 anaplastic astrocytomas WHO grade III, 105 IDH1 (82.0%) and 6 IDH2 mutations (4.7%) in 128 oligodendrogliomas WHO grade II, 121 IDH1 (69.5%) and 9 IDH2 mutations (5.2%) in 174 anaplastic oligodendrogliomas WHO grade III, 62 IDH1 (81.6%) and 1 IDH2 mutations (1.3%) in 76 oligoastrocytomas WHO grade II and 117 IDH1 (66.1%) and 11 IDH2 mutations (6.2%) in 177 anaplastic oligoastrocytomas WHO grade III. We report on an inverse association of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in these gliomas and a non-random distribution of the mutation types within the tumor entities. IDH1 mutations of the R132C type are strongly associated with astrocytoma, while IDH2 mutations predominantly occur in oligodendroglial tumors. In addition, patients with anaplastic glioma harboring IDH1 mutations were on average 6 years younger than those without these alterations. PMID:19554337

  8. 33 CFR 165.116 - Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Command (ISC) Boston piers and; (3) Salem Harbor. All waters of Salem Harbor within a two-hundred and... Guard Auxiliary, local, state, and federal law enforcement vessels. (3) No person may enter the...

  9. U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage System, Linear underground system extending from North Road to Icarus Way, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF REMEDIAL DREDGING AT THE NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MA, SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, is a Superfund site due to high sediment polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations. An initial remedial dredging operation removed the most contaminated sediments from the upper harbor ("Hot Spot"). During remediation, a monitoring program assess...

  11. 33 CFR 209.155 - Expenditure of Federal funds for work shoreward of harbor lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.155 Expenditure of... of rivers and harbors for dredging inside of harbor lines duly established. (b) It is not the...

  12. 33 CFR 209.155 - Expenditure of Federal funds for work shoreward of harbor lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.155 Expenditure of... of rivers and harbors for dredging inside of harbor lines duly established. (b) It is not the...

  13. 33 CFR 209.155 - Expenditure of Federal funds for work shoreward of harbor lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.155 Expenditure of... of rivers and harbors for dredging inside of harbor lines duly established. (b) It is not the...

  14. 33 CFR 209.155 - Expenditure of Federal funds for work shoreward of harbor lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.155 Expenditure of... of rivers and harbors for dredging inside of harbor lines duly established. (b) It is not the...

  15. 78 FR 35326 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Securing Financial Obligations under the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act and its...

  16. 75 FR 60141 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Continuing Collection; Comment request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Continuing.... Background The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs, (OWCP) administers the Longshore and Harbor Workers.... Agency: Office of Workers' Compensation Programs. Type of Review: Extension. Title: Application...

  17. 77 FR 16266 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection.... Background The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) administers the ] Longshore and Harbor...

  18. 75 FR 63862 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection.... Background: The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP), administers the Longshore and Harbor...

  19. 76 FR 39904 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Renewal of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Payment.... Background The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs administers the Longshore and Harbor...

  20. 78 FR 57416 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed Revision of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Regulations Governing the Administration of the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act (LS-200,...

  1. 75 FR 78270 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Request.... Background The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) administers the Longshore and Harbor...

  2. 76 FR 64976 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed Renewal of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation Programs (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background OWCP administers the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation...

  3. 75 FR 71456 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed... Office of Workers' Compensation (OWCP) is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Pre... Workers' Compensation Programs, (OWCP) administers the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act....

  4. Sorafenib enhances the therapeutic efficacy of rapamycin in colorectal cancers harboring oncogenic KRAS and PIK3CA

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B. Mark

    2012-01-01

    Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling is associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC). The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase, a downstream effector of PI3K/Akt signaling, regulates tumorigenesis and metastasis of CRCs, indicating that mTOR inhibition may have therapeutic potential. Notwithstanding, many cancers, including CRC, demonstrate resistance to the antitumorigenic effects of rapamycin. In this study, we show that inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin leads to feedback activation of PI3K/Akt and Ras-MAPK signaling, resulting in cell survival and possible contribution to rapamycin resistance. Combination with the multikinase inhibitor, sorafenib, abrogates rapamycin-induced activation of PI3K/Akt and Ras-MAPK signaling pathways. Combination of rapamycin with sorafenib synergistically inhibits proliferation of CRC cells. CRCs harboring coexistent KRAS and PIK3CA mutations are partially sensitive to either rapamycin or sorafenib monotherapy, but highly sensitive to combination treatment with rapamycin and sorafenib. Combination with sorafenib enhances therapeutic efficacy of rapamycin on induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell-cycle progression, migration and invasion of CRCs. We demonstrate efficacy and safety of concomitant treatment with rapamycin and sorafenib at inhibiting growth of xenografts from CRC cells with coexistent mutations in KRAS and PIK3CA. The efficacy and tolerability of combined treatment with rapamycin and sorafenib provides rationale for use in treating CRC patients, particularly those with tumors harboring coexistent KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Abbreviations:CIcombination indexCRCcolorectal cancerIHCimmunohistochemistryMAPKmitogen activated protein kinasemTORmammalian target of rapamycinPI3Kphosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. PMID:22696593

  5. CF Mutation Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Cystic Fibrosis Genotyping; CF DNA Analysis; CF Gene Mutation Panel; CF Molecular Genetic Testing Formal name: Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation Panel Related tests: Sweat Test ; Trypsinogen ; ...

  6. The Mutational Landscape of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stransky, Nicolas; Egloff, Ann Marie; Tward, Aaron D.; Kostic, Aleksandar D.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Kryukov, Gregory V.; Lawrence, Michael; Sougnez, Carrie; McKenna, Aaron; Shefler, Erica; Ramos, Alex H.; Stojanov, Petar; Carter, Scott L.; Voet, Douglas; Cortés, Maria L; Auclair, Daniel; Berger, Michael F.; Saksena, Gordon; Guiducci, Candace; Onofrio, Robert; Parkin, Melissa; Romkes, Marjorie; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Seethala, Raja R.; Wang, Lin; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Winckler, Wendy; Ardlie, Kristin; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Meyerson, Matthew; Lander, Eric S.; Getz, Gad; Golub, Todd R.; Garraway, Levi A.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a common, morbid, and frequently lethal malignancy. To uncover its mutational spectrum, we analyzed whole-exome sequencing data from 74 tumor-normal pairs. The majority exhibited a mutational profile consistent with tobacco exposure; human papilloma virus was detectable by sequencing of DNA from infected tumors. In addition to identifying previously known HNSCC genes (TP53, CDKN2A, PTEN, PIK3CA, and HRAS), the analysis revealed many genes not previously implicated in this malignancy. At least 30% of cases harbored mutations in genes that regulate squamous differentiation (e.g., NOTCH1, IRF6, and TP63), implicating its dysregulation as a major driver of HNSCC carcinogenesis. More generally, the results indicate the ability of large-scale sequencing to reveal fundamental tumorigenic mechanisms. PMID:21798893

  7. Colorectal cancer prognosis: is it all mutation, mutation, mutation?

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A B; Paraskeva, C

    2005-01-01

    For the 500 000 new cases of colorectal cancer in the world each year, identification of patients with a worse prognosis and those who are more likely to respond to treatment is a challenge. There is an increasing body of evidence correlating genetic mutations with outcome in tumours derived from human colorectal cancer cohorts. K-ras, but not p53 or APC, mutations appear to be associated with poorer overall survival in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:16099785

  8. A smart ROV solution for ship hull and harbor inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Scott; Wood, Jon; Vazquez, Jose; Mignotte, Pierre-Yves; Privat, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    Hull and harbor infrastructure inspections are frequently performed manually and involve quite a bit of risk and human and monetary resources. In any kind of threat and resource constrained environment, this involves unacceptable levels of risk and cost. Modern Remotely Operated Vehicles are highly refined machines that provide features and capabilities previously unavailable. Operations once carried out by divers can now be carried out more quickly, efficiently and safely by smart enabled ROVs. ROVs are rapidly deployable and capable of continuous, reliable operations in adverse conditions. They also provide a stable platform on which multiple sensors may be mounted and utilized to meet the harbor inspection problem. Automated Control software provides ROV's and their pilots with the capability to inspect complex, constrained environments such as those found in a harbor region. This application and the user interface allow the ROV to automatically conduct complex maneuvers relative to the area being inspected and relieves the training requirements and work load for the pilot, allowing he or she to focus on the primary task of survey, inspection and looking for possible threats (such as IEDs, Limpet Mines, signs of sabotage, etc). Real-time sensor processing tools can be integrated into the smart ROV solution to assist the operator. Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms are used to search through the sensor data collected by the ROV in real time. These algorithms provide immediate feedback on possible threats and notify the operator of regions that may require manual verification. Sensor data (sonar or video) is also mosaiced, providing the operator with real-time situational awareness and a coverage map of the hull or seafloor. Detected objects may also be placed in the context of the large scale characteristics of the hull (or bottom or pilings) and localized. Within the complex areas such as the harbor pier pilings and the running gear of the ship, real

  9. Mutation History of the Roma/Gypsies

    PubMed Central

    Morar, Bharti; Gresham, David; Angelicheva, Dora; Tournev, Ivailo; Gooding, Rebecca; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Schmidt, Carolin; Abicht, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Tordai, Attila; Kalmár, Lajos; Nagy, Melinda; Karcagi, Veronika; Jeanpierre, Marc; Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Beeson, David; Venkataraman, Viswanathan; Warwick Carter, Kim; Reeve, Jeff; de Pablo, Rosario; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2004-01-01

    The 8–10 million European Roma/Gypsies are a founder population of common origins that has subsequently split into multiple socially divergent and geographically dispersed Gypsy groups. Unlike other founder populations, whose genealogy has been extensively documented, the demographic history of the Gypsies is not fully understood and, given the lack of written records, has to be inferred from current genetic data. In this study, we have used five disease loci harboring private Gypsy mutations to examine some missing historical parameters and current structure. We analyzed the frequency distribution of the five mutations in 832–1,363 unrelated controls, representing 14 Gypsy populations, and the diversification of chromosomal haplotypes in 501 members of affected families. Sharing of mutations and high carrier rates supported a strong founder effect, and the identity of the congenital myasthenia 1267delG mutation in Gypsy and Indian/Pakistani chromosomes provided the best evidence yet of the Indian origins of the Gypsies. However, dramatic differences in mutation frequencies and haplotype divergence and very limited haplotype sharing pointed to strong internal differentiation and characterized the Gypsies as a founder population comprising multiple subisolates. Using disease haplotype coalescence times at the different loci, we estimated that the entire Gypsy population was founded ∼32–40 generations ago, with secondary and tertiary founder events occurring ∼16–25 generations ago. The existence of multiple subisolates, with endogamy maintained to the present day, suggests a general approach to complex disorders in which initial gene mapping could be performed in large families from a single Gypsy group, whereas fine mapping would rely on the informed sampling of the divergent subisolates and searching for the shared genomic region that displays the strongest linkage disequilibrium with the disease. PMID:15322984

  10. Mutation history of the roma/gypsies.

    PubMed

    Morar, Bharti; Gresham, David; Angelicheva, Dora; Tournev, Ivailo; Gooding, Rebecca; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Schmidt, Carolin; Abicht, Angela; Lochmuller, Hanns; Tordai, Attila; Kalmar, Lajos; Nagy, Melinda; Karcagi, Veronika; Jeanpierre, Marc; Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Beeson, David; Venkataraman, Viswanathan; Warwick Carter, Kim; Reeve, Jeff; de Pablo, Rosario; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2004-10-01

    The 8-10 million European Roma/Gypsies are a founder population of common origins that has subsequently split into multiple socially divergent and geographically dispersed Gypsy groups. Unlike other founder populations, whose genealogy has been extensively documented, the demographic history of the Gypsies is not fully understood and, given the lack of written records, has to be inferred from current genetic data. In this study, we have used five disease loci harboring private Gypsy mutations to examine some missing historical parameters and current structure. We analyzed the frequency distribution of the five mutations in 832-1,363 unrelated controls, representing 14 Gypsy populations, and the diversification of chromosomal haplotypes in 501 members of affected families. Sharing of mutations and high carrier rates supported a strong founder effect, and the identity of the congenital myasthenia 1267delG mutation in Gypsy and Indian/Pakistani chromosomes provided the best evidence yet of the Indian origins of the Gypsies. However, dramatic differences in mutation frequencies and haplotype divergence and very limited haplotype sharing pointed to strong internal differentiation and characterized the Gypsies as a founder population comprising multiple subisolates. Using disease haplotype coalescence times at the different loci, we estimated that the entire Gypsy population was founded approximately 32-40 generations ago, with secondary and tertiary founder events occurring approximately 16-25 generations ago. The existence of multiple subisolates, with endogamy maintained to the present day, suggests a general approach to complex disorders in which initial gene mapping could be performed in large families from a single Gypsy group, whereas fine mapping would rely on the informed sampling of the divergent subisolates and searching for the shared genomic region that displays the strongest linkage disequilibrium with the disease. PMID:15322984

  11. Experiences from treatment-predictive KRAS testing; high mutation frequency in rectal cancers from females and concurrent mutations in the same tumor

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Mats; Ekstrand, Anna; Edekling, Thomas; Eberhard, Jakob; Grabau, Dorthe; Borg, David; Nilbert, Mef

    2009-01-01

    Background KRAS mutations represent key alterations in colorectal cancer development and lead to constitutive EGFR signaling. Since EGFR inhibition represents a therapeutic strategy in advanced colorectal cancer, KRAS mutation analysis has quickly been introduced as a treatment-predictive test. Methods We used a real-time PCR based method to determine KRAS mutations in 136 colorectal cancers with mutations identified in 53 (39%) tumors. Results KRAS mutations were significantly more often found in rectal cancer (21/38, 55%) than in colon cancer (32/98, 33%) (P = 0.02). This finding was explained by marked differences mutation rates in female patients who showed mutations in 33% of the colon cancers and in 67% of the rectal cancers (P = 0.01). Concurrent KRAS mutations were identified in three tumors; two colorectal cancers harbored Gly12Asp/Gly13Asp and Gly12Cys/Gly13Asp and a third tumor carried Gly12Cys/Gly12Asp in an adenomatous component and additionally acquired Gly12Val in the invasive component. Conclusion The demonstration of a particularly high KRAS mutation frequency among female rectal cancer patients suggests that this subset is the least likely to respond to anti-EGFR therapies, whereas the observation of concurrent KRAS mutations imply that repeated KRAS targeting may occur during tumor progression in a subset of colorectal cancers. PMID:19832985

  12. Development of Alkyne-Containing Pyrazolopyrimidines To Overcome Drug Resistance of Bcr-Abl Kinase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Kung, Alvin; Malinoski, Brock; Prakash, G K Surya; Zhang, Chao

    2015-12-10

    Despite the success of imatinib at inhibiting Bcr-Abl and treating chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), resistance to the therapy occurs over time in patients. In particular, the resistance to imatinib caused by the gatekeeper mutation T315I in Bcr-Abl remains a challenge in the clinic. Inspired by the successful development of ponatinib to curb drug resistance, we hypothesize that the incorporation of an alkyne linker in other heterocyclic scaffolds can also achieve potent inhibition of Bcr-Abl(T315I) by allowing for simultaneous occupancy of both the active site and the allosteric pocket in the Abl kinase domain. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and characterization of a series of alkyne-containing pyrazolopyrimidines as Bcr-Abl inhibitors. Our results demonstrate that some alkyne-containing pyrazolopyrimidines potently inhibit not only Abl(T315I) in vitro but also Bcr-Abl(T315I) in cells. These pyrazolopyrimidines can serve as lead compounds for future development of novel targeted therapy to overcome drug resistance of CML. PMID:26562217

  13. 33 CFR 100.113 - Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.113 Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, MA. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of Provincetown Harbor within 200 feet of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Provincetown Harbor Swim for...

  14. 33 CFR 100.113 - Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.113 Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, MA. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of Provincetown Harbor within 200 feet of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Provincetown Harbor Swim for...

  15. 77 FR 43513 - Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard... Local Regulation, Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd Inlet, WA from 12 p.m. through 8 p.m. on... notice of enforcement of the Special Local Regulation for Olympia Harbor Days Tug Boat Races, Budd...

  16. 76 FR 20530 - Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Boom Days, Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo... temporary safety zone in the Buffalo Outer Harbor, Buffalo, NY for the Boom Days Fireworks. This zone is intended to restrict vessels from Doug's Dive, the NFTA small boat harbor and a portion of the...

  17. 12 CFR Appendix N to Part 226 - Higher-Priced Mortgage Loan Appraisal Safe Harbor Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Harbor Review N Appendix N to Part 226 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF...—Higher-Priced Mortgage Loan Appraisal Safe Harbor Review To qualify for the safe harbor provided in § 226... opinion of the property's market value and an effective date for the opinion. 7. Indicates that a...

  18. 76 FR 69131 - Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast... Guard will enforce the Navy Pier Southeast Safety Zone in Chicago Harbor from December 3, 2011 through... INFORMATION: The Coast Guard will enforce the Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago,...

  19. 75 FR 34365 - Safety Zone, Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone, Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier Southeast, Chicago, IL AGENCY... Navy Pier Southeast Safety Zone in Chicago Harbor for annual fireworks events during nine separate... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Coast Guard will enforce Safety Zone, Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier...

  20. 76 FR 52268 - Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier East, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier East, Chicago, IL... enforce the Navy Pier East Safety Zone in Chicago Harbor from August 12, 2011 through August 14, 2011 and... zone; 33 CFR 165.933-Chicago Harbor, Navy Pier East, Chicago, IL for the following events: (1)...