Science.gov

Sample records for hard mobile launcher

  1. Time lapse: Mobile Launcher Moves

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mobile launcher returned from Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida following two weeks of structural and other testing. The 355-foot-tall structure is to be used by the Spac...

  2. Mobile Launcher Moves for Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    In anticipation of launching NASA’s Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket later in this decade, engineers wanted to check the mobile launcher, or ML, to see how it would behave moving atop a craw...

  3. 1. AERIAL VIEW, SHOWING MOBILE LAUNCHER. BASE IS CALLED LAUNCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, SHOWING MOBILE LAUNCHER. BASE IS CALLED LAUNCH PLATFORM AND TOWER ON RIGHT IS CALLED LAUNCH UMBILICAL TOWER, (LUT). - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  4. 6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. PROTRUSION ON UPPER RIGHT HAND SIDE OF LUT IS SWING ARM NINE WHICH PROVIDED ACCESS TO CAPSULE OF LAUNCH VEHICLE WHILE ON LAUNCHER. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  5. 3. AERIAL VIEW OF MOBILE LAUNCHER. ON TOP OF LUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AERIAL VIEW OF MOBILE LAUNCHER. ON TOP OF LUT SITS A 25 TON HAMMERHEAD CRANE. STRUCTURE ON LEFT SIDE OF LAUNCH PLATFORM IS KNOWN AS A 'MILK STOOL' AND ALLOWS A SATURN 1B ROCKET TO BE USED IN PLACE OF THE SATURN V ROCKET. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  6. Time-Lapse: Mobile Launcher Moves to Launch Pad

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mobile launcher that will host NASA's Space Launch System and new Orion spacecraft was moved to Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to begin two weeks of structural and sys...

  7. Dr. Wernher Von Braun near the mobile launcher.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for manned space flight, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, are seen near the mobile launcher carrying a 363 foot tall Saturn V space launch vehicle as the rocket is rolled from the vehicle assembly building at KSC for its three mile trip to the launch pad.

  8. Acoustic and Vibration Environment for Crew Launch Vehicle Mobile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.

    2007-01-01

    A launch-induced acoustic environment represents a dynamic load on the exposed facilities and ground support equipment (GSE) in the form of random pressures fluctuating around the ambient atmospheric pressure. In response to these fluctuating pressures, structural vibrations are generated and transmitted throughout the structure and to the equipment items supported by the structure. Certain equipment items are also excited by the direct acoustic input as well as by the vibration transmitted through the supporting structure. This paper presents the predicted acoustic and vibration environments induced by the launch of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) from Launch Complex (LC) 39. The predicted acoustic environment depicted in this paper was calculated by scaling the statistically processed measured data available from Saturn V launches to the anticipated environment of the CLV launch. The scaling was accomplished by using the 5-segment Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) engine parameters. Derivation of vibration environment for various Mobile Launcher (ML) structures throughout the base and tower was accomplished by scaling the Saturn V vibration environment.

  9. Workers in the VAB move sling into place to lift Columbia to mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Workers in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) move a specially-built sling into place to lift Orbiter Columbia from the transfer aisle to the mobile launcher platform (27015); Columbia is lifted from the floor of the VAB transfer aisle (27016).

  10. STS-30 Atlantis, OV-104, at KSC LC Pad 39B atop mobile launcher platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, arrives at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B atop mobile launcher platform. The fixed service structure (FSS) towers above OV-104, its external tank (ET), and its solid rocket boosters (SRBs). The rotating service structure (RSS) is retracted. The launch tower catwalks are also retracted.

  11. STS-30 Atlantis, OV-104, on the mobile launcher platform heads to KSC LC pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, riding atop the mobile launcher platform and the crawler transporter approaches Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) pad 39B. This backlit view highlights OV-104's profile, the external tank (ET), and one of the two solid rocket boosters (SRBs) as it moves up LC pad 39B incline.

  12. VIEW OF HB1 (VAB HIGH BAY) WITH MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF HB-1 (VAB HIGH BAY) WITH MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM (VEHICLE ACCESS PLATFORMS ARE VISIBLE IN THE CENTER), FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. Utilizing NX Advanced Simulation for NASA's New Mobile Launcher for Ares-l

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of NX to simulate the new Mobile Launcher (ML) for the Ares-I. It includes: a comparison of the sizes of the Saturn 5, the Space Shuttle, the Ares I, and the Ares V, with the height, and payload capability; the loads control plan; drawings of the base framing, the underside of the ML, beam arrangement, and the finished base and the origin of the 3D CAD data. It also reviews the modeling approach, meshing. the assembly Finite Element Modeling, the model summary. and beam improvements.

  14. Micro-unattended mobility system for grenade-launcher-deployed sensors (MUMS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sword, Lee F.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a robotic system that will provide limited mobility capability to ballistically deployed sensors for acquisition of intelligence from building interiors. The future of warfare is expected to shift from large-scale battles to smaller conflicts in increasingly urban environments. Success in such situations can be improved by providing the war fighter detailed information about the location, activities, and capabilities of the opponents. A limited mobility capability adds to the usefulness of grenade launcher deployed sensors in two important ways. First, it relaxes the targeting accuracy requirement allowing a higher probability of successful placement even at greater ranges. Second, it increases the covertness of the sensor by allowing precise placement in an unobtrusive location. Underlying technologies required to implement this approach include a method of attaching the sensor package to the wall and shock tolerant electronics.

  15. The STS-93 external tank and booster stack sits at the Mobile Launcher Platform park site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-93 stack of solid rocket boosters and external tank sits at the Mobile Launcher Platform park site waiting for lightning shield wires to be installed on the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) in the background. The stack is being temporarily stored outside the VAB while Space Shuttle Discovery undergoes repair to hail damage in High Bay 1. Discovery was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The STS-93 stack will be moved under the wires at the VAB for protection until Discovery returns to the pad, later this week. The scheduled date for launch of mission STS-96 is no earlier than May 27. STS-93 is targeted for launch on July 22, carrying the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  16. Survivability of the hardened mobile launcher when attacked by a hypothetical rapidly retargetable ICBM system. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, D.J.; Merrow, S.F.

    1986-03-01

    This thesis evaluates the survivability of the hardened mobile launcher system (HML) against a hypothetical enemy ICBM system. The hypothetical system has two key capabilities: it can obtain near real-time intelligence information regarding the HML's location, and it can be retargeted in flight (as necessary) according to the intelligence information. Thus, the hypothetical ICBM threat systems can attack individual HMLs directly rather than rely on a barrage attack against HML bases. Monte Carlo simulation is used to approach the problem. The model is an MBASIC computer program, written and runs on an Apple Macintosh computer. The model simulates the flight of the attacking ICBMs (there may be as few as one or as many as 14 warheads directed at each HML) and the random dispersal tactics of a single HML. The model determines the locations of the detonations and the location of the HML at time of detonation. Based on these locations, probability of kill due to peak-blast overpressure is calculated. A key parameter in the model is intelligence / retargeting cycle time -- the time required to obtain intelligence and retarget accordingly. This time is varied from 1-30 minutes. The model also allows variations in HML speed and hardness and threat system CEP. A subroutine for examining the effects of neutron fratricide on the attacking warheads is included (although the effects were found to be negligible). The thesis concludes that very small intelligence/retargeting cycle times are required for this to be an effective weapon system against the HML. Thus, with today's (or near future) technology, the HML can be considered a very survivable system.

  17. Chartering Launchers for Small Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Daniel

    The question of how to launch small satellites has been solved over the years by the larger launchers offering small satellites the possibility of piggy-backing. Specific fixtures have been developed and commercialized: Arianespace developed the ASAP interface, the USAF studied ESPA, NASA has promoted Shuttle launch possibilities, Russian authorities and companies have been able to find solutions with many different launchers... It is fair to say that most launcher suppliers have worked hard and finally often been able to find solutions to launch most small satellites into orbit. It is also true, however, that most of these small satellites were technology demonstration missions capable of accepting a wide range of orbit and launch characteristics: orbit altitude and inclination, launch date, etc. In some cases the small satellite missions required a well-defined type of orbit and have therefore been obliged to hire a small launcher on which they were the prime passenger. In our paper we would like to propose an additional solution to all these possibilities: launchers could plan well in advance (for example about 3 years), trips to precisely defined orbits to allow potential passengers to organize themselves and be ready on the D-Day. On the scheduled date the chartered launcher goes to the stated orbit while on another date, another chartered launcher goes to another orbit. The idea is to organize departures for space like trains or airplanes leaving on known schedules for known destinations.

  18. Sphere launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The sphere launcher was designed to eject a 200 lb, 15 in. diameter sphere from a space vehicle or missile, at a velocity of 58 ft/sec without imparting excessive lateral loads to the vehicle. This launching is accomplished with the vehicle operating in vacuum conditions and under a 9 g acceleration. Two principal elements are used: a high thrust, short burn time rocket motor and two snubbers for reducing the lateral loads to acceptable limits.

  19. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  20. 27. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER SLAB AND LAUNCHER RAIL WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER SLAB AND LAUNCHER RAIL WITH 7 INCH DIAMETER HOLE FOR SUPPORT CARRIAGE LOCKING PIN. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 5. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE OVER LAUNCHER SLAB TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE OVER LAUNCHER SLAB TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR LOOKING NORTH. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Generic Software Architecture for Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carre, Emilien; Gast, Philippe; Hiron, Emmanuel; Leblanc, Alain; Lesens, David; Mescam, Emmanuelle; Moro, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    The definition and reuse of generic software architecture for launchers is not so usual for several reasons: the number of European launcher families is very small (Ariane 5 and Vega for these last decades); the real time constraints (reactivity and determinism needs) are very hard; low levels of versatility are required (implying often an ad hoc development of the launcher mission). In comparison, satellites are often built on a generic platform made up of reusable hardware building blocks (processors, star-trackers, gyroscopes, etc.) and reusable software building blocks (middleware, TM/TC, On Board Control Procedure, etc.). If some of these reasons are still valid (e.g. the limited number of development), the increase of the available CPU power makes today an approach based on a generic time triggered middleware (ensuring the full determinism of the system) and a centralised mission and vehicle management (offering more flexibility in the design and facilitating the long term maintenance) achievable. This paper presents an example of generic software architecture which could be envisaged for future launchers, based on the previously described principles and supported by model driven engineering and automatic code generation.

  3. 4. VAL PARTIAL ELEVATION SHOWING LAUNCHER BRIDGE ON SUPPORTS, LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VAL PARTIAL ELEVATION SHOWING LAUNCHER BRIDGE ON SUPPORTS, LAUNCHER SLAB, SUPPORT CARRIAGE, CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE AND CAMERA TOWER LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Superconducting Magnetic Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed projectile launcher exploits Meissner effect to transfer much of kinetic energy of relatively massive superconducting plunger to smaller projectile, accelerating projectile to high speed. Because it operates with magnetic fields, launcher not limited by gas-expansion thermodynamics. Plunger energized mechanically and/or chemically, avoiding need for large electrical power supplies and energy-storage systems. Potential applications include launching of projectiles for military purposes and for scientific and industrial tests of hypervelocity impacts.

  5. Characterization of the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression Water in the Space Launch System Mobile Launcher Using Volume of Fluid Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Vehicle consists of a Core Stage with four RS-25 engines and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). This vehicle is launched from the Launchpad using a Mobile Launcher (ML) which supports the SLS vehicle until its liftoff from the ML under its own power. The combination of the four RS-25 engines and two SRBs generate a significant Ignition Over-Pressure (IOP) and Acoustic Sound environment. One of the mitigations of these environments is the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression (IOP/SS) subsystem installed on the ML. This system consists of six water nozzles located parallel to and 24 inches downstream of each SRB nozzle exit plane as well as 16 water nozzles located parallel to and 53 inches downstream of the RS-25 nozzle exit plane. During launch of the SLS vehicle, water is ejected through each water nozzle to reduce the intensity of the transient pressure environment imposed upon the SLS vehicle. While required for the mitigation of the transient pressure environment on the SLS vehicle, the IOP/SS subsystem interacts (possibly adversely) with other systems located on the Launch Pad. One of the other systems that the IOP/SS water is anticipated to interact with is the Hydrogen Burn-Off Igniter System (HBOI). The HBOI system's purpose is to ignite the unburned hydrogen/air mixture that develops in and around the nozzle of the RS-25 engines during engine start. Due to the close proximity of the water system to the HBOI system, the presence of the IOP/SS may degrade the effectiveness of the HBOI system. Another system that the IOP/SS water may interact with adversely is the RS-25 engine nozzles and the SRB nozzles. The adverse interaction anticipated is the wetting, to a significant degree, of the RS-25 nozzles resulting in substantial weight of ice forming and water present to a significant degree upstream of the SRB nozzle exit plane inside the nozzle itself, posing significant additional blockage of the effluent that exits the nozzle

  6. View of Launcher #3 surface doors. Launcher #1 in background. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Launcher #3 surface doors. Launcher #1 in background. Image looking southwest - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. View of Launcher #3 surface doors. Launcher #1 in background ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Launcher #3 surface doors. Launcher #1 in background left, Launcher #2 in background right. Image looking west - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. EMACK electromagnetic launcher commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deis, D. W.; Scherbarth, D. W.; Ferrentino, G. L.

    1984-03-01

    The Laboratory Demonstration Electromagnetic Launcher Program (EMACK) was initiated in April 1979, with the objective to design, construct, and demonstrate a complete electromagnetic launcher (EML) system capable of accelerating projectiles of substantial mass to velocities significantly greater than those achievable with conventional chemical systems. The last hardware was installed in late 1981. During February 1982, a series of five test shots was made to evaluate the system's performance. Particular attention is given to the parameters of the final, as-built hardware, and the results of the commissioning tests. The results of these tests have demonstrated the viability of the components required for large scale electromagnetic launchers. It has been shown that large projectiles with velocities significantly greater than those achievable by chemical systems can be accelerated intact.

  9. Coilgun Launcher for Nanosatellites

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.

    1999-03-23

    Nanosatellite space launches could significantly benefit from an electrically powered launch complex, based on an electromagnetic coil launcher. This paper presents results of studies to estimate the required launcher parameters and some fixed facility issues. This study is based on electromagnetic launch, or electromagnetic gun technology, which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. A baseline configuration for analysis considers a payload mass of 10 kg, launch velocity of 6 km/s, a second stage solid booster for orbital insertion, and a payload fraction of about 0.1. The launch facility is envisioned as an inclined track, 1-2 km in length, mounted on a hillside at 25 degrees aimed in the orbital inclination of interest. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 2000 MJ and 2 MW electric. This energy would be supplied by 400 modules of energy storage and magnetic coils. With a prime power generator of 2 MW, a launch rate of some 200 satellites per day is possible. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened to launch acceleration on the order of 1000 gee. Parametric evaluations compare performance parameters for a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 4-8 km/s, and payloads of 1-100 kg. The EM launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. Most importantly, such a facility could reduce the cost per launch and could give true launch-on-demand capability for nanosatellites.

  10. Air-Powered Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, T.; Bjorklund, R. A.; Elliott, D. G.; Jones, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air-powered launcher fires plastic projectiles without using explosive propellants. Does not generate high temperatures. Launcher developed for combat training for U.S. Army. With reservoir pressurized, air launcher ready to fire. When pilot valve opened, sleeve (main valve) moves to rear. Projectile rapidly propelled through barrel, pushed by air from reservoir. Potential applications in seismic measurements, avalanche control, and testing impact resistance of windshields on vehicles.

  11. Rocket/launcher structural dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferragut, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The equations of motion describing the interactions between a rocket and a launcher were derived using Lagrange's Equation. A rocket launching was simulated. The motions of both the rocket and the launcher can be considered in detail. The model contains flexible elements and rigid elements. The rigid elements (masses) were judiciously utilized to simplify the derivation of the equations. The advantages of simultaneous shoe release were illustrated. Also, the loading history of the interstage structure of a boosted configuration was determined. The equations shown in this analysis could be used as a design tool during the modification of old launchers and the design of new launchers.

  12. Magnetic reconnection launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M.

    1987-04-06

    An electromagnetic launcher includes a plurality of electrical stages which are energized sequentially in the launcher with the passage of a projectiles. Each stage of the launcher includes two or more coils which are arranged coaxially on either closed-loop or straight lines to form gaps between their ends. The projectile has an electrically conductive gap-portion that passes through all the gaps of all the stages in a direction transverse to the axes of the coils. The coils receive an electric current, store magnetic energy, and convert a significant portion of the stored magnetic energy into kinetic energy of the projectile moves through the gap. The magnetic polarity of the opposing coils is in the same direction, e.g. N-S-N-S. A gap portion of the projectile may be made from aluminum and is propelled by the reconnection of magnetic flux stored in the coils which causes accelerating forces to act upon the projectile and at the horizontal surfaces of the projectile near its rear. The gap portion of the projectile may be flat, rectangular and longer than the length of the opposing coils. The gap portion of the projectile permits substantially unrestricted distribution of the induced currents so that current densities are only high where the useful magnetic force is high. This allows designs which permit ohmic oblation from the rear surfaces of the gap portion of the projectile allowing much high velocities to be achieved. An electric power apparatus controls the electric power supplied to the opposing coils until the gap portion of the projectile substantially occupies the gap between the coils, at which time the coils are supplied with peak current quickly. 8 figs.

  13. Electromagnetic Meissner effect launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electromagnetic projectile launcher provides acceleration of a superconducting projectile through the diamagnetic repulsion of the superconducting projectile. A superconducting layer is provided aft of the projectile, either directly on the projectile or on a platform upon which the projectile is carried, and a traveling magnetic field is caused to propagate along a magnetic field drive coil in which the projectile is disposed. The resulting diamagnetic repulsion between the superconducting projectile and the traveling magnetic field causes the projectile to be propelled along the coil. In one embodiment, a segmented drive coil is used to generate the traveling magnetic field.

  14. Magnetic reconnection launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Maynard

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic launcher includes a plurality of electrical stages which are energized sequentially in synchrony with the passage of a projectile. Each stage of the launcher includes two or more coils which are arranged coaxially on either closed-loop or straight lines to form gaps between their ends. The projectile has an electrically conductive gap-portion that passes through all the gaps of all the stages in a direction transverse to the axes of the coils. The coils receive an electric current, store magnetic energy, and convert a significant portion of the stored magnetic energy into kinetic energy of the projectile by magnetic reconnection as the gap portion of the projectile moves through the gap. The magnetic polarity of the opposing coils is in the same direction, e.g. N-S-N-S. A gap portion of the projectile may be made from aluminum and is propelled by the reconnection of magnetic flux stored in the coils which causes accelerating forces to act upon the projectile at both the rear vertical surface of the projectile and at the horizontal surfaces of the projectile near its rear. The gap portion of the projectile may be flat, rectangular and longer than the length of the opposing coils and fit loosely within the gap between the opposing coils.

  15. Historic and Current Launcher Success Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, Randy

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reviews historic and current space launcher success rates from all nations with a mature launcher industry. Data from the 1950's through present day is reviewed for possible trends such as when in the launch timeline a failure occurred, which stages had the highest failure rate, overall launcher reliability, a decade by decade look at launcher reliability, when in a launchers history did failures occur, and the reliability of United States human-rated launchers. This information is useful in determining where launcher reliability can be improved and where additional measures for crew survival (i.e., Crew Escape systems) will have the greatest emphasis

  16. The SHARP scramjet launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cartland, H.; Fiske, P.; Greenwood, R.; Hargiss, D.; Heston, P.; Hinsey, N.; Hunter, J.; Massey, W.

    1995-01-10

    The worlds largest light gas gun at SHARP (Super High Altitude Research Project) is completed and in the past year has launched 9 scramjets. Typical masses and velocities are 5.9 kg at 2.8 km/sec.and 4.4 kg at 3.1 km/sec. In so doing SHARP launched the first fully functioning, hydrogen burning scramjet at mach 8. The SHARP launcher is unique in having a 4 inch diameter and 155 foot-long barrel. This enables lower acceleration launches than any other system. In addition the facility can deliver high energy projectiles to targets in the open air without having to contain the impact fragments. This allows one to track lethality test debris for several thousand feet.

  17. The DSI small satellite launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, S.; Gibbons, D.; Wise, J.; Nguyen, D.

    1992-01-01

    A new launcher has been developed by DSI, that is compatible with the GAS canisters. It has the proven capability to deploy a satellite from an orbiting Shuttle that is 18 inches in diameter, 31 inches long, and weighing 190 pounds. These DSI Launchers were used aboard the Discovery (STS-39) in May 1991 as part of the Infrared Background Signature Survey (IBSS) to deploy three small satellites known as Chemical Release Observation (CRO) satellites A, B, and C. Because the satellites contained hazardous liquids (MMH, UDMH, and MON-10) and were launched from GAS Cylinders without motorized doors, the launchers were required to pass NASA Shuttle Payload safety and verification requirements. Some of the more interesting components of the design were the V-band retention and separation mechanism, the separation springs, and the launcher electronics which provided a properly inhibited release sequence operated through the Small Payload Accommodations Switch Panel (SPASP) on board the Orbiter. The original plan for this launcher was to use a motorized door. The launcher electronics, therefore has the capability to be modified to accommodate the door, if desired.

  18. Dimensions and Measurements of Debuncher Band 3 and 4 Waveguide-Coax Launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ding; /Fermilab

    2000-09-13

    This note is a document about dimensions and measurement results of waveguide-coax launchers (Band 3 and 4) installed on the arrays in debuncher cooling upgrade. Shown in Figure 1 and 5 are schematic drawings of launchers (pick-up) in the cross section along the longitudinal direction (beam direction) of the arrays. The unit in these drawings is inch. Note: although there are upper band and lower band for pickup arrays, the launchers are the same to avoid possible confusion during installation. Launchers for band 3 and 4 kickers were made by Penn-engineering Inc., therefor no schematic drawings are presented in this note. RF Measurements were made on all launchers (port) and printed in hard copies for future reference. Since the measurement results are similar to each other, only a few plots for each type of launcher/band are presented in this document. There are two types of measured S11 parameters. One is the measurement made at the end of design/tuning stage using a launcher and a straight section of band 3 or 4 waveguide terminated with a cone of absorber. I use 'Original' to denote this kind of measurement. As shown in Figure 2, 6, 9 and 12, the original S11 of all launchers are below or around -20 db over the full band 3 or 4. The other type of measurement is the one made after these launchers were installed onto the array including several type N feedthrough or connectors, elbows, waveguide bends (kicker) and magic Ts (kicker) etc. The kicker arrays were terminated with wedges of absorber. During all measurements (pickup array or kicker array) when one launcher was being measured, all other launchers were terminated with 50 ohm terminator. As shown in Figure 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13 and 14 these 'final' S11s are around -15 db.

  19. 32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER SLAB AND UNDERSIDE OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 21. VAL, DETAIL OF MUZZLE END OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VAL, DETAIL OF MUZZLE END OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE SHOWING BOTH LAUNCHER TUBES TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR LOOKING NORTH. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. MULTIPLE ECH LAUNCHER CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN,M.T; PONCE,D; GRUNLOH,H.J; ELLIS,R.A; GROSNICKLE,W.H; HUMPHREY,R.L

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The addition of new, high power gyrotrons to the heating and current drive arsenal at DIII-D, required a system upgrade for control of fully steerable ECH Launchers. Each launcher contains two pointing mirrors with two degrees of mechanical freedom. The two flavors of motion are called facet and tilt. Therefore up to four channels of motion per launcher need to be controlled. The system utilizes absolute encoders to indicate mirror position and therefore direction of the microwave beam. The launcher movement is primarily controlled by PLC, but future iterations of design, may require this control to be accomplished by a CPU on fast bus such as Compact PCI. This will be necessary to accomplish real time position control. Safety of equipment and personnel is of primary importance when controlling a system of moving parts. Therefore multiple interlocks and fault status enunciators have been implemented. This paper addresses the design of a Multiple ECH Launcher Control System, and characterizes the flexibility needed to upgrade to a real time position control system in the future.

  2. 90. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'FRONT ELEVATION OF LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'FRONT ELEVATION OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE, CONNECTING BRIDGE AND BARGES' drawn at 1/4'=1'0'. (BUROD Sketch # 208247). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 89. 22'X34' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher 'ELEVATION OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. 22'X34' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher 'ELEVATION OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE ON TEMPORARY SUPPORT' drawn at 1'=20'. (BUORD Sketch # 209786, PAPW 1932). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Space transportation propulsion USSR launcher technology, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Space transportation propulsion U.S.S.R. launcher technology is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: Energia background (launch vehicle summary, Soviet launcher family) and Energia propulsion characteristics (booster propulsion, core propulsion, and growth capability).

  5. Control of an Aerospace Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbiri, N.; Manseur, Z.

    2009-03-01

    This research is within the framework of the PERSEUS project proposed by the CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales). Its aim is to develop new concepts for the attitude control of space modules. This article presents a first study as well as the results of a robust LQG control system that allows stable and satisfactory performance for the attitude of a rigid launcher.

  6. Dimensions and Measurements of Debuncher Band 1 and 2 Waveguide-Coax Launchers (Final Version)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ding

    2000-02-15

    This note is a document about dimensions and measurement results of waveguide-coax launchers (Band 1 and 2) installed on the arrays in debuncher cooling upgrade. Shown in Figure 1, 5, 8 and 12 are schematic drawings of launchers in the cross section along the longitudinal direction (beam direction) of the arrays. The unit in these drawings is inch. Note: although there are upper band and lower band for pickup arrays, the launchers are the same to avoid possible confusion during installation. RF Measurements were made on all launchers (port) and printed in hard copies for future reference. Since the measurement results are similar to each other, only a few plots for each type of launcher/band are presented in this document. There are two types of measured S11 parameters. One is the measurement made at the end of design/tuning stage using a straight section of band 1 or 2 waveguide terminated with a cone of absorber. I use 'Original' to denote this kind of measurement. As shown in Figure 2, 6, 9 and 13, the original S11 of all launchers are below or around - 20 db over the full band 1 or 2. The other type of measurement is the one made after these launchers were installed onto the array including elbows and several type N feedthrough or connectors. The kicker arrays were terminated with wedges of absorber. During all measurements (pickup array or kicker array) when one launcher was being measured, all other launchers were terminated with 50 ohm terminator. As shown in Figure 3, 4, 7, 10, 11 and 14 these 'final' S11s are around -15 db.

  7. Mobile hard substrata - An additional biodiversity source in a high latitude shallow subtidal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazy, Piotr; Kuklinski, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    This study demonstrates the importance of a hard mobile substratum (hermit crab shells) for Arctic biodiversity. Based on previous observations from other geographic regions we hypothesized that this niche at high latitudes would support a higher biodiversity of epifauna than might be predicted from similar substrata. We test whether the hermit crab epifauna is specific to that substratum providing unique biodiversity components to the local community. From four study sites in Isfjorden (78°N), West Spitsbergen and two study sites in Northern Norway (69°N) we collected approximately 50 each of hermit crabs, gastropods and pebbles, of visually similar surface area using SCUBA diving. Hermit crab shells were colonized by a larger number of epifaunal species than either gastropods or pebbles, even when they were of a larger size. Among 87 taxa found on all the three substrata, 22 occurred only on hermit crab shells. Except for two study sites hermit crab shells also supported more individuals. This study shows that the contribution of shells carried by hermit crabs to high-latitude, shallow-subtidal diversity is higher than might be predicted by their surface area alone and that hermit crabs modify, maintain and create a unique habitat. This is the result of a number of factors interacting positively on the presence of epifauna including shell surface heterogeneity and the complex influence of the crab host.

  8. Electromagnetic launchers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. M.; Gully, J. H.; Driga, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic launcher (EML) was designed for NASA-Langley to boost large models to hypervelocity for flight evaluation. Two different concepts were developed using railgun and coilgun principles. A coilgun was designed to accelerate a 14-kg mass to 6 km/s and, by adding additional equipment, to accelerate a 10-kg mass to 11 km/s. The railgun system was designed to accelerate only 14 kg to 6 km/s. Of significance in this development is the opportunity to use the launcher for aeroballistic research of the upper atmosphere, eventually placing packages in low earth orbit using a small rocket. The authors describe the railgun and coilgun launch designs and suggest a reconfiguration for placement of 150-kg parcels into low earth orbit for aeroballistic studies and possible space lab support. Each design is detailed along with the performance adjustments which would be required for circular orbit payload placement.

  9. New life for expendable launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ramon L.; Waskul, Greg

    The U.S. commercial expendable launch vehicle (ELV) industry is examined. The use of Titan, Delta, Atlas-Centaur, and Liberty boosters to launch domestic and foreign commercial payloads is analyzed. The ELV commercialization agreement which explains the division of liability between the parties is described. Consideration is given to the competition to the U.S. industry from Europe's Ariane, China's Long March, and the Soviet Proton launchers.

  10. Electromagnetic Meissner-Effect Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic Meissner-effect launching apparatus differs from previous electromagnetic launchers; no need for electromagnet coil on projectile. Result, no need for brush contacts and high-voltage commutation equipment to supply current directly to projectile coil, or for pulse circuitry to induce current in projectile coil if brush contacts not used. Compresses magnetic field surrounding rear surface of projectile, creating gradient of magnetic pressure pushing projectile forward.

  11. Traveling-wave induction launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of traveling-wave induction launchers shows that induction is a feasible method of producing armature current and that efficient accelerators can be built without sliding contacts or arcs. In a traveling-wave induction launcher the armature current is induced by a slip speed between the armature and a traveling magnetic field. At 9 m/s slip speed a 9 kg projectile with an aluminum armature weighing 25 percent of the total mass can be accelerated to 3000 m/s in a 5 m-long barrel with a total ohmic loss in the barrel coils and armature of 4 percent of the launch kinetic energy and with an average armature temperature rise of 220 deg C, but a peak excitation frequency of 8600 Hz is required. With a 2 kg launch mass the ohmic loss is 7 percent. A launcher system optimized for rotating generators would have a peak frequency of 4850 Hz; with an aluminum armature weighing 33 percent of the launch mass and a slip speed of 30 m/s the total ohmic loss in the generators, cables, and accelerator would be 43 percent of the launch kinetic energy, and the average armature temperature rise would be 510 deg C.

  12. An electomagnetic lunar launcher utilizing superconductivity technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilby, Curt; Nozette, Stewart; Kolm, Henry

    1989-01-01

    The application of superconductivity technology to the lunar launcher problem was considered, and a quenchgun concept was formulated to reduce the mass of the launcher system by incorporating the energy storage in the launcher itself and using the efficiency of the quenchgun to reduce the power requirements. A conceptual design for the quenchgun launcher is presented, and the integration of the system into a lunar base logistics model for evaluation is addressed. The results of these evaluations under the NASA Office of Exploration lunar base scenarios are reported.

  13. A 10-stage reconnection demonstration launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cnare, E.G.; Widner, M.M.; Duggins, B.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a small-scale, 10-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher that has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Ten-gram projectiles are accelerated from rest to 317 m/s through the 0.44 m launcher assembly with a projectile kinetic energy to capacitor stored energy efficiency of 9%. Comparison of test results and computer code predictions are presented. Results of these studies have substantiated launcher scaling at small size and have provided a useful test bed for launcher components and diagnostics.

  14. 18. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE ALONG THE SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE ALONG THE SIDE OF THE 32' DIAMETER LAUNCHING TUBE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER (VAL) CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER (VAL) CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING CAMERA TOWER STRUCTURE LOOKING SOUTH AND ARCHED OPENING FOR ROADWAY. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... approved under 46 CFR 160.028 must also be carried. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  17. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... approved under 46 CFR 160.028 must also be carried. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  18. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... approved under 46 CFR 160.028 must also be carried. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  19. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... approved under 46 CFR 160.028 must also be carried. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  20. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... approved under 46 CFR 160.028 must also be carried. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  1. Hypervelocity Launcher for Aerothermodynamic Experiments. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, Timothy J.; Bauer, David P.

    1995-01-01

    The capability of an Ultra Distributed Energy Store System (UDESS) powered electromagnetic launcher (EM) is experimentally assessed. The UDESS system was developed specifically to address the velocity speed limit seen in plasma armature EM launchers. Metal armature launch packages were also developed and tested to assess the usefulness of the UDESS concept for low velocity applications.

  2. The ESA activities on future launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfeffer, H.

    1984-01-01

    A future launcher development scenario depends on many assumptions, such as the impetus provided by the probability of future missions, and the political willingness of member states to undertake future developments. Because of the long timescale implied by a coherent launcher development, a step-wise approach within an overall future launcher development plan appears essential. The definition of development steps allows the launcher developments to be adapted to the driving external forces, so that no possible opportunity to Europe in the space launch business is missed out because of improper planning on the absence of a long term goal. The launcher senario, to be presented in 1985, forms part of Europe's overall STS plan for the future. This overall STS plan is one product of the complete STS LTPP, a first draft of which should exist by 1985, and which will be updated regularly to take into account the changing political and economic perspectives.

  3. Parameter studies for traveling wave coaxial launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.Y. . Center for Electromechanics)

    1991-01-01

    The traveling wave coaxial launcher is a complex machine that requires very extensive parameter studies to optimize. Most of previous attempts to realize hypervelocity using coaxial launchers have failed partly due to inadequate analyses. This paper reports the results of very extensive air-core coaxial launcher parameter studies performed using computers. These results and the methodology introduced should help future researchers on this topic. In the course of studying the feasibility of accelerating a 1-kg projectile to 10 km/s with an 18 m air-core multiphase coaxial launcher powered by a rising frequency generator (RFGs), a complete simulation code based on the current filament method was developed. Results from the simulation code indicate rather chaotic behavior of an arbitrary coaxial launcher design. More fundamental studies were then conducted using various computer codes based on the current filament method.

  4. Modeling of an Implosion Driven Hypervelocity Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Szirti, Daniel; Batchelor, Patrick; Zhang, Fan; Tanguay, Vincent

    2007-06-01

    Modelling work carried out on the implosion driven launcher under concurrent development is presented. The launcher consists of a thin walled metal tube surrounded by explosive which when detonated pinches the tube shut and drives a strong shock into the projectile. The commercial hydrocode LS-DYNA was used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the design parameters of the launcher and their effect on implosion dynamics and performance. These parameters include fill pressure, tube diameter, explosive layer thickness, and explosives tampering. The launcher is primarily modeled using a quasi 2D Arbitrary Langrage Euler formulation. A full 3-D axisymmetric model is also employed. The model is evaluated against experimental data previously collected. Additional developmental work on a second stage launcher taking advantage of a phase velocity between the imploding tube and explosives via the use of angled flyer plates and cones is also carried out.

  5. Electrically actuated multiple store launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Frank P.; Travor, Bruce W.

    1991-12-01

    This invention comprises a multi-store, electrical pulse initiated launcher that fits into, and is electrically connected with a transporting vehicle and that contains sequentially stacked assemblies. An electrical pulse from the transporting vehicle causes a resistor with the least value to transfer the electric sufficient gas pressure to force the store out of the launcher. The present invention discloses an electrically-actuated, multi-store dispenser wherein an initial electrical charge ignites gas cartridges causing sequential launching of stores from their tandem position inside a launch container. In some environments, it is desirable to dispense multiple stores from a launch vehicle, for instance sonobuoys, in dense patterns. Due to physical limitations of space in the dispensing vehicle, an effort was made to miniaturize the active components inside the store and therefore reduce the overall outer dimensions thereof. Once the size of the store was reduced, in order to meet the demands of the denser patterns, the inside of the individual launch containers were modified to allow each to hold and dispense more than one store. This new type of launch container, in addition to maintaining the size requirement dictated by the transporting vehicle, is operated by the vehicle's electrical system.

  6. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher.

    PubMed

    Plöckl, B; Lang, P T

    2013-10-01

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios. PMID:24182110

  7. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Plöckl, B.; Lang, P. T.

    2013-10-15

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  8. New Forms of Planetary Surface Exploration and Mobility Using Hard Landers and Propulsive Hoppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohanim, B.; Slagowski, S.; Murphy, S.; Hoffman, J.; Cunio, P.

    2012-06-01

    This paper will discuss some of the technological advances in using a smaller class of hard Landers, called penetrators, that would reduce the mass and cost and propellant of safely placing science payloads on the surface of another body.

  9. 30. VAL LOOKING DOWN THE LAUNCHER SLAB STAIRS AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VAL LOOKING DOWN THE LAUNCHER SLAB STAIRS AT THE PROJECTILE LOADING CAR AND LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO THE PROJECTILE LOADING DECK AND LAUNCHER BRIDGE. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Computational design of hypervelocity launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.; Chhabildas, L.

    1993-12-31

    The Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher (HVL) uses impact techniques on a two-stage light-gas gun to launch flier plates to velocities in excess of 10 km/s. An important problem in designing successful third stage techniques for impact launching fliers to such velocities is detailed understanding of the interior ballistic performance of the third stage. This is crucial for preventing melt and fracture of the flier plates during the extraordinary accelerations that they undergo (accelerations on the order of 10{sup 9} g are typical on the HVL). We seek to optimize HVL launch conditions in order to achieve two major goals: first, to maximize the potential launch velocity for a given flier, and second, to allow different flier configurations. One tool that we can apply in studying HVL performance is the use of multi-dimensional wave propagation codes. We have used such codes, particularly the Sandia Eulerian code CTH, to study a variety of interior ballistics issues related to gun performance and launcher development for almost ten years. Recently this work has culminated in a major contribution to HVL design, namely the capability to launch ``chunk`` fliers. `Me initial phases of design development were solely devoted to CTH computations that studied potential designs, identified problems, and posed possible solutions for launching chunk fliers on the HVL. Our computations sufficiently narrowed the design space to the point that systematic experimental progress was possible. Our first experiment resulted in the successful launch of an intact 0.33 gram titanium alloy chunk flier to a velocity of 10.2 km/s. The thickness to diameter ratio of this flier was approximately 0.5.

  11. Technology demonstration for reusable launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiocco, P.; Bonnal, Ch.

    2016-03-01

    Reusable launchers have been studied under CNES contracts for more than 30 years, with early concepts such as STS-2000 or Oriflamme, more recently with very significant efforts devoted to Liquid Fly Back Boosters as with the Bargouzin project led with Tsniimash, TSTO with the Everest concept studied by Airbus-DS as prime contractor or the RFS Reusable First Stage concept of a large first stage associated to a cryotechnic second stage. These investigations, summarized in the first part of the paper, enabled CNES to identify clearly the technology requirements associated to reusability, as well as cost efficiency through detailed non-recurring costs and mission costs analysis. In parallel, CNES set in place development logic for sub-systems and equipment based on demonstrators, hardware test benches enabling maturation of technologies up to a TRL such that an actual development can be decided with limited risk. This philosophy has been applied so far to a large number of cases, such as TPTech and TPX for Hydrogen turbo pump, GGPX as demonstrator of innovative gas generator, HX demonstrator of modern cryotechnic upper stage with a dozen of different objectives (Thermal Protection, 20K Helium storage, measurements …). This virtuous approach, "learn as you test", is currently applied in the phased approach towards scaled down reusable booster stage, whose possibility to be used as first stage of a microlaunch vehicle is under investigation. The selected technologies allow paving the way towards reusable booster stages for Ariane 6 evolutions or main reusable stage for a further generation of heavy launchers. The paper describes the logic behind this project, together with the demonstration objectives set for the various sub-systems as well as operations.

  12. Study of new materials for railgun launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Poltanov, A.; Jygailo, N.; Bykov, M.; Glinov, A.; Svobodov, A.; Belyakov, A.; Chernetskaya, N.

    1997-01-01

    The description of new materials which can be used in railgun launchers is presented. Mo-W compositions in the Cu matrix, binary composites with anisotropic conductivity, ceramics and ceramic covers have been studied as materials for rails, solid armature and insulator respectively. The tests have been conducted on a 1m long railgun launcher with a section of the bore 10mm x 10mm using a current with the amplitude 350--400 kA. Main test results are demonstrated.

  13. Distributed data fusion across multiple hard and soft mobile sensor platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsley, Gregory

    is a younger field than centralized fusion. The main issues in distributed fusion that are addressed are distributed classification and distributed tracking. There are several well established methods for performing distributed fusion that are first reviewed. The chapter on distributed fusion concludes with a multiple unmanned vehicle collaborative test involving an unmanned aerial vehicle and an unmanned ground vehicle. The third issue this thesis addresses is that of soft sensor only data fusion. Soft-only fusion is a newer field than centralized or distributed hard sensor fusion. Because of the novelty of the field, the chapter on soft only fusion contains less background information and instead focuses on some new results in soft sensor data fusion. Specifically, it discusses a novel fuzzy logic based soft sensor data fusion method. This new method is tested using both simulations and field measurements. The biggest issue addressed in this thesis is that of combined hard and soft fusion. Fusion of hard and soft data is the newest area for research in the data fusion community; therefore, some of the largest theoretical contributions in this thesis are in the chapter on combined hard and soft fusion. This chapter presents a novel combined hard and soft data fusion method based on random set theory, which processes random set data using a particle filter. Furthermore, the particle filter is designed to be distributed across multiple robots and portable computers (used by human observers) so that there is no centralized failure point in the system. After laying out a theoretical groundwork for hard and soft sensor data fusion the thesis presents practical applications for hard and soft sensor data fusion in simulation. Through a series of three progressively more difficult simulations, some important hard and soft sensor data fusion capabilities are demonstrated. The first simulation demonstrates fusing data from a single soft sensor and a single hard sensor in

  14. Distributed data fusion across multiple hard and soft mobile sensor platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsley, Gregory

    is a younger field than centralized fusion. The main issues in distributed fusion that are addressed are distributed classification and distributed tracking. There are several well established methods for performing distributed fusion that are first reviewed. The chapter on distributed fusion concludes with a multiple unmanned vehicle collaborative test involving an unmanned aerial vehicle and an unmanned ground vehicle. The third issue this thesis addresses is that of soft sensor only data fusion. Soft-only fusion is a newer field than centralized or distributed hard sensor fusion. Because of the novelty of the field, the chapter on soft only fusion contains less background information and instead focuses on some new results in soft sensor data fusion. Specifically, it discusses a novel fuzzy logic based soft sensor data fusion method. This new method is tested using both simulations and field measurements. The biggest issue addressed in this thesis is that of combined hard and soft fusion. Fusion of hard and soft data is the newest area for research in the data fusion community; therefore, some of the largest theoretical contributions in this thesis are in the chapter on combined hard and soft fusion. This chapter presents a novel combined hard and soft data fusion method based on random set theory, which processes random set data using a particle filter. Furthermore, the particle filter is designed to be distributed across multiple robots and portable computers (used by human observers) so that there is no centralized failure point in the system. After laying out a theoretical groundwork for hard and soft sensor data fusion the thesis presents practical applications for hard and soft sensor data fusion in simulation. Through a series of three progressively more difficult simulations, some important hard and soft sensor data fusion capabilities are demonstrated. The first simulation demonstrates fusing data from a single soft sensor and a single hard sensor in

  15. Performance of an induction coil launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.; Cowan, M.; Kaye, R.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1993-12-31

    Performance of an electromagnetic induction launcher is considered for three types of armatures. These are: Solid, 1-element wound and 16-element wound aluminum armatures. The one element wound armature has uniform current density throughout. Because of the uniformity of the current density, the wound armature can withstand field reversal and still maintain low temperature. Slingshot simulations were performed for several configurations. Best performance was obtained for a single element wound armature with two field reversals. For a 60 kg projectile, 10.5 cm coil inner radius and 5.5 cm coil build, the velocity after 50 meters of launcher length (670 stages) exceeded 3.5 km/sec with an overall efficiency of about 45%. For the same parameters the solid and 16-element wound armatures reach a velocity of about 3.3 km/sec after 800 stages (60 meters of launcher length) but without field reversal. A velocity of 3.5 km/sec is possible after 60 meters of launcher length with the 16-element wound armature with one field reversal, but the temperature is close to the melting temperature of aluminum. In all simulations with a solid armature, melting of some of the surface material occurs. However, it is shown that most of the melting occurs after contribution has been made to the forward going pressure, that is, melting does not affect the electrical performance of the launcher. The effect of coil firing time jitter on launcher performance is also considered and is found to be very small for realistic perturbations. For {plus_minus} 2 {mu}-secs random jitter, the reduction in the final velocity for a 60 meter launcher with a solid armature is less than 0.1% and the increase in temperature is only 2%. This result holds for all types of armatures.

  16. Comparative modelling of lower hybrid current drive with two launcher designs in the Tore Supra tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Hillairet, J.; Aniel, T.; Basiuk, V.; Goniche, M.; Imbeaux, F.; Mazon, D.; Sharma, P.

    2013-08-01

    Fully non-inductive operation with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in the Tore Supra tokamak is achieved using either a fully active multijunction (FAM) launcher or a more recent ITER-relevant passive active multijunction (PAM) launcher, or both launchers simultaneously. While both antennas show comparable experimental efficiencies, the analysis of stability properties in long discharges suggest different current profiles. We present comparative modelling of LHCD with the two different launchers to characterize the effect of the respective antenna spectra on the driven current profile. The interpretative modelling of LHCD is carried out using a chain of codes calculating, respectively, the global discharge evolution (tokamak simulator METIS), the spectrum at the antenna mouth (LH coupling code ALOHA), the LH wave propagation (ray-tracing code C3PO), and the distribution function (3D Fokker-Planck code LUKE). Essential aspects of the fast electron dynamics in time, space and energy are obtained from hard x-ray measurements of fast electron bremsstrahlung emission using a dedicated tomographic system. LHCD simulations are validated by systematic comparisons between these experimental measurements and the reconstructed signal calculated by the code R5X2 from the LUKE electron distribution. An excellent agreement is obtained in the presence of strong Landau damping (found under low density and high-power conditions in Tore Supra) for which the ray-tracing model is valid for modelling the LH wave propagation. Two aspects of the antenna spectra are found to have a significant effect on LHCD. First, the driven current is found to be proportional to the directivity, which depends upon the respective weight of the main positive and main negative lobes and is particularly sensitive to the density in front of the antenna. Second, the position of the main negative lobe in the spectrum is different for the two launchers. As this lobe drives a counter-current, the resulting

  17. Resent Status of ITER Equatorial Launcher Development

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Kasugai, A.; Oda, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.

    2009-11-26

    The ITER equatorial launcher is divided into a front shield and a port plug. The front shield is composed of fourteen blanket shield modules so as to form three openings for the injection of mm-wave beams into plasma. Twenty-four waveguide transmission lines, internal shields, cooling pipes and so on are installed in the port plug. The transmission lines consist of the corrugated waveguides, miter bends and the free space propagation region utilizing two mirrors in front of the waveguide outlet. The analysis of mm-wave beam propagation in the region shows that the transmission efficiency more than 99.5% is attained. The high power experiments of the launcher mock-up have been carried out and the measured field patterns at each mirror and the outlet of the launcher are agreed with the calculations. It is concluded that the transmission line components in the launcher mock-up are fabricated as designed and the present mm-wave design in the launcher is feasible.

  18. A general theory of DC electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Thomas G.; Timpson, Erik J.

    2015-08-01

    The non-linear, transient operation of DC electromagnetic launchers (EMLs) complicates their theoretical understanding and prevents scaling studies and performance comparisons without the aid of detailed numerical models. This paper presents a general theory for DC electromagnetic launchers that has simplified these tasks by identifying critical EML parameters and relationships affecting the EML's voltage, current, and power scaling, as well as its performance and energy conversion efficiency. EML parameters and relationships discussed in this paper include the specific force, the operating mode, the launcher constant, the launcher characteristic velocity, the contact characteristic velocity, the energy conversion efficiency, and the kinetic power and voltage-current scaling relationship. The concepts of the ideal EML, same-scale comparisons, and EML impedance are discussed. This paper defines conditions needed for the EML to operate in the steady-state. A comparison of the general theory with experimental results of several different types of DC (i.e., non-induction) electromagnetic launchers ranging from medium velocity (100's m/s) to high velocity (1000's m/s) is performed. There is good agreement between the general theory and the experimental results.

  19. Resent Status of ITER Equatorial Launcher Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Kasugai, A.; Oda, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.

    2009-11-01

    The ITER equatorial launcher is divided into a front shield and a port plug. The front shield is composed of fourteen blanket shield modules so as to form three openings for the injection of mm-wave beams into plasma. Twenty-four waveguide transmission lines, internal shields, cooling pipes and so on are installed in the port plug. The transmission lines consist of the corrugated waveguides, miter bends and the free space propagation region utilizing two mirrors in front of the waveguide outlet. The analysis of mm-wave beam propagation in the region shows that the transmission efficiency more than 99.5% is attained. The high power experiments of the launcher mock-up have been carried out and the measured field patterns at each mirror and the outlet of the launcher are agreed with the calculations. It is concluded that the transmission line components in the launcher mock-up are fabricated as designed and the present mm-wave design in the launcher is feasible.

  20. DTRC electromagnetic launcher with feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emad, F. P.; Borraccini, J. P.; Waltman, D. J.; Fikse, T. H.; Ruby, W. R.; Superczynski, M. J.; Whitestone, R. C.; Thomas, E. V.

    1993-01-01

    Emad et al. (1989) described the development of an analytical model used to simulate, and aid in the design and construction, of a coaxial launcher. Attention is here given to a more powerful launcher, improved design methods, and the use of feedback to control the forces as the launch is taking place. The model is based on a variable set of differential equations that represent the electromagnetics of the system coupled with the mechanical equations of motion. This approach in modeling results in excellent accuracy, numerical stability, and efficiency. The simulation can be performed on a desktop computer. The resulting design was used to build a full scale model, which was then instrumented and tested. Both simulation and actual test results of the new launcher are presented.

  1. The ELF-I augmented electromagnetic launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikse, D. A.; Wu, J. L.; Thio, Y. C.

    1984-03-01

    Augmenting an electromagnetic launcher barrel with one or more turns can theoretically increase the launcher system performance more than twice that of a simple EML. This is accomplished by increasing the amount of magnetic flux in the bore and thus increasing the electromagnetic accelerating force. The potential for augmented barrels had yet to be evaluated, therefore a one meter long test barrel was designed and constructed. This barrel was tested in the ELF-I electromagnetic test facility and the results compared with the theoretically predicted performance of a simple barrel design. This comparison shows an increase in muzzle velocity of 83 percent for the augmented case over the simple launcher case. It was also found that the augmented barrel could be fabricated in a simple manner within the physical limitations of a conventional barrel size, and that its solid armatures provided an excellent method of achieving longer rail life, averaging 20 shots per rail set.

  2. 79. VIEW OF VAL FIRING RANGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. VIEW OF VAL FIRING RANGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING LAUNCHER BRIDGE, BARGES, SONAR BUOY RANGE AND MORRIS DAM IN BACKGROUND, June 10, 1948. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 83. DETAIL OF THE MUZZLE END OF THE LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. DETAIL OF THE MUZZLE END OF THE LAUNCHER BRIDGE ON TEMPORARY SUPPORTS LOOKING NORTHEAST SHOWING TWO LAUNCHING TUBES, Date unknown, circa 1950'S. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 82. DETAIL OF THE MUZZLE END OF THE LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. DETAIL OF THE MUZZLE END OF THE LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING NORTH SHOWING THE CONNECTING BRIDGE AND TWO LAUNCHING TUBES, Date unknown, circa 1952. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Impurity Radiation From The LHCD Launcher During Operation In JET And Investigation Of Launcher Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kirov, K.K.; Mailloux, J.

    2005-09-26

    In this study, the most likely causes of the enhanced radiation in front of the LHCD launcher are investigated: fast ions from the warm plasma, fast electrons parasitically accelerated in front of the grill and arcs. Evidence for the presence of each of these mechanisms is discussed. The experimental conditions favouring the appearance of these phenomena and their impact on the launcher have also been highlighted.

  6. Electromagnetic coilgun launcher for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Lipinski, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    A ground-based electrically-powered launcher could significantly reduce the complexity and cost of space launches for moderate-weight payloads. The EM launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turnaround time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened. This paper presents results of a study to estimate the required launcher parameters, and estimate the cost of such a launch facility. This study is based on electromagnetic gun technology which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 40 {minus} 260 GJ and 20 {minus} 400 GW electric. Parametric evaluations have been conducted with a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 1-6 kn/s, and payloads to low earth orbit of 100 1000 kg.

  7. Electromagnetic coilgun launcher for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Lipinski, R.J.

    1996-03-01

    A ground-based electrically-powered launcher could significantly reduce the complexity and cost of space launches for moderate-weight payloads. The electromagnetic launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened. This paper presents results of a study to estimate the required launcher parameters, and estimate the cost of such a launch facility. This study is based on electromagnetic gun technology which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 40{endash}260 GJ and 20{endash}400 GW electric. Parametric evaluations have been conducted with a launcher length of 1{endash}2 km, exit velocity of 1{endash}6 km/s, and payloads to low earth orbit of 100{endash}1000 kg. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Electromagnetic coilgun launcher for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turman, B. N.; Lipinski, R. J.

    1996-03-01

    A ground-based electrically-powered launcher could significantly reduce the complexity and cost of space launches for moderate-weight payloads. The electromagnetic launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened. This paper presents results of a study to estimate the required launcher parameters, and estimate the cost of such a launch facility. This study is based on electromagnetic gun technology which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 40-260 GJ and 20-400 GW electric. Parametric evaluations have been conducted with a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 1-6 km/s, and payloads to low earth orbit of 100-1000 kg.

  9. Pulsed power requirements for electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, W.F.; Woodson, H.H.

    1984-03-01

    Both linear (railgun) and coaxial (mass driver, etc.) electromagnetic launchers (EMLs) are treated as time-varying impedances to determine the relationships between acceleration force, payload velocity, and power supply voltage and current. These relationships are then examined in the light of electromagnetic parameters associated with each EML type to establish a basis for determining and comparing power supply requirements for various EMLs.

  10. A Cost Effective Automatic Balloon Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Berrigan J. Michael

    2000-06-08

    Approximately 800,000 balloon-borne radiosondes are hand-launched each year, a cost and labor-intensive procedure. Development of a low-cost Automatic Radiosonde Launcher would allow the manual procedure to be replaced with a reliable and less expensive process. Balloon-borne radiosondes provide essential meteorological data used by forecasters and researchers around the globe. The National Weather service alone launches tens of thousands of sondes from sites across the US. Although worldwide launching of radiosondes has been done for many years, it remains a labor intensive and therefore expensive operation. Using its own funding and, more recently with the help of a Phase I SBIR grant, Visidyne, Inc. has begun investigating the feasibility of building an Automatic Radiosonde Launcher (ARL) that can be built at a cost that will be acceptable to the commercial marketplace. That work has led to the issuing of four patents covering important innovations that will allow us to meet that goal. Under the recent Phase I effort, solutions to many of the key problems have been tested in the laboratory and in real-world demonstrations in the field. The balloon filling, battery wetting, and launch release mechanisms were designed, built, and tested. A breadboard launcher was constructed and tested to prove feasibility of key system elements. Demonstration launches of radiosondes were performed using the breadboard launcher from the National Weather Service facility in Gray, ME, and from Hanscom AFB in Lexington, MA. The cost and size of a full scale shelter prevented us from building one during Phase I, however, we do have a design that will accomplish our goals. The Automatic Radiosonde Launcher will significantly reduce the cost of launching balloon-borne instruments. US and foreign weather services and atmospheric, climatological, and meteorological researchers will all benefit from this innovation.

  11. SIDON: A simulator of radio-frequency networks. Application to WEST ICRF launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, Walid; Dumortier, Pierre; Durodié, Frédéric; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Mollard, Patrick; Berger-By, Gilles; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Colas, Laurent; Lombard, Gilles; Maggiora, Riccardo; Magne, Roland; Milanesio, Daniele; Moreau, Didier

    2015-12-01

    SIDON (SImulator of raDiO-frequency Networks) is an in-house developed Radio-Frequency (RF) network solver that has been implemented to cross-validate the design of WEST ICRF launchers and simulate their impedance matching algorithm while considering all mutual couplings and asymmetries. In this paper, the authors illustrate the theory of SIDON as well as results of its calculations. The authors have built time-varying plasma scenarios (a sequence of launchers front-faces L-mode and H-mode Z-matrices), where at each time step (1 millisecond here), SIDON solves the RF network. At the same time, when activated, the impedance matching algorithm controls the matching elements (vacuum capacitors) and thus their corresponding S-matrices. Typically a 1-second pulse requires around 10 seconds of computational time on a desktop computer. These tasks can be hardly handled by commercial RF software. This innovative work allows identifying strategies for the launchers future operation while insuring the limitations on the currents, voltages and electric fields, matching and Load-Resilience, as well as the required straps voltage amplitude/phase balance. In this paper, a particular attention is paid to the simulation of the launchers behavior when arcs appear at several locations of their circuits using SIDON calculator. This latter work shall confirm or identify strategies for the arc detection using various RF electrical signals. One shall note that the use of such solvers in not limited to ICRF launchers simulations but can be employed, in principle, to any linear or linearized RF problem.

  12. Future launchers strategy : the ariane 2010 initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnal, Ch.; Eymard, M.; Soccodato, C.

    2001-03-01

    With the new cryogenic upper stage ESC, the European heavy launcher Ariane 5+ is perfectly suited to the space market envisioned for the coming decade: flexible to cope with any payload and commercially attractive despite a fierce competition. Current Arianespace projections for the following years 2010-2020 indicate two major trends: satellites may still become larger and may require very different final orbits; today's market largely dominated by GEO may well evolve, influenced by LEO operations such as those linked to ISS or by constellations, to remain competitive, the launch cost has to be reduced. The future generation of the European heavy launcher has therefore to focus on an ever increased flexibility with a drastic cost reduction. Two strategies are possible to achieve this double goal: reusable launchers, either partially or totally, may ease the access to space, limiting costly expendable stages; the assessment of their technical feasibility and financial viability is undergoing in Europe under the Future Launchers Technology Program (FLTP), expendable launchers, derived from the future Ariane 5+. This second way started by CNES at the end of year 1999 is called the "Ariane 2010 initiative". The main objectives are simultaneously an increase of 25% in performance and a reduction of 30% in launch cost wrt Ariane 5+. To achieve these very ambitious goals, numerous major modifications are studied: technical improvements : modifications of the Solid Rocket Boosters may consist in filament winding casing, increased loading, simplified casting, improved grain, simplified Thrust Vector Control, … evolution of the Vulcain engine leading to higher efficiency despite a simplified design, flow separation controlled nozzle extension, propellant management of the two cryogenic stages, simplified electrical system, increased standardization, for instance on flanged interfaces and manufacturing processes, operational improvements such as launch cycle simplification

  13. Three-phase hypervelocity projectile launcher

    DOEpatents

    Fugelso, L. Erik; Langner, Gerald C.; Burns, Kerry L.; Albright, James N.

    1994-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile launcher for use in perforating borehole casings provides improved penetration into the surrounding rock structure. The launcher includes a first cylinder of explosive material that defines an axial air-filled cavity, a second cylinder of explosive material defining an axial frustum-shaped cavity abutting and axially aligned with the first cylinder. A pliant washer is located between and axially aligned with the first and second cylinders. The frustum shaped cavity is lined with a metal liner effective to form a projectile when the first and second cylinders are detonated. The washer forms a unique intermediate projectile in advance of the liner projectile and enables the liner projectile to further penetrate into and fracture the adjacent rock structure.

  14. Power and energy requirements for electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lottes, P. A.; Holtz, R. E.; Uherka, K. L.

    A large data base exists covering almost all aspects of the requirements for the successful development of electromagnetic launchers. To extend the use of electromagnetic launchers to the limits of technology for such exotic applications as hypervelocity weaponry or space launch systems, it is useful to examine the energy and power requirements for such uses. One way to do this is to purposely neglect all system losses in order to determine minimum power and energy requirements. Actual power requirements will most likely be higher by at least a factor of three. Calculations are presented for minimum power requirements, launch acceleration time, projectile kinetic energy, and projectile inertial force as a function of projectile mass, projectile terminal velocity, and the length of the launch tube. Results of these calculations are presented.

  15. Launchers - The first 50-year cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoe, G. K. C.

    1986-11-01

    An assessment is made of the development history of spacecraft launch vehicles to the present date, with attention to mission economics and the criteria of profitability. Three technological generations are postulated: that dominated by expendable launch vehicles, lasting from 1957 to the introduction of the Space Shuttle; the Space Shuttle period of semireusable launch vehicles; and the soon-to-be-inaugurated era of fully reusable launchers which are expected to begin operations around the year 2000.

  16. Conference on electromagnetic guns and launchers, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Anon

    1982-01-01

    Proceedings includes 31 papers dealing with the physical principles and engineering technology associated with the development of electromagnetic propulsion, with emphasis on its use for guns, launchers as well as other military equipment. Topics covered include: rail guns, projectiles, mass accelerators, electric motors and generators, nuclear reactors, superconducting devices, plasma acceleration and confinement, traveling magnetic waves, aerospace propulsion, space shuttles, homopolar generators, fusion reactors, tokamaks, impact fusion, and electric power generation. 14 papers are abstracted and indexed separately.

  17. Mercury: Little Joe (LJ1) launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Technicians attach the escape tower to the Mercury capsule prior to assembly with Little Joe (LJ1) launcher, August 20, 1959. Joseph Shortal describe this as follows (vol. 3., p. 33): 'The escape tower and rocket motors were taken from the Mercury capsule production. The tower is shown being attached to the capsule.... The escape rocket was a Grand Central 1-KS-52000 motor with three canted nozzles. The tower-jettison motor was an Atlantic Research Corp. 1.4-KS-785 motor. This was the same design tested in a beach abort test...and had the offset thrust line as used in the beach abort test to insure that the capsule would get away from the booster in an emergency. The escape system weighed 1,015 pounds, including 236 pounds of ballast for stability.' 'The Little Joe booster was assembled at Wallops on its special launcher in a vertical attitude. It is shown in the [on the left] with the work platform in place. The launcher was located on a special concrete slab in Launching Area 1. The capsule was lowered onto the booster by crane.... After the assembly was completed, the scaffolding was disassembled and the launcher pitched over to its normal launch angle of 80 degrees.... Little Joe had a diameter of 80 inches and an overall length, including the capsule and escape tower of 48 feet. The total weight at launch was about 43,000 pounds. The overall span of the stabilizing fins was 21.3 feet.' 'Although in comparison with the overall Mercury Project, Little Joe was a simple undertaking, the fact that an attempt was made to condense a normal two-year project into a 6-month one with in house labor turned it into a major undertaking for Langley.'

  18. Mercury: Little Joe (LJ1) launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Technicians adjust the rocket motor during the attachment of the escape tower to the Mercury capsule prior to assembly with Little Joe (LJ1) launcher, August 20, 1959. Joseph Shortal wrote (vol. 3., p. 33): 'The escape tower and rocket motors were taken from the Mercury capsule production. The tower is shown being attached to the capsule.... The escape rocket was a Grand Central 1-KS-52000 motor with three canted nozzles. The tower-jettison motor was an Atlantic Research Corp. 1.4-KS-785 motor. This was the same design tested in a beach abort test...and had the offset thrust line as used in the beach abort test to insure that the capsule would get away from the booster in an emergency. The escape system weighed 1,015 pounds, including 236 pounds of ballast for stability.' 'The Little Joe booster was assembled at Wallops on its special launcher in a vertical attitude. It is shown in the [on the left] with the work platform in place. The launcher was located on a special concrete slab in Launching Area 1. The capsule was lowered onto the booster by crane.... After the assembly was completed, the scaffolding was disassembled and the launcher pitched over to its normal launch angle of 80 degrees.... Little Joe had a diameter of 80 inches and an overall length, including the capsule and escape tower of 48 feet. The total weight at launch was about 43,000 pounds. The overall span of the stabilizing fins was 21.3 feet.' 'Although in comparison with the overall Mercury Project, Little Joe was a simple undertaking, the fact that an attempt was made to condense a normal two-year project into a 6-month one with in house labor turned it into a major undertaking for Langley.'

  19. Mercury: Little Joe (LJ1) launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Technicians attach the escape tower to the Mercury capsule prior to assembly with Little Joe (LJ1) launcher, August 20, 1959. Joseph Shortal describe this as follows (vol. 3., p. 33): 'The escape tower and rocket motors were taken from the Mercury capsule production. The tower is shown being attached to the capsule.... The escape rocket was a Grand Central 1-KS-52000 motor with three canted nozzles. The tower-jettison motor was an Atlantic Research Corp. 1.4-KS-785 motor. This was the same design tested in a beach abort test...and had the offset thrust line as used in the beach abort test to insure that the capsule would get away from the booster in an emergency. The escape system weighed 1,015 pounds, including 236 pounds of ballast for stability.' 'The Little Joe booster was assembled at Wallops on its special launcher in a vertical attitude. It is shown in the [on the left] with the work platform in place. The launcher was located on a special concrete slab in Launching Area 1. The capsule was lowered onto the booster by crane.... After the assembly was completed, the scaffolding was disassembled and the launcher pitched over to its normal launch angle of 80 degrees.... Little Joe had a diameter of 80 inches and an overall length, including the capsule and escape tower of 48 feet. The total weight at launch was about 43,000 pounds. The overall span of the stabilizing fins was 21.3 feet.' 'Although in comparison with the overall Mercury Project, Little Joe was a simple undertaking, the fact that an attempt was made to condense a normal two-year project into a 6-month one with in house labor turned it into a major undertaking for Langley.' - Published in Joseph A. Shortal, History of Wallops Station: Origins and Activities Through 1949, (Wallops Island, VA: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Wallops Station, nd), Comment Edition.

  20. INPAGN_Launcher_V3.DLL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-05-01

    INPAGN_Launcher_v3.DLL is a preprocessor and postprocessor used to integrate the INPAG-N code (Monitor Scientific, LLC) with the GoldSim{trademark} code (GoldSim Technology Group, LLC). The program is intended as a DLL for use with a GoldSim{trademark} model file. The code is executed through a call from the GoldSim.exe during runtime. The code allocates parameters to memory to receive data from subsequent calls from goldsim.exe when the model is run. The goldsim.exe passes input values to themore » INPAGN_Launcher_v3.DLL during runtime, which comprise a single array of values (Appendix C, GoldSim Users Guide, GoldSim Technology Group, 2006). The DLL parses the GoldSim array in (*) into the allocated memory and then writes a new INPAG-N input file using the values passed by goldsim.exe. This software is used as part of a modeling package that consists of INPAGN.EXE, INPAGNH.EXE, INPAGNHI.EXE, INPAGNV2.EXE, INPAGNV21.EXE, GoldSim{trademark}, and INPAGN_Launcher_v3.DLL.« less

  1. Nuclear analyses for the ITER ECRH launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Heidinger, R.; Spaeh, P.; Stickel, S.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.

    2008-05-01

    Computational results of the nuclear analyses for the ECRH launcher integrated into the ITER upper port are presented. The purpose of the analyses was to provide the proof for the launcher design that the nuclear requirements specified in the ITER project can be met. The aim was achieved on the basis of 3D neutronics radiation transport calculations using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. In the course of the analyses an adequate shielding configuration against neutron and gamma radiation was developed keeping the necessary empty space for mm-waves propagation in accordance with the ECRH physics guidelines. Different variants of the shielding configuration for the extended performance front steering launcher (EPL) were compared in terms of nuclear response functions in the critical positions. Neutron damage (dpa), nuclear heating, helium production rate, neutron and gamma fluxes have been calculated under the conditions of ITER operation. It has been shown that the radiation shielding criteria are satisfied and the supposed shutdown dose rates are below the ITER nuclear design limits.

  2. Final Report Advanced Quasioptical Launcher System

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Neilson

    2010-04-30

    This program developed an analytical design tool for designing antenna and mirror systems to convert whispering gallery RF modes to Gaussian or HE11 modes. Whispering gallery modes are generated by gyrotrons used for electron cyclotron heating of fusion plasmas in tokamaks. These modes cannot be easily transmitted and must be converted to free space or waveguide modes compatible with transmission line systems.This program improved the capability of SURF3D/LOT, which was initially developed in a previous SBIR program. This suite of codes revolutionized quasi-optical launcher design, and this code, or equivalent codes, are now used worldwide. This program added functionality to SURF3D/LOT to allow creating of more compact launcher and mirror systems and provide direct coupling to corrugated waveguide within the vacuum envelope of the gyrotron. Analysis was also extended to include full-wave analysis of mirror transmission line systems. The code includes a graphical user interface and is available for advanced design of launcher systems.

  3. Nondestructive inspection of a composite missile launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, O.; Chung, S.; Butera, M.; Valatka, T.; Triplett, M. H.; Godinez, V.

    2012-05-01

    Lighter weight alternatives are being sought to replace metallic components currently used in high performance aviation and missile systems. Benefits of lightweight, high strength carbon fiber reinforced composites in missile launchers and rocket motor cases include improved fuel economy, increased flight times, enhanced lethality and/or increased velocity. In this work, various nondestructive inspection techniques are investigated for the damage assessment of a composite missile launcher system for use in U.S. Army attack helicopters. The launcher system, which includes rails and a hardback, can be subject to impact damage from accidental tool drops, routine operation, and/or ballistic threats. The composite hardback and the launch rails both have complex geometries that can challenge the inspection process. Scanning techniques such as line scanning thermography, ultrasonic, and acousto-ultrasonics will be used and compared to determine damage detection accuracy, reliability, and efficiency. Results will also be compared with visual observations to determine if there is a correlation. The goal is to establish an inspection method that quickly and accurately assesses damage extent in order to minimize service time and return the missile system back into the field [1].

  4. Design and development of mode launcher for high frequency Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Sinha, A. K.; Khatun, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and development of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher for high frequency and high power Gyrotron. A Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for converting TE22,6 mode to a Gaussian mode has been designed for 120 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron. The initial design of mode launcher has been optimized using LOT/SURF-3D software. The mode launcher diameter and length are optimized considering the minimum return loss and the minimum insertion loss by using CST microwave studio. The return loss (S11) and insertion loss (S21) performance of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher have been obtained using CST-Microwave Studio. The fabrication of Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for 120 GHz Gyrotron has also been carried out.

  5. Photographic copy of photograph, view of rail launcher used for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, view of rail launcher used for 'Baby Corporal E' missiles on 6 and 7 May 1946 at JPL-Muroc Army Air Base (later Edwards Air Force Base) (This launcher was also used for 'Baby WAC' missiles at Goldstone, Fort Irwin, California in 1945). Photocopy of 35mm photograph made in December 1994, looking west with Test Stand 'A' immediately behind the rail launcher. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Multirail electromagnetic launcher powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, A. G.; Butov, V. G.; Panchenko, V. P.; Sinyaev, S. V.; Solonenko, V. A.; Shvetsov, G. A.; Yakushev, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The operation of an electromagnetic multirail launcher of solids powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is studied. The plasma flow in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the possibility of launching solids in a rapid-fire mode of launcher operation are considered. It is shown that this mode of launcher operation can be implemented by matching the plasma flow dynamics in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the launching conditions. It is also shown that powerful pulsed MHD generators can be used as a source of electrical energy for rapid-fire electromagnetic rail launchers operating in a burst mode.

  7. Robotsonde: New concept of automatic radiosonde launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, R.; Charpentier, P.; Ricaud, G.

    2009-09-01

    Beyond SR2K2 receiving system, MODEM has introduced a new concept of low cost automatic launcher for Upper-Air meteorological station. This new product so called RobotSonde has been developed according to following purposes: • Make operator task easier • Reduce possibility of error and wrong handling during preparation/launch phase • Increase percentage of successful soundings and available data on GTS • Increase security of persons specially when hydrogen is used for inflating the balloon • Facilitate staff management during out of normal working hours (Night or week-end) • Reduce global running costs of sounding stations (possible reduction of global staff)

  8. Stationkeeping with two-way electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordley, Gerald David

    1994-11-01

    This study is motivated by previous proposals for electromagnetic launchers (EML) to launch payloads from the moon and space stations. With the advent of modern computer-controlled attitude and velocity control systems on the payload it is possible for EML to decelerate as well as launch payloads. In view of this, a two-way EML-equipped design to generate significant outward velocity without loss of reaction mass is realized. This model indicates that, in-addition to L1 stationkeeping, satellite could be pushed away from planets, or planets away from the sun, without loss of reaction mass.

  9. An investigation of electromagnetic launcher repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Mark W.; Cornette, James B.; Brown, Jere L.

    1992-07-01

    Electromagnetic launcher (EML) performance repeatability has been identified as a potential development issue for several years. Investigation of this issue has been difficult because an EML that is powered on a relatively continuous basis to provide long duration operation has not been available. A battery charged capacitor power system has enabled long duration, 6 to 7 seconds, EML experiments. This paper provides a summary of an experiment to investigate EML launch to launch performance consistency. A series of 8 ten-shot bursts, each separated by 15 to 30 minutes, performed in a single day using a single set of bore materials is the subject of this paper.

  10. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA STATION 1400 (BUILDING NO. 42021), VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA STATION 1400 (BUILDING NO. 42021), VIEW OF EXTERIOR LOOKING NORTHEAST WITH CAMERA STATION IN 1100 (BUILDING NO. 42020) BACKGROUND. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH CAMERA STATION ABOVE LOOKING NORTH TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. 23. VIEW DOWN INTO LAUNCHER AND FLAME BUCKET FROM STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW DOWN INTO LAUNCHER AND FLAME BUCKET FROM STATION 48 IN SLC-3W MST. NOTE REMOVABLE METAL PLANKS BELOW LAUNCHER AND ROPE NET OVER FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. 7. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER DEDICATION PLAQUE SHOWING JAMES H. JENNISON (LEFT), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER DEDICATION PLAQUE SHOWING JAMES H. JENNISON (LEFT), AND W.H. SAYLOR (RIGHT), AT THE DEDICATION CEREMONY, May 7, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. New coplanar waveguide to rectangular waveguide end launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, R. N.; Taub, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    A new coplanar waveguide to rectangular waveguide end launcher is experimentally demonstrated. The end launcher operates over the Ka-band frequencies that are designated for the NASA Advanced Communication Technology Satellite uplink. The measured insertion loss and return loss are better than 0.5 and -10 dB, respectively.

  15. Explosively driven hypervelocity launcher: Second-stage augmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results are described of a continuing study aimed at developing a two-stage explosively driven hypervelocity launcher capable of achieving projectile velocities between 15 and 20 km/sec. The testing and evaluation of a new cylindrical impact technique for collapsing the barrel of two-stage launcher are reported. Previous two-stage launchers have been limited in ultimate performance by incomplete barrel collapse behind the projectile. The cylindrical impact technique explosively collapses a steel tube concentric with and surrounding the barrel of the launcher. The impact of the tube on the barrel produces extremely high stresses which cause the barrel to collapse. The collapse rate can be adjusted by appropriate variation of the explosive charge and tubing parameters. Launcher experiments demonstrated that the technique did achieve complete barrel collapse and form a second-stage piston. However, jetting occurred in the barrel collapse process and was responsible for severe projectile damage.

  16. Modeling the effects of surfactant, hardness, and natural organic matter on deposition and mobility of silver nanoparticles in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Min; Heo, Jiyong; Her, Namguk; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Jang, Min; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-10-15

    This study aims to provide insights into the mechanisms governing the deposition and retention of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in saturated porous media. Column experiments were conducted with quartz sand under saturated conditions to investigate the deposition kinetics of AgNPs, their mobility at different groundwater hardnesses (10-400 mg/L as CaCO3), and humic acid (HA, 0-50 mg/L as dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). An anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), was used as a dispersing agent to prepare a SDS-AgNPs suspension. The deposition kinetics of AgNPs were highly sensitive to the surfactant concentration, ionic strength, and cation type in solution. The breakthrough curves (BTCs) of SDS-AgNPs suggested that the transport and retention were influenced by groundwater hardness and HA. At low water hardness and high HA, high mobility of SDS-AgNPs was observed in saturated conditions. However, the retention of SDS-AgNPs increased substantially in very hard water with a low concentration of HA, because of a decreased primary energy barrier and the straining effect during the course of transport experiments. A modified clean-bed filtration theory and a two-site kinetic attachment model showed good fits with the BTCs of SDS-AgNPs. The fitted model parameters (katt and kstr) could be used successfully to describe that the retention behaviors were dominated by electrostatic and electrosteric repulsion, based on extended Derjaguin-Landau-Vaerwey-Overbeek calculations. PMID:27429353

  17. A hypervelocity projectile launcher for well perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J.N.; Fugelso, L.E.; Lagner, G.C.; Burns, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Current oil well perforation techniques use low- to medium-velocity gun launchers for completing wells in soft rock. Shaped-charge jets are normally used in harder, more competent rock. A device to create a much higher velocity projectile was designed. This launcher will provide an alternative technique to be used when the conventional devices do not yield the maximum well performance. It is an adaptation of the axial cavity in a high explosive (HE) annulus design, with the axial cavity being filled with a low density foam material. Two configurations were tested; both had an HE annulus filled with organic foam, one had a projectile. Comparison of the two shots was made. A time sequence of Image Intensifier Camera photographs and sequential, orthogonal flash x-ray radiographs provided information on the propagation of the foam fragments, the first shock wave disturbance, the projectile motion and deformation, and the direct shock wave transmission from the main HE charge. DYNA2D calculations were made to assist in the experimental interpretation. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Non-US electrodynamic launchers research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Batteh, J.H.; Greig, J.R.; Keefer, D.; McNab, I.R.; Zabar, Z.

    1994-11-01

    Electrodynamic launcher research and development work of scientists outside the United States is analyzed and assessed by six internationally recognized US experts in the field of electromagnetic and electrothermal launchers. The assessment covers five broad technology areas: (1) Experimental railguns; (2) Railgun theory and design; (3) Induction launchers; (4) Electrothermal guns; (5) Energy storage and power supplies. The overall conclusion is that non-US work on electrodynamic launchers is maturing rapidly after a relatively late start in many countries. No foreign program challenges the US efforts in scope, but it is evident that the United States may be surpassed in some technologies within the next few years. Until recently, published Russian work focused on hypervelocity for research purposes. Within the last two years, large facilities have been described where military-oriented development has been underway since the mid-1980s. Financial support for these large facilities appears to have collapsed, leaving no effective effort to develop practical launchers for military or civilian applications. Electrodynamic launcher research in Europe is making rapid progress by focusing on a single application, tactical launchers for the military. Four major laboratories, in Britain, France, Germany, and the Netherlands, are working on this problem. Though narrower in scope than the US effort, the European work enjoys a continuity of support that has accelerated its progress. The next decade will see the deployment of electrodynamic launcher technology, probably in the form of an electrothermal-chemical upgrade for an existing gun system. The time scale for deployment of electromagnetic launchers is entirely dependent on the level of research-and-development effort. If resources remain limited, the advantage will lie with cooperative efforts that have reasonably stable funding such as the present French-German program.

  19. Use of mobile phones for improving vaccination coverage among children living in rural hard-to-reach areas and urban streets of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jasim; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Horng, Lily; Labrique, Alain; Vasudevan, Lavanya; Zeller, Kelsey; Chowdhury, Mridul; Larson, Charles P; Bishai, David; Alam, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    In Bangladesh, full vaccination rates among children living in rural hard-to-reach areas and urban streets are low. We conducted a quasi-experimental pre-post study of a 12-month mobile phone intervention to improve vaccination among 0-11 months old children in rural hard-to-reach and urban street dweller areas. Software named "mTika" was employed within the existing public health system to electronically register each child's birth and remind mothers about upcoming vaccination dates with text messages. Android smart phones with mTika were provided to all health assistants/vaccinators and supervisors in intervention areas, while mothers used plain cell phones already owned by themselves or their families. Pre and post-intervention vaccination coverage was surveyed in intervention and control areas. Among children over 298 days old, full vaccination coverage actually decreased in control areas--rural baseline 65.9% to endline 55.2% and urban baseline 44.5% to endline 33.9%--while increasing in intervention areas from rural baseline 58.9% to endline 76*8%, difference +18.8% (95% CI 5.7-31.9) and urban baseline 40.7% to endline 57.1%, difference +16.5% (95% CI 3.9-29.0). Difference-in-difference (DID) estimates were +29.5% for rural intervention versus control areas and +27.1% for urban areas for full vaccination in children over 298 days old, and logistic regression adjusting for maternal education, mobile phone ownership, and sex of child showed intervention effect odds ratio (OR) of 3.8 (95% CI 1.5-9.2) in rural areas and 3.0 (95% CI 1.4-6.4) in urban areas. Among all age groups, intervention effects on age-appropriate vaccination coverage were positive: DIDs +13.1-30.5% and ORs 2.5-4.6 (p<0.001 in all comparisons). Qualitative data showed the intervention was well-accepted. Our study demonstrated that a mobile phone intervention can improve vaccination coverage in rural hard-to-reach and urban street dweller communities in Bangladesh. This small-scale successful

  20. Non-Rocket Missile Rope Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The method, installation, and estimation for delivering payload and missiles into outer space are presented. This method uses, in general, the engines and straight or closed-loop cables disposed on a planet surface. The installation consists of a space apparatus, power drive stations located along trajectory of the apparatus, the cables connected to the apparatus and to the power stations, a system for suspending the cable, and disconnected device. The drive stations accelerate the apparatus up to hypersonic speed. The estimations and computations show the possibility of making these projects a reality in a short period of time (see attached project: launcher for missiles and loads). The launch will be very cheap $1-$2 per LB. We need only light strong cable, which can be made from artificial fibers, whiskers, nanotubes, which exist in industry and scientific laboratories.

  1. Shuttle Hitchhiker Experiment Launcher System (SHELS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daelemans, Gerry

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Shuttle Small Payloads Project (SSPP), in partnership with the United States Air Force and NASA's Explorer Program, is developing a Shuttle based launch system called SHELS (Shuttle Hitchhiker Experiment Launcher System), which shall be capable of launching up to a 400 pound spacecraft from the Shuttle cargo bay. SHELS consists of a Marman band clamp push-plate ejection system mounted to a launch structure; the launch structure is mounted to one Orbiter sidewall adapter beam. Avionics mounted to the adapter beam will interface with Orbiter electrical services and provide optional umbilical services and ejection circuitry. SHELS provides an array of manifesting possibilities to a wide range of satellites.

  2. Infrared tracker for a portable missile launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.J.

    1993-07-13

    An infrared beam tracker is described for arrangement to a housing that is unitary with a portable missile launcher, comprising: a rotating beam splitter positioned to intercept the infrared beam passing a first portion of the beam through the beam splitter along a first direction and reflecting the remaining portion along a different direction; a first infrared detector for receiving the beam reflected portion from the beam splitter and produce electric signals responsive thereto; a second infrared detector for receiving the beam portion that passes through the beam splitter and providing electric signals responsive thereto; and means interconnected to the first and second infrared detectors and responsive to the electric signals generated by said detectors for determining errors in missile flight direction and communicating course correction information to the missile.

  3. Electromagnetic launcher control using Finite State Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Jeffrey M.; Cornette, James B.; Heyse, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper shows the continued viability of sequential Finite State Machines (FSM's) as a means to control the sequencing of Electromagnetic Launcher (EWL) systems. While computer controlled sequencing is an attractive alternative, FSM's are easy to design, inexpensive, and reliable. Several FSM controllers are currently in use for the long duration EML experiments at the Hypervelocity Research Facility, Eglin AFB, FL. This paper discusses the basic system design with reference to design procedure and systems interfacing. Flexibility, and the fail-safe nature of the FSM (i.e., system interrupt capability) are also discussed. Where requirements include repeatability, reliability, ease of operation, relative low cost, and flexibility, the FSM is presented as a reasonable alternative to more expensive computer-based systems.

  4. Electromagnetic launcher control using finite state machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Jeffrey M.; Cornette, James B.; Heyse, Mark W.

    1992-07-01

    This paper shows the continued viability of sequential Finite State Machines (FSM's) as a means to control the sequencing of Electromagnetic Launcher (EWL) systems. While computer controlled sequencing is an attractive alternative, FSM's are easy to design, inexpensive, and reliable. Several FSM controllers are currently in use for the long duration EML experiments at the Hypervelocity Research Facility, Eglin AFB, FL. This paper discusses the basic system design with reference to design procedure and systems interfacing. Flexibility, and the fail-safe nature of the FSM (i.e., system interrupt capability) are also discussed. Where requirements include repeatability, reliability, ease of operation, relative low cost, and flexibility, the FSM is presented as a reasonable alternative to more expensive computer-based systems.

  5. The microspace launcher: first step to the fully air-breathing space launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falempin, F.; Bouchez, M.; Calabro, M.

    2009-09-01

    A possible application for the high-speed air-breathing propulsion is the fully or partially reusable space launcher. Indeed, by combining the high-speed air-breathing propulsion with a conventional rocket engine (combined cycle or combined propulsion system), it should be possible to improve the average installed specific impulse along the ascent trajectory and then make possible more performing launchers and, hopefully, a fully reusable one. During the last 15 years, a lot of system studies have been performed in France on that subject within the framework of different and consecutive programs. Nevertheless, these studies never clearly demonstrated that a space launcher could take advantage of using a combined propulsion system. During last years, the interest to air-breathing propulsion for space application has been revisited. During this review and taking into account technologies development activities already in progress in Europe, clear priorities have been identified regarding a minimum complementary research and technology program addressing specific needs of space launcher application. It was also clearly identified that there is the need to restart system studies taking advantage of recent progress made regarding knowledge, tools, and technology and focusing on more innovative airframe/propulsion system concepts enabling better trade-off between structural efficiency and propulsion system performance. In that field, a fully axisymmetric configuration has been considered for a microspace launcher (10 kg payload). The vehicle is based on a main stage powered by air-breathing propulsion, combined or not with liquid rocket mode. A "kick stage," powered by a solid rocket engine provides the final acceleration. A preliminary design has been performed for different variants: one using a separated booster and a purely air-breathing main stage, a second one using a booster and a main stage combining air-breathing and rocket mode, a third one without separated

  6. An Ergonomic Evaluation of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Space Suit Hard Upper Torso (HUT) Size Effect on Metabolic, Mobility, and Strength Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Christopher; Harvill, Lauren; England, Scott; Young, Karen; Norcross, Jason; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the performance differences between a nominally sized Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit and a nominal +1 (plus) sized EMU. Method: This study evaluated suit size conditions by using metabolic cost, arm mobility, and arm strength as performance metrics. Results: Differences between the suit sizes were found only in shoulder extension strength being 15.8% greater for the plus size. Discussion: While this study was able to identify motions and activities that were considered to be practically or statistically different, it does not signify that use of a plus sized suit should be prohibited. Further testing would be required that either pertained to a particular mission critical task or better simulates a microgravity environment that the EMU suit was designed to work in.

  7. LH Power Losses In Front of the JET Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Arnoux, G.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Ongena, J.

    2009-11-26

    In recent JET experiments, Lower Hybrid (LH) power losses in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) were characterized using infra-red (IR) thermography. Hot spots were observed on objects intercepting the field lines passing in front of the LH launcher, i.e. on poloidal limiters and on dumplates located at the top of the tokamak; their locations being in good agreement with magnetic field line tracing using the EFIT equilibrium code. The dumplate temperature was monitored while scanning the launcher position so that the radial distance between field lines intercepting the hot spots and the launcher was increased up to 3.5 cm. The dissipation layer in front of the launcher was estimated to be at least 3.5 cm wide, in agreement with recent measurements on Tore-Supra, but not with simple models that predict a dissipation layer in the mm range.

  8. The XLLGG — A Hypervelocity Launcher for Impact Cratering Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexow, B.; Bückle, A.; Wickert, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity launchers are used to accelerate projectiles that simulate impacting meteoroids or asteroids. The XLLGG (eXtra Large Light Gas Gun) at the EMI (Ernst-Mach-Institute) was used within the MEMIN program.

  9. 56. VIEW OF LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHWEST. NITROGEN CONTROL UNIT ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. VIEW OF LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHWEST. NITROGEN CONTROL UNIT ON RIGHT; UMBILICAL MAST ON LEFT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  10. The Ariane 5 Launcher - Mid-way to success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, J. H.; van Gaver, A.

    1992-08-01

    The paper discusses the salient features of the ESA's Ariane 5 Launcher concept, which retains the dual launch capability of the Ariane-sequence launchers but will be more economical and more reliable than Ariane 4 and will be able to accommodate the needs of the Columbus mission to launch the PPF polar platform and the free-flying laboratory. Attention is given to the objectives, performance, and schedule of Ariane 5; the launcher configuration; the flight guidance and vehicle control; the mission profile; and the ground infrastructure. The launcher configuration of Ariane 5 is made of two parts: a lower complex which is identical to all missions (and is comprised of the cryotechnic Vulcain engine, a tank housing LH2 and LO2, the fluid feed and pressurization systems, the electrical and pyrotechnical equipment, and a forward skirt which transmits thrust of main-stage and solid boosters to the upper complex), and an upper complex, which is specific for each case.

  11. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Cristian, Barbu; Chelaru, Adrian

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project "Suborbital Launcher for Testing" (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital vehicle

  12. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Cristian, Barbu; Chelaru, Adrian

    2014-12-10

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project 'Suborbital Launcher for Testing' (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital vehicle

  13. Commercial space development needs cheap launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, James William

    1998-01-01

    SpaceDev is in the market for a deep space launch, and we are not going to pay $50 million for it. There is an ongoing debate about the elasticity of demand related to launch costs. On the one hand there are the ``big iron'' NASA and DoD contractors who say that there is no market for small or inexpensive launchers, that lowering launch costs will not result in significantly more launches, and that the current uncompetitive pricing scheme is appropriate. On the other hand are commercial companies which compete in the real world, and who say that there would be innumerable new launches if prices were to drop dramatically. I participated directly in the microcomputer revolution, and saw first hand what happened to the big iron computer companies who failed to see or heed the handwriting on the wall. We are at the same stage in the space access revolution that personal computers were in the late '70s and early '80s. The global economy is about to be changed in ways that are just as unpredictable as those changes wrought after the introduction of the personal computer. Companies which fail to innovate and keep producing only big iron will suffer the same fate as IBM and all the now-extinct mainframe and minicomputer companies. A few will remain, but with a small share of the market, never again to be in a position to dominate.

  14. Calibrating Accelerometers Using an Electromagnetic Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Erik Timpson

    2012-05-13

    A Pulse Forming Network (PFN), Helical Electromagnetic Launcher (HEML), Command Module (CM), and Calibration Table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored energy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass and is designed to accelerate 600 grams to 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the bank voltage and desired voltage. After entering a desired bank voltage, the CM controls the charge of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it allows the fire button to send a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile's tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocity meter and catch pot. The Target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely for the velocity meter to get an accurate reading. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  15. Calculations supporting HyperVelocity Launcher development

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a HyperVelocity Launcher (also referred to as HVL) in which a thin flier plate (nominally 1 mm thick) is launched to velocities in excess of 12 km/s. The length to diameter ratio of these launched flier plates varies from 0.02 to 0.06. The launch technique is based upon using structured, time-dependant, high-pressure, high-acceleration pulses to drive the flier plates. Such pulses are achieved by using a graded-density material to impact a stationary flier. A computational and experimental program at Sandia seeks to extend this technique to allow launching thick plates whose length-to-diameter ratio is 10 to 20 times larger than thin plates. Hydrodynamic codes are used to design modifications to the basic technique. The authors have controlled and used these effects to successfully launch a chunk-flier, consisting of 0.33 gm of titanium alloy, 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm in diameter, to a velocity of 10.2 km/s. This is the largest chunky size ever launched at this velocity from a gas gun configuration.

  16. 10. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher, 'PROJECT PLOT PLAN' drawn ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'PROJECT PLOT PLAN' drawn at no scale (P.W.DWG.NO. 1781). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 11. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher, 'INDEX TO Drawings' drawn ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'INDEX TO Drawings' drawn at no scale (P.W.DWG.No. 1781). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Direct Energy Exchange Enhancement in Distributed Injection Light Gas Launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T W; Finucane, R G; Hall, J P; Penetrante, B M; Uphaus, T M

    2000-04-06

    It is not widely acknowledged or appreciated that conventional, two-stage light-gas launchers do not efficiently apply their high breech pressures to the design intent: accelerating the projectile. Our objective in this project was to carry out the analysis, design, construction, and testing of a new class of launchers that will address this limitation. Our particular application is to expand the pressure range of the conventional, two-stage gas launcher to overlap and validate the pressure regimes previously attainable only with shock waves generated by nuclear explosions, lasers, or multistage conventional explosions. That is, these launchers would have the capability to conduct--in a laboratory setting--high-velocity-impact, equation-of-state (EOS) measurements at up to 2-TPa (20 Mbar) pressure levels in high-Z materials. Our design entailed a new class of distributed-injection, gas-dynamic launchers that are designed to use a boat-tail projectile to overcome the fundamental gas-expansion phenomena known as escape velocity (the Riemann limit). Our program included analytical, numerical, and experimental studies of the fast gas release flow technique that is central to the success of our approach. The analyses led us to believe that, in a typical configuration, the pressure will be effectively applied to the projectile in a time short relative to its few-microsecond traverse time; the experimental program we conducted during FY1999 supported these estimates. In addition, our program revealed dramatic increased efficiency in this process that was previously unknown to the launcher community. The most fundamental practical restrictions on the performance of any gas launcher are the ability of the launcher to (1) contain pressure in a reservoir, and (2) effectively apply that pressure to the base of a moving projectile. Our gas-release test-fixture experiments showed that our design was capable of applying nearly twice the pressure to the projectile that is

  19. 101. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH BREECH DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    101. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH BREECH DOOR OPERATING MECHANISM ASSEMBLY' drawn at 3'=1'-0, 6'=1'0', and full size. (P.W. DRW. NO. 1788). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 91. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'CONNECTING BRIDGE, REAR VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'CONNECTING BRIDGE, REAR VIEW CAMERA HOUSE ASSEMBLY' drawn at 3/8=1'-0', 3'=1'-0'. (BUORD Sketch # 209042). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 96. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH TUBE ASSEMBLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    96. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH TUBE ASSEMBLY SECTION 1' drawn at 3'=1'-0', 6'=1'-0', and full size. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1783). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 97. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH UPPER TUBE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH UPPER TUBE ASSEMBLY' drawn at 2'=1'-0' and 6'=1'0', full size. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1784). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 100. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH BREECH' drawn ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH BREECH' drawn at 2'=1'-0', 3'=1'-0' and full size. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1787). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 98. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH 'Y' JOINT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH 'Y' JOINT AND TRANSITION ASSEMBLY' drawn at 1 1/2'=1'-0'. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1785). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 99. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH 'Y' JOINT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH 'Y' JOINT DETAILS drawn at 1 1/2'=1'-0' and 6'=1'-0'. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1786). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 95. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH TUBE ASSEMBLY' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH TUBE ASSEMBLY' drawn at 1/8'=1'-0', 1'=1'-0' and 1'-40'. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1782). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Metal vapor vacuum arc switching - Applications and results. [for launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, D.; Mongeau, P.

    1984-01-01

    The design of metal-vapor vacuum-arc switches (MVSs) for electromagnetic launchers is discussed, and preliminary results are presented for an experimental MVS. The general principles of triggered-vacuum-gap and vacuum-interrupter MVSs are reviewed, and the requirements of electromagnetic launchers are analyzed. High-current design problems such as electrode erosion, current sharing, magnetic effects, and thermal effects are examined. The experimental MVS employs stainless-steel flanges, a glass vacuum vessel, an adjustable electrode gap, autonomous internal magnetic-field coils, and a tungsten-pin trigger assembly. Some results from tests without magnetic augmentation are presented graphically.

  8. Mesh-matrix analysis method for electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1989-01-01

    The mesh-matrix method is a procedure for calculating the current distribution in the conductors of electromagnetic launchers with coil or flat-plate geometry. Once the current distribution is known the launcher performance can be calculated. The method divides the conductors into parallel current paths, or meshes, and finds the current in each mesh by matrix inversion. The author presents procedures for writing equations for the current and voltage relations for a few meshes to serve as a pattern for writing the computer code. An available subroutine package provides routines for field and flux coefficients and equation solution.

  9. Development of an automatic multiple launcher for expendable probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappalà, G.; Reseghetti, F.; Manzella, G. M. R.

    2007-04-01

    A main goal of a Ship Of Opportunity Programme (SOOP) is the provision of temperature profiles in near real time. The use of commercial ships and expandable probes allows the reduction of costs, in comparison with research ship cruises. A major cost effectiveness is achieved using an automated multiple launcher, requiring minimum personnel effort. A multiple launcher, developed in the framework of the Mediterranean Forecasting System - Toward Environmental Prediction Project (MFSTEP), allows for a sequential collection of eight temperature profiles, using a software-programmable sampling strategy. The data acquisition system can be remotely controlled in every functionality, and data can be transmitted by GSM-GPRS or satellite telephone systems.

  10. Design of an automatic multiple launcher for expendable probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappalà, G.; Reseghetti, F.; Manzella, G. M. R.

    2006-07-01

    A main goal of a ships of opportunity program is the provision of near real time temperature profiles. The use of expandable probes allows the reduction of costs, in comparison to usual scientific cruises. A major cost effectiveness can be achieved by using an automated multiple launcher, that can be used with a minimum personnel effort. A multiple launcher, developed in the framework of the Mediterranean Forecasting System - Toward Environmental Prediction, allows to collect eight temperature profiles, with a sampling strategy that can be monitored automatically by means of a software. The data acquisition system is controlled internally in all functionalities, and data can be transmitted by GSM or satellite telephone systems.

  11. Characteristics of a large multijunction launcher for high-power LHCD experiments on JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Ushigusa, K.; Naito, O.; Kondoh, T.; Wolfe, S.W.; Imai, T. )

    1994-10-15

    This paper presents overview of a large multijunction launcher for JT-60U. The launcher is featured by the multijunction module with the oversized taper waveguide, in order to simplify structure of the launcher. This launcher allows high performances of current drive and current profile control by using very sharp and highly directive spectrum. Initial result of coupling property is also described. A good coupling was observed at a power level of [similar to]0.8 MW with plasma-launcher distance of [lt]14 cm.

  12. Energy stores and switches for rail-launcher systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, W. F.; Zowarka, R. C.; Marshall, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of existing switch and power supply technology applicable to space launch, a new candidate pulsed power supply for Earth-to-space rail launcher duty, the inverse railgun flux compressor, and a set of switching experiments to study further the feasibility of Earth-to-space launch are discussed.

  13. Note Launchers: Promoting Active Reading of Mathematics Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Josh W.; Helms, Kimberly Turner

    2010-01-01

    Note launchers, an instructor-designed reading guide, model how to select, decide, and focus upon what textbook material is important to learn. Reading guides are specially-designed study aids that can steer students through difficult parts of assigned readings (Bean, 1996) while encouraging advance preparation. As an example of a reading guide,…

  14. 63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE RECOVERY TANK LEFT OF FLAME BUCKET; LIQUID OXYGEN CATCH TANK RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  15. 62. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET BELOW LAUNCHER ON SOUTH END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET BELOW LAUNCHER ON SOUTH END OF LAUNCH PAD. FIRE SUPPRESSION EQUIPMENT RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. SOUTH FACE OF MST IS IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. 33. Lower level, ballistic gas generator at left (opens launcher ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Lower level, ballistic gas generator at left (opens launcher door during launch), LDB panel at right - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  17. 48. CONTROL PANEL FOR UMBILICAL MAST AND TRENCH DOORS. LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. CONTROL PANEL FOR UMBILICAL MAST AND TRENCH DOORS. LAUNCHER ON RIGHT IN BACKGROUND; TRENCH DOORS AND RAIL BEHIND CONTROL PANEL - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  18. 41. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST AND LAUNCH PAD FROM LAUNCHER; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST AND LAUNCH PAD FROM LAUNCHER; SOUTH FACE OF MST IN BACKGROUND. RAIL SYSTEM FROM BASE OF MST PARALLEL TO MAST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. 13. Photocopy of drawing of missile launcher from 'Procedures and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of drawing of missile launcher from 'Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Ajax System,' Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, 1956 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  20. An Engineering Design STEM Project: T-Shirt Launcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantz, Todd D.; Grant, Melva R.

    2013-01-01

    The article offers information on making technology education students interested in science and mathematics through the use of a T-shirt launcher design project. This project was designed for junior and senior level high school students who have completed or are currently taking physics and precalculus. The project involves designing an…

  1. Feasibility study of superconducting LSM rocket launcher system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Ohashi, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Katsuto; Takami, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented concerning an application of a superconducting linear synchronous motor (LSM) to a large-scale rocket launcher, whose acceleration guide tube of LSM armature windings is constructed 1,500 meters under the ground. The rocket is released from the linear launcher just after it gets to a peak speed of about 900 kilometers per hour, and it flies out of the guide tube to obtain the speed of 700 kilometers per hour at the height of 100 meters above ground. The linear launcher is brought to a stop at the ground surface for a very short time of 5 seconds by a quick control of deceleration. Very large current variations in the single-layer windings of the LSM armature, which are produced at the higher speed region of 600 to 900 kilometers per hour, are controlled successfully by adopting the double-layer windings. The proposed control method makes the rocket launcher ascend stably in the superconducting LSM system, controlling the Coriolis force.

  2. Data acquisition applications for long duration electromagnetic launcher experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Mark W.; Cornette, James B.; Brown, Jere L.; Burkett, Douglas

    1993-01-01

    The demands on a data acquisition system for monitoring and recording electromagnetic launcher (DML) phenomena are examined. The evolution of a data acquisition approach in use for basic research in the EML area is described. Data acquisition capabilities and requirements are discussed, and examples of the data which has been obtained using this approach are presented.

  3. 58. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST SIDE OF LAUNCHER FROM ABOVE. AFRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST SIDE OF LAUNCHER FROM ABOVE. A-FRAME PIVOT POINT IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH; NITROGEN CONTROL UNIT IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. Development of explosively driven launcher for meteoroid studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a continuing program to develop an explosively driven 2-stage hypervelocity launcher capable of achieving velocities between 15 and 20 km/sec are described. Previous efforts had identified incomplete barrel collapse as a limiting factor in launcher performance. Correlation of experimental and computational results obtained in the present study indicate that boundary-layer gases within the barrel act to prevent complete closure. Simplified calculations suggest that in-contact explosives may have insufficient energy densities to collapse the barrel against a developed boundary layer. Higher energy densities, sufficient to produce complete closure, were obtained with the use of steel flyer plates accelerated by a phased explosive lens. However, when flat flyer plates were impacted on the barrel, the sides of the barrel were observed to rupture and leak gas prior to barrel closure. A promising solution to this problem (untested) is to produce a symmetrical collapse with a cylindrical tube around the barrel.

  5. Mode Launcher Design for the Multi-moded DLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai

    2003-04-30

    The DLDS (Delay Line Distribution System) power delivery system proposed by KEK combines several klystrons to obtain the high peak power required to drive a TeV scale linear collider. In this system the combined klystron output is subdivided into shorter pulses by proper phasing of the sources, and each subpulse is delivered to various accelerator sections via separate waveguides. A cost-saving improvement suggested by SLAC is to use a single multimoded waveguide to deliver the power of all the subpulses. This scheme requires a mode launcher that can deliver each subpulse by way of a different waveguide mode through selective phasing of the sources when combining their power. We present a compact design for such a mode launcher that converts the power from four rectangular waveguide feeds to separate modes in a multi-moded circular guide through coupling slots. Such a design has been simulated and found to satisfy the requirements for high efficiency and low surface fields.

  6. Experimental launcher facility - ELF-I: Design and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deis, D. W.; Ross, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    In order to investigate the general area of ultra-high-current density, high-velocity sliding contacts as applied to electromagnetic launcher armatures, a small experimental launcher, ELF-I, has been developed, and preliminary experiments have been performed. The system uses a 36 kJ, 5 kV capacitor bank as a primary pulse power source. When used in conjunction with a 5-microhenry pulse conditioning coil, a 100-kA peak current and 10-ms-wide pulse is obtained. A three-station 150 kV flash X-ray system is operational for obtaining in-bore photographs of the projectiles. Experimental results obtained for both metal and plasma armatures at sliding velocities of up to 1 km/s are discussed with emphasis on armature-rail interactions.

  7. LAUNCHER PERFORMANCE IN THE DIII-D SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    KAJIWARA,K; BAXI,CB; LOHR,J; GORELOV,YA; GREEN,MT; PONCE,D; CALLIS,RW

    2003-07-01

    LAUNCHER PERFORMANCE IN THE DIII-D SYSTEM. The thermal performance of three different designs for the steerable mirrors on the ECH launchers installed in the DIII-D tokamak has been evaluated theoretically and experimentally. In each case the disruption forces must be minimized while providing a low loss reflecting surface. One design uses all Glidcop{reg_sign} material, but shaped so that the center is appreciably thicker than the edge. A second design is graphite with a molybdenum surface brazed to the graphite. The latest design is laminated copper/stainless steel construction with a thin copper reflecting surface. All three mirrors employ passive radiative cooling. The mirror temperatures are measured by resistance temperature devices (RTDs) which are attached at the back surfaces of the mirrors. The temperature increases are moderate for the laminated mirror, which has the best overall performance.

  8. A preliminary engineering assessment of the ITER CDA ECH Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; Swain, D.W. ); Sawan, M. )

    1994-10-15

    A preliminary engineering study of the ITER electron cyclotron heating (ECH) launcher configuration proposed by the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) team has been performed to assess its survivability in the ITER nuclear environment. Potential problem areas are with the vacuum windows, the plasma-facing mirrors, and some of the other high-power waveguide components that are untested in a reactor environment. The study indicates that the CDA design is quite robust, since the mirror power density is relatively low and the windows are well shielded. Although the CDA ECH system is unlikely to be built as proposed, most analysis techniques developed to study this system will apply to future ITER ECH system configurations. The vacuum window is likely to be the most difficult launcher component to develop. Design for a proposed resonant ring for high-power testing of windows using existing lower-power gyrotrons is presented.

  9. A preliminary engineering assessment of the ITER CDA ECH launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; Swain, D.W.; Sawan, M.

    1993-06-01

    A preliminary engineering study of the ITER electron cyclotron heating (ECH) launcher configuration proposed by the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) team has been performed to assess its survivability in the ITER nuclear environment. Potential problem areas are with the vacuum windows, the plasma-facing mirrors, and some of the other high-power waveguide components that are untested in a reactor environment. The study indicates that the CDA design is quite robust, since the mirror power density is relatively low and the windows are well shielded. Although the CDA ECH system is unlikely to be built as proposed, most analysis techniques developed to study this system will apply to future ITER ECH system configurations. The vacuum window is likely to be the most difficult launcher component to develop. Design for a proposed resonant ring for high-power testing of windows using existing lower-power gyrotrons is presented.

  10. Variable dual-frequency electrostatic wave launcher for plasma applications.

    PubMed

    Jorns, Benjamin; Sorenson, Robert; Choueiri, Edgar

    2011-12-01

    A variable tuning system is presented for launching two electrostatic waves concurrently in a magnetized plasma. The purpose of this system is to satisfy the wave launching requirements for plasma applications where maximal power must be coupled into two carefully tuned electrostatic waves while minimizing erosion to the launching antenna. Two parallel LC traps with fixed inductors and variable capacitors are used to provide an impedance match between a two-wave source and a loop antenna placed outside the plasma. Equivalent circuit analysis is then employed to derive an analytical expression for the normalized, average magnetic flux density produced by the antenna in this system as a function of capacitance and frequency. It is found with this metric that the wave launcher can couple to electrostatic modes at two variable frequencies concurrently while attenuating noise from the source signal at undesired frequencies. An example based on an experiment for plasma heating with two electrostatic waves is used to demonstrate a procedure for tailoring the wave launcher to accommodate the frequency range and flux densities of a specific two-wave application. This example is also used to illustrate a method based on averaging over wave frequencies for evaluating the overall efficacy of the system. The wave launcher is shown to be particularly effective for the illustrative example--generating magnetic flux densities in excess of 50% of the ideal case at two variable frequencies concurrently--with a high adaptability to a number of plasma dynamics and heating applications. PMID:22225213

  11. Modeling the capillary discharge of an electrothermal (ET) launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Least, Travis

    Over the past few decades, different branches of the US Department of Defense (DoD) have invested at improving the field ability of electromagnetic launchers. One such focus has been on achieving hypervelocity launch velocities in excess of 7 km/s for direct launch to space applications [1]. It has been shown that pre-injection is required for this to be achieved. One method of pre-injection which has promise involves using an electro-thermal (ET) due to its ability to achieve the desired velocities with a minimal amount of hot plasma injected into the launcher behind the projectile. Despite the demonstration of pre-injection using this method, polymer ablation is not very well known and this makes it challenging to predict how the system will behave for a given input of electrical power. In this work, the rate of ablation has been studied and predicted using different models to generate the best possible characteristic curve. [1] - Wetz, David A., Francis Stefani, Jerald V. Parker, and Ian R. McNab. "Advancements in the Development of a Plasma-Driven Electromagnetic Launcher." IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS 45.1 (2009): 495--500. IEEE Xplore. Web. 18 Aug. 2012.

  12. Launcher Systems Development Cost: Behavior, Uncertainty, Influences, Barriers and Strategies for Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will report on the activities of the IAA Launcher Systems Economics Working Group in preparations for its Launcher Systems Development Cost Behavior Study. The Study goals include: improve launcher system and other space system parametric cost analysis accuracy; improve launcher system and other space system cost analysis credibility; and provide launcher system and technology development program managers and other decisionmakers with useful information on development cost impacts of their decisions. The Working Group plans to explore at least the following five areas in the Study: define and explain development cost behavior terms and concepts for use in the Study; identify and quantify sources of development cost and cost estimating uncertainty; identify and quantify significant influences on development cost behavior; identify common barriers to development cost understanding and reduction; and recommend practical, realistic strategies to accomplish reductions in launcher system development cost.

  13. Design and coupling characteristics of lower-hybrid launcher for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, A.E.; Porkolab, M. ); Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N. ); Goranson, P.; Swain, D.; Yugo, J. )

    1994-10-15

    The physics and mechanical design of the LHCD launcher for the proposed TPX experiment is presented. The main role of this system is current drive and current profile control, requiring a flexible and well defined spectrum. The launcher features 32 independently phasable guides in each of 4 rows. Coupling calculations indicate that low reflection coefficients can be achieved over the whole range of phasing by adjusting the launcher position. Good directivity is predicted over a wide range of densities. The mechanical design of the launcher is complicated by the high expected thermal loads and radiation fluxes. A design which incorporates these requirements is outlined.

  14. A hypervelocity launcher for simulated large fragment space debris impacts at 10 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tullos, R. J.; Gray, W. M.; Mullin, S. A.; Cour-Palais, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    The background, design, and testing of two explosive launchers for simulating large fragment space debris impacts are presented. The objective was to develop a launcher capable of launching one gram aluminum fragments at velocities of 10 km/s. The two launchers developed are based on modified versions of an explosive shaped charge, common in many military weapons. One launcher design has yielded a stable fragment launch of approximately one gram of aluminum at 8.93 km/s velocity. The other design yielded velocities in excess of 10 km/s, but failed to produce a cohesive fragment launch. This work is ongoing, and future plans are given.

  15. Design and performance of a multi-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Brawley, E.L.; Duggin, B.W.; Cnare, E.C.; Rovang, D.C.; Widner, M.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A multi-stage, cylindrical reconnection launcher is being tested to demonstrate electrically-contactless, induction-launch technology for solenoidal coil geometry. A 6-stage launcher system is being developed to accelerate a 5 kg mass from rest to 300 m/s with a stored energy of {ge}200 kJ per coil stage. This launcher will provide data fro model verification and the engineering basis for proceeding with larger multistage systems. This paper describes the design of the multi-stage, discrete-coil launcher. Integration of coils, projectile, power systems, and real-time fire control are discussed. Results of multi-stage firings are presented.

  16. The Physics Performance Of The Front Steering Launcher For The ITER ECRH Upper Port

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.; Chavan, R.; Nikkola, P.; Sanchez, F.; Sauter, O.; Shidara, H.; Ramponi, G.; Saibene, G.; Zohm, H.

    2005-09-26

    The capability of any given e.m.-wave plasma heating system to be utilized for physics applications depends strongly on the technical properties of the launching antenna (or launcher). An effective ECH launcher must project a small mm-wave beam spot size far into the plasma and 'steer' the beam across a large fraction of the plasma cross section (along the resonance surface). Thus the choice in the launcher concept and design may either severely limit or enhance the capability of a heating system to be effectively applied for physics applications, such as sawtooth stabilization, control of the Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM), Edge Localized Mode (ELM) control, etc. Presently, two antenna concepts are under consideration for the ITER upper port ECH launcher: front steering (FS) and remote steering (RS) launchers. The RS launcher has the technical advantage of easier maintenance access to the steering mirror, which is isolated from the torus vacuum. The FS launcher places the steering mirror near the plasma increasing the technical challenges, but significantly enhancing the focusing and steering capabilities of the launcher, offering a threefold increase in NTM stabilization efficiency over the RS launcher as well as the potential for application to other critical physics issues such as ELM or sawtooth control.

  17. Electromechanical Dynamics Simulations of Superconducting LSM Rocket Launcher System in Attractive-Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Hayashi, Kengo; Takami, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Further feasibility study on a superconducting linear synchronous motor (LSM) rocket launcher system is presented on the basis of dynamic simulations of electric power, efficiency and power factor as well as the ascending motions of the launcher and rocket. The advantages of attractive-mode operation are found from comparison with repulsive-mode operation. It is made clear that the LSM rocket launcher system, of which the long-stator is divided optimally into 60 sections according to launcher speeds, can obtain high efficiency and power factor.

  18. EGSE (Electrical Ground Support Equipment) for ESA VEGA Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, M.; Ortenzi, A.; del Re, V.; Bordin, M.; Saccucci, Fr.

    2004-08-01

    Activities belonging to Assembly, Integration and Validation (AIV) phase of a launch vehicle are fundamental in development of a so much delicate system. The equipment used to support this long and crucial phase can be described as a set of Mechanical and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE). This paper describes the approach followed to develop such a system, and the benefits that this brings in terms of lower risk, more coordinated interfaces and improved functionality. The paper briefly outlines VEGA Electrical Ground Support Equipment major characteristics. In particular, this paper describes the EGSE design for a small launch vehicle such as VEGA. The objective of EGSE is to provide hardware and software for efficient electrical testing of either single stages and integrated launcher. The needs to develop a small launcher is a response to a Resolution in the Space Transportation Strategy adopted by the ESA Council in June 2000, aiming at: "completing, in the medium term, the range of launch services offered by the addition of European manufactured small and medium launcher, complementary to Ariane, consistent with diversified users' needs and relying on common elements, such as stages, subsystems, technologies, production facilities and operational infrastructure, thereby increasing the European launcher industry's competitiveness". Three different parts principally compose the Vega EGSE: TCS (Test Configuration System), TES (Test Execution System), PPS (Post Processing System). The TES is the part of the EGSE devoted to the tests execution; it has capabilities of immediate test data analysis, parameters monitoring and it is able to undertake pre-defined actions, in case of anomalous events happen, in order to put in safe conditions the Unity Under Test (UUT). The TES is composed of two main components: HLCS and LLCS. The HLCS is based on SCOS 2000 ESA product; it is mainly devoted to the interaction with operators. It allows loading Test Sequences and

  19. Projectile transverse motion and stability in electromagnetic induction launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.

    1993-12-31

    The transverse motion of a projectile in an electromagnetic induction launcher is considered. The equations of motion for translation and rotation are derived assuming a rigid projectile and a flyway restoring force per unit length that is proportional to the local displacement. Linearized transverse forces and torques due to energized coils are derived for displaced or tilted armature elements based on a first order perturbation method. The resulting equations of motion for a rigid projectile composed of multiple elements in a multi-coil launcher are analyzed as a coupled oscillator system of equations and a simple linear stability condition is derived. The equations of motion are incorporated into the 2-D Slingshot circuit code and numerical solutions for the transverse motion are obtained. For a launcher with a 10 cm bore radius with a 40 cm long solid armature, we find that stability is achieved with a restoring force (per unit length) constant of k {approx} 1 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2}. For k = 1.5 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2} and sample coil misalignment modeled as a sine wave of 1 mm amplitude at wavelengths of one or two meters, the projectile displacement grows to a maximum of 4 mm. This growth is due to resonance between the natural frequency of the projectile transverse motion and the coil displacement wavelength. This resonance does not persist because of the changing axial velocity. Random coil displacement is also found to cause roughly the same projectile displacement. For the maximum displacement a rough estimate of the transverse pressure is 50 bars. Results for a wound armature with uniform current density throughout show very similar displacements.

  20. Data acquisition applications for long duration electromagnetic launcher experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Mark W.; Cornette, James B.

    1992-07-01

    Investigation of the basic physics associated with Electromagnetic Launcher (EML) operation requires accurate measurement of a number of diverse phenomena. Monitoring and recording EML phenomena during operation over relatively long time frames places unusual demands on a Data Acquisition System (DAS). While the sampling rate requirement is modest by DAS standards of today, the combination of the sampling rate and the number of events to be monitored presents challenges. This paper describes the evolution of a data acquisition approach in use for basic research in the EML area, discusses data acquisition capabilities and requirements, and presents examples of the data that has been obtained using this approach.

  1. British government, industry agree to fund Hotel launcher studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. A.

    1986-02-01

    A program status assessment is presented for the horizontal takeoff and landing 'Hotol' single-stage-to-orbit space launcher, for which parallel, two-year airframe and propulsion system proof-of-concept studies have been approved. A two-year initial development program for the airframe would be followed by a four-year development and manufacturing phase that would begin upon the propulsion system concept's successful demonstration. Flight trials could begin in 1996. A number of significant modifications have already been made to the initial design concept, such as to the foreplanes, afterbody, engine intake, and orbital control system.

  2. Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher Testing of Spacecraft Shield Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a test program in which several orbital debris shield designs were impact tested using the inhibited shaped charge launcher facility at Southwest Research Institute. This facility enables researchers to study the impact of one-gram aluminum projectiles on various shielding designs at velocities above 11 km/s. A total of twenty tests were conducted on targets provided by NASA-MSFC. This report discusses in detail the shield design, the projectile parameters and the test configuration used for each test. A brief discussion of the target damage is provided, as the detailed analysis of the target response will be done by NASA-MSFC.

  3. 11. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA WOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA WOOD FRAME SUPERSTRUCTURE' drawn at 1/2'=1'-0'. (BOURD Sketch # 209125). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 12. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'GENERAL SIDE VIEW CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'GENERAL SIDE VIEW CAMERA STATIONS' drawn at 1/2'=1'-0'. (BUORD Sketch # 209111). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 13. 22'X34' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher, 'SIDEVIEW CAMERA CAR TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. 22'X34' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'SIDEVIEW CAMERA CAR TRACK DETAILS' drawn at 1/4'=1'-0' (BUORD Sketch # 208078, PAPW 908). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 10. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA CARSTEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA CAR-STEEL FRAME AND AXLES' drawn at 1/2'=1'-0'. (BOURD Sketch # 209124). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Characterization of Quasi-Optical Launcher for ECRH in SST-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, B.K.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Biswas, Prabal; Purohit, Dharmesh; Bora, D

    2004-06-15

    The design and characterization of a high-power microwave launcher have been discussed. The launchers have been designed for electron cyclotron resonance heating of the plasma in the Steady-State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1). High-power microwave beam launchers mainly consist of a focusing mirror and a plane mirror combination to focus the beam at a specified location. Two microwave beam launchers are fabricated to launch the waves from the low magnetic field side (radial port) as well as from the high magnetic field side (top port). The frequency of operation is 82.6 GHz, and the power is 200 kW/continuous wave. A gyrotron capable of delivering 200 kW power at 82.6 GHz is under fabrication at M/s. Gycom. The mirrors of the launchers are based on quasi-optical Gaussian beam theory. The mirrors provide cooling for long-pulse (1000-s) operation. Low-power microwave characterization is done to check the performance of the launchers. A low-power microwave beam incident on the focusing mirror of the launcher and focusing action is analyzed at the output of the launcher.

  8. 12. 22'X34' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. 22'X34' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA TRACK H-20 BRIDGE MODIFICATIONS' drawn at 3/16'=1'-0' and 1/2'1'-0'. (BUORD Sketch # 208784, PAPW 907). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 11. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'CONTROL STATION STRUCTURAL DETAILS' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'CONTROL STATION STRUCTURAL DETAILS' drawn at 1 1/2'=1'-0'. (BUORD Sketch # 208401). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Control Station, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Design Performance of Front Steering-Type Electron Cyclotron Launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Imai, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Kasugai, A.; Hayakawa, A.; Mori, S.; Mohri, K.

    2005-01-15

    The performance of a front steering (FS)-type electron cyclotron launcher designed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is evaluated with a thermal, electromagnetic, and nuclear analysis of the components; a mechanical test of a spiral tube for the steering mirror; and a rotational test of bearings. The launcher consists of a front shield and a launcher plug where three movable optic mirrors to steer incident multimegawatt radio-frequency beam power, waveguide components, nuclear shields, and vacuum windows are installed. The windows are located behind a closure plate to isolate the transmission lines from the radioactivated circumstance (vacuum vessel). The waveguide lines of the launcher are doglegged to reduce the direct neutron streaming toward the vacuum windows and other components. The maximum stresses on the critical components such as the steering mirror, its cooling tube, and the front shield are less than their allowable stresses. It was also identified that the stress on the launcher, which yielded from electromagnetic force caused by plasma disruption, was a little larger than the criteria, and a modification of the launcher plug structure was necessary. The nuclear analysis result shows that the neutron shield capability of the launcher satisfies the shield criteria of the ITER. It concludes that the design of the FS launcher is generally suitable for application to the ITER.

  11. Theory and algorithms for a quasi-optical launcher design method for high-frequency gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungku Farid, Ungku Fazri

    Gyrotrons are vacuum tubes that can generate high amounts of coherent high-frequency microwave radiation used for plasma heating, breakdown and current drive, and other applications. The gyrotron output power is not directly usable, and must be converted to either a free-space circular TEM00 Gaussian beam or a HE11 corrugated waveguide mode by employing mode converters. Quasi-optical mode converters (QOMC) achieve this by utilizing a launcher (a type of waveguide antenna) and a mirror system. Adding perturbations to smooth-wall launchers can produce a better Gaussian shaped radiation pattern with smaller side lobes and less diffraction, and this improvement leads to higher power efficiency in the QOMC. The oversize factor (OF) is defined as the ratio of the operating to cutoff frequency of the launcher, and the higher this value is, the more difficult it is to obtain good launcher designs. This thesis presents a new method for the design of any perturbed-wall TE 0n launcher that is not too highly oversized, and it is an improvement over previous launcher design methods that do not work well for highly oversized launchers. This new launcher design method is a fusion of three different methods, which are the Iterative Stratton-Chu algorithm (used for fast and accurate waveguide field propagations), the Katsenelenbaum-Semenov phase-correcting optimization algorithm, and Geometrical Optics. Three different TE02 launchers were designed using this new method, 1) a highly oversized (2.49 OF) 60 GHz launcher as proof-of-method, 2) a highly oversized (2.66 OF) 28 GHz launcher for possible use in the quasihelically symmetric stellarator (HSX) transmission line at the University of Wisconsin -- Madison, and 3) a compact internal 94 GHz 1.54 OF launcher for use in a compact gyrotron. Good to excellent results were achieved, and all launcher designs were independently verified with Surf3d, a method-of-moments based software. Additionally, the corresponding mirror system for

  12. RL-10 Based Combined Cycle For A Small Reusable Single-Stage-To-Orbit Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balepin, Vladimir; Price, John; Filipenco, Victor

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a new application of the combined propulsion known as the KLIN(TM) cycle, consisting of a thermally integrated deeply cooled turbojet (DCTJ) and liquid rocket engine (LRE). If based on the RL10 rocket engine family, the KLIN (TM) cycle makes a small single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) reusable launcher feasible and economically very attractive. Considered in this paper are the concept and parameters of a small SSTO reusable launch vehicle (RLV) powered by the KLIN (TM) cycle (sSSTO(TM)) launcher. Also discussed are the benefits of the small launcher, the reusability, and the combined cycle application. This paper shows the significant reduction of the gross take off weight (GTOW) and dry weight of the KLIN(TM) cycle-powered launcher compared to an all-rocket launcher.

  13. Chunk projectile launch using the Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Trucano, T.G.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental technique is described to launch an intact ``chunk,`` i.e. a 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm diameter cylindrical titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) flyer, to 10.2 km/s. The ability to launch fragments having such an aspect ratio is important for hypervelocity impact phenomenology studies. The experimental techniques used to accomplish this launch were similar but not identical to techniques developed for the Sandia HyperVelocity Launcher (HVL). A confined barrel impact is crucial in preventing the two-dimensional effects from dominating the loading response of the projectile chunk. The length to diameter ratio of the metallic chunk that is launched to 10.2 km/s is 0.5 and is an order of magnitude larger than those accomplished using the conventional hypervelocity launcher. The multi-dimensional, finite-difference (finite-volume), hydrodynamic code CTH was used to evaluate and assess the acceleration characteristics i.e., the in-bore ballistics of the chunky projectile launch. A critical analysis of the CTH calculational results led to the final design and the experimental conditions that were used in this study. However, the predicted velocity of the projectile chunk based on CTH calculations was {approximately} 6% lower than the measured velocity of {approximately}10.2 km/S.

  14. Improvement of payload capability of the Brazilian VLS satellite launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Toshiaki; Schlingloff, Hanfried; Boscov, Jayme

    The future Brazilian VLS satellite launcher is a conventional four stage rocket utilizing solid propellant motors in all stages. With a lift-off mass of about 50 tons and a length of 18.8 meters, the vehicle will have a capacity of inserting about a 200 kg satellite payload into circular low earth orbit. Since the demand on payload weight tends to increase more and more, improvement possibilities of this payload capacity for later missions are now under consideration. Introducing conceptual modifications in the present reference configuration, consequences in trajectory parameters and payload capacity are examined. The computation of the flight performance of each new configuration is made by means of the SKYNAV computer code, a special CAE/CAD system for IBM-PC environment supporting space launcher design with ascent trajectory optimization. The paper presents a resume of the analysis in terms of payload capabilities and trajectory parameters for relevant new VLS configurations. It is shown that the addition of one or two more booster motors, the replacement of the solid propellant second stage by liquid propulsion and satellite integrated orbital injection may improve the payload capacity considerably, while modifications like off-loading of propellant in the fourth stage or changing the thrust behavior of the first stage to reduce aerodynamic loads cannot be recommended.

  15. "It Is Hard to Stay in England": Itineraries, Routes, and Dead Ends--An (Im)mobility Study of Nurses Who Became Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuban, Sondra

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from an Economic Social Research Council (ESRC) study on the roles of education in the trajectories of health care professionals who migrated to England and became carers. The study looks at the downward mobility and deskilling of these women, and their struggles to reverse their bungled career paths. The author maps…

  16. Effect of the electric field pattern on the generation of fast electrons in front of lower hybrid launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, Laurent; Fuchs, Vladimir; Ekedahl, Annika; Petrzilka, Vaclav; Colas, Laurent; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Li, Miaohui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The effect of the detailed waveguide spectrum on the electron acceleration has been studied for the 3.7 GHz LHCD launchers in Tore Supra, i.e. the ITER-like passive-active multijunction (PAM) launcher and the fully-active-multijunction (FAM) launcher, using test electron modelling technique. The detailed launched antenna wave spectrum is used as input to the code that computes the dynamics of the electrons in the electric field. Comparison with the LHCD launchers in EAST, operating at 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz, has also been made. The simulations show that the PAM-design generates lower flux of fast electrons than FAM-launchers, this could be the consequence of the wider waveguide of PAM-launcher (14.65 mm for Tore-Supra) than FAM-launcher (8 mm for Tore-Supra).

  17. Effect of the electric field pattern on the generation of fast electrons in front of lower hybrid launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Valade, Laurent Ekedahl, Annika; Colas, Laurent; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Fuchs, Vladimir; Petrzilka, Vaclav; Li, Miaohui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-12-10

    The effect of the detailed waveguide spectrum on the electron acceleration has been studied for the 3.7 GHz LHCD launchers in Tore Supra, i.e. the ITER-like passive-active multijunction (PAM) launcher and the fully-active-multijunction (FAM) launcher, using test electron modelling technique. The detailed launched antenna wave spectrum is used as input to the code that computes the dynamics of the electrons in the electric field. Comparison with the LHCD launchers in EAST, operating at 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz, has also been made. The simulations show that the PAM-design generates lower flux of fast electrons than FAM-launchers, this could be the consequence of the wider waveguide of PAM-launcher (14.65 mm for Tore-Supra) than FAM-launcher (8 mm for Tore-Supra)

  18. Impact of Launchers on the Environment in French Guiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, S.; Chemoul, B.

    2012-01-01

    The main combustion products of the Ariane 5 solid rocket boosters are alumina and chlorhyde gas. When the launcher lift off the significant concentrations of this components are around the launch zone. We use samplers to evaluate the concentrations of this two elements. To optimize the localisation of the samplers we use a model to obtain the projected traces of the combustion cloud according to meteorological data (software sarrim). During the first seconds of takes 1000 m3 of water flood the base right to decrease the acoustic vibration. The major parts of the pollutants fall close to the launch zone and acidic cloud is formed. Once having stabilized the cloud begins diluting, it is subjected to the influence of the different layers of wind. To measure air quality we use first continuous analysers, secondly containers with distilled water to sample the acidic particles from the cloud. We also monitor the physicochemical quality of water in a river near the launch zone, the impact of the combustion products on vegetation, the aquatic fauna. Noise and vibrations are also measured. For terrestrial fauna like birds, we monitor the general population and a colony of wade. The most important colony of this species is located on the base : around 75% of the population of the French Guiana. We use also a new protocol to estimate the impact of launch by measuring the thickness of eggshells. We use research results which show that calcium can be replaced by alumina. When the thickness of eggshells is thin, the reproduction can be affected. For each measurement campaign, we have more than 100 sites and around 600 samples. The results shows that the land around the space centre is like a natural refuge. The impact of the launches is low, hunting is forbidden and security personal controls the zone base is a protected zone. The space centre is now a natural wildlife refuge. For the two new launchers, Vega and Soyuz, we will also monitor the environmental impact of the launch

  19. Evaluation of the Preliminary Project Tool ESAComp on Launcher Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Michel; Petermann, Nicolas; Monicke, Andre; Katajisto, Harri

    2012-07-01

    Within the objective of shorten design cycles and quickly converge towards a realistic solution, accessible preliminary project tools such as ESAComp are used in composite structures design offices to perform a first round design. As with any new software modules, the questions are to know how accurate this design is and how much time can be saved? For an application on space launchers, ESAComp developed by Componeering Inc has been used for composite cylindrical structures, monolithic or stiffened. Lay-up and stiffeners cross-section has been defined and buckling analyses have been made with this tool. Within few hours of work, great accuracy has been proved when compared to analyses with standard FE tools has been proved. The ESAComp solution relies on Elmer solver [1]. Element technology is based on Reissner-Mindlin-type shell solution, which is described, for example, in [2].

  20. Reduction of the azimuthal beamwidth of quasi-optical circular waveguide slot-type launchers using a corrugated horn-like structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sealy, P.J.; Vernon, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The radiation pattern of a rotating TE{sub mn}{sup O} mode quasi-optical launcher with corrugated flares is examined. A potential use of the launcher would be to excite a beam-shaping reflector system. Without the flares the launcher has a broad azimuthal beamwidth. The corrugated flares decrease the azimuthal beamwidth and increase the peak power density of the launcher`s radiation pattern.

  1. Microwave impedance matching strategies of an applicator supplied by a bi-directional magnetron waveguide launcher.

    PubMed

    Roussy, Georges; Kongmark, Nils

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that a bi-directional waveguide launcher can be used advantageously for reducing the reflection coefficient mismatch of an input impedance of an applicator. In a simple bi-directional waveguide launcher, the magnetron is placed in the waveguide and generates a nominal field distribution with significant output impedance in both directions of the waveguide. If a standing wave is tolerated in the torus, which connects the launcher and the applicator, the power transfer from the magnetron to the applicator can be optimal, without using special matching devices. It is also possible to match the bi-directional launcher with two inductance stubs near the antenna of the magnetron and use them for supplying a two-input applicator without reflection. PMID:15323109

  2. WARP-10; A numerical simulation model for the cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Widner, M.M. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a fully self-consistent computer simulation code called WARP-10, used for modelling the Reconnection Launcher, is described. WARP-10 has been compared with various experiments with good agreement for performance and heating. Simulations predict that it is possible to obtain nearly uniform acceleration with high efficiency and low armature heating. There does not appear to be an armature heating limit to velocity provided the armature mass can be sufficiently large. Simulation results are presented which show it is possible to obtain conditions needed for Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) launch applications (4.15 km/s and a 850 kg launch mass). This 3100-stage launcher has an efficiency of 47.2% and a final ohmic energy/kinetic energy - .00146. The mode of launcher operation is similar to a traveling wave induction launcher and is produced by properly timed and tuned discrete stages. Further optimization and much higher velocities appear possible.

  3. Spins, phonons, and hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    In crystals (and/or glasses) with localized sp{sup 3} or spd-bonding orbitals, dislocations have very low mobilities, making the crystals very hard. Classical Peierls-Nabarro theory does not account for the low mobility. The breaking of spin-pair bonds which creates internal free-radicals must be considered. Therefore, a theory based on quantum mechanics has been proposed (Science, 261, 1436 (1993)). It has been applied successfully to diamond, Si, Ge, SiC, and with a modification to TiC and WC. It has recently been extended to account for the temperature independence of the hardness of silicon at low temperatures together with strong softening at temperatures above the Debye temperature. It is quantitatively consistent with the behaviors of the Group 4 elements (C, Si, Ge, Sn) when their Debye temperatures are used as normalizing factors; and appears to be consistent with data for TiC if an Einstein temperature for carbon is used. Since the Debye temperature marks the approximate point at which phonons of atomic wavelengths become excited (as contrasted with collective acoustic waves), this confirms the idea that the process which limits dislocation mobility is localized to atomic dimensions (sharp kinks).

  4. Study of the modelling of an electromagnetic launcher of fire extinguishing loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunzulica, Florin; Oncescu, Cosmin; Dumitrache, Alexandru; Vintea, Adela

    2016-06-01

    The problem of launchers used in civil applications is a topical issue. The role of a launcher is to launch objects with a certain speed towards certain goals like for example dangerous fire outbreaks (drilling areas, fires in buildings). This paper is aiming to present the theoretical aspects and results regarding the launching objects, in this case spheres that contains firefighting substance, during the launching stage, the ballistic stage and the impact stage with a solid surface.

  5. Must "Hard Problems" Be Hard?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1985-01-01

    To determine how hard it is for computers to solve problems, researchers have classified groups of problems (polynomial hierarchy) according to how much time they seem to require for their solutions. A difficult and complex proof is offered which shows that a combinatorial approach (using Boolean circuits) may resolve the problem. (JN)

  6. Development of an accelerating-piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles at velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest to several scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. The energy and power density of high explosives provides a possible avenue to reach this velocity if used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures compared to light-gas guns. In the implosion-driven launcher (IDL), linear implosion of a pressurized tube drives a strong shock into the gas ahead of the tube pinch, thereby forming an increasingly long column of compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This study focuses on the implementation of a novel launch cycle wherein the explosively driven pinch is accelerated down the length of the tube in order to maintain a relatively constant projectile base pressure early in the launch cycle. The experimental development of an accelerating driver which utilizes an explosive lens to phase the detonation wave is presented. The design and experimental performance of an accelerating-piston IDL is also discussed.

  7. LH launcher Arcs Formation and Detection on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Yu. F.; Challis, C. D.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Monakhov, I.

    2011-12-01

    Mechanisms of arc formation have been analyzed and the critical electric fields for the multipactor effect calculated, compared to the experimental values and found to be within the normal operational space of the LH system on JET. It has been shown that the characteristic electron energy (20-1000)eV for the highest multipactor resonances (N = 4-9) are within the limits of secondary electron yield above 1 required for multipactoring. Electrons with these energies provide the highest gas desorption efficiency when hitting the waveguide walls. The effect of higher waveguide modes and magnetic field on the multipactor was also considered. The distribution function for electrons accelerated by LH waves in front of the launcher has been calculated. The field emission currents have been estimated and found to be small. It is proposed that emission of Fel5, 16 lines, which can be obtained with improved diagnostics, could be used to detect arcs that are missed by a protection system based on the reflected power. The reliability and time response of these signals are discussed. A similar technique based on the observation of the emission of low ionized atoms can be used for a fast detection of other undesirable events to avoid sputtering or melting of the plasma facing components such as RF antenna. These techniques are especially powerful if they are based on emission uniquely associated with specific locations and components.

  8. LH launcher Arcs Formation and Detection on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, Yu. F.; Challis, C. D.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Monakhov, I.

    2011-12-23

    Mechanisms of arc formation have been analyzed and the critical electric fields for the multipactor effect calculated, compared to the experimental values and found to be within the normal operational space of the LH system on JET. It has been shown that the characteristic electron energy (20-1000)eV for the highest multipactor resonances (N = 4-9) are within the limits of secondary electron yield above 1 required for multipactoring. Electrons with these energies provide the highest gas desorption efficiency when hitting the waveguide walls. The effect of higher waveguide modes and magnetic field on the multipactor was also considered. The distribution function for electrons accelerated by LH waves in front of the launcher has been calculated. The field emission currents have been estimated and found to be small. It is proposed that emission of Fel5, 16 lines, which can be obtained with improved diagnostics, could be used to detect arcs that are missed by a protection system based on the reflected power. The reliability and time response of these signals are discussed. A similar technique based on the observation of the emission of low ionized atoms can be used for a fast detection of other undesirable events to avoid sputtering or melting of the plasma facing components such as RF antenna. These techniques are especially powerful if they are based on emission uniquely associated with specific locations and components.

  9. Advanced Optics for the Remote Steering ITER ECRH Upper Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Moro, A.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The optics of the ECRH Upper Launcher in ITER based on the Remote Steering concept needs special attention, since any focussing element in front of the waveguide has combined effects on the range of steering angles achievable and the beam width in the plasma region. The effects are studied in detail for a setup composed by 8 beams per port (three ports), for a spherical and a hyperbolic mirror surface. Gaussian beam analysis is compared to beam pattern calculations with the optical physics code GRASP, in order to verify the validity of gaussian optics approximation. The standard description with simply astigmatic beams, not adequate in more complex systems as the proposed two-mirror set-up, requires approximations, which are compared with the generalized astigmatic beam description. The ohmic losses at the end mirrors and the related localized heating due to the very large power density cause deformations that depends on the design of the cooling circuit. The distortion of the beam shape has been evaluated in a realistic case of mirror cooling with a small-channel system. The quantification of the effect depends on the precise evaluation ohmic losses and their enhancement in the long term due to the surface deterioration.

  10. Preliminary analysis of space mission applications for electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. A.; Rice, E. E.; Earhart, R. W.; Conlon, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of using electromagnetically launched EML payloads propelled from the Earth's surface to LEO, GEO, lunar orbit, or to interplanetary space was assessed. Analyses of the designs of rail accelerators and coaxial magnetic accelerators show that each is capable of launching to space payloads of 800 KG or more. A hybrid launcher in which EML is used for the first 2 KM/sec followed by chemical rocket stages was also tested. A cost estimates study shows that one to two EML launches per day are needed to break even, compared to a four-stage rocket. Development models are discussed for: (1) Earth orbital missions; (2) lunar base supply mission; (3) solar system escape mission; (4) Earth escape missions; (5) suborbital missions; (6) electromagnetic boost missions; and (7) space-based missions. Safety factors, environmental impacts, and EML systems analysis are discussed. Alternate systems examined include electrothermal thrustors, an EML rocket gun; an EML theta gun, and Soviet electromagnetic accelerators.

  11. A small scale lunar launcher for early lunar material utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. R.; Kubby, J. A.; Dunbar, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    A system for the launching of lunar derived oxygen or raw materials into low lunar orbit or to L2 for transfer to low earth orbit is presented. The system described is a greatly simplified version of the conventional and sophisticated approach suggested by O'Neill using mass drivers with recirculating buckets. An electromagnetic accelerator is located on the lunar surface which launches 125 kg 'smart' containers of liquid oxygen or raw materials into a transfer orbit. Upon reaching apolune a kick motor is fired to circularize the orbit at 100 km altitude or L2. These containers are collected and their payloads transferred to a tanker OTV. The empty containers then have their kick motors refurbished and then are returned to the launcher site on the lunar surface for reuse. Initial launch capability is designed for about 500T of liquid oxygen delivered to low earth orbit per year with upgrading to higher levels, delivery of lunar soil for shielding, or raw materials for processing given the demand.

  12. Assessment of the ITER EC Upper Launcher Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figini, Lorenzo; Farina, Daniela; Poli, Emanuele; Sauter, Olivier; Bruschi, Alessandro; Goodman, Timothy; Moro, Alessandro; Platania, Paola; Sozzi, Carlo; Cavinato, Mario; Saibene, Gabriella; Henderson, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The 24 MW ITER Electron Cyclotron (EC) Heating and Current Drive (H&CD) system, operating at 170 GHz, consists of one Equatorial (EL) and four Upper Launchers (UL). The main task of the UL will be the control of Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) activity such as Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs) at the q=3/2 and q=2 surfaces, but it will also be needed for current profile tailoring in advanced scenarios and to assist plasma break-down and L- to H-mode transition. Moreover, it is required to be e.ective both when ITER will operate at nominal and reduced magnetic field magnitude. Here the performance of the UL is assessed through the study of the full temporal evolution of di.erent scenarios, including the reference ITER 15MA H-mode plasma, a half-field case at 2.65T, and a steady state scenario. The ECCD efficiency has been evaluated for a wide range of injection angles, deriving the optimal angles and the power required for NTMs stabilization, as well as the steering range necessary to reach the rational surfaces during all the phases of the discharge. The steering sensitivity to shifts of the target or aiming errors has been estimated too. The result is an assessment of the UL design requirements to achieve the desired functionalities, which, together with the engineering limits, will be used to drive the optimization and finalization of the UL design.

  13. Zero Boil Off Cryogen Storage for Future Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentian, D.; Plachta, D.; Kittel, P.; Hastings, L. J.; Salerno, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Zero boil off (ZBO) cryogen storage using both cryocoolers and passive insulation technologies will enable long-term exploration missions by allowing designers to optimize tankage without the need for excess cryogen storage to account for boil off. Studies of ZBO (zero boil off) have been on-going in the USA for several years. More recently, a review of the needs of advanced space propulsion took place in Europe. This showed the interest of the European community in cryogenic propulsion for planetary missions as well as the use of liquid hydrogen for large power electric propulsion (manned Mars missions). Although natural boiling could be acceptable for single leg missions, passive insulation techniques yield roughly a I% per month cryogen loss and this would not be cost effective for robotic planetary missions involving storage times greater than one year. To make economic sense, long-term exploration missions require lower tank capacity and longer storage times. Recent advances in cryocooler technology, resulting in vast improvements in both cooler efficiency and reliability, make ZBO is a clear choice for planetary exploration missions. Other, more near term applications of ZBO include boil-off reduction or elimination applied to first and upper stages of future earth-to-orbit (ETO) launchers. This would extend launch windows and reduce infrastructure costs. Successors to vehicles like Ariane 5 could greatly benefit by implementing ZBO. Zero Boil Off will only be successful in ETO launcher applications if it makes economic sense to implement. The energy cost is only a fraction of the total cost of buying liquid cryogen, the rest being transportation and other overhead. Because of this, higher boiling point cryogens will benefit more from on-board liquefaction, thus reducing the infrastructure costs. Since hydrogen requires a liquefier with at least a 17% efficiency just to break even from a cost standpoint, one approach for implementing ZBO in upper stages would

  14. A design study for the ECH launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Grunloh, H.J.; Moeller, C.P.; Doane, J.L.; Olstad, R.A.; Makowski, M.A.; Harvey, R.W.

    1997-04-01

    The Design Description Document for ITER calls for 50 MW of electron cyclotron power at a frequency of 170 GHz, upgradeable to 100 MW. This power is intended to heat the plasma from Ohmic temperatures to ignition, in concert with power from some combination of neutral injection and/or ICRF heating. The second major application of ECH power is current drive. In the advanced steady-state scenarios, the total current is 12 to 16 MA, of which 75% is driven by bootstrap effects. The current drive requirement is 2 to 3 MA at a relative minor radius of 0.7, plus a small current near the center of the discharge. ECH power is also used for plasma initiation and startup, using a separate ECH system of two fixed frequencies between 90 to 140 GHz and total power to 6 MW. Suppression or control of MHD instabilities like neoclassical tearing modes, sawteeth, ELMs, and locked modes are also important objectives for the ECH systems. However, the launching and power characteristics of the ECH for these applications is highly specialized. The ability to modulate at high frequency (at least several tens of kHz), the ability to redirect the beams with precision at relatively high speed, and the requirement that the stabilization be carried out at the same time as the bulk heating and current drive imply that separate and specialized ECH systems are needed for the stabilization activities. For example, for stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes current must be driven inside the islands near the q = 2 surface. If this is done near the outboard mid plane, a system with optimized frequency might be much more effective than what could be done with the main 170 GHz system. This paper does not treat the launchers for the stabilization systems.

  15. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Duggin, Billy W.; Widner, Melvin M.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic cylindrical projectile mass launcher and a method of operation is provided which includes a cylindrical projectile having a conducting armature, a cylindrical barrel in which the armature is received, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coil stages, a plurality of pulse energy sources, and a pulsed power arrangement for generating magnetic pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave along the length of the launcher barrel. The pulsed magnetic wave provides a propelling force on the projectile along the drive coil. The pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil stages is advanced along the armature faster than the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature. The pulsed generation of the magnetic wave minimizes electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provides for smooth acceleration of the projectile through the barrel of the launcher.

  16. International Space Station-Based Electromagnetic Launcher for Space Science Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed of lowering the cost of planetary exploration missions by using an electromagnetic propulsion/launcher, rather than a chemical-fueled rocket for propulsion. An electromagnetic launcher (EML) based at the International Space Station (ISS) would be used to launch small science payloads to the Moon and near Earth asteroids (NEAs) for the science and exploration missions. An ISS-based electromagnetic launcher could also inject science payloads into orbits around the Earth and perhaps to Mars. The EML would replace rocket technology for certain missions. The EML is a high-energy system that uses electricity rather than propellant to accelerate payloads to high velocities. The most common type of EML is the rail gun. Other types are possible, e.g., a coil gun, also known as a Gauss gun or mass driver. The EML could also "drop" science payloads into the Earth's upper

  17. Nuclear analysis for the intor array of loops ICRF launcher module design

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.

    1985-07-01

    Nuclear analysis for the array of loops ICRF launcher module design of INTOR is presented. The nuclear radiation environment in the different module components is determined. The fast neutron fluence in the BeO radome is 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ after one full power year leading to significant microcracking. Activation calculations for SF/sub 6/ imply a total activity of 5 x 10/sup 4/ Ci at shutdown. Nuclear heating results in a large breakdown rate in SF/sub 6/. A 1.6 m thick nuclear shield is needed to allow for hands-on maintenance one day after shutdown behind the launcher module. The results imply that significant design changes are required for the array of loops ICRF launcher module to stand the severe INTOR nuclear environment.

  18. Integrated plasmonic semi-circular launcher for dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polariton waveguide.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Huang, Lingling; Tan, Qiaofeng; Bai, Benfeng; Jin, Guofan

    2011-03-28

    A semi-circular plasmonic launcher integrated with dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polaritons waveguide (DLSPPW) is proposed and analyzed theoretically, which can focus and efficiently couple the excited surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) into the DLSPPW via the highly matched spatial field distribution with the waveguide mode in the focal plane. By tuning the incident angle or polarization of the illuminating beam, it is shown that the launcher may be conveniently used as a switch or a multiplexer that have potential applications in plasmonic circuitry. Furthermore, from an applicational point of view, it is analyzed how the coupling performance of the launcher can be further improved by employing multiple semi-circular slits. PMID:21451682

  19. From Satellite To Launcher, Highlights On Powder/Wire ALM At Astrium Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourenaud, Florent; Desagulier, Christian

    2012-07-01

    ALM (Additive Layer Manufacturing) or Direct Manufacturing has been one of EADS’ (and more recently Astrium ST’s) major interests for almost a decade. It consists in manufacturing a part by adding (metallic) material layer by layer instead of machining the desired shape from a blank. It therefore has many advantages directly suitable for the spatial business, ranging from satellite to launcher structures. The present paper describes the range of available additive processes suitable for our present or future metallic launcher structures. The operational domain is described, in close correlation with the specific spatial constraints. A first successful in-flight application has been recently demonstrated by Astrium ST, which clearly opens a wide range of opportunities for next generation launchers and satellite structures. This paper gives an overview of the (technically and economically) eligible spatial structures that represent strong ALM business cases, as well as the on-going R&T and development trends at Astrium ST

  20. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Duggin, B.W.; Widner, M.M.

    1992-06-30

    An electromagnetic cylindrical projectile mass launcher and a method of operation is provided which includes a cylindrical projectile having a conducting armature, a cylindrical barrel in which the armature is received, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coil stages, a plurality of pulse energy sources, and a pulsed power arrangement for generating magnetic pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave along the length of the launcher barrel. The pulsed magnetic wave provides a propelling force on the projectile along the drive coil. The pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil stages is advanced along the armature faster than the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature. The pulsed generation of the magnetic wave minimizes electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provides for smooth acceleration of the projectile through the barrel of the launcher. 2 figs.

  1. Results from Sandia National Laboratories/Lockheed Martin Electromagnetic Missile Launcher (EMML).

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Skurdal, Ben; Gaigler, Randy; Basak, L; Root, G; Aubuchon, Matthew S.; Turman, Bobby N.; Floyd, Mendel D.

    2005-05-01

    Sandia national laboratories (SNL) and lockheed martin MS2 are designing an electromagnetic missile launcher (EMML) for naval applications. The EMML uses an induction coilgun topology with the requirement of launching a 3600 lb. missile up to a velocity of 40 m/s. To demonstrate the feasibility of the electromagnetic propulsion design, a demonstrator launcher was built that consists of approximately 10% of the propulsion coils needed for a tactical design. The demonstrator verified the design by launching a 1430 lb weighted sled to a height of 24 ft in mid-December 2004 (Figure 1). This paper provides the general launcher design, specific pulsed power system component details, system operation, and demonstration results.

  2. Radiation shielding analyses for the ECRH launcher in the ITER upper port

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Heidinger, R.; Lang, K.; Luo, Y.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation shielding analyses have been performed for the ECRH system in the ITER upper port to complete the neutron streaming analysis performed previously. The analyses aimed at assessing and optimising the performance of the radiation shield to prove that the shielding requirements can be met by the proposed design variants. The radiation transport calculations have been performed by means of the Monte Carlo programme MCNP in 3D geometry using the standard ITER neutronics model with ECRH launcher and plug integrated into the upper port. The interface programme MCAM was used to convert the 3D ECRH launcher models available from the CAD-system for use with MCNP-calculations. It was shown that the launcher design with the proposed radiation shield can satisfy the design limits for the radiation loads to both the launcher and the neighbouring components such as the Vacuum Vessel and the TF coils. Radiation dose levels were assessed for reactor shutdown at the rear side of ECRH launcher at locations where personnel access for maintenance may be required. The shutdown dose rate calculations were also performed in 3D geometry by applying the rigorous 2-step (R2S) method and comparing the results to those obtained with the direct 1-step (D1S) method. The R2S method includes activation calculations for the launcher materials by means of the inventory code FISPACT. It was proven that the shutdown dose rates inside the port with straight waveguides will be below the ITER radiation limit of 100 µSv/hr after 10 days decay time.

  3. Design and evaluation of coils for a 50 mm diameter induction coilgun launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, R. J.; Shokair, I. R.; Wavrik, R. W.; Dempsey, J. F.; Honey, W. E.; Shimp, K. J.; Douglas, G. M.

    Coilguns have the ability to provide magnetic pressure to projectiles which results in near constant acceleration. However, to achieve this performance and control projectile hearing, significant constraints are placed on the design of the coils. We are developing coils to produce an effective projectile base pressure of 100 MPa as a step toward reaching base pressures of 200 MPa. The design uses a scalable technology applicable to the entire range of breech to muzzle coils of a multi-stage launcher. This paper presents the design of capacitor-driven coils for launching nominal 50 mm, 350 gram projectiles. Design criteria, constraints, mechanical stress analysis, launcher performance, and test results are discussed.

  4. Salvo fire experiments using a 0.60 caliber electromagnetic launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, R. L.; Kitzmiller, J. R.; Pratap, S. B.; Thelen, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    The laboratory-based small caliber electromagnetic launcher (EML) and compulsator power supply currently under development are intended to accelerate three 32-g masses to 2 km/sec at a 10-Hz firing rate. This 0.60-cal EML employs an iron core compulsator (ICC) power supply and small caliber switch. Attention is presently given to the design features of the launcher, the muzzle shunt resistor, the ICC, and the high pressure pneumatic autoloader, as well as to data obtained from several double shots and one triple shot.

  5. The LHCD Launcher for Alcator C-Mod - Design, Construction, Calibration and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hosea; D. Beals; W. Beck; S. Bernabei; W. Burke; R. Childs; R. Ellis; E. Fredd; N. Greenough; M. Grimes; D. Gwinn; J. Irby; S. Jurczynski; P. Koert; C.C. Kung; G.D. Loesser; E. Marmar; R. Parker; J. Rushinski; G. Schilling; D. Terry; R. Vieira; J.R. Wilson; J. Zaks

    2005-06-27

    MIT and PPPL have joined together to fabricate a high-power lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system for supporting steady-state AT regime research on Alcator C-Mod. The goal of the first step of this project is to provide 1.5 MW of 4.6 GHz rf [radio frequency] power to the plasma with a compact launcher which has excellent spectral selectivity and fits into a single C-Mod port. Some of the important design, construction, calibration and testing considerations for the launcher leading up to its installation on C-Mod are presented here.

  6. LAUNCHER PERFORMANCE AND THERMAL CAPABILITY OF THE DIII-D ECH SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    KAJIWARA,K; LOHR,J; GORELOV,I.A; GREEN,M.T; PONCE,D; CALLIS,R.W; ELLIS,R.A

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The temperatures of components of DIII-D ECH launchers were observed during 2003 tokamak operation. The injected power was typically 500-700 kW and the pulse length was typically 2s. Plasma shots were performed at intervals of about 17 min from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The temperatures of a movable mirror, a fixed mirror and a launcher reached an equilibrium after about six hours of repetitive pulsing. The saturation temperature depends to some extent on the plasma stored energy. However, even in high {beta} plasma, the temperatures plateaued at acceptable values.

  7. CRAWLER HIDDEN UNDER MOBILE LAUNCHER MOVES APOLLO 17 FROM VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING AS TRIP TO LAUNC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 17 space vehicle was moved today from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Complex 39's pad A in preparation for its launch with Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Commander; Ronald A. Evans, Command Module Pilot; and Dr. Harrison H. ''Jack'' Schmitt, Lunar Module Pilot, on the sixth U.S. manned lunar landing mission on December 6, 1972.

  8. Mount mechanisms for the Saturn 5/Apollo mobile launcher at John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balke, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    A support system was designed to resist hurricane wind loads at the launch pad and to allow the supported structural frame to expand and contract freely under wide ranges of temperature. This system consists of six mount mechanisms devised to meet the previously stated requirements plus a load-carrying capacity for each of 3.2-million kilograms (7-million pounds) downward and 1.6-million kilograms (3.5-million pounds) upward. A similar but lighter system of six mount mechanisms was designed for use in the sheltered environment of the vehicle assembly building. Each requirement and design result is discussed, and each mount mechanism is defined by location and type with references to visual presentations.

  9. Crew Launch Vehicle Mobile Launcher Solid Rocket Motor Plume Induced Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Sulyma, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The plume-induced environment created by the Ares 1 first stage, five-segment reusable solid rocket motor (RSRMV) will impose high heating rates and impact pressures on Launch Complex 39. The extremes of these environments pose a potential threat to weaken or even cause structural components to fail if insufficiently designed. Therefore the ability to accurately predict these environments is critical to assist in specifying structural design requirements to insure overall structural integrity and flight safety. This paper presents the predicted thermal and pressure environments induced by the launch of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) from Launch Complex (LC) 39. Once the environments are predicted, a follow-on thermal analysis is required to determine the surface temperature response and the degradation rate of the materials. An example of structures responding to the plume-induced environment will be provided.

  10. Design and Characterization of Thin Stainless Steel Burst Disks for Increasing Two-Stage Light Gas Launcher Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Henderson, Donald; Rodriguez, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Laser etched 300 series Stainless Steel Burst Disks (SSBD) ranging between 0.178 mm (0.007-in.) and 0.508mm (0.020-in.) thick were designed for use in a 17-caliber two-stage light gas launcher. First, a disk manufacturing method was selected using a combination of wire electrical discharge machining (EDM) to form the blank disks and laser etching to define the pedaling fracture pattern. Second, a replaceable insert was designed to go between the SSDB and the barrel. This insert reduced the stress concentration between the SSBD and the barrel, providing a place for the petals of the SSDB to open, and protecting the rifling on the inside of the barrel. Thereafter, a design of experiments was implemented to test and characterize the burst characteristics of SSBDs. Extensive hydrostatic burst testing of the SSBDs was performed to complete the design of experiments study with one-hundred and seven burst tests. The experiment simultaneously tested the effects of the following: two SSBD material states (full hard, annealed); five SSBD thicknesses 0.178, 0.254, 0.305, 0.381 mm (0.007, 0.010, 0.012, 0.015, 0.020-in.); two grain directions relative); number of times the laser etch pattern was repeated (varies between 5-200 times); two heat sink configurations (with and without heat sink); and, two barrel configurations (with and without insert). These tests resulted in the quantification of the relationship between SSBD thickness, laser etch parameters, and desired burst pressure. Of the factors investigated only thickness and number of laser etches were needed to develop a mathematical relationship predicting hydrostatic burst pressure of disks using the same barrel configuration. The fracture surfaces of two representative SSBD bursts were then investigated with a scanning electron microscope, one burst hydrostatically in a fixture and another dynamically in the launcher. The fracture analysis verified that both burst conditions resulted in a ductile overload failure

  11. Optimization of the ITER electron cyclotron equatorial launcher for improved heating and current drive functional capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Henderson, M.; Saibene, G.

    2014-06-15

    The design of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (EC H and CD) system has evolved in the last years both in goals and functionalities by considering an expanded range of applications. A large effort has been devoted to a better integration of the equatorial and the upper launchers, both from the point of view of the performance and of the design impact on the engineering constraints. However, from the analysis of the ECCD performance in two references H-mode scenarios at burn (the inductive H-mode and the advanced non-inductive scenario), it was clear that the EC power deposition was not optimal for steady-state applications in the plasma region around mid radius. An optimization study of the equatorial launcher is presented here aiming at removing this limitation of the EC system capabilities. Changing the steering of the equatorial launcher from toroidal to poloidal ensures EC power deposition out to the normalized toroidal radius ρ ≈ 0.6, and nearly doubles the EC driven current around mid radius, without significant performance degradation in the core plasma region. In addition to the improved performance, the proposed design change is able to relax some engineering design constraints on both launchers.

  12. Advanced Optics for a Full Quasi-Optical Front Steering ECRH Upper Launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A.; Alessi, E.; Bruschi, A.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.; Chavan, R.; Collazos, A.; Goodman, T. P.; Udintsev, V. S.; Henderson, M. A.

    2009-11-26

    A full quasi-optical setup for the internal optics of the Front Steering Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) Upper Launcher for ITER was designed, proving to be feasible and favorable in terms of additional flexibility and cost reduction with respect to the former design. This full quasi-optical solution foresees the replacement of the mitre-bends in the final section of the launcher with dedicated free-space mirrors to realize the last changes of directions in the launcher. A description of the launcher is given and its advantages presented. The parameters of the expected output beams as well as preliminary evaluations of truncation effects with the physical optics GRASP code are shown. Moreover, a study of mitre-bends replacement with single mirrors for multiple beams is described. In principle it could allow the beams to be larger at the mirror locations (with a further decrease of the peak power density due to partial overlapping) and has the additional advantage to get a larger opening with compressed beams to avoid conflicts with side-walls port. Constraints on the setup, arising both from the resulting beam characteristics in the space of free parameters and from mechanical requirements are taken into account in the analysis.

  13. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Duggin, B.W.; Widner, M.M.

    1990-12-06

    In accordance with the one aspect of the invention, an electromagnetic projectile launcher is provided which comprises: a conducting projectile, a barrel that receives the projectile, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coils, a plurality of pulsed energy sources, and pulse power means for generating a sequence of pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave within the drive coil for propelling the projectile along the barrel, wherein the pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil is advanced along the barrel faster than the projectile to thereby induce a current wave in the armature of the projectile and thereby minimize electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provide nearly constant acceleration of the projectile. In accordance with another aspect of the invention, a method is provided for propelling a projectile within a pulsed induction electromagnetic coil launcher, wherein the method comprises the steps of: generating a sequence of pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave within the coil launcher, applying the pulsed magnetic wave initially at the aft end of the projectile to accelerate the projectile within the coil launcher, and advancing the position of the pulsed magnetic wave relative to the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature, such that electromagnetic heating of the projectile is minimized and acceleration is nearly constant.

  14. Design and development of the redundant launcher stabilization system for the Atlas 2 launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Launcher Stabilization System (LSS) is a pneumatic/hydraulic ground system used to support an Atlas launch vehicle prior to launch. The redesign and development activity undertaken to achieve an LSS with increased load capacity and a redundant hydraulic system for the Atlas 2 launch vehicle are described.

  15. Modal test of the Brazilian satellite launcher (VLS) configuration burn-out of the first stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, R. L. R.; Pirk, R.; Dasilveira, D. D.; Strafacci, D. J.; Barros, E.

    1993-02-01

    A modal survey was performed on the Brazilian Satellite Launcher Vehicle, in four different configurations, to validate the theoretical finite element model. This paper describes the methodology and related techniques used in the experimental modal analysis, namely the burn-out of the first stage.

  16. 59. GENERAL VIEW OF ATLAS E/F LAUNCHER AT SLC3W FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. GENERAL VIEW OF ATLAS E/F LAUNCHER AT SLC-3W FROM ITS SOUTHWEST CORNER. SOUTH FACE OF ERECT UMBILICAL MAST IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  17. Flow structure and unsteadiness in the supersonic wake of a generic space launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    At the junction between the rocket engine and the main body of a classical space launcher, a separation-dominated and highly unstable flow field develops and induces strong wall-pressure oscillations. These can excite structural vibrations detrimental to the launcher. It is desirable to minimize these effects, for which a better understanding of the flow field is required. We study the wake flow of a generic axisymmetric space-launcher model with and without propulsive jet (cold air). Experimental investigations are performed at Mach 2.9 and a Reynolds number ReD = 1 . 3 .106 based on model diameter D. The jet exits the nozzle at Mach 2.5. Velocity measurements by means of Particle Image Velocimetry and mean and unsteady wall-pressure measurements on the main-body base are performed simultaneously. Additionally, we performed hot-wire measurements at selected points in the wake. We can thus observe the evolution of the wake flow along with its spectral content. We describe the mean and turbulent flow topology and evolution of the structures in the wake flow and discuss the origin of characteristic frequencies observed in the pressure signal at the launcher base. The influence of a propulsive jet on the evolution and topology of the wake flow is discussed in detail. The German Research Foundation DFG is gratefully acknowledged for funding this research within the SFB-TR40 ``Technological foundations for the design of thermally and mechanically highly loaded components of future space transportation systems.''

  18. Preliminary feasibility assessment for Earth-to-space electromagnetic (Railgun) launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. E.; Miller, L. A.; Earhart, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    An Earth to space electromagnetic (railgun) launcher (ESRL) for launching material into space was studied. Potential ESRL applications were identified and initially assessed to formulate preliminary system requirements. The potential applications included nuclear waste disposal in space, Earth orbital applications, deep space probe launchers, atmospheric research, and boost of chemical rockets. The ESRL system concept consisted of two separate railgun launcher tubes (one at 20 deg from the horizontal for Earth orbital missions, the other vertical for solar system escape disposal missions) powered by a common power plant. Each 2040 m launcher tube is surrounded by 10,200 homopolar generator/inductor units to transmit the power to the walls. Projectile masses are 6500 kg for Earth orbital missions and 2055 kg for nuclear waste disposal missions. For the Earth orbital missions, the projectile requires a propulsion system, leaving an estimated payload mass of 650 kg. For the nuclear waste disposal in space mission, the high level waste mass was estimated at 250 kg. This preliminary assessment included technical, environmental, and economic analyses.

  19. Status of next generation expendable launchers concepts within the FLPP program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letourneur, Yann; Leleu, Frederic; Pinard, Didier; Krueger, Joerg; Balduccini, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    In the framework of the preparation of the next generation of launchers to be developed in Europe, the European Space Agency (ESA) has contracted NGL Prime and its industrial team to conduct a first slice of launch system and stage design activities and programmatic analyses for two types of launchers: A new expendable mid-term launch system relying on elements or "Building Blocks" from Ariane and Vega to be operational by 2015. A new long-term launch system called the Next Generation Launcher (NGL) to be operational by 2020-2025. The design reference missions include a 5 metric tons performance requirement into a Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO), to meet the European institutional need, with the increased capability to 8 metric tons into GTO by the addition of solid boosters, to meet the commercial market needs. In a first step, a series of trade-offs were conducted to select the concepts that best fit the requirements of the NGL and "Building Block" launcher options, in terms of propulsion (thrust level, engine characteristics), propellant choice (hydrogen, methane or solid propellants), launcher architecture (with or without strap-on boosters, bi or three stages architecture). In a second step, more detailed analyses were carried out in term of thermo-mechanical design, functional architecture, as well as in term of versatility capacity, i.e. the capability of the launcher to perform different missions than the reference ones. Consistently with this technical activity, a programmatic evaluation was consolidated by the industrial team. This paper details the outcomes of the activity carried out during this second step targeting at selecting one or two concepts. The paper will also give an overview and first results of the follow-on contract in which selected NGL concepts are being further investigated, in the prospect of creating a new European launcher family encompassing versions dedicated to the institutional needs and the commercial market (reference

  20. Assessment of the Feasibility of Innovative Reusable Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, S.; Corpino, S.; Viola, N.

    The demand for getting access to space, in particular to Low Earth Orbit, is increasing and fully reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) are likely to play a key role in the development of future space activities. Up until now this kind of space systems has not been successfully carried out: in fact today only the Space Shuttle, which belongs to the old generation of launchers, is operative and furthermore it is not a fully reusable system. In the nineties many studies regarding advanced transatmospheric planes were started, but no one was accomplished because of the technological problems encountered and the high financial resources required with the corresponding industrial risk. One of the most promising project was the Lockheed Venture Star, which seemed to have serious chances to be carried out. Anyway, if this ever happens, it will take quite a long time thus the operative life of Space Shuttle will have to be extended for the International Space Station support. The purpose of the present work is to assess the feasibility of different kinds of advanced reusable launch vehicles to gain access to space and to meet the requirements of today space flight needs, which are mainly safety and affordability. Single stage to orbit (SSTO), two stage to orbit (TSTO) and the so called "one and a half" stage to orbit vehicles are here taken into account to highlight their advantages and disadvantages. The "one and a half" stage to orbit vehicle takes off and climbs to meet a tanker aircraft to be aerially refuelled and then, after disconnecting from the tanker, it flies to reach the orbit. In this case, apart from the space vehicle, also the tanker aircraft needs a dedicated study to examine the problems related to the refuelling at high subsonic speeds and at a height near the tropopause. Only winged vehicles which take off and land horizontally are considered but different architectural layouts and propulsive configurations are hypothesised. Unlike the Venture Star, which

  1. ITER ECH launcher options for start-up assist, bulk heating, and EC current drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.

    1994-03-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is proposed for providing plasma start-up, bulk heating, current drive, and other applications on the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. The requirements for ECH power launching systems for ITER have been investigated, and several possible configurations that have been devised are described in this report. The proposed launcher designs use oversized circular corrugated waveguides that make small penetrations through the blanket modules and radiate into the plasma. The criteria used for the design calls for minimum blanket penetration area, maximum reliability, and optimum launched beam quality. The effects of the harsh plasma edge environment on the launcher are discussed. Power generation systems, windows, and other components of the ECH systems are also investigated. The designs presented are believed to be capable of operating reliably and are relatively easy to maintain remotely.

  2. Appraisal of UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, I. I.

    1972-01-01

    A critical appraisal is made of the design, research, development, and operation of the novel UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes. Explosively driven (PbN6-lead azide, PETN-pentaerythritetetranitrate) implosions in detonating stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixtures have been successfully developed as drivers for hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes in a safe and reusable facility. Intense loadings at very high calculated pressures, densities, and temperatures, at the implosion center, cause severe problems with projectile integrity. Misalignment of the focal point can occur and add to the difficulty in using small caliber projectiles. In addition, the extreme driving conditions cause barrel expansion, erosion, and possible gas leakage from the base to the head of the projectile which cut the predicted muzzle velocities to half or a third of the lossless calculated values. However, in the case of a shock-tube operation these difficulties are minimized or eliminated and the possibilities of approaching Jovian reentry velocities are encouraging.

  3. Design and evaluation of coils for a 50 mm diameter induction coilgun launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Shokair, I.R.; Wavrik, R.W.; Dempsey, J.F.; Honey, W.E.; Shimp, K.J.; Douglas, G.M.

    1993-12-31

    Coilguns have the ability to provide magnetic pressure to projectiles which results in near constant acceleration. However, to achieve this performance and control projectile hearing, significant constraints are placed on the design of the coils. We are developing coils to produce an effective projectile base pressure of 100 MPa (1kbar) as a step toward reaching base pressures of 200 MPa. The design uses a scalable technology applicable to the entire range of breech to muzzle coils of a multi-stage launcher. This paper presents the design of capacitor-driven coils for launching nominal 50 mm, 350 gram projectiles. Design criteria, constraints, mechanical stress analysis, launcher performance, and test results are discussed.

  4. A Monte Carlo Analysis for Collision Risk Assessment on Vega Launcher Payloads and LARES Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindoni, G.; Ciufolini, I.; Battie, F.

    2016-03-01

    This work has been developed in the framework of the LARES mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The LARES satellite has been built to test, with high accuracy, the frame-dragging effect predicted by the theory of General Relativity, specifically the Lense-Thirring drag of its node. LARES was the main payload in the qualification flight of the European Space Agency launcher VEGA. A concern arose about the possibility of an impact between the eight secondary payloads among themselves, with LARES and with the last stage of the launcher (AVUM). An impact would have caused failure on the payloads and the production of debris in violation of the space debris mitigation measures established internationally. As an additional contribution, this study allowed the effect of the payload release on the final manoeuvers of the AVUM to be understood.

  5. Integrated fiber-coupled launcher for slow plasmon-polariton waves.

    PubMed

    Della Valle, Giuseppe; Longhi, Stefano

    2012-01-30

    We propose and numerically demonstrate an integrated fiber-coupled launcher for slow surface plasmon-polaritons. The device is based on a novel plasmonic mode-converter providing efficient power transfer from the fast to the slow modes of a metallic nanostripe. Total coupling efficiency with standard single-mode fiber approaching 30% (including ohmic losses) has been numerically predicted for a 25-µm long gold-based device operating at 1.55 µm telecom wavelength. PMID:22330553

  6. Nano-Launcher Technologies, Approaches, and Life Cycle Assessment. Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Assist in understanding NASA technology and investment approaches, and other driving factors, necessary for enabling dedicated nano-launchers by industry at a cost and flight rate that (1) could support and be supported by an emerging nano-satellite market and (2) would benefit NASAs needs. Develop life-cycle cost, performance and other NASA analysis tools or models required to understand issues, drivers and challenges.

  7. Quantity Distance for the Kennedy Space Center Vehicle Assembly Building for Solid Propellant Fueled Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stover, Steven; Diebler, Corey; Frazier, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The NASA KSC VAB was built to process Apollo launchers in the 1960's, and later adapted to process Space Shuttles. The VAB has served as a place to assemble solid rocket motors (5RM) and mate them to the vehicle's external fuel tank and Orbiter before rollout to the launch pad. As Space Shuttle is phased out, and new launchers are developed, the VAB may again be adapted to process these new launchers. Current launch vehicle designs call for continued and perhaps increased use of SRM segments; hence, the safe separation distances are in the process of being re-calculated. Cognizant NASA personnel and the solid rocket contractor have revisited the above VAB QD considerations and suggest that it may be revised to allow a greater number of motor segments within the VAB. This revision assumes that an inadvertent ignition of one SRM stack in its High Bay need not cause immediate and complete involvement of boosters that are part of a vehicle in adjacent High Bay. To support this assumption, NASA and contractor personnel proposed a strawman test approach for obtaining subscale data that may be used to develop phenomenological insight and to develop confidence in an analysis model for later use on full-scale situations. A team of subject matter experts in safety and siting of propellants and explosives were assembled to review the subscale test approach and provide options to NASA. Upon deliberations regarding the various options, the team arrived at some preliminary recommendations for NASA.

  8. Beam propagation and stray radiation in the ITER EC H&CD Upper Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platania, Paola; Bruschi, Alex; Farina, Daniela; Figini, Lorenzo; Goodman, Timothy; Krause, Alexandra; Henderson, Mark A.; Moro, Alessandro; Saibene, Gabriella; Toussaint, Matthieu; Sozzi, Carlo

    2015-03-01

    The four ITER Electron Cyclotron Upper Launchers (UL) are designed to control Magneto- Hydrodynamic instabilities with the deposition of Electron Cyclotron power. According to the present design, each launcher comprises two rows of four input waveguides, whose output beam is focused and driven towards the plasma by four sets of mirrors. In order to study the beam-launcher interaction throughout quasi-optical propagation, with particular attention to straylight behaviour, and to verify analytical calculations, a 3D model of the UL optical system has been implemented with the electromagnetic code GRASP® and the Physical Optics method. Detailed description of the components are introduced: pure hybrid mode HE11 from cylindrical waveguide as input beams, real shapes of the mirror contours, semi-analytical description of the ellipsoidal surfaces of focussing mirrors. A conceptual calculation scheme has been developed in order to take into account not only the direct contribution of the single source on its next scatterer but also the first order indirect effects: crosstalk from different lines of the same row and crosstalk from different rows have been evaluated after reflection on the first and third set of mirrors. The evaluations presented have been performed on the preliminary UL design, the last major milestone before finalization; however, the numerical model is suitable to be applied to future evolutions of the setup and/or other configurations.

  9. Design of off-midplane launcher (LH3) for Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hillairet, J.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Wallace, G. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2012-10-01

    Improving LHCD efficiency at density above 10^20m-3 is crucial for approaching AT regimes on Alcator C-Mod. In this density regime, an unexpected loss of LHCD efficency has been observed. Modeling and experiments suggest that such loss is intrinsic to the strong multipass absorption regime and can be overcome by improving the wave single pass absorption. For this purpose, an additional launcher (LH3) was designed. Besides doubling total injected LH power, LH3 will be located off-midplane and will enhance the waves single pass absorption by velocity space synergy with the existing launcher (LH2). The poloidal location and launched N// were selected based on a large parameter scan using a ray-tracing code. About 300kA of LH driven current was predicted at 1.4e20m-3 using 1.3MW of forward power. LH3 has a grill of 4x16 active waveguides and is based on a eight-way splitter design, which splits the microwave power into four ways in the poloidal direction and two ways in the toroidal direction. Coupling studies using commercial FEM software and the ALOHA code predict good coupling in a wide range of N// (from 2.2 to 2.7). Details of RF design and progress of launcher fabrication will be reported.

  10. New Designs, Materials and Processes for Interstage Structures of Future Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangas, C. B.; Diaz, V.

    2012-07-01

    Since the 1990’s EADS CASA Espacio has been leading the development of structures made out of advanced composite materials for the upper stage of Ariane 5: Inter Stage Structure (ISS), Vehicle Equipment Bay (VEB), different Payload Adaptor Systems, Satellite Dispensers and other structures. The next generation of launchers will demand an improvement on mechanical performances, reduction of mass and cost, and an optimization of the manufacturing processes. In the frame of the Future Launcher Preparatory Programme (FLPP) promoted by ESA, new designs, materials and processes are being studied and tested, in order to mature the most promising technologies and implement them in the future launchers. Specifically, in this programme these efforts are focused on different ISS structures. Taking as starting point the current ISS of Ariane 5 and IS3 of VEGA, new designs are suggested. Monocoque stiffened with omega stringers is the concept proposed for the ISS, while carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) - syntactic core sandwich is the one planned for IS3. This paper outlines the work performed in the programme: • Design and analysis of two Inter Stage Structures • Basic characterization tests for new materials: CFRP, syntactic core • Development tests at sample level for the different design solutions: different omega stringers, syncore sandwich • Manufacturing trials for the selected designs • Manufacturing of a sub-scaled demonstrator of the ISS

  11. Optimized use of superconducting magnetic energy storage for electromagnetic rail launcher powering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badel, Arnaud; Tixador, Pascal; Arniet, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic rail launchers (EMRLs) require very high currents, from hundreds of kA to several MA. They are usually powered by capacitors. The use of superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) in the supply chain of an EMRL is investigated, as an energy buffer and as direct powering source. Simulations of direct powering are conducted to quantify the benefits of this method in terms of required primary energy. In order to enhance further the benefits of SMES powering, a novel integration concept is proposed, the superconducting self-supplied electromagnetic launcher (S3EL). In the S3EL, the SMES is used as a power supply for the EMRL but its coil serves also as an additional source of magnetic flux density, in order to increase the thrust (or reduce the required current for a given thrust). Optimization principles for this new concept are presented. Simulations based on the characteristics of an existing launcher demonstrate that the required current could be reduced by a factor of seven. Realizing such devices with HTS cables should be possible in the near future, especially if the S3EL concept is used in combination with the XRAM principle, allowing current multiplication.

  12. High Velocity Linear Induction Launcher with Exit-Edge Compensation for Testing of Aerospace Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsov, Stephen; Marriott, Darin

    2008-01-01

    Advances in ultra high speed linear induction electromagnetic launchers over the past decade have focused on magnetic compensation of the exit and entry-edge transient flux wave to produce efficient and compact linear electric machinery. The paper discusses two approaches to edge compensation in long-stator induction catapults with typical end speeds of 150 to 1,500 m/s. In classical linear induction machines, the exit-edge effect is manifest as two auxiliary traveling waves that produce a magnetic drag on the projectile and a loss of magnetic flux over the main surface of the machine. In the new design for the Stator Compensated Induction Machine (SCIM) high velocity launcher, the exit-edge effect is nulled by a dual wavelength machine or alternately the airgap flux is peaked at a location prior to the exit edge. A four (4) stage LIM catapult is presently being constructed for 180 m/s end speed operation using double-sided longitudinal flux machines. Advanced exit and entry edge compensation is being used to maximize system efficiency, and minimize stray heating of the reaction armature. Each stage will output approximately 60 kN of force and produce over 500 G s of acceleration on the armature. The advantage of this design is there is no ablation to the projectile and no sliding contacts, allowing repeated firing of the launcher without maintenance of any sort. The paper shows results of a parametric study for 500 m/s and 1,500 m/s linear induction launchers incorporating two of the latest compensation techniques for an air-core stator primary and an iron-core primary winding. Typical thrust densities for these machines are in the range of 150 kN/sq.m. to 225 kN/sq.m. and these compete favorably with permanent magnet linear synchronous machines. The operational advantages of the high speed SCIM launcher are shown by eliminating the need for pole-angle position sensors as would be required by synchronous systems. The stator power factor is also improved.

  13. Wear of hard materials by hard particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2003-10-01

    Hard materials, such as WC-Co, boron carbide, titanium diboride and composite carbide made up of Mo2C and WC, have been tested in abrasion and erosion conditions. These hard materials showed negligible wear in abrasion against SiC particles and erosion using Al2O3 particles. The WC-Co materials have the highest wear rate of these hard materials and a very different material removal mechanism. Wear mechanisms for these materials were different for each material with the overall wear rate controlled by binder composition and content and material grain size.

  14. Turbojet-type engines for the airbreathing propulsion of reusable winged launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duparcq, J. L.; Hermant, E.; Scherrer, D.

    Combined propulsion systems for hypersonic application have become new challenges for industrial and research organizations. In France, SNECMA and SEP, which have just joined together for a common effort on hypersonics within Hyperspace, and ONERA have been involved, under CNES (French space agency) contracts, in the assessment of new propulsion concepts for reusable winged launchers (SSTO or TSTO). As potential solutions for the airbreathing propulsion, some turbojet-type engines are presented: —the twin spool turbojet or turbofan with reheat —the turbojet with reheat —the twin-duct turbojet ramjet —the precooled turbojet with reheat. All these engines have been sized for a flight Mach number under seven with a cryogenic fuel (liquid hydrogen). Mainly due to total temperature and pressure encountered along the trajectory, the systems will have to withstand severe physical constraints. Coupled with performance and size requirements, like specific thrust and maximum air capture area, these operating conditions have been taken into account in order to select each engine cycle and technical arrangement. Performance and mass criteria make it possible to compare these systems and to emphasize their distinctive features among the propulsion concepts envisioned for the future reusable winged launchers (including airbreathing combined engines under study in France). The first step of the final selection, leading to the best adaptation between the engine and the vehicle, will then be tackled. This will be particularly enhanced by the analysis of potential advantages or technical difficulties, like thrust-to-weight ratio or needs of variable geometry and heat exchangers. The twin-duct turbojet ramjet, for example, is probably one of the best candidates for the first stages of propulsion of a reusable winged launcher.

  15. Development of a CFRP Engine Thrust Frame for the Next Generation Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatemi, Javad; van der Bas, Finn; Cruijssen, Henk

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the activities related to the development of technologies for a composite Engine Thrust Frame (ETF) for the next generation launchers. In particular, the design and analyses of a full Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) engine thrust frame are presented in more detail. The ETF concept is composed of three main parts, i.e. an aluminium top-ring which connects the ETF to the upper-stage tank, a CFRP cone, and a CFRP cone-cap which connects the Vinci engine to the ETF. The main challenging requirements for development of a CFRP ETF are recalled. The ETF concept and its mechanical performances are assessed.

  16. Coaxial electromagnetic launcher calculations using FE-BE method and hybrid potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. H.; Becker, E. B.; Driga, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, a hybrid method combining finite and boundary elements (the FE-BE method) is presented to analyze the transient electromagnetic/mechanical behavior of coaxial induction launchers (i.e., the coilgun). The corresponding initial/boundary value problem is formulated in terms of the hybrid potentials, which mixes the vector and scalar magnetic potential functions. The problem is assumed to be axisymmetric and the forcing currents are circumferential. Thermal effect due to ohmic losses is considered during the launching processes.

  17. Large Debris Dragging and De-Orbiting by the VEGA Launcher Using a Tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Christophe; Federico, Martina; Gallucci, Stefano

    2013-08-01

    Thanks to limited adaptations - additional propellant tanks, addition of a small probe, few SW and Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) modifications - the launcher VEGA can be shown to be suited in terms of performances, safety and costs to a de-orbiting mission. Such a mission consists of three main phases: rendezvous, capture and de-orbiting. Focused on the last phase, this work presents the adaptation of GNC algorithms to realize the de-orbiting of a debris dragged by VEGA by means of a tether.

  18. Ordering of hard particles between hard walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowska, A.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Ehrentraut, H.; Cleaver, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    The structure of a fluid of hard Gaussian overlap particles of elongation κ = 5, confined between two hard walls, has been calculated from density-functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. By using the exact expression for the excluded volume kernel (Velasco E and Mederos L 1998 J. Chem. Phys. 109 2361) and solving the appropriate Euler-Lagrange equation entirely numerically, we have been able to extend our theoretical predictions into the nematic phase, which had up till now remained relatively unexplored due to the high computational cost. Simulation reveals a rich adsorption behaviour with increasing bulk density, which is described semi-quantitatively by the theory without any adjustable parameters.

  19. Measurements of ECH absorption on ATF using a polarization-controlled beam launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; Schaich, C.R.; White, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) experiment at ORNL for plasma formation and heating. A 53.2 GHz gyrotron generates 200 kW cw which is transported to ATF in 6.35 cm evacuated waveguide. Power is launched into ATF using a recently completed polarization controlled beam launcher which can launch a linear polarized beam with a /minus/20 dB diameter of 12 cm at the plasma center. The launcher consists of a Vlasov mode converting antenna, a Teflon-copper laminate polarization rotating grating, and a spherical focusing mirror. The plane of polarization can be remotely adjusted by rotating the grating with a motorized vacuum feedthrough. First pass plasma absorption is monitored in two planes of polarization using a dual-polarized detector looking through a dome shaped scattering cut-off screen. During plasma operation, the detected signals indicate that absorption under ideal conditions is nearly complete. With low density or a shifted resonance zone, absorption is small and there are cases where there is mode coupling to the perpendicular polarization. This is presumably due to shear in the ATF magnetic field. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Analysis of LH Launcher Arrays (Like the ITER One) Using the TOPLHA Code

    SciTech Connect

    Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Vecchi, G.

    2009-11-26

    TOPLHA (Torino Polytechnic Lower Hybrid Antenna) code is an innovative tool for the 3D/1D simulation of Lower Hybrid (LH) antennas, i.e. accounting for realistic 3D waveguides geometry and for accurate 1D plasma models, and without restrictions on waveguide shape, including curvature. This tool provides a detailed performances prediction of any LH launcher, by computing the antenna scattering parameters, the current distribution, electric field maps and power spectra for any user-specified waveguide excitation. In addition, a fully parallelized and multi-cavity version of TOPLHA permits the analysis of large and complex waveguide arrays in a reasonable simulation time. A detailed analysis of the performances of the proposed ITER LH antenna geometry has been carried out, underlining the strong dependence of the antenna input parameters with respect to plasma conditions. A preliminary optimization of the antenna dimensions has also been accomplished. Electric current distribution on conductors, electric field distribution at the interface with plasma, and power spectra have been calculated as well. The analysis shows the strong capabilities of the TOPLHA code as a predictive tool and its usefulness to LH launcher arrays detailed design.

  1. Characterisation of SOL density fluctuations in front of the LHCD PAM launcher in Tore

    SciTech Connect

    Oosako, T.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Achard, J.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.

    2011-12-23

    The density fluctuations, modified by Lower Hybrid Wave (LHW), is analyzed in Tore Supra with reference to the injected LHW power, density and the gap between LCFS (Last Closed Flux Surface) and the PAM (passive-active-multijunction) launcher. The density fluctuations are measured with RF probes installed at the PAM launcher front. A density scan at nominal toroidal field (3.8 T) shows that the fluctuations rate stays nearly constant ({approx}50%) for <3.5x10{sup 19}m{sup -3} and with LHW power up to 2MW. However, when increasing the density above <{approx}4.2x10{sup 19}m{sup -3}, using strong gas puffing, the fluctuation rate increases to >70% and is characterized by strong negative spikes, with typical frequency >100kHz. These are most likely originating from acceleration of electrons in the LHW near field due to parasitic absorption, as evidenced on the IR images, showing hot spots on the side limiters.

  2. Down-Bore Two-Laser Heterodyne Velocimetry of an Implosion-Driven Hypervelocity Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Myles; Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew J.

    2015-06-01

    The implosion-driven launcher uses explosives to shock-compress helium, driving well-characterized projectiles to velocities exceeding 10 km/s. The masses of projectiles range between 0.1 - 10 g, and the design shows excellent scalability, reaching similar velocities across different projectile sizes. In the past, velocity measurements have been limited to muzzle velocity obtained via a high-speed videography upon the projectile exiting the launch tube. Recently, Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) has demonstrated the ability to continuously measure in-bore velocity, even in the presence of significant blow-by of high temperature helium propellant past the projectile. While a single-laser PDV is limited to approximately 8 km/s, a two-laser PDV system is developed that uses two lasers operating near 1550 nm to provide velocity measurement capabilities up to 16 km/s. The two laser PDV system is used to obtain a continuous velocity history of the projectile throughout the entire launch cycle. These continuous velocity data are used to validate models of the launcher cycle and compare different advanced concepts aimed at increasing the projectile velocity to well beyond 10 km/s.

  3. SAMP App Launcher: An On-Demand VO Application Starter by JMMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafrasse, S.; Bourges, L.; Mella, G.

    2012-09-01

    SAMP is the dedicated Virtual Observatory protocol to ensure data exchange between compatible astronomical software running on personal computers. However, one SAMP weakness lies in its requirement to have interoperable applications already running in order to gracefully ensure communication between them. To circumvent this requirement, we present a dedicated application, plus some new SAMP specifications, focused on Java™ software available through the Java Web Start application-deployment technology (JNLP) at this stage. JMMC AppLauncher software fakes any described application by registering stub clients on the central SAMP hub. When one of the fake clients is solicited by any third-party software, AppLauncher takes the responsibility to start the true application, and then forwards the waiting SAMP message once fully started. To achieve this, we propose a set of new SAMP key-value pair to hold JNLP URLs. In the future, other kind of software packages technology could also be supported. We also want to standardize this solution, and get one central registry-like interoperable repository of compatible software, in order to open our mechanism to any third-party SAMP application provider. To illustrate, we briefly present our own use case, which demonstrates the need of such a tool for the JMMC applications suite.

  4. Millimeter wave experiment of ITER equatorial EC launcher mock-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Isozaki, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Omori, T.; Henderson, M.

    2014-02-01

    The full-scale mock-up of the equatorial launcher was fabricated in basis of the baseline design to investigate the mm-wave propagation properties of the launcher, the manufacturability, the cooling line management, how to assemble the components and so on. The mock-up consists of one of three mm-wave transmission sets and one of eight waveguide lines can deliver the mm-wave power. The mock-up was connected to the ITER compatible transmission line and the 170GHz gyrotron and the high power experiment was carried out. The measured radiation pattern of the beam at the location of 2.5m away from the EL mock-up shows the successful steering capability of 20°˜40°. It was also revealed that the radiated profile at both steering and fixed focusing mirror agreed with the calculation. The result also suggests that some unwanted modes are included in the radiated beam. Transmission of 0.5MW-0.4sec and of 0.12MW-50sec were also demonstrated.

  5. Fabrication issues and technology development for HELEOS (Hypervelocity Electromagnetic Launcher for Equation of State)

    SciTech Connect

    Susoeff, A.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Balk, J.K.; Hall, C.A.; McDonald, M.J.

    1988-02-01

    Starfire is a joint railgun project of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque. The goal of Starfire is to develop a Hypervelocity Electromagnetic Launcher for Equation of State (HELEOS) experiments. A two-stage light-gas gun is used as pre-injector. Each round-bore HELEOS railgun module is 12.7 mm in diameter and 2.4 m long. The muzzle end of the railgun is connected to a vacuum tank. Common materials and fabrication technology are used in the manufacture of all components,a nd modular design allows for extending the length of the railgun as progress dictates. The launcher uses a ''vee block'' geometry, which is designed to: provide compressive preload; operate with a 300-MPa (3-kbar) internal bore pressure; and easily accommodate interchangeable materials in the bore support structure and rail. We have performed full-scale material testing of the railgun and have developed a precision round-bore fabrication process. Air-gage inspection is used to determine bore diameter and straightness. We have also developed a surface mapping system to document the surface topography of the bore before and after an experiment. This paper presents fabrication details, results of tests conducted, and areas for potential improvement. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. A New Concept of Launchers for Lower Hybrid Waves in Tokamaks: Quasi-Optical Grills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preinhaelter, Josef; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    1996-11-01

    There is an urgent need to develop highly simplified rf launchers in the 4-10 GHz range for future large tokamaks operating with 5T fields. The quasi-optical launcher (QOG) for LH waves offers one possible solution. A short survey of existing theories of such structures is given along with their limitations. We propose a new QOG structure that is mounted in a hyperguide in which the rods are situated in an oversized waveguide and irradiated obliquely by a wave emerging (in the form of a higher mode) from an auxiliary oversized waveguide. To illustrate our theory, numerical results are presented for several large structures tentatively proposed for the TORE-SUPRA tokamak. A 16-rod structure, operating at 3.7 GHz, can be used as a proof-of-principle QOG for LHCD in large tokamaks. We find that it is easy to design the transmission line exciting the LSE_14 mode in the auxiliary hyperguide at 99% efficiency. This simple one-row structure has good coupling (R_tot < 9%) and acceptable directivity (delta = 46%). We also comment on the original QOG design for TORE-SUPRA at 8 GHz. It is shown how an alternate QOG design would lead to good results for either a 1- or 2-row structure of 31 rods. // work supported by US-Czech Grant, Czech Academy & DoE

  7. Millimeter wave experiment of ITER equatorial EC launcher mock-up

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Oda, Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Isozaki, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Omori, T.; Henderson, M.

    2014-02-12

    The full-scale mock-up of the equatorial launcher was fabricated in basis of the baseline design to investigate the mm-wave propagation properties of the launcher, the manufacturability, the cooling line management, how to assemble the components and so on. The mock-up consists of one of three mm-wave transmission sets and one of eight waveguide lines can deliver the mm-wave power. The mock-up was connected to the ITER compatible transmission line and the 170GHz gyrotron and the high power experiment was carried out. The measured radiation pattern of the beam at the location of 2.5m away from the EL mock-up shows the successful steering capability of 20°∼40°. It was also revealed that the radiated profile at both steering and fixed focusing mirror agreed with the calculation. The result also suggests that some unwanted modes are included in the radiated beam. Transmission of 0.5MW-0.4sec and of 0.12MW-50sec were also demonstrated.

  8. Feasibility of an earth-to-space rail launcher system. [emphasizing nuclear waste disposal application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. E.; Miller, L. A.; Marshall, R. A.; Kerslake, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of earth-to-space electromagnetic (railgun) launchers (ESRL) is considered, in order to determine their technical practicality and economic viability. The potential applications of the launcher include nuclear waste disposal into space, deep space probe launches, and atmospheric research. Examples of performance requirements of the ESRL system are a maximum acceleration of 10,000 g's for nuclear waste disposal in space (NWDS) missions and 2,500 g's for earth orbital missions, a 20 km/sec launch velocity for NWDS missions, and a launch azimuth of 90 degrees E. A brief configuration description is given, and test results indicate that for the 2020-2050 time period, as much as 3.0 MT per day of bulk material could be launched, and about 0.5 MT per day of high-level nuclear waste could be launched. For earth orbital missions, a significant projectile mass was approximately 6.5 MT, and an integral distributed energy store launch system demonstrated a good potential performance. ESRL prove to be economically and environmentally feasible, but an operational ESRL of the proposed size is not considered achievable before the year 2020.

  9. SHARP, a first step towards a full sized Jules Verne Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, L.R.; Hunter, J.W.; Powell, J.R.; Tidman, D.A.

    1993-05-01

    A vital element for space exploration and utilization is the ability to affordably place large quantities of consumables and building material into low earth orbit. Calculations and supportive data indicate this can be done with a large hydrogen gas gun referred to as the Jules Verne Launcher (JVL). We present a design for the JVL based upon the concept of side injecting preheated hydrogen along a long barrel. This dramatically reduces the peak pressures in the launcher as well as the pressures and g-loads at the vehicle. The JVL has the promise of reducing payload delivery costs to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to below $500/kg. The Super High Altitude Research Project (SHARP) is a conventional two-stage hydrogen gas gun which is configured to launch 5 kg packages on suborbital trajectories. It is the first step towards the much larger Jules Verne system and will demonstrate several important features of the larger system. SHARP is currently in the middle of a series of tests aimed at its first milestone. This is to launch 5 kg at 4 km/sec horizontally. In its inclined configuration SHARP should launch vehicles to apogees in excess of 400 km and ranges in excess of 700 km.

  10. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  11. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  12. The hard metal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cugell, D W

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure. PMID:1511554

  13. High temperature properties of alloys being considered for design of a concentric canister launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, M E; Lowry, R W; Rosen, R S

    1998-06-01

    This report describes a study to determine the high temperature mechanical properties of several titanium alloys and to compare them with properties of AISI 316L stainless steel and ASTM A 387 structural steel. The steel materials are less costly to procure but exhibit good resistance to corrosion in seawater environments. Six titanium alloys were evaluated as candidate materials for use in a c Concentric Canister Launcher (CCL). Each titanium alloy was tested at three temperatures (68°, 2000°F, and 2400°F). Strain-rate changes tests were used to determine the strain rate sensitivity of the alloys at each test temperature. Optical metallography was performed on two of the alloys to determine the relationship between test temperature and microstructure (presence of second phase precipitates, grain size). Complete test results are includes, a long with figures and tables of test data.

  14. Specifications and implementation of the RT MHD control system for the EC launcher of FTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galperti, C.; Alessi, E.; Boncagni, L.; Bruschi, A.; Granucci, G.; Grosso, A.; Iannone, F.; Marchetto, C.; Nowak, S.; Panella, M.; Sozzi, C.; Tilia, B.

    2012-09-01

    To perform real time plasma control experiments using EC heating waves by using the new fast launcher installed on FTU a dedicated data acquisition and elaboration system has been designed recently. A prototypical version of the acquisition/control system has been recently developed and will be tested on FTU machine in its next experimental campaign. The open-source framework MARTe (Multi-threaded Application Real-Time executor) on Linux/RTAI real-time operating system has been chosen as software platform to realize the control system. Standard open-architecture industrial PCs, based either on VME bus and CompactPCI bus equipped with standard input/output cards are the chosen hardware platform.

  15. Preliminary studies on the feasibility of a new concept for a Moon-to-Earth launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migli, A.

    A new concept for a Moon launcher is presented. This launcher uses the working principles of a centrifugal sling, i.e. it is composed of a central pivotal element, a wire for launching the payload and a wire for a counterweight. Like the idea of a mass driver, which uses maglev technology, it is electrically powered; unlike the mass driver, which exploits linear acceleration for furnishing the escape speed needed, the payload gains velocity while payload wire and counterweight wire simultaneously deploy from the central pivotal element as its rotating speed increases. When exact speed and payload position are reached, a detachment system releases the payload. Wire length has been calculated to be in the order of 2 km; simple calcules on quasi-static conditions, that is with wire fully deployed and rotating at launching speed, indicate that a material like Kevlar 49 fibers for the wire would be able to sustain the centrifugal forces, and its mass would be around 100 kg. Given the wire length, launches can occur only tangentially to the ground. The payload nature would be lunar rock, preferably iron-rich volcanic glass, which seems to be easiest to be reduced and from which oxygen could be easily derived. Its mass, around 20 kg. A robot collector on the Moon's surface would be needed to search and select adequate payload and deliver it to the launcher. Target of the launch would be the Lagrange point L1, located between the Earth and the Moon. There, a catcher satellite would be needed to catch the payload and bring it to Earth orbit, where useful materials can be extracted from the lunar rock. My studies have mostly focused on space mechanics of the launch and demonstrated that an error of 10 milliseconds on the payload release time, or an error of 1 m/s on the evaluation of its speed, produce an error of about 60 km from target location. An optic control from the pivotal element can easily control this magnitude of errors. Absolute speed difference between the L1

  16. Ariane 3 European launcher strap-on booster development, qualification and flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, M.; Vari, E.

    1985-07-01

    Ariane 3 is an improved version of the European Ariane launcher System obtained by adding two solid propellant Strap-on boosters. This modification increases the payload from 2175 Kg placed into geostationary transfer orbit. The Strap-on booster, loaded with 7,3 metric tons of solid propellant each and providing a maximum thrust of 730 KN, has been developed and qualified at SNIA BPD, Defence and Space Division, Colleferro, Italy. The program started in late 1979 and the first flight of the new Ariane 3 version took place successfully on 4 August 1984. This paper presents the configuration of the motor and describes the main steps of the design, development and qualification program. The first flight data are then compared with the qualification data.

  17. Inverse synthetic aperture radar imagery of a man with a rocket propelled grenade launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Chi N.; Innocenti, Roberto; Kirose, Getachew; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Smith, Gregory

    2004-08-01

    As the Army moves toward more lightly armored Future Combat System (FCS) vehicles, enemy personnel will present an increasing threat to U.S. soldiers. In particular, they face a very real threat from adversaries using shoulder-launched, rocket propelled grenade (RPG). The Army Research Laboratory has utilized its Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) turntable facility to collect very high resolution, fully polarimetric Ka band radar data at low depression angles of a man holding an RPG. In this paper, we examine the resulting low resolution and high resolution range profiles; and based on the observed radar cross section (RCS) value, we attempt to determine the utility of Ka band radar for detecting enemy personnel carrying RPG launchers.

  18. On the criteria guiding the design of the upper electron-cyclotron launcher for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, E.; Angioni, C.; Casson, F. J.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Goodman, T. P.; Maj, O.; Sauter, O.; Weber, H.; Zohm, H.; Saibene, G.; Henderson, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Electron cyclotron waves injected from an antenna located in the upper part of the vessel will be employed in ITER to controlMHD instabilities, particularly neoclassical tearingmodes (NTMs). The derivation of the NTM stabilization criteria used up to now to guide the optimization of the launcher is reviewed in this paper and their range of validity elucidated. Possible effects leading to a deterioration of the predicted performance through a broadening of the EC deposition profile are discussed. The most detrimental effect will likely be the scattering of the EC beams from density fluctuations, resulting in a beam broadening in the 100% range. The combined impact of these effects with that of beam misalignment (with respect to the targeted surface) is discussed for a time slice of the standard Q = 10 H-mode scenario.

  19. Beam masking to reduce cyclic error in beam launcher of interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Lawrence L. (Inventor); Bell, Raymond Mark (Inventor); Dutta, Kalyan (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed to reducing cyclic error in the beam launcher of an interferometer. In one embodiment, an interferometry apparatus comprises a reference beam directed along a reference path, and a measurement beam spatially separated from the reference beam and being directed along a measurement path contacting a measurement object. The reference beam and the measurement beam have a single frequency. At least a portion of the reference beam and at least a portion of the measurement beam overlapping along a common path. One or more masks are disposed in the common path or in the reference path and the measurement path to spatially isolate the reference beam and the measurement beam from one another.

  20. Prototype development of a battery power supply at the electromagnetic launcher research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornette, James B.; Thurmond, Leo E.

    1989-01-01

    Electromagnetic launcher (EML) research at Elgin Air Force Base has progressed beyond available power source levels. Therefore, an inexpensive, high-power, high-energy battery system is under construction to fulfill present and future requirements. Data on the subscale battery power supply (BPS) system are examined. Decisions made on the design and operation of pneumatic switches, batteries, and contactors as a result of this testing program are described. Discharges to date have proved that the gang concept of operation is successful at current levels significantly higher than the standard operational level of 50 kA to 60 kA expected in the full BPS system. The electrical integrity of the prototype system has also been proved at energy levels of approximately 45 MJ, which is 15 to 20 MJ greater than energy levels that will be exhibited at the gang level in the final system.

  1. A deconvolution technique for B-dot signals from a plasma-driven electromagnetic launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, Brigitte U.

    1989-06-01

    A novel technique is being developed to quantify the current distribution in the plasma armature of an electromagnetic launcher (EML). The technique relies on data from B-dot probes inserted above the barrel of an EML. The current distribution is found by taking the fast Fourier transform of the integral of the B-dot signal and deconvolving it with a geometry-dependent weight function. The result allows calculation of the total plasma length and total current magnitude. The author describes the signal-analysis technique, discusses results obtained from theoretical B-dot signals, and suggests possible sources of error which may be encountered when deconvolving experimental B-dot signals.

  2. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  3. ESC-B: The Cryogenic Upper Stage for Europe's Heavy Lift Launcher Ariane 5ECB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhls, A.

    2002-01-01

    -A. Juhls, Astrium GmbH -M. Lepelletier, Snecma Moteurs -JM. Bahu, CNES -C. Poincheval, CNES. In the year 1998 the European ministerial council decided to initiate the Ariane 5 Plus programme in order to upgrade the European heavy lift launcher Ariane 5. The market was changing more rapidly than predicted showing steadily growing satellite mass and the demand for flexible missions while strong competitors were intensifying their preparations to enter the commercial business. The answer was to improve the Ariane 5 launcher by modifying the cryogenic first (or lower ?) stage and the solid boosters and by introducing two cryogenic upper stages in two steps: In order to cope with the short term need of a significant growth of GTO lift capacity up to 10 t the first denoted ESC-A shall enter commercial service in 2002. Four years later a more powerful second version shall take over enabling a GTO performance of 12 t and providing versatile mission capability. The paper will focus on this new cryogenic upper stage denoted ESC-B giving first a general description of main characteristics and constituents. The article will highlight different challenging aspects of the ESC-B development: Ambitious economical conditions regarding both limited development budgets and the strong need to reduce production cost require improved working methods and an adjustment of the conventional development logic, in particular regarding new verification methods. Furthermore Europe is now facing the complex combination of versatile mission capability together with a powerful cryogenic upper stage. The paper will present the approach to define reasonable mission scenarios in order to cover customer demands while avoiding too stringent system requirements. Along with VINCI, Europe's first expander cycle type engine featuring an extendable nozzle dedicated subsystems will be described which allow 4 re-ignitions and 6 hours of ballistic flight. The paper concludes with the summary of the

  4. Mobile Learning Using Mobile Phones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vicente, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The participation in mobile learning programs is conditioned by having/using mobile communication technology. Those who do not have or use such technology cannot participate in mobile learning programs. This study evaluates who are the most likely participants of mobile learning programs by examining the demographic profile and mobile phone usage…

  5. Spacecraft configuration study for second generation mobile satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louie, M.; Vonstentzsch, W.; Zanella, F.; Hayes, R.; Mcgovern, F.; Tyner, R.

    1985-01-01

    A high power, high performance communicatons satellite bus being developed is designed to satisfy a broad range of multimission payload requirements in a cost effective manner and is compatible with both STS and expendable launchers. Results are presented of tradeoff studies conducted to optimize the second generation mobile satellite system for its mass, power, and physical size. Investigations of the 20-meter antenna configuration, transponder linearization techniques, needed spacecraft modifications, and spacecraft power, dissipation, mass, and physical size indicate that the advanced spacecraft bus is capable of supporting the required payload for the satellite.

  6. How 'hard' are hard-rock deformations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, A. J.

    2003-04-01

    The study of soft-rock deformations has received increasing attention during the past two decades, and much progress has been made in the understanding of their genesis. It is also recognized now that soft-rock deformations—which show a wide variety in size and shape—occur frequently in sediments deposited in almost all types of environments. In spite of this, deformations occurring in lithified rocks are still relatively rarely attributed to sedimentary or early-diagenetic processes. Particularly faults in hard rocks are still commonly ascribed to tectonics, commonly without a discussion about a possible non-tectonic origin at a stage that the sediments were still unlithified. Misinterpretations of both the sedimentary and the structural history of hard-rock successions may result from the negligence of a possible soft-sediment origin of specific deformations. It is therefore suggested that a re-evaluation of these histories, keeping the present-day knowledge about soft-sediment deformations in mind, may give new insights into the geological history of numerous sedimentary successions in which the deformations have not been studied from both a sedimentological and a structural point of view.

  7. Hard tissue laser procedures.

    PubMed

    Gimbel, C B

    2000-10-01

    A more conservative, less invasive treatment of the carious lesion has intrigued researchers and clinicians for decades. With over 170 million restorations placed worldwide each year, many of which could be treated using a laser, there exists an increasing need for understanding hard tissue laser procedures. An historical review of past scientific and clinical hard research, biophysics, and histology are discussed. A complete review of present applications and procedures along with their capabilities and limitations will give the clinician a better understanding. Clinical case studies, along with guidelines for tooth preparation and hard tissue laser applications and technological advances for diagnosis and treatment will give the clinician a look into the future. PMID:11048281

  8. Passive Active Multi-Junction 3, 7 GHZ launcher for Tore-Supra Long Pulse Experiments. Manufacturing Process and Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Guilhem, D.; Achard, J.; Bertrand, B.; Bej, Z.; Bibet, Ph.; Brun, C.; Chantant, M.; Delmas, E.; Delpech, L.; Doceul, Y.; Ekedahl, A.; Goletto, C.; Goniche, M.; Hatchressian, J. C.; Hillairet, J.; Houry, M.; Joubert, P.; Lipa, M.; Madeleine, S.; Martinez, A.

    2009-11-26

    The design and the fabrication of a new Lower Hybrid (LH) actively cooled antenna based on the passive active concept is a part of the CIMES project (Components for the Injection of Mater and Energy in Steady-state). The major objectives of Tore-Supra program is to achieve 1000 s pulses with this LH launcher, by coupling routinely >3 MW of LH wave at 3.7 GHz to the plasma with a parallel index n{sub ||} = 1.7 {sup {+-}}{sup 0.2}. The launcher is on its way to achieve its validation tests--low power Radio Frequency (RF) measurements, vacuum and hydraulic leak tests--and will be installed and commissioned on plasma during the fall of 2009.

  9. Analysis of near-surface flow physics in a two-stage, 10 km/s, electromagnetic launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Alfred C.; Hawke, Ronald S.

    1990-06-01

    An analysis was made of several apparently influential physical processes observed in current electromagnetic launcher performance experiments. Boundary layer and thin-film Couette flow processes in the hypervelocity range (approaching 10 km/s) are the focus of this work. The specific launch device under study has a two stage acceleration: initially a light gas projectile injection phase followed by a plasma driven Lorentz force acceleration phase. The emphasis is on understanding the concomitant influence of plasma transport, gas phase and gas/solid kinetics, skin depth, solid neutral and ionic particle seed additives on near-wall boundary layer and Couette flow processes. Studies are initiated on the effects of plasma-enriching ion additives and wall transpiration cooling with respect to increasing the integrity, performance, and launch-to-launch endurance of this type of electromagnetic launcher (EML).

  10. Analysis of near-surface flow physics in a two-stage, 10 km/s, electromagnetic launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Hawke, R.S.

    1990-06-06

    This is a report of progress in the analysis of several apparently influential physical processes observed in current electromagnetic launcher performance experiments. Boundary layer and thin-film Couette flow processes in the hypervelocity range (approaching 10 km/s) are the focus of this work. The specific launch device under study has a two-stage acceleration: initially a light gas projectile injection phase followed by a plasma driven Lorentz force acceleration phase. Our emphasis is on understanding the concomitant influence of plasma transport, gas phase and gas/solid kinetics, skin depth, solid neutral and ionic particle seed additives on near-wall boundary layer and Couette flow processes. Studies are initiated on the effects of plasma-enriching ion additives and wall transpiration cooling with respect to increasing the integrity, performance, and launch-to-launch endurance of this type of electromagnetic launcher (EML). 14 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C. C. Isler, R. C.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B.; Green, D. L.; Harris, J. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Martin, E. H.; Colas, L.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Panayotis, S.; Pegourié, B.; Jacquot, J.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.; Shannon, S. C.

    2014-11-15

    An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (>∼1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher.

  12. Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields (invited).

    PubMed

    Klepper, C C; Martin, E H; Isler, R C; Colas, L; Goniche, M; Hillairet, J; Panayotis, S; Pegourié, B; Jacquot, J; Lotte, Ph; Colledani, G; Biewer, T M; Caughman, J B; Ekedahl, A; Green, D L; Harris, J H; Hillis, D L; Shannon, S C; Litaudon, X

    2014-11-01

    An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (>∼1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher. PMID:25430306

  13. Probing the plasma near high power wave launchers in fusion devices for static and dynamic electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Klepper, C Christopher; Martin, Elijah H; Isler, Ralph C; Colas, L.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Panayotis, Stephanie; Jacquot, Jonathan; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Biewer, Theodore M; Caughman, J. B. O.; Ekedahl, A.; Green, David L; Harris, Jeffrey H; Hillis, Donald Lee; Shannon, Prof. Steven; Litaudon, X

    2014-01-01

    An exploratory study was carried out in the long-pulse tokamak Tore Supra, to determine if electric fields in the plasma around high-power, RF wave launchers could be measured with non-intrusive, passive, optical emission spectroscopy. The focus was in particular on the use of the external electric field Stark effect. The feasibility was found to be strongly dependent on the spatial extent of the electric fields and overlap between regions of strong (> 1 kV/cm) electric fields and regions of plasma particle recycling and plasma-induced, spectral line emission. Most amenable to the measurement was the RF electric field in edge plasma, in front of a lower hybrid heating and current drive launcher. Electric field strengths and direction, derived from fitting the acquired spectra to a model including time-dependent Stark effect and the tokamak-range magnetic field Zeeman-effect, were found to be in good agreement with full-wave modeling of the observed launcher.

  14. Aerothermal and flight mechanic considerations by development of small launchers for low orbit payloads started from lorentz rail accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Božić, O.; Eggers, T.; Wiggen, S.

    2011-10-01

    The injection of small payloads in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by means of propelled launchers starting from a Lorentz Rail Accelerator (LRA) is a concept that may enable the access to space at extremely low cost. A propelled launcher is required since today a LRA is only able to launch a total mass of a few kilograms with a velocity up to 4.4 km/s but LEOpayloads require approximately 10 km/s at higher launch mass. Velocity difference must be assured with another propulsion system. Furthermore and independent of the type of selected propulsion, such solution has serious consequences on launcher design. Reasons are, e.g., the harsh mechanical loads like high acceleration on the LRA ramp, high deceleration due to pressure drag, unsteady phenomena during the transition from the LRA ramp into the free atmosphere and also due to extreme thermal loads in the first 30 s of flight. The study presents a conceptual design of a nominal payload of 3 kg, including dimensions, mass- and velocitybudget estimations. In the focus of the analysis are several concepts for the thermal protection of critical system like the nose cap, the front part of the fuselage which houses a hybrid kick-off engine, flares, and the attitude control engines. Additionally, the potential of plug nozzles in comparison to classical Laval nozzles as well as trajectory calculations are discussed. They underline that an elliptical orbit between 300 and 400 km is possible.

  15. Recruiting Hard-to-Reach Subjects for Exercise Interventions: A Multi-Centre and Multi-Stage Approach Targeting General Practitioners and Their Community-Dwelling and Mobility-Limited Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brach, Michael; Moschny, Anna; Bücker, Bettina; Klaaßen-Mielke, Renate; Trampisch, Matthias; Wilm, Stefan; Platen, Petra; Hinrichs, Timo

    2013-01-01

    The general practitioner (GP)’s practice appears to be an ideal venue for recruiting community-dwelling older adults with limited mobility. This study (Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN17727272) aimed at evaluating the recruiting process used for a multi-centre exercise intervention (HOMEfit). Each of six steps resulted in an absolute number of patients (N1–N6). Sex and age (for N4–N6) and reasons for dropping out were assessed. Patient database screening (N1–N3) at 15 GP practices yielded N1 = 5,990 patients aged 70 and above who had visited their GP within the past 6 months, N2 = 5,467 after exclusion of institutionalised patients, N3 = 1,545 patients eligible. Using a pre-defined limitation algorithm in order to conserve the practices’ resources resulted in N4 = 1,214 patients (80.3 ± 5.6 years, 68% female), who were then officially invited to the final assessment of eligibility at the GP’s practice. N5 = 434 patients (79.5 ± 5.4 years, 69% female) attended the practice screening (n = 13 of whom had not received an official invitation). Finally, N6 = 209 (79.8 ± 5.2 years, 74% female) were randomised after they were judged eligible and had given their written informed consent to participate in the randomised controlled trial (overall recruitment rate: 4.4%). The general strategy of utilising a GP’s practice to recruit the target group proved beneficial. The data and experiences presented here can help planners of future exercise-intervention studies. PMID:24317380

  16. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  17. Running in Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    Roberta Stevens and Kent Oliver are campaigning hard for the presidency of the American Library Association (ALA). Stevens is outreach projects and partnerships officer at the Library of Congress. Oliver is executive director of the Stark County District Library in Canton, Ohio. They have debated, discussed, and posted web sites, Facebook pages,…

  18. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  19. Diffractive hard scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.; Collins, J.C.; Soper, D.E.; Sterman, G.

    1986-03-01

    I discuss events in high energy hadron collisions that contain a hard scattering, in the sense that very heavy quarks or high P/sub T/ jets are produced, yet are diffractive, in the sense that one of the incident hadrons is scattered with only a small energy loss. 8 refs.

  20. A crude model to study radio frequency induced density modification close to launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eester, Dirk; Crombé, Kristel

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between radio frequency (RF) waves and the density is discussed by adopting the general framework of a 2-time-scale multi-fluid treatment, allowing to separate the dynamics on the RF time scale from that on the time scale on which macroscopic density and flows vary as a result of the presence of electromagnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The focus is on regions close to launchers where charge neutrality is incomplete and waves are commonly evanescent. The fast time scale dynamics influences the slow time scale behavior via quasilinear terms (the Ponderomotive force for the case of the equation of motion). Electrons and ions are treated on the same footing. Also, both fast and slow waves are retained in the wave description. Although this work is meant as a subtopic of a large study—the wave induced "convective cell" physics at hand is of a 2- or 3-dimensional nature while this paper limits itself to a single dimension—a few tentative examples are presented.

  1. Dynamic mode decomposition of supersonic and transonic wakes of generic space launcher configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, Vladimir; Sayadi, Taraneh; Meinke, Matthias; Schroeder, Wolfgang; Schmid, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is applied to supersonic and transonic wakes of generic space launcher configurations of Mach numbers 0.7 and 6 computed using a zonal RANS/LES approach. The axisymmetric geometry includes a backward facing step that causes the flow to separate. In addition to the separation bubble, acoustic waves are also radiated from the downstream region of the flow. Experimental and numerical observations clearly demonstrate the existence of peaks in the pressure spectra which can be attributed to both the flow inside the wake and the acoustic waves in the freestream. The objective of this work is to apply DMD to the set of numerical data in order to firstly, extract the spatial shape of the modes and secondly, identify their respective frequencies. This allows the dynamics associated to the separation bubble and those of the acoustic waves to be differentiated properly. In addition, with the help of DMD the modes responsible for pressure-loading on the backward face of the step are extracted and analyzed.

  2. Guidelines for internal optics optimization of the ITER EC H and CD upper launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A.; Bruschi, A.; Figini, L.; Farina, D.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.; Chavan, R.; Goodman, T. P.; Krause, A.; Landis, J. D.; Sanchez Galan, F.; Toussaint, M.; Henderson, M. A.; Saibene, G.

    2014-02-12

    The importance of localized injection of Electron Cyclotron waves to control Magneto-HydroDynamic instability is well assessed in tokamak physics and the set of four Electron Cyclotron (EC) Upper Launchers (UL) in ITER is mainly designed for this purpose. Each of the 4 ULs uses quasi-optical mirrors (shaping and planes, fixed and steerable) to redirect and focus 8 beams (in two rows, with power close to 1 MW per beam coming from the EC transmission lines) in the plasma region where the instability appears. Small beam dimensions and maximum beam superposition guarantee the necessary localization of the driven current. To achieve the goal of MHD stabilization with minimum EC power to preserve the energy confinement in the outer half of the plasma cross section, optimization of the quasi-optical design is required and a guideline of a strategy is presented. As a result of this process and following the guidelines indicated, modifications of the design (new mirrors positions, rotation axes and/or focal properties) will be proposed for the next step of an iterative process, including the mandatory compatibility check with the mechanical constraints.

  3. Measurement Uncertainty Analysis of an Accelerometer Calibration Using a POC Electromagnetic Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Timpson, Erik J.; Engel, T. G.

    2012-06-12

    A pulse forming network (PFN), helical electromagnetic launcher (HEML), command module (CM), and calibration table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored nergy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass reinforced epoxy and is designed to accelerate a mass of 600 grams to a velocity of 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller-based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the PFN voltage and desired charging voltage. After entering a desired PFN voltage, the CM controls the charging of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it sends a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile’s tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocimeter and catch pot. The target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely so that the velocimeter can accurately read. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  4. Cryogenic pellet launcher adapted for controlling of tokamak plasma edge instabilities.

    PubMed

    Lang, P T; Cierpka, P; Harhausen, J; Neuhauser, J; Wittmann, C; Gál, K; Kálvin, S; Kocsis, G; Sárközi, J; Szepesi, T; Dorner, C; Kauke, G

    2007-02-01

    One of the main challenges posed recently on pellet launcher systems in fusion-oriented plasma physics is the control of the plasma edge region. Strong energy bursts ejected from the plasma due to edge localized modes (ELMs) can form a severe threat for in-vessel components but can be mitigated by sufficiently frequent triggering of the underlying instabilities using hydrogen isotope pellet injection. However, pellet injection systems developed mainly for the task of ELM control, keeping the unwanted pellet fueling minimized, are still missing. Here, we report on a novel system developed under the premise of its suitability for control and mitigation of plasma edge instabilities. The system is based on the blower gun principle and is capable of combining high repetition rates up to 143 Hz with low pellet velocities. Thus, the flexibility of the accessible injection geometry can be maximized and the pellet size kept low. As a result the new system allows for an enhancement in the tokamak operation as well as for more sophisticated experiments investigating the underlying physics of the plasma edge instabilities. This article reports on the design of the new system, its main operational characteristics as determined in extensive test bed runs, and also its first test at the tokamak experiment ASDEX Upgrade. PMID:17578110

  5. Cryogenic pellet launcher adapted for controlling of tokamak plasma edge instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, P. T.; Cierpka, P.; Harhausen, J.; Neuhauser, J.; Wittmann, C.; Gal, K.; Kalvin, S.; Kocsis, G.; Sarkoezi, J.; Szepesi, T.; Dorner, C.; Kauke, G.

    2007-02-15

    One of the main challenges posed recently on pellet launcher systems in fusion-oriented plasma physics is the control of the plasma edge region. Strong energy bursts ejected from the plasma due to edge localized modes (ELMs) can form a severe threat for in-vessel components but can be mitigated by sufficiently frequent triggering of the underlying instabilities using hydrogen isotope pellet injection. However, pellet injection systems developed mainly for the task of ELM control, keeping the unwanted pellet fueling minimized, are still missing. Here, we report on a novel system developed under the premise of its suitability for control and mitigation of plasma edge instabilities. The system is based on the blower gun principle and is capable of combining high repetition rates up to 143 Hz with low pellet velocities. Thus, the flexibility of the accessible injection geometry can be maximized and the pellet size kept low. As a result the new system allows for an enhancement in the tokamak operation as well as for more sophisticated experiments investigating the underlying physics of the plasma edge instabilities. This article reports on the design of the new system, its main operational characteristics as determined in extensive test bed runs, and also its first test at the tokamak experiment ASDEX Upgrade.

  6. A PLANAR, RECTANGULAR WAVEGUIDE LAUNCHER AND EXTRACTOR FOR A DUAL-MODED RF POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher D.

    2000-11-21

    The desire to reduce the amount of low-loss, circular-waveguide delay line required in a pulse-compressing power distribution system for the Next Linear Collider has led to the pursuit of multi-moded schemes [1]. In such a system, power is delivered to different destinations through the same waveguide via different propagating modes. Current plans [2] utilize two modes, with manipulations done primarily in overmoded rectangular guide. We describe two key components of the system, a four-input/four-output, dual-mode launcher and an extractor for diverting one mode from the delay line to an accelerator feed while allowing the other to pass on to an upstream feed. These novel passive waveguide devices utilize the rectangular TE10 and TE20 modes. Because they must carry up to 600 MW pulsed rf power, H-planar symmetry is maintained in their designs to allow the use of overheight waveguide, and features that invite breakdown, such as coupling slots, irises, and septa, are avoided. Special rectangular-to-circular tapers [3] will be used to convert between the above modes and the circular TE11{sup o} (TE12{sup o}) and TE01{sup o} delay line modes, respectively. Rectangular waveguide for relative ease of handling. Mode converters, including special cross-section tapers [3] will be used to transform between the above circular waveguide modes and the TE20 and TE10 rectangular waveguide modes, respectively.

  7. A crude model to study radio frequency induced density modification close to launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eester, Dirk; Crombé, Kristel

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between radio frequency (RF) waves and the density is discussed by adopting the general framework of a 2-time-scale multi-fluid treatment, allowing to separate the dynamics on the RF time scale from that on the time scale on which macroscopic density and flows vary as a result of the presence of electromagnetic and/or electrostatic fields. The focus is on regions close to launchers where charge neutrality is incomplete and waves are commonly evanescent. The fast time scale dynamics influences the slow time scale behavior via quasilinear terms (the Ponderomotive force for the case of the equation of motion). Electrons and ions are treated on the same footing. Also, both fast and slow waves are retained in the wave description. Although this work is meant as a subtopic of a large study—the wave induced “convective cell” physics at hand is of a 2- or 3-dimensional nature while this paper limits itself to a single dimension—a few tentative examples are presented.

  8. Numerical investigation of the near wake of generic space launcher systems at transonic and supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, V.; Glatzer, C.; Meiß, J.-H.; Meinke, M.; Schröder, W.

    2013-06-01

    Numerical simulations of the near wake of generic rocket configurations are performed at transonic and supersonic freestream conditions to improve the understanding of the highly intricate near wake structures. The Reynolds number in both flow regimes is 106 based on the main body diameter, i. e., specific freestream conditions of ESA's Ariane launcher trajectory. The geometry matches models used in experiments in the framework of the German Transregional Collaborative Research Center TRR40. Both axisymmetric wind tunnel models possess cylindrical sting supports, representing a nozzle to allow investigations of a less disturbed wake flow. A zonal approach consisting of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and a large-eddy simulation (LES) is applied. It is shown that the highly unsteady transonic wake flow at Ma∞ = 0.7 is characterized by the expanding separated shear layer, while the Mach 6.0 wake is defined by a shock, expansion waves, and a recompression region. In both cases, an instantaneous view on the base characteristics reveals complex azimuthal flow structures even for axisymmetric geometries. The flow regimes are discussed by comparing the aerodynamic characteristics, such as the size of the recirculation region and the turbulent kinetic energy.

  9. Guidelines for internal optics optimization of the ITER EC H&CD upper launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, A.; Bruschi, A.; Figini, L.; Chavan, R.; Farina, D.; Goodman, T. P.; Krause, A.; Henderson, M. A.; Landis, J. D.; Platania, P.; Saibene, G.; Sanchez Galan, F.; Sozzi, C.; Toussaint, M.

    2014-02-01

    The importance of localized injection of Electron Cyclotron waves to control Magneto-HydroDynamic instability is well assessed in tokamak physics and the set of four Electron Cyclotron (EC) Upper Launchers (UL) in ITER is mainly designed for this purpose. Each of the 4 ULs uses quasi-optical mirrors (shaping and planes, fixed and steerable) to redirect and focus 8 beams (in two rows, with power close to 1 MW per beam coming from the EC transmission lines) in the plasma region where the instability appears. Small beam dimensions and maximum beam superposition guarantee the necessary localization of the driven current. To achieve the goal of MHD stabilization with minimum EC power to preserve the energy confinement in the outer half of the plasma cross section, optimization of the quasi-optical design is required and a guideline of a strategy is presented. As a result of this process and following the guidelines indicated, modifications of the design (new mirrors positions, rotation axes and/or focal properties) will be proposed for the next step of an iterative process, including the mandatory compatibility check with the mechanical constraints.

  10. Update on Progress of Space Station Integrated Kinetic Launcher for Orbital Payload Systems (SSIKLOPS) - Cyclops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newswander, Daniel; Smith, James P.; Lamb, Craig R.; Ballard, Perry G.

    2014-01-01

    The Space Station Integrated Kinetic Launcher for Orbital Payload Systems (SSIKLOPS), known as "Cyclops" to the International Space Station (ISS) community, was introduced last August (2013) during Technical Session V: From Earth to Orbit of the 27th Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites. Cyclops is a collaboration between the NASA ISS Program, NASA Johnson Space Center Engineering, and Department of Defense (DoD) Space Test Program (STP) communities to develop a dedicated 50-100 kg class ISS small satellite deployment system. This paper will address the progress of Cyclops through its fabrication, assembly, flight certification, and on-orbit demonstration phases. It will also go into more detail regarding its anatomy, its satellite deployment concept of operations, and its satellite interfaces and requirements. Cyclops is manifested to fly on Space-X 4 which is currently scheduled in July 2014 with its initial satellite deployment demonstration of DoD STP's SpinSat and UT/TAMU's Lonestar satellites being late summer or fall of 2014.

  11. Development of a high-velocity free-flight launcher : the Ames light-gas gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charters, A C; Denardo, B Pat; Rossow, Vernon J

    1955-01-01

    Recent interest in long-range missiles has stimulated a search for new experimental techniques which can reproduce in the laboratory the high temperatures and Mach numbers associated with the missiles' flight. One promising possibility lies in free-flight testing of laboratory models which are flown at the full velocity of the missile. In this type of test, temperatures are approximated and aerodynamic heating of the model is representative of that experienced by the missile in high-velocity flight. A prime requirement of the free-flight test technique is a device which had the capacity for launching models at the velocities desired. In response to thie need, a gun firing light models at velocities up to 15,000 feet per second has been developed at the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. The design of this gun, the analysis of its performance, and the results of the initial firing trials are described in this paper. The firing trials showed that the measured velocities and pressures agreed well with the predicted values. Also, the erosion of the launch tube was very small for the eleven rounds fired. The performance of the gun suggests that it will prove to be a satisfactory launcher for high-velocity free-flight tests. However, it should be mentioned that only the gross performance has been evaluated so far, and, consequently, the operation of the gun must be investigated in further detail before its performance can be reliably predicted over its full operating range.

  12. Hard Times Hit Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Hard-to-grasp dollar amounts are forcing real cuts in K-12 education at a time when the cost of fueling buses and providing school lunches is increasing and the demands of the federal No Child Left Behind Act still loom larger over states and districts. "One of the real challenges is to continue progress in light of the economy," said Gale Gaines,…

  13. Work Hard. Be Nice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Jay

    2009-01-01

    In 1994, fresh from a two-year stint with Teach for America, Mike Feinberg and Dave Levin inaugurated the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) in Houston with an enrollment of 49 5th graders. By this Fall, 75 KIPP schools will be up and running, setting children from poor and minority families on a path to college through a combination of hard work,…

  14. SUPER HARD SURFACED POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, Louis K; Bhattacharya, R; Blau, Peter Julian; Clemons, Art; Eberle, Cliff; Evans, H B; Janke, Christopher James; Jolly, Brian C; Lee, E H; Leonard, Keith J; Trejo, Rosa M; Rivard, John D

    2010-01-01

    High energy ion beam surface treatments were applied to a selected group of polymers. Of the six materials in the present study, four were thermoplastics (polycarbonate, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polystyrene) and two were thermosets (epoxy and polyimide). The particular epoxy evaluated in this work is one of the resins used in formulating fiber reinforced composites for military helicopter blades. Measures of mechanical properties of the near surface regions were obtained by nanoindentation hardness and pin on disk wear. Attempts were also made to measure erosion resistance by particle impact. All materials were hardness tested. Pristine materials were very soft, having values in the range of approximately 0.1 to 0.5 GPa. Ion beam treatment increased hardness by up to 50 times compared to untreated materials. For reference, all materials were hardened to values higher than those typical of stainless steels. Wear tests were carried out on three of the materials, PET, PI and epoxy. On the ion beam treated epoxy no wear could be detected, whereas the untreated material showed significant wear.

  15. Ultrasonic characterization of materials hardness

    PubMed

    Badidi Bouda A; Benchaala; Alem

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental technique has been developed to measure velocities and attenuation of ultrasonic waves through a steel with a variable hardness. A correlation between ultrasonic measurements and steel hardness was investigated. PMID:10829663

  16. Hard-pan soils - Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hard pans, hard layers, or compacted horizons, either surface or subsurface, are universal problems that limit crop production. Hard layers can be caused by traffic or soil genetic properties that result in horizons with high density or cemented soil particles; these horizons have elevated penetrati...

  17. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eester, D.; Lu, Ling-Feng

    2015-12-10

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple ’derivative switch-on’ procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved.

  18. Wave induced density modification in RF sheaths and close to wave launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eester, D.; Crombé, K.; Lu, Ling-Feng

    2015-12-01

    With the return to full metal walls - a necessary step towards viable fusion machines - and due to the high power densities of current-day ICRH (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating) or RF (radio frequency) antennas, there is ample renewed interest in exploring the reasons for wave-induced sputtering and formation of hot spots. Moreover, there is experimental evidence on various machines that RF waves influence the density profile close to the wave launchers so that waves indirectly influence their own coupling efficiency. The present study presents a return to first principles and describes the wave-particle interaction using a 2-time scale model involving the equation of motion, the continuity equation and the wave equation on each of the time scales. Through the changing density pattern, the fast time scale dynamics is affected by the slow time scale events. In turn, the slow time scale density and flows are modified by the presence of the RF waves through quasilinear terms. Although finite zero order flows are identified, the usual cold plasma dielectric tensor - ignoring such flows - is adopted as a first approximation to describe the wave response to the RF driver. The resulting set of equations is composed of linear and nonlinear equations and is tackled in 1D in the present paper. Whereas the former can be solved using standard numerical techniques, the latter require special handling. At the price of multiple iterations, a simple 'derivative switch-on' procedure allows to reformulate the nonlinear problem as a sequence of linear problems. Analytical expressions allow a first crude assessment - revealing that the ponderomotive potential plays a role similar to that of the electrostatic potential arising from charge separation - but numerical implementation is required to get a feeling of the full dynamics. A few tentative examples are provided to illustrate the phenomena involved.

  19. Structure Design Approach and Technology Selection for Next Generation European Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiocco, P.; Ramusat, G.; Kauffmann, J.; Jaredson, D.; Bouilly, Th.; Lavelle, F.; Louaas, E.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the next generation launchers activity at ESA, a top-down and a bottom-up approach has been performed for the alternative conception and promising technologies of NGL sub-assemblies and sub-systems. The top-down approach consisted in looking for system-driven design solutions and the bottom-up in the proposal of design solutions taking to substantial advantages for the system. The main investigations have been focused on structures and technologies tight to structures and interfaces. Specifications coming from a preliminary system design have been used in order to permit sub-system design with the goal to find the major advantage for the overall launch system. In this respect selection criteria have been identified and among these a specific evaluation of the payload mass over recurring cost advantage has been evaluated. The development cost, recurring cost and operational aspects have been considered as competitiveness factors for the identification of the most interesting solutions. The TRL/IRL has been assessed and a preliminary development plan has been identified. This approach is dedicated to reference NGL architectures, but alternative architectures have been investigated in order to assess their interest in terms of competitiveness factors and study of other technologies. This paper deals mainly with metallic and composite structures owing to sub-systems or sub-assemblies proposed for the NGL. The major sub-systems and structures analysed are the engine thrust frame (ETF), inter stage structures (ISS), cryogenic propellant tanks, feeding lines and attachments, pressurisation systems and fairing. The paper provides an overview of the main results of this investigation and the potential benefit it can provide.

  20. Investigations on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher geometry in the hypersonic flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saile, D.; Gülhan, A.; Henckels, A.; Glatzer, C.; Statnikov, V.; Meinke, M.

    2013-06-01

    The turbulent wake flow of generic rocket configurations is investigated experimentally and numerically at a freestream Mach number of 6.0 and a unit Reynolds number of 10·106 m-1. The flow condition is based on the trajectory of Ariane V-like launcher at an altitude of 50 km, which is used as the baseline to address the overarching tasks of wake flows in the hypersonic regime like fluid-structural coupling, reverse hot jets and base heating. Experimental results using pressure transducers and the high-speed Schlieren measurement technique are shown to gain insight into the local pressure fluctuations on the base and the oscillations of the recompression shock. This experimental configuration features a wedgeprofiled strut orthogonally mounted to the main body. Additionally, the influence of cylindrical dummy nozzles attached to the base of the rocket is investigated, which is the link to the numerical investigations. Here, the axisymmetric model possesses a cylindrical sting support of the same diameter as the dummy nozzles. The sting support allows investigations for an undisturbed wake flow. A time-accurate zonal Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes/Large Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach is applied to identify shocks, expansion waves, and the highly unsteady recompression region numerically. Subsequently, experimental and numerical results in the strut-averted region are compared with regard to the wall pressure and recompression shock frequency spectra. For the compared configurations, experimental pressure spectra exhibit dominant Strouhal numbers at about SrD = 0.03 and 0.27, and the recompression shock oscillates at 0.2. In general, the pressure and recompression shock fluctuations numerically calculated agree reasonably with the experimental results. The experiments with a blunt base reveal base-pressure spectra with dominant Strouhal numbers at 0.08 at the center position and 0.145, 0.21-0.22, and 0.31-0.33 at the outskirts of the base.

  1. Assessment of the ITER electron cyclotron upper launcher capabilities in view of an optimized design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figini, L.; Farina, D.; Henderson, M.; Mariani, A.; Poli, E.; Saibene, G.

    2015-05-01

    The 24 MW ITER electron cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive (H and CD) system, operating at 170 GHz, consists of one equatorial and four upper launchers (UL). The main task of the UL will be the control of magneto-hydrodynamic activity such as neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) at the q = 3/2 and q = 2 surfaces and sawteeth at q = 1, but it will also be needed for current profile tailoring in advanced scenarios and to assist plasma break-down and L- to H-mode transition. Moreover, it is required to be effective both when ITER will operate at nominal and reduced magnetic field magnitude. Here the performance of the UL has been assessed through the study of the full temporal evolution of different scenarios, including the reference ITER 15 MA H-mode plasma, a half-field case at 2.65 T and a steady state scenario. The ECCD efficiency has been evaluated for a wide range of injection angles, deriving the optimal angles and the power required for NTMs stabilization with simplified criteria. An injected power ranging from 3 MW to 9 MW should be sufficient to control NTMs in the flat-top phase of the scenarios considered here. The result of the analysis shows that the EC system maintains a good performance level even at intermediate values of the magnetic field, between the nominal and the half-field value. The analysis has also allowed to evaluate the adequateness of the available steering range for reaching the rational surfaces during all the phases of the discharge and to quantify the steering sensitivity to shifts of the target or aiming errors. The result is an assessment of the UL design requirements to achieve the desired functionalities, which will be used to drive the optimization and finalization of the UL design.

  2. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  3. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  4. Hard Metal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bech, A. O.; Kipling, M. D.; Heather, J. C.

    1962-01-01

    In Great Britain there have been no published reports of respiratory disease occurring amongst workers in the hard metal (tungsten carbide) industry. In this paper the clinical and radiological findings in six cases and the pathological findings in one are described. In two cases physiological studies indicated mild alveolar diffusion defects. Histological examination in a fatal case revealed diffuse pulmonary interstitial fibrosis with marked peribronchial and perivascular fibrosis and bronchial epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia. Radiological surveys revealed the sporadic occurrence and low incidence of the disease. The alterations in respiratory mechanics which occurred in two workers following a day's exposure to dust are described. Airborne dust concentrations are given. The industrial process is outlined and the literature is reviewed. The toxicity of the metals is discussed, and our findings are compared with those reported from Europe and the United States. We are of the opinion that the changes which we would describe as hard metal disease are caused by the inhalation of dust at work and that the component responsible may be cobalt. Images PMID:13970036

  5. Steady-State Cycle Deck Launcher Developed for Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDrei, Donald E.

    1997-01-01

    industry and NASA. The NPSS Steady-State Cycle Deck team released a batch version of the Steady-State Cycle Deck in March 1996. Version 1.1 was released in June 1996. During fiscal 1997, NPSS accepted enhancements and modifications to the Steady-State Cycle Deck launcher. Consistent with NPSS' commercialization plan, these modifications will be done by a third party that can provide long-term software support.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of the turbulent wake flow of a generic space launcher configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, V.; Saile, D.; Meiß, J.-H.; Henckels, A.; Meinke, M.; Gülhan, A.; Schröder, W.

    2015-06-01

    The turbulent wake of a generic space launcher at cold hypersonic freestream conditions is investigated experimentally and numerically to gain detailed insight into the intricate base flow phenomena of space vehicles at upper stages of the flight trajectory. The experiments are done at Ma∞ = 6 and ReD = 1.7 · 106 m-1 by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the corresponding computations are performed by the Institute of Aerodynamics Aachen using a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes / Large-Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach. Two different aft-body geometries consisting of a blunt base and an attached cylindrical nozzle dummy are considered. It is found that the wind tunnel model support attached to the upper side of the main body has a nonnegligible impact on the wake along the whole circumference, albeit on the opposite side, the effects are minimal compared to an axisymmetric configuration. In the blunt-base case, the turbulent supersonic boundary layer undergoes a strong aftexpansion on the model shoulder leading to the formation of a confined low-pressure (p/p∞ ≈ 0.2) recirculation region. Adding a nozzle dummy causes the shear layer to reattach on the its wall at x/D ˜ 0.6 and the base pressure level to increase (p/p∞ ≈ 0.25) compared to the blunt-base case. For both configurations, the pressure fluctuations on the base wall feature dominant frequencies at SrD ≈ 0.05 and SrD ≈ 0.2-0.27, but are of small amplitudes (prms/p∞ = 0.02-0.025) compared to the main body boundary layer. For the nozzle dummy configuration, when moving downstream along the nozzle extension, the wall pressure is increasingly influenced by the reattaching shear layer and the periodic low-frequency behavior becomes less pronounced. Directly behind the reattachment point, the wall pressure reaches maximum mean and root-mean-square (rms) values of about p/p∞ = 1 and p'rms/p∞ = 0.1 and features a broadband specrms trum without distinct frequencies determined by the

  7. Final Progress Report for the NASA Inductrack Model Rocket Launcher at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, L S; Post, R F; Martinez-Frias, J

    2001-06-27

    The Inductrack magnetic levitation system, developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, was studied for its possible use for launching rockets. Under NASA sponsorship, a small model system was constructed at the Laboratory to pursue key technical aspects of this proposed application. The Inductrack is a passive magnetic levitation system employing special arrays of high-field permanent magnets (Halbach arrays) on the levitating cradle, moving above a ''track'' consisting of a close-packed array of shorted coils with which are interleaved with special drive coils. Halbach arrays produce a strong spatially periodic magnetic field on the front surface of the arrays, while canceling the field on their back surface. Relative motion between the Halbach arrays and the track coils induces currents in those coils. These currents levitate the cradle by interacting with the horizontal component of the magnetic field. Pulsed currents in the drive coils, synchronized with the motion of the carrier, interact with the vertical component of the magnetic field to provide acceleration forces. Motional stability, including resistance to both vertical and lateral aerodynamic forces, is provided by having Halbach arrays that interact with both the upper and the lower sides of the track coils. At present, a 7.8 meter track composed of drive and levitation coils has been built and the electronic drive circuitry performs as designed. A 9 kg cradle that carries the Halbach array of permanent magnets has been built. A mechanical launcher is nearly complete which will provide an initial cradle velocity of 9 m/s into the electronic drive section. We have found that the drag forces from the levitation coils were higher than in our original design. However, measurements of drag force at velocities less than 1 m/s are exactly as predicted by theory. Provided here are recommended design changes to improve the track's performance so that a final velocity of 40 m/s can be achieved with

  8. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  9. Cyclic strength of hard metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sereda, N.N.; Gerikhanov, A.K.; Koval'chenko, M.S.; Pedanov, L.G.; Tsyban', V.A.

    1986-02-01

    The authors study the strength of hard-metal specimens and structural elements under conditions of cyclic loading since many elements of processing plants, equipment, and machines are made of hard metals. Fatigue tests were conducted on KTS-1N, KTSL-1, and KTNKh-70 materials, which are titanium carbide hard metals cemented with nickel-molybdenum, nickelcobalt-chromium, and nickel-chromium alloys, respectively. As a basis of comparison, the standard VK-15 (WC+15% Co) alloy was used. Some key physicomechanical characteristics of the materials investigated are presented. On time bases not exceeding 10/sup 6/ cycles, titanium carbide hard metals are comparable in fatigue resistance to the standard tungstencontaining hard metals.

  10. Reviews Book: Enjoyable Physics Equipment: SEP Colorimeter Box Book: Pursuing Power and Light Equipment: SEP Bottle Rocket Launcher Equipment: Sciencescope GLE Datalogger Equipment: EDU Logger Book: Physics of Sailing Book: The Lightness of Being Software: Logotron Insight iLog Studio iPhone Apps Lecture: 2010 IOP Schools and Colleges Lecture Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Enjoyable Physics Mechanics book makes learning more fun SEP Colorimeter Box A useful and inexpensive colorimeter for the classroom Pursuing Power and Light Account of the development of science in the 19th centuary SEP Bottle Rocket Launcher An excellent resource for teaching about projectiles GLE Datalogger GPS software is combined with a datalogger EDU Logger Remote datalogger has greater sensing abilities Logotron Insight iLog Studio Software enables datlogging, data analysis and modelling iPhone Apps Mobile phone games aid study of gravity WORTH A LOOK Physics of Sailing Book journeys through the importance of physics in sailing The Lightness of Being Study of what the world is made from LECTURE The 2010 IOP Schools and Colleges Lecture presents the physics of fusion WEB WATCH Planet Scicast pushes boundaries of pupil creativity

  11. MISTIC: Radiation hard ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, F.; Lecesne, N.; Bricault, P.

    2008-10-01

    The ISAC RIB facility at TRIUMF utilizes up to 100 μA from the 500 MeV H- cyclotron to produce RIB using the isotopic separation on line (ISOL) method. In the moment, we are mainly using a hot surface ion source and a laser ion source to produce our RIB. A FEBIAD ion source has been recently tested at ISAC, but these ion sources are not suitable for gaseous elements like N, O, F, Ne, … , A new type of ion source is then necessary. By combining a high frequency electromagnetic wave and a magnetic confinement, the ECRIS [R. Geller, Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source and ECR Plasmas, Institute of Physics Publishing, Bristol, 1996], [1] (electron cyclotron resonance ion source) can produce high energy electrons essential for efficient ionization of those elements. To this end, a prototype ECRIS called MISTIC (monocharged ion source for TRIUMF and ISAC complex) has been built at TRIUMF using a design similar to the one developed at GANIL [GANIL (Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds), www.ganil.fr], [2] The high level radiation caused by the proximity to the target prevented us to use a conventional ECRIS. To achieve a radiation hard ion source, we used coils instead of permanent magnets to produce the magnetic confinement. Each coil is supplied by 1000 A-15 V power supply. The RF generator cover a frequency range from 2 to 8 GHz giving us all the versatility we need to characterize the ionization of the following elements: He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, C, O, N, F. Isotopes of these elements are involved in star thermonuclear cycles and, consequently, very important for researches in nuclear astrophysics. Measures of efficiency, emittance and ionization time will be performed for each of those elements. Preliminary tests show that MISTIC is very stable over a large range of frequency, magnetic field and pressure.

  12. Palaeoecology and evolution of marine hard substrate communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. D.; Wilson, M. A.

    2003-07-01

    Marine organisms have occupied hard substrates since the Archaean. Shells, rocks, wood and sedimentary hardgrounds offer relatively stable habitats compared to unconsolidated sediments, but the plants and animals which inhabit them must develop means to gain and defend this premium attachment space. Hard substrate communities are formed by organisms with a variety of strategies for adhering to and/or excavating the substrates they inhabit. While mobile grazers, organically attached and even soft-bodied organisms may leave evidence of their former presence in ancient hard substrate communities, a superior fossil record is left by sessile encrusters with mineralised skeletons and by borers which leave trace fossils. Furthermore, encrusters and borers are preserved in situ, retaining their spatial relationships to one another and to the substrate. Spatial competition, ecological succession, oriented growth, and differential utilisation of exposed vs. hidden substrate surfaces can all be observed or inferred. Hard substrate communities are thus excellent systems with which to study community evolution over hundreds of millions of years. Here we review the research on modern and ancient hard substrate communities, and point to some changes that have affected them over geological time scales. Such changes include a general increase in bioerosion of hard substrates, particularly carbonate surfaces, through the Phanerozoic. This is, at least in part, analogous to the infaunalisation trends seen in soft substrate communities. Encrusting forms show an increase in skeletalisation from the Palaeozoic into the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, which may be a response to increasing levels of predation. Hard substrate communities, considering borers and encrusters together, show a rough increase in tiering through the Phanerozoic which again parallels trends seen in soft substrate communities. This extensive review of the literature on living and fossil hard substrate organisms shows that

  13. Characteristics of surface-wave and volume-wave plasmas produced with internally mounted large-area planar microwave launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatsu, Masaaki; Naito, Katsutoshi; Ogino, Akihisa; Ninomiya, Keigo; Nanko, Shohei

    2005-10-17

    We studied discharge characteristics of microwave plasmas excited with a large-area planar microwave launcher installed internally in a 600-mm-diam cylindrical vacuum chamber. With the microwave power less than roughly 400 W, we demonstrated the large volumetric volume-wave plasma (VWP) spread in the entire chamber at a pressure of 14-27 Pa in He. Above 400 W, the plasma discharge made a sudden transition to higher-density, uniform surface-wave plasma (SWP) having a spatial uniformity of {+-}3.5% over 300 mm in diameter. Electron energy probability functions in the downstream region were studied using Langmuir probe measurements with Druyvesteyn method in both the SWP and VWP discharges.

  14. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  15. Social Mobility and Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, S. M.

    Social mobility is generally studied in three different ways: stratum mobility, intergenerational social mobility, and intragenerational or career mobility. This paper deals with the first two types of mobility and more with intergenerational mobility than with stratum mobility. The working hypothesis of both discussions is that, in general, a…

  16. Hard-phase engineering in hard/soft nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudyal, Narayan; Rong, Chuanbing; Vuong Nguyen, Van; Liu, J. Ping

    2014-03-01

    Bulk SmCo/Fe(Co) based hard/soft nanocomposite magnets with different hard phases (1:5, 2:17, 2:7 and 1:3 types) were fabricated by high-energy ball-milling followed by a warm compaction process. Microstructural studies revealed a homogeneous distribution of bcc-Fe(Co) phase in the matrix of hard magnetic Sm-Co phase with grain size ⩽20 nm after severe plastic deformation and compaction. The small grain size leads to effective inter-phase exchange coupling as shown by the single-phase-like demagnetization behavior with enhanced remanence and energy product. Among the different hard phases investigated, it was found that the Sm2Co7-based nanocomposites can incorporate a higher soft phase content, and thus a larger reduction in rare-earth content compared with the 2:17, 1:5 and 1:3 phase-based nanocomposite with similar properties. (BH)max up to 17.6 MGOe was obtained for isotropic Sm2Co7/FeCo nanocomposite magnets with 40 wt% of the soft phase which is about 300% higher than the single-phase counterpart prepared under the same conditions. The results show that hard-phase engineering in nanocomposite magnets is an alternative approach to fabrication of high-strength nanocomposite magnets with reduced rare-earth content.

  17. BCM Search Launcher--an integrated interface to molecular biology data base search and analysis services available on the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Smith, R F; Wiese, B A; Wojzynski, M K; Davison, D B; Worley, K C

    1996-05-01

    The BCM Search Launcher is an integrated set of World Wide Web (WWW) pages that organize molecular biology-related search and analysis services available on the WWW by function, and provide a single point of entry for related searches. The Protein Sequence Search Page, for example, provides a single sequence entry form for submitting sequences to WWW servers that offer remote access to a variety of different protein sequence search tools, including BLAST, FASTA, Smith-Waterman, BEAUTY, PROSITE, and BLOCKS searches. Other Launch pages provide access to (1) nucleic acid sequence searches, (2) multiple and pair-wise sequence alignments, (3) gene feature searches, (4) protein secondary structure prediction, and (5) miscellaneous sequence utilities (e.g., six-frame translation). The BCM Search Launcher also provides a mechanism to extend the utility of other WWW services by adding supplementary hypertext links to results returned by remote servers. For example, links to the NCBI's Entrez data base and to the Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) are added to search results returned by the NCBI's WWW BLAST server. These links provide easy access to auxiliary information, such as Medline abstracts, that can be extremely helpful when analyzing BLAST data base hits. For new or infrequent users of sequence data base search tools, we have preset the default search parameters to provide the most informative first-pass sequence analysis possible. We have also developed a batch client interface for Unix and Macintosh computers that allows multiple input sequences to be searched automatically as a background task, with the results returned as individual HTML documents directly to the user's system. The BCM Search Launcher and batch client are available on the WWW at URL http:@gc.bcm.tmc.edu:8088/search-launcher.html. PMID:8743995

  18. Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Mobile Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanayei, Ali; Mirzaei, Abas

    The purpose of this study is twofold. First, in order to guarantee a coherent discussion about mobile customer relationship management (mCRM), this paper presents a conceptualization of mCRM delineating its unique characteristics because of Among the variety of mobile services, considerable attention has been devoted to mobile marketing and in particular to mobile customer relationship management services. Second, the authors discusses the security risks in mobile computing in different level(user, mobile device, wireless network,...) and finally we focus on enterprise mobile security and it's subgroups with a series of suggestion and solution for improve mobile computing security.

  19. Hard Work and Hard Data: Getting Our Message Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glau, Gregory R.

    Unless questions about student performance and student retention can be answered and unless educators are proactive in finding and publicizing such information, basic writing programs cannot determine if what they are doing is working. Hard data, especially from underrepresented groups, is needed to support these programs. At Arizona State…

  20. Feedback Control of Tearing Modes Through Ecrh with Launcher Mirror Steering and Power Modulation Using a Line-Of Ece Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennen, B. A.; Westerhof, E.; de Baar, M. R.; Bongers, W. A.; Thoen, D. J.; Nuij, P. W. J. M.; Steinbuch, M.; Bürger, A.; Oosterbeek, J. W.

    2011-02-01

    A demonstration of real-time feedback control for autonomous tracking and stabilization of m/n = 2/1 tearing modes in a tokamak using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating and Current Drive (ECRH/ECCD) is reported. The prototype system on TEXTOR combines in the same sight-line an Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostic for tearing mode sensing and a steerable ECRH/ECCD antenna. The mode location is retrieved from the ECE measurements and serves as input for a control loop, which aligns the ECRH/ECCD deposition with the tearing modes by steering of a launcher mirror. The alignment is achieved by matching the mode location in the sensor spectrum with the fixed ECRH/ECCD actuator frequency. The control response is dominated by the response of the mechanical launcher. Analysis of the launcher dynamics receives special emphasis in the control design. In addition, the ECRH/ECCD power is modulated in phase with the rotation frequency of the O-point of the tearing modes using a feedback loop, which extracts the mode's frequency and phase from the ECE data. The experimental results demonstrate the capabilities of the control system to track and suppress tearing modes in real-time. A relatively simple control design suffices to meet the performance requirements demanded for effective tearing mode suppression.

  1. Mechanical Analysis of an SM 2 Blk IV restrained firing within a concentric canister launcher test unit

    SciTech Connect

    Kassner, M C; Kennedy, T C; Puttapitukporn, T; Rosen, R S

    1999-03-01

    The Office of Naval Research (ONR) and PMS512 have undertaken a program to develop a new Vertical Launching System (VLS) for future generation ships, such as the DD-21 Destroyer. The Naval Sea Systems Command Combat Weapons Program (NAVSEA 05K) and Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division (NSWCDD) are working jointly with industry and universities to develop one such launcher design, the Concentric Canister Launcher (CCL). The basic CCL design consists of a tube made of two concentric cylinders; one end is open, the other is sealed with a hemispherical end cap. During firing, the missile exhaust gas is turned 180 degrees by the hemispherical end cap and flows through the annular space between inner and outer cylinders. Depending on the missile utilized and the particular service environment of the CCL, maximum temperatures within the cylinder material have been calculated to exceed 2000 F. In an earlier study [1], the authors determined the high temperature mechanical properties of several candidate alloys being considered for fabrication of the CCL. This study [1] found that, of these candidate materials, titanium alloys exhibit higher yield stresses than that of 316L stainless steel at temperatures up to about 1000 F; above 1500 F, the yield stress of 316L stainless steel is comparable to those of the titanium alloys. The 316L stainless steel was found to strain harden (increase its flow stress with increasing strain) at temperatures up to about 1800 F. The ability of the 316L stainless steel to strain harden at high temperatures may provide an added margin of safety for engineering design of the CCL. The objective of the current study was to perform a computer simulation of the structural response of a CCL during a restrained firing, one in which a SM-2 Blk IV missile would fail to exit the canister. A finite element model of the inner cylinder, outer cylinder, end rings (mounting brackets), and lateral restraints in the uptake was constructed. An elastic

  2. Laser Safety Evaluation of the Oscmar M203PI Grenade Launcher Simulator (GLS) and the Associated Umpire Control Gun

    SciTech Connect

    AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.

    2002-06-01

    A laser safety evaluation and pertinent output measurements were performed (during March and April 2002) on the M203PI Grenade Launcher Simulator (GLS) and its associated Umpire Control Gun manufactured by Oscmar International Limited, Auckland, New Zealand. The results were the Oscmar Umpire Gun is laser hazard Class 1 and can be used without restrictions. The radiant energy output of the Oscmar M203PI GLS, under ''Small Source'' criteria at 10 centimeters, is laser hazard Class 3b and not usable, under SNL policy, in force-on-force exercises. However, due to a relatively large exit diameter and an intentionally large beam divergence, to simulate a large area blast, the output beam geometry met the criteria for ''Extended Source'' viewing [ANSI Std. 2136.1-2000 (S.l)]. Under this ''Extended Source'' criteria the output of the M203PI GLS unit was, in fact, laser hazard Class 1 (eye safe), for 3 of the 4 possible modes of laser operation. The 4'h mode, ''Auto Fire'', which simulates a continuous grenade firing every second and is not used at SNL, was laser hazard Class 3a (under the ''Extended Source'' viewing criteria). The M203PI GLS does present a laser hazard Class 3a to aided viewing with binoculars inside 3 meters from the unit. Farther than 3 meters it is ''eye safe''. The M203PI GLS can be considered a Class 1 laser hazard and can be used under SNL policy with the following restrictions: (1) The M203PI GLS unit shall only be programmed for: the ''Single Fire'' (which, includes ''Rapid Fire'') and the ''Auto Align'' (used in adjusting the alignment of the grenade launcher simulator system to the target) modes of operation. (2) The M203PI GLS shall never be directed against personnel, using binoculars, inside of 3 meters. DOE Order 5480.16A, Firearms Safety, (Chapter 1)(5)(a)(8)(d) and DOE-STD-1091-96, Firearms Safety (Chapter 4); already prevents ESS laser engagement of personnel (with or without binoculars), ''closer than 10 feet (3.05 meters)''. Both of

  3. Future hard disk drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Roger

    2009-03-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of today's hard disk drive with the additional intention of orienting the reader to the overall mechanical and electrical architecture. The modern hard disk drive is a miracle of storage capacity and function together with remarkable economy of design. This paper presents a personal view of future customer requirements and the anticipated design evolution of the components. There are critical decisions and great challenges ahead for the key technologies of heads, media, head-disk interface, mechanics, and electronics.

  4. Hard diffraction in Pythia 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overgaard Rasmussen, Christine

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the options for diffraction implemented in the general-purpose event generator Pythia 8 [1]. We review the existing model for soft diffraction and present a new model for hard diffraction. Both models use the Pomeron approach pioneered by Ingelman and Schlein, factorising the diffractive cross section into a Pomeron flux and a Pomeron PDF, with several choices for both implemented in Pythia 8. The model of hard diffraction is implemented as a part of the multiparton interactions (MPI) framework, thus introducing a dynamical gap survival probability that explicitly breaks factorisation.

  5. Magnetic levitation for hard superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kordyuk, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    An approach for calculating the interaction between a hard superconductor and a permanent magnet in the field-cooled case is proposed. The exact solutions were obtained for the point magnetic dipole over a flat ideally hard superconductor. We have shown that such an approach is adaptable to a wide practical range of melt-textured high-temperature superconductors{close_quote} systems with magnetic levitation. In this case, the energy losses can be calculated from the alternating magnetic field distribution on the superconducting sample surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Hard sphere packings within cylinders.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Steinhardt, William; Zhao, Hao; Socolar, Joshua E S; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2016-02-23

    Arrangements of identical hard spheres confined to a cylinder with hard walls have been used to model experimental systems, such as fullerenes in nanotubes and colloidal wire assembly. Finding the densest configurations, called close packings, of hard spheres of diameter σ in a cylinder of diameter D is a purely geometric problem that grows increasingly complex as D/σ increases, and little is thus known about the regime for D > 2.873σ. In this work, we extend the identification of close packings up to D = 4.00σ by adapting Torquato-Jiao's adaptive-shrinking-cell formulation and sequential-linear-programming (SLP) technique. We identify 17 new structures, almost all of them chiral. Beyond D ≈ 2.85σ, most of the structures consist of an outer shell and an inner core that compete for being close packed. In some cases, the shell adopts its own maximum density configuration, and the stacking of core spheres within it is quasiperiodic. In other cases, an interplay between the two components is observed, which may result in simple periodic structures. In yet other cases, the very distinction between the core and shell vanishes, resulting in more exotic packing geometries, including some that are three-dimensional extensions of structures obtained from packing hard disks in a circle. PMID:26843132

  7. FATIGUE OF BIOMATERIALS: HARD TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Arola, D.; Bajaj, D.; Ivancik, J.; Majd, H.; Zhang, D.

    2009-01-01

    The fatigue and fracture behavior of hard tissues are topics of considerable interest today. This special group of organic materials comprises the highly mineralized and load-bearing tissues of the human body, and includes bone, cementum, dentin and enamel. An understanding of their fatigue behavior and the influence of loading conditions and physiological factors (e.g. aging and disease) on the mechanisms of degradation are essential for achieving lifelong health. But there is much more to this topic than the immediate medical issues. There are many challenges to characterizing the fatigue behavior of hard tissues, much of which is attributed to size constraints and the complexity of their microstructure. The relative importance of the constituents on the type and distribution of defects, rate of coalescence, and their contributions to the initiation and growth of cracks, are formidable topics that have not reached maturity. Hard tissues also provide a medium for learning and a source of inspiration in the design of new microstructures for engineering materials. This article briefly reviews fatigue of hard tissues with shared emphasis on current understanding, the challenges and the unanswered questions. PMID:20563239

  8. Metrics for Hard Goods Merchandising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gloria S., Ed.; Magisos, Joel H., Ed.

    Designed to meet the job-related metric measurement needs of students interested in hard goods merchandising, this instructional package is one of five for the marketing and distribution cluster, part of a set of 55 packages for metric instruction in different occupations. The package is intended for students who already know the occupational…

  9. Hypervelocity Impact Testing of International Space Station Meteoroid/Orbital Debris Shielding Using an Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Justin H.; Grosch, Donald

    2001-01-01

    Engineers at the NASA Johnson Space Center have conducted hypervelocity impact (HVI) performance evaluations of spacecraft meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) shields at velocities in excess of 7 km/s. The inhibited shaped charge launcher (ISCL), developed by the Southwest Research Institute, launches hollow, circular, cylindrical jet tips to approximately 11 km/s. Since traditional M/OD shield ballistic limit performance is defined as the diameter of sphere required to just perforate or spall a spacecraft pressure wall, engineers must decide how to compare ISCL derived data with those of the spherical impactor data set. Knowing the mass of the ISCL impactor, an equivalent sphere diameter may be calculated. This approach is conservative since ISCL jet tips are more damaging than equal mass spheres. A total of 12 tests were recently conducted at the Southwest Research Institute (SWRI) on International Space Station M/OD shields. Results of these tests are presented and compared to existing ballistic limit equations. Modification of these equations is suggested based on the results.

  10. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Satz, H. |; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason - and in fact its original trigger - is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, we discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behaviour it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time and work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks` duration each, in February 1994 at CERn in Geneva andin July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley.

  11. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, M.S.; Schuster, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part. 12 figs.

  12. Hard Photodisintegration of 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, Carlos

    2011-02-01

    Large angle photodisintegration of two nucleons from the 3He nucleus is studied within the framework of the hard rescattering model (HRM). In the HRM the incoming photon is absorbed by one nucleon's valence quark that then undergoes a hard rescattering reaction with a valence quark from the second nucleon producing two nucleons emerging at large transverse momentum . Parameter free cross sections for pp and pn break up channels are calculated through the input of experimental cross sections on pp and pn elastic scattering. The calculated cross section for pp breakup and its predicted energy dependency are in good agreement with recent experimental data. Predictions on spectator momentum distributions and helicity transfer are also presented.

  13. Weld cladding of hard surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habrekke, T.

    1993-02-01

    A literature study about clad welding of hard surfaces on steel is performed. The purpose was to see what kind of methods are mainly used, and particular attention is paid to clad welding of rolls. The main impression from this study is that several methods are in use. Some of these must be considered as 'too exotic' for the aim of the program, such as laser build-up welding. However, clad welding of hard surfaces to rolls is widely used around the world, and there is no need for particularly advanced welding methods to perform the work. The welding consumables and the way the welding is carried out is of more important character. The report will give some comments to this, and hopefully will give a short review of the current technology in this field.

  14. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, Morris S.; Schuster, George J.; Skorpik, James R.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  15. Schwannoma of the hard palate

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Pradyumna Kumar; Mandal, Palash Kumar; Ghosh, Saradindu

    2014-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign encapsulated perineural tumors. The head and neck region is the most common site. Intraoral origin is seen in only 1% of cases, tongue being the most common site; its location in the palate is rare. We report a case of hard-palate schwannoma with bony erosion which was immunohistochemically confirmed. The tumor was excised completely intraorally. After two months of follow-up, the defect was found to be completely covered with palatal mucosa. PMID:25298716

  16. Microwave assisted hard rock cutting

    DOEpatents

    Lindroth, David P.; Morrell, Roger J.; Blair, James R.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for the sequential fracturing and cutting of subsurface volume of hard rock (102) in the strata (101) of a mining environment (100) by subjecting the volume of rock to a beam (25) of microwave energy to fracture the subsurface volume of rock by differential expansion; and , then bringing the cutting edge (52) of a piece of conventional mining machinery (50) into contact with the fractured rock (102).

  17. PLD of hard ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Yibran; Gottmann, Jens; Husmann, Andreas; Klotzbuecher, Thomas; Kreutz, Ernst-Wolfgang; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2001-06-01

    The deposition of different hard ceramics coatings as Al2O3, ZrO2, c-BN and DLC thin films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) has been of increasing interest as alternative process compared to the latest progress in CVD and PVD deposition. For instance, in pulsed laser deposition, the properties of the resulting thin films are influenced by the composition, ionization state, density, kinetic and excitation energies of the particles of the vapor/plasma. In order to deposit hard ceramics with different properties and applications, various substrates as Pt/Ti/Si multilayer, glass (fused silica), steel, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), Si(100) and Si(111) are used. These thin films are deposited either by excimer laser radiation ((lambda) equals 248 nm) or by CO2 laser radiation ((lambda) equals 10.6 micrometers ). To characterize the structural, optical and mechanical properties of the hard ceramics thin films, different techniques as Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, FTIR spectroscopy and nanoindentation are used.

  18. Molecular hardness and softness, local hardness and softness, hardness and softness kernels, and relations among these quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Max; Parr, Robert G.

    1988-02-01

    Hardness and softness kernels η(r,r') and s(r,r') are defined for the ground state of an atomic or molecular electronic system, and the previously defined local hardness and softness η(r) and s(r) and global hardness and softness η and S are obtained from them. The physical meaning of s(r), as a charge capacitance, is discussed (following Huheey and Politzer), and two alternative ``hardness'' indices are identified and briefly discussed.

  19. Nanomechanics of hard films on compliant substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Emerson, John Allen; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville Reid; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Hales, Lucas; Adams, David Price; Yeager,John; Nyugen, Thao D.; Corona, Edmundo; Kennedy, Marian S.; Cordill, Megan J.

    2009-09-01

    Development of flexible thin film systems for biomedical, homeland security and environmental sensing applications has increased dramatically in recent years [1,2,3,4]. These systems typically combine traditional semiconductor technology with new flexible substrates, allowing for both the high electron mobility of semiconductors and the flexibility of polymers. The devices have the ability to be easily integrated into components and show promise for advanced design concepts, ranging from innovative microelectronics to MEMS and NEMS devices. These devices often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films where differing properties can lead to large residual stresses [5]. As long as the films remain substrate-bonded, they may deform far beyond their freestanding counterpart. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure where compressive stresses can lead to wrinkling, delamination, and buckling [6,7,8] while tensile stresses can lead to film fracture and decohesion [9,10,11]. In all cases, performance depends on film adhesion. Experimentally it is difficult to measure adhesion. It is often studied using tape [12], pull off [13,14,15], and peel tests [16,17]. More recent techniques for measuring adhesion include scratch testing [18,19,20,21], four point bending [22,23,24], indentation [25,26,27], spontaneous blisters [28,29] and stressed overlayers [7,26,30,31,32,33]. Nevertheless, sample design and test techniques must be tailored for each system. There is a large body of elastic thin film fracture and elastic contact mechanics solutions for elastic films on rigid substrates in the published literature [5,7,34,35,36]. More recent work has extended these solutions to films on compliant substrates and show that increasing compliance markedly changes fracture energies compared with rigid elastic solution results [37,38]. However, the introduction of inelastic substrate response significantly complicates the problem [10,39,40]. As

  20. Mobile shearography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalms, Michael; Jueptner, Werner

    2005-04-01

    By reason of their sensitivity, accuracy and non-contact as well as non-destructive characteristics, modern optical methods such as digital speckle shearography have found an increasing interest for NDT applications on the factory floor. With new carbon filter technologies and other lightweight constructions in aircraft and automotive manufacturing, adapted examination designs and especially developed testing methods are necessary. Shearography as a coherent optical method has been widely accepted as an useful NDT tool. It is a robust interferometric method to determine locations with maximum stress on various material structures. However, limitations of this technique can be found in the bulky equipment components, the interpretation of the complex sherographic result images and at the work with non-cooperative surfaces (dark absorber, bright shining reflectors). We report a mobile shearography system that was especially designed for investigations at aircraft and automotive constructions.

  1. Large Spun Formed Friction-Stir Welded Tank Domes for Liquid Propellant Tanks Made from AA2195: A Technology Demonstration for the Next Generation of Heavy Lift Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stachulla, M.; Pernpeinter, R.; Brewster J.; Curreri, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2010-01-01

    Improving structural efficiency while reducing manufacturing costs are key objectives when making future heavy-lift launchers more performing and cost efficient. The main enabling technologies are the application of advanced high performance materials as well as cost effective manufacture processes. This paper presents the status and main results of a joint industrial research & development effort to demonstrate TRL 6 of a novel manufacturing process for large liquid propellant tanks for launcher applications. Using high strength aluminium-lithium alloy combined with the spin forming manufacturing technique, this development aims at thinner wall thickness and weight savings up to 25% as well as a significant reduction in manufacturing effort. In this program, the concave spin forming process is used to manufacture tank domes from a single flat plate. Applied to aluminium alloy, this process allows reaching the highest possible material strength status T8, eliminating numerous welding steps which are typically necessary to assemble tank domes from 3D-curved panels. To minimize raw material costs for large diameter tank domes for launchers, the dome blank has been composed from standard plates welded together prior to spin forming by friction stir welding. After welding, the dome blank is contoured in order to meet the required wall thickness distribution. For achieving a material state of T8, also in the welding seams, the applied spin forming process allows the required cold stretching of the 3D-curved dome, with a subsequent ageing in a furnace. This combined manufacturing process has been demonstrated up to TRL 6 for tank domes with a 5.4 m diameter. In this paper, the manufacturing process as well as test results are presented. Plans are shown how this process could be applied to future heavy-lift launch vehicles developments, also for larger dome diameters.

  2. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  3. The Hard Problem of Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Kimmo; Strimling, Pontus

    2012-01-01

    Based on individual variation in cooperative inclinations, we define the “hard problem of cooperation” as that of achieving high levels of cooperation in a group of non-cooperative types. Can the hard problem be solved by institutions with monitoring and sanctions? In a laboratory experiment we find that the answer is affirmative if the institution is imposed on the group but negative if development of the institution is left to the group to vote on. In the experiment, participants were divided into groups of either cooperative types or non-cooperative types depending on their behavior in a public goods game. In these homogeneous groups they repeatedly played a public goods game regulated by an institution that incorporated several of the key properties identified by Ostrom: operational rules, monitoring, rewards, punishments, and (in one condition) change of rules. When change of rules was not possible and punishments were set to be high, groups of both types generally abided by operational rules demanding high contributions to the common good, and thereby achieved high levels of payoffs. Under less severe rules, both types of groups did worse but non-cooperative types did worst. Thus, non-cooperative groups profited the most from being governed by an institution demanding high contributions and employing high punishments. Nevertheless, in a condition where change of rules through voting was made possible, development of the institution in this direction was more often voted down in groups of non-cooperative types. We discuss the relevance of the hard problem and fit our results into a bigger picture of institutional and individual determinants of cooperative behavior. PMID:22792282

  4. The hard problem of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Kimmo; Strimling, Pontus

    2012-01-01

    Based on individual variation in cooperative inclinations, we define the "hard problem of cooperation" as that of achieving high levels of cooperation in a group of non-cooperative types. Can the hard problem be solved by institutions with monitoring and sanctions? In a laboratory experiment we find that the answer is affirmative if the institution is imposed on the group but negative if development of the institution is left to the group to vote on. In the experiment, participants were divided into groups of either cooperative types or non-cooperative types depending on their behavior in a public goods game. In these homogeneous groups they repeatedly played a public goods game regulated by an institution that incorporated several of the key properties identified by Ostrom: operational rules, monitoring, rewards, punishments, and (in one condition) change of rules. When change of rules was not possible and punishments were set to be high, groups of both types generally abided by operational rules demanding high contributions to the common good, and thereby achieved high levels of payoffs. Under less severe rules, both types of groups did worse but non-cooperative types did worst. Thus, non-cooperative groups profited the most from being governed by an institution demanding high contributions and employing high punishments. Nevertheless, in a condition where change of rules through voting was made possible, development of the institution in this direction was more often voted down in groups of non-cooperative types. We discuss the relevance of the hard problem and fit our results into a bigger picture of institutional and individual determinants of cooperative behavior. PMID:22792282

  5. Mobile Schools for a Mobile World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelmingly, independent schools are embracing mobile devices--laptops, iPads or other tablets, and smartphones--to enhance teaching and learning. This article describes the results of the "NAIS 2012 Mobile Learning Survey." Among its findings were that 75 percent of NAIS-member schools currently use mobile learning devices in at…

  6. Making Nozzles From Hard Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Dennis L.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed method of electrical-discharge machining (EDM) cuts hard materials like silicon carbide into smoothly contoured parts. Concept developed for fabrication of interior and exterior surfaces and internal cooling channels of convergent/divergent nozzles. EDM wire at skew angle theta creates hyperboloidal cavity in tube. Wire offset from axis of tube and from axis of rotation by distance equal to throat radius. Maintaining same skew angle as that used to cut hyperboloidal inner surface but using larger offset, cooling channel cut in material near inner hyperboloidal surface.

  7. Radiation Hardness Assurance (RHA) Guideline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campola, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Hardness Assurance (RHA) consists of all activities undertaken to ensure that the electronics and materials of a space system perform to their design specifications after exposure to the mission space environment. The subset of interests for NEPP and the REAG, are EEE parts. It is important to register that all of these undertakings are in a feedback loop and require constant iteration and updating throughout the mission life. More detail can be found in the reference materials on applicable test data for usage on parts.

  8. Hardness correlation for uranium and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D L; Romig, Jr, A D

    1983-03-01

    The hardness of 16 different uranium-titanium (U-Ti) alloys was measured on six (6) different hardness scales (R/sub A/, R/sub B/, R/sub C/, R/sub D/, Knoop, and Vickers). The alloys contained between 0.75 and 2.0 wt % Ti. All of the alloys were solutionized (850/sup 0/C, 1 h) and ice-water quenched to produce a supersaturated martensitic phase. A range of hardnesses was obtained by aging the samples for various times and temperatures. The correlation of various hardness scales was shown to be virtually identical to the hardness-scale correlation for steels. For more-accurate conversion from one hardness scale to another, least-squares-curve fits were determined for the various hardness-scale correlations. 34 figures, 5 tables.

  9. Hard and Soft Safety Verifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Anderson, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences between and the effects of hard and soft safety verifications. Initially, the terminology should be defined and clarified. A hard safety verification is datum which demonstrates how a safety control is enacted. An example of this is relief valve testing. A soft safety verification is something which is usually described as nice to have but it is not necessary to prove safe operation. An example of a soft verification is the loss of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) casings from Shuttle flight, STS-4. When the main parachutes failed, the casings impacted the water and sank. In the nose cap of the SRBs, video cameras recorded the release of the parachutes to determine safe operation and to provide information for potential anomaly resolution. Generally, examination of the casings and nozzles contributed to understanding of the newly developed boosters and their operation. Safety verification of SRB operation was demonstrated by examination for erosion or wear of the casings and nozzle. Loss of the SRBs and associated data did not delay the launch of the next Shuttle flight.

  10. Hard X-ray astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Past hard X-ray and lower energy satellite instruments are reviewed and it is shown that observation above 20 keV and up to hundreds of keV can provide much valuable information on the astrophysics of cosmic sources. To calculate possible sensitivities of future arrays, the efficiencies of a one-atmosphere inch gas counter (the HEAO-1 A-2 xenon filled HED3) and a 3 mm phoswich scintillator (the HEAO-1 A-4 Na1 LED1) were compared. Above 15 keV, the scintillator was more efficient. In a similar comparison, the sensitivity of germanium detectors did not differ much from that of the scintillators, except at high energies where the sensitivity would remain flat and not rise with loss of efficiency. Questions to be addressed concerning the physics of active galaxies and the diffuse radiation background, black holes, radio pulsars, X-ray pulsars, and galactic clusters are examined.

  11. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Woods, D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. ); Blackburn, R. )

    1992-05-01

    Substantial improvements have been made in the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators. Cylinders of scintillating materials 2.2 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick have been exposed to 10 Mrads of gamma rays at a dose rate of 1 Mrad/h in a nitrogen atmosphere. One of the formulations tested showed an immediate decrease in pulse height of only 4% and has remained stable for 12 days while annealing in air. By comparison a commercial PVT scintillator showed an immediate decrease of 58% and after 43 days of annealing in air it improved to a 14% loss. The formulated sample consisted of 70 parts by weight of Dow polystyrene, 30 pbw of pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (Dow Corning DC 705 oil), 2 pbw of p-terphenyl, 0.2 pbw of tetraphenylbutadiene, and 0.5 pbw of UVASIL299LM from Ferro.

  12. Tactics of Interventions: Student Mobility and Human Capital Building in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Hitherto, research on transnational higher education student mobility tended to narrowly present hard statistics on student mobility, analysing these in terms of "trends" and the implication this has on policy and internationalizing strategies. What is missing from this "big picture" is a close-up analysis of the micropolitics of student mobility…

  13. Persistence, Privilege, and Parenting: The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeeding, Timothy M., Ed.; Erikson, Robert, Ed.; Jantti, Markus, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Americans like to believe that theirs is the land of opportunity, but the hard facts are that children born into poor families in the United States tend to stay poor and children born into wealthy families generally stay rich. Other countries have shown more success at lessening the effects of inequality on mobility--possibly by making public…

  14. Handheld Libraries 101: Using Mobile Technologies in the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosturski, Kate; Skornia, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 "Horizon Report" called mobile technologies "an opportunity for higher education to reach its constituents in new and compelling ways." The report implied that academic libraries would find them to be the ideal tools for bringing reluctant researchers to the library, mainly for their convenience. It's not hard to see why--in 2008, mobile…

  15. Mobile Devices at School: Possibilities, Problems, and Tough Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dennis; Angeles, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a "point/counterpoint" approach to considering the educational use of mobile devices. It views the possibilities and problems surrounding the use of small laptops, cellphones, iPhones, etc. Although clear answers to questions regarding the classroom use of digital devices are hard to come by, the authors believe that educators…

  16. Mobile Phone Application Development for the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, P.; Oostra, D.; Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.

    2012-08-01

    With smartphone sales currently surpassing laptop sales, it is hard not to think that these devices will have a place in the classroom. More specifically, with little to no monetary investment, classroom-centric mobile applications have the ability to suit the needs of teachers. Previously, programming such an item was a daunting task to the classroom teacher. But now, through the use of online visual tools, anyone has the ability to generate a mobile application to suit individual classroom needs. The "MY NASA DATA" (MND) project has begun work on such an application. Using online tools that are directed at the non-programmer, the team has developed two usable mobile applications ("apps") that fit right into the science classroom. The two apps generated include a cloud dichotomous key for cloud identification in the field, and an atmospheric science glossary to help with standardized testing key vocabulary and classroom assignments. Through the use of free online tools, teachers and students now have the ability to customize mobile applications to meet their individual needs. As an extension of the mobile applications, the MND team is planning web-based application programming interfaces (API's) that will be generated from data that is currently included in the MND Live Access Server. This will allow teachers and students to choose data sets that they want to include in the mobile application without having to populate the API themselves. Through the use of easy to understand online mobile app tutorials and MND data sets, teachers will have the ability to generate unit-specific mobile applications to further engage and empower students in the science classroom.

  17. Induction launcher design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driga, M. D.; Weldon, W. F.

    1989-01-01

    New concepts in the design of induction accelerators and their power supplies for space and military applications are discussed. Particular attention is given to a piecewise-rising-frequency power supply in which each elementary generator (normal compulsator or rising frequency generator) has a different base frequency. A preliminary design of a coaxial induction accelerator for a hypersonic real gas facility is discussed to illustrate the concepts described.

  18. Mobile Router Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David H.; Bell, Terry L.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Shell, Dan; Leung, Kent

    2002-01-01

    Cisco Systems and NASA have been performing joint research on mobile routing technology under a NASA Space Act Agreement. Cisco developed mobile router technology and provided that technology to NASA for applications to aeronautic and space-based missions. NASA has performed stringent performance testing of the mobile router, including the interaction of routing and transport-level protocols. This paper describes mobile routing, the mobile router, and some key configuration parameters. In addition, the paper describes the mobile routing test network and test results documenting the performance of transport protocols in dynamic routing environments.

  19. Application of the French Space Operation Act and the Development of Space Activities in the Field of Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahuzac, F.; Biard, A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of space activities has led France to define a new legal framework: French Space Operation Act (FSOA). The aim of this act, is to define the conditions according to which the French government authorizes and checks the spatial operations under its jurisdiction or its international responsibility as State of launch, according to the international treaties of the UN on space, in particular the Treaty (1967) on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, the Convention ( 1972 ) on International Liability for Damage Caused by Space Objects, and the Convention (1975) on Registration of Objects Launched into Outer Space. The main European space centre is the Guiana Space Centre (CSG), settled in France. A clarification of the French legal framework was compulsory to allow the arrival of new launchers (Soyuz and Vega). This act defines the competent authority, the procedure of authorization and licenses, the regime for operations led from foreign countries, the control of spatial objects, the enabling of inspectors, the delegation of monitoring to CNES, the procedure for urgent measures necessary for the safety, the registration of spatial objects. In this framework, the operator is fully responsible of the operation that he leads. He is subjected to a regime of authorization and to governmental technical monitoring delegated to CNES. In case of litigation, the operator gets the State guarantee above a certain level of damage to third party. The introduction of FSOA has led to issue a Technical Regulation set forth, in particular for the safety of persons and property, the protection of public health and the environment. This general regulation is completed by a specific regulation applicable to CSG that covers the preparation phase of the launch, and all specificities of the launch range, as regards the beginning of the launch. The Technical Regulation is based on 30 years of Ariane's activities and on the

  20. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-06-17

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion processes. PMID:25993272

  1. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., if any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.21 Section 201.21...

  2. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.30 Section 201.30...

  3. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.30 Section 201.30...

  4. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.30 Section 201.30...

  5. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.30 Section 201.30...

  6. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., if any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.21 Section 201.21...

  7. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., if any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.21 Section 201.21...

  8. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., if any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.21 Section 201.21...

  9. 7 CFR 201.21 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., if any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.21 Section 201.21...

  10. 7 CFR 201.30 - Hard seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... any is present, for any seed required to be labeled as to the percentage of germination, and the percentage of hard seed shall not be included as part of the germination percentage. ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hard seed. 201.30 Section 201.30...

  11. Retraction of Hard, Lozano, and Tversky (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hard, B. M.; Lozano, S. C.; Tversky, B.

    2008-01-01

    Reports a retraction of "Hierarchical encoding of behavior: Translating perception into action" by Bridgette Martin Hard, Sandra C. Lozano and Barbara Tversky (Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 2006[Nov], Vol 135[4], 588-608). All authors retract this article. Co-author Tversky and co-author Hard believe that the research results cannot…

  12. Scaling, dimensional analysis, and hardness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yang-Tse; Cheng, Che-Min; Li, Zhiyong

    2000-03-01

    Hardness is one of the frequently used concepts in tribology. For nearly one hundred years, indentation experiments have been performed to obtain the hardness of materials. Recent years have seen significant improvements in indentation equipment and a growing need to measure the mechanical properties of materials on small scales. However, questions remain, including what properties can be measured using instrumented indention techniques and what is hardness? We discuss these basic questions using dimensional analysis together with finite element calculations. We derive scaling relationships for loading and unloading curve, initial unloading slope, contact depth, and hardness. Hardness is shown to depend on elastic, as well as plastic properties of materials. The conditions for "piling-up" and "sinking-in" of surface profiles in indentation are obtained. The methods for estimating contact area are examined. The work done during indentation is also studied. A relationship between hardness, elastic modulus, and the work of indentation is revealed. This relationship offers a new method for obtaining hardness and elastic modulus. In addition, we demonstrate that stress-strain relationships may not be uniquely determined from loading/unloading curves alone using a conical or pyramidal indenter. The dependence of hardness on indenter geometry is also studied. Finally, a scaling theory for indentation in power-law creep solids using self-similar indenters is developed. A connection between creep and "indentation size effect" is established.

  13. "Hard Science" for Gifted 1st Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGennaro, April

    2006-01-01

    "Hard Science" is designed to teach 1st grade gifted students accurate and high level science concepts. It is based upon their experience of the world and attempts to build a foundation for continued love and enjoyment of science. "Hard Science" provides field experiences and opportunities for hands-on discovery working beside experts in the field…

  14. HARD SPRING WHEAT TECHNICAL COMMITTEE 2007 CROP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve experimental lines of hard spring wheat were grown at up to five locations in 2007 and evaluated for kernel, milling, and bread baking quality against the check variety Glenn. Samples of wheat were submitted through the Wheat Quality Council and processed and milled at the USDA Hard Red Spri...

  15. Hard Spring Wheat Technical Committee 2009 Crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirteen hard spring wheat lines that were developed by breeders throughout the spring wheat region of the U. S. were grown at up to five locations in 2009 and evaluated for kernel, milling, and bread baking quality against the check variety Glenn. Samples of wheat were milled at the USDA Hard Red ...

  16. Hard Spring Wheat Technical Committee, 2008 Crop.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eleven hard spring wheat lines that were developed by breeders throughout the spring wheat region of the U. S. were grown at up to five locations in 2008 and evaluated for kernel, milling, and bread baking quality against the check variety Glenn. Samples of wheat were milled at the USDA Hard Red Sp...

  17. Hardness methods for testing maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Fox, Glen; Manley, Marena

    2009-07-01

    Maize is a highly important crop to many countries around the world, through the sale of the maize crop to domestic processors and subsequent production of maize products and also provides a staple food to subsistance farms in undeveloped countries. In many countries, there have been long-term research efforts to develop a suitable hardness method that could assist the maize industry in improving efficiency in processing as well as possibly providing a quality specification for maize growers, which could attract a premium. This paper focuses specifically on hardness and reviews a number of methodologies as well as important biochemical aspects of maize that contribute to maize hardness used internationally. Numerous foods are produced from maize, and hardness has been described as having an impact on food quality. However, the basis of hardness and measurement of hardness are very general and would apply to any use of maize from any country. From the published literature, it would appear that one of the simpler methods used to measure hardness is a grinding step followed by a sieving step, using multiple sieve sizes. This would allow the range in hardness within a sample as well as average particle size and/or coarse/fine ratio to be calculated. Any of these parameters could easily be used as reference values for the development of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy calibrations. The development of precise NIR calibrations will provide an excellent tool for breeders, handlers, and processors to deliver specific cultivars in the case of growers and bulk loads in the case of handlers, thereby ensuring the most efficient use of maize by domestic and international processors. This paper also considers previous research describing the biochemical aspects of maize that have been related to maize hardness. Both starch and protein affect hardness, with most research focusing on the storage proteins (zeins). Both the content and composition of the zein fractions affect

  18. Hardness Evolution of Gamma-Irradiated Polyoxymethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chuan-Hao; Harmon, Julie P.; Lee, Sanboh

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on analyzing hardness evolution in gamma-irradiated polyoxymethylene (POM) exposed to elevated temperatures after irradiation. Hardness increases with increasing annealing temperature and time, but decreases with increasing gamma ray dose. Hardness changes are attributed to defects generated in the microstructure and molecular structure. Gamma irradiation causes a decrease in the glass transition temperature, melting point, and extent of crystallinity. The kinetics of defects resulting in hardness changes follow a first-order structure relaxation. The rate constant adheres to an Arrhenius equation, and the corresponding activation energy decreases with increasing dose due to chain scission during gamma irradiation. The structure relaxation of POM has a lower energy barrier in crystalline regions than in amorphous ones. The hardness evolution in POM is an endothermic process due to the semi-crystalline nature of this polymer.

  19. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  20. Innovative island mobile vet.

    PubMed

    Forster, Dan

    2016-06-11

    One of the UK's first mobile veterinary clinics was recently awarded a Queen's Award for Innovation. Mobile Vet was launched on the Isle of Wight in 2013 by Dan Forster and his wife Kirsty, a veterinary nurse. PMID:27288178

  1. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOEpatents

    Buttz, James H.; Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.

    2003-01-01

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  2. Dynamic relaxation of the elastic properties of hard carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Hirvonen, J.; Koskinen, J.; Kaukonen, M.; Nieminen, R.; Scheibe, H.

    1997-06-01

    The effect of enhanced atomic mobility on the growth of hard carbon films was examined. Tetrahedrally bonded amorphous carbon films were deposited by condensing energetic carbon ions using an arc-discharge deposition method. The deposition temperature varied between 50 and 400{degree}C. The dependence of elastic properties on deposition temperature was examined by determining the frequency-dependent propagation velocity of ultrasonic surface acoustic waves induced by a laser. A remarkable decrease in elastic coefficient was revealed above the deposition temperature of 300{degree}C and complete relaxation was obtained at 400{degree}C. This observation was analyzed by using a simple model which was in turn supported by molecular dynamics simulations. The relaxation turns out to be a thermally activated, dynamic process with an activation energy of 0.57 eV. Possible relaxation mechanisms associated with the migration of atoms or defects on a growing surface are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Use of a portable tower and remote-controlled launcher to improve physical conditioning in a rehabilitating wild mallard (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Pollard-Wright, Holly M; Wright, Mark T; Warren, Jeffrey M

    2010-12-01

    Prerelease reconditioning improves the chance of survival of rehabilitating raptors. Reconditioning may also help to rehabilitate waterfowl, including those that are threatened or endangered, especially if the birds are released during periods of migration. A flying harness, creance, remote-controlled launcher, and portable tower were used to create a means of reconditioning a rehabilitating 5-month-old female wild mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos) that had been housed in a rehabilitation center for 7 weeks while recovering from an injury. Pre- and postflight serum lactate levels, body condition index scores, and controlled flight distances were used to assess the bird's degree of conditioning. Postflight serum lactate levels never returned to preflight levels and were not deemed a reliable indicator of physical fitness. However, the mallard showed an increase in endurance and strength as well as improved body condition index scores over the course of the reconditioning program. PMID:21302761

  4. Two-dimensional current density and temperature development in the return rail of an EM launcher with temperature-dependent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, P. A.; Rathmann, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    A method used to model the two-dimensional current and temperature development in the return rail of an electromagnetic launcher (EML) during launch, incorporating temperature-dependent electrical and thermal material properties, is presented. Due to these temperature dependencies and the nonlinearities they introduce, the derived equations must be solved numerically. Comparisons of the current and temperature responses are made with the results of a previously published constant-property model. This two-dimensional model duplicates the breech responses of one-dimensional analyses and, in addition, provides the detailed structure of the current and temperature sheaths. In particular, application of this model shows that the most severe gradients occur away from the breech, and that they are much in excess of those predicted by one-dimensional analyses.

  5. Mobility and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue deals with the phenomenon of mobility or transience in India, Kenya, Greece, Ireland, Malaysia, Thailand and Israel. The primary focus is on mobility's effect on young children, specifically their health and education; some of the broader concerns also addressed by the newsletter are the causes of mobility and its…

  6. Mobile Student Information System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  7. Design and Implementation of a Hall Effect Sensor Array Applied to Recycling Hard Drive Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kisner, Roger; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Killough, Stephen M; McIntyre, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Rare earths are an important resource for many electronic components and technologies. Examples abound including Neodymium magnets used in mobile devices and computer hard drives (HDDs), and a variety of renewable energy technologies (e.g., wind turbines). Approximately 21,000 metric tons of Neodymium is processed annually with less than 1% being recycled. An economic system to assist in the recycling of magnet material from post-consumer goods, such as Neodymium Iron Boron magnets commonly found in hard drives is presented. A central component of this recycling measurement system uses an array of 128 Hall Effect sensors arranged in two columns to detect the magnetic flux lines orthogonal to the HDD. Results of using the system to scan planar shaped objects such as hard drives to identify and spatially locate rare-earth magnets for removal and recycling from HDDs are presented. Applications of the sensor array in other identification and localization of magnetic components and assemblies will be presented.

  8. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  9. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  10. Effects of Hard Water on Hair

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Gautham; Srinivas, Chakravarthi Rangachari; Mathew, Anil C; Duraiswami, Divakar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hardness of water is determined by the amount of salts (calcium carbonate [CaCO3] and magnesium sulphate [MgSO4]) present in water. The hardness of the water used for washing hair may cause fragility of hair. Objective: The objective of the following study is to compare the tensile strength and elasticity of hair treated in hard water and hair treated in distilled water. Materials and Methods: 10-15 strands of hair of length 15-20 cm, lost during combing were obtained from 15 volunteers. Each sample was cut in the middle to obtain 2 sets of hair per volunteer. One set of 15 samples was immersed in hard water and the other set in distilled water for 10 min on alternate days. Procedure was repeated for 30 days. The tensile strength and elasticity of the hair treated in hard water and distilled water was determined using INSTRON universal strength tester. Results: The CaCO3 and MgSO4 content of hard water and distilled water were determined as 212.5 ppm of CaCO3 and 10 ppm of CaCO3 respectively. The tensile strength and elasticity in each sample was determined and the mean values were compared using t-test. The mean (SD) of tensile strength of hair treated in hard water was 105.28 (27.59) and in distilled water was 103.66 (20.92). No statistical significance was observed in the tensile strength, t = 0.181, P = 0.858. The mean (SD) of elasticity of hair treated in hard water was 37.06 (2.24) and in distilled water was 36.84 (4.8). No statistical significance was observed in the elasticity, t = 0.161, P = 0.874. Conclusion: The hardness of water does not interfere with the tensile strength and elasticity of hair. PMID:24574692

  11. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    MSFC is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using electron cyclotron resonance chemical vapor deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film an stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  12. Analysis of Hard Thin Film Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Dashen

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is interested in developing hard thin film coating for bearings. The wearing of the bearing is an important problem for space flight engine. Hard thin film coating can drastically improve the surface of the bearing and improve the wear-endurance of the bearing. However, many fundamental problems in surface physics, plasma deposition, etc, need further research. The approach is using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECRCVD) to deposit hard thin film on stainless steel bearing. The thin films in consideration include SiC, SiN and other materials. An ECRCVD deposition system is being assembled at MSFC.

  13. Prescription drug laws: justified hard paternalism.

    PubMed

    Rainbolt, George W

    1989-01-01

    Prescription drug laws are justified as examples of permissible hard paternalism and not as soft paternalism, which is morally legitimated by the defective cognitive or affective state of the individual on whose behalf the action is performed. Other examples of hard paternalism are considered, along with two strategies for determining the limits of paternalism. It is concluded that instances of permissible hard paternalism exist and that the only acceptable strategy is to balance harm and benefit on a case-by-case basis. PMID:11650113

  14. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1996-02-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Topological lifetimes of polydisperse colloidal hard spheres at a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullens, Roel P. A.; Kegel, Willem K.

    2005-01-01

    Confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study the behavior of dense suspensions of model colloidal hard spheres at a single wall. Due to the slight polydispersity, our system shows a reentrant melting transition at high densities involving a hexatic structure [R. P. A. Dullens and W. K. Kegel, Phys. Rev. Lett 92, 195702 (2004)]. The reentrant melting transition is accompanied by an increase in the mean-squared displacement. The correlation between structure and dynamics was quantitatively analyzed on a single-particle level. In particular, the topological lifetime, being the average time that a particle spends having the same coordination number, is determined for all coordination numbers and as a function of volume fraction. The defective (non-sixfold-coordinated) particles exhibit shorter lifetimes than sixfold-coordinated particles, indicating that the mobility of the system is larger at or close to defective particles. The lifetime itself is a strong function of volume fraction. In particular, the global behavior of the mean-squared displacement is proportional to the hopping frequency (the inverse of the lifetime), showing that particles changing their coordination number contribute most to the local mobility.

  16. Strong mobility in weakly disordered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-naim, Eli; Krapivsky, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We study transport of interacting particles in weakly disordered media. Our one-dimensional system includes (i) disorder, the hopping rate governing the movement of a particle between two neighboring lattice sites is inhomogeneous, and (ii) hard core interaction, the maximum occupancy at each site is one particle. We find that over a substantial regime, the root-mean-square displacement of a particle s grows superdiffusively with time t, {sigma}{approx}({epsilon}t){sup 2/3}, where {epsilon} is the disorder strength. Without disorder the particle displacement is subdiffusive, {sigma} {approx}t{sup 1/4}, and therefore disorder strongly enhances particle mobility. We explain this effect using scaling arguments, and verify the theoretical predictions through numerical simulations. Also, the simulations show that regardless of disorder strength, disorder leads to stronger mobility over an intermediate time regime.

  17. Greedy data transportation scheme with hard packet deadlines for wireless ad hoc networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, HyungJune

    2014-01-01

    We present a greedy data transportation scheme with hard packet deadlines in ad hoc sensor networks of stationary nodes and multiple mobile nodes with scheduled trajectory path and arrival time. In the proposed routing strategy, each stationary ad hoc node en route decides whether to relay a shortest-path stationary node toward destination or a passing-by mobile node that will carry closer to destination. We aim to utilize mobile nodes to minimize the total routing cost as far as the selected route can satisfy the end-to-end packet deadline. We evaluate our proposed routing algorithm in terms of routing cost, packet delivery ratio, packet delivery time, and usability of mobile nodes based on network level simulations. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm fully exploits the remaining time till packet deadline to turn into networking benefits of reducing the overall routing cost and improving packet delivery performance. Also, we demonstrate that the routing scheme guarantees packet delivery with hard deadlines, contributing to QoS improvement in various network services. PMID:25258736

  18. Greedy Data Transportation Scheme with Hard Packet Deadlines for Wireless Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, HyungJune

    2014-01-01

    We present a greedy data transportation scheme with hard packet deadlines in ad hoc sensor networks of stationary nodes and multiple mobile nodes with scheduled trajectory path and arrival time. In the proposed routing strategy, each stationary ad hoc node en route decides whether to relay a shortest-path stationary node toward destination or a passing-by mobile node that will carry closer to destination. We aim to utilize mobile nodes to minimize the total routing cost as far as the selected route can satisfy the end-to-end packet deadline. We evaluate our proposed routing algorithm in terms of routing cost, packet delivery ratio, packet delivery time, and usability of mobile nodes based on network level simulations. Simulation results show that our proposed algorithm fully exploits the remaining time till packet deadline to turn into networking benefits of reducing the overall routing cost and improving packet delivery performance. Also, we demonstrate that the routing scheme guarantees packet delivery with hard deadlines, contributing to QoS improvement in various network services. PMID:25258736

  19. Novel hard compositions and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1981-02-03

    Novel very hard compositions of matter are prepared by using in all embodiments only a minor amount of a particular carbide (or materials which can form the carbide in situ when subjected to heat and pressure); and no strategic cobalt is needed. Under a particular range of conditions, densified compositions of matter of the invention are prepared having hardnesses on the Rockwell A test substantially equal to the hardness of pure tungsten carbide and to two of the hardest commercial cobalt-bonded tungsten carbides. Alternately, other compositions of the invention which have slightly lower hardnesses than those described above in one embodiment also possess the advantage of requiring no tungsten and in another embodiment possess the advantage of having a good fracture toughness value.

  20. Automated radiation hard ASIC design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Mike; Bartholet, Bill; Baze, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A commercial based, foundry independent, compiler design tool (ChipCrafter) with custom radiation hardened library cells is described. A unique analysis approach allows low hardness risk for Application Specific IC's (ASIC's). Accomplishments, radiation test results, and applications are described.

  1. A rock in a hard place.

    PubMed

    Gray, C

    1998-10-20

    Federal Minister of Health Allan Rock appears committed to improved funding for the health care system, but this may be a hard sell in cabinet. He outlined his views during the CMA's recent annual meeting in Whitehorse. PMID:9834729

  2. Financial Incentives for Staffing Hard Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, Cynthia D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes examples of financial incentives used to recruit teachers for low-achieving and hard-to-staff schools. Includes targeted salary increases, housing incentives, tuition assistance, and tax credits. (PKP)

  3. 21 CFR 133.150 - Hard cheeses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... rennet, rennet paste, extract of rennet paste, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that... minutes, or for a time and at a temperature equivalent thereto in phosphatase destruction. A hard...

  4. 21 CFR 133.150 - Hard cheeses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... rennet, rennet paste, extract of rennet paste, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that... minutes, or for a time and at a temperature equivalent thereto in phosphatase destruction. A hard...

  5. 21 CFR 133.150 - Hard cheeses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... rennet, rennet paste, extract of rennet paste, or other safe and suitable milk-clotting enzyme that... minutes, or for a time and at a temperature equivalent thereto in phosphatase destruction. A hard...

  6. Macroindentation hardness measurement-Modernization and applications.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvat; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we first developed a modernized indentation technique for measuring tablet hardness. This technique is featured by rapid digital image capture, using a calibrated light microscope, and precise area-determination. We then systematically studied effects of key experimental parameters, including indentation force, speed, and holding time, on measured hardness of a very soft material, hydroxypropyl cellulose, and a very hard material, dibasic calcium phosphate, to cover a wide range of material properties. Based on the results, a holding period of 3min at the peak indentation load is recommended to minimize the effect of testing speed on H. Using this method, we show that an exponential decay function well describes the relationship between tablet hardness and porosity for seven commonly used pharmaceutical powders investigated in this work. We propose that H and H at zero porosity may be used to quantify the tablet deformability and powder plasticity, respectively. PMID:27130365

  7. Electronic Teaching: Hard Disks and Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Samuel F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes floppy-disk and hard-disk based networks, electronic systems linking microcomputers together for the purpose of sharing peripheral devices, and presents points to remember when shopping for a network. (MBR)

  8. Hard X-ray imaging from Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, J. E.; Murray, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Coded aperture X-ray detectors were applied to obtain large increases in sensitivity as well as angular resolution. A hard X-ray coded aperture detector concept is described which enables very high sensitivity studies persistent hard X-ray sources and gamma ray bursts. Coded aperture imaging is employed so that approx. 2 min source locations can be derived within a 3 deg field of view. Gamma bursts were located initially to within approx. 2 deg and X-ray/hard X-ray spectra and timing, as well as precise locations, derived for possible burst afterglow emission. It is suggested that hard X-ray imaging should be conducted from an Explorer mission where long exposure times are possible.

  9. Breakdown of QCD factorization in hard diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.

    2016-07-01

    Factorization of short- and long-distance interactions is severely broken in hard diffractive hadronic collisions. Interaction with the spectator partons leads to an interplay between soft and hard scales, which results in a leading twist behavior of the cross section, on the contrary to the higher twist predicted by factorization. This feature is explicitly demonstrated for diffractive radiation of abelian (Drell-Yan, gauge bosons, Higgs) and non-abelian (heavy flavors) particles.

  10. A Novel Approach to Hardness Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, F. Xavier; West, Harvey A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives a description of the application of a simple rebound time measuring device and relates the determination of relative hardness of a variety of common engineering metals. A relation between rebound time and hardness will be sought. The effect of geometry and surface condition will also be discussed in order to acquaint the student with the problems associated with this type of method.

  11. Laser Ablatin of Dental Hard Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Seka, W.; Rechmann, P.; Featherstone, J.D.B.; Fried, D.

    2007-07-31

    This paper discusses ablation of dental hard tissue using pulsed lasers. It focuses particularly on the relevant tissue and laser parameters and some of the basic ablation processes that are likely to occur. The importance of interstitial water and its phase transitions is discussed in some detail along with the ablation processes that may or may not directly involve water. The interplay between tissue parameters and laser parameters in the outcome of the removal of dental hard tissue is discussed in detail.

  12. Mobile healthcare informatics.

    PubMed

    Siau, Keng; Shen, Zixing

    2006-06-01

    Advances in wireless technology give pace to the rapid development of mobile applications. The coming mobile revolution will bring dramatic and fundamental changes to our daily life. It will influence the way we live, the way we do things, and the way we take care of our health. For the healthcare industry, mobile applications provide a new frontier in offering better care and services to patients, and a more flexible and mobile way of communicating with suppliers and patients. Mobile applications will provide important real time data for patients, physicians, insurers, and suppliers. In addition, it will revolutionalize the way information is managed in the healthcare industry and redefine the doctor - patient communication. This paper discusses different aspects of mobile healthcare. Specifically, it presents mobile applications in healthcare, and discusses possible challenges facing the development of mobile applications. Obstacles in developing mobile healthcare applications include mobile device limitations, wireless networking problems, infrastructure constraints, security concerns, and user distrust. Research issues in resolving or alleviating these problems are also discussed in the paper. PMID:16777784

  13. Social mobility and fertility.

    PubMed

    Kasarda, J D; Billy, J O

    1985-01-01

    This review examines 4 possible causal links between social mobility and fertility: 1) fertility affects social mobility; 2) social mobility affects fertility; 3) fertility and social mobility simultaneously affect each other; and 4) social mobility and fertility are unrelated. Due to the lack of systematic theory guiding the research, conceptualizations and measures of social mobility and fertility vary markedly from study to study, leading to inconsistent findings. The review focuses on theoretical perspectives underpinning the research, causal operators proposed to interpret observed associations, and analytical methods used. The selectivity perspective is based on the contention that a family must be small in order to rise on the social scale. This has found little support, however. In fact, studies suggest that children induce slightly higher levels of status achievement and family responsibilities may stimulate the energy and ambition of some so that they achieve more than they would have done without a family. Most studies have concerned the hypothesis that social mobility affects fertility. 4 theoretical perspectives have emerged: status enhancement; relative economic status; social isolation; and stress and disorientation. At any time in a couple's reproductive life cycle the decision or actual experience of either social mobility or fertility may influence the decision or actual experience of the other variable. Mobility-fertility research has defined an individual's or couple's position in terms of income, education, or occupation with occupation used most often as a single index of social class and indexes of social mobility developed by comparing persons' changes in occupational position. A common theme in much of the research literature is that the existence of an effect of social mobility on fertility depends on the societal conditions of a given population. Most studies through the mid-60s used a common measurement method to assess whether a

  14. ACTS mobile SATCOM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Frye, Robert E.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, the demand for reliable mobile satellite communications (satcom) for voice, data, and video applications has increased dramatically. As consumer demand grows, the current spectrum allocation at L-band could become saturated. For this reason, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are developing the Advanced Communications Technology Satellites (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) and are evaluating the feasibility of K/Ka-band (20/30 GHz) mobile satcom to meet these growing needs. U.S. industry and government, acting as co-partners, will evaluate K/Ka-band mobile satcom and develop new technologies by conducting a series of applications-oriented experiments. The ACTS and the AMT testbed will be used to conduct these mobile satcom experiments. The goals of the ACTS Mobile Experiments Program and the individual experiment configurations and objectives are further presented.

  15. Mobile learning in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  16. Mobile computing for radiology.

    PubMed

    Auffermann, William F; Chetlen, Alison L; Sharma, Arjun; Colucci, Andrew T; DeQuesada, Ivan M; Grajo, Joseph R; Kung, Justin W; Loehfelm, Thomas W; Sherry, Steven J

    2013-12-01

    The rapid advances in mobile computing technology have the potential to change the way radiology and medicine as a whole are practiced. Several mobile computing advances have not yet found application to the practice of radiology, while others have already been applied to radiology but are not in widespread clinical use. This review addresses several areas where radiology and medicine in general may benefit from adoption of the latest mobile computing technologies and speculates on potential future applications. PMID:24200475

  17. Exploring the mobility of mobile phone users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáji, Balázs Cs.; Browet, Arnaud; Traag, V. A.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Huens, Etienne; Van Dooren, Paul; Smoreda, Zbigniew; Blondel, Vincent D.

    2013-03-01

    Mobile phone datasets allow for the analysis of human behavior on an unprecedented scale. The social network, temporal dynamics and mobile behavior of mobile phone users have often been analyzed independently from each other using mobile phone datasets. In this article, we explore the connections between various features of human behavior extracted from a large mobile phone dataset. Our observations are based on the analysis of communication data of 100,000 anonymized and randomly chosen individuals in a dataset of communications in Portugal. We show that clustering and principal component analysis allow for a significant dimension reduction with limited loss of information. The most important features are related to geographical location. In particular, we observe that most people spend most of their time at only a few locations. With the help of clustering methods, we then robustly identify home and office locations and compare the results with official census data. Finally, we analyze the geographic spread of users’ frequent locations and show that commuting distances can be reasonably well explained by a gravity model.

  18. Doctors going mobile.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ron; Baum, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Having a Web page and a blog site are the minimum requirements for an Internet presence in the new millennium. However, a Web page that loads on a personal computer or a laptop will be ineffective on a mobile or cellular phone. Today, with more existing and potential patients having access to cellular technology, it is necessary to reconfigure the appearance of your Web site that appears on a mobile phone. This article discusses mobile computing and suggestions for improving the appearance of your Web site on a mobile or cellular phone. PMID:25807610

  19. Novel hard compositions and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1983-08-23

    Novel very hard compositions of matter are prepared by using in all embodiments only a minor amount of a particular carbide (or materials which can form the carbide in situ when subjected to heat and pressure); and no strategic cobalt is needed. Under a particular range of conditions, densified compositions of matter of the invention are prepared having hardnesses on the Rockwell A test substantially equal to the hardness of pure tungsten carbide and to two of the hardest commercial cobalt-bonded tungsten carbides. Alternately, other compositions of the invention which have slightly lower hardnesses than those described above in one embodiment also possess the advantage of requiring no tungsten and in another embodiment possess the advantage of having a good fracture toughness value. Photomicrographs show that the shapes of the grains of the alloy mixture with which the minor amount of carbide (or carbide-formers) is mixed are radically altered from large, rounded to small, very angular by the addition of the carbide. Superiority of one of these hard compositions of matter over cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide for ultra-high pressure anvil applications was demonstrated.

  20. Novel hard compositions and methods of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-08-23

    Novel very hard compositions of matter are prepared by using in all embodiments only a minor amount of a particular carbide (or materials which can form the carbide in situ when subjected to heat and pressure); and no strategic cobalt is needed. Under a particular range of conditions, densified compositions of matter of the invention are prepared having hardnesses on the Rockwell A test substantially equal to the hardness of pure tungsten carbide and to two of the hardest commercial cobalt-bonded tungsten carbides. Alternately, other compositions of the invention which have slightly lower hardnesses than those described above in one embodiment also possess the advantage of requiring no tungsten and in another embodiment possess the advantage of having a good fracture toughness value. Photomicrographs show that the shapes of the grains of the alloy mixture with which the minor amount of carbide (or carbide-formers) is mixed are radically altered from large, rounded to small, very angular by the addition of the carbide. Superiority of one of these hard compositions of matter over cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide for ultra-high pressure anvil applications was demonstrated. 3 figs.

  1. Analysis of pressure perturbation sources on a generic space launcher after-body in supersonic flow using zonal turbulence modeling and dynamic mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, Vladimir; Sayadi, Taraneh; Meinke, Matthias; Schmid, Peter; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    A sparsity promoting dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) combined with a classical data-based statistical analysis is applied to the turbulent wake of a generic axisymmetric configuration of an Ariane 5-like launcher at Ma∞ = 6.0 computed via a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes/large-eddy simulation (RANS/LES) method. The objective of this work is to gain a better understanding of the wake flow dynamics of the generic launcher by clarification and visualization of initially unknown pressure perturbation sources on its after-body in coherent flow patterns. The investigated wake topology is characterized by a subsonic cavity region around the cylindrical nozzle extension which is formed due to the displacement effect of the afterexpanding jet plume emanating from the rocket nozzle (Mae = 2.52, pe/p∞ = 100) and the shear layer shedding from the main body. The cavity region contains two toroidal counter-rotating large-scale vortices which extensively interact with the turbulent shear layer, jet plume, and rocket walls, leading to the shear layer instability process to be amplified. The induced velocity fluctuations in the wake and the ultimately resulting pressure perturbations on the after-body feature three global characteristic frequency ranges, depending on the streamwise position inside the cavity. The most dominant peaks are detected at SrD r3 = 0.85 ± 0.075 near the nozzle exit, while the lower frequency peaks, in the range of SrD r2 = 0.55 ± 0.05 and SrD r1 = 0.25 ± 0.05, are found to be dominant closer to the rocket's base. A sparse promoting DMD algorithm is applied to the time-resolved velocity field to clarify the origin of the detected peaks. This analysis extracts three low-frequency spatial modes at SrD = 0.27, 0.56, and 0.85. From the three-dimensional shape of the DMD modes and the reconstructed modulation of the mean flow in time, it is deduced that the detected most dominant peaks of SrD r3 ≈ 0.85 are caused by the radial flapping motion of

  2. "We Can Get Everything We Want if We Try Hard": Young People, Celebrity, Hard Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendick, Heather; Allen, Kim; Harvey, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on 24 group interviews on celebrity with 148 students aged 14-17 across six schools, we show that "hard work" is valued by young people in England. We argue that we should not simply celebrate this investment in hard work. While it opens up successful subjectivities to previously excluded groups, it reproduces neoliberal…

  3. Hard Water and Soft Soap: Dependence of Soap Performance on Water Hardness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osorio, Viktoria K. L.; de Oliveira, Wanda; El Seoud, Omar A.; Cotton, Wyatt; Easdon, Jerry

    2005-01-01

    The demonstration of the performance of soap in different aqueous solutions, which is due to water hardness and soap formulation, is described. The demonstrations use safe, inexpensive reagents and simple glassware and equipment, introduce important everyday topics, stimulates the students to consider the wider consequences of water hardness and…

  4. Research in the Hard Sciences, and in Very Hard "Softer" Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, D. C.

    2014-01-01

    The author of this commentary argues that physical scientists are attempting to advance knowledge in the so-called hard sciences, whereas education researchers are laboring to increase knowledge and understanding in an "extremely hard" but softer domain. Drawing on the work of Popper and Dewey, this commentary highlights the relative…

  5. Mobility and Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Theresa Z.

    A study examined the effect of geographic mobility on elementary school students' achievement. Although such mobility, which requires students to make multiple moves among schools, can have a negative impact on academic achievement, the hypothesis for the study was that it was not a determining factor in reading achievement test scores. Subjects…

  6. Mobile Marine Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, R. D.; Schaadt, M. S.

    1984-01-01

    Calfiornia State University (Long Beach) purchased a motor home and converted it into a mobile marine science display unit, outfitting it with built-in display racks inside and an awning to provide shelter displays suited to outdoor use. School activities and programs using the mobile museum are described. (JN)

  7. Mobile Apps for Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June L.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasing mobile environment, library and reading-related activities often take place on a phone or tablet device. Not only does this mean that library Web sites must keep mobile navigability in mind, but also develop and utilize apps that allow patrons to interact with information and with libraries. While apps do not serve every purpose,…

  8. Mastering Mobile Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Without proper security, mobile devices are easy targets for worms, viruses, and so-called robot ("bot") networks. Hackers increasingly use bot networks to launch massive attacks against eCommerce websites--potentially targeting one's online tuition payment or fundraising/financial development systems. How can one defend his mobile systems against…

  9. ACTS Mobile Terminals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Agan, Martin J.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) and its follow-on, the Broadband Aeronautical Terminal (BAT), have provided an excellent testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications systems. An overview of both of these terminals is presented in this paper.

  10. Mobile Goes Mainstream

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisele-Dyrli, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning--the use of mobile devices for educational purposes by students--is rapidly moving from an experimental initiative by a few innovative districts over the last five years to a broadly accepted concept in K12. The latest research and surveys, results of pilot programs, and analysis of trends in both public education and the broader…

  11. Mobile Learning Anytime, Anywhere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlodan, Oksana

    2010-01-01

    Some educational institutions are taking the leap to mobile learning (m-learning) by giving out free iPods. For example, Abilene Christian University gave iPods or iPhones to freshman students and developed 15 Web applications specifically for the mobile devices. The iPod is not the only ubiquitous m-learning device. Any technology that connects…

  12. Mobility control agent

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, P.A.; Phillips, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

    1983-05-17

    Polymer mobility control agents useful in supplemental oil recovery processes, which give improved reciprocal relative mobilities, are prepared by initiating the polymerization of a monomer containing a vinyl group with a catalyst comprising a persulfate and ferrous ammonium sulfate. The vinyl monomer is an acrylyl, a vinyl cyanide, a styryl and water soluble salts thereof.

  13. Extravehicular mobility unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, M. A.; Rouen, M. N.; Lutz, C. C.; Mcbarron, J. W., II

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) consisted of a highly mobile, anthropomorphic pressure vessel and a portable life support system. The EMU used for the first lunar landing is described along with the changes made in the EMU design during the program to incorporate the results of experience and to provide new capabilities. The performance of the EMU is discussed.

  14. Erosion testing of hard materials and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-29

    Erosion is the process by which unconstrained particles, usually hard, impact a surface, creating damage that leads to material removal and component failure. These particles are usually very small and entrained in fluid of some type, typically air. The damage that occurs as a result of erosion depends on the size of the particles, their physical characteristics, the velocity of the particle/fluid stream, and their angle of impact on the surface of interest. This talk will discuss the basics of jet erosion testing of hard materials, composites and coatings. The standard test methods will be discussed as well as alternative approaches to determining the erosion rate of materials. The damage that occurs will be characterized in genera1 terms, and examples will be presented for the erosion behavior of hard materials and coatings (both thick and thin).

  15. Solar flare hard X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    1988-01-01

    Recent hard X-ray observations of solar flares are reviewed with emphasis on results obtained with instruments on the solar maximum satellite. Flares with three sets of characteristics, designated as Type A, Type B, and Type C, are discussed and hard X-ray temporal, spatial spectral, and polarization measurements are reviewed in this framework. Coincident observations are reviewed at other wavelengths including the UV, microwaves, and soft X-rays, with discussions of their interpretations. In conclusion, a brief outline is presented of the potential of future hard X-ray observations with sub-second time resolution, arcsecond spatial resolution, and keV energy resolution, and polarization measurements at the few percent level up to 100 keV.

  16. Potential Health Impacts of Hard Water

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Pallav

    2013-01-01

    In the past five decades or so evidence has been accumulating about an environmental factor, which appears to be influencing mortality, in particular, cardiovascular mortality, and this is the hardness of the drinking water. In addition, several epidemiological investigations have demonstrated the relation between risk for cardiovascular disease, growth retardation, reproductive failure, and other health problems and hardness of drinking water or its content of magnesium and calcium. In addition, the acidity of the water influences the reabsorption of calcium and magnesium in the renal tubule. Not only, calcium and magnesium, but other constituents also affect different health aspects. Thus, the present review attempts to explore the health effects of hard water and its constituents. PMID:24049611

  17. Hard template synthesis of metal nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanowires (NWs) have attracted much attention because of their high electron conductivity, optical transmittance, and tunable magnetic properties. Metal NWs have been synthesized using soft templates such as surface stabilizing molecules and polymers, and hard templates such as anodic aluminum oxide, mesoporous oxide, carbon nanotubes. NWs prepared from hard templates are composites of metals and the oxide/carbon matrix. Thus, selecting appropriate elements can simplify the production of composite devices. The resulting NWs are immobilized and spatially arranged, as dictated by the ordered porous structure of the template. This avoids the NWs from aggregating, which is common for NWs prepared with soft templates in solution. Herein, the hard template synthesis of metal NWs is reviewed, and the resulting structures, properties and potential applications are discussed. PMID:25453031

  18. Saltwater and hard water bentonite mud

    SciTech Connect

    Pabley, A. S.

    1985-02-19

    A seawater/saltwater or hard water bentonite mud for use in drilling, and process for preparing same, comprising sequentially adding to seawater, to saltwater of a chloride concentration up to saturation, or hard water: a caustic agent; a filtration control agent; and bentonite. The resultant drilling mud meets API standards for viscosity and water loss, and is stable after aging and at tempertures in excess of 100/sup 0/ c. In another embodiment, the additives are premixed as dry ingredients and hydrated with seawater, saltwater or hard water. Unlike other bentonite drilling muds, the muds of this invention require no fresh water in their preparation, which makes them particularly useful at off-shore and remote on-shore drilling locations. The muds of this invention using bentonite further require less clay than known saltwater muds made with attapulgite, and provides superior filtration control, viscosity and stability.

  19. Hard template synthesis of metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-01-01

    Metal nanowires (NWs) have attracted much attention because of their high electron conductivity, optical transmittance, and tunable magnetic properties. Metal NWs have been synthesized using soft templates such as surface stabilizing molecules and polymers, and hard templates such as anodic aluminum oxide, mesoporous oxide, carbon nanotubes. NWs prepared from hard templates are composites of metals and the oxide/carbon matrix. Thus, selecting appropriate elements can simplify the production of composite devices. The resulting NWs are immobilized and spatially arranged, as dictated by the ordered porous structure of the template. This avoids the NWs from aggregating, which is common for NWs prepared with soft templates in solution. Herein, the hard template synthesis of metal NWs is reviewed, and the resulting structures, properties and potential applications are discussed. PMID:25453031

  20. Hard template synthesis of metal nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-11-01

    Metal nanowires (NWs) have attracted much attention because of their high electron conductivity, optical transmittance and tunable magnetic properties. Metal NWs have been synthesized using soft templates such as surface stabilizing molecules and polymers, and hard templates such as anodic aluminum oxide, mesoporous oxide, carbon nanotubes. NWs prepared from hard templates are composites of metals and the oxide/carbon matrix. Thus, selecting appropriate elements can simplify the production of composite devices. The resulting NWs are immobilized and spatially arranged, as dictated by the ordered porous structure of the template. This avoids the NWs from aggregating, which is common for NWs prepared with soft templates in solution. Herein, the hard template synthesis of metal NWs is reviewed, and the resulting structures, properties and potential applications are discussed.

  1. Hysteresis of misaligned hard-soft grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, X. L.; Zhao, G. P.; Zhang, X. F.; Xia, J.; Zhang, X. C.; Morvan, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    The demagnetization process in hard/soft multilayer systems has been investigated systematically within a self-contained micromagnetic model when a deviation angle β between the easy axis and the applied field exists. Hysteresis loops, spin distributions and energy products have been calculated with a finite hard layer thickness th. Both remanence and coercivity of the multilayer system decrease as β increases, leading to a significant decrease of the maximum energy product. A 30° deviation of the easy axis could result in a drop of the maximum energy product by more than 60%, which offers a possible explanation on the large discrepancy between the experimental and theoretical energy products. The effect of the finite hard layer thickness on the demagnetization process is important, which can only be ignored when th is large enough.

  2. Observational Aspects of Hard X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Tanmoy

    2016-04-01

    in retrieving polarization information from few of such spectroscopic instruments like RHESSI, INTEGRAL-IBIS, INTEGRAL-SPI. Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) onboard Astrosat, India's first astronomical mission, is one of such instruments which is expected to provide sensitive polarization measurements for bright X-ray sources. CZTI consists of 64 CZT detector modules, each of which is 5 mm thick and 4 cm × 4 cm in size. Each CZT module is subdivided into 256 pixels with pixel pitch of 2.5 mm. Due to its pixelation nature and significant Compton scattering efficiency at energies beyond 100 keV, CZTI can work as a sensitive Compton polarimeter in hard X-rays. Detailed Geant‑4 simulations and polarization experiments with the flight configuration of CZTI show that CZTI will have significant polarization measurement capability for bright sources in hard X-rays. CZTI is primarily a spectroscopic instrument with coded mask imaging. To properly utilize the spectroscopic capabilities of CZT detectors, it is important to generate accurate response matrix for CZTI, which in turn requires precise modelling of the CZT lines shapes for monoenergetic X-ray interaction. CZT detectors show an extended lower energy tail of an otherwise Gaussian line shape due to low mobility and lifetime of the charge carriers. On the other hand, interpixel charge sharing may also contribute to the lower energy tail making the line shape more complicated. We have developed a model to predict the line shapes from CZTI modules taking into account the mobility and lifetime of the charge carriers and charge sharing fractions. The model predicts the line shape quite well and can be used to generate pixel-wise response matrix for CZTI.

  3. Skylab mobile laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primeaux, G. R.; Larue, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab mobile laboratory was designed to provide the capability to obtain necessary data on the Skylab crewmen 30 days before lift-off, within 1 hour after recovery, and until preflight physiological baselines were reattained. The mobile laboratory complex consisted of six laboratories that supported cardiovascular, metabolic, nutrition and endocrinology, operational medicine, blood, and microbiology experiments; a utility package; and two shipping containers. The objectives and equipment requirements of the Skylab mobile laboratory and the data acquisition systems are discussed along with processes such as permanently mounting equipment in the individual laboratories and methods of testing and transporting the units. The operational performance, in terms of amounts of data collected, and the concept of mobile laboratories for medical and scientific experiments are evaluated. The Skylab mobile laboratory succeeded in facilitating the data collection and sample preservation associated with the three Skylab manned flights.

  4. Gone Mobile? (Mobile Libraries Survey 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2010-01-01

    Librarians, like patrons and researchers, are caught between traditional library service models and the promise of evolving information technologies. In recent years, professional conferences have strategically featured programs and presentations geared toward building a mobile agenda and adapting or adopting services to meet new demands of mobile…

  5. Geometrical characterization of hard-sphere systems.

    PubMed

    Richard, P; Oger, L; Troadec, J P; Gervois, A

    1999-10-01

    By using molecular dynamics simulations on a large number of hard spheres and the Voronoï tessellation we characterize hard-sphere systems geometrically at any packing fraction eta along the different branches of the phase diagram. Crystallization of disordered packings occurs only for a small range of packing fraction. For the other packing fractions the system behaves as either a fluid (stable or metastable) or a glass. We have studied the evolution of the statistics of the Voronoï tessellation during crystallization and characterized the apparition of order by an order parameter (Q(6)) built from spherical harmonics. PMID:11970312

  6. Fractal hard drives for quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, James R.

    2016-02-01

    A quantum hard drive, capable of storing qubits for unlimited timescales, would be very useful for quantum computation. Unfortunately, the most ideal solutions currently known can only be built in a universe of four spatial dimensions. In a recent publication (Brell 2016 New J. Phys. 18 013050), Brell introduces a new family of models based on these ideal solutions. These use fractal lattices, and result in models whose Hausdorff dimension is less than 3. This opens a new avenue of research towards a quantum hard drive that can be build in our own 3D universe.

  7. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... definition covers passenger vessels that must comply with 33 CFR parts 120 and 128. (b) Location. The..., Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  8. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... definition covers passenger vessels that must comply with 33 CFR parts 120 and 128. (b) Location. The..., Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  9. 33 CFR 165.835 - Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... definition covers passenger vessels that must comply with 33 CFR parts 120 and 128. (b) Location. The..., Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. 165.835 Section 165.835 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.835 Security Zone; Port of Mobile, Mobile Ship Channel, Mobile, AL. (a) Definition. As used...

  10. Advances in data representation for hard/soft information fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimland, Jeffrey C.; Coughlin, Dan; Hall, David L.; Graham, Jacob L.

    2012-06-01

    Information fusion is becoming increasingly human-centric. While past systems typically relegated humans to the role of analyzing a finished fusion product, current systems are exploring the role of humans as integral elements in a modular and extensible distributed framework where many tasks can be accomplished by either human or machine performers. For example, "participatory sensing" campaigns give humans the role of "soft sensors" by uploading their direct observations or as "soft sensor platforms" by using mobile devices to record human-annotated, GPS-encoded high quality photographs, video, or audio. Additionally, the role of "human-in-the-loop", in which individuals or teams using advanced human computer interface (HCI) tools such as stereoscopic 3D visualization, haptic interfaces, or aural "sonification" interfaces can help to effectively engage the innate human capability to perform pattern matching, anomaly identification, and semantic-based contextual reasoning to interpret an evolving situation. The Pennsylvania State University is participating in a Multi-disciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) program funded by the U.S. Army Research Office to investigate fusion of hard and soft data in counterinsurgency (COIN) situations. In addition to the importance of this research for Intelligence Preparation of the Battlefield (IPB), many of the same challenges and techniques apply to health and medical informatics, crisis management, crowd-sourced "citizen science", and monitoring environmental concerns. One of the key challenges that we have encountered is the development of data formats, protocols, and methodologies to establish an information architecture and framework for the effective capture, representation, transmission, and storage of the vastly heterogeneous data and accompanying metadata -- including capabilities and characteristics of human observers, uncertainty of human observations, "soft" contextual data, and information pedigree

  11. Electric field determination in the plasma-antenna boundary of a lower-hybrid wave launcher in Tore Supra through dynamic Stark-effect spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. H.; Goniche, M.; Klepper, C. C.; Hillairet, J.; Isler, R. C.; Bottereau, C.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Panayotis, S.; Pegourie, B.; Lotte, Ph; Colledani, G.; Caughman, J. B.; Harris, J. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Shannon, S. C.; Clairet, F.; Litaudon, X.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction of radio-frequency (RF) waves with the plasma in the near-field of a high-power wave launcher is now seen to be an important topic, both in understanding the channeling of these waves through the plasma boundary and in avoiding power losses in the edge. In a recent Letter, a direct non-intrusive measurement of a near antenna RF electric field in the range of lower hybrid (LH) frequencies (ELH) was announced (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 215005). This measurement was achieved through the fitting of Balmer series deuterium spectral lines utilizing a time dependent (dynamic) Stark effect model. In this article, the analysis of the spectral data is discussed in detail and applied to a larger range of measurements and the accuracy and limitations of the experimental technique are investigated. It was found through an analysis of numerous Tore Supra discharges that good quantitative agreement exists between the measured and full-wave modeled ELH when the launched power exceeds 0.5 MW. For low power the measurement becomes inaccurate utilizing the implemented passive spectroscopic technique because the spectral noise overwhelms the effect of the RF electric field on the line profile. Additionally, effects of the ponderomotive force are suspected at sufficiently high power.

  12. Electric field determination in the plasma-antenna boundary of a lower-hybrid wave launcher in Tore Supra through dynamic Stark-effect spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Elijah H.; Goniche, M.; Klepper, C. Christopher; Hillairet, J.; Isler, Ralph C.; Bottereau, C.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Panayotis, S.; Pegourie, B.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Harris, Jeffrey H.; Hillis, Donald Lee; Shannon, S.C.; Clairet, F.; Litaudon, X.

    2015-04-22

    Interaction of radio-frequency (RF) waves with the plasma in the near-field of a high-power wave launcher is now seen to be important, both in understanding the channeling of these waves through the plasma boundary and in avoiding power losses in the edge. In a recent Letter a direct non-intrusive measurement of a near antenna RF electric field in the range of lower hybrid (LH) frequencies ($E_{LH}$) was announced (Phys. Rev. Lett., 110:215005, 2013). The measurement was achieved through the fitting of Balmer series deuterium spectral lines utilizing a time dependent (dynamic) Stark effect model. In this article, the processing of the spectral data is discussed in detail and applied to a larger range of measurements and the accuracy and limitations of the experimental technique is investigated. We find through an analysis of numerous Tore Supra pulses that good quantitative agreement exists between the measured and full-wave modeled $E_{LH}$ when the launched power exceeds 0.5MW. For low power the measurement becomes formidable utilizing the implemented passive spectroscopic technique because the spectral noise overwhelms the effect of the RF electric field on the line profile. Additionally, effects of the ponderomotive force are suspected at sufficiently high power.

  13. Electric field determination in the plasma-antenna boundary of a lower-hybrid wave launcher in Tore Supra through dynamic Stark-effect spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Martin, Elijah H.; Goniche, M.; Klepper, C. Christopher; Hillairet, J.; Isler, Ralph C.; Bottereau, C.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Panayotis, S.; Pegourie, B.; et al

    2015-04-22

    Interaction of radio-frequency (RF) waves with the plasma in the near-field of a high-power wave launcher is now seen to be important, both in understanding the channeling of these waves through the plasma boundary and in avoiding power losses in the edge. In a recent Letter a direct non-intrusive measurement of a near antenna RF electric field in the range of lower hybrid (LH) frequencies (more » $$E_{LH}$$) was announced (Phys. Rev. Lett., 110:215005, 2013). The measurement was achieved through the fitting of Balmer series deuterium spectral lines utilizing a time dependent (dynamic) Stark effect model. In this article, the processing of the spectral data is discussed in detail and applied to a larger range of measurements and the accuracy and limitations of the experimental technique is investigated. We find through an analysis of numerous Tore Supra pulses that good quantitative agreement exists between the measured and full-wave modeled $$E_{LH}$$ when the launched power exceeds 0.5MW. For low power the measurement becomes formidable utilizing the implemented passive spectroscopic technique because the spectral noise overwhelms the effect of the RF electric field on the line profile. Additionally, effects of the ponderomotive force are suspected at sufficiently high power.« less

  14. State-of-the-art neoclassical tearing mode control in DIII-D using real-time steerable electron cyclotron current drive launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolemen, E.; Welander, A. S.; La Haye, R. J.; Eidietis, N. W.; Humphreys, D. A.; Lohr, J.; Noraky, V.; Penaflor, B. G.; Prater, R.; Turco, F.

    2014-07-01

    Real-time steerable electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been demonstrated to reduce the power requirements and time needed to remove 3/2 and 2/1 neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in the DIII-D tokamak. In a world first demonstration of the techniques required in ITER, the island formation onset is detected automatically, gyrotrons are turned on and the real-time steerable ECCD launcher mirrors are moved promptly to drive current at the location of the islands. This shrinks and suppresses the modes well before saturation using real-time motional Stark effect constrained equilibria reconstruction with advanced feedback and search algorithms to target the deposition. In ITER, this method will reduce the ECCD energy requirement and so raise Q by keeping the EC system off when the NTM is not present. Further, in the experiments with accurate tracking of pre-emptive ECCD to resonant surfaces, both 3/2 and 2/1 modes are prevented from appearing with much lower ECCD peak power than required for removal of a saturated mode.

  15. Lock-and-key dimerization in dense Brownian systems of hard annular sector particles.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Wade D; Mason, Thomas G

    2016-08-01

    We develop a translational-rotational cage model that describes the behavior of dense two-dimensional (2D) Brownian systems of hard annular sector particles (ASPs), resembling C shapes. At high particle densities, pairs of ASPs can form mutually interdigitating lock-and-key dimers. This cage model considers either one or two mobile central ASPs which can translate and rotate within a static cage of surrounding ASPs that mimics the system's average local structure and density. By comparing with recent measurements made on dispersions of microscale lithographic ASPs [P. Y. Wang and T. G. Mason, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 137, 15308 (2015)JACSAT0002-786310.1021/jacs.5b10549], we show that mobile two-particle predictions of the probability of dimerization P_{dimer}, equilibrium constant K, and 2D osmotic pressure Π_{2D} as a function of the particle area fraction ϕ_{A} correspond closely to these experiments. By contrast, predictions based on only a single mobile particle do not agree well with either the two-particle predictions or the experimental data. Thus, we show that collective entropy can play an essential role in the behavior of dense Brownian systems composed of nontrivial hard shapes, such as ASPs. PMID:27627263

  16. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A.; Truskett, Thomas M.; Swol, Frank van

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083–4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer’s enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics.

  17. Tuning structure and mobility of solvation shells surrounding tracer additives.

    PubMed

    Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Bollinger, Jonathan A; van Swol, Frank; Truskett, Thomas M

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations and a stochastic Fokker-Planck equation based approach are used to illuminate how position-dependent solvent mobility near one or more tracer particle(s) is affected when tracer-solvent interactions are rationally modified to affect corresponding solvation structure. For tracers in a dense hard-sphere fluid, we compare two types of tracer-solvent interactions: (1) a hard-sphere-like interaction, and (2) a soft repulsion extending beyond the hard core designed via statistical mechanical theory to enhance tracer mobility at infinite dilution by suppressing coordination-shell structure [Carmer et al., Soft Matter 8, 4083-4089 (2012)]. For the latter case, we show that the mobility of surrounding solvent particles is also increased by addition of the soft repulsive interaction, which helps to rationalize the mechanism underlying the tracer's enhanced diffusivity. However, if multiple tracer surfaces are in closer proximity (as at higher tracer concentrations), similar interactions that disrupt local solvation structure instead suppress the position-dependent solvent dynamics. PMID:25833590

  18. Judging hardness of an object from the sounds of tapping created by a white cane.

    PubMed

    Nunokawa, K; Seki, Y; Ino, S; Doi, K

    2014-01-01

    The white cane plays a vital role in the independent mobility support of the visually impaired. Allowing the recognition of target attributes through the contact of a white cane is an important function. We have conducted research to obtain fundamental knowledge concerning the exploration methods used to perceive the hardness of an object through contact with a white cane. This research has allowed us to examine methods that enhance accuracy in the perception of objects as well as the materials and structures of a white cane. Previous research suggest considering the roles of both auditory and tactile information from the white cane in determining objects' hardness is necessary. This experimental study examined the ability of people to perceive the hardness of an object solely through the tapping sounds of a white cane (i.e., auditory information) using a method of magnitude estimation. Two types of sounds were used to estimate hardness: 1) the playback of recorded tapping sounds and 2) the sounds produced on-site by tapping. Three types of handgrips were used to create different sounds of tapping on an object with a cane. The participants of this experiment were five sighted university students wearing eye masks and two totally blind students who walk independently with a white cane. The results showed that both sighted university students and totally blind participants were able to accurately judge the hardness of an object solely by using auditory information from a white cane. For the blind participants, different handgrips significantly influenced the accuracy of their estimation of an object's hardness. PMID:25571333

  19. 30 CFR 75.1720-1 - Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1720-1 Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard...

  20. 30 CFR 75.1720-1 - Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps; identification for newly employed, inexperienced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1720-1 Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard caps... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Distinctively colored hard hats, or hard...

  1. Limits of social mobilization.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-04-16

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  2. Mobile Lunar Base Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Marc M.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes three innovative concepts for a mobile lunar base. These concept combine design research for habitat architecture, mobility systems, habitability, radiation protection, human factors, and living and working environments on the lunar surface. The mobile lunar base presents several key advantages over conventional static base notions. These advantages concern landing zone safety, the requirement to move modules over the lunar surface, and the ability to stage mobile reconnaissance with effective systemic redundancy. All of these concerns lead to the consideration of a mobile walking habitat module and base design. The key issues involve landing zone safety, the ability to transport habitat modules across the surface, and providing reliability and redundancy to exploration traverses in pressurized vehicles. With self-ambulating lunar base modules, it will be feasible to have each module separate itself from its retro-rocket thruster unit, and walk five to ten km away from the LZ to a pre-selected site. These mobile modules can operate in an autonomous or teleoperated mode to navigate the lunar surface. At the site of the base, the mobile modules can combine together; make pressure port connections among themselves, to create a multi-module pressurized lunar base.

  3. Mobile sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  4. Mobile Sensing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  5. Limits of social mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Dsouza, Sohan; Moro, Esteban; Pentland, Alex; Rahwan, Iyad

    2013-01-01

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations over large geographies. Despite significant success, selection bias may lead to inflated expectations of the efficacy of social mobilization for these tasks. What are the limits of social mobilization, and how reliable is it in operating at these limits? We build on recent results on the spatiotemporal structure of social and information networks to elucidate the constraints they pose on social mobilization. We use the DARPA Network Challenge as our working scenario, in which social media were used to locate 10 balloons across the United States. We conduct high-resolution simulations for referral-based crowdsourcing and obtain a statistical characterization of the population recruited, geography covered, and time to completion. Our results demonstrate that the outcome is plausible without the presence of mass media but lies at the limit of what time-critical social mobilization can achieve. Success relies critically on highly connected individuals willing to mobilize people in distant locations, overcoming the local trapping of diffusion in highly dense areas. However, even under these highly favorable conditions, the risk of unsuccessful search remains significant. These findings have implications for the design of better incentive schemes for social mobilization. They also call for caution in estimating the reliability of this capability. PMID:23576719

  6. Hard error generation by thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.S.; Gover, J.E.; Wrobel, T.F.; Hass, K.J.; Nasby, R.D.; Simpson, R.L.; Posey, L.D.; Block, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The generation of hard errors in MNOS dielectric structures has been observed at thermal neutron fluence levels of 3.6 x 10/sup 13/ n/cm/sup 2/. Fission fragments from neutron induced fission of /sup 235/U contamination in ceramic lids have been shown to be responsible.

  7. Help! Libraries and the Hard of Hearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1982

    This transcript contains the text of three speeches on the problems of people with hearing impairments and the provision of library services to the hard of hearing. Howard Edward (Rocky) Stone, founder of Self-Help-For-Hearing-Impaired-People, Inc., describes his difficulties as a hearing impaired person, the growing number of Americans with…

  8. Clinical findings among hard metal workers.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbein, A; Luo, J C; Solomon, S J; Horowitz, S; Hailoo, W; Miller, A

    1992-01-01

    In 1940, the first report appeared describing a pulmonary disorder associated with occupational exposures in the cemented tungsten carbide industry. The disease, known as "hard metal disease," has subsequently been characterised in detail and comprises a wide range of clinical signs and symptoms. In this report, clinical findings in a group of 41 hard metal workers employed until recently are described. A high prevalence of respiratory symptoms was found. Thirteen workers (31%) had abnormal chest radiographs indicative of interstitial lung disease. Fifty per cent of these had been employed in hard metal manufacturing for less than 10 years. Abnormalities of pulmonary function were also frequent and included a restrictive pattern of impairment and decrease in diffusing capacity (27%). Associations were found between diffusing capacity, chest radiographic abnormalities and right ventricular ejection fraction at exercise indicating cardiopulmonary effects. The findings show the continuous need to control excessive occupational exposures to prevent hard metal disease, the history of which now enters its sixth decade. PMID:1733452

  9. Radiation-Hardness Data For Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, W. E.; Nichols, D. K.; Brown, S. F.; Gauthier, M. K.; Martin, K. E.

    1984-01-01

    Document presents data on and analysis of radiation hardness of various semiconductor devices. Data specifies total-dose radiation tolerance of devices. Volume 1 of report covers diodes, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors, silicon controlled rectifiers and optical devices. Volume 2 covers integrated circuits. Volume 3 provides detailed analysis of data in volumes 1 and 2.

  10. Hard Times: Philosophy and the Fundamentalist Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Randall Everett

    2005-01-01

    A close reading of Gradgrind's opening monologue of Hard Times by Charles Dickens will provide the starting off point for an examination of the role and place of philosophy in the music curriculum. The Gradgrind philosophy finds easy parallel to current thinking in American education. In the fundamentalist imagination, sources of ambiguity must be…

  11. PROTEIN TEMPLATES IN HARD TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    George, Anne; Ravindran, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    Biomineralization processes such as formation of bones and teeth require controlled mineral deposition and self-assembly into hierarchical biocomposites with unique mechanical properties. Ideal biomaterials for regeneration and repair of hard tissues must be biocompatible, possess micro and macroporosity for vascular invasion, provide surface chemistry and texture that facilitate cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation of lineage specific progenitor cells, and induce deposition of calcium phosphate mineral. To expect in-vivo like cellular response several investigators have used extracellular matrix proteins as templates to recreate in-vivo microenvironment for regeneration of hard tissues. Recently, several novel methods of designing tissue repair and restoration materials using bioinspired strategies are currently being formulated. Nanoscale structured materials can be fabricated via the spontaneous organization of self-assembling proteins to construct hierarchically organized nanomaterials. The advantage of such a method is that polypeptides can be specifically designed as building blocks incorporated with molecular recognition features and spatially distributed bioactive ligands that would provide a physiological environment for cells in-vitro and in-vivo. This is a rapidly evolving area and provides a promising platform for future development of nanostructured templates for hard tissue engineering. In this review we try to highlight the importance of proteins as templates for regeneration and repair of hard tissues as well as the potential of peptide based nanomaterials for regenerative therapies. PMID:20802848

  12. Recording the Hard Times: A Leader's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behm, Karen; Futrell, Eloise

    This document contains a leader's guide for Recording the Hard Times, a program designed to help young people between the ages of 11 and 15 handle the stress in their lives or the stress of their friends. It notes that the workbook is designed to be used in a group setting while the specific recording sessions are designed to be completed…

  13. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at 15..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED...

  14. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at 15..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED...

  15. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at 15..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED...

  16. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at 15..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED...

  17. 7 CFR 201.57 - Hard seeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., are to be counted as “hard seed.” If at the end of the germination period provided for legumes, okra... percentage of germination. For flatpea, continue the swollen seed in test for 14 days when germinating at 15..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED...

  18. A bibliography of micro-hardness testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, I. C.

    1981-09-01

    Arranged chronologically by year of publicaton, this bibliography cites about 900 articles and books which appeared between 1937 and 1980. In addition to hardness measurement and test procedures, ductility, machineability, wear resistance, and tensile strength are considered. An author index is provided.

  19. Playing Fields and Hard Surface Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education and Science, London (England).

    Guidelines are presented regarding the planning, layout, construction, and maintenance of outdoor playing fields for physical education. Consideration is given to the dual use of playing fields by the school and the community, the planning of hard surface playing areas, and specifications and bills of quantities. Maintenance costs of grass playing…

  20. Sustaining Transformation: "Resiliency in Hard Times"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarasci, Richard; Lieberman, Devorah

    2009-01-01

    The strategic, systemic, and encompassing evolution of a college or university spans a number of years, and the vagaries of economic cycles inevitably catch transforming institutions in mid-voyage. "Sustaining Transformation: Resiliency in Hard Times" presents a study of Wagner College as it moves into its second decade of purposeful institutional…