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Sample records for hard mobile launcher

  1. Mobile Launcher Moves for Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    In anticipation of launching NASA’s Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket later in this decade, engineers wanted to check the mobile launcher, or ML, to see how it would behave moving atop a craw...

  2. Time lapse: Mobile Launcher Moves

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mobile launcher returned from Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida following two weeks of structural and other testing. The 355-foot-tall structure is to be used by the Spac...

  3. 1. AERIAL VIEW, SHOWING MOBILE LAUNCHER. BASE IS CALLED LAUNCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, SHOWING MOBILE LAUNCHER. BASE IS CALLED LAUNCH PLATFORM AND TOWER ON RIGHT IS CALLED LAUNCH UMBILICAL TOWER, (LUT). - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  4. 6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. MOBILE LAUNCHER SIDE 4, SHOWING MILK STOOL AND LUT. PROTRUSION ON UPPER RIGHT HAND SIDE OF LUT IS SWING ARM NINE WHICH PROVIDED ACCESS TO CAPSULE OF LAUNCH VEHICLE WHILE ON LAUNCHER. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  5. 3. AERIAL VIEW OF MOBILE LAUNCHER. ON TOP OF LUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AERIAL VIEW OF MOBILE LAUNCHER. ON TOP OF LUT SITS A 25 TON HAMMERHEAD CRANE. STRUCTURE ON LEFT SIDE OF LAUNCH PLATFORM IS KNOWN AS A 'MILK STOOL' AND ALLOWS A SATURN 1B ROCKET TO BE USED IN PLACE OF THE SATURN V ROCKET. - Mobile Launcher One, Kennedy Space Center, Titusville, Brevard County, FL

  6. Time-Lapse: Mobile Launcher Moves to Launch Pad

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mobile launcher that will host NASA's Space Launch System and new Orion spacecraft was moved to Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to begin two weeks of structural and sys...

  7. Dr. Wernher Von Braun near the mobile launcher.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for manned space flight, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, are seen near the mobile launcher carrying a 363 foot tall Saturn V space launch vehicle as the rocket is rolled from the vehicle assembly building at KSC for its three mile trip to the launch pad.

  8. Acoustic and Vibration Environment for Crew Launch Vehicle Mobile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.

    2007-01-01

    A launch-induced acoustic environment represents a dynamic load on the exposed facilities and ground support equipment (GSE) in the form of random pressures fluctuating around the ambient atmospheric pressure. In response to these fluctuating pressures, structural vibrations are generated and transmitted throughout the structure and to the equipment items supported by the structure. Certain equipment items are also excited by the direct acoustic input as well as by the vibration transmitted through the supporting structure. This paper presents the predicted acoustic and vibration environments induced by the launch of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) from Launch Complex (LC) 39. The predicted acoustic environment depicted in this paper was calculated by scaling the statistically processed measured data available from Saturn V launches to the anticipated environment of the CLV launch. The scaling was accomplished by using the 5-segment Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) engine parameters. Derivation of vibration environment for various Mobile Launcher (ML) structures throughout the base and tower was accomplished by scaling the Saturn V vibration environment.

  9. Workers in the VAB move sling into place to lift Columbia to mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Workers in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) move a specially-built sling into place to lift Orbiter Columbia from the transfer aisle to the mobile launcher platform (27015); Columbia is lifted from the floor of the VAB transfer aisle (27016).

  10. STS-30 Atlantis, OV-104, at KSC LC Pad 39B atop mobile launcher platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, arrives at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39B atop mobile launcher platform. The fixed service structure (FSS) towers above OV-104, its external tank (ET), and its solid rocket boosters (SRBs). The rotating service structure (RSS) is retracted. The launch tower catwalks are also retracted.

  11. STS-30 Atlantis, OV-104, on the mobile launcher platform heads to KSC LC pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-30 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, riding atop the mobile launcher platform and the crawler transporter approaches Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) pad 39B. This backlit view highlights OV-104's profile, the external tank (ET), and one of the two solid rocket boosters (SRBs) as it moves up LC pad 39B incline.

  12. VIEW OF HB1 (VAB HIGH BAY) WITH MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF HB-1 (VAB HIGH BAY) WITH MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM (VEHICLE ACCESS PLATFORMS ARE VISIBLE IN THE CENTER), FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. Utilizing NX Advanced Simulation for NASA's New Mobile Launcher for Ares-l

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of NX to simulate the new Mobile Launcher (ML) for the Ares-I. It includes: a comparison of the sizes of the Saturn 5, the Space Shuttle, the Ares I, and the Ares V, with the height, and payload capability; the loads control plan; drawings of the base framing, the underside of the ML, beam arrangement, and the finished base and the origin of the 3D CAD data. It also reviews the modeling approach, meshing. the assembly Finite Element Modeling, the model summary. and beam improvements.

  14. Micro-unattended mobility system for grenade-launcher-deployed sensors (MUMS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sword, Lee F.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a robotic system that will provide limited mobility capability to ballistically deployed sensors for acquisition of intelligence from building interiors. The future of warfare is expected to shift from large-scale battles to smaller conflicts in increasingly urban environments. Success in such situations can be improved by providing the war fighter detailed information about the location, activities, and capabilities of the opponents. A limited mobility capability adds to the usefulness of grenade launcher deployed sensors in two important ways. First, it relaxes the targeting accuracy requirement allowing a higher probability of successful placement even at greater ranges. Second, it increases the covertness of the sensor by allowing precise placement in an unobtrusive location. Underlying technologies required to implement this approach include a method of attaching the sensor package to the wall and shock tolerant electronics.

  15. The STS-93 external tank and booster stack sits at the Mobile Launcher Platform park site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-93 stack of solid rocket boosters and external tank sits at the Mobile Launcher Platform park site waiting for lightning shield wires to be installed on the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) in the background. The stack is being temporarily stored outside the VAB while Space Shuttle Discovery undergoes repair to hail damage in High Bay 1. Discovery was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The STS-93 stack will be moved under the wires at the VAB for protection until Discovery returns to the pad, later this week. The scheduled date for launch of mission STS-96 is no earlier than May 27. STS-93 is targeted for launch on July 22, carrying the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  16. Survivability of the hardened mobile launcher when attacked by a hypothetical rapidly retargetable ICBM system. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, D.J.; Merrow, S.F.

    1986-03-01

    This thesis evaluates the survivability of the hardened mobile launcher system (HML) against a hypothetical enemy ICBM system. The hypothetical system has two key capabilities: it can obtain near real-time intelligence information regarding the HML's location, and it can be retargeted in flight (as necessary) according to the intelligence information. Thus, the hypothetical ICBM threat systems can attack individual HMLs directly rather than rely on a barrage attack against HML bases. Monte Carlo simulation is used to approach the problem. The model is an MBASIC computer program, written and runs on an Apple Macintosh computer. The model simulates the flight of the attacking ICBMs (there may be as few as one or as many as 14 warheads directed at each HML) and the random dispersal tactics of a single HML. The model determines the locations of the detonations and the location of the HML at time of detonation. Based on these locations, probability of kill due to peak-blast overpressure is calculated. A key parameter in the model is intelligence / retargeting cycle time -- the time required to obtain intelligence and retarget accordingly. This time is varied from 1-30 minutes. The model also allows variations in HML speed and hardness and threat system CEP. A subroutine for examining the effects of neutron fratricide on the attacking warheads is included (although the effects were found to be negligible). The thesis concludes that very small intelligence/retargeting cycle times are required for this to be an effective weapon system against the HML. Thus, with today's (or near future) technology, the HML can be considered a very survivable system.

  17. Chartering Launchers for Small Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Daniel

    The question of how to launch small satellites has been solved over the years by the larger launchers offering small satellites the possibility of piggy-backing. Specific fixtures have been developed and commercialized: Arianespace developed the ASAP interface, the USAF studied ESPA, NASA has promoted Shuttle launch possibilities, Russian authorities and companies have been able to find solutions with many different launchers... It is fair to say that most launcher suppliers have worked hard and finally often been able to find solutions to launch most small satellites into orbit. It is also true, however, that most of these small satellites were technology demonstration missions capable of accepting a wide range of orbit and launch characteristics: orbit altitude and inclination, launch date, etc. In some cases the small satellite missions required a well-defined type of orbit and have therefore been obliged to hire a small launcher on which they were the prime passenger. In our paper we would like to propose an additional solution to all these possibilities: launchers could plan well in advance (for example about 3 years), trips to precisely defined orbits to allow potential passengers to organize themselves and be ready on the D-Day. On the scheduled date the chartered launcher goes to the stated orbit while on another date, another chartered launcher goes to another orbit. The idea is to organize departures for space like trains or airplanes leaving on known schedules for known destinations.

  18. Sphere launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The sphere launcher was designed to eject a 200 lb, 15 in. diameter sphere from a space vehicle or missile, at a velocity of 58 ft/sec without imparting excessive lateral loads to the vehicle. This launching is accomplished with the vehicle operating in vacuum conditions and under a 9 g acceleration. Two principal elements are used: a high thrust, short burn time rocket motor and two snubbers for reducing the lateral loads to acceptable limits.

  19. Rotating mobile launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus holds remotely piloted arm that accelerates until launching speed is reached. Then vehicle and counterweight at other end of arm are released simultaneously to avoid structural damage from unbalanced rotating forces.

  20. 27. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER SLAB AND LAUNCHER RAIL WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER SLAB AND LAUNCHER RAIL WITH 7 INCH DIAMETER HOLE FOR SUPPORT CARRIAGE LOCKING PIN. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 5. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE OVER LAUNCHER SLAB TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VAL LAUNCHER BRIDGE OVER LAUNCHER SLAB TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR LOOKING NORTH. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. Generic Software Architecture for Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carre, Emilien; Gast, Philippe; Hiron, Emmanuel; Leblanc, Alain; Lesens, David; Mescam, Emmanuelle; Moro, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    The definition and reuse of generic software architecture for launchers is not so usual for several reasons: the number of European launcher families is very small (Ariane 5 and Vega for these last decades); the real time constraints (reactivity and determinism needs) are very hard; low levels of versatility are required (implying often an ad hoc development of the launcher mission). In comparison, satellites are often built on a generic platform made up of reusable hardware building blocks (processors, star-trackers, gyroscopes, etc.) and reusable software building blocks (middleware, TM/TC, On Board Control Procedure, etc.). If some of these reasons are still valid (e.g. the limited number of development), the increase of the available CPU power makes today an approach based on a generic time triggered middleware (ensuring the full determinism of the system) and a centralised mission and vehicle management (offering more flexibility in the design and facilitating the long term maintenance) achievable. This paper presents an example of generic software architecture which could be envisaged for future launchers, based on the previously described principles and supported by model driven engineering and automatic code generation.

  3. 4. VAL PARTIAL ELEVATION SHOWING LAUNCHER BRIDGE ON SUPPORTS, LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VAL PARTIAL ELEVATION SHOWING LAUNCHER BRIDGE ON SUPPORTS, LAUNCHER SLAB, SUPPORT CARRIAGE, CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE AND CAMERA TOWER LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Superconducting Magnetic Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed projectile launcher exploits Meissner effect to transfer much of kinetic energy of relatively massive superconducting plunger to smaller projectile, accelerating projectile to high speed. Because it operates with magnetic fields, launcher not limited by gas-expansion thermodynamics. Plunger energized mechanically and/or chemically, avoiding need for large electrical power supplies and energy-storage systems. Potential applications include launching of projectiles for military purposes and for scientific and industrial tests of hypervelocity impacts.

  5. Characterization of the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression Water in the Space Launch System Mobile Launcher Using Volume of Fluid Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Vehicle consists of a Core Stage with four RS-25 engines and two Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). This vehicle is launched from the Launchpad using a Mobile Launcher (ML) which supports the SLS vehicle until its liftoff from the ML under its own power. The combination of the four RS-25 engines and two SRBs generate a significant Ignition Over-Pressure (IOP) and Acoustic Sound environment. One of the mitigations of these environments is the Ignition Over-Pressure/Sound Suppression (IOP/SS) subsystem installed on the ML. This system consists of six water nozzles located parallel to and 24 inches downstream of each SRB nozzle exit plane as well as 16 water nozzles located parallel to and 53 inches downstream of the RS-25 nozzle exit plane. During launch of the SLS vehicle, water is ejected through each water nozzle to reduce the intensity of the transient pressure environment imposed upon the SLS vehicle. While required for the mitigation of the transient pressure environment on the SLS vehicle, the IOP/SS subsystem interacts (possibly adversely) with other systems located on the Launch Pad. One of the other systems that the IOP/SS water is anticipated to interact with is the Hydrogen Burn-Off Igniter System (HBOI). The HBOI system's purpose is to ignite the unburned hydrogen/air mixture that develops in and around the nozzle of the RS-25 engines during engine start. Due to the close proximity of the water system to the HBOI system, the presence of the IOP/SS may degrade the effectiveness of the HBOI system. Another system that the IOP/SS water may interact with adversely is the RS-25 engine nozzles and the SRB nozzles. The adverse interaction anticipated is the wetting, to a significant degree, of the RS-25 nozzles resulting in substantial weight of ice forming and water present to a significant degree upstream of the SRB nozzle exit plane inside the nozzle itself, posing significant additional blockage of the effluent that exits the nozzle

  6. View of Launcher #3 surface doors. Launcher #1 in background. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Launcher #3 surface doors. Launcher #1 in background. Image looking southwest - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. View of Launcher #3 surface doors. Launcher #1 in background ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Launcher #3 surface doors. Launcher #1 in background left, Launcher #2 in background right. Image looking west - Titan One Missile Complex 2A, .3 miles west of 129 Road and 1.5 miles north of County Line Road, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. EMACK electromagnetic launcher commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deis, D. W.; Scherbarth, D. W.; Ferrentino, G. L.

    1984-03-01

    The Laboratory Demonstration Electromagnetic Launcher Program (EMACK) was initiated in April 1979, with the objective to design, construct, and demonstrate a complete electromagnetic launcher (EML) system capable of accelerating projectiles of substantial mass to velocities significantly greater than those achievable with conventional chemical systems. The last hardware was installed in late 1981. During February 1982, a series of five test shots was made to evaluate the system's performance. Particular attention is given to the parameters of the final, as-built hardware, and the results of the commissioning tests. The results of these tests have demonstrated the viability of the components required for large scale electromagnetic launchers. It has been shown that large projectiles with velocities significantly greater than those achievable by chemical systems can be accelerated intact.

  9. Coilgun Launcher for Nanosatellites

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.

    1999-03-23

    Nanosatellite space launches could significantly benefit from an electrically powered launch complex, based on an electromagnetic coil launcher. This paper presents results of studies to estimate the required launcher parameters and some fixed facility issues. This study is based on electromagnetic launch, or electromagnetic gun technology, which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. A baseline configuration for analysis considers a payload mass of 10 kg, launch velocity of 6 km/s, a second stage solid booster for orbital insertion, and a payload fraction of about 0.1. The launch facility is envisioned as an inclined track, 1-2 km in length, mounted on a hillside at 25 degrees aimed in the orbital inclination of interest. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 2000 MJ and 2 MW electric. This energy would be supplied by 400 modules of energy storage and magnetic coils. With a prime power generator of 2 MW, a launch rate of some 200 satellites per day is possible. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened to launch acceleration on the order of 1000 gee. Parametric evaluations compare performance parameters for a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 4-8 km/s, and payloads of 1-100 kg. The EM launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. Most importantly, such a facility could reduce the cost per launch and could give true launch-on-demand capability for nanosatellites.

  10. Air-Powered Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, T.; Bjorklund, R. A.; Elliott, D. G.; Jones, L. K.

    1987-01-01

    Air-powered launcher fires plastic projectiles without using explosive propellants. Does not generate high temperatures. Launcher developed for combat training for U.S. Army. With reservoir pressurized, air launcher ready to fire. When pilot valve opened, sleeve (main valve) moves to rear. Projectile rapidly propelled through barrel, pushed by air from reservoir. Potential applications in seismic measurements, avalanche control, and testing impact resistance of windshields on vehicles.

  11. Rocket/launcher structural dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferragut, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The equations of motion describing the interactions between a rocket and a launcher were derived using Lagrange's Equation. A rocket launching was simulated. The motions of both the rocket and the launcher can be considered in detail. The model contains flexible elements and rigid elements. The rigid elements (masses) were judiciously utilized to simplify the derivation of the equations. The advantages of simultaneous shoe release were illustrated. Also, the loading history of the interstage structure of a boosted configuration was determined. The equations shown in this analysis could be used as a design tool during the modification of old launchers and the design of new launchers.

  12. Magnetic reconnection launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M.

    1987-04-06

    An electromagnetic launcher includes a plurality of electrical stages which are energized sequentially in the launcher with the passage of a projectiles. Each stage of the launcher includes two or more coils which are arranged coaxially on either closed-loop or straight lines to form gaps between their ends. The projectile has an electrically conductive gap-portion that passes through all the gaps of all the stages in a direction transverse to the axes of the coils. The coils receive an electric current, store magnetic energy, and convert a significant portion of the stored magnetic energy into kinetic energy of the projectile moves through the gap. The magnetic polarity of the opposing coils is in the same direction, e.g. N-S-N-S. A gap portion of the projectile may be made from aluminum and is propelled by the reconnection of magnetic flux stored in the coils which causes accelerating forces to act upon the projectile and at the horizontal surfaces of the projectile near its rear. The gap portion of the projectile may be flat, rectangular and longer than the length of the opposing coils. The gap portion of the projectile permits substantially unrestricted distribution of the induced currents so that current densities are only high where the useful magnetic force is high. This allows designs which permit ohmic oblation from the rear surfaces of the gap portion of the projectile allowing much high velocities to be achieved. An electric power apparatus controls the electric power supplied to the opposing coils until the gap portion of the projectile substantially occupies the gap between the coils, at which time the coils are supplied with peak current quickly. 8 figs.

  13. Electromagnetic Meissner effect launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An electromagnetic projectile launcher provides acceleration of a superconducting projectile through the diamagnetic repulsion of the superconducting projectile. A superconducting layer is provided aft of the projectile, either directly on the projectile or on a platform upon which the projectile is carried, and a traveling magnetic field is caused to propagate along a magnetic field drive coil in which the projectile is disposed. The resulting diamagnetic repulsion between the superconducting projectile and the traveling magnetic field causes the projectile to be propelled along the coil. In one embodiment, a segmented drive coil is used to generate the traveling magnetic field.

  14. Magnetic reconnection launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Maynard

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic launcher includes a plurality of electrical stages which are energized sequentially in synchrony with the passage of a projectile. Each stage of the launcher includes two or more coils which are arranged coaxially on either closed-loop or straight lines to form gaps between their ends. The projectile has an electrically conductive gap-portion that passes through all the gaps of all the stages in a direction transverse to the axes of the coils. The coils receive an electric current, store magnetic energy, and convert a significant portion of the stored magnetic energy into kinetic energy of the projectile by magnetic reconnection as the gap portion of the projectile moves through the gap. The magnetic polarity of the opposing coils is in the same direction, e.g. N-S-N-S. A gap portion of the projectile may be made from aluminum and is propelled by the reconnection of magnetic flux stored in the coils which causes accelerating forces to act upon the projectile at both the rear vertical surface of the projectile and at the horizontal surfaces of the projectile near its rear. The gap portion of the projectile may be flat, rectangular and longer than the length of the opposing coils and fit loosely within the gap between the opposing coils.

  15. Historic and Current Launcher Success Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, Randy

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reviews historic and current space launcher success rates from all nations with a mature launcher industry. Data from the 1950's through present day is reviewed for possible trends such as when in the launch timeline a failure occurred, which stages had the highest failure rate, overall launcher reliability, a decade by decade look at launcher reliability, when in a launchers history did failures occur, and the reliability of United States human-rated launchers. This information is useful in determining where launcher reliability can be improved and where additional measures for crew survival (i.e., Crew Escape systems) will have the greatest emphasis

  16. The SHARP scramjet launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cartland, H.; Fiske, P.; Greenwood, R.; Hargiss, D.; Heston, P.; Hinsey, N.; Hunter, J.; Massey, W.

    1995-01-10

    The worlds largest light gas gun at SHARP (Super High Altitude Research Project) is completed and in the past year has launched 9 scramjets. Typical masses and velocities are 5.9 kg at 2.8 km/sec.and 4.4 kg at 3.1 km/sec. In so doing SHARP launched the first fully functioning, hydrogen burning scramjet at mach 8. The SHARP launcher is unique in having a 4 inch diameter and 155 foot-long barrel. This enables lower acceleration launches than any other system. In addition the facility can deliver high energy projectiles to targets in the open air without having to contain the impact fragments. This allows one to track lethality test debris for several thousand feet.

  17. Dimensions and Measurements of Debuncher Band 3 and 4 Waveguide-Coax Launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ding; /Fermilab

    2000-09-13

    This note is a document about dimensions and measurement results of waveguide-coax launchers (Band 3 and 4) installed on the arrays in debuncher cooling upgrade. Shown in Figure 1 and 5 are schematic drawings of launchers (pick-up) in the cross section along the longitudinal direction (beam direction) of the arrays. The unit in these drawings is inch. Note: although there are upper band and lower band for pickup arrays, the launchers are the same to avoid possible confusion during installation. Launchers for band 3 and 4 kickers were made by Penn-engineering Inc., therefor no schematic drawings are presented in this note. RF Measurements were made on all launchers (port) and printed in hard copies for future reference. Since the measurement results are similar to each other, only a few plots for each type of launcher/band are presented in this document. There are two types of measured S11 parameters. One is the measurement made at the end of design/tuning stage using a launcher and a straight section of band 3 or 4 waveguide terminated with a cone of absorber. I use 'Original' to denote this kind of measurement. As shown in Figure 2, 6, 9 and 12, the original S11 of all launchers are below or around -20 db over the full band 3 or 4. The other type of measurement is the one made after these launchers were installed onto the array including several type N feedthrough or connectors, elbows, waveguide bends (kicker) and magic Ts (kicker) etc. The kicker arrays were terminated with wedges of absorber. During all measurements (pickup array or kicker array) when one launcher was being measured, all other launchers were terminated with 50 ohm terminator. As shown in Figure 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13 and 14 these 'final' S11s are around -15 db.

  18. The DSI small satellite launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, S.; Gibbons, D.; Wise, J.; Nguyen, D.

    1992-01-01

    A new launcher has been developed by DSI, that is compatible with the GAS canisters. It has the proven capability to deploy a satellite from an orbiting Shuttle that is 18 inches in diameter, 31 inches long, and weighing 190 pounds. These DSI Launchers were used aboard the Discovery (STS-39) in May 1991 as part of the Infrared Background Signature Survey (IBSS) to deploy three small satellites known as Chemical Release Observation (CRO) satellites A, B, and C. Because the satellites contained hazardous liquids (MMH, UDMH, and MON-10) and were launched from GAS Cylinders without motorized doors, the launchers were required to pass NASA Shuttle Payload safety and verification requirements. Some of the more interesting components of the design were the V-band retention and separation mechanism, the separation springs, and the launcher electronics which provided a properly inhibited release sequence operated through the Small Payload Accommodations Switch Panel (SPASP) on board the Orbiter. The original plan for this launcher was to use a motorized door. The launcher electronics, therefore has the capability to be modified to accommodate the door, if desired.

  19. 32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VAL, DETAIL SHOWING LOADING PLATFORM, PROJECTILE LOADING CAR, LAUNCHER SLAB AND UNDERSIDE OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 21. VAL, DETAIL OF MUZZLE END OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VAL, DETAIL OF MUZZLE END OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE SHOWING BOTH LAUNCHER TUBES TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR LOOKING NORTH. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. MULTIPLE ECH LAUNCHER CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN,M.T; PONCE,D; GRUNLOH,H.J; ELLIS,R.A; GROSNICKLE,W.H; HUMPHREY,R.L

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The addition of new, high power gyrotrons to the heating and current drive arsenal at DIII-D, required a system upgrade for control of fully steerable ECH Launchers. Each launcher contains two pointing mirrors with two degrees of mechanical freedom. The two flavors of motion are called facet and tilt. Therefore up to four channels of motion per launcher need to be controlled. The system utilizes absolute encoders to indicate mirror position and therefore direction of the microwave beam. The launcher movement is primarily controlled by PLC, but future iterations of design, may require this control to be accomplished by a CPU on fast bus such as Compact PCI. This will be necessary to accomplish real time position control. Safety of equipment and personnel is of primary importance when controlling a system of moving parts. Therefore multiple interlocks and fault status enunciators have been implemented. This paper addresses the design of a Multiple ECH Launcher Control System, and characterizes the flexibility needed to upgrade to a real time position control system in the future.

  2. 90. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'FRONT ELEVATION OF LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'FRONT ELEVATION OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE, CONNECTING BRIDGE AND BARGES' drawn at 1/4'=1'0'. (BUROD Sketch # 208247). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 89. 22'X34' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher 'ELEVATION OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. 22'X34' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher 'ELEVATION OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE ON TEMPORARY SUPPORT' drawn at 1'=20'. (BUORD Sketch # 209786, PAPW 1932). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Space transportation propulsion USSR launcher technology, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Space transportation propulsion U.S.S.R. launcher technology is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: Energia background (launch vehicle summary, Soviet launcher family) and Energia propulsion characteristics (booster propulsion, core propulsion, and growth capability).

  5. Control of an Aerospace Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbiri, N.; Manseur, Z.

    2009-03-01

    This research is within the framework of the PERSEUS project proposed by the CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales). Its aim is to develop new concepts for the attitude control of space modules. This article presents a first study as well as the results of a robust LQG control system that allows stable and satisfactory performance for the attitude of a rigid launcher.

  6. Dimensions and Measurements of Debuncher Band 1 and 2 Waveguide-Coax Launchers (Final Version)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ding

    2000-02-15

    This note is a document about dimensions and measurement results of waveguide-coax launchers (Band 1 and 2) installed on the arrays in debuncher cooling upgrade. Shown in Figure 1, 5, 8 and 12 are schematic drawings of launchers in the cross section along the longitudinal direction (beam direction) of the arrays. The unit in these drawings is inch. Note: although there are upper band and lower band for pickup arrays, the launchers are the same to avoid possible confusion during installation. RF Measurements were made on all launchers (port) and printed in hard copies for future reference. Since the measurement results are similar to each other, only a few plots for each type of launcher/band are presented in this document. There are two types of measured S11 parameters. One is the measurement made at the end of design/tuning stage using a straight section of band 1 or 2 waveguide terminated with a cone of absorber. I use 'Original' to denote this kind of measurement. As shown in Figure 2, 6, 9 and 13, the original S11 of all launchers are below or around - 20 db over the full band 1 or 2. The other type of measurement is the one made after these launchers were installed onto the array including elbows and several type N feedthrough or connectors. The kicker arrays were terminated with wedges of absorber. During all measurements (pickup array or kicker array) when one launcher was being measured, all other launchers were terminated with 50 ohm terminator. As shown in Figure 3, 4, 7, 10, 11 and 14 these 'final' S11s are around -15 db.

  7. Mobile hard substrata - An additional biodiversity source in a high latitude shallow subtidal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balazy, Piotr; Kuklinski, Piotr

    2013-03-01

    This study demonstrates the importance of a hard mobile substratum (hermit crab shells) for Arctic biodiversity. Based on previous observations from other geographic regions we hypothesized that this niche at high latitudes would support a higher biodiversity of epifauna than might be predicted from similar substrata. We test whether the hermit crab epifauna is specific to that substratum providing unique biodiversity components to the local community. From four study sites in Isfjorden (78°N), West Spitsbergen and two study sites in Northern Norway (69°N) we collected approximately 50 each of hermit crabs, gastropods and pebbles, of visually similar surface area using SCUBA diving. Hermit crab shells were colonized by a larger number of epifaunal species than either gastropods or pebbles, even when they were of a larger size. Among 87 taxa found on all the three substrata, 22 occurred only on hermit crab shells. Except for two study sites hermit crab shells also supported more individuals. This study shows that the contribution of shells carried by hermit crabs to high-latitude, shallow-subtidal diversity is higher than might be predicted by their surface area alone and that hermit crabs modify, maintain and create a unique habitat. This is the result of a number of factors interacting positively on the presence of epifauna including shell surface heterogeneity and the complex influence of the crab host.

  8. Electromagnetic launchers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, J. M.; Gully, J. H.; Driga, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    An electromagnetic launcher (EML) was designed for NASA-Langley to boost large models to hypervelocity for flight evaluation. Two different concepts were developed using railgun and coilgun principles. A coilgun was designed to accelerate a 14-kg mass to 6 km/s and, by adding additional equipment, to accelerate a 10-kg mass to 11 km/s. The railgun system was designed to accelerate only 14 kg to 6 km/s. Of significance in this development is the opportunity to use the launcher for aeroballistic research of the upper atmosphere, eventually placing packages in low earth orbit using a small rocket. The authors describe the railgun and coilgun launch designs and suggest a reconfiguration for placement of 150-kg parcels into low earth orbit for aeroballistic studies and possible space lab support. Each design is detailed along with the performance adjustments which would be required for circular orbit payload placement.

  9. New life for expendable launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ramon L.; Waskul, Greg

    The U.S. commercial expendable launch vehicle (ELV) industry is examined. The use of Titan, Delta, Atlas-Centaur, and Liberty boosters to launch domestic and foreign commercial payloads is analyzed. The ELV commercialization agreement which explains the division of liability between the parties is described. Consideration is given to the competition to the U.S. industry from Europe's Ariane, China's Long March, and the Soviet Proton launchers.

  10. Electromagnetic Meissner-Effect Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed electromagnetic Meissner-effect launching apparatus differs from previous electromagnetic launchers; no need for electromagnet coil on projectile. Result, no need for brush contacts and high-voltage commutation equipment to supply current directly to projectile coil, or for pulse circuitry to induce current in projectile coil if brush contacts not used. Compresses magnetic field surrounding rear surface of projectile, creating gradient of magnetic pressure pushing projectile forward.

  11. Traveling-wave induction launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of traveling-wave induction launchers shows that induction is a feasible method of producing armature current and that efficient accelerators can be built without sliding contacts or arcs. In a traveling-wave induction launcher the armature current is induced by a slip speed between the armature and a traveling magnetic field. At 9 m/s slip speed a 9 kg projectile with an aluminum armature weighing 25 percent of the total mass can be accelerated to 3000 m/s in a 5 m-long barrel with a total ohmic loss in the barrel coils and armature of 4 percent of the launch kinetic energy and with an average armature temperature rise of 220 deg C, but a peak excitation frequency of 8600 Hz is required. With a 2 kg launch mass the ohmic loss is 7 percent. A launcher system optimized for rotating generators would have a peak frequency of 4850 Hz; with an aluminum armature weighing 33 percent of the launch mass and a slip speed of 30 m/s the total ohmic loss in the generators, cables, and accelerator would be 43 percent of the launch kinetic energy, and the average armature temperature rise would be 510 deg C.

  12. A 10-stage reconnection demonstration launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cnare, E.G.; Widner, M.M.; Duggins, B.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a small-scale, 10-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher that has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Ten-gram projectiles are accelerated from rest to 317 m/s through the 0.44 m launcher assembly with a projectile kinetic energy to capacitor stored energy efficiency of 9%. Comparison of test results and computer code predictions are presented. Results of these studies have substantiated launcher scaling at small size and have provided a useful test bed for launcher components and diagnostics.

  13. An electomagnetic lunar launcher utilizing superconductivity technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilby, Curt; Nozette, Stewart; Kolm, Henry

    1989-01-01

    The application of superconductivity technology to the lunar launcher problem was considered, and a quenchgun concept was formulated to reduce the mass of the launcher system by incorporating the energy storage in the launcher itself and using the efficiency of the quenchgun to reduce the power requirements. A conceptual design for the quenchgun launcher is presented, and the integration of the system into a lunar base logistics model for evaluation is addressed. The results of these evaluations under the NASA Office of Exploration lunar base scenarios are reported.

  14. 18. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE ALONG THE SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VAL, DETAIL OF LAUNCHER BRIDGE ALONG THE SIDE OF THE 32' DIAMETER LAUNCHING TUBE LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER (VAL) CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER (VAL) CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING CAMERA TOWER STRUCTURE LOOKING SOUTH AND ARCHED OPENING FOR ROADWAY. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... approved under 46 CFR 160.028 must also be carried. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  17. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... approved under 46 CFR 160.028 must also be carried. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  18. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... approved under 46 CFR 160.028 must also be carried. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  19. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... approved under 46 CFR 160.028 must also be carried. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  20. 33 CFR 175.113 - Launchers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... approved under 46 CFR 160.028 must also be carried. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Launchers. 175.113 Section 175... SAFETY EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS Visual Distress Signals § 175.113 Launchers. (a) When a visual...

  1. Hypervelocity Launcher for Aerothermodynamic Experiments. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, Timothy J.; Bauer, David P.

    1995-01-01

    The capability of an Ultra Distributed Energy Store System (UDESS) powered electromagnetic launcher (EM) is experimentally assessed. The UDESS system was developed specifically to address the velocity speed limit seen in plasma armature EM launchers. Metal armature launch packages were also developed and tested to assess the usefulness of the UDESS concept for low velocity applications.

  2. The ESA activities on future launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfeffer, H.

    1984-01-01

    A future launcher development scenario depends on many assumptions, such as the impetus provided by the probability of future missions, and the political willingness of member states to undertake future developments. Because of the long timescale implied by a coherent launcher development, a step-wise approach within an overall future launcher development plan appears essential. The definition of development steps allows the launcher developments to be adapted to the driving external forces, so that no possible opportunity to Europe in the space launch business is missed out because of improper planning on the absence of a long term goal. The launcher senario, to be presented in 1985, forms part of Europe's overall STS plan for the future. This overall STS plan is one product of the complete STS LTPP, a first draft of which should exist by 1985, and which will be updated regularly to take into account the changing political and economic perspectives.

  3. Parameter studies for traveling wave coaxial launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, A.Y. . Center for Electromechanics)

    1991-01-01

    The traveling wave coaxial launcher is a complex machine that requires very extensive parameter studies to optimize. Most of previous attempts to realize hypervelocity using coaxial launchers have failed partly due to inadequate analyses. This paper reports the results of very extensive air-core coaxial launcher parameter studies performed using computers. These results and the methodology introduced should help future researchers on this topic. In the course of studying the feasibility of accelerating a 1-kg projectile to 10 km/s with an 18 m air-core multiphase coaxial launcher powered by a rising frequency generator (RFGs), a complete simulation code based on the current filament method was developed. Results from the simulation code indicate rather chaotic behavior of an arbitrary coaxial launcher design. More fundamental studies were then conducted using various computer codes based on the current filament method.

  4. Modeling of an Implosion Driven Hypervelocity Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew; Szirti, Daniel; Batchelor, Patrick; Zhang, Fan; Tanguay, Vincent

    2007-06-01

    Modelling work carried out on the implosion driven launcher under concurrent development is presented. The launcher consists of a thin walled metal tube surrounded by explosive which when detonated pinches the tube shut and drives a strong shock into the projectile. The commercial hydrocode LS-DYNA was used to quantitatively and qualitatively evaluate the design parameters of the launcher and their effect on implosion dynamics and performance. These parameters include fill pressure, tube diameter, explosive layer thickness, and explosives tampering. The launcher is primarily modeled using a quasi 2D Arbitrary Langrage Euler formulation. A full 3-D axisymmetric model is also employed. The model is evaluated against experimental data previously collected. Additional developmental work on a second stage launcher taking advantage of a phase velocity between the imploding tube and explosives via the use of angled flyer plates and cones is also carried out.

  5. Electrically actuated multiple store launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Frank P.; Travor, Bruce W.

    1991-12-01

    This invention comprises a multi-store, electrical pulse initiated launcher that fits into, and is electrically connected with a transporting vehicle and that contains sequentially stacked assemblies. An electrical pulse from the transporting vehicle causes a resistor with the least value to transfer the electric sufficient gas pressure to force the store out of the launcher. The present invention discloses an electrically-actuated, multi-store dispenser wherein an initial electrical charge ignites gas cartridges causing sequential launching of stores from their tandem position inside a launch container. In some environments, it is desirable to dispense multiple stores from a launch vehicle, for instance sonobuoys, in dense patterns. Due to physical limitations of space in the dispensing vehicle, an effort was made to miniaturize the active components inside the store and therefore reduce the overall outer dimensions thereof. Once the size of the store was reduced, in order to meet the demands of the denser patterns, the inside of the individual launch containers were modified to allow each to hold and dispense more than one store. This new type of launch container, in addition to maintaining the size requirement dictated by the transporting vehicle, is operated by the vehicle's electrical system.

  6. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Plöckl, B.; Lang, P. T.

    2013-10-15

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios.

  7. The enhanced ASDEX Upgrade pellet centrifuge launcher.

    PubMed

    Plöckl, B; Lang, P T

    2013-10-01

    Pellets played an important role in the program of ASDEX Upgrade serving both for investigations on efficient particle fuelling and high density scenarios but also for pioneering work on Edge Localised Mode (ELM) pacing and mitigation. Initially designed for launching fuelling pellets from the magnetic low field side, the system was converted already some time ago to inject pellets from the magnetic high field side as much higher fuelling efficiency was found using this configuration. In operation for more than 20 years, the pellet launching system had to undergo a major revision and upgrading, in particular of its control system. Furthermore, the control system installed adjacent to the launcher had to be transferred to a more distant location enforcing a complete galvanic separation from torus potential and a fully remote control solution. Changing from a hybrid system consisting of PLC S5/S7 and some hard wired relay control to a state of the art PLC system allowed the introduction of several new operational options enabling more flexibility in the pellet experiments. This article describes the new system architecture of control hardware and software, the operating procedure, and the extended operational window. First successful applications for ELM pacing and triggering studies are presented as well as utilization for the development of high density scenarios. PMID:24182110

  8. New Forms of Planetary Surface Exploration and Mobility Using Hard Landers and Propulsive Hoppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohanim, B.; Slagowski, S.; Murphy, S.; Hoffman, J.; Cunio, P.

    2012-06-01

    This paper will discuss some of the technological advances in using a smaller class of hard Landers, called penetrators, that would reduce the mass and cost and propellant of safely placing science payloads on the surface of another body.

  9. 30. VAL LOOKING DOWN THE LAUNCHER SLAB STAIRS AT THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VAL LOOKING DOWN THE LAUNCHER SLAB STAIRS AT THE PROJECTILE LOADING CAR AND LOADING PLATFORM ADJACENT TO THE PROJECTILE LOADING DECK AND LAUNCHER BRIDGE. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Technology demonstration for reusable launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiocco, P.; Bonnal, Ch.

    2016-03-01

    Reusable launchers have been studied under CNES contracts for more than 30 years, with early concepts such as STS-2000 or Oriflamme, more recently with very significant efforts devoted to Liquid Fly Back Boosters as with the Bargouzin project led with Tsniimash, TSTO with the Everest concept studied by Airbus-DS as prime contractor or the RFS Reusable First Stage concept of a large first stage associated to a cryotechnic second stage. These investigations, summarized in the first part of the paper, enabled CNES to identify clearly the technology requirements associated to reusability, as well as cost efficiency through detailed non-recurring costs and mission costs analysis. In parallel, CNES set in place development logic for sub-systems and equipment based on demonstrators, hardware test benches enabling maturation of technologies up to a TRL such that an actual development can be decided with limited risk. This philosophy has been applied so far to a large number of cases, such as TPTech and TPX for Hydrogen turbo pump, GGPX as demonstrator of innovative gas generator, HX demonstrator of modern cryotechnic upper stage with a dozen of different objectives (Thermal Protection, 20K Helium storage, measurements …). This virtuous approach, "learn as you test", is currently applied in the phased approach towards scaled down reusable booster stage, whose possibility to be used as first stage of a microlaunch vehicle is under investigation. The selected technologies allow paving the way towards reusable booster stages for Ariane 6 evolutions or main reusable stage for a further generation of heavy launchers. The paper describes the logic behind this project, together with the demonstration objectives set for the various sub-systems as well as operations.

  11. Computational design of hypervelocity launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.; Chhabildas, L.

    1993-12-31

    The Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher (HVL) uses impact techniques on a two-stage light-gas gun to launch flier plates to velocities in excess of 10 km/s. An important problem in designing successful third stage techniques for impact launching fliers to such velocities is detailed understanding of the interior ballistic performance of the third stage. This is crucial for preventing melt and fracture of the flier plates during the extraordinary accelerations that they undergo (accelerations on the order of 10{sup 9} g are typical on the HVL). We seek to optimize HVL launch conditions in order to achieve two major goals: first, to maximize the potential launch velocity for a given flier, and second, to allow different flier configurations. One tool that we can apply in studying HVL performance is the use of multi-dimensional wave propagation codes. We have used such codes, particularly the Sandia Eulerian code CTH, to study a variety of interior ballistics issues related to gun performance and launcher development for almost ten years. Recently this work has culminated in a major contribution to HVL design, namely the capability to launch ``chunk`` fliers. `Me initial phases of design development were solely devoted to CTH computations that studied potential designs, identified problems, and posed possible solutions for launching chunk fliers on the HVL. Our computations sufficiently narrowed the design space to the point that systematic experimental progress was possible. Our first experiment resulted in the successful launch of an intact 0.33 gram titanium alloy chunk flier to a velocity of 10.2 km/s. The thickness to diameter ratio of this flier was approximately 0.5.

  12. Distributed data fusion across multiple hard and soft mobile sensor platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsley, Gregory

    is a younger field than centralized fusion. The main issues in distributed fusion that are addressed are distributed classification and distributed tracking. There are several well established methods for performing distributed fusion that are first reviewed. The chapter on distributed fusion concludes with a multiple unmanned vehicle collaborative test involving an unmanned aerial vehicle and an unmanned ground vehicle. The third issue this thesis addresses is that of soft sensor only data fusion. Soft-only fusion is a newer field than centralized or distributed hard sensor fusion. Because of the novelty of the field, the chapter on soft only fusion contains less background information and instead focuses on some new results in soft sensor data fusion. Specifically, it discusses a novel fuzzy logic based soft sensor data fusion method. This new method is tested using both simulations and field measurements. The biggest issue addressed in this thesis is that of combined hard and soft fusion. Fusion of hard and soft data is the newest area for research in the data fusion community; therefore, some of the largest theoretical contributions in this thesis are in the chapter on combined hard and soft fusion. This chapter presents a novel combined hard and soft data fusion method based on random set theory, which processes random set data using a particle filter. Furthermore, the particle filter is designed to be distributed across multiple robots and portable computers (used by human observers) so that there is no centralized failure point in the system. After laying out a theoretical groundwork for hard and soft sensor data fusion the thesis presents practical applications for hard and soft sensor data fusion in simulation. Through a series of three progressively more difficult simulations, some important hard and soft sensor data fusion capabilities are demonstrated. The first simulation demonstrates fusing data from a single soft sensor and a single hard sensor in

  13. Study of new materials for railgun launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Poltanov, A.; Jygailo, N.; Bykov, M.; Glinov, A.; Svobodov, A.; Belyakov, A.; Chernetskaya, N.

    1997-01-01

    The description of new materials which can be used in railgun launchers is presented. Mo-W compositions in the Cu matrix, binary composites with anisotropic conductivity, ceramics and ceramic covers have been studied as materials for rails, solid armature and insulator respectively. The tests have been conducted on a 1m long railgun launcher with a section of the bore 10mm x 10mm using a current with the amplitude 350--400 kA. Main test results are demonstrated.

  14. Distributed data fusion across multiple hard and soft mobile sensor platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsley, Gregory

    is a younger field than centralized fusion. The main issues in distributed fusion that are addressed are distributed classification and distributed tracking. There are several well established methods for performing distributed fusion that are first reviewed. The chapter on distributed fusion concludes with a multiple unmanned vehicle collaborative test involving an unmanned aerial vehicle and an unmanned ground vehicle. The third issue this thesis addresses is that of soft sensor only data fusion. Soft-only fusion is a newer field than centralized or distributed hard sensor fusion. Because of the novelty of the field, the chapter on soft only fusion contains less background information and instead focuses on some new results in soft sensor data fusion. Specifically, it discusses a novel fuzzy logic based soft sensor data fusion method. This new method is tested using both simulations and field measurements. The biggest issue addressed in this thesis is that of combined hard and soft fusion. Fusion of hard and soft data is the newest area for research in the data fusion community; therefore, some of the largest theoretical contributions in this thesis are in the chapter on combined hard and soft fusion. This chapter presents a novel combined hard and soft data fusion method based on random set theory, which processes random set data using a particle filter. Furthermore, the particle filter is designed to be distributed across multiple robots and portable computers (used by human observers) so that there is no centralized failure point in the system. After laying out a theoretical groundwork for hard and soft sensor data fusion the thesis presents practical applications for hard and soft sensor data fusion in simulation. Through a series of three progressively more difficult simulations, some important hard and soft sensor data fusion capabilities are demonstrated. The first simulation demonstrates fusing data from a single soft sensor and a single hard sensor in

  15. Performance of an induction coil launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.; Cowan, M.; Kaye, R.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1993-12-31

    Performance of an electromagnetic induction launcher is considered for three types of armatures. These are: Solid, 1-element wound and 16-element wound aluminum armatures. The one element wound armature has uniform current density throughout. Because of the uniformity of the current density, the wound armature can withstand field reversal and still maintain low temperature. Slingshot simulations were performed for several configurations. Best performance was obtained for a single element wound armature with two field reversals. For a 60 kg projectile, 10.5 cm coil inner radius and 5.5 cm coil build, the velocity after 50 meters of launcher length (670 stages) exceeded 3.5 km/sec with an overall efficiency of about 45%. For the same parameters the solid and 16-element wound armatures reach a velocity of about 3.3 km/sec after 800 stages (60 meters of launcher length) but without field reversal. A velocity of 3.5 km/sec is possible after 60 meters of launcher length with the 16-element wound armature with one field reversal, but the temperature is close to the melting temperature of aluminum. In all simulations with a solid armature, melting of some of the surface material occurs. However, it is shown that most of the melting occurs after contribution has been made to the forward going pressure, that is, melting does not affect the electrical performance of the launcher. The effect of coil firing time jitter on launcher performance is also considered and is found to be very small for realistic perturbations. For {plus_minus} 2 {mu}-secs random jitter, the reduction in the final velocity for a 60 meter launcher with a solid armature is less than 0.1% and the increase in temperature is only 2%. This result holds for all types of armatures.

  16. Comparative modelling of lower hybrid current drive with two launcher designs in the Tore Supra tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Hillairet, J.; Aniel, T.; Basiuk, V.; Goniche, M.; Imbeaux, F.; Mazon, D.; Sharma, P.

    2013-08-01

    Fully non-inductive operation with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in the Tore Supra tokamak is achieved using either a fully active multijunction (FAM) launcher or a more recent ITER-relevant passive active multijunction (PAM) launcher, or both launchers simultaneously. While both antennas show comparable experimental efficiencies, the analysis of stability properties in long discharges suggest different current profiles. We present comparative modelling of LHCD with the two different launchers to characterize the effect of the respective antenna spectra on the driven current profile. The interpretative modelling of LHCD is carried out using a chain of codes calculating, respectively, the global discharge evolution (tokamak simulator METIS), the spectrum at the antenna mouth (LH coupling code ALOHA), the LH wave propagation (ray-tracing code C3PO), and the distribution function (3D Fokker-Planck code LUKE). Essential aspects of the fast electron dynamics in time, space and energy are obtained from hard x-ray measurements of fast electron bremsstrahlung emission using a dedicated tomographic system. LHCD simulations are validated by systematic comparisons between these experimental measurements and the reconstructed signal calculated by the code R5X2 from the LUKE electron distribution. An excellent agreement is obtained in the presence of strong Landau damping (found under low density and high-power conditions in Tore Supra) for which the ray-tracing model is valid for modelling the LH wave propagation. Two aspects of the antenna spectra are found to have a significant effect on LHCD. First, the driven current is found to be proportional to the directivity, which depends upon the respective weight of the main positive and main negative lobes and is particularly sensitive to the density in front of the antenna. Second, the position of the main negative lobe in the spectrum is different for the two launchers. As this lobe drives a counter-current, the resulting

  17. Resent Status of ITER Equatorial Launcher Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Kasugai, A.; Oda, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.

    2009-11-01

    The ITER equatorial launcher is divided into a front shield and a port plug. The front shield is composed of fourteen blanket shield modules so as to form three openings for the injection of mm-wave beams into plasma. Twenty-four waveguide transmission lines, internal shields, cooling pipes and so on are installed in the port plug. The transmission lines consist of the corrugated waveguides, miter bends and the free space propagation region utilizing two mirrors in front of the waveguide outlet. The analysis of mm-wave beam propagation in the region shows that the transmission efficiency more than 99.5% is attained. The high power experiments of the launcher mock-up have been carried out and the measured field patterns at each mirror and the outlet of the launcher are agreed with the calculations. It is concluded that the transmission line components in the launcher mock-up are fabricated as designed and the present mm-wave design in the launcher is feasible.

  18. Resent Status of ITER Equatorial Launcher Development

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Kasugai, A.; Oda, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.

    2009-11-26

    The ITER equatorial launcher is divided into a front shield and a port plug. The front shield is composed of fourteen blanket shield modules so as to form three openings for the injection of mm-wave beams into plasma. Twenty-four waveguide transmission lines, internal shields, cooling pipes and so on are installed in the port plug. The transmission lines consist of the corrugated waveguides, miter bends and the free space propagation region utilizing two mirrors in front of the waveguide outlet. The analysis of mm-wave beam propagation in the region shows that the transmission efficiency more than 99.5% is attained. The high power experiments of the launcher mock-up have been carried out and the measured field patterns at each mirror and the outlet of the launcher are agreed with the calculations. It is concluded that the transmission line components in the launcher mock-up are fabricated as designed and the present mm-wave design in the launcher is feasible.

  19. A general theory of DC electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Thomas G.; Timpson, Erik J.

    2015-08-01

    The non-linear, transient operation of DC electromagnetic launchers (EMLs) complicates their theoretical understanding and prevents scaling studies and performance comparisons without the aid of detailed numerical models. This paper presents a general theory for DC electromagnetic launchers that has simplified these tasks by identifying critical EML parameters and relationships affecting the EML's voltage, current, and power scaling, as well as its performance and energy conversion efficiency. EML parameters and relationships discussed in this paper include the specific force, the operating mode, the launcher constant, the launcher characteristic velocity, the contact characteristic velocity, the energy conversion efficiency, and the kinetic power and voltage-current scaling relationship. The concepts of the ideal EML, same-scale comparisons, and EML impedance are discussed. This paper defines conditions needed for the EML to operate in the steady-state. A comparison of the general theory with experimental results of several different types of DC (i.e., non-induction) electromagnetic launchers ranging from medium velocity (100's m/s) to high velocity (1000's m/s) is performed. There is good agreement between the general theory and the experimental results.

  20. DTRC electromagnetic launcher with feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emad, F. P.; Borraccini, J. P.; Waltman, D. J.; Fikse, T. H.; Ruby, W. R.; Superczynski, M. J.; Whitestone, R. C.; Thomas, E. V.

    1993-01-01

    Emad et al. (1989) described the development of an analytical model used to simulate, and aid in the design and construction, of a coaxial launcher. Attention is here given to a more powerful launcher, improved design methods, and the use of feedback to control the forces as the launch is taking place. The model is based on a variable set of differential equations that represent the electromagnetics of the system coupled with the mechanical equations of motion. This approach in modeling results in excellent accuracy, numerical stability, and efficiency. The simulation can be performed on a desktop computer. The resulting design was used to build a full scale model, which was then instrumented and tested. Both simulation and actual test results of the new launcher are presented.

  1. The ELF-I augmented electromagnetic launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikse, D. A.; Wu, J. L.; Thio, Y. C.

    1984-03-01

    Augmenting an electromagnetic launcher barrel with one or more turns can theoretically increase the launcher system performance more than twice that of a simple EML. This is accomplished by increasing the amount of magnetic flux in the bore and thus increasing the electromagnetic accelerating force. The potential for augmented barrels had yet to be evaluated, therefore a one meter long test barrel was designed and constructed. This barrel was tested in the ELF-I electromagnetic test facility and the results compared with the theoretically predicted performance of a simple barrel design. This comparison shows an increase in muzzle velocity of 83 percent for the augmented case over the simple launcher case. It was also found that the augmented barrel could be fabricated in a simple manner within the physical limitations of a conventional barrel size, and that its solid armatures provided an excellent method of achieving longer rail life, averaging 20 shots per rail set.

  2. 83. DETAIL OF THE MUZZLE END OF THE LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. DETAIL OF THE MUZZLE END OF THE LAUNCHER BRIDGE ON TEMPORARY SUPPORTS LOOKING NORTHEAST SHOWING TWO LAUNCHING TUBES, Date unknown, circa 1950'S. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 82. DETAIL OF THE MUZZLE END OF THE LAUNCHER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. DETAIL OF THE MUZZLE END OF THE LAUNCHER BRIDGE LOOKING NORTH SHOWING THE CONNECTING BRIDGE AND TWO LAUNCHING TUBES, Date unknown, circa 1952. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 79. VIEW OF VAL FIRING RANGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. VIEW OF VAL FIRING RANGE LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING LAUNCHER BRIDGE, BARGES, SONAR BUOY RANGE AND MORRIS DAM IN BACKGROUND, June 10, 1948. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Impurity Radiation From The LHCD Launcher During Operation In JET And Investigation Of Launcher Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kirov, K.K.; Mailloux, J.

    2005-09-26

    In this study, the most likely causes of the enhanced radiation in front of the LHCD launcher are investigated: fast ions from the warm plasma, fast electrons parasitically accelerated in front of the grill and arcs. Evidence for the presence of each of these mechanisms is discussed. The experimental conditions favouring the appearance of these phenomena and their impact on the launcher have also been highlighted.

  6. Electromagnetic coilgun launcher for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Lipinski, R.J.

    1996-03-01

    A ground-based electrically-powered launcher could significantly reduce the complexity and cost of space launches for moderate-weight payloads. The electromagnetic launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened. This paper presents results of a study to estimate the required launcher parameters, and estimate the cost of such a launch facility. This study is based on electromagnetic gun technology which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 40{endash}260 GJ and 20{endash}400 GW electric. Parametric evaluations have been conducted with a launcher length of 1{endash}2 km, exit velocity of 1{endash}6 km/s, and payloads to low earth orbit of 100{endash}1000 kg. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Electromagnetic coilgun launcher for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turman, B. N.; Lipinski, R. J.

    1996-03-01

    A ground-based electrically-powered launcher could significantly reduce the complexity and cost of space launches for moderate-weight payloads. The electromagnetic launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turn-around time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened. This paper presents results of a study to estimate the required launcher parameters, and estimate the cost of such a launch facility. This study is based on electromagnetic gun technology which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 40-260 GJ and 20-400 GW electric. Parametric evaluations have been conducted with a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 1-6 km/s, and payloads to low earth orbit of 100-1000 kg.

  8. Electromagnetic coilgun launcher for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Lipinski, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    A ground-based electrically-powered launcher could significantly reduce the complexity and cost of space launches for moderate-weight payloads. The EM launch complex could greatly reduce the amount of fuels handling, reduce the turnaround time between launches, allow more concurrence in launch preparation, reduce the manpower requirements for launch vehicle preparation and increase the reliability of launch by using more standardized vehicle preparations. The launch requires high acceleration, so the satellite package must be hardened. This paper presents results of a study to estimate the required launcher parameters, and estimate the cost of such a launch facility. This study is based on electromagnetic gun technology which is constrained to a coaxial geometry to take advantage of the efficiency of closely-coupled coils. The launcher energy and power requirements fall in the range of 40 {minus} 260 GJ and 20 {minus} 400 GW electric. Parametric evaluations have been conducted with a launcher length of 1-2 km, exit velocity of 1-6 kn/s, and payloads to low earth orbit of 100 1000 kg.

  9. Pulsed power requirements for electromagnetic launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Weldon, W.F.; Woodson, H.H.

    1984-03-01

    Both linear (railgun) and coaxial (mass driver, etc.) electromagnetic launchers (EMLs) are treated as time-varying impedances to determine the relationships between acceleration force, payload velocity, and power supply voltage and current. These relationships are then examined in the light of electromagnetic parameters associated with each EML type to establish a basis for determining and comparing power supply requirements for various EMLs.

  10. A Cost Effective Automatic Balloon Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Berrigan J. Michael

    2000-06-08

    Approximately 800,000 balloon-borne radiosondes are hand-launched each year, a cost and labor-intensive procedure. Development of a low-cost Automatic Radiosonde Launcher would allow the manual procedure to be replaced with a reliable and less expensive process. Balloon-borne radiosondes provide essential meteorological data used by forecasters and researchers around the globe. The National Weather service alone launches tens of thousands of sondes from sites across the US. Although worldwide launching of radiosondes has been done for many years, it remains a labor intensive and therefore expensive operation. Using its own funding and, more recently with the help of a Phase I SBIR grant, Visidyne, Inc. has begun investigating the feasibility of building an Automatic Radiosonde Launcher (ARL) that can be built at a cost that will be acceptable to the commercial marketplace. That work has led to the issuing of four patents covering important innovations that will allow us to meet that goal. Under the recent Phase I effort, solutions to many of the key problems have been tested in the laboratory and in real-world demonstrations in the field. The balloon filling, battery wetting, and launch release mechanisms were designed, built, and tested. A breadboard launcher was constructed and tested to prove feasibility of key system elements. Demonstration launches of radiosondes were performed using the breadboard launcher from the National Weather Service facility in Gray, ME, and from Hanscom AFB in Lexington, MA. The cost and size of a full scale shelter prevented us from building one during Phase I, however, we do have a design that will accomplish our goals. The Automatic Radiosonde Launcher will significantly reduce the cost of launching balloon-borne instruments. US and foreign weather services and atmospheric, climatological, and meteorological researchers will all benefit from this innovation.

  11. SIDON: A simulator of radio-frequency networks. Application to WEST ICRF launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, Walid; Dumortier, Pierre; Durodié, Frédéric; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Mollard, Patrick; Berger-By, Gilles; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Colas, Laurent; Lombard, Gilles; Maggiora, Riccardo; Magne, Roland; Milanesio, Daniele; Moreau, Didier

    2015-12-01

    SIDON (SImulator of raDiO-frequency Networks) is an in-house developed Radio-Frequency (RF) network solver that has been implemented to cross-validate the design of WEST ICRF launchers and simulate their impedance matching algorithm while considering all mutual couplings and asymmetries. In this paper, the authors illustrate the theory of SIDON as well as results of its calculations. The authors have built time-varying plasma scenarios (a sequence of launchers front-faces L-mode and H-mode Z-matrices), where at each time step (1 millisecond here), SIDON solves the RF network. At the same time, when activated, the impedance matching algorithm controls the matching elements (vacuum capacitors) and thus their corresponding S-matrices. Typically a 1-second pulse requires around 10 seconds of computational time on a desktop computer. These tasks can be hardly handled by commercial RF software. This innovative work allows identifying strategies for the launchers future operation while insuring the limitations on the currents, voltages and electric fields, matching and Load-Resilience, as well as the required straps voltage amplitude/phase balance. In this paper, a particular attention is paid to the simulation of the launchers behavior when arcs appear at several locations of their circuits using SIDON calculator. This latter work shall confirm or identify strategies for the arc detection using various RF electrical signals. One shall note that the use of such solvers in not limited to ICRF launchers simulations but can be employed, in principle, to any linear or linearized RF problem.

  12. Future launchers strategy : the ariane 2010 initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnal, Ch.; Eymard, M.; Soccodato, C.

    2001-03-01

    With the new cryogenic upper stage ESC, the European heavy launcher Ariane 5+ is perfectly suited to the space market envisioned for the coming decade: flexible to cope with any payload and commercially attractive despite a fierce competition. Current Arianespace projections for the following years 2010-2020 indicate two major trends: satellites may still become larger and may require very different final orbits; today's market largely dominated by GEO may well evolve, influenced by LEO operations such as those linked to ISS or by constellations, to remain competitive, the launch cost has to be reduced. The future generation of the European heavy launcher has therefore to focus on an ever increased flexibility with a drastic cost reduction. Two strategies are possible to achieve this double goal: reusable launchers, either partially or totally, may ease the access to space, limiting costly expendable stages; the assessment of their technical feasibility and financial viability is undergoing in Europe under the Future Launchers Technology Program (FLTP), expendable launchers, derived from the future Ariane 5+. This second way started by CNES at the end of year 1999 is called the "Ariane 2010 initiative". The main objectives are simultaneously an increase of 25% in performance and a reduction of 30% in launch cost wrt Ariane 5+. To achieve these very ambitious goals, numerous major modifications are studied: technical improvements : modifications of the Solid Rocket Boosters may consist in filament winding casing, increased loading, simplified casting, improved grain, simplified Thrust Vector Control, … evolution of the Vulcain engine leading to higher efficiency despite a simplified design, flow separation controlled nozzle extension, propellant management of the two cryogenic stages, simplified electrical system, increased standardization, for instance on flanged interfaces and manufacturing processes, operational improvements such as launch cycle simplification

  13. Three-phase hypervelocity projectile launcher

    DOEpatents

    Fugelso, L. Erik; Langner, Gerald C.; Burns, Kerry L.; Albright, James N.

    1994-01-01

    A hypervelocity projectile launcher for use in perforating borehole casings provides improved penetration into the surrounding rock structure. The launcher includes a first cylinder of explosive material that defines an axial air-filled cavity, a second cylinder of explosive material defining an axial frustum-shaped cavity abutting and axially aligned with the first cylinder. A pliant washer is located between and axially aligned with the first and second cylinders. The frustum shaped cavity is lined with a metal liner effective to form a projectile when the first and second cylinders are detonated. The washer forms a unique intermediate projectile in advance of the liner projectile and enables the liner projectile to further penetrate into and fracture the adjacent rock structure.

  14. Power and energy requirements for electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lottes, P. A.; Holtz, R. E.; Uherka, K. L.

    A large data base exists covering almost all aspects of the requirements for the successful development of electromagnetic launchers. To extend the use of electromagnetic launchers to the limits of technology for such exotic applications as hypervelocity weaponry or space launch systems, it is useful to examine the energy and power requirements for such uses. One way to do this is to purposely neglect all system losses in order to determine minimum power and energy requirements. Actual power requirements will most likely be higher by at least a factor of three. Calculations are presented for minimum power requirements, launch acceleration time, projectile kinetic energy, and projectile inertial force as a function of projectile mass, projectile terminal velocity, and the length of the launch tube. Results of these calculations are presented.

  15. Launchers - The first 50-year cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoe, G. K. C.

    1986-11-01

    An assessment is made of the development history of spacecraft launch vehicles to the present date, with attention to mission economics and the criteria of profitability. Three technological generations are postulated: that dominated by expendable launch vehicles, lasting from 1957 to the introduction of the Space Shuttle; the Space Shuttle period of semireusable launch vehicles; and the soon-to-be-inaugurated era of fully reusable launchers which are expected to begin operations around the year 2000.

  16. Conference on electromagnetic guns and launchers, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Anon

    1982-01-01

    Proceedings includes 31 papers dealing with the physical principles and engineering technology associated with the development of electromagnetic propulsion, with emphasis on its use for guns, launchers as well as other military equipment. Topics covered include: rail guns, projectiles, mass accelerators, electric motors and generators, nuclear reactors, superconducting devices, plasma acceleration and confinement, traveling magnetic waves, aerospace propulsion, space shuttles, homopolar generators, fusion reactors, tokamaks, impact fusion, and electric power generation. 14 papers are abstracted and indexed separately.

  17. Mercury: Little Joe (LJ1) launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Technicians attach the escape tower to the Mercury capsule prior to assembly with Little Joe (LJ1) launcher, August 20, 1959. Joseph Shortal describe this as follows (vol. 3., p. 33): 'The escape tower and rocket motors were taken from the Mercury capsule production. The tower is shown being attached to the capsule.... The escape rocket was a Grand Central 1-KS-52000 motor with three canted nozzles. The tower-jettison motor was an Atlantic Research Corp. 1.4-KS-785 motor. This was the same design tested in a beach abort test...and had the offset thrust line as used in the beach abort test to insure that the capsule would get away from the booster in an emergency. The escape system weighed 1,015 pounds, including 236 pounds of ballast for stability.' 'The Little Joe booster was assembled at Wallops on its special launcher in a vertical attitude. It is shown in the [on the left] with the work platform in place. The launcher was located on a special concrete slab in Launching Area 1. The capsule was lowered onto the booster by crane.... After the assembly was completed, the scaffolding was disassembled and the launcher pitched over to its normal launch angle of 80 degrees.... Little Joe had a diameter of 80 inches and an overall length, including the capsule and escape tower of 48 feet. The total weight at launch was about 43,000 pounds. The overall span of the stabilizing fins was 21.3 feet.' 'Although in comparison with the overall Mercury Project, Little Joe was a simple undertaking, the fact that an attempt was made to condense a normal two-year project into a 6-month one with in house labor turned it into a major undertaking for Langley.'

  18. Mercury: Little Joe (LJ1) launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Technicians adjust the rocket motor during the attachment of the escape tower to the Mercury capsule prior to assembly with Little Joe (LJ1) launcher, August 20, 1959. Joseph Shortal wrote (vol. 3., p. 33): 'The escape tower and rocket motors were taken from the Mercury capsule production. The tower is shown being attached to the capsule.... The escape rocket was a Grand Central 1-KS-52000 motor with three canted nozzles. The tower-jettison motor was an Atlantic Research Corp. 1.4-KS-785 motor. This was the same design tested in a beach abort test...and had the offset thrust line as used in the beach abort test to insure that the capsule would get away from the booster in an emergency. The escape system weighed 1,015 pounds, including 236 pounds of ballast for stability.' 'The Little Joe booster was assembled at Wallops on its special launcher in a vertical attitude. It is shown in the [on the left] with the work platform in place. The launcher was located on a special concrete slab in Launching Area 1. The capsule was lowered onto the booster by crane.... After the assembly was completed, the scaffolding was disassembled and the launcher pitched over to its normal launch angle of 80 degrees.... Little Joe had a diameter of 80 inches and an overall length, including the capsule and escape tower of 48 feet. The total weight at launch was about 43,000 pounds. The overall span of the stabilizing fins was 21.3 feet.' 'Although in comparison with the overall Mercury Project, Little Joe was a simple undertaking, the fact that an attempt was made to condense a normal two-year project into a 6-month one with in house labor turned it into a major undertaking for Langley.'

  19. Mercury: Little Joe (LJ1) launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Technicians attach the escape tower to the Mercury capsule prior to assembly with Little Joe (LJ1) launcher, August 20, 1959. Joseph Shortal describe this as follows (vol. 3., p. 33): 'The escape tower and rocket motors were taken from the Mercury capsule production. The tower is shown being attached to the capsule.... The escape rocket was a Grand Central 1-KS-52000 motor with three canted nozzles. The tower-jettison motor was an Atlantic Research Corp. 1.4-KS-785 motor. This was the same design tested in a beach abort test...and had the offset thrust line as used in the beach abort test to insure that the capsule would get away from the booster in an emergency. The escape system weighed 1,015 pounds, including 236 pounds of ballast for stability.' 'The Little Joe booster was assembled at Wallops on its special launcher in a vertical attitude. It is shown in the [on the left] with the work platform in place. The launcher was located on a special concrete slab in Launching Area 1. The capsule was lowered onto the booster by crane.... After the assembly was completed, the scaffolding was disassembled and the launcher pitched over to its normal launch angle of 80 degrees.... Little Joe had a diameter of 80 inches and an overall length, including the capsule and escape tower of 48 feet. The total weight at launch was about 43,000 pounds. The overall span of the stabilizing fins was 21.3 feet.' 'Although in comparison with the overall Mercury Project, Little Joe was a simple undertaking, the fact that an attempt was made to condense a normal two-year project into a 6-month one with in house labor turned it into a major undertaking for Langley.' - Published in Joseph A. Shortal, History of Wallops Station: Origins and Activities Through 1949, (Wallops Island, VA: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Wallops Station, nd), Comment Edition.

  20. Final Report Advanced Quasioptical Launcher System

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Neilson

    2010-04-30

    This program developed an analytical design tool for designing antenna and mirror systems to convert whispering gallery RF modes to Gaussian or HE11 modes. Whispering gallery modes are generated by gyrotrons used for electron cyclotron heating of fusion plasmas in tokamaks. These modes cannot be easily transmitted and must be converted to free space or waveguide modes compatible with transmission line systems.This program improved the capability of SURF3D/LOT, which was initially developed in a previous SBIR program. This suite of codes revolutionized quasi-optical launcher design, and this code, or equivalent codes, are now used worldwide. This program added functionality to SURF3D/LOT to allow creating of more compact launcher and mirror systems and provide direct coupling to corrugated waveguide within the vacuum envelope of the gyrotron. Analysis was also extended to include full-wave analysis of mirror transmission line systems. The code includes a graphical user interface and is available for advanced design of launcher systems.

  1. INPAGN_Launcher_V3.DLL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-05-01

    INPAGN_Launcher_v3.DLL is a preprocessor and postprocessor used to integrate the INPAG-N code (Monitor Scientific, LLC) with the GoldSim{trademark} code (GoldSim Technology Group, LLC). The program is intended as a DLL for use with a GoldSim{trademark} model file. The code is executed through a call from the GoldSim.exe during runtime. The code allocates parameters to memory to receive data from subsequent calls from goldsim.exe when the model is run. The goldsim.exe passes input values to themore » INPAGN_Launcher_v3.DLL during runtime, which comprise a single array of values (Appendix C, GoldSim Users Guide, GoldSim Technology Group, 2006). The DLL parses the GoldSim array in (*) into the allocated memory and then writes a new INPAG-N input file using the values passed by goldsim.exe. This software is used as part of a modeling package that consists of INPAGN.EXE, INPAGNH.EXE, INPAGNHI.EXE, INPAGNV2.EXE, INPAGNV21.EXE, GoldSim{trademark}, and INPAGN_Launcher_v3.DLL.« less

  2. Nuclear analyses for the ITER ECRH launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Heidinger, R.; Spaeh, P.; Stickel, S.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.

    2008-05-01

    Computational results of the nuclear analyses for the ECRH launcher integrated into the ITER upper port are presented. The purpose of the analyses was to provide the proof for the launcher design that the nuclear requirements specified in the ITER project can be met. The aim was achieved on the basis of 3D neutronics radiation transport calculations using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. In the course of the analyses an adequate shielding configuration against neutron and gamma radiation was developed keeping the necessary empty space for mm-waves propagation in accordance with the ECRH physics guidelines. Different variants of the shielding configuration for the extended performance front steering launcher (EPL) were compared in terms of nuclear response functions in the critical positions. Neutron damage (dpa), nuclear heating, helium production rate, neutron and gamma fluxes have been calculated under the conditions of ITER operation. It has been shown that the radiation shielding criteria are satisfied and the supposed shutdown dose rates are below the ITER nuclear design limits.

  3. Nondestructive inspection of a composite missile launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, O.; Chung, S.; Butera, M.; Valatka, T.; Triplett, M. H.; Godinez, V.

    2012-05-01

    Lighter weight alternatives are being sought to replace metallic components currently used in high performance aviation and missile systems. Benefits of lightweight, high strength carbon fiber reinforced composites in missile launchers and rocket motor cases include improved fuel economy, increased flight times, enhanced lethality and/or increased velocity. In this work, various nondestructive inspection techniques are investigated for the damage assessment of a composite missile launcher system for use in U.S. Army attack helicopters. The launcher system, which includes rails and a hardback, can be subject to impact damage from accidental tool drops, routine operation, and/or ballistic threats. The composite hardback and the launch rails both have complex geometries that can challenge the inspection process. Scanning techniques such as line scanning thermography, ultrasonic, and acousto-ultrasonics will be used and compared to determine damage detection accuracy, reliability, and efficiency. Results will also be compared with visual observations to determine if there is a correlation. The goal is to establish an inspection method that quickly and accurately assesses damage extent in order to minimize service time and return the missile system back into the field [1].

  4. Design and development of mode launcher for high frequency Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Sinha, A. K.; Khatun, H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and development of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher for high frequency and high power Gyrotron. A Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for converting TE22,6 mode to a Gaussian mode has been designed for 120 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron. The initial design of mode launcher has been optimized using LOT/SURF-3D software. The mode launcher diameter and length are optimized considering the minimum return loss and the minimum insertion loss by using CST microwave studio. The return loss (S11) and insertion loss (S21) performance of helical cut smooth wall mode launcher have been obtained using CST-Microwave Studio. The fabrication of Vlasov-type helical cut mode launcher for 120 GHz Gyrotron has also been carried out.

  5. Photographic copy of photograph, view of rail launcher used for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, view of rail launcher used for 'Baby Corporal E' missiles on 6 and 7 May 1946 at JPL-Muroc Army Air Base (later Edwards Air Force Base) (This launcher was also used for 'Baby WAC' missiles at Goldstone, Fort Irwin, California in 1945). Photocopy of 35mm photograph made in December 1994, looking west with Test Stand 'A' immediately behind the rail launcher. - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Multirail electromagnetic launcher powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonin, A. G.; Butov, V. G.; Panchenko, V. P.; Sinyaev, S. V.; Solonenko, V. A.; Shvetsov, G. A.; Yakushev, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The operation of an electromagnetic multirail launcher of solids powered from a pulsed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is studied. The plasma flow in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the possibility of launching solids in a rapid-fire mode of launcher operation are considered. It is shown that this mode of launcher operation can be implemented by matching the plasma flow dynamics in the channel of the pulsed MHD generator and the launching conditions. It is also shown that powerful pulsed MHD generators can be used as a source of electrical energy for rapid-fire electromagnetic rail launchers operating in a burst mode.

  7. Robotsonde: New concept of automatic radiosonde launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, R.; Charpentier, P.; Ricaud, G.

    2009-09-01

    Beyond SR2K2 receiving system, MODEM has introduced a new concept of low cost automatic launcher for Upper-Air meteorological station. This new product so called RobotSonde has been developed according to following purposes: • Make operator task easier • Reduce possibility of error and wrong handling during preparation/launch phase • Increase percentage of successful soundings and available data on GTS • Increase security of persons specially when hydrogen is used for inflating the balloon • Facilitate staff management during out of normal working hours (Night or week-end) • Reduce global running costs of sounding stations (possible reduction of global staff)

  8. Stationkeeping with two-way electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordley, Gerald David

    1994-11-01

    This study is motivated by previous proposals for electromagnetic launchers (EML) to launch payloads from the moon and space stations. With the advent of modern computer-controlled attitude and velocity control systems on the payload it is possible for EML to decelerate as well as launch payloads. In view of this, a two-way EML-equipped design to generate significant outward velocity without loss of reaction mass is realized. This model indicates that, in-addition to L1 stationkeeping, satellite could be pushed away from planets, or planets away from the sun, without loss of reaction mass.

  9. An investigation of electromagnetic launcher repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Mark W.; Cornette, James B.; Brown, Jere L.

    1992-07-01

    Electromagnetic launcher (EML) performance repeatability has been identified as a potential development issue for several years. Investigation of this issue has been difficult because an EML that is powered on a relatively continuous basis to provide long duration operation has not been available. A battery charged capacitor power system has enabled long duration, 6 to 7 seconds, EML experiments. This paper provides a summary of an experiment to investigate EML launch to launch performance consistency. A series of 8 ten-shot bursts, each separated by 15 to 30 minutes, performed in a single day using a single set of bore materials is the subject of this paper.

  10. 7. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER DEDICATION PLAQUE SHOWING JAMES H. JENNISON (LEFT), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER DEDICATION PLAQUE SHOWING JAMES H. JENNISON (LEFT), AND W.H. SAYLOR (RIGHT), AT THE DEDICATION CEREMONY, May 7, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. New coplanar waveguide to rectangular waveguide end launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, R. N.; Taub, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    A new coplanar waveguide to rectangular waveguide end launcher is experimentally demonstrated. The end launcher operates over the Ka-band frequencies that are designated for the NASA Advanced Communication Technology Satellite uplink. The measured insertion loss and return loss are better than 0.5 and -10 dB, respectively.

  12. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA STATION 1400 (BUILDING NO. 42021), VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA STATION 1400 (BUILDING NO. 42021), VIEW OF EXTERIOR LOOKING NORTHEAST WITH CAMERA STATION IN 1100 (BUILDING NO. 42020) BACKGROUND. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 1. VARIABLEANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VARIABLE-ANGLE LAUNCHER CAMERA CAR, VIEW OF CAMERA CAR AND TRACK WITH CAMERA STATION ABOVE LOOKING NORTH TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. 23. VIEW DOWN INTO LAUNCHER AND FLAME BUCKET FROM STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW DOWN INTO LAUNCHER AND FLAME BUCKET FROM STATION 48 IN SLC-3W MST. NOTE REMOVABLE METAL PLANKS BELOW LAUNCHER AND ROPE NET OVER FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  15. Explosively driven hypervelocity launcher: Second-stage augmentation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results are described of a continuing study aimed at developing a two-stage explosively driven hypervelocity launcher capable of achieving projectile velocities between 15 and 20 km/sec. The testing and evaluation of a new cylindrical impact technique for collapsing the barrel of two-stage launcher are reported. Previous two-stage launchers have been limited in ultimate performance by incomplete barrel collapse behind the projectile. The cylindrical impact technique explosively collapses a steel tube concentric with and surrounding the barrel of the launcher. The impact of the tube on the barrel produces extremely high stresses which cause the barrel to collapse. The collapse rate can be adjusted by appropriate variation of the explosive charge and tubing parameters. Launcher experiments demonstrated that the technique did achieve complete barrel collapse and form a second-stage piston. However, jetting occurred in the barrel collapse process and was responsible for severe projectile damage.

  16. Modeling the effects of surfactant, hardness, and natural organic matter on deposition and mobility of silver nanoparticles in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Min; Heo, Jiyong; Her, Namguk; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Jang, Min; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-10-15

    This study aims to provide insights into the mechanisms governing the deposition and retention of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in saturated porous media. Column experiments were conducted with quartz sand under saturated conditions to investigate the deposition kinetics of AgNPs, their mobility at different groundwater hardnesses (10-400 mg/L as CaCO3), and humic acid (HA, 0-50 mg/L as dissolved organic carbon [DOC]). An anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), was used as a dispersing agent to prepare a SDS-AgNPs suspension. The deposition kinetics of AgNPs were highly sensitive to the surfactant concentration, ionic strength, and cation type in solution. The breakthrough curves (BTCs) of SDS-AgNPs suggested that the transport and retention were influenced by groundwater hardness and HA. At low water hardness and high HA, high mobility of SDS-AgNPs was observed in saturated conditions. However, the retention of SDS-AgNPs increased substantially in very hard water with a low concentration of HA, because of a decreased primary energy barrier and the straining effect during the course of transport experiments. A modified clean-bed filtration theory and a two-site kinetic attachment model showed good fits with the BTCs of SDS-AgNPs. The fitted model parameters (katt and kstr) could be used successfully to describe that the retention behaviors were dominated by electrostatic and electrosteric repulsion, based on extended Derjaguin-Landau-Vaerwey-Overbeek calculations. PMID:27429353

  17. A hypervelocity projectile launcher for well perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, J.N.; Fugelso, L.E.; Lagner, G.C.; Burns, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    Current oil well perforation techniques use low- to medium-velocity gun launchers for completing wells in soft rock. Shaped-charge jets are normally used in harder, more competent rock. A device to create a much higher velocity projectile was designed. This launcher will provide an alternative technique to be used when the conventional devices do not yield the maximum well performance. It is an adaptation of the axial cavity in a high explosive (HE) annulus design, with the axial cavity being filled with a low density foam material. Two configurations were tested; both had an HE annulus filled with organic foam, one had a projectile. Comparison of the two shots was made. A time sequence of Image Intensifier Camera photographs and sequential, orthogonal flash x-ray radiographs provided information on the propagation of the foam fragments, the first shock wave disturbance, the projectile motion and deformation, and the direct shock wave transmission from the main HE charge. DYNA2D calculations were made to assist in the experimental interpretation. 25 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Non-US electrodynamic launchers research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.; Batteh, J.H.; Greig, J.R.; Keefer, D.; McNab, I.R.; Zabar, Z.

    1994-11-01

    Electrodynamic launcher research and development work of scientists outside the United States is analyzed and assessed by six internationally recognized US experts in the field of electromagnetic and electrothermal launchers. The assessment covers five broad technology areas: (1) Experimental railguns; (2) Railgun theory and design; (3) Induction launchers; (4) Electrothermal guns; (5) Energy storage and power supplies. The overall conclusion is that non-US work on electrodynamic launchers is maturing rapidly after a relatively late start in many countries. No foreign program challenges the US efforts in scope, but it is evident that the United States may be surpassed in some technologies within the next few years. Until recently, published Russian work focused on hypervelocity for research purposes. Within the last two years, large facilities have been described where military-oriented development has been underway since the mid-1980s. Financial support for these large facilities appears to have collapsed, leaving no effective effort to develop practical launchers for military or civilian applications. Electrodynamic launcher research in Europe is making rapid progress by focusing on a single application, tactical launchers for the military. Four major laboratories, in Britain, France, Germany, and the Netherlands, are working on this problem. Though narrower in scope than the US effort, the European work enjoys a continuity of support that has accelerated its progress. The next decade will see the deployment of electrodynamic launcher technology, probably in the form of an electrothermal-chemical upgrade for an existing gun system. The time scale for deployment of electromagnetic launchers is entirely dependent on the level of research-and-development effort. If resources remain limited, the advantage will lie with cooperative efforts that have reasonably stable funding such as the present French-German program.

  19. Use of mobile phones for improving vaccination coverage among children living in rural hard-to-reach areas and urban streets of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jasim; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Horng, Lily; Labrique, Alain; Vasudevan, Lavanya; Zeller, Kelsey; Chowdhury, Mridul; Larson, Charles P; Bishai, David; Alam, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    In Bangladesh, full vaccination rates among children living in rural hard-to-reach areas and urban streets are low. We conducted a quasi-experimental pre-post study of a 12-month mobile phone intervention to improve vaccination among 0-11 months old children in rural hard-to-reach and urban street dweller areas. Software named "mTika" was employed within the existing public health system to electronically register each child's birth and remind mothers about upcoming vaccination dates with text messages. Android smart phones with mTika were provided to all health assistants/vaccinators and supervisors in intervention areas, while mothers used plain cell phones already owned by themselves or their families. Pre and post-intervention vaccination coverage was surveyed in intervention and control areas. Among children over 298 days old, full vaccination coverage actually decreased in control areas--rural baseline 65.9% to endline 55.2% and urban baseline 44.5% to endline 33.9%--while increasing in intervention areas from rural baseline 58.9% to endline 76*8%, difference +18.8% (95% CI 5.7-31.9) and urban baseline 40.7% to endline 57.1%, difference +16.5% (95% CI 3.9-29.0). Difference-in-difference (DID) estimates were +29.5% for rural intervention versus control areas and +27.1% for urban areas for full vaccination in children over 298 days old, and logistic regression adjusting for maternal education, mobile phone ownership, and sex of child showed intervention effect odds ratio (OR) of 3.8 (95% CI 1.5-9.2) in rural areas and 3.0 (95% CI 1.4-6.4) in urban areas. Among all age groups, intervention effects on age-appropriate vaccination coverage were positive: DIDs +13.1-30.5% and ORs 2.5-4.6 (p<0.001 in all comparisons). Qualitative data showed the intervention was well-accepted. Our study demonstrated that a mobile phone intervention can improve vaccination coverage in rural hard-to-reach and urban street dweller communities in Bangladesh. This small-scale successful

  20. Non-Rocket Missile Rope Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    The method, installation, and estimation for delivering payload and missiles into outer space are presented. This method uses, in general, the engines and straight or closed-loop cables disposed on a planet surface. The installation consists of a space apparatus, power drive stations located along trajectory of the apparatus, the cables connected to the apparatus and to the power stations, a system for suspending the cable, and disconnected device. The drive stations accelerate the apparatus up to hypersonic speed. The estimations and computations show the possibility of making these projects a reality in a short period of time (see attached project: launcher for missiles and loads). The launch will be very cheap $1-$2 per LB. We need only light strong cable, which can be made from artificial fibers, whiskers, nanotubes, which exist in industry and scientific laboratories.

  1. Infrared tracker for a portable missile launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.J.

    1993-07-13

    An infrared beam tracker is described for arrangement to a housing that is unitary with a portable missile launcher, comprising: a rotating beam splitter positioned to intercept the infrared beam passing a first portion of the beam through the beam splitter along a first direction and reflecting the remaining portion along a different direction; a first infrared detector for receiving the beam reflected portion from the beam splitter and produce electric signals responsive thereto; a second infrared detector for receiving the beam portion that passes through the beam splitter and providing electric signals responsive thereto; and means interconnected to the first and second infrared detectors and responsive to the electric signals generated by said detectors for determining errors in missile flight direction and communicating course correction information to the missile.

  2. Electromagnetic launcher control using Finite State Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Jeffrey M.; Cornette, James B.; Heyse, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper shows the continued viability of sequential Finite State Machines (FSM's) as a means to control the sequencing of Electromagnetic Launcher (EWL) systems. While computer controlled sequencing is an attractive alternative, FSM's are easy to design, inexpensive, and reliable. Several FSM controllers are currently in use for the long duration EML experiments at the Hypervelocity Research Facility, Eglin AFB, FL. This paper discusses the basic system design with reference to design procedure and systems interfacing. Flexibility, and the fail-safe nature of the FSM (i.e., system interrupt capability) are also discussed. Where requirements include repeatability, reliability, ease of operation, relative low cost, and flexibility, the FSM is presented as a reasonable alternative to more expensive computer-based systems.

  3. Electromagnetic launcher control using finite state machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Jeffrey M.; Cornette, James B.; Heyse, Mark W.

    1992-07-01

    This paper shows the continued viability of sequential Finite State Machines (FSM's) as a means to control the sequencing of Electromagnetic Launcher (EWL) systems. While computer controlled sequencing is an attractive alternative, FSM's are easy to design, inexpensive, and reliable. Several FSM controllers are currently in use for the long duration EML experiments at the Hypervelocity Research Facility, Eglin AFB, FL. This paper discusses the basic system design with reference to design procedure and systems interfacing. Flexibility, and the fail-safe nature of the FSM (i.e., system interrupt capability) are also discussed. Where requirements include repeatability, reliability, ease of operation, relative low cost, and flexibility, the FSM is presented as a reasonable alternative to more expensive computer-based systems.

  4. Shuttle Hitchhiker Experiment Launcher System (SHELS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daelemans, Gerry

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Shuttle Small Payloads Project (SSPP), in partnership with the United States Air Force and NASA's Explorer Program, is developing a Shuttle based launch system called SHELS (Shuttle Hitchhiker Experiment Launcher System), which shall be capable of launching up to a 400 pound spacecraft from the Shuttle cargo bay. SHELS consists of a Marman band clamp push-plate ejection system mounted to a launch structure; the launch structure is mounted to one Orbiter sidewall adapter beam. Avionics mounted to the adapter beam will interface with Orbiter electrical services and provide optional umbilical services and ejection circuitry. SHELS provides an array of manifesting possibilities to a wide range of satellites.

  5. The microspace launcher: first step to the fully air-breathing space launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falempin, F.; Bouchez, M.; Calabro, M.

    2009-09-01

    A possible application for the high-speed air-breathing propulsion is the fully or partially reusable space launcher. Indeed, by combining the high-speed air-breathing propulsion with a conventional rocket engine (combined cycle or combined propulsion system), it should be possible to improve the average installed specific impulse along the ascent trajectory and then make possible more performing launchers and, hopefully, a fully reusable one. During the last 15 years, a lot of system studies have been performed in France on that subject within the framework of different and consecutive programs. Nevertheless, these studies never clearly demonstrated that a space launcher could take advantage of using a combined propulsion system. During last years, the interest to air-breathing propulsion for space application has been revisited. During this review and taking into account technologies development activities already in progress in Europe, clear priorities have been identified regarding a minimum complementary research and technology program addressing specific needs of space launcher application. It was also clearly identified that there is the need to restart system studies taking advantage of recent progress made regarding knowledge, tools, and technology and focusing on more innovative airframe/propulsion system concepts enabling better trade-off between structural efficiency and propulsion system performance. In that field, a fully axisymmetric configuration has been considered for a microspace launcher (10 kg payload). The vehicle is based on a main stage powered by air-breathing propulsion, combined or not with liquid rocket mode. A "kick stage," powered by a solid rocket engine provides the final acceleration. A preliminary design has been performed for different variants: one using a separated booster and a purely air-breathing main stage, a second one using a booster and a main stage combining air-breathing and rocket mode, a third one without separated

  6. An Ergonomic Evaluation of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Space Suit Hard Upper Torso (HUT) Size Effect on Metabolic, Mobility, and Strength Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Christopher; Harvill, Lauren; England, Scott; Young, Karen; Norcross, Jason; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the performance differences between a nominally sized Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit and a nominal +1 (plus) sized EMU. Method: This study evaluated suit size conditions by using metabolic cost, arm mobility, and arm strength as performance metrics. Results: Differences between the suit sizes were found only in shoulder extension strength being 15.8% greater for the plus size. Discussion: While this study was able to identify motions and activities that were considered to be practically or statistically different, it does not signify that use of a plus sized suit should be prohibited. Further testing would be required that either pertained to a particular mission critical task or better simulates a microgravity environment that the EMU suit was designed to work in.

  7. 56. VIEW OF LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHWEST. NITROGEN CONTROL UNIT ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. VIEW OF LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHWEST. NITROGEN CONTROL UNIT ON RIGHT; UMBILICAL MAST ON LEFT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. LH Power Losses In Front of the JET Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, P.; Arnoux, G.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Ongena, J.

    2009-11-26

    In recent JET experiments, Lower Hybrid (LH) power losses in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) were characterized using infra-red (IR) thermography. Hot spots were observed on objects intercepting the field lines passing in front of the LH launcher, i.e. on poloidal limiters and on dumplates located at the top of the tokamak; their locations being in good agreement with magnetic field line tracing using the EFIT equilibrium code. The dumplate temperature was monitored while scanning the launcher position so that the radial distance between field lines intercepting the hot spots and the launcher was increased up to 3.5 cm. The dissipation layer in front of the launcher was estimated to be at least 3.5 cm wide, in agreement with recent measurements on Tore-Supra, but not with simple models that predict a dissipation layer in the mm range.

  9. The Ariane 5 Launcher - Mid-way to success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, J. H.; van Gaver, A.

    1992-08-01

    The paper discusses the salient features of the ESA's Ariane 5 Launcher concept, which retains the dual launch capability of the Ariane-sequence launchers but will be more economical and more reliable than Ariane 4 and will be able to accommodate the needs of the Columbus mission to launch the PPF polar platform and the free-flying laboratory. Attention is given to the objectives, performance, and schedule of Ariane 5; the launcher configuration; the flight guidance and vehicle control; the mission profile; and the ground infrastructure. The launcher configuration of Ariane 5 is made of two parts: a lower complex which is identical to all missions (and is comprised of the cryotechnic Vulcain engine, a tank housing LH2 and LO2, the fluid feed and pressurization systems, the electrical and pyrotechnical equipment, and a forward skirt which transmits thrust of main-stage and solid boosters to the upper complex), and an upper complex, which is specific for each case.

  10. The XLLGG — A Hypervelocity Launcher for Impact Cratering Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexow, B.; Bückle, A.; Wickert, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity launchers are used to accelerate projectiles that simulate impacting meteoroids or asteroids. The XLLGG (eXtra Large Light Gas Gun) at the EMI (Ernst-Mach-Institute) was used within the MEMIN program.

  11. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Cristian, Barbu; Chelaru, Adrian

    2014-12-10

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project 'Suborbital Launcher for Testing' (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital vehicle

  12. Computational model for simulation small testing launcher, technical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Cristian, Barbu; Chelaru, Adrian

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present some aspects regarding the computational model and technical solutions for multistage suborbital launcher for testing (SLT) used to test spatial equipment and scientific measurements. The computational model consists in numerical simulation of SLT evolution for different start conditions. The launcher model presented will be with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) and variable mass. The results analysed will be the flight parameters and ballistic performances. The discussions area will focus around the technical possibility to realize a small multi-stage launcher, by recycling military rocket motors. From technical point of view, the paper is focused on national project "Suborbital Launcher for Testing" (SLT), which is based on hybrid propulsion and control systems, obtained through an original design. Therefore, while classical suborbital sounding rockets are unguided and they use as propulsion solid fuel motor having an uncontrolled ballistic flight, SLT project is introducing a different approach, by proposing the creation of a guided suborbital launcher, which is basically a satellite launcher at a smaller scale, containing its main subsystems. This is why the project itself can be considered an intermediary step in the development of a wider range of launching systems based on hybrid propulsion technology, which may have a major impact in the future European launchers programs. SLT project, as it is shown in the title, has two major objectives: first, a short term objective, which consists in obtaining a suborbital launching system which will be able to go into service in a predictable period of time, and a long term objective that consists in the development and testing of some unconventional sub-systems which will be integrated later in the satellite launcher as a part of the European space program. This is why the technical content of the project must be carried out beyond the range of the existing suborbital vehicle

  13. Calculations supporting HyperVelocity Launcher development

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a HyperVelocity Launcher (also referred to as HVL) in which a thin flier plate (nominally 1 mm thick) is launched to velocities in excess of 12 km/s. The length to diameter ratio of these launched flier plates varies from 0.02 to 0.06. The launch technique is based upon using structured, time-dependant, high-pressure, high-acceleration pulses to drive the flier plates. Such pulses are achieved by using a graded-density material to impact a stationary flier. A computational and experimental program at Sandia seeks to extend this technique to allow launching thick plates whose length-to-diameter ratio is 10 to 20 times larger than thin plates. Hydrodynamic codes are used to design modifications to the basic technique. The authors have controlled and used these effects to successfully launch a chunk-flier, consisting of 0.33 gm of titanium alloy, 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm in diameter, to a velocity of 10.2 km/s. This is the largest chunky size ever launched at this velocity from a gas gun configuration.

  14. Commercial space development needs cheap launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, James William

    1998-01-01

    SpaceDev is in the market for a deep space launch, and we are not going to pay $50 million for it. There is an ongoing debate about the elasticity of demand related to launch costs. On the one hand there are the ``big iron'' NASA and DoD contractors who say that there is no market for small or inexpensive launchers, that lowering launch costs will not result in significantly more launches, and that the current uncompetitive pricing scheme is appropriate. On the other hand are commercial companies which compete in the real world, and who say that there would be innumerable new launches if prices were to drop dramatically. I participated directly in the microcomputer revolution, and saw first hand what happened to the big iron computer companies who failed to see or heed the handwriting on the wall. We are at the same stage in the space access revolution that personal computers were in the late '70s and early '80s. The global economy is about to be changed in ways that are just as unpredictable as those changes wrought after the introduction of the personal computer. Companies which fail to innovate and keep producing only big iron will suffer the same fate as IBM and all the now-extinct mainframe and minicomputer companies. A few will remain, but with a small share of the market, never again to be in a position to dominate.

  15. Calibrating Accelerometers Using an Electromagnetic Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Erik Timpson

    2012-05-13

    A Pulse Forming Network (PFN), Helical Electromagnetic Launcher (HEML), Command Module (CM), and Calibration Table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored energy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass and is designed to accelerate 600 grams to 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the bank voltage and desired voltage. After entering a desired bank voltage, the CM controls the charge of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it allows the fire button to send a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile's tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocity meter and catch pot. The Target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely for the velocity meter to get an accurate reading. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  16. 10. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher, 'PROJECT PLOT PLAN' drawn ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'PROJECT PLOT PLAN' drawn at no scale (P.W.DWG.NO. 1781). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 11. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher, 'INDEX TO Drawings' drawn ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'INDEX TO Drawings' drawn at no scale (P.W.DWG.No. 1781). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Direct Energy Exchange Enhancement in Distributed Injection Light Gas Launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, T W; Finucane, R G; Hall, J P; Penetrante, B M; Uphaus, T M

    2000-04-06

    It is not widely acknowledged or appreciated that conventional, two-stage light-gas launchers do not efficiently apply their high breech pressures to the design intent: accelerating the projectile. Our objective in this project was to carry out the analysis, design, construction, and testing of a new class of launchers that will address this limitation. Our particular application is to expand the pressure range of the conventional, two-stage gas launcher to overlap and validate the pressure regimes previously attainable only with shock waves generated by nuclear explosions, lasers, or multistage conventional explosions. That is, these launchers would have the capability to conduct--in a laboratory setting--high-velocity-impact, equation-of-state (EOS) measurements at up to 2-TPa (20 Mbar) pressure levels in high-Z materials. Our design entailed a new class of distributed-injection, gas-dynamic launchers that are designed to use a boat-tail projectile to overcome the fundamental gas-expansion phenomena known as escape velocity (the Riemann limit). Our program included analytical, numerical, and experimental studies of the fast gas release flow technique that is central to the success of our approach. The analyses led us to believe that, in a typical configuration, the pressure will be effectively applied to the projectile in a time short relative to its few-microsecond traverse time; the experimental program we conducted during FY1999 supported these estimates. In addition, our program revealed dramatic increased efficiency in this process that was previously unknown to the launcher community. The most fundamental practical restrictions on the performance of any gas launcher are the ability of the launcher to (1) contain pressure in a reservoir, and (2) effectively apply that pressure to the base of a moving projectile. Our gas-release test-fixture experiments showed that our design was capable of applying nearly twice the pressure to the projectile that is

  19. 98. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH 'Y' JOINT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    98. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH 'Y' JOINT AND TRANSITION ASSEMBLY' drawn at 1 1/2'=1'-0'. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1785). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. 99. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH 'Y' JOINT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH 'Y' JOINT DETAILS drawn at 1 1/2'=1'-0' and 6'=1'-0'. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1786). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. 95. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH TUBE ASSEMBLY' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH TUBE ASSEMBLY' drawn at 1/8'=1'-0', 1'=1'-0' and 1'-40'. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1782). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 100. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH BREECH' drawn ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH BREECH' drawn at 2'=1'-0', 3'=1'-0' and full size. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1787). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 101. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH BREECH DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    101. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH BREECH DOOR OPERATING MECHANISM ASSEMBLY' drawn at 3'=1'-0, 6'=1'0', and full size. (P.W. DRW. NO. 1788). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 91. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'CONNECTING BRIDGE, REAR VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'CONNECTING BRIDGE, REAR VIEW CAMERA HOUSE ASSEMBLY' drawn at 3/8=1'-0', 3'=1'-0'. (BUORD Sketch # 209042). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 96. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH TUBE ASSEMBLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    96. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH TUBE ASSEMBLY SECTION 1' drawn at 3'=1'-0', 6'=1'-0', and full size. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1783). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 97. 28'X40' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher '32 INCH UPPER TUBE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. 28'X40' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher '32 INCH UPPER TUBE ASSEMBLY' drawn at 2'=1'-0' and 6'=1'0', full size. (P.W. DWG. NO. 1784). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Metal vapor vacuum arc switching - Applications and results. [for launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, D.; Mongeau, P.

    1984-01-01

    The design of metal-vapor vacuum-arc switches (MVSs) for electromagnetic launchers is discussed, and preliminary results are presented for an experimental MVS. The general principles of triggered-vacuum-gap and vacuum-interrupter MVSs are reviewed, and the requirements of electromagnetic launchers are analyzed. High-current design problems such as electrode erosion, current sharing, magnetic effects, and thermal effects are examined. The experimental MVS employs stainless-steel flanges, a glass vacuum vessel, an adjustable electrode gap, autonomous internal magnetic-field coils, and a tungsten-pin trigger assembly. Some results from tests without magnetic augmentation are presented graphically.

  8. Mesh-matrix analysis method for electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, David G.

    1989-01-01

    The mesh-matrix method is a procedure for calculating the current distribution in the conductors of electromagnetic launchers with coil or flat-plate geometry. Once the current distribution is known the launcher performance can be calculated. The method divides the conductors into parallel current paths, or meshes, and finds the current in each mesh by matrix inversion. The author presents procedures for writing equations for the current and voltage relations for a few meshes to serve as a pattern for writing the computer code. An available subroutine package provides routines for field and flux coefficients and equation solution.

  9. Development of an automatic multiple launcher for expendable probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappalà, G.; Reseghetti, F.; Manzella, G. M. R.

    2007-04-01

    A main goal of a Ship Of Opportunity Programme (SOOP) is the provision of temperature profiles in near real time. The use of commercial ships and expandable probes allows the reduction of costs, in comparison with research ship cruises. A major cost effectiveness is achieved using an automated multiple launcher, requiring minimum personnel effort. A multiple launcher, developed in the framework of the Mediterranean Forecasting System - Toward Environmental Prediction Project (MFSTEP), allows for a sequential collection of eight temperature profiles, using a software-programmable sampling strategy. The data acquisition system can be remotely controlled in every functionality, and data can be transmitted by GSM-GPRS or satellite telephone systems.

  10. Design of an automatic multiple launcher for expendable probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappalà, G.; Reseghetti, F.; Manzella, G. M. R.

    2006-07-01

    A main goal of a ships of opportunity program is the provision of near real time temperature profiles. The use of expandable probes allows the reduction of costs, in comparison to usual scientific cruises. A major cost effectiveness can be achieved by using an automated multiple launcher, that can be used with a minimum personnel effort. A multiple launcher, developed in the framework of the Mediterranean Forecasting System - Toward Environmental Prediction, allows to collect eight temperature profiles, with a sampling strategy that can be monitored automatically by means of a software. The data acquisition system is controlled internally in all functionalities, and data can be transmitted by GSM or satellite telephone systems.

  11. Characteristics of a large multijunction launcher for high-power LHCD experiments on JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Ushigusa, K.; Naito, O.; Kondoh, T.; Wolfe, S.W.; Imai, T. )

    1994-10-15

    This paper presents overview of a large multijunction launcher for JT-60U. The launcher is featured by the multijunction module with the oversized taper waveguide, in order to simplify structure of the launcher. This launcher allows high performances of current drive and current profile control by using very sharp and highly directive spectrum. Initial result of coupling property is also described. A good coupling was observed at a power level of [similar to]0.8 MW with plasma-launcher distance of [lt]14 cm.

  12. 58. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST SIDE OF LAUNCHER FROM ABOVE. AFRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. VIEW OF SOUTHWEST SIDE OF LAUNCHER FROM ABOVE. A-FRAME PIVOT POINT IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH; NITROGEN CONTROL UNIT IN UPPER LEFT CORNER OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  13. 33. Lower level, ballistic gas generator at left (opens launcher ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Lower level, ballistic gas generator at left (opens launcher door during launch), LDB panel at right - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  14. 48. CONTROL PANEL FOR UMBILICAL MAST AND TRENCH DOORS. LAUNCHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. CONTROL PANEL FOR UMBILICAL MAST AND TRENCH DOORS. LAUNCHER ON RIGHT IN BACKGROUND; TRENCH DOORS AND RAIL BEHIND CONTROL PANEL - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  15. 41. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST AND LAUNCH PAD FROM LAUNCHER; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW OF UMBILICAL MAST AND LAUNCH PAD FROM LAUNCHER; SOUTH FACE OF MST IN BACKGROUND. RAIL SYSTEM FROM BASE OF MST PARALLEL TO MAST. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. Energy stores and switches for rail-launcher systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, W. F.; Zowarka, R. C.; Marshall, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of existing switch and power supply technology applicable to space launch, a new candidate pulsed power supply for Earth-to-space rail launcher duty, the inverse railgun flux compressor, and a set of switching experiments to study further the feasibility of Earth-to-space launch are discussed.

  17. Note Launchers: Promoting Active Reading of Mathematics Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Josh W.; Helms, Kimberly Turner

    2010-01-01

    Note launchers, an instructor-designed reading guide, model how to select, decide, and focus upon what textbook material is important to learn. Reading guides are specially-designed study aids that can steer students through difficult parts of assigned readings (Bean, 1996) while encouraging advance preparation. As an example of a reading guide,…

  18. 63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET AND LAUNCHER FROM SOUTHEAST. TRICHLOROETHENE RECOVERY TANK LEFT OF FLAME BUCKET; LIQUID OXYGEN CATCH TANK RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. 62. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET BELOW LAUNCHER ON SOUTH END ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. VIEW OF FLAME BUCKET BELOW LAUNCHER ON SOUTH END OF LAUNCH PAD. FIRE SUPPRESSION EQUIPMENT RIGHT OF FLAME BUCKET. SOUTH FACE OF MST IS IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  20. Data acquisition applications for long duration electromagnetic launcher experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Mark W.; Cornette, James B.; Brown, Jere L.; Burkett, Douglas

    1993-01-01

    The demands on a data acquisition system for monitoring and recording electromagnetic launcher (DML) phenomena are examined. The evolution of a data acquisition approach in use for basic research in the EML area is described. Data acquisition capabilities and requirements are discussed, and examples of the data which has been obtained using this approach are presented.

  1. 13. Photocopy of drawing of missile launcher from 'Procedures and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of drawing of missile launcher from 'Procedures and Drills for the NIKE Ajax System,' Department of the Army Field Manual, FM-44-80 from Institute for Military History, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA, 1956 - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, East Windsor Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  2. An Engineering Design STEM Project: T-Shirt Launcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantz, Todd D.; Grant, Melva R.

    2013-01-01

    The article offers information on making technology education students interested in science and mathematics through the use of a T-shirt launcher design project. This project was designed for junior and senior level high school students who have completed or are currently taking physics and precalculus. The project involves designing an…

  3. Feasibility study of superconducting LSM rocket launcher system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Ohashi, Takaaki; Shiraishi, Katsuto; Takami, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented concerning an application of a superconducting linear synchronous motor (LSM) to a large-scale rocket launcher, whose acceleration guide tube of LSM armature windings is constructed 1,500 meters under the ground. The rocket is released from the linear launcher just after it gets to a peak speed of about 900 kilometers per hour, and it flies out of the guide tube to obtain the speed of 700 kilometers per hour at the height of 100 meters above ground. The linear launcher is brought to a stop at the ground surface for a very short time of 5 seconds by a quick control of deceleration. Very large current variations in the single-layer windings of the LSM armature, which are produced at the higher speed region of 600 to 900 kilometers per hour, are controlled successfully by adopting the double-layer windings. The proposed control method makes the rocket launcher ascend stably in the superconducting LSM system, controlling the Coriolis force.

  4. Mode Launcher Design for the Multi-moded DLDS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai

    2003-04-30

    The DLDS (Delay Line Distribution System) power delivery system proposed by KEK combines several klystrons to obtain the high peak power required to drive a TeV scale linear collider. In this system the combined klystron output is subdivided into shorter pulses by proper phasing of the sources, and each subpulse is delivered to various accelerator sections via separate waveguides. A cost-saving improvement suggested by SLAC is to use a single multimoded waveguide to deliver the power of all the subpulses. This scheme requires a mode launcher that can deliver each subpulse by way of a different waveguide mode through selective phasing of the sources when combining their power. We present a compact design for such a mode launcher that converts the power from four rectangular waveguide feeds to separate modes in a multi-moded circular guide through coupling slots. Such a design has been simulated and found to satisfy the requirements for high efficiency and low surface fields.

  5. Development of explosively driven launcher for meteoroid studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a continuing program to develop an explosively driven 2-stage hypervelocity launcher capable of achieving velocities between 15 and 20 km/sec are described. Previous efforts had identified incomplete barrel collapse as a limiting factor in launcher performance. Correlation of experimental and computational results obtained in the present study indicate that boundary-layer gases within the barrel act to prevent complete closure. Simplified calculations suggest that in-contact explosives may have insufficient energy densities to collapse the barrel against a developed boundary layer. Higher energy densities, sufficient to produce complete closure, were obtained with the use of steel flyer plates accelerated by a phased explosive lens. However, when flat flyer plates were impacted on the barrel, the sides of the barrel were observed to rupture and leak gas prior to barrel closure. A promising solution to this problem (untested) is to produce a symmetrical collapse with a cylindrical tube around the barrel.

  6. LAUNCHER PERFORMANCE IN THE DIII-D SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    KAJIWARA,K; BAXI,CB; LOHR,J; GORELOV,YA; GREEN,MT; PONCE,D; CALLIS,RW

    2003-07-01

    LAUNCHER PERFORMANCE IN THE DIII-D SYSTEM. The thermal performance of three different designs for the steerable mirrors on the ECH launchers installed in the DIII-D tokamak has been evaluated theoretically and experimentally. In each case the disruption forces must be minimized while providing a low loss reflecting surface. One design uses all Glidcop{reg_sign} material, but shaped so that the center is appreciably thicker than the edge. A second design is graphite with a molybdenum surface brazed to the graphite. The latest design is laminated copper/stainless steel construction with a thin copper reflecting surface. All three mirrors employ passive radiative cooling. The mirror temperatures are measured by resistance temperature devices (RTDs) which are attached at the back surfaces of the mirrors. The temperature increases are moderate for the laminated mirror, which has the best overall performance.

  7. A preliminary engineering assessment of the ITER CDA ECH Launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; Swain, D.W. ); Sawan, M. )

    1994-10-15

    A preliminary engineering study of the ITER electron cyclotron heating (ECH) launcher configuration proposed by the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) team has been performed to assess its survivability in the ITER nuclear environment. Potential problem areas are with the vacuum windows, the plasma-facing mirrors, and some of the other high-power waveguide components that are untested in a reactor environment. The study indicates that the CDA design is quite robust, since the mirror power density is relatively low and the windows are well shielded. Although the CDA ECH system is unlikely to be built as proposed, most analysis techniques developed to study this system will apply to future ITER ECH system configurations. The vacuum window is likely to be the most difficult launcher component to develop. Design for a proposed resonant ring for high-power testing of windows using existing lower-power gyrotrons is presented.

  8. A preliminary engineering assessment of the ITER CDA ECH launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; Swain, D.W.; Sawan, M.

    1993-06-01

    A preliminary engineering study of the ITER electron cyclotron heating (ECH) launcher configuration proposed by the ITER Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) team has been performed to assess its survivability in the ITER nuclear environment. Potential problem areas are with the vacuum windows, the plasma-facing mirrors, and some of the other high-power waveguide components that are untested in a reactor environment. The study indicates that the CDA design is quite robust, since the mirror power density is relatively low and the windows are well shielded. Although the CDA ECH system is unlikely to be built as proposed, most analysis techniques developed to study this system will apply to future ITER ECH system configurations. The vacuum window is likely to be the most difficult launcher component to develop. Design for a proposed resonant ring for high-power testing of windows using existing lower-power gyrotrons is presented.

  9. Experimental launcher facility - ELF-I: Design and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deis, D. W.; Ross, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    In order to investigate the general area of ultra-high-current density, high-velocity sliding contacts as applied to electromagnetic launcher armatures, a small experimental launcher, ELF-I, has been developed, and preliminary experiments have been performed. The system uses a 36 kJ, 5 kV capacitor bank as a primary pulse power source. When used in conjunction with a 5-microhenry pulse conditioning coil, a 100-kA peak current and 10-ms-wide pulse is obtained. A three-station 150 kV flash X-ray system is operational for obtaining in-bore photographs of the projectiles. Experimental results obtained for both metal and plasma armatures at sliding velocities of up to 1 km/s are discussed with emphasis on armature-rail interactions.

  10. Variable dual-frequency electrostatic wave launcher for plasma applications.

    PubMed

    Jorns, Benjamin; Sorenson, Robert; Choueiri, Edgar

    2011-12-01

    A variable tuning system is presented for launching two electrostatic waves concurrently in a magnetized plasma. The purpose of this system is to satisfy the wave launching requirements for plasma applications where maximal power must be coupled into two carefully tuned electrostatic waves while minimizing erosion to the launching antenna. Two parallel LC traps with fixed inductors and variable capacitors are used to provide an impedance match between a two-wave source and a loop antenna placed outside the plasma. Equivalent circuit analysis is then employed to derive an analytical expression for the normalized, average magnetic flux density produced by the antenna in this system as a function of capacitance and frequency. It is found with this metric that the wave launcher can couple to electrostatic modes at two variable frequencies concurrently while attenuating noise from the source signal at undesired frequencies. An example based on an experiment for plasma heating with two electrostatic waves is used to demonstrate a procedure for tailoring the wave launcher to accommodate the frequency range and flux densities of a specific two-wave application. This example is also used to illustrate a method based on averaging over wave frequencies for evaluating the overall efficacy of the system. The wave launcher is shown to be particularly effective for the illustrative example--generating magnetic flux densities in excess of 50% of the ideal case at two variable frequencies concurrently--with a high adaptability to a number of plasma dynamics and heating applications. PMID:22225213

  11. Modeling the capillary discharge of an electrothermal (ET) launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Least, Travis

    Over the past few decades, different branches of the US Department of Defense (DoD) have invested at improving the field ability of electromagnetic launchers. One such focus has been on achieving hypervelocity launch velocities in excess of 7 km/s for direct launch to space applications [1]. It has been shown that pre-injection is required for this to be achieved. One method of pre-injection which has promise involves using an electro-thermal (ET) due to its ability to achieve the desired velocities with a minimal amount of hot plasma injected into the launcher behind the projectile. Despite the demonstration of pre-injection using this method, polymer ablation is not very well known and this makes it challenging to predict how the system will behave for a given input of electrical power. In this work, the rate of ablation has been studied and predicted using different models to generate the best possible characteristic curve. [1] - Wetz, David A., Francis Stefani, Jerald V. Parker, and Ian R. McNab. "Advancements in the Development of a Plasma-Driven Electromagnetic Launcher." IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS 45.1 (2009): 495--500. IEEE Xplore. Web. 18 Aug. 2012.

  12. Launcher Systems Development Cost: Behavior, Uncertainty, Influences, Barriers and Strategies for Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Eric J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will report on the activities of the IAA Launcher Systems Economics Working Group in preparations for its Launcher Systems Development Cost Behavior Study. The Study goals include: improve launcher system and other space system parametric cost analysis accuracy; improve launcher system and other space system cost analysis credibility; and provide launcher system and technology development program managers and other decisionmakers with useful information on development cost impacts of their decisions. The Working Group plans to explore at least the following five areas in the Study: define and explain development cost behavior terms and concepts for use in the Study; identify and quantify sources of development cost and cost estimating uncertainty; identify and quantify significant influences on development cost behavior; identify common barriers to development cost understanding and reduction; and recommend practical, realistic strategies to accomplish reductions in launcher system development cost.

  13. Design and coupling characteristics of lower-hybrid launcher for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, A.E.; Porkolab, M. ); Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N. ); Goranson, P.; Swain, D.; Yugo, J. )

    1994-10-15

    The physics and mechanical design of the LHCD launcher for the proposed TPX experiment is presented. The main role of this system is current drive and current profile control, requiring a flexible and well defined spectrum. The launcher features 32 independently phasable guides in each of 4 rows. Coupling calculations indicate that low reflection coefficients can be achieved over the whole range of phasing by adjusting the launcher position. Good directivity is predicted over a wide range of densities. The mechanical design of the launcher is complicated by the high expected thermal loads and radiation fluxes. A design which incorporates these requirements is outlined.

  14. A hypervelocity launcher for simulated large fragment space debris impacts at 10 km/s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tullos, R. J.; Gray, W. M.; Mullin, S. A.; Cour-Palais, B. G.

    1989-01-01

    The background, design, and testing of two explosive launchers for simulating large fragment space debris impacts are presented. The objective was to develop a launcher capable of launching one gram aluminum fragments at velocities of 10 km/s. The two launchers developed are based on modified versions of an explosive shaped charge, common in many military weapons. One launcher design has yielded a stable fragment launch of approximately one gram of aluminum at 8.93 km/s velocity. The other design yielded velocities in excess of 10 km/s, but failed to produce a cohesive fragment launch. This work is ongoing, and future plans are given.

  15. Design and performance of a multi-stage cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Brawley, E.L.; Duggin, B.W.; Cnare, E.C.; Rovang, D.C.; Widner, M.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A multi-stage, cylindrical reconnection launcher is being tested to demonstrate electrically-contactless, induction-launch technology for solenoidal coil geometry. A 6-stage launcher system is being developed to accelerate a 5 kg mass from rest to 300 m/s with a stored energy of {ge}200 kJ per coil stage. This launcher will provide data fro model verification and the engineering basis for proceeding with larger multistage systems. This paper describes the design of the multi-stage, discrete-coil launcher. Integration of coils, projectile, power systems, and real-time fire control are discussed. Results of multi-stage firings are presented.

  16. The Physics Performance Of The Front Steering Launcher For The ITER ECRH Upper Port

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.; Chavan, R.; Nikkola, P.; Sanchez, F.; Sauter, O.; Shidara, H.; Ramponi, G.; Saibene, G.; Zohm, H.

    2005-09-26

    The capability of any given e.m.-wave plasma heating system to be utilized for physics applications depends strongly on the technical properties of the launching antenna (or launcher). An effective ECH launcher must project a small mm-wave beam spot size far into the plasma and 'steer' the beam across a large fraction of the plasma cross section (along the resonance surface). Thus the choice in the launcher concept and design may either severely limit or enhance the capability of a heating system to be effectively applied for physics applications, such as sawtooth stabilization, control of the Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM), Edge Localized Mode (ELM) control, etc. Presently, two antenna concepts are under consideration for the ITER upper port ECH launcher: front steering (FS) and remote steering (RS) launchers. The RS launcher has the technical advantage of easier maintenance access to the steering mirror, which is isolated from the torus vacuum. The FS launcher places the steering mirror near the plasma increasing the technical challenges, but significantly enhancing the focusing and steering capabilities of the launcher, offering a threefold increase in NTM stabilization efficiency over the RS launcher as well as the potential for application to other critical physics issues such as ELM or sawtooth control.

  17. Electromechanical Dynamics Simulations of Superconducting LSM Rocket Launcher System in Attractive-Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshida, Kinjiro; Hayashi, Kengo; Takami, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Further feasibility study on a superconducting linear synchronous motor (LSM) rocket launcher system is presented on the basis of dynamic simulations of electric power, efficiency and power factor as well as the ascending motions of the launcher and rocket. The advantages of attractive-mode operation are found from comparison with repulsive-mode operation. It is made clear that the LSM rocket launcher system, of which the long-stator is divided optimally into 60 sections according to launcher speeds, can obtain high efficiency and power factor.

  18. EGSE (Electrical Ground Support Equipment) for ESA VEGA Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrante, M.; Ortenzi, A.; del Re, V.; Bordin, M.; Saccucci, Fr.

    2004-08-01

    Activities belonging to Assembly, Integration and Validation (AIV) phase of a launch vehicle are fundamental in development of a so much delicate system. The equipment used to support this long and crucial phase can be described as a set of Mechanical and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE). This paper describes the approach followed to develop such a system, and the benefits that this brings in terms of lower risk, more coordinated interfaces and improved functionality. The paper briefly outlines VEGA Electrical Ground Support Equipment major characteristics. In particular, this paper describes the EGSE design for a small launch vehicle such as VEGA. The objective of EGSE is to provide hardware and software for efficient electrical testing of either single stages and integrated launcher. The needs to develop a small launcher is a response to a Resolution in the Space Transportation Strategy adopted by the ESA Council in June 2000, aiming at: "completing, in the medium term, the range of launch services offered by the addition of European manufactured small and medium launcher, complementary to Ariane, consistent with diversified users' needs and relying on common elements, such as stages, subsystems, technologies, production facilities and operational infrastructure, thereby increasing the European launcher industry's competitiveness". Three different parts principally compose the Vega EGSE: TCS (Test Configuration System), TES (Test Execution System), PPS (Post Processing System). The TES is the part of the EGSE devoted to the tests execution; it has capabilities of immediate test data analysis, parameters monitoring and it is able to undertake pre-defined actions, in case of anomalous events happen, in order to put in safe conditions the Unity Under Test (UUT). The TES is composed of two main components: HLCS and LLCS. The HLCS is based on SCOS 2000 ESA product; it is mainly devoted to the interaction with operators. It allows loading Test Sequences and

  19. Projectile transverse motion and stability in electromagnetic induction launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Shokair, I.R.

    1993-12-31

    The transverse motion of a projectile in an electromagnetic induction launcher is considered. The equations of motion for translation and rotation are derived assuming a rigid projectile and a flyway restoring force per unit length that is proportional to the local displacement. Linearized transverse forces and torques due to energized coils are derived for displaced or tilted armature elements based on a first order perturbation method. The resulting equations of motion for a rigid projectile composed of multiple elements in a multi-coil launcher are analyzed as a coupled oscillator system of equations and a simple linear stability condition is derived. The equations of motion are incorporated into the 2-D Slingshot circuit code and numerical solutions for the transverse motion are obtained. For a launcher with a 10 cm bore radius with a 40 cm long solid armature, we find that stability is achieved with a restoring force (per unit length) constant of k {approx} 1 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2}. For k = 1.5 {times} 10{sup 8} N/m{sup 2} and sample coil misalignment modeled as a sine wave of 1 mm amplitude at wavelengths of one or two meters, the projectile displacement grows to a maximum of 4 mm. This growth is due to resonance between the natural frequency of the projectile transverse motion and the coil displacement wavelength. This resonance does not persist because of the changing axial velocity. Random coil displacement is also found to cause roughly the same projectile displacement. For the maximum displacement a rough estimate of the transverse pressure is 50 bars. Results for a wound armature with uniform current density throughout show very similar displacements.

  20. British government, industry agree to fund Hotel launcher studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. A.

    1986-02-01

    A program status assessment is presented for the horizontal takeoff and landing 'Hotol' single-stage-to-orbit space launcher, for which parallel, two-year airframe and propulsion system proof-of-concept studies have been approved. A two-year initial development program for the airframe would be followed by a four-year development and manufacturing phase that would begin upon the propulsion system concept's successful demonstration. Flight trials could begin in 1996. A number of significant modifications have already been made to the initial design concept, such as to the foreplanes, afterbody, engine intake, and orbital control system.

  1. Inhibited Shaped Charge Launcher Testing of Spacecraft Shield Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a test program in which several orbital debris shield designs were impact tested using the inhibited shaped charge launcher facility at Southwest Research Institute. This facility enables researchers to study the impact of one-gram aluminum projectiles on various shielding designs at velocities above 11 km/s. A total of twenty tests were conducted on targets provided by NASA-MSFC. This report discusses in detail the shield design, the projectile parameters and the test configuration used for each test. A brief discussion of the target damage is provided, as the detailed analysis of the target response will be done by NASA-MSFC.

  2. Data acquisition applications for long duration electromagnetic launcher experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyse, Mark W.; Cornette, James B.

    1992-07-01

    Investigation of the basic physics associated with Electromagnetic Launcher (EML) operation requires accurate measurement of a number of diverse phenomena. Monitoring and recording EML phenomena during operation over relatively long time frames places unusual demands on a Data Acquisition System (DAS). While the sampling rate requirement is modest by DAS standards of today, the combination of the sampling rate and the number of events to be monitored presents challenges. This paper describes the evolution of a data acquisition approach in use for basic research in the EML area, discusses data acquisition capabilities and requirements, and presents examples of the data that has been obtained using this approach.

  3. Design Performance of Front Steering-Type Electron Cyclotron Launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Imai, T.; Kobayashi, N.; Sakamoto, K.; Kasugai, A.; Hayakawa, A.; Mori, S.; Mohri, K.

    2005-01-15

    The performance of a front steering (FS)-type electron cyclotron launcher designed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is evaluated with a thermal, electromagnetic, and nuclear analysis of the components; a mechanical test of a spiral tube for the steering mirror; and a rotational test of bearings. The launcher consists of a front shield and a launcher plug where three movable optic mirrors to steer incident multimegawatt radio-frequency beam power, waveguide components, nuclear shields, and vacuum windows are installed. The windows are located behind a closure plate to isolate the transmission lines from the radioactivated circumstance (vacuum vessel). The waveguide lines of the launcher are doglegged to reduce the direct neutron streaming toward the vacuum windows and other components. The maximum stresses on the critical components such as the steering mirror, its cooling tube, and the front shield are less than their allowable stresses. It was also identified that the stress on the launcher, which yielded from electromagnetic force caused by plasma disruption, was a little larger than the criteria, and a modification of the launcher plug structure was necessary. The nuclear analysis result shows that the neutron shield capability of the launcher satisfies the shield criteria of the ITER. It concludes that the design of the FS launcher is generally suitable for application to the ITER.

  4. Characterization of Quasi-Optical Launcher for ECRH in SST-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, B.K.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Biswas, Prabal; Purohit, Dharmesh; Bora, D

    2004-06-15

    The design and characterization of a high-power microwave launcher have been discussed. The launchers have been designed for electron cyclotron resonance heating of the plasma in the Steady-State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1). High-power microwave beam launchers mainly consist of a focusing mirror and a plane mirror combination to focus the beam at a specified location. Two microwave beam launchers are fabricated to launch the waves from the low magnetic field side (radial port) as well as from the high magnetic field side (top port). The frequency of operation is 82.6 GHz, and the power is 200 kW/continuous wave. A gyrotron capable of delivering 200 kW power at 82.6 GHz is under fabrication at M/s. Gycom. The mirrors of the launchers are based on quasi-optical Gaussian beam theory. The mirrors provide cooling for long-pulse (1000-s) operation. Low-power microwave characterization is done to check the performance of the launchers. A low-power microwave beam incident on the focusing mirror of the launcher and focusing action is analyzed at the output of the launcher.

  5. 11. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA WOOD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA WOOD FRAME SUPERSTRUCTURE' drawn at 1/2'=1'-0'. (BOURD Sketch # 209125). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. 12. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'GENERAL SIDE VIEW CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'GENERAL SIDE VIEW CAMERA STATIONS' drawn at 1/2'=1'-0'. (BUORD Sketch # 209111). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 13. 22'X34' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher, 'SIDEVIEW CAMERA CAR TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. 22'X34' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'SIDEVIEW CAMERA CAR TRACK DETAILS' drawn at 1/4'=1'-0' (BUORD Sketch # 208078, PAPW 908). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. 10. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA CARSTEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA CAR-STEEL FRAME AND AXLES' drawn at 1/2'=1'-0'. (BOURD Sketch # 209124). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. 11. 22'X34' original blueprint, VariableAngle Launcher, 'CONTROL STATION STRUCTURAL DETAILS' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 22'X34' original blueprint, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'CONTROL STATION STRUCTURAL DETAILS' drawn at 1 1/2'=1'-0'. (BUORD Sketch # 208401). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Control Station, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 12. 22'X34' original vellum, VariableAngle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA TRACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. 22'X34' original vellum, Variable-Angle Launcher, 'SIDE VIEW CAMERA TRACK H-20 BRIDGE MODIFICATIONS' drawn at 3/16'=1'-0' and 1/2'1'-0'. (BUORD Sketch # 208784, PAPW 907). - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Car & Track, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. Theory and algorithms for a quasi-optical launcher design method for high-frequency gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungku Farid, Ungku Fazri

    Gyrotrons are vacuum tubes that can generate high amounts of coherent high-frequency microwave radiation used for plasma heating, breakdown and current drive, and other applications. The gyrotron output power is not directly usable, and must be converted to either a free-space circular TEM00 Gaussian beam or a HE11 corrugated waveguide mode by employing mode converters. Quasi-optical mode converters (QOMC) achieve this by utilizing a launcher (a type of waveguide antenna) and a mirror system. Adding perturbations to smooth-wall launchers can produce a better Gaussian shaped radiation pattern with smaller side lobes and less diffraction, and this improvement leads to higher power efficiency in the QOMC. The oversize factor (OF) is defined as the ratio of the operating to cutoff frequency of the launcher, and the higher this value is, the more difficult it is to obtain good launcher designs. This thesis presents a new method for the design of any perturbed-wall TE 0n launcher that is not too highly oversized, and it is an improvement over previous launcher design methods that do not work well for highly oversized launchers. This new launcher design method is a fusion of three different methods, which are the Iterative Stratton-Chu algorithm (used for fast and accurate waveguide field propagations), the Katsenelenbaum-Semenov phase-correcting optimization algorithm, and Geometrical Optics. Three different TE02 launchers were designed using this new method, 1) a highly oversized (2.49 OF) 60 GHz launcher as proof-of-method, 2) a highly oversized (2.66 OF) 28 GHz launcher for possible use in the quasihelically symmetric stellarator (HSX) transmission line at the University of Wisconsin -- Madison, and 3) a compact internal 94 GHz 1.54 OF launcher for use in a compact gyrotron. Good to excellent results were achieved, and all launcher designs were independently verified with Surf3d, a method-of-moments based software. Additionally, the corresponding mirror system for

  12. RL-10 Based Combined Cycle For A Small Reusable Single-Stage-To-Orbit Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balepin, Vladimir; Price, John; Filipenco, Victor

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses a new application of the combined propulsion known as the KLIN(TM) cycle, consisting of a thermally integrated deeply cooled turbojet (DCTJ) and liquid rocket engine (LRE). If based on the RL10 rocket engine family, the KLIN (TM) cycle makes a small single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) reusable launcher feasible and economically very attractive. Considered in this paper are the concept and parameters of a small SSTO reusable launch vehicle (RLV) powered by the KLIN (TM) cycle (sSSTO(TM)) launcher. Also discussed are the benefits of the small launcher, the reusability, and the combined cycle application. This paper shows the significant reduction of the gross take off weight (GTOW) and dry weight of the KLIN(TM) cycle-powered launcher compared to an all-rocket launcher.

  13. Improvement of payload capability of the Brazilian VLS satellite launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Toshiaki; Schlingloff, Hanfried; Boscov, Jayme

    The future Brazilian VLS satellite launcher is a conventional four stage rocket utilizing solid propellant motors in all stages. With a lift-off mass of about 50 tons and a length of 18.8 meters, the vehicle will have a capacity of inserting about a 200 kg satellite payload into circular low earth orbit. Since the demand on payload weight tends to increase more and more, improvement possibilities of this payload capacity for later missions are now under consideration. Introducing conceptual modifications in the present reference configuration, consequences in trajectory parameters and payload capacity are examined. The computation of the flight performance of each new configuration is made by means of the SKYNAV computer code, a special CAE/CAD system for IBM-PC environment supporting space launcher design with ascent trajectory optimization. The paper presents a resume of the analysis in terms of payload capabilities and trajectory parameters for relevant new VLS configurations. It is shown that the addition of one or two more booster motors, the replacement of the solid propellant second stage by liquid propulsion and satellite integrated orbital injection may improve the payload capacity considerably, while modifications like off-loading of propellant in the fourth stage or changing the thrust behavior of the first stage to reduce aerodynamic loads cannot be recommended.

  14. Chunk projectile launch using the Sandia Hypervelocity Launcher Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chhabildas, L.C.; Trucano, T.G.; Reinhart, W.D.; Hall, C.A.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental technique is described to launch an intact ``chunk,`` i.e. a 0.3 cm thick by 0.6 cm diameter cylindrical titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) flyer, to 10.2 km/s. The ability to launch fragments having such an aspect ratio is important for hypervelocity impact phenomenology studies. The experimental techniques used to accomplish this launch were similar but not identical to techniques developed for the Sandia HyperVelocity Launcher (HVL). A confined barrel impact is crucial in preventing the two-dimensional effects from dominating the loading response of the projectile chunk. The length to diameter ratio of the metallic chunk that is launched to 10.2 km/s is 0.5 and is an order of magnitude larger than those accomplished using the conventional hypervelocity launcher. The multi-dimensional, finite-difference (finite-volume), hydrodynamic code CTH was used to evaluate and assess the acceleration characteristics i.e., the in-bore ballistics of the chunky projectile launch. A critical analysis of the CTH calculational results led to the final design and the experimental conditions that were used in this study. However, the predicted velocity of the projectile chunk based on CTH calculations was {approximately} 6% lower than the measured velocity of {approximately}10.2 km/S.

  15. "It Is Hard to Stay in England": Itineraries, Routes, and Dead Ends--An (Im)mobility Study of Nurses Who Became Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuban, Sondra

    2010-01-01

    This article presents findings from an Economic Social Research Council (ESRC) study on the roles of education in the trajectories of health care professionals who migrated to England and became carers. The study looks at the downward mobility and deskilling of these women, and their struggles to reverse their bungled career paths. The author maps…

  16. Effect of the electric field pattern on the generation of fast electrons in front of lower hybrid launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Valade, Laurent Ekedahl, Annika; Colas, Laurent; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Fuchs, Vladimir; Petrzilka, Vaclav; Li, Miaohui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-12-10

    The effect of the detailed waveguide spectrum on the electron acceleration has been studied for the 3.7 GHz LHCD launchers in Tore Supra, i.e. the ITER-like passive-active multijunction (PAM) launcher and the fully-active-multijunction (FAM) launcher, using test electron modelling technique. The detailed launched antenna wave spectrum is used as input to the code that computes the dynamics of the electrons in the electric field. Comparison with the LHCD launchers in EAST, operating at 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz, has also been made. The simulations show that the PAM-design generates lower flux of fast electrons than FAM-launchers, this could be the consequence of the wider waveguide of PAM-launcher (14.65 mm for Tore-Supra) than FAM-launcher (8 mm for Tore-Supra)

  17. Effect of the electric field pattern on the generation of fast electrons in front of lower hybrid launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, Laurent; Fuchs, Vladimir; Ekedahl, Annika; Petrzilka, Vaclav; Colas, Laurent; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Li, Miaohui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The effect of the detailed waveguide spectrum on the electron acceleration has been studied for the 3.7 GHz LHCD launchers in Tore Supra, i.e. the ITER-like passive-active multijunction (PAM) launcher and the fully-active-multijunction (FAM) launcher, using test electron modelling technique. The detailed launched antenna wave spectrum is used as input to the code that computes the dynamics of the electrons in the electric field. Comparison with the LHCD launchers in EAST, operating at 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz, has also been made. The simulations show that the PAM-design generates lower flux of fast electrons than FAM-launchers, this could be the consequence of the wider waveguide of PAM-launcher (14.65 mm for Tore-Supra) than FAM-launcher (8 mm for Tore-Supra).

  18. Evaluation of the Preliminary Project Tool ESAComp on Launcher Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Michel; Petermann, Nicolas; Monicke, Andre; Katajisto, Harri

    2012-07-01

    Within the objective of shorten design cycles and quickly converge towards a realistic solution, accessible preliminary project tools such as ESAComp are used in composite structures design offices to perform a first round design. As with any new software modules, the questions are to know how accurate this design is and how much time can be saved? For an application on space launchers, ESAComp developed by Componeering Inc has been used for composite cylindrical structures, monolithic or stiffened. Lay-up and stiffeners cross-section has been defined and buckling analyses have been made with this tool. Within few hours of work, great accuracy has been proved when compared to analyses with standard FE tools has been proved. The ESAComp solution relies on Elmer solver [1]. Element technology is based on Reissner-Mindlin-type shell solution, which is described, for example, in [2].

  19. Impact of Launchers on the Environment in French Guiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, S.; Chemoul, B.

    2012-01-01

    The main combustion products of the Ariane 5 solid rocket boosters are alumina and chlorhyde gas. When the launcher lift off the significant concentrations of this components are around the launch zone. We use samplers to evaluate the concentrations of this two elements. To optimize the localisation of the samplers we use a model to obtain the projected traces of the combustion cloud according to meteorological data (software sarrim). During the first seconds of takes 1000 m3 of water flood the base right to decrease the acoustic vibration. The major parts of the pollutants fall close to the launch zone and acidic cloud is formed. Once having stabilized the cloud begins diluting, it is subjected to the influence of the different layers of wind. To measure air quality we use first continuous analysers, secondly containers with distilled water to sample the acidic particles from the cloud. We also monitor the physicochemical quality of water in a river near the launch zone, the impact of the combustion products on vegetation, the aquatic fauna. Noise and vibrations are also measured. For terrestrial fauna like birds, we monitor the general population and a colony of wade. The most important colony of this species is located on the base : around 75% of the population of the French Guiana. We use also a new protocol to estimate the impact of launch by measuring the thickness of eggshells. We use research results which show that calcium can be replaced by alumina. When the thickness of eggshells is thin, the reproduction can be affected. For each measurement campaign, we have more than 100 sites and around 600 samples. The results shows that the land around the space centre is like a natural refuge. The impact of the launches is low, hunting is forbidden and security personal controls the zone base is a protected zone. The space centre is now a natural wildlife refuge. For the two new launchers, Vega and Soyuz, we will also monitor the environmental impact of the launch

  20. Reduction of the azimuthal beamwidth of quasi-optical circular waveguide slot-type launchers using a corrugated horn-like structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sealy, P.J.; Vernon, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The radiation pattern of a rotating TE{sub mn}{sup O} mode quasi-optical launcher with corrugated flares is examined. A potential use of the launcher would be to excite a beam-shaping reflector system. Without the flares the launcher has a broad azimuthal beamwidth. The corrugated flares decrease the azimuthal beamwidth and increase the peak power density of the launcher`s radiation pattern.

  1. Microwave impedance matching strategies of an applicator supplied by a bi-directional magnetron waveguide launcher.

    PubMed

    Roussy, Georges; Kongmark, Nils

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that a bi-directional waveguide launcher can be used advantageously for reducing the reflection coefficient mismatch of an input impedance of an applicator. In a simple bi-directional waveguide launcher, the magnetron is placed in the waveguide and generates a nominal field distribution with significant output impedance in both directions of the waveguide. If a standing wave is tolerated in the torus, which connects the launcher and the applicator, the power transfer from the magnetron to the applicator can be optimal, without using special matching devices. It is also possible to match the bi-directional launcher with two inductance stubs near the antenna of the magnetron and use them for supplying a two-input applicator without reflection. PMID:15323109

  2. WARP-10; A numerical simulation model for the cylindrical reconnection launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Widner, M.M. )

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a fully self-consistent computer simulation code called WARP-10, used for modelling the Reconnection Launcher, is described. WARP-10 has been compared with various experiments with good agreement for performance and heating. Simulations predict that it is possible to obtain nearly uniform acceleration with high efficiency and low armature heating. There does not appear to be an armature heating limit to velocity provided the armature mass can be sufficiently large. Simulation results are presented which show it is possible to obtain conditions needed for Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) launch applications (4.15 km/s and a 850 kg launch mass). This 3100-stage launcher has an efficiency of 47.2% and a final ohmic energy/kinetic energy - .00146. The mode of launcher operation is similar to a traveling wave induction launcher and is produced by properly timed and tuned discrete stages. Further optimization and much higher velocities appear possible.

  3. Spins, phonons, and hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    In crystals (and/or glasses) with localized sp{sup 3} or spd-bonding orbitals, dislocations have very low mobilities, making the crystals very hard. Classical Peierls-Nabarro theory does not account for the low mobility. The breaking of spin-pair bonds which creates internal free-radicals must be considered. Therefore, a theory based on quantum mechanics has been proposed (Science, 261, 1436 (1993)). It has been applied successfully to diamond, Si, Ge, SiC, and with a modification to TiC and WC. It has recently been extended to account for the temperature independence of the hardness of silicon at low temperatures together with strong softening at temperatures above the Debye temperature. It is quantitatively consistent with the behaviors of the Group 4 elements (C, Si, Ge, Sn) when their Debye temperatures are used as normalizing factors; and appears to be consistent with data for TiC if an Einstein temperature for carbon is used. Since the Debye temperature marks the approximate point at which phonons of atomic wavelengths become excited (as contrasted with collective acoustic waves), this confirms the idea that the process which limits dislocation mobility is localized to atomic dimensions (sharp kinks).

  4. Study of the modelling of an electromagnetic launcher of fire extinguishing loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frunzulica, Florin; Oncescu, Cosmin; Dumitrache, Alexandru; Vintea, Adela

    2016-06-01

    The problem of launchers used in civil applications is a topical issue. The role of a launcher is to launch objects with a certain speed towards certain goals like for example dangerous fire outbreaks (drilling areas, fires in buildings). This paper is aiming to present the theoretical aspects and results regarding the launching objects, in this case spheres that contains firefighting substance, during the launching stage, the ballistic stage and the impact stage with a solid surface.

  5. Must "Hard Problems" Be Hard?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1985-01-01

    To determine how hard it is for computers to solve problems, researchers have classified groups of problems (polynomial hierarchy) according to how much time they seem to require for their solutions. A difficult and complex proof is offered which shows that a combinatorial approach (using Boolean circuits) may resolve the problem. (JN)

  6. Assessment of the ITER EC Upper Launcher Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figini, Lorenzo; Farina, Daniela; Poli, Emanuele; Sauter, Olivier; Bruschi, Alessandro; Goodman, Timothy; Moro, Alessandro; Platania, Paola; Sozzi, Carlo; Cavinato, Mario; Saibene, Gabriella; Henderson, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The 24 MW ITER Electron Cyclotron (EC) Heating and Current Drive (H&CD) system, operating at 170 GHz, consists of one Equatorial (EL) and four Upper Launchers (UL). The main task of the UL will be the control of Magneto-Hydrodynamic (MHD) activity such as Neoclassical Tearing Modes (NTMs) at the q=3/2 and q=2 surfaces, but it will also be needed for current profile tailoring in advanced scenarios and to assist plasma break-down and L- to H-mode transition. Moreover, it is required to be e.ective both when ITER will operate at nominal and reduced magnetic field magnitude. Here the performance of the UL is assessed through the study of the full temporal evolution of di.erent scenarios, including the reference ITER 15MA H-mode plasma, a half-field case at 2.65T, and a steady state scenario. The ECCD efficiency has been evaluated for a wide range of injection angles, deriving the optimal angles and the power required for NTMs stabilization, as well as the steering range necessary to reach the rational surfaces during all the phases of the discharge. The steering sensitivity to shifts of the target or aiming errors has been estimated too. The result is an assessment of the UL design requirements to achieve the desired functionalities, which, together with the engineering limits, will be used to drive the optimization and finalization of the UL design.

  7. LH launcher Arcs Formation and Detection on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Yu. F.; Challis, C. D.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Monakhov, I.

    2011-12-01

    Mechanisms of arc formation have been analyzed and the critical electric fields for the multipactor effect calculated, compared to the experimental values and found to be within the normal operational space of the LH system on JET. It has been shown that the characteristic electron energy (20-1000)eV for the highest multipactor resonances (N = 4-9) are within the limits of secondary electron yield above 1 required for multipactoring. Electrons with these energies provide the highest gas desorption efficiency when hitting the waveguide walls. The effect of higher waveguide modes and magnetic field on the multipactor was also considered. The distribution function for electrons accelerated by LH waves in front of the launcher has been calculated. The field emission currents have been estimated and found to be small. It is proposed that emission of Fel5, 16 lines, which can be obtained with improved diagnostics, could be used to detect arcs that are missed by a protection system based on the reflected power. The reliability and time response of these signals are discussed. A similar technique based on the observation of the emission of low ionized atoms can be used for a fast detection of other undesirable events to avoid sputtering or melting of the plasma facing components such as RF antenna. These techniques are especially powerful if they are based on emission uniquely associated with specific locations and components.

  8. LH launcher Arcs Formation and Detection on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, Yu. F.; Challis, C. D.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Monakhov, I.

    2011-12-23

    Mechanisms of arc formation have been analyzed and the critical electric fields for the multipactor effect calculated, compared to the experimental values and found to be within the normal operational space of the LH system on JET. It has been shown that the characteristic electron energy (20-1000)eV for the highest multipactor resonances (N = 4-9) are within the limits of secondary electron yield above 1 required for multipactoring. Electrons with these energies provide the highest gas desorption efficiency when hitting the waveguide walls. The effect of higher waveguide modes and magnetic field on the multipactor was also considered. The distribution function for electrons accelerated by LH waves in front of the launcher has been calculated. The field emission currents have been estimated and found to be small. It is proposed that emission of Fel5, 16 lines, which can be obtained with improved diagnostics, could be used to detect arcs that are missed by a protection system based on the reflected power. The reliability and time response of these signals are discussed. A similar technique based on the observation of the emission of low ionized atoms can be used for a fast detection of other undesirable events to avoid sputtering or melting of the plasma facing components such as RF antenna. These techniques are especially powerful if they are based on emission uniquely associated with specific locations and components.

  9. Advanced Optics for the Remote Steering ITER ECRH Upper Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Moro, A.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.

    2005-01-01

    The optics of the ECRH Upper Launcher in ITER based on the Remote Steering concept needs special attention, since any focussing element in front of the waveguide has combined effects on the range of steering angles achievable and the beam width in the plasma region. The effects are studied in detail for a setup composed by 8 beams per port (three ports), for a spherical and a hyperbolic mirror surface. Gaussian beam analysis is compared to beam pattern calculations with the optical physics code GRASP, in order to verify the validity of gaussian optics approximation. The standard description with simply astigmatic beams, not adequate in more complex systems as the proposed two-mirror set-up, requires approximations, which are compared with the generalized astigmatic beam description. The ohmic losses at the end mirrors and the related localized heating due to the very large power density cause deformations that depends on the design of the cooling circuit. The distortion of the beam shape has been evaluated in a realistic case of mirror cooling with a small-channel system. The quantification of the effect depends on the precise evaluation ohmic losses and their enhancement in the long term due to the surface deterioration.

  10. Development of an accelerating-piston implosion-driven launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneault, Justin; Loiseau, Jason; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    The ability to soft-launch projectiles at velocities exceeding 10 km/s is of interest to several scientific fields, including orbital debris impact testing and equation of state research. Current soft-launch technologies have reached a performance plateau below this operating range. The energy and power density of high explosives provides a possible avenue to reach this velocity if used to dynamically compress a light driver gas to significantly higher pressures and temperatures compared to light-gas guns. In the implosion-driven launcher (IDL), linear implosion of a pressurized tube drives a strong shock into the gas ahead of the tube pinch, thereby forming an increasingly long column of compressed gas which can be used to propel a projectile. The McGill IDL has demonstrated the ability to launch a 0.1-g projectile to 9.1 km/s. This study focuses on the implementation of a novel launch cycle wherein the explosively driven pinch is accelerated down the length of the tube in order to maintain a relatively constant projectile base pressure early in the launch cycle. The experimental development of an accelerating driver which utilizes an explosive lens to phase the detonation wave is presented. The design and experimental performance of an accelerating-piston IDL is also discussed.

  11. A small scale lunar launcher for early lunar material utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. R.; Kubby, J. A.; Dunbar, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    A system for the launching of lunar derived oxygen or raw materials into low lunar orbit or to L2 for transfer to low earth orbit is presented. The system described is a greatly simplified version of the conventional and sophisticated approach suggested by O'Neill using mass drivers with recirculating buckets. An electromagnetic accelerator is located on the lunar surface which launches 125 kg 'smart' containers of liquid oxygen or raw materials into a transfer orbit. Upon reaching apolune a kick motor is fired to circularize the orbit at 100 km altitude or L2. These containers are collected and their payloads transferred to a tanker OTV. The empty containers then have their kick motors refurbished and then are returned to the launcher site on the lunar surface for reuse. Initial launch capability is designed for about 500T of liquid oxygen delivered to low earth orbit per year with upgrading to higher levels, delivery of lunar soil for shielding, or raw materials for processing given the demand.

  12. Preliminary analysis of space mission applications for electromagnetic launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. A.; Rice, E. E.; Earhart, R. W.; Conlon, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of using electromagnetically launched EML payloads propelled from the Earth's surface to LEO, GEO, lunar orbit, or to interplanetary space was assessed. Analyses of the designs of rail accelerators and coaxial magnetic accelerators show that each is capable of launching to space payloads of 800 KG or more. A hybrid launcher in which EML is used for the first 2 KM/sec followed by chemical rocket stages was also tested. A cost estimates study shows that one to two EML launches per day are needed to break even, compared to a four-stage rocket. Development models are discussed for: (1) Earth orbital missions; (2) lunar base supply mission; (3) solar system escape mission; (4) Earth escape missions; (5) suborbital missions; (6) electromagnetic boost missions; and (7) space-based missions. Safety factors, environmental impacts, and EML systems analysis are discussed. Alternate systems examined include electrothermal thrustors, an EML rocket gun; an EML theta gun, and Soviet electromagnetic accelerators.

  13. Zero Boil Off Cryogen Storage for Future Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentian, D.; Plachta, D.; Kittel, P.; Hastings, L. J.; Salerno, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Zero boil off (ZBO) cryogen storage using both cryocoolers and passive insulation technologies will enable long-term exploration missions by allowing designers to optimize tankage without the need for excess cryogen storage to account for boil off. Studies of ZBO (zero boil off) have been on-going in the USA for several years. More recently, a review of the needs of advanced space propulsion took place in Europe. This showed the interest of the European community in cryogenic propulsion for planetary missions as well as the use of liquid hydrogen for large power electric propulsion (manned Mars missions). Although natural boiling could be acceptable for single leg missions, passive insulation techniques yield roughly a I% per month cryogen loss and this would not be cost effective for robotic planetary missions involving storage times greater than one year. To make economic sense, long-term exploration missions require lower tank capacity and longer storage times. Recent advances in cryocooler technology, resulting in vast improvements in both cooler efficiency and reliability, make ZBO is a clear choice for planetary exploration missions. Other, more near term applications of ZBO include boil-off reduction or elimination applied to first and upper stages of future earth-to-orbit (ETO) launchers. This would extend launch windows and reduce infrastructure costs. Successors to vehicles like Ariane 5 could greatly benefit by implementing ZBO. Zero Boil Off will only be successful in ETO launcher applications if it makes economic sense to implement. The energy cost is only a fraction of the total cost of buying liquid cryogen, the rest being transportation and other overhead. Because of this, higher boiling point cryogens will benefit more from on-board liquefaction, thus reducing the infrastructure costs. Since hydrogen requires a liquefier with at least a 17% efficiency just to break even from a cost standpoint, one approach for implementing ZBO in upper stages would

  14. A design study for the ECH launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Grunloh, H.J.; Moeller, C.P.; Doane, J.L.; Olstad, R.A.; Makowski, M.A.; Harvey, R.W.

    1997-04-01

    The Design Description Document for ITER calls for 50 MW of electron cyclotron power at a frequency of 170 GHz, upgradeable to 100 MW. This power is intended to heat the plasma from Ohmic temperatures to ignition, in concert with power from some combination of neutral injection and/or ICRF heating. The second major application of ECH power is current drive. In the advanced steady-state scenarios, the total current is 12 to 16 MA, of which 75% is driven by bootstrap effects. The current drive requirement is 2 to 3 MA at a relative minor radius of 0.7, plus a small current near the center of the discharge. ECH power is also used for plasma initiation and startup, using a separate ECH system of two fixed frequencies between 90 to 140 GHz and total power to 6 MW. Suppression or control of MHD instabilities like neoclassical tearing modes, sawteeth, ELMs, and locked modes are also important objectives for the ECH systems. However, the launching and power characteristics of the ECH for these applications is highly specialized. The ability to modulate at high frequency (at least several tens of kHz), the ability to redirect the beams with precision at relatively high speed, and the requirement that the stabilization be carried out at the same time as the bulk heating and current drive imply that separate and specialized ECH systems are needed for the stabilization activities. For example, for stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes current must be driven inside the islands near the q = 2 surface. If this is done near the outboard mid plane, a system with optimized frequency might be much more effective than what could be done with the main 170 GHz system. This paper does not treat the launchers for the stabilization systems.

  15. Integrated plasmonic semi-circular launcher for dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polariton waveguide.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Huang, Lingling; Tan, Qiaofeng; Bai, Benfeng; Jin, Guofan

    2011-03-28

    A semi-circular plasmonic launcher integrated with dielectric-loaded surface plasmon-polaritons waveguide (DLSPPW) is proposed and analyzed theoretically, which can focus and efficiently couple the excited surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) into the DLSPPW via the highly matched spatial field distribution with the waveguide mode in the focal plane. By tuning the incident angle or polarization of the illuminating beam, it is shown that the launcher may be conveniently used as a switch or a multiplexer that have potential applications in plasmonic circuitry. Furthermore, from an applicational point of view, it is analyzed how the coupling performance of the launcher can be further improved by employing multiple semi-circular slits. PMID:21451682

  16. From Satellite To Launcher, Highlights On Powder/Wire ALM At Astrium Space Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourenaud, Florent; Desagulier, Christian

    2012-07-01

    ALM (Additive Layer Manufacturing) or Direct Manufacturing has been one of EADS’ (and more recently Astrium ST’s) major interests for almost a decade. It consists in manufacturing a part by adding (metallic) material layer by layer instead of machining the desired shape from a blank. It therefore has many advantages directly suitable for the spatial business, ranging from satellite to launcher structures. The present paper describes the range of available additive processes suitable for our present or future metallic launcher structures. The operational domain is described, in close correlation with the specific spatial constraints. A first successful in-flight application has been recently demonstrated by Astrium ST, which clearly opens a wide range of opportunities for next generation launchers and satellite structures. This paper gives an overview of the (technically and economically) eligible spatial structures that represent strong ALM business cases, as well as the on-going R&T and development trends at Astrium ST

  17. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Duggin, Billy W.; Widner, Melvin M.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic cylindrical projectile mass launcher and a method of operation is provided which includes a cylindrical projectile having a conducting armature, a cylindrical barrel in which the armature is received, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coil stages, a plurality of pulse energy sources, and a pulsed power arrangement for generating magnetic pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave along the length of the launcher barrel. The pulsed magnetic wave provides a propelling force on the projectile along the drive coil. The pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil stages is advanced along the armature faster than the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature. The pulsed generation of the magnetic wave minimizes electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provides for smooth acceleration of the projectile through the barrel of the launcher.

  18. International Space Station-Based Electromagnetic Launcher for Space Science Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed of lowering the cost of planetary exploration missions by using an electromagnetic propulsion/launcher, rather than a chemical-fueled rocket for propulsion. An electromagnetic launcher (EML) based at the International Space Station (ISS) would be used to launch small science payloads to the Moon and near Earth asteroids (NEAs) for the science and exploration missions. An ISS-based electromagnetic launcher could also inject science payloads into orbits around the Earth and perhaps to Mars. The EML would replace rocket technology for certain missions. The EML is a high-energy system that uses electricity rather than propellant to accelerate payloads to high velocities. The most common type of EML is the rail gun. Other types are possible, e.g., a coil gun, also known as a Gauss gun or mass driver. The EML could also "drop" science payloads into the Earth's upper

  19. Nuclear analysis for the intor array of loops ICRF launcher module design

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.

    1985-07-01

    Nuclear analysis for the array of loops ICRF launcher module design of INTOR is presented. The nuclear radiation environment in the different module components is determined. The fast neutron fluence in the BeO radome is 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ after one full power year leading to significant microcracking. Activation calculations for SF/sub 6/ imply a total activity of 5 x 10/sup 4/ Ci at shutdown. Nuclear heating results in a large breakdown rate in SF/sub 6/. A 1.6 m thick nuclear shield is needed to allow for hands-on maintenance one day after shutdown behind the launcher module. The results imply that significant design changes are required for the array of loops ICRF launcher module to stand the severe INTOR nuclear environment.

  20. Results from Sandia National Laboratories/Lockheed Martin Electromagnetic Missile Launcher (EMML).

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Skurdal, Ben; Gaigler, Randy; Basak, L; Root, G; Aubuchon, Matthew S.; Turman, Bobby N.; Floyd, Mendel D.

    2005-05-01

    Sandia national laboratories (SNL) and lockheed martin MS2 are designing an electromagnetic missile launcher (EMML) for naval applications. The EMML uses an induction coilgun topology with the requirement of launching a 3600 lb. missile up to a velocity of 40 m/s. To demonstrate the feasibility of the electromagnetic propulsion design, a demonstrator launcher was built that consists of approximately 10% of the propulsion coils needed for a tactical design. The demonstrator verified the design by launching a 1430 lb weighted sled to a height of 24 ft in mid-December 2004 (Figure 1). This paper provides the general launcher design, specific pulsed power system component details, system operation, and demonstration results.

  1. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    DOEpatents

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Duggin, B.W.; Widner, M.M.

    1992-06-30

    An electromagnetic cylindrical projectile mass launcher and a method of operation is provided which includes a cylindrical projectile having a conducting armature, a cylindrical barrel in which the armature is received, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coil stages, a plurality of pulse energy sources, and a pulsed power arrangement for generating magnetic pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave along the length of the launcher barrel. The pulsed magnetic wave provides a propelling force on the projectile along the drive coil. The pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil stages is advanced along the armature faster than the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature. The pulsed generation of the magnetic wave minimizes electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provides for smooth acceleration of the projectile through the barrel of the launcher. 2 figs.

  2. Radiation shielding analyses for the ECRH launcher in the ITER upper port

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Heidinger, R.; Lang, K.; Luo, Y.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation shielding analyses have been performed for the ECRH system in the ITER upper port to complete the neutron streaming analysis performed previously. The analyses aimed at assessing and optimising the performance of the radiation shield to prove that the shielding requirements can be met by the proposed design variants. The radiation transport calculations have been performed by means of the Monte Carlo programme MCNP in 3D geometry using the standard ITER neutronics model with ECRH launcher and plug integrated into the upper port. The interface programme MCAM was used to convert the 3D ECRH launcher models available from the CAD-system for use with MCNP-calculations. It was shown that the launcher design with the proposed radiation shield can satisfy the design limits for the radiation loads to both the launcher and the neighbouring components such as the Vacuum Vessel and the TF coils. Radiation dose levels were assessed for reactor shutdown at the rear side of ECRH launcher at locations where personnel access for maintenance may be required. The shutdown dose rate calculations were also performed in 3D geometry by applying the rigorous 2-step (R2S) method and comparing the results to those obtained with the direct 1-step (D1S) method. The R2S method includes activation calculations for the launcher materials by means of the inventory code FISPACT. It was proven that the shutdown dose rates inside the port with straight waveguides will be below the ITER radiation limit of 100 µSv/hr after 10 days decay time.

  3. Design and evaluation of coils for a 50 mm diameter induction coilgun launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaye, R. J.; Shokair, I. R.; Wavrik, R. W.; Dempsey, J. F.; Honey, W. E.; Shimp, K. J.; Douglas, G. M.

    Coilguns have the ability to provide magnetic pressure to projectiles which results in near constant acceleration. However, to achieve this performance and control projectile hearing, significant constraints are placed on the design of the coils. We are developing coils to produce an effective projectile base pressure of 100 MPa as a step toward reaching base pressures of 200 MPa. The design uses a scalable technology applicable to the entire range of breech to muzzle coils of a multi-stage launcher. This paper presents the design of capacitor-driven coils for launching nominal 50 mm, 350 gram projectiles. Design criteria, constraints, mechanical stress analysis, launcher performance, and test results are discussed.

  4. The LHCD Launcher for Alcator C-Mod - Design, Construction, Calibration and Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hosea; D. Beals; W. Beck; S. Bernabei; W. Burke; R. Childs; R. Ellis; E. Fredd; N. Greenough; M. Grimes; D. Gwinn; J. Irby; S. Jurczynski; P. Koert; C.C. Kung; G.D. Loesser; E. Marmar; R. Parker; J. Rushinski; G. Schilling; D. Terry; R. Vieira; J.R. Wilson; J. Zaks

    2005-06-27

    MIT and PPPL have joined together to fabricate a high-power lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system for supporting steady-state AT regime research on Alcator C-Mod. The goal of the first step of this project is to provide 1.5 MW of 4.6 GHz rf [radio frequency] power to the plasma with a compact launcher which has excellent spectral selectivity and fits into a single C-Mod port. Some of the important design, construction, calibration and testing considerations for the launcher leading up to its installation on C-Mod are presented here.

  5. LAUNCHER PERFORMANCE AND THERMAL CAPABILITY OF THE DIII-D ECH SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    KAJIWARA,K; LOHR,J; GORELOV,I.A; GREEN,M.T; PONCE,D; CALLIS,R.W; ELLIS,R.A

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The temperatures of components of DIII-D ECH launchers were observed during 2003 tokamak operation. The injected power was typically 500-700 kW and the pulse length was typically 2s. Plasma shots were performed at intervals of about 17 min from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The temperatures of a movable mirror, a fixed mirror and a launcher reached an equilibrium after about six hours of repetitive pulsing. The saturation temperature depends to some extent on the plasma stored energy. However, even in high {beta} plasma, the temperatures plateaued at acceptable values.

  6. Salvo fire experiments using a 0.60 caliber electromagnetic launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, R. L.; Kitzmiller, J. R.; Pratap, S. B.; Thelen, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    The laboratory-based small caliber electromagnetic launcher (EML) and compulsator power supply currently under development are intended to accelerate three 32-g masses to 2 km/sec at a 10-Hz firing rate. This 0.60-cal EML employs an iron core compulsator (ICC) power supply and small caliber switch. Attention is presently given to the design features of the launcher, the muzzle shunt resistor, the ICC, and the high pressure pneumatic autoloader, as well as to data obtained from several double shots and one triple shot.

  7. Mount mechanisms for the Saturn 5/Apollo mobile launcher at John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balke, H. A.

    1975-01-01

    A support system was designed to resist hurricane wind loads at the launch pad and to allow the supported structural frame to expand and contract freely under wide ranges of temperature. This system consists of six mount mechanisms devised to meet the previously stated requirements plus a load-carrying capacity for each of 3.2-million kilograms (7-million pounds) downward and 1.6-million kilograms (3.5-million pounds) upward. A similar but lighter system of six mount mechanisms was designed for use in the sheltered environment of the vehicle assembly building. Each requirement and design result is discussed, and each mount mechanism is defined by location and type with references to visual presentations.

  8. CRAWLER HIDDEN UNDER MOBILE LAUNCHER MOVES APOLLO 17 FROM VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING AS TRIP TO LAUNC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 17 space vehicle was moved today from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Complex 39's pad A in preparation for its launch with Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Commander; Ronald A. Evans, Command Module Pilot; and Dr. Harrison H. ''Jack'' Schmitt, Lunar Module Pilot, on the sixth U.S. manned lunar landing mission on December 6, 1972.

  9. Crew Launch Vehicle Mobile Launcher Solid Rocket Motor Plume Induced Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Sulyma, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The plume-induced environment created by the Ares 1 first stage, five-segment reusable solid rocket motor (RSRMV) will impose high heating rates and impact pressures on Launch Complex 39. The extremes of these environments pose a potential threat to weaken or even cause structural components to fail if insufficiently designed. Therefore the ability to accurately predict these environments is critical to assist in specifying structural design requirements to insure overall structural integrity and flight safety. This paper presents the predicted thermal and pressure environments induced by the launch of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) from Launch Complex (LC) 39. Once the environments are predicted, a follow-on thermal analysis is required to determine the surface temperature response and the degradation rate of the materials. An example of structures responding to the plume-induced environment will be provided.

  10. Design and Characterization of Thin Stainless Steel Burst Disks for Increasing Two-Stage Light Gas Launcher Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Henderson, Donald; Rodriguez, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Laser etched 300 series Stainless Steel Burst Disks (SSBD) ranging between 0.178 mm (0.007-in.) and 0.508mm (0.020-in.) thick were designed for use in a 17-caliber two-stage light gas launcher. First, a disk manufacturing method was selected using a combination of wire electrical discharge machining (EDM) to form the blank disks and laser etching to define the pedaling fracture pattern. Second, a replaceable insert was designed to go between the SSDB and the barrel. This insert reduced the stress concentration between the SSBD and the barrel, providing a place for the petals of the SSDB to open, and protecting the rifling on the inside of the barrel. Thereafter, a design of experiments was implemented to test and characterize the burst characteristics of SSBDs. Extensive hydrostatic burst testing of the SSBDs was performed to complete the design of experiments study with one-hundred and seven burst tests. The experiment simultaneously tested the effects of the following: two SSBD material states (full hard, annealed); five SSBD thicknesses 0.178, 0.254, 0.305, 0.381 mm (0.007, 0.010, 0.012, 0.015, 0.020-in.); two grain directions relative); number of times the laser etch pattern was repeated (varies between 5-200 times); two heat sink configurations (with and without heat sink); and, two barrel configurations (with and without insert). These tests resulted in the quantification of the relationship between SSBD thickness, laser etch parameters, and desired burst pressure. Of the factors investigated only thickness and number of laser etches were needed to develop a mathematical relationship predicting hydrostatic burst pressure of disks using the same barrel configuration. The fracture surfaces of two representative SSBD bursts were then investigated with a scanning electron microscope, one burst hydrostatically in a fixture and another dynamically in the launcher. The fracture analysis verified that both burst conditions resulted in a ductile overload failure

  11. Advanced Optics for a Full Quasi-Optical Front Steering ECRH Upper Launcher for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Moro, A.; Alessi, E.; Bruschi, A.; Platania, P.; Sozzi, C.; Chavan, R.; Collazos, A.; Goodman, T. P.; Udintsev, V. S.; Henderson, M. A.

    2009-11-26

    A full quasi-optical setup for the internal optics of the Front Steering Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) Upper Launcher for ITER was designed, proving to be feasible and favorable in terms of additional flexibility and cost reduction with respect to the former design. This full quasi-optical solution foresees the replacement of the mitre-bends in the final section of the launcher with dedicated free-space mirrors to realize the last changes of directions in the launcher. A description of the launcher is given and its advantages presented. The parameters of the expected output beams as well as preliminary evaluations of truncation effects with the physical optics GRASP code are shown. Moreover, a study of mitre-bends replacement with single mirrors for multiple beams is described. In principle it could allow the beams to be larger at the mirror locations (with a further decrease of the peak power density due to partial overlapping) and has the additional advantage to get a larger opening with compressed beams to avoid conflicts with side-walls port. Constraints on the setup, arising both from the resulting beam characteristics in the space of free parameters and from mechanical requirements are taken into account in the analysis.

  12. Apparatus for and method of operating a cylindrical pulsed induction mass launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, M. Jr.; Duggin, B.W.; Widner, M.M.

    1990-12-06

    In accordance with the one aspect of the invention, an electromagnetic projectile launcher is provided which comprises: a conducting projectile, a barrel that receives the projectile, a plurality of electromagnetic drive coils, a plurality of pulsed energy sources, and pulse power means for generating a sequence of pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave within the drive coil for propelling the projectile along the barrel, wherein the pulsed magnetic wave of the drive coil is advanced along the barrel faster than the projectile to thereby induce a current wave in the armature of the projectile and thereby minimize electromagnetic heating of the projectile and provide nearly constant acceleration of the projectile. In accordance with another aspect of the invention, a method is provided for propelling a projectile within a pulsed induction electromagnetic coil launcher, wherein the method comprises the steps of: generating a sequence of pulses forming a pulsed magnetic wave within the coil launcher, applying the pulsed magnetic wave initially at the aft end of the projectile to accelerate the projectile within the coil launcher, and advancing the position of the pulsed magnetic wave relative to the projectile to thereby generate an induced current wave in the armature, such that electromagnetic heating of the projectile is minimized and acceleration is nearly constant.

  13. Design and development of the redundant launcher stabilization system for the Atlas 2 launch vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Launcher Stabilization System (LSS) is a pneumatic/hydraulic ground system used to support an Atlas launch vehicle prior to launch. The redesign and development activity undertaken to achieve an LSS with increased load capacity and a redundant hydraulic system for the Atlas 2 launch vehicle are described.

  14. Modal test of the Brazilian satellite launcher (VLS) configuration burn-out of the first stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, R. L. R.; Pirk, R.; Dasilveira, D. D.; Strafacci, D. J.; Barros, E.

    1993-02-01

    A modal survey was performed on the Brazilian Satellite Launcher Vehicle, in four different configurations, to validate the theoretical finite element model. This paper describes the methodology and related techniques used in the experimental modal analysis, namely the burn-out of the first stage.

  15. 59. GENERAL VIEW OF ATLAS E/F LAUNCHER AT SLC3W FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. GENERAL VIEW OF ATLAS E/F LAUNCHER AT SLC-3W FROM ITS SOUTHWEST CORNER. SOUTH FACE OF ERECT UMBILICAL MAST IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. Optimization of the ITER electron cyclotron equatorial launcher for improved heating and current drive functional capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Henderson, M.; Saibene, G.

    2014-06-15

    The design of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (EC H and CD) system has evolved in the last years both in goals and functionalities by considering an expanded range of applications. A large effort has been devoted to a better integration of the equatorial and the upper launchers, both from the point of view of the performance and of the design impact on the engineering constraints. However, from the analysis of the ECCD performance in two references H-mode scenarios at burn (the inductive H-mode and the advanced non-inductive scenario), it was clear that the EC power deposition was not optimal for steady-state applications in the plasma region around mid radius. An optimization study of the equatorial launcher is presented here aiming at removing this limitation of the EC system capabilities. Changing the steering of the equatorial launcher from toroidal to poloidal ensures EC power deposition out to the normalized toroidal radius ρ ≈ 0.6, and nearly doubles the EC driven current around mid radius, without significant performance degradation in the core plasma region. In addition to the improved performance, the proposed design change is able to relax some engineering design constraints on both launchers.

  17. Preliminary feasibility assessment for Earth-to-space electromagnetic (Railgun) launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. E.; Miller, L. A.; Earhart, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    An Earth to space electromagnetic (railgun) launcher (ESRL) for launching material into space was studied. Potential ESRL applications were identified and initially assessed to formulate preliminary system requirements. The potential applications included nuclear waste disposal in space, Earth orbital applications, deep space probe launchers, atmospheric research, and boost of chemical rockets. The ESRL system concept consisted of two separate railgun launcher tubes (one at 20 deg from the horizontal for Earth orbital missions, the other vertical for solar system escape disposal missions) powered by a common power plant. Each 2040 m launcher tube is surrounded by 10,200 homopolar generator/inductor units to transmit the power to the walls. Projectile masses are 6500 kg for Earth orbital missions and 2055 kg for nuclear waste disposal missions. For the Earth orbital missions, the projectile requires a propulsion system, leaving an estimated payload mass of 650 kg. For the nuclear waste disposal in space mission, the high level waste mass was estimated at 250 kg. This preliminary assessment included technical, environmental, and economic analyses.

  18. Flow structure and unsteadiness in the supersonic wake of a generic space launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    At the junction between the rocket engine and the main body of a classical space launcher, a separation-dominated and highly unstable flow field develops and induces strong wall-pressure oscillations. These can excite structural vibrations detrimental to the launcher. It is desirable to minimize these effects, for which a better understanding of the flow field is required. We study the wake flow of a generic axisymmetric space-launcher model with and without propulsive jet (cold air). Experimental investigations are performed at Mach 2.9 and a Reynolds number ReD = 1 . 3 .106 based on model diameter D. The jet exits the nozzle at Mach 2.5. Velocity measurements by means of Particle Image Velocimetry and mean and unsteady wall-pressure measurements on the main-body base are performed simultaneously. Additionally, we performed hot-wire measurements at selected points in the wake. We can thus observe the evolution of the wake flow along with its spectral content. We describe the mean and turbulent flow topology and evolution of the structures in the wake flow and discuss the origin of characteristic frequencies observed in the pressure signal at the launcher base. The influence of a propulsive jet on the evolution and topology of the wake flow is discussed in detail. The German Research Foundation DFG is gratefully acknowledged for funding this research within the SFB-TR40 ``Technological foundations for the design of thermally and mechanically highly loaded components of future space transportation systems.''

  19. Status of next generation expendable launchers concepts within the FLPP program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letourneur, Yann; Leleu, Frederic; Pinard, Didier; Krueger, Joerg; Balduccini, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    In the framework of the preparation of the next generation of launchers to be developed in Europe, the European Space Agency (ESA) has contracted NGL Prime and its industrial team to conduct a first slice of launch system and stage design activities and programmatic analyses for two types of launchers: A new expendable mid-term launch system relying on elements or "Building Blocks" from Ariane and Vega to be operational by 2015. A new long-term launch system called the Next Generation Launcher (NGL) to be operational by 2020-2025. The design reference missions include a 5 metric tons performance requirement into a Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO), to meet the European institutional need, with the increased capability to 8 metric tons into GTO by the addition of solid boosters, to meet the commercial market needs. In a first step, a series of trade-offs were conducted to select the concepts that best fit the requirements of the NGL and "Building Block" launcher options, in terms of propulsion (thrust level, engine characteristics), propellant choice (hydrogen, methane or solid propellants), launcher architecture (with or without strap-on boosters, bi or three stages architecture). In a second step, more detailed analyses were carried out in term of thermo-mechanical design, functional architecture, as well as in term of versatility capacity, i.e. the capability of the launcher to perform different missions than the reference ones. Consistently with this technical activity, a programmatic evaluation was consolidated by the industrial team. This paper details the outcomes of the activity carried out during this second step targeting at selecting one or two concepts. The paper will also give an overview and first results of the follow-on contract in which selected NGL concepts are being further investigated, in the prospect of creating a new European launcher family encompassing versions dedicated to the institutional needs and the commercial market (reference

  20. Assessment of the Feasibility of Innovative Reusable Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, S.; Corpino, S.; Viola, N.

    The demand for getting access to space, in particular to Low Earth Orbit, is increasing and fully reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) are likely to play a key role in the development of future space activities. Up until now this kind of space systems has not been successfully carried out: in fact today only the Space Shuttle, which belongs to the old generation of launchers, is operative and furthermore it is not a fully reusable system. In the nineties many studies regarding advanced transatmospheric planes were started, but no one was accomplished because of the technological problems encountered and the high financial resources required with the corresponding industrial risk. One of the most promising project was the Lockheed Venture Star, which seemed to have serious chances to be carried out. Anyway, if this ever happens, it will take quite a long time thus the operative life of Space Shuttle will have to be extended for the International Space Station support. The purpose of the present work is to assess the feasibility of different kinds of advanced reusable launch vehicles to gain access to space and to meet the requirements of today space flight needs, which are mainly safety and affordability. Single stage to orbit (SSTO), two stage to orbit (TSTO) and the so called "one and a half" stage to orbit vehicles are here taken into account to highlight their advantages and disadvantages. The "one and a half" stage to orbit vehicle takes off and climbs to meet a tanker aircraft to be aerially refuelled and then, after disconnecting from the tanker, it flies to reach the orbit. In this case, apart from the space vehicle, also the tanker aircraft needs a dedicated study to examine the problems related to the refuelling at high subsonic speeds and at a height near the tropopause. Only winged vehicles which take off and land horizontally are considered but different architectural layouts and propulsive configurations are hypothesised. Unlike the Venture Star, which

  1. Appraisal of UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, I. I.

    1972-01-01

    A critical appraisal is made of the design, research, development, and operation of the novel UTIAS implosion-driven hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes. Explosively driven (PbN6-lead azide, PETN-pentaerythritetetranitrate) implosions in detonating stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixtures have been successfully developed as drivers for hypervelocity launchers and shock tubes in a safe and reusable facility. Intense loadings at very high calculated pressures, densities, and temperatures, at the implosion center, cause severe problems with projectile integrity. Misalignment of the focal point can occur and add to the difficulty in using small caliber projectiles. In addition, the extreme driving conditions cause barrel expansion, erosion, and possible gas leakage from the base to the head of the projectile which cut the predicted muzzle velocities to half or a third of the lossless calculated values. However, in the case of a shock-tube operation these difficulties are minimized or eliminated and the possibilities of approaching Jovian reentry velocities are encouraging.

  2. Design and evaluation of coils for a 50 mm diameter induction coilgun launcher

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.J.; Shokair, I.R.; Wavrik, R.W.; Dempsey, J.F.; Honey, W.E.; Shimp, K.J.; Douglas, G.M.

    1993-12-31

    Coilguns have the ability to provide magnetic pressure to projectiles which results in near constant acceleration. However, to achieve this performance and control projectile hearing, significant constraints are placed on the design of the coils. We are developing coils to produce an effective projectile base pressure of 100 MPa (1kbar) as a step toward reaching base pressures of 200 MPa. The design uses a scalable technology applicable to the entire range of breech to muzzle coils of a multi-stage launcher. This paper presents the design of capacitor-driven coils for launching nominal 50 mm, 350 gram projectiles. Design criteria, constraints, mechanical stress analysis, launcher performance, and test results are discussed.

  3. ITER ECH launcher options for start-up assist, bulk heating, and EC current drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.

    1994-03-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is proposed for providing plasma start-up, bulk heating, current drive, and other applications on the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. The requirements for ECH power launching systems for ITER have been investigated, and several possible configurations that have been devised are described in this report. The proposed launcher designs use oversized circular corrugated waveguides that make small penetrations through the blanket modules and radiate into the plasma. The criteria used for the design calls for minimum blanket penetration area, maximum reliability, and optimum launched beam quality. The effects of the harsh plasma edge environment on the launcher are discussed. Power generation systems, windows, and other components of the ECH systems are also investigated. The designs presented are believed to be capable of operating reliably and are relatively easy to maintain remotely.

  4. A Monte Carlo Analysis for Collision Risk Assessment on Vega Launcher Payloads and LARES Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindoni, G.; Ciufolini, I.; Battie, F.

    2016-03-01

    This work has been developed in the framework of the LARES mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The LARES satellite has been built to test, with high accuracy, the frame-dragging effect predicted by the theory of General Relativity, specifically the Lense-Thirring drag of its node. LARES was the main payload in the qualification flight of the European Space Agency launcher VEGA. A concern arose about the possibility of an impact between the eight secondary payloads among themselves, with LARES and with the last stage of the launcher (AVUM). An impact would have caused failure on the payloads and the production of debris in violation of the space debris mitigation measures established internationally. As an additional contribution, this study allowed the effect of the payload release on the final manoeuvers of the AVUM to be understood.

  5. Integrated fiber-coupled launcher for slow plasmon-polariton waves.

    PubMed

    Della Valle, Giuseppe; Longhi, Stefano

    2012-01-30

    We propose and numerically demonstrate an integrated fiber-coupled launcher for slow surface plasmon-polaritons. The device is based on a novel plasmonic mode-converter providing efficient power transfer from the fast to the slow modes of a metallic nanostripe. Total coupling efficiency with standard single-mode fiber approaching 30% (including ohmic losses) has been numerically predicted for a 25-µm long gold-based device operating at 1.55 µm telecom wavelength. PMID:22330553

  6. Nano-Launcher Technologies, Approaches, and Life Cycle Assessment. Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapata, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Assist in understanding NASA technology and investment approaches, and other driving factors, necessary for enabling dedicated nano-launchers by industry at a cost and flight rate that (1) could support and be supported by an emerging nano-satellite market and (2) would benefit NASAs needs. Develop life-cycle cost, performance and other NASA analysis tools or models required to understand issues, drivers and challenges.

  7. Design of off-midplane launcher (LH3) for Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hillairet, J.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Wallace, G. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2012-10-01

    Improving LHCD efficiency at density above 10^20m-3 is crucial for approaching AT regimes on Alcator C-Mod. In this density regime, an unexpected loss of LHCD efficency has been observed. Modeling and experiments suggest that such loss is intrinsic to the strong multipass absorption regime and can be overcome by improving the wave single pass absorption. For this purpose, an additional launcher (LH3) was designed. Besides doubling total injected LH power, LH3 will be located off-midplane and will enhance the waves single pass absorption by velocity space synergy with the existing launcher (LH2). The poloidal location and launched N// were selected based on a large parameter scan using a ray-tracing code. About 300kA of LH driven current was predicted at 1.4e20m-3 using 1.3MW of forward power. LH3 has a grill of 4x16 active waveguides and is based on a eight-way splitter design, which splits the microwave power into four ways in the poloidal direction and two ways in the toroidal direction. Coupling studies using commercial FEM software and the ALOHA code predict good coupling in a wide range of N// (from 2.2 to 2.7). Details of RF design and progress of launcher fabrication will be reported.

  8. New Designs, Materials and Processes for Interstage Structures of Future Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangas, C. B.; Diaz, V.

    2012-07-01

    Since the 1990’s EADS CASA Espacio has been leading the development of structures made out of advanced composite materials for the upper stage of Ariane 5: Inter Stage Structure (ISS), Vehicle Equipment Bay (VEB), different Payload Adaptor Systems, Satellite Dispensers and other structures. The next generation of launchers will demand an improvement on mechanical performances, reduction of mass and cost, and an optimization of the manufacturing processes. In the frame of the Future Launcher Preparatory Programme (FLPP) promoted by ESA, new designs, materials and processes are being studied and tested, in order to mature the most promising technologies and implement them in the future launchers. Specifically, in this programme these efforts are focused on different ISS structures. Taking as starting point the current ISS of Ariane 5 and IS3 of VEGA, new designs are suggested. Monocoque stiffened with omega stringers is the concept proposed for the ISS, while carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) - syntactic core sandwich is the one planned for IS3. This paper outlines the work performed in the programme: • Design and analysis of two Inter Stage Structures • Basic characterization tests for new materials: CFRP, syntactic core • Development tests at sample level for the different design solutions: different omega stringers, syncore sandwich • Manufacturing trials for the selected designs • Manufacturing of a sub-scaled demonstrator of the ISS

  9. Quantity Distance for the Kennedy Space Center Vehicle Assembly Building for Solid Propellant Fueled Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stover, Steven; Diebler, Corey; Frazier, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    The NASA KSC VAB was built to process Apollo launchers in the 1960's, and later adapted to process Space Shuttles. The VAB has served as a place to assemble solid rocket motors (5RM) and mate them to the vehicle's external fuel tank and Orbiter before rollout to the launch pad. As Space Shuttle is phased out, and new launchers are developed, the VAB may again be adapted to process these new launchers. Current launch vehicle designs call for continued and perhaps increased use of SRM segments; hence, the safe separation distances are in the process of being re-calculated. Cognizant NASA personnel and the solid rocket contractor have revisited the above VAB QD considerations and suggest that it may be revised to allow a greater number of motor segments within the VAB. This revision assumes that an inadvertent ignition of one SRM stack in its High Bay need not cause immediate and complete involvement of boosters that are part of a vehicle in adjacent High Bay. To support this assumption, NASA and contractor personnel proposed a strawman test approach for obtaining subscale data that may be used to develop phenomenological insight and to develop confidence in an analysis model for later use on full-scale situations. A team of subject matter experts in safety and siting of propellants and explosives were assembled to review the subscale test approach and provide options to NASA. Upon deliberations regarding the various options, the team arrived at some preliminary recommendations for NASA.

  10. Beam propagation and stray radiation in the ITER EC H&CD Upper Launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platania, Paola; Bruschi, Alex; Farina, Daniela; Figini, Lorenzo; Goodman, Timothy; Krause, Alexandra; Henderson, Mark A.; Moro, Alessandro; Saibene, Gabriella; Toussaint, Matthieu; Sozzi, Carlo

    2015-03-01

    The four ITER Electron Cyclotron Upper Launchers (UL) are designed to control Magneto- Hydrodynamic instabilities with the deposition of Electron Cyclotron power. According to the present design, each launcher comprises two rows of four input waveguides, whose output beam is focused and driven towards the plasma by four sets of mirrors. In order to study the beam-launcher interaction throughout quasi-optical propagation, with particular attention to straylight behaviour, and to verify analytical calculations, a 3D model of the UL optical system has been implemented with the electromagnetic code GRASP® and the Physical Optics method. Detailed description of the components are introduced: pure hybrid mode HE11 from cylindrical waveguide as input beams, real shapes of the mirror contours, semi-analytical description of the ellipsoidal surfaces of focussing mirrors. A conceptual calculation scheme has been developed in order to take into account not only the direct contribution of the single source on its next scatterer but also the first order indirect effects: crosstalk from different lines of the same row and crosstalk from different rows have been evaluated after reflection on the first and third set of mirrors. The evaluations presented have been performed on the preliminary UL design, the last major milestone before finalization; however, the numerical model is suitable to be applied to future evolutions of the setup and/or other configurations.