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Sample records for hard superconducting nitrides

  1. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.

  2. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements. PMID:26333418

  3. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-01

    Transition-metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock-salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10-20 GPa. Here, we report high-pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ-MoN and cubic γ-MoN through an ion-exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form with crystallite sizes of 50 - 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ-MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ-MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo-N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ-MoN and cubic γ-MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.

  4. The Hardest Superconducting Metal Nitride

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Shanmin; Antonio, Daniel; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cornelius, Andrew L.; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-03

    Transition–metal (TM) nitrides are a class of compounds with a wide range of properties and applications. Hard superconducting nitrides are of particular interest for electronic applications under working conditions such as coating and high stress (e.g., electromechanical systems). However, most of the known TM nitrides crystallize in the rock–salt structure, a structure that is unfavorable to resist shear strain, and they exhibit relatively low indentation hardness, typically in the range of 10–20 GPa. Here, we report high–pressure synthesis of hexagonal δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN through an ion–exchange reaction at 3.5 GPa. The final products are in the bulk form withmore » crystallite sizes of 50 – 80 μm. Based on indentation testing on single crystals, hexagonal δ–MoN exhibits excellent hardness of ~30 GPa, which is 30% higher than cubic γ–MoN (~23 GPa) and is so far the hardest among the known metal nitrides. The hardness enhancement in hexagonal phase is attributed to extended covalently bonded Mo–N network than that in cubic phase. The measured superconducting transition temperatures for δ–MoN and cubic γ–MoN are 13.8 and 5.5 K, respectively, in good agreement with previous measurements.« less

  5. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOEpatents

    Murduck, James M.; Lepetre, Yves J.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.

    1989-01-01

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

  6. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOEpatents

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  7. Density and elasticity of superconducting niobium nitride under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Y.; Li, B.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.

    2013-12-01

    Hard superconducting materials are of considerable interest for specific electronic applications. Transition-metal (TM) nitrides have increasingly attracted attention because of their outstanding mechanical, optoelectronic, thermal, magnetic and/or superconducting properties and potential usage in a variety of technological areas, such as NbN exploited in superconducting and high hardness coatings. Previous hardness measurements on NbN by Vickers indentation method reported a Vickers hardness about 20 GPa and its bulk modulus was found close to that of cubic boron nitride. In addition, experimental studies and first-principles calculations have investigated the equation-of-state (EOS) for B1 structured NbN and provided important insights into the origin of its outstanding mechanical properties. In spite of its importance, to date, the high-pressure behavior and elastic properties of NbN are not well studied experimentally, in particular for the shear properties under pressure. In this study, we hot-pressed high quality (well-sintered, free of cracks, small grain size and homogeneous) polycrystalline NbN specimens and performed simultaneous measurements of compressional and shear wave travel times using ultrasonic interferometry techniques up to ~12 GPa at room temperature in a large-volume high-pressure apparatus. By fitting these experimental data to finite strain equations, the compressional and shear wave velocities, density, and the bulk and shear moduli as a function of pressure are all obtained. These new data not only allow us to compare with previous EOS data on NbN and those of other transition metal nitrides, but also enable us to further explore the constitutive relations between elastic moduli and hardness in these nitrides.

  8. Superconductivity in the ferromagnetic semiconductor samarium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, E.-M.; Granville, S.; Engel, A.; Chong, S. V.; Governale, M.; Zülicke, U.; Moghaddam, A. G.; Trodahl, H. J.; Natali, F.; Vézian, S.; Ruck, B. J.

    2016-07-01

    Conventional wisdom expects that making semiconductors ferromagnetic requires doping with magnetic ions and that superconductivity cannot coexist with magnetism. However, recent concerted efforts exploring new classes of materials have established that intrinsic ferromagnetic semiconductors exist and that certain types of strongly correlated metals can be ferromagnetic and superconducting at the same time. Here we show that the trifecta of semiconducting behavior, ferromagnetism, and superconductivity can be achieved in a single material. Samarium nitride (SmN) is a well-characterized intrinsic ferromagnetic semiconductor, hosting strongly spin-ordered 4 f electrons below a Curie temperature of 27 K. We have now observed that it also hosts a superconducting phase below 4 K when doped to electron concentrations above 1021cm-3 . The large exchange splitting of the conduction band in SmN favors equal-spin triplet pairing with p -wave symmetry. Significantly, superconductivity is enhanced in superlattices of gadolinium nitride (GdN) and SmN. An analysis of the robustness of such a superconducting phase against disorder leads to the conclusion that the 4 f bands are crucial for superconductivity, making SmN a heavy-fermion-type superconductor.

  9. Discovery of Superconductivity in Hard Hexagonal ε-NbN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yongtao; Qi, Xintong; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Shuailing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Li, Qiang; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2016-02-01

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ∼11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bonding in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ∼20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (∼227 GPa). This exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments.

  10. Discovery of Superconductivity in Hard Hexagonal ε-NbN.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongtao; Qi, Xintong; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Shuailing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Li, Qiang; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ∼11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bonding in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ∼20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN; it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (∼227 GPa). This exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments. PMID:26923318

  11. Discovery of Superconductivity in Hard Hexagonal ε-NbN

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yongtao; Qi, Xintong; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Shuailing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Li, Qiang; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ∼11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bonding in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ∼20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN; it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (∼227 GPa). This exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments. PMID:26923318

  12. Discovery of superconductivity in hard hexagonal ε-NbN

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zou, Yongtao; Li, Qiang; Qi, Xintong; Zhang, Cheng; Ma, Shuailing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ying; Chen, Ting; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Zhiqiang; et al

    2016-02-29

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond with a critical temperature (TC) near 4 K, great interest has been attracted in hard superconductors such as transition-metal nitrides and carbides. Here we report the new discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Direct magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements demonstrate that the superconductivity in bulk polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN is below ~11.6 K, which is significantly higher than that for boron-doped diamond. The nature of superconductivity in hexagonal ε-NbN and the physical mechanism for the relatively lower TC have been addressed by the weaker bondingmore » in the Nb-N network, the co-planarity of Nb-N layer as well as its relatively weaker electron-phonon coupling, as compared with the cubic δ-NbN counterpart. Moreover, the newly discovered ε-NbN superconductor remains stable at pressures up to ~20 GPa and is significantly harder than cubic δ-NbN; it is as hard as sapphire, ultra-incompressible and has a high shear rigidity of 201 GPa to rival hard/superhard material γ-B (~227 GPa). Furthermore, this exploration opens a new class of highly desirable materials combining the outstanding mechanical/elastic properties with superconductivity, which may be particularly attractive for its technological and engineering applications in extreme environments.« less

  13. Nitrogen concentration driving the hardness of rhenium nitrides

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhonglong; Bao, Kuo; Li, Da; Duan, Defang; Tian, Fubo; Jin, Xilian; Chen, Changbo; Huang, Xiaoli; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2014-01-01

    The structures and properties of rhenium nitrides are studied with density function based first principle method. New candidate ground states or high-pressure phases at Re:N ratios of 3:2, 1:3, and 1:4 are identified via a series of evolutionary structure searches. We find that the 3D polyhedral stacking with strong covalent N-N and Re-N bonding could stabilize Re nitrides to form nitrogen rich phases, meanwhile, remarkably improve the mechanical performance than that of sub-nitrides, as Re3N, Re2N, and Re3N2. By evaluating the trends of the crystal configuration, electronic structure, elastic properties, and hardness as a function of the N concentration, we proves that the N content is the key factor affecting the metallicity and hardness of Re nitrides. PMID:24762713

  14. Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali; Urgen, Mustafa; Cakir, Ali Fuat; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Kazmanli, Kursat; Keles, Ozgul

    2007-05-01

    An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

  15. The hardness and toughness of HIPed silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Berriche, R.; Holt, R.T.; Kumar, S.N.; Maccagno, T.M.

    1992-10-01

    Silicon nitride with and without additives has been produced by hot isostatic pressing under different conditions. The HIP cycle parameters and grade of powder used have been found to affect the density, the hardness and the fracture toughness of the material produced. Sintering aids, on the other hand, have been found to affect the fracture toughness only. Materials HIPed with additives displayed a higher fracture toughness than materials HIPed without additives. 12 refs.

  16. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Haller, Eugene E.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Hansen, William L.

    1992-01-01

    Novel crystalline .alpha. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and .beta. (silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate.

  17. Submicron cubic boron nitride as hard as diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guoduan; Kou, Zili E-mail: yanxz@hpstar.ac.cn; Lei, Li; Peng, Fang; Wang, Qiming; Wang, Kaixue; Wang, Pei; Li, Liang; Li, Yong; Wang, Yonghua; Yan, Xiaozhi E-mail: yanxz@hpstar.ac.cn; Li, Wentao; Bi, Yan; Leng, Yang; He, Duanwei

    2015-03-23

    Here, we report the sintering of aggregated submicron cubic boron nitride (sm-cBN) at a pressure of 8 GPa. The sintered cBN compacts exhibit hardness values comparable to that of single crystal diamond, fracture toughness about 5-fold that of cBN single crystal, in combination with a high oxidization temperature. Thus, another way has been demonstrated to improve the mechanical properties of cBN besides reducing the grain size to nano scale. In contrast to other ultrahard compacts with similar hardness, the sm-cBN aggregates are better placed for potential industrial application, as their relative low pressure manufacturing perhaps be easier and cheaper.

  18. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of superconducting nanocrystalline niobium nitride.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Gu, Yunle; Chen, Luyang; Yang, Zeheng; Ma, Jianhua; Qian, Yitai

    2005-02-01

    Nanocrystalline niobium nitride (NbN0.9) was successfully synthesized at 600 degrees C through a solid-state reaction. The synthesis was carried out in an autoclave by using NbCl5 and NaN3 as the reactants. The X-ray powder diffraction pattern indicates the formation of cubic NbN0.9. Transmission electron microscopy images show that typical NbN0.9 crystallites are composed of uniform particles with an average size of about 30 nm and nanorod crystallites with a typical size of about 40 x 2500 nm. Magnetic measurements exhibited that a superconducting transition occurred at 15.4 K for the NbN0.9 product. PMID:15853151

  20. Laser nitriding for niobium superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilraja Singaravelu, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Michael Kelley

    2010-10-01

    Particle accelerators are a key tool for scientific research ranging from fundamental studies of matter to analytical studies at light sources. Cost-forperformance is critical, both in terms of initial capital outlay and ongoing operating expense, especially for electricity. It depends on the niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities at the heart of most of these machines. Presently Nb SRF cavities operate near 1.9 K, well (and expensively) below the 4.2 K atmospheric boiling point of liquid He. Transforming the 40 nm thick active interior surface layer from Nb to delta NbN (Tc = 17 K instead of 9.2 K) appears to be a promising approach. Traditional furnace nitriding appears to have not been successful for this. Further, exposing a complete SRF cavity to the time-temperature history required for nitriding risks mechanical distortion. Gas laser nitriding instead has been applied successfully to other metals [P.Schaaf, Prog. Mat. Sci. 47 (2002) 1]. The beam dimensions and thermal diffusion length permit modeling in one dimension to predict the time course of the surface temperature for a range of per-pulse energy densities. As with the earlier work, we chose conditions just sufficient for boiling as a reference point. We used a Spectra Physics HIPPO nanosecond laser (l = 1064 nm, Emax= 0.392 mJ, beam spot@ 34 microns, PRF =15 – 30 kHz) to obtain an incident fluence of 1.73 - 2.15 J/cm2 for each laser pulse at the target. The target was a 50 mm diameter SRF-grade Nb disk maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 550 – 625 torr and rotated at a constant speed of 9 rpm. The materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM images show a sharp transition with fluence from a smooth, undulating topography to significant roughening, interpreted here as the onset of ablation. EPMA measurements of N/Nb atom ratio as a function of depth found a constant

  1. Chromium nitride-silver self-lubricating nanoporous hard coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan Christopher P

    The focus of this thesis research is to explore a new approach to adaptive solid lubrication using nanoporous hard coatings. To investigate this approach, I deposited prototype coatings for study consisting of a hard chromium nitride (CrN) matrix co-deposited with a lubricious silver (Ag) phase by reactive magnetron co-sputtering. The idea is to exploit the relative immiscibility of the two phases to create nanocomposite structures with intrinsic lubricant transport properties enabled by the presence of the nanopores. Specifically, I develop the scientific understanding of the critical growth parameters that govern nanocomposite structural evolution which in turn control mechanical properties, solid lubricant diffusion, and tribological response. Mechanical properties were analyzed by both micro and nanoindentation measurements for the composites as a function of Ag aggregate morphology. For Ts ≤ 500°C, hardness as measured by nanoindentation into the surface is relatively uniform giving values of 14.6, 13.6, and 14.3 GPa for Ts = 300, 400, and 500°C respectively. For Ts > 500°C, the cross-sectional microhardness increases with T s from 16.5 to 19.7 to 24.3 GPa for Ts = 500, 600, and 700°C, respectively, which is attributed to a decrease in the effective Ag concentration associated with temperature activated segregation. The average hardness for pure CrN samples is 23.8 and 27.5 GPa as measured by surface nanoindentation and cross-sectional microindentation, respectively. Lubricant transport behavior was characterized by a series of vacuum annealing experiments. Vacuum annealing experiments at Ta = 425, 525, and 625°C show that Ag diffuses to the coating surface to form lubricious surface aggregates and that the rate for Ag lubricant transport increases with increasing DeltaT (Ta - Ts) for Ta > Ts, as determined by quantitative electron microscopy surface analyses. However, the Ag remains in the CrN matrix for Ta < Ts, which is attributed to the Ag aggregate

  2. Magnetoresistance measurements of superconducting molybdenum nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, R.; Arasu, A. V. Thanikai; Amaladass, E. P.

    2016-05-01

    Molybdenum nitride thin films have been deposited on aluminum nitride buffered glass substrates by reactive DC sputtering. GIXRD measurements indicate formation of nano-crystalline molybdenum nitride thin films. The transition temperature of MoN thin film is 7.52 K. The transition width is less than 0.1 K. The upper critical field Bc2(0), calculated using GLAG theory is 12.52 T. The transition width for 400 µA current increased initially upto 3 T and then decreased, while that for 100 µA current transition width did not decrease.

  3. The phase diagram and hardness of carbon nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Huafeng; Oganov, Artem R.; Zhu, Qiang; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Guang-Rui

    2015-05-06

    Novel superhard materials, especially those with superior thermal and chemical stability, are needed to replace diamond. Carbon nitrides (C-N), which are likely to possess these characteristics and have even been expected to be harder than diamond, are excellent candidates. Here we report three new superhard and thermodynamically stable carbon nitride phases. Based on a systematic evolutionary structure searches, we report a complete phase diagram of the C-N system at 0–300 GPa and analyze the hardest metastable structures. Surprisingly, we find that at zero pressure, the earlier proposed graphitic-C3N4 structure (P6-bar m2) is dynamically unstable, and we find the lowest-energy structure based on s-triazine unit and s-heptazine unit.

  4. The phase diagram and hardness of carbon nitrides

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Huafeng; Oganov, Artem R.; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Guang-Rui

    2015-01-01

    Novel superhard materials, especially those with superior thermal and chemical stability, are needed to replace diamond. Carbon nitrides (C-N), which are likely to possess these characteristics and have even been expected to be harder than diamond, are excellent candidates. Here we report three new superhard and thermodynamically stable carbon nitride phases. Based on a systematic evolutionary structure searches, we report a complete phase diagram of the C-N system at 0–300 GPa and analyze the hardest metastable structures. Surprisingly, we find that at zero pressure, the earlier proposed graphitic-C3N4 structure () is dynamically unstable, and we find the lowest-energy structure based on s-triazine unit and s-heptazine unit. PMID:25943072

  5. The phase diagram and hardness of carbon nitrides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dong, Huafeng; Oganov, Artem R.; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Guang-Rui

    2015-05-06

    Novel superhard materials, especially those with superior thermal and chemical stability, are needed to replace diamond. Carbon nitrides (C-N), which are likely to possess these characteristics and have even been expected to be harder than diamond, are excellent candidates. Here we report three new superhard and thermodynamically stable carbon nitride phases. Based on a systematic evolutionary structure searches, we report a complete phase diagram of the C-N system at 0–300 GPa and analyze the hardest metastable structures. Surprisingly, we find that at zero pressure, the earlier proposed graphitic-C3N4 structure (P6-bar m2) is dynamically unstable, and we find the lowest-energy structuremore » based on s-triazine unit and s-heptazine unit.« less

  6. Elasticity and hardness of nano-polycrystalline boron nitrides: The apparent Hall-Petch effect

    SciTech Connect

    Nagakubo, A.; Ogi, H. Hirao, M.; Sumiya, H.

    2014-08-25

    Nano-polycrystalline boron nitride (BN) is expected to replace diamond as a superhard and superstiff material. Although its hardening was reported, its elasticity remains unclear and the as-measured hardness could be significantly different from the true value due to the elastic recovery. In this study, we measured the longitudinal-wave elastic constant of nano-polycrystalline BNs using picosecond ultrasound spectroscopy and confirmed the elastic softening for small-grain BNs. We also measured Vickers and Knoop hardness for the same specimens and clarified the relationship between hardness and stiffness. The Vickers hardness significantly increased as the grain size decreased, while the Knoop hardness remained nearly unchanged. We attribute the apparent increase in Vickers hardness to the elastic recovery and propose a model to support this insight.

  7. Elasticity and hardness of nano-polycrystalline boron nitrides: The apparent Hall-Petch effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakubo, A.; Ogi, H.; Sumiya, H.; Hirao, M.

    2014-08-01

    Nano-polycrystalline boron nitride (BN) is expected to replace diamond as a superhard and superstiff material. Although its hardening was reported, its elasticity remains unclear and the as-measured hardness could be significantly different from the true value due to the elastic recovery. In this study, we measured the longitudinal-wave elastic constant of nano-polycrystalline BNs using picosecond ultrasound spectroscopy and confirmed the elastic softening for small-grain BNs. We also measured Vickers and Knoop hardness for the same specimens and clarified the relationship between hardness and stiffness. The Vickers hardness significantly increased as the grain size decreased, while the Knoop hardness remained nearly unchanged. We attribute the apparent increase in Vickers hardness to the elastic recovery and propose a model to support this insight.

  8. Hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride thin films studied by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Malyarenko, D. I.; Kraft, O.; Hoatson, G. L.; Reilly, A. C.; Holloway, B. C.

    2002-10-01

    The chemical bonding of hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films was examined using solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. The films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests reveal a recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. This combination of low modulus and high strength means the material can be regarded as hard and elastic; the material gives when pressed on and recovers its shape when the load is released. The 13C NMR results conclusively demonstrate that hard and elastic a-CNx has an sp2 carbon bonded structure and that sp3 hybridized carbons are absent. Our results stand in contrast with earlier work that proposed that the interesting mechanical properties of hard and elastic a-CNx were due, in part, to sp3 bonded carbon.

  9. Hard proximity induced superconducting gap in semiconductor - superconductor epitaxial hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Krogstrup, Peter; Ziino, Nino; Albrecht, Sven; Chang, Willy; Madsen, Morten; Johnson, Erik; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Nygård, Jesper; Marcus, Charles

    2015-03-01

    We present molecular beam epitaxy grown InAs semiconductor nanowires capped with a shell of aluminum (superconductor). The hybrid wires are grown without breaking vacuum, resulting in an epitaxial interface between the two materials as demonstrated by detailed transmission electron microscopy and simulations. The domain matching at the interface is discussed. Incorporating the epitaxial nanowire hybrids in electrical devices we performed detailed tunneling spectroscopy of the proximity induced superconducting gap in the InAs core at 20 mK. We find the sub-gap conductance being at least a factor 200 smaller than the normal state value (gap hardness). This is a significant improvement compared to devices fabricated by conventional lithographic methods and metal evaporation showing no more than a factor of ~ 5 . The epitaxial hybrids seem to solve the soft gap problem associated with the use of nanowire hybrids for future applications in topological quantum information based on Majorana zero modes. Research supported by Microsoft Station Q, Danish National Research Foundation, Villum Foundation, Lundbeck Foundation, and the European Commission.

  10. Method of nitriding niobium to form a superconducting surface

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Michael J.; Klopf, John Michael; Singaravelu, Senthilaraja

    2014-08-19

    A method of forming a delta niobium nitride .delta.-NbN layer on the surface of a niobium object including cleaning the surface of the niobium object; providing a treatment chamber; placing the niobium object in the treatment chamber; evacuating the chamber; passing pure nitrogen into the treatment chamber; focusing a laser spot on the niobium object; delivering laser fluences at the laser spot until the surface of the niobium object reaches above its boiling temperature; and rastering the laser spot over the surface of the niobium object.

  11. Superconducting tantalum nitride-based normal metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, S.; Maasilta, I. J.

    2014-03-24

    We report the development of superconducting tantalum nitride (TaN{sub x}) normal metal-insulator-superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. For the insulating barrier, we used both AlO{sub x} and TaO{sub x} (Cu-AlO{sub x}-Al-TaN{sub x} and Cu-TaO{sub x}-TaN{sub x}), with both devices exhibiting temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics which follow the simple one-particle tunneling model. The superconducting gap follows a BCS type temperature dependence, rendering these devices suitable for sensitive thermometry and bolometry from the superconducting transition temperature T{sub C} of the TaN{sub x} film at ∼5 K down to ∼0.5 K. Numerical simulations were also performed to predict how junction parameters should be tuned to achieve electronic cooling at temperatures above 1 K.

  12. Toughness enhancement in zirconium-tungsten-nitride nanocrystalline hard coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, P.; Srivastava, S.; Chandra, R.; Ramana, C. V.

    2016-07-01

    An approach is presented to increase the toughness (KIC) while retaining high hardness (H) of Zr-W-N nanocrystalline coatings using energetic ions bombardment. Tuning KIC and H values was made possible by a careful control over the substrate bias, i.e., the kinetic energy (Uk˜9-99 J/cm3) of the bombarding ions, while keeping the deposition temperature relatively low (200 oC). Structural and mechanical characterization revealed a maximum wear resistance (H/Er˜0.23) and fracture toughness (KIC˜2.25 MPa √{ m } ) of ZrWN coatings at Uk˜72 J/cm3. A direct Uk-microstructure-KIC-H relationship suggests that tailoring mechanical properties for a given application is possible by tuning Uk and, hence, ZrWN-coatings' microstructure.

  13. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bueno, J. Baselmans, J. J. A; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Doyle, S.

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  14. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, J.; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G.; de Visser, P. J.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Doyle, S.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2014-11-01

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  15. Crystal structures of superconducting sodium intercalates of hafnium nitride chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Oro-Sole, J.; Frontera, C.; Beltran-Porter, D.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Fuertes, A. . E-mail: amparo.fuertes@icmab.es

    2006-05-25

    Sodium intercalation compounds of HfNCl have been prepared at room temperature in naphtyl sodium solutions in tetrahydrofuran and their crystal structure has been investigated by Rietveld refinement using X-ray powder diffraction data and high-resolution electron microscopy. The structure of two intercalates with space group R3-bar m and lattice parameters a=3.58131(6)A, c=57.752(6)A, and a=3.58791(8)A, c=29.6785(17)A is reported, corresponding to the stages 2 and 1, respectively, of Na{sub x}HfNCl. For the stage 2 phase an ordered model is presented, showing two crystallographically independent [HfNCl] units with an alternation of the Hf-Hf interlayer distance along the c-axis, according with the occupation by sodium atoms of one out of two van der Waals gaps. Both stages 1 and 2 phases are superconducting with critical temperatures between 20 and 24K, they coexist in different samples with proportions depending on the synthesis conditions, and show a variation in c spacing that can be correlated with the sodium stoichiometry. High-resolution electron microscopy images of the host and intercalated samples show bending of the HfNCl bilayers as well as stacking faults in some regions, which coexist in the same crystal with ordered domains.

  16. Superconducting energy scales and anomalous dissipative conductivity in thin films of molybdenum nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmendinger, Julian; Pracht, Uwe S.; Daschke, Lena; Proslier, Thomas; Klug, Jeffrey A.; Dressel, Martin; Scheffler, Marc

    2016-08-01

    We report investigations of molybdenum nitride (MoN) thin films with different thickness and disorder and with superconducting transition temperature 9.89 K ≥Tc≥2.78 K . Using terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy we explore the normal and superconducting charge carrier dynamics for frequencies covering the range from 3 to 38 cm-1 (0.1 to 1.1 THz). The superconducting energy scales, i.e., the critical temperature Tc, the pairing energy Δ , and the superfluid stiffness J , and the superfluid density ns can be well described within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory for conventional superconductors. At the same time, we find an anomalously large dissipative conductivity, which cannot be explained by thermally excited quasiparticles, but rather by a temperature-dependent normal-conducting fraction, persisting deep into the superconducting state. Our results on this disordered system constrain the regime, where discernible effects stemming from the disorder-induced superconductor-insulator transition possibly become relevant, to MoN films with a transition temperature lower than at least 2.78 K.

  17. Hardness, microstructure and surface characterization of laser gas nitrided commercially pure titanium using high power CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Selvan, J.S.; Subramanian, K.; Nath, A.K.; Gogia, A.K.; Balamurugan, A.K.; Rajagopal, S.

    1998-10-01

    Surface nitriding of commercially pure (CP) titanium was carried out using high power CO{sub 2} laser at pure nitrogen and dilute nitrogen (N{sub 2} + Ar) environment. The hardness, microstructure, and melt pool configuration of the laser melted titanium in helium and argon atmosphere was compared with laser melting at pure and dilute nitrogen environment. The hardness of the nitrided layer was of the order of 1000 to 1600 HV. The hardness of the laser melted titanium in the argon and helium atmosphere was 500 to 1000 HV. Using x-ray analysis of the formation of TiN and Ti{sub 2}N phase was identified in the laser nitrided titanium. The presence of nitrogen in the nitrided zone was confirmed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. The microstructures revealed densely populated dendrites in the sample nitrided at 100% N{sub 2} environment and thinly populated dendrites in dilute environment. The crack intensity was large in the nitrided sample at pure nitrogen, and few cracks were observed in the 50% N{sub 2} + 50% Ar environment.

  18. Nitrogen implantation effects on the chemical bonding and hardness of boron and boron nitride coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S; Felter, T; Hayes, J; Jankowski, A F; Patterson, R; Poker, D; Stamler, T

    1999-02-08

    Boron nitride (BN) coatings are deposited by the reactive sputtering of fully dense, boron (B) targets utilizing an argon-nitrogen (Ar-N{sub 2}) reactive gas mixture. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis reveals features of chemical bonding in the B 1s photoabsorption spectrum. Hardness is measured at the film surface using nanoindentation. The BN coatings prepared at low, sputter gas pressure with substrate heating are found to have bonding characteristic of a defected hexagonal phase. The coatings are subjected to post-deposition nitrogen (N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +}) implantation at different energies and current densities. The changes in film hardness attributed to the implantation can be correlated to changes observed in the B 1s NEXAFS spectra.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of boron carbon nitride thin films as protective overcoat for hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanfeng

    The current goal in the magnetic storage industry is to reach the areal density of 1Tbit/in2 in a few years. This requires the head-media spacing (HMS), which includes media overcoat, lubricant layer, air bearing, and head overcoat, not to exceed 5.0 nm. Trade-off between these layers results in requiring the protective overcoat to be 1.0 nm or less. The protective overcoat must be hard, wear-resistant, continuous, thermally stable, and compatible with the magnetic layer and lubricant. This thesis work is mainly to develop protective overcoat for ultra high density hard disk drives (HDD). Amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films were synthesized using pulseDC magnetron sputtering. The influence of substrate bias, substrate tilt, and substrate rotation on film growth and properties was studied. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) was used to measure film density, roughness and thickness. Surface roughness and thickness measurements from XRR are comparable to AFM and surface profiler measurements respectively. a-CNx films have good mechanical properties. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and high resolution transmission microscope (HRTEM) were used to obtain the film composition and microstructure. HRTEM cross sectioned experiments showed that CN x film is amorphous. Chemical corrosion experiments display drastic decrease of corrosion spots for thin films synthesized under optimum conditions. In pursuit of new materials for hard disk drive protective overcoat, boron carbide (B4C) and boron carbon nitride (BxC yNz) thin films were synthesized by pulse-DC magnetron sputtering. Effects of target power, target pulse frequency, substrate bias and pulse frequency on surface roughness were studied by AFM. Nitrogen incorporation into B4C films, which gives BxCyNz thin films, has a beneficial effect to decrease the film roughness. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to characterize the film composition. High-resolution cross-sectioned TEM studies showed that both films are amorphous

  20. Microstructure and hardness of hollow cathode discharge ion-plated titanium nitride film

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.T.; Song, Y.C.; Yu, G.P.; Huang, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) films were deposited on 304 stainless steel substrate by hollow cathode discharge (HCD) ion-plating technique. The preferred orientation and microstructure were studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. Microhardness of the TiN film was measured and correlated to the microstructure and preferred orientation. The results of TEM study showed that the microstructure of TiN film contains grains with nanometer scale. As the film thickness increases, the grain size of TiN increases. The x-ray results show that TiN(111) is the major preferred orientation of the film. The hardness of TiN film is primarily contributed from TiN(111) preferred orientation.

  1. Hardness and deformation mechanisms of highly elastic carbon nitride thin films as studied by nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hainsworth, S.V.; Page, T.F.; Sjoestroem, H.; Sundgren, J.E.

    1997-05-01

    Carbon nitride (CN{sub x}) thin films (0.18 < x < 0.43), deposited by magnetron sputtering of C in a N{sub 2} discharge, have been observed to be extremely resistant to plastic deformation during surface contact (i.e., exhibit a purely elastic response over large strains). Elastic recoveries as high as 90% have been measured by nanoindentation. This paper addresses the problems of estimating Young`s modulus (E) and hardness (H) in such cases and shows how different strategies involving analysis of both loading and unloading curves and measuring the work of indentation each present their own problems. The results of some cyclic contact experiments are also presented and possible deformation mechanisms in the fullerene-like CN{sub x} structures discussed.

  2. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Li, X.; Qi, X; Welch, D.; Zhu, P.; Liu, B.; Cui, T.; Li, B.

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.

  3. Hexagonal-structured ε-NbN: ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Qi, Xintong; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions. PMID:26028439

  4. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Li, X.; Qi, X; Welch, D.; Zhu, P.; Liu, B.; Cui, T.; Li, B.

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂Pmore » = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.« less

  5. The Effect of Ion Damage and Annealing on Superconducting Transition-Metal - Nitride Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John Thomas

    Thin films of the B1 phase superconducting compounds vanadium nitride and titanium nitride have been formed. This was accomplished by heating the previously evaporated pure metal films in high purity nitrogen gas. The resistivity at room and low temperature, the superconducting transition temperature T(,C), and the upper critical field of these films were measured using a four probe d.c. resistive technique and found to be similar to those measured on bulk samples of the same compound. The films were then irradiated with nitrogen ions and the effect of lattice damage on these parameters was determined. It was found that the dependence on ion fluence of the residual resistivity and the transition temperature obeyed saturating exponential functions that could be derived from a simple defect production and annealing model. The renormalized electronic density of states N*(O) was calculated as a function of ion fluence, while the band density of states N('b)(O) was calculated using the electron lifetime model. The electron-phonon coupling constant was determined from these densities of states and from the McMillan equation for T(,C). The results do not agree and it is shown that spin fluctuations cannot be used to explain the discrepancy. It is argued that some mechanism, other than lifetime reduction of the band density of states, is responsible for the observed effects. This is in contrast to the high temperature A15 superconductors in which the electron lifetime model yields large reductions in N('b)(O). It is thought that any other mechanism present in these materials would be overshadowed by this large reduction. Subsequent annealing studies were performed on these samples. The results indicate that the radiation damage effects are, to a large extent, reversible. It is also found that annealing in vacuum at high temperatures results in loss of nitrogen and thus degradation of the properties of the material. From the ion damage and annealing results and from

  6. Hardness and Young's modulus of high-quality cubic boron nitride films grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Philip, J.; Zhang, W. J.; Hess, P.; Matsumoto, S.

    2003-02-01

    The elastic and mechanical properties of high-quality cubic boron nitride (cBN) films with a few microns thickness and submicron grain size grown on silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition were determined by measuring the dispersion of surface acoustic waves propagating along the surface of the layered system. The values are compared with those obtained with an ultralow load indenter (Triboscope). Specifically, the hardness, Young's modulus and density of the film were measured.

  7. Ultra-thin superconducting film coated silicon nitride nanowire resonators for low-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Abhilash; Zhelev, Nikolay; de Alba, Roberto; Parpia, Jeevak

    We demonstrate fabrication of high stress silicon nitride nanowire resonators with a thickness and width of less than 50 nm intended to be used as probes for the study of superfluid 3He. The resonators are fabricated as doubly-clamped wires/beams using a combination of electron-beam lithography and wet/dry etching techniques. We demonstrate the ability to suspend (over a trench of depth ~8 µm) wires with a cross section as small as 30 nm, covered with a 20 nm superconducting film, and having lengths up to 50 µm. Room temperature resonance measurements were carried out by driving the devices using a piezo stage and detecting the motion using an optical interferometer. The results show that metalizing nano-mechanical resonators not only affects their resonant frequencies but significantly reduce their quality factor (Q). The devices are parametrically pumped by modulating the system at twice its fundamental resonant frequency, which results in observed amplification of the signal. The wires show self-oscillation with increasing modulation strength. The fabricated nanowire resonators are intended to be immersed in the superfluid 3He. By tracking the resonant frequency and the Q of the various modes of the wire versus temperature, we aim to probe the superfluid gap structure.

  8. Chemical bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon-nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, Wesley Jason

    In this study, the chemical bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is investigated with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The films were deposited by DC Magnetron sputtering in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300--400°C. Nanoindentation measurements reveal an elastic modulus of ˜50 GPa and a hardness of ˜5 GPa, thus confirming our films are highly elastic but resist plastic deformation. Our 13C NMR study demonstrates the absence of sp 3-bonded carbon in this material. Collectively, our N(1s) XPS, 13C NMR, and 15N NMR data suggest a film-bonding model that has an aromatic carbon structure with sp2-hybridized nitrogen incorporated in heterocyclic rings. We demonstrate that the nitrogen bonding is predominantly in configurations similar to those in pyridine and pyrrole. In addition, the data indicate that the a-CNx films prepared for this study have low hydrogen content, but are hydrophilic. Specifically, results from 15N and 13C cross polarization (CP) and 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments suggest that nitrogen sites are susceptible to protonation from water absorbed during sample preparation for the NMR experiments. The sensitivity of the surface of a-CNx to water absorption may impact tribological applications for this material. In accord with our XPS and NMR spectroscopic studies on a-CN x films, we propose a film-structure model consisting of buckled graphitic planes that are cross-linked together by sp2 hybridized carbons. The curvature and cross-linking is attributed to a type of compound defect, which is formed by placing a pentagon next to single-atom vacancy in a graphite layer. Our proposed film structure is called the pentagon-with-vacancy-defect (5VD) model. Using Hartree-Fock calculations, we show that the 5VD, film-structure model is compatible with our XPS, NMR, and nanoindentation measurements and with previous

  9. Hexagonal-structured ε-NbN: ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yongtao; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Qi, Xintong; Welch, David; Zhu, Pinwen; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Li, Baosheng

    2015-01-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂P = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions. PMID:26028439

  10. Structure and hardness of corrosion-resistant ferritic steels subjected to high-temperature nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, S. A.; Rogachev, S. O.; Khatkevich, V. M.; Rozhnov, A. B.

    2014-02-01

    A comparative study of the effect of high-temperature internal nitriding (at above 1000°C) on the structure formation and hardening of thin-sheet samples of 08Kh17T (0.06% C-17.0% Cr-0.5% Ti) and 15Kh25T (0.10% C-25.0% Cr-0.5% Ti) steels was performed. The high-temperature internal nitriding of the 08Kh17T steel leads to the formation of martensite structure with Cr2N precipitates. The nitriding of 15Kh25T steel results in the formation of a layered structure; in this case, individual layers consist of a mixture of the α and γ phases and Cr2N particles, which are present in different proportions. It was shown that the internal nitriding of both steels with their subsequent annealing leads to their substantial uniform hardening.

  11. Bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride films investigated using 15N, 13C, and 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, W. J.; Hoatson, G. L.; Holloway, B. C.; Vold, R. L.; Reilly, A. C.

    2003-11-01

    The nitrogen bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is examined with 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering, in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300 °C. Nanoindentation tests revealed an elastic recovery of 80%, a hardness of 5 GPa, and an elastic modulus of 47 GPa. The NMR results show that nitrogen bonding in this material is consistent with sp2 hybridized nitrogen incorporated in an aromatic carbon environment. The data also indicate that the a-CNx prepared for this study has very low hydrogen content and is hydrophilic. Specifically, analysis of 15N and 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning and 1H NMR experiments suggests that water preferentially protonates nitrogen sites.

  12. Quantum and thermal phase slips in superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) ultrathin crystalline nanowire: application to single photon detection.

    PubMed

    Delacour, Cécile; Pannetier, Bernard; Villegier, Jean-Claude; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2012-07-11

    We present low-temperature electronic transport properties of superconducting nanowires obtained by nanolithography of 4-nm-thick niobium nitride (NbN) films epitaxially grown on sapphire substrate. Below 6 K, clear evidence of phase slippages is observed in the transport measurements. Upon lowering the temperature, we observe the signatures of a crossover between a thermal and a quantum behavior in the phase slip regimes. We find that phase slips are stable even at the lowest temperatures and that no hotspot is formed. The photoresponse of these nanowires is measured as a function of the light irradiation wavelength and temperature and exhibits a behavior comparable with previous results obtained on thicker films. PMID:22694480

  13. Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Langone, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book explains the theoretical background of superconductivity. Includes discussion of electricity, material fabrication, maglev trains, the superconducting supercollider, and Japanese-US competition. The authors reports the latest discoveries.

  14. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using an environmental cell with silicon nitride membrane windows

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemi, Eika; Watanabe, Yoshio; Oji, Hiroshi; Cui, Yi-Tao; Son, Jin-Young

    2015-06-21

    We applied hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) to a sample under ambient pressure conditions using an environmental cell with an approximately 24 nm-thick SiN{sub x} membrane window. As a model chemical substance, europium (II) iodide (EuI{sub 2}) sealed in the cell with argon gas was investigated with HAXPES to identify the chemical species present inside the cell. The optical and morphological properties of the sample within the cell were measured with optical and fluorescent microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. We confirmed the effectiveness of the gas barrier properties of the cell with the SiN{sub x} window and demonstrated its applicability to various other optical and electron measurements as well as HAXPES.

  15. The electron-phonon relaxation time in thin superconducting titanium nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Kardakova, A.; Finkel, M.; Kovalyuk, V.; An, P.; Morozov, D.; Dunscombe, C.; Mauskopf, P.; Tarkhov, M.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Goltsman, G.

    2013-12-16

    We report on the direct measurement of the electron-phonon relaxation time, τ{sub eph}, in disordered TiN films. Measured values of τ{sub eph} are from 5.5 ns to 88 ns in the 4.2 to 1.7 K temperature range and consistent with a T{sup −3} temperature dependence. The electronic density of states at the Fermi level N{sub 0} is estimated from measured material parameters. The presented results confirm that thin TiN films are promising candidate-materials for ultrasensitive superconducting detectors.

  16. Elastic property and intrinsic hardness of novel superhard ternary nitrides (CSi2N4 and SiC2N4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ying-Chun; Chen, Min; Jiang, Meng-Heng; Gao, Xiu-Ying

    2012-11-01

    In this work, the new ternary nitrides (CSi2N4 and SiC2N4) are designed by the substitution method. The structures, elastic properties, intrinsic hardness and Debye temperature of the new ternary nitrides (CSi2N4 and SiC2N4) are studied by first-principles calculations based on the density-functional theory. The elastic constants C of these new ternary nitrides are obtained using the stress-strain method. Derived elastic constants, such as bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson coefficient and brittle/ductile behavior are estimated using Voigt-Reuss-Hill theories. The results indicate that γ-CSi2N4, p-CSi2N4 and p-SiC2N4 are mechanically stable. Calculated B/G values and Poisson's ratio for γ-CSi2N4, p-CSi2N4 and p-SiC2N4 indicate that these materials are brittle. The calculated anisotropy parameters indicate that γ-CSi2N4 shows weak anisotropy and p-SiC2N4 and p-CSi2N4 have larger anisotropy. Based on the microscopic hardness model, p-CSi2N4, p-SiC2N4 and γ-CSi2N4 should be viewed as superhard materials with some peculiar mechanical properties.

  17. Reactive magnetron cosputtering of hard and conductive ternary nitride thin films: Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N

    SciTech Connect

    Abadias, G.; Koutsokeras, L. E.; Dub, S. N.; Tolmachova, G. N.; Debelle, A.; Sauvage, T.; Villechaise, P.

    2010-07-15

    Ternary transition metal nitride thin films, with thickness up to 300 nm, were deposited by dc reactive magnetron cosputtering in Ar-N{sub 2} plasma discharges at 300 deg. C on Si substrates. Two systems were comparatively studied, Ti-Zr-N and Ti-Ta-N, as representative of isostructural and nonisostructural prototypes, with the aim of characterizing their structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. While phase-separated TiN-ZrN and TiN-TaN are the bulk equilibrium states, Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N and Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N solid solutions with the Na-Cl (B1-type) structure could be stabilized in a large compositional range (up to x=1 and y=0.75, respectively). Substituting Ti atoms by either Zr or Ta atoms led to significant changes in film texture, microstructure, grain size, and surface morphology, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction, x-ray reflectivity, and scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. The ternary Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films exhibited superior mechanical properties to Ti{sub 1-x}Zr{sub x}N films as well as binary compounds, with hardness as high as 42 GPa for y=0.69. All films were metallic, the lowest electrical resistivity {rho}{approx}65 {mu}{Omega} cm being obtained for pure ZrN, while for Ti{sub 1-y}Ta{sub y}N films a minimum was observed at y{approx}0.3. The evolution of the different film properties is discussed based on microstructrural investigations.

  18. Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Yung K.

    Many potential high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) military applications have been demonstrated by low-temperature superconductivity systems; they encompass high efficiency electric drives for naval vessels, airborne electric generators, energy storage systems for directed-energy weapons, electromechanical launchers, magnetic and electromagnetic shields, and cavity resonators for microwave and mm-wave generation. Further HST applications in militarily relevant fields include EM sensors, IR focal plane arrays, SQUIDs, magnetic gradiometers, high-power sonar sources, and superconducting antennas and inertial navigation systems. The development of SQUID sensors will furnish novel magnetic anomaly detection methods for ASW.

  19. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  20. Semi-quantitative chemical analysis of hard coatings by Raman micro-spectroscopy: the aluminium chromium nitride system as an example.

    PubMed

    Kaindl, R; Sartory, B; Neidhardt, J; Franz, R; Reiter, A; Polcik, P; Tessadri, R; Mitterer, C

    2007-11-01

    A new method for chemical analyses of nitride-based hard coatings is presented. Raman band shifts in the spectra of Al(x)Cr(1-x)N coatings, deposited by physical vapour deposition from Al(x)Cr(1-x) targets with x (T,Al) = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.70 and 0.85, are calibrated using compositional data of the coatings derived by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). Inserting the composition-dependent Raman shift of a combinatorial acoustic-optic lattice mode into an empirically derived equation allows the determination of Al/Cr ratios of the coating with an accuracy of about +/-2%. Spot, line and area analyses of coated cemented carbide and cold work steel samples by using a computer-controlled, motorized x,y-stage are demonstrated and the most important errors influencing precision and accuracy are discussed. Figure Raman map of a coated cold-work steel sample. PMID:17932660

  1. Uranium hohlraum with an ultrathin uranium-nitride coating layer for low hard x-ray emission and high radiation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Ding, Yongkun; Xing, Pifeng; Li, Sanwei; Kuang, Longyu; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Taimin; Ren, Guoli; Wu, Zeqing; Jing, Longfei; Zhang, Wenhai; Zhan, Xiayu; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Baibin; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Jie; Huo, Wenyi; Lan, Ke

    2015-11-01

    An ultrathin layer of uranium nitrides (UN) has been coated on the inner surface of depleted uranium hohlraum (DUH), which has been proven by our experiment to prevent the oxidization of uranium (U) effectively. Comparative experiments between the novel depleted uranium hohlraum and pure golden (Au) hohlraum are implemented on an SGIII-prototype laser facility. Under a laser intensity of 6 × 1014 W cm-2, we observe that the hard x-ray (hν \\gt 1.8 keV) fraction of the uranium hohlraum decreases by 61% and the peak intensity of the total x-ray flux (0.1 keV˜5.0 keV) increases by 5%. Radiation hydrodynamic code LARED is used to interpret the above observations. Our result for the first time indicates the advantages of the UN-coated DUH in generating a uniform x-ray source with a quasi-Planckian spectrum, which should have important applications in high energy density physics.

  2. Surface properties of metal-nitride and metal-carbide films deposited on Nb for RF superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Garwin, E.L.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Aita, O.

    1983-09-01

    Various effects occur which can prevent attainment of the high Q's and/or the high gradient fields necessary for the operation of rf superconducting cavities. One of these effects, multipactor, both causes the cavity to detune during filling due to resonant secondary electron emission at the cavity walls, and lowers the Q by dissipative processes. TiN deposited onto the high field regions of room temperature Al cavities has been used at SLAC to successfully reduce multipactor in the past. We have therefore studied TiN and its companion materials, NbN, NbC, and TiC, all on Nb substrates under several realistic conditions: (1) as deposited, (2) exposed to air, and (3) 1 keV electron-bombarded. The studied films (up to 14 nm thickness) were sputter deposited onto sputter-cleaned Nb substrates. Results indicate that the materials tested gave substantially the same results. The maximum secondary electron yields for as-deposited films was about 1.0 to 1.2. These yields rose to greater than 1.5 upon air-exposure and were reduced to nearly the pre-oxidized values after electron bombardment (about 3 x 10/sup 17/ electrons-cm/sup -2/ in the case of NbN and NbC). XPS analysis showed that the oxides (e.g. TiO/sub 2/ in the case of TiN films) formed during air exposure were only slightly reduced (converted to lower oxides) by the electron beam exposure. AES showed a slight reduction in the surface O concentration following beam exposure. The results indicate that any of these films would be poor choices if simply deposited and exposed to air, but, in fact, the in-situ electron bombardment which occurs in cavities serves to reduce the effective secondary electron yield and thereby causes a substantial reduction in multipacting.

  3. Tests of the radiation hardness of VLSI Integrated Circuits and Silicon Strip Detectors for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) under neutron, proton, and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, H.J.; Milner, C.; Sommer, W.F. ); Carteglia, N.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Ellison, J.A. ); Ferguson, P. ); Giubellino

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to develop a silicon strip central tracking detector system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) we are studying the effects of radiation damage in silicon detectors and their associated front-end readout electronics. We report on the results of neutron and proton irradiations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and {gamma}-ray irradiations at UC Santa Cruz (UCSC). Individual components on single-sided AC-coupled silicon strip detectors and on test structures were tested. Circuits fabricated in a radiation hard CMOS process and individual transistors fabricated using dielectric isolation bipolar technology were also studied. Results indicate that a silicon strip tracking detector system should have a lifetime of at least one decade at the SSC. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  4. Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Of Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes synthesis, properties, and applications of boron nitride. Especially in thin-film form. Boron nitride films useful as masks in x-ray lithography; as layers for passivation of high-speed microelectronic circuits; insulating films; hard, wear-resistant, protective films for optical components; lubricants; and radiation detectors. Present status of single-crystal growth of boron nitride indicates promising candidate for use in high-temperature semiconductor electronics.

  5. Effect of Plasma Nitriding on the Performance of WC-Co Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamzaoglu, Ebru; Yilmaz, Safak; Gulmez, Turgut

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the effect of nitriding process parameters on the cutting performance of WC-Co tools. The cutting performance was measured by CNC machining of GG25 cast iron parts. The hardness and phase composition of nitrided layer were determined for different plasma nitriding temperatures and times. The hardness of the nitrided layer increased at all plasma nitrided conditions investigated. However, the machining performance of the cutting inserts varied in the range between a 60% increase and a 40% decrease after plasma nitriding. The maximum number of machined parts was seen when the insert was nitrided at 600 °C-4 h and at 500 °C-4 h.

  6. Superconducting Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peotta, Sebastiano; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2014-09-01

    In his original work, Josephson predicted that a phase-dependent conductance should be present in superconducting tunnel junctions, an effect difficult to detect, mainly because it is hard to single it out from the usual nondissipative Josephson current. We propose a solution for this problem that consists of using different superconducting materials to realize the two junctions of a superconducting interferometer. According to the Ambegaokar-Baratoff relation the two junctions have different conductances if the critical currents are equal, thus the Josephson current can be suppressed by fixing the magnetic flux in the loop at half of a flux quantum without canceling the phase-dependent conductance. Our proposal can be used to study the phase-dependent conductance, an effect present in principle in all superconducting weak links. From the standpoint of nonlinear circuit theory, such a device is in fact an ideal memristor with possible applications to memories and neuromorphic computing in the framework of ultrafast and low-energy-consumption superconducting digital circuits.

  7. Nitriding of Aluminum Extrusion Die: Effect of Die Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, S. S.; Arif, A. F. M.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2010-04-01

    Nitriding of complex-shaped extrusion dies may result in non-uniform nitride layers and hence a required hardness may not be achieved in some regions of the bearing area. The present study is carried out to assess the effect of extrusion die profile on the characteristics and growth behavior of nitride layers so that the critical die design feature can be identified to enhance the uniformity of the nitride layer. For this purpose, AISI H13 steel samples have been manufactured with profiles similar to those of hot extrusion dies. The samples were then gas nitrided under controlled nitriding potential. The uniformity and depth of nitride layers have been investigated in terms of compound layer and total nitride case depth for selected die features. The results of this study indicated the need to include the effect of profile on the nitride layer for the optimal die design with improved service life.

  8. Wear resistance of boron nitride coated metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Yasunori; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Sakai, Shigeki; Ogata, Kiyoshi; Fujimoto, Fuminori

    1993-06-01

    The wear resistance of boron nitride films was studied. The films of 1 μm thickness were prepared on the surface of a cutting tool by simultaneous nitrogen ion irradiation and vapor depositon of boron; the Vickers hardness of the films was between 3000 and 5000 kg/mm 2. The test was performed by the cutting of steel. On the tool deposited directly, the wear of the surface is large and this could not be improved greatly. However, the tools prepared after nitridation of the surface layer by ion implantation and the one with another nitride layer in the interface showed decreasing wear, and the wear of the tool with an interlayer of silicon nitride could be decreased to about 15%. As a result, it became clear that boron nitride could be effectively used as a highly hard film by the optimization of the interface between the film and the matrix.

  9. Low-compressibility and hard material carbon nitride imide C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH): First principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Haiyan; Wei Qun; Zheng Baobing; Guo Ping

    2011-03-15

    First principles calculations are performed to investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH). Our calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data and previous theoretical values. Orthorhombic C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) phase is found to be mechanically stable at an ambient pressure. Based on the calculated bulk modulus and shear modulus of polycrystalline aggregate, C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) can be regarded as a potential candidate of ultra-incompressible and hard material. Furthermore, the elastic anisotropy and Debye temperatures are also discussed by investigating the elastic constants and moduli. Density of states and electronic localization function analysis show that the strong C-N covalent bond in CN{sub 4} tetrahedron is the main driving force for the high bulk and shear moduli as well as small Poisson's ratio of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH). -- Graphical abstract: Contours of electronic localization function (ELF) of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) on the: (0 0 1) plane (a), (1 0 0) plane (b), an ELF of Si{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) on the: (0 0 1) plane (c) and (1 0 0) plane (d). Display Omitted Research highlights: The structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) have been studied. C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) is a potential low compressible and hard material. Both C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) and Si{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH) are found to have insulating feature with large band gaps. The strong covalent C-N bonding in CN{sub 4} tetrahedrons play a key role in the incompressibility and hardness of C{sub 2}N{sub 2}(NH). The chemical bonding in these two solids is a complex mixture of covalent and ionic characters.

  10. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  11. Synthesis, Hardness, and Electronic Properties of Stoichiometric VN and CrN

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shanmin; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Liping; Leinenweber, Kurt; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-11-09

    Here, we report synthesis of single-crystal VN and CrN through high-pressure ionexchange reaction routes. The final products are stoichiometric and have crystallite sizes in the range of 50-120 mu m. We also prepared VN and TiN crystals using high-pressure sintering of nitride powders. On the basis of single-crystal indentation testing, the determined asymptotic Vickers hardness for TiN, VN, and CrN is 18 (1), 10 (1), and 16 (1) GPa, respectively. Moreover, the relatively low hardness in VN indicates that the metallic bonding prevails due to the overfilled metallic a bonds, although the cation-anion covalent hybridization in this compound is much stronger than that in TiN and CrN. All three nitrides are intrinsically excellent metals at ambient pressure. In particular, VN exhibits superconducting transition at T-c approximate to 7.8 K, which is slightly lower than the reported values for nitrogen-deficient or crystallinedisordered samples due to unsuppressed "spin fluctuation" in the well-crystallized stoichiometric VN. The magnetostructural transition in CrN correlates with a metal metal transition at T-N = 240(5) K and is accompanied by a similar to 40% drop in electrical resistivity. Additionally, more detailed electronic properties are presented with new insights into these nitrides.

  12. Synthesis, Hardness, and Electronic Properties of Stoichiometric VN and CrN

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Shanmin; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Liping; Leinenweber, Kurt; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-11-09

    Here, we report synthesis of single-crystal VN and CrN through high-pressure ionexchange reaction routes. The final products are stoichiometric and have crystallite sizes in the range of 50-120 mu m. We also prepared VN and TiN crystals using high-pressure sintering of nitride powders. On the basis of single-crystal indentation testing, the determined asymptotic Vickers hardness for TiN, VN, and CrN is 18 (1), 10 (1), and 16 (1) GPa, respectively. Moreover, the relatively low hardness in VN indicates that the metallic bonding prevails due to the overfilled metallic a bonds, although the cation-anion covalent hybridization in this compound is muchmore » stronger than that in TiN and CrN. All three nitrides are intrinsically excellent metals at ambient pressure. In particular, VN exhibits superconducting transition at T-c approximate to 7.8 K, which is slightly lower than the reported values for nitrogen-deficient or crystallinedisordered samples due to unsuppressed "spin fluctuation" in the well-crystallized stoichiometric VN. The magnetostructural transition in CrN correlates with a metal metal transition at T-N = 240(5) K and is accompanied by a similar to 40% drop in electrical resistivity. Additionally, more detailed electronic properties are presented with new insights into these nitrides.« less

  13. Plasma nitriding of Fe-18Cr-9Ni in the range of 723-823 K

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, H.; Matsuoka, H.; Tamura, I. ); Takada, J. ); Kikuchi, S.; Tomii, Y. )

    1991-08-01

    To clarify the mechanism of plasma nitriding, the authors examined the optical microstructure, the hardness, the precipitation, and the concentration of dissolved nitrogen in Fe-18Cr-9Ni nitrided using plasma in the range of 723-823 K. Compared with ammonia-gas nitriding, the features of plasma nitriding are the formation of small chromium-nitride precipitates (CrN), the absence of an externally nitrided layer, the high concentration of dissolved nitrogen, and the high hardness (HV = 1,200). The diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the present alloy was determined using the growth rate of the internally nitrided layer, based on calculations used in internal oxidation. Plasma- and gas-nitriding were also compared with respect to the growth rate of the nitrided layer.

  14. Ion nitriding; Proceedings of the International Conference, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 15-17, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The present conference discusses plasma-assisted surface coating/modification processes, the applications to date of ion nitriding, the effects of nitrogen on metal surfaces, ion nitriding mechanisms in Cr, Al and Cr + Al-containing 1040 steel, ion nitriding of Al and its alloys, life enhancement for forging dies, novel anode plasma nitriding developments, and a comparative study of the pulsed and dc ion-nitriding behavior in specimens with blind holes. Also discussed are the influence of heating method on ion nitriding, surface hardening of marage steels by ion nitriding without core hardness reduction, plasma nitriding of nodular cast iron sput gears, NbN composites for superconductors, the carburization of tungsten in a glow discharge methane plasma, economic considerations concerning plasma nitriding, and the corrosion properties obtained by ion nitriding.

  15. Surface characterization of a decarburized and nitrided steel.

    PubMed

    Calliari, Irene; Dabalà, Manuele; Zanesco, Marzia; Bernardo, Enrico; Olmi, Filippo; Vagelli, Gloria

    2006-08-01

    This article describes the effects of surface controlled decarburization on the structure of a nitrided steel. Samples of quenched and tempered 40CrMo4 steel were decarburized by air heat treatment (800-900 degrees C) at different depths and submitted to gaseous nitriding. The microstructure of surface layers after decarburization and nitriding were investigated by optical (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nitrogen and carbon profiles in the diffusion layers were determined by a scanning electron microscope equipped with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (EPMA-WDS). The effect of nitriding was determined by microhardness measurements. The increasing of time and temperature of decarburization slightly affect the surface hardness values, while case hardness depths decrease. In all the specimens, the nitriding depth, as determined by the WDS nitrogen profile, is larger than the one determined by the hardness profile. PMID:16842649

  16. Microstructure and antibacterial properties of microwave plasma nitrided layers on biomedical stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li-Hsiang; Chen, Shih-Chung; Wu, Ching-Zong; Hung, Jing-Ming; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2011-06-01

    Nitriding of AISI 303 austenitic stainless steel using microwave plasma system at various temperatures was conducted in the present study. The nitrided layers were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness tester. The antibacterial properties of this nitrided layer were evaluated. During nitriding treatment between 350 °C and 550 °C, the phase transformation sequence on the nitrided layers of the alloys was found to be γ → (γ + γ N) → (γ + α + CrN). The analytical results revealed that the surface hardness of AISI 303 stainless steel could be enhanced with the formation of γ N phase in nitriding process. Antibacterial test also demonstrated the nitrided layer processed the excellent antibacterial properties. The enhanced surface hardness and antibacterial properties make the nitrided AISI 303 austenitic stainless steel to be one of the essential materials in the biomedical applications.

  17. Ceramics based on titanium nitride and silicon nitride sintered by SPS-method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Gerasimov, D. Yu; Evdokimov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The dependences of the microstructure and physical and mechanical properties of ceramic mixtures Si3N4/TiN in the full range of mass ratios of the components. Was also investigated directly, and the process of sintering occurring during a physical or chemical processes, in particular, has been obtained and the hardness of the material density on the ratio of the conductive titanium nitride phase and a silicon nitride insulating phase with values above and below the percolation threshold. Also obtained was pure ceramics based on titanium nitride with high physical-mechanical characteristics (H = 21.5 GPa).

  18. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  19. Conductive and robust nitride buffer layers on biaxially textured substrates

    DOEpatents

    Sankar, Sambasivan [Chicago, IL; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Barnett, Scott A [Evanston, IL; Kim, Ilwon [Skokie, IL; Kroeger, Donald M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-03-31

    The present invention relates to epitaxial, electrically conducting and mechanically robust, cubic nitride buffer layers deposited epitaxially on biaxially textured substrates such as metals and alloys. The invention comprises of a biaxially textured substrate with epitaxial layers of nitrides. The invention also discloses a method to form such epitaxial layers using a high rate deposition method as well as without the use of forming gases. The invention further comprises epitaxial layers of oxides on the biaxially textured nitride layer. In some embodiments the article further comprises electromagnetic devices which may have superconducting properties.

  20. Manufacture of sintered silicon nitrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwai, T.

    1985-01-01

    Sintered silicon nitrides are manufactured by sintering Si3N powder containing 2 to 15% in wt of a powder mixture composed of nitride powder of lanthanide or Y 100 parts and AIN powder less than 100 parts at 1500 to 1900 deg. temperature under a pressure of less than 200 Kg/sq. cm. The sintered Si3N has high mechanical strength in high temperature. Thus, Si3N4 93.0, Y 5.0 and AlN 2.0% in weight were wet mixed in acetone in N atom, molded and sintered at 1750 deg. and 1000 Kg/sq. cm. to give a sintered body having high hardness.

  1. The Effect of Nitrided Layer on Antibacterial Properties for Biomedical Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C. F.; Wu, C. Z.; Lee, W. F.; Ou, K. L.; Liu, C. M.; Peng, P. W.

    Plasma nitriding of AISI type 303 austenitic stainless steel using microwave system at various input powers was conducted in present study. The nitrided layers were characterized via scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness tester. The anti-bacterial property of this nitrided layer was also evaluated. The analytical results revealed the hardness of AISI type 303 stainless steel could be enhanced with nitriding process. The microstructure of the nitrided layer comprised of nitrogen-expanded γ phase. Bacterial test demonstrated the nitrided layer processed the excellent an ti-bacterial properties. The enhanced hardness and anti-bacterial properties make the nitrided AISI type 303 austenitic stainless steel the potential material in the biomedical applications.

  2. High pressure nitriding

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Hoffmann, F.T.; Mayr, P.; Minarski, P.

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the presented research project is the development of a new high pressure nitriding process, which avoids disadvantages of conventional nitriding processes and allows for new applications. Up to now, a nitriding furnace has been constructed and several investigations have been made in order to characterize the influence of pressure on the nitriding process. In this paper, connections between pressure in the range of 2 to 12 atm and the corresponding nitride layer formation for the steel grades AISI 1045, H11 and a nitriding steel are discussed. Results of the nitride layer formation are presented. For all steel grades, a growth of nitride layers with increasing pressure was obtained. Steels with passive layers, as the warm working steel H11, showed a better nitriding behavior at elevated pressure.

  3. Effects of DC plasma nitriding parameters on microstructure and properties of 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jun; Xiong Ji Peng Qian; Fan Hongyuan; Wang Ying; Li Guijiang; Shen Baoluo

    2009-03-15

    A wear-resistant nitrided layer was formed on a 304L austenitic stainless steel substrate by DC plasma nitriding. Effects of DC plasma nitriding parameters on the structural phases, micro-hardness and dry-sliding wear behavior of the nitrided layer were investigated by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, micro-hardness testing and ring-on-block wear testing. The results show that the highest surface hardness over a case depth of about 10 {mu}m is obtained after nitriding at 460 deg. C. XRD indicated a single expanded austenite phase and a single CrN nitride phase were formed at 350 deg. C and 480 deg. C, respectively. In addition, the S-phase layers formed on the samples provided the best dry-sliding wear resistance under the ring-on-block contact configuration test.

  4. Application of hard coatings to substrates at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sproul, William D.

    1993-01-01

    BIRL, the industrial research laboratory of Northwestern University, has conducted unique and innovative research, under sponsorship from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), in the application of hard, wear resistant coatings to bearing steels using the high-rate reactive sputtering (HRRS) process that was pioneered by Dr. William Sproul, the principal investigator on this program. Prior to this program, Dr. Sproul had demonstrated that it is possible to apply hard coatings such as titanium nitride (TiN) to alloy steels at low temperatures via the HRRS process without changing the metallurgical properties of the steel. The NASA MSFC program at BIRL had the specific objectives to: apply TiN to 440C stainless steel without changing the metallurgical properties of the steel; prepare rolling contact fatigue (RCF) test samples coated with binary hard coatings of TiN, zirconium nitride (ZrN), hafnium nitride (HfN), chromium nitride (CrN), and molybdenum nitride (MoN), and metal coatings of copper (Cu) and gold (Au); and develop new alloyed hard coatings of titanium aluminum nitride (Ti(0.5)Al(0.5)N), titanium zirconium nitride (Ti(0.5)Zr(0.5)N), and titanium aluminum vanadium nitride.

  5. Lattice dynamics and electron/phonon interactions in epitaxial transition-metal nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Antonio Rodolph Bighetti

    Transition metal (TM) nitrides, due to their unique combination of remarkable physical properties and simple NaCl structure, are presently utilized in a broad range of applications and as model systems in the investigation of complex phenomena. Group-IVB nitrides TiN, ZrN, and HfN have transport properties which include superconductivity and high electrical conductivity; consequentially, they have become technologically important as electrodes and contacts in the semiconducting and superconducting industries. The Group-VB nitride VN, which exhibits enhanced ductility, is a fundamental component in superhard and tough nanostructured hard coatings. In this thesis, I investigate the lattice dynamics responsible for controlling superconductivity and electrical conductivities in Group-IVB nitrides and elasticity and structural stability of the NaCl-structure Group-VB nitride VN. Our group has already synthesized high-quality epitaxial TiN, HfN, and CeN layers on MgO(001) substrates. By irradiating the growth surface with high ion fluxes at energies below the bulk lattice-atom displacement threshold, dense epitaxial single crystal TM nitride films with extremely smooth surfaces have been grown using ultra-high vacuum magnetically-unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Using this approach, I completed the Group-IVB nitride series by growing epitaxial ZrN/MgO(001) films and then grew Group-VB nitride VN films epitaxially on MgO(001), MgO(011), and MgO(111). The combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) reciprocal lattice maps (RLMs), high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR-XTEM), and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) show that single-crystal stoichiometric ZrN films grown at 450 °C are epitaxially oriented cube-on-cube with respect to their MgO(001) substrates, (001) ZrN||(001)MgO and [100]ZrN||[100]MgO. The layers are essentially fully relaxed with a lattice parameter of 0.4575 nm. X-ray reflectivity results reveal that

  6. Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Minghui; Allen, Amy J.; Nguyen, Minh T.; Ralston, Walter T.; MacLeod, Michelle J.; DiSalvo, Francis J.

    2013-09-15

    Transition metal nitrides (TMN) have many desirable characteristics such as high hardness and good thermal stability under reducing conditions. This work reports an initial survey of the chemical stability of mesoporous TMNs (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in water at 80 °C at neutral, acidic and alkaline pH. The mesoporous TMNs had specific surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g with average pore sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm. The high surface areas of these materials enhance the rate of corrosion per unit mass over that of a bulk material, making detection of corrosion much easier. The products were characterized by Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) patterns and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several nitrides have corrosion rates that are, within error, not distinguishable from zero (±1 Å/day). Of the nitrides examined, CrN appears to be the most corrosion resistant under acidic conditions. None of the nitrides studied are corrosion resistant under alkaline conditions. - Graphical abstract: Corrosion behavior of mesoporous transition metal nitrides (TM=Nb, V, Cr and Ti) in acidic and alkaline solutions at 80 °C for 2 weeks. Display Omitted - highlights: • Corrosion rates of mesoporous transition metal nitrides in aqueous solution is reported. • The mesoporous TMNs had surface areas of 25–60 m{sup 2}/g. • CrN is the most corrosion resistant under the conditions studied.

  7. Stable xenon nitride at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Feng; Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Yunwei; Ma, Yanming

    2015-09-01

    Nitrides in many ways are fascinating since they often appear as superconductors, high-energy density, and hard materials. Though there exist a large variety of nitrides, noble gas nitrides are missing in nature. Pursuit of noble gas nitrides has therefore become the subject of topical interests, but remains as a great challenge since molecular nitrogen (N2, a major form of nitrogen) and noble gases are both inert systems and do not interact at normal conditions. We show through a first-principles swarm-structure search that high pressure enables a direct interaction of N2 and xenon (Xe) above 146 GPa. The resultant Xe nitride has a peculiar stoichiometry of XeN6, possessing a high-energy density of approximately 2.4 kJg -1, rivaling that of the modern explosives. Structurally, XeN6 is intriguing with the appearance of chaired N6 hexagons and unusually high 12-coordination of Xe bonded with N. Our work opens up the possibility of achieving Xe nitride with superior high-energy density whose formation is long sought as impossible.

  8. Preparation of uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Potter, Ralph A.; Tennery, Victor J.

    1976-01-01

    A process for preparing actinide-nitrides from massive actinide metal which is suitable for sintering into low density fuel shapes by partially hydriding the massive metal and simultaneously dehydriding and nitriding the dehydrided portion. The process is repeated until all of the massive metal is converted to a nitride.

  9. Disorder-induced inhomogeneities of the superconducting state close to the superconductor-insulator transition.

    SciTech Connect

    Sacepe, B.; Chapelier, C.; Baturina, T. I.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baklanov, M. R.; Sanquer, M.; Materials Science Division; CEA, INAC; Inst. Semiconductor Physics; IMEC

    2008-01-01

    Scanning tunneling spectroscopy at very low temperatures on homogeneously disordered superconducting titanium nitride thin films reveals strong spatial inhomogeneities of the superconducting gap {Delta} in the density of states. Upon increasing disorder, we observe suppression of the superconducting critical temperature T{sub c} towards zero, enhancement of spatial fluctuations in {Delta}, and growth of the {Delta}/T{sub c} ratio. These findings suggest that local superconductivity survives across the disorder-driven superconductor-insulator transition.

  10. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, David A.; Bingert, John F.; Peterson, Dean E.; Sheinberg, Haskell

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  11. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

    1995-07-18

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity. 2 figs.

  12. Superconducting transistor

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  13. Thermal stability of laser-produced iron nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M.; Carpene, E.; Landry, F.; Lieb, K.-P.; Schaaf, P.

    2001-04-01

    Laser nitriding is a very efficient method to improve the mechanical properties, surface hardness, corrosion, and wear resistance of iron and steel, with the advantages of a high nitrogen concentration, fast treatment, and accurate position control, and without any undesired heating effect on the substrate. However, the stability of laser-produced iron nitrides is still under investigation. This article reports investigations of the thermal stability of these iron nitrides upon annealing treatments, which were conducted both in vacuum and air. The phase and elemental composition of the nitride layers were deduced from conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, resonant nuclear reaction analysis, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. The surface hardness was measured by the nanoindentation method. In laser-nitrided iron, two critical temperatures are found: at 523 K the predominant iron-nitride phase changes from the γ/ɛ to the γ' phase. When the temperature exceeds 773 K, all of the nitrogen has escaped from the surface layer. For annealing in air the nitrogen escapes completely already at 673 K, where a thick oxide layer has formed. Stainless steel proved to be more stable than iron, and even up to 973 K no new phases or oxides were produced, here, also, only at 973 K the nitrogen content decreased significantly. Therefore, laser-nitrided stainless steel is well suited for applications.

  14. Tunable superconducting microstrip resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamyan, A. A.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Danilov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a simple yet versatile design for a tunable superconducting microstrip resonator. Niobium nitride is employed as the superconducting material and aluminum oxide, produced by atomic layer deposition, as the dielectric layer. We show that the high quality of the dielectric material allows to reach the internal quality factors in the order of Qi˜104 in the single photon regime. Qi rapidly increases with the number of photons in the resonator N and exceeds 105 for N ˜10 -50 . A straightforward modification of the basic microstrip design allows to pass a current bias through the strip and to control its kinetic inductance. We achieve a frequency tuning δf =62 MHz around f0=2.4 GHz for a fundamental mode and δf =164 MHz for a third harmonic. This translates into a tuning parameter Qiδf /f0=150 . The presented design can be incorporated into essentially any superconducting circuitry operating at temperatures below 2.5 K.

  15. Surface modification of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by plasma nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wang

    2003-04-01

    Plasma nitriding of austenitic stainless steel samples has been carried out using pulse dc glow discharge plasma of NH 3 gas at substrate temperature ranging from 350 to 520 °C. A nitriding time of only 4 h has been found to produce a compact surface nitride layer composed of γN' phase with a thickness of around 7-12 μm as processing temperature remained between 420 and 450 °C. The thickness of γN phase was found to be very thin only about 2 μm after plasma nitriding at temperature below 400 °C. Microhardness measurements showed significant increase in the hardness from 240 HV (for untreated samples) up to 1700 HV (for nitrided samples at temperature of 460 °C). For nitriding at higher temperature, i.e. above 460 °C, the chromium nitrides precipitated in the nitrided layer and caused austenite phase transform into ferrite phase or iron nitrides ( γ' or ɛ). The consequent result of chromium nitride precipitation is the reduction of corrosion resistance of nitrided layer. Compressive residual stresses existed in the nitrided layer due to nitrogen diffusion into austenitic stainless steel.

  16. Mechanical and tribological behavior of silicon nitride and silicon carbon nitride coatings for total joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, M; Tkachenko, S; Schmidt, S; Berlind, T; Jacobson, S; Hultman, L; Engqvist, H; Persson, C

    2013-09-01

    Total joint replacements currently have relatively high success rates at 10-15 years; however, increasing ageing and an active population places higher demands on the longevity of the implants. A wear resistant configuration with wear particles that resorb in vivo can potentially increase the lifetime of an implant. In this study, silicon nitride (SixNy) and silicon carbon nitride (SixCyNz) coatings were produced for this purpose using reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS). The coatings are intended for hard bearing surfaces on implants. Hardness and elastic modulus of the coatings were evaluated by nanoindentation, cohesive, and adhesive properties were assessed by micro-scratching and the tribological performance was investigated in a ball-on-disc setup run in a serum solution. The majority of the SixNy coatings showed a hardness close to that of sintered silicon nitride (~18 GPa), and an elastic modulus close to that of cobalt chromium (~200 GPa). Furthermore, all except one of the SixNy coatings offered a wear resistance similar to that of bulk silicon nitride and significantly higher than that of cobalt chromium. In contrast, the SixCyNz coatings did not show as high level of wear resistance. PMID:23726925

  17. Quantum electromechanics on silicon nitride nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, J. M.; Kalaee, M.; Pitanti, A.; Norte, R.; Heinzle, L.; Davanço, M.; Srinivasan, K.; Painter, O.

    2016-08-01

    Radiation pressure has recently been used to effectively couple the quantum motion of mechanical elements to the fields of optical or microwave light. Integration of all three degrees of freedom--mechanical, optical and microwave--would enable a quantum interconnect between microwave and optical quantum systems. We present a platform based on silicon nitride nanomembranes for integrating superconducting microwave circuits with planar acoustic and optical devices such as phononic and photonic crystals. Using planar capacitors with vacuum gaps of 60 nm and spiral inductor coils of micron pitch we realize microwave resonant circuits with large electromechanical coupling to planar acoustic structures of nanoscale dimensions and femtoFarad motional capacitance. Using this enhanced coupling, we demonstrate microwave backaction cooling of the 4.48 MHz mechanical resonance of a nanobeam to an occupancy as low as 0.32. These results indicate the viability of silicon nitride nanomembranes as an all-in-one substrate for quantum electro-opto-mechanical experiments.

  18. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  19. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  20. Combined effect of rapid nitriding and plastic deformation on the surface strength, toughness and wear resistance of steel 38CrMoAlA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Lv, Z. Q.; Zhou, Z. A.; Sun, S. H.; Huang, X.; Fu, W. T.

    2015-08-01

    The combined treatment of pressurized gas nitriding and cold rolling is proposed as a new approach to rapid preparation of a strong and tough nitrided layer for steel 38CrMoAlA. The microstructural characteristics and properties of the modified surface layer in comparison with those of the conventionally gas nitrided sample have systematically been evaluated. The results show that the hardness and toughness of the nitrided surface layer can be significantly improved by the combined treatment. Especially, the wear resistance of nitrided surface layer under heavy loads was greatly enhanced. It can provide a new approach to rapidly preparing a nitrided layer with high strength and toughness.

  1. Methods of forming boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, Tammy L; Wertsching, Alan K; Pinhero, Patrick J; Crandall, David L

    2015-03-03

    A method of forming a boron nitride. The method comprises contacting a metal article with a monomeric boron-nitrogen compound and converting the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound to a boron nitride. The boron nitride is formed on the same or a different metal article. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is borazine, cycloborazane, trimethylcycloborazane, polyborazylene, B-vinylborazine, poly(B-vinylborazine), or combinations thereof. The monomeric boron-nitrogen compound is polymerized to form the boron nitride by exposure to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. The boron nitride is amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, rhombohedral boron nitride, turbostratic boron nitride, wurzite boron nitride, combinations thereof, or boron nitride and carbon. A method of conditioning a ballistic weapon and a metal article coated with the monomeric boron-nitrogen compound are also disclosed.

  2. Thermal and quantum phase slips in niobium-nitride nanowires based on suspended carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kohei; Moriyama, Satoshi; Morita, Yoshifumi; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi; Takagi, Tasuku; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Miki, Norihisa; Tanabe, Takasumi; Maki, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    Superconducting nanowires have attracted considerable attention due to their unique quantum-mechanical properties, as well as their potential as next-generation quantum nanodevices, such as single-photon detectors, phase-slip (PS) qubits, and other hybrid structures. In this study, we present the results of one-dimensional (1D) superconductivity in nanowires fabricated by coating suspended carbon nanotubes with a superconducting thin niobium nitride (NbN) film. In the resistance-temperature characteristic curves, hallmarks of 1D superconductivity with PS events are observed with unconventional negative magnetoresistance. We also confirm that a crossover occurs between thermal and quantum PSs as the temperature is lowered.

  3. Making Superconducting Welds between Superconducting Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I.; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2008-01-01

    A technique for making superconducting joints between wires made of dissimilar superconducting metals has been devised. The technique is especially suitable for fabrication of superconducting circuits needed to support persistent electric currents in electromagnets in diverse cryogenic applications. Examples of such electromagnets include those in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Sometimes, it is desirable to fabricate different parts of a persistent-current-supporting superconducting loop from different metals. For example, a sensory coil in a SQUID might be made of Pb, a Pb/Sn alloy, or a Cu wire plated with Pb/Sn, while the connections to the sensory coil might be made via Nb or Nb/Ti wires. Conventional wire-bonding techniques, including resistance spot welding and pressed contact, are not workable because of large differences between the hardnesses and melting temperatures of the different metals. The present technique is not subject to this limitation. The present technique involves the use (1) of a cheap, miniature, easy-to-operate, capacitor-discharging welding apparatus that has an Nb or Nb/Ti tip and operates with a continuous local flow of gaseous helium and (2) preparation of a joint in a special spark-discharge welding geometry. In a typical application, a piece of Nb foil about 25 m thick is rolled to form a tube, into which is inserted a wire that one seeks to weld to the tube (see figure). The tube can be slightly crimped for mechanical stability. Then a spark weld is made by use of the aforementioned apparatus with energy and time settings chosen to melt a small section of the niobium foil. The energy setting corresponds to the setting of a voltage to which the capacitor is charged. In an experiment, the technique was used to weld an Nb foil to a copper wire coated with a Pb/Sn soft solder, which is superconducting. The joint was evaluated as

  4. Superconducting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  5. Superconducting structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of aluminum nitride/boron nitride nanocomposites by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of aluminum borate powders.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sakayanagi, Nobuaki; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2008-11-01

    In order to fabricate aluminum nitride/boron nitride (AIN/BN) nanocomposites by pressureless sintering, the present study investigated the synthesis of AIN-BN nanocomposite powders by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of aluminum borate powders. Homogeneous mixtures of alumina (Al2O3), boric acid (H3BO3), and carbon powder were used to synthesize AIN/BN nanocomposite powders containing 10 and 20 vol% BN. Aluminum borate was produced by reacting Al2O3 and B2O3 above 800 degrees C, and AIN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) were produced by reacting aluminum borate with carbon powder and nitrogen gas at 1500 degrees C. Carbothermal reduction followed by nitridation yielded an AIN/BN nanocomposite powder composed of nanosized AIN and t-BN. By pressureless sintering nanocomposite AIN/BN powders containing 5 wt% Y22O3, AIN/BN nanocomposites were obtained without compromising the high thermal conductivity and high hardness. PMID:19198315

  7. Research of functional properties of nitride ion-plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. Yu; Ovechkin, B. B.; Papchenko, A. V.; Shvagrukova, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the influence of ion-plasma coatings with the use of nitrogen (N), zirconium nitride (ZrN), titanium-aluminum nitride (Ti,Al)N and titanium nitride and zirconium nitride by-layer (TiN+ZrN - eight layers) on the properties of steel 65X13. The main functional properties of the coatings are determined: microhardness, nanohardness, Young's modulus and corrosion resistance. It is shown that all the types of coatings allow increasing the physical and mechanical characteristics of instrument steel 65X13. Hardness and wear-resistance, depending on the type of the deposited coating, increase from 1, 5 to 4 times, corrosion resistance increases by tens times.

  8. Magnetic levitation for hard superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kordyuk, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    An approach for calculating the interaction between a hard superconductor and a permanent magnet in the field-cooled case is proposed. The exact solutions were obtained for the point magnetic dipole over a flat ideally hard superconductor. We have shown that such an approach is adaptable to a wide practical range of melt-textured high-temperature superconductors{close_quote} systems with magnetic levitation. In this case, the energy losses can be calculated from the alternating magnetic field distribution on the superconducting sample surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Method for preparing actinide nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Bryan, G.H.; Cleveland, J.M.; Heiple, C.R.

    1975-12-01

    Actinide nitrides, and particularly plutonium and uranium nitrides, are prepared by reacting an ammonia solution of an actinide compound with an ammonia solution of a reactant or reductant metal, to form finely divided actinide nitride precipitate which may then be appropriately separated from the solution. The actinide nitride precipitate is particularly suitable for forming nuclear fuels.

  10. Internally nitrided refractory alloy (INRA) development. FY 1986 report. [Nitridation of Mo-1. 86 Hf alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.B.; Walter, C.E.

    1986-10-06

    Internal structure studies show that by controlling grain size and amount of cold work, the results of the nitriding process can be modified. A uniform hardness can be obtained by properly controlling the nitriding parameters. The ability to control nitrogen pressure during the process over a broad range, including above one atmosphere is expected to provide greater uniformity of hardness. Limited welding efforts have produced sound welds using TIG and E-beam techniques in Mo-1.86 Hf alloy sheet. Fabrication of space power components thus appears to be achievable. Alloy compositions Mo-1.86 Hf and Mo-15 Re-1.86 Hf have been successfully produced in sheet form. Additional effort is required to reduce carbon, oxygen and nitrogen impurities. Creep resistance of Mo-HfN alloy is 100 to 1000 times greater than that observed for other molybdenum based alloys. Greater design flexibility yielding lighter and more reliable components would be available with this material.

  11. Application of hard coatings to substrates at low temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sproul, W.D.

    1993-06-01

    BIRL, the industrial research laboratory of Northwestern University, has conducted unique and innovative research, under sponsorship from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), in the application of hard, wear resistant coatings to bearing steels using the high-rate reactive sputtering (HRRS) process that was pioneered by Dr. William Sproul, the principal investigator on this program. Prior to this program, Dr. Sproul had demonstrated that it is possible to apply hard coatings such as titanium nitride (TiN) to alloy steels at low temperatures via the HRRS process without changing the metallurgical properties of the steel. The NASA MSFC program at BIRL had the specific objectives to: apply TiN to 440C stainless steel without changing the metallurgical properties of the steel; prepare rolling contact fatigue (RCF) test samples coated with binary hard coatings of TiN, zirconium nitride (ZrN), hafnium nitride (HfN), chromium nitride (CrN), and molybdenum nitride (MoN), and metal coatings of copper (Cu) and gold (Au); and develop new alloyed hard coatings of titanium aluminum nitride (Ti(0.5)Al(0.5)N), titanium zirconium nitride (Ti(0.5)Zr(0.5)N), and titanium aluminum vanadium nitride.

  12. Synthesis of aluminium nitride/boron nitride composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, T.D. . Polymer Science Program and Dept. of Chemistry); Gonsalves, K.E. . Polymer Science Program and Dept. of Chemistry Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT . Dept. of Chemistry); Strutt, P.R. . Dept. of Metallurgy)

    1993-04-01

    Aluminum nitride/boron nitride composite was synthesized by using boric acid, urea, and aluminum chloride (or aluminum lactate) as the starting compounds. The starting materials were dissolved in water and mixed homogeneously. Ammonolysis of this aqueous solution resulted in the formation of a precomposite gel, which converted into the aluminum nitride/boron nitride composite on further heat treatment. Characterization of both the precomposite and the composite powders included powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of the composite revealed that the aluminum nitride phase had a hexagonal structure, and the boron nitride phase a turbostratic structure.

  13. Gallium nitride optoelectronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    The growth of bulk gallium nitride crystals was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride. Gallium nitride single crystals up to 2.5 x 0.5 cm in size were produced. The crystals are suitable as substrates for the epitaxial growth of gallium nitride. The epitaxial growth of gallium nitride on sapphire substrates with main faces of (0001) and (1T02) orientations was achieved by the ammonolysis of gallium monochloride in a gas flow system. The grown layers had electron concentrations in the range of 1 to 3 x 10 to the 19th power/cu cm and Hall mobilities in the range of 50 to 100 sq cm/v/sec at room temperature.

  14. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin; Park, Cheol

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  15. Boron nitride composites

    DOEpatents

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  16. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  17. Effect of plasma nitriding treatment on structural, tribological and electrochemical properties of commercially pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Çelik, İlhan; Karakan, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    In this study, plasma nitriding treatment was applied to commercially pure titanium (Grade 2). Structural properties, electrochemical and tribological behaviours of the nitrided pure titanium specimens were comparatively investigated. Microstructure and morphology of the plasma nitrided specimens were analysed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, corrosion tests were conducted in Ringer's solution, which represents a human body environment, to determine electrochemical properties. Then, tribological and frictional properties were investigated using pin-on-disc tribometer, and a micro-hardness tester was used to measure the hardness of the coatings. The results showed that plasma nitrided specimens exhibited higher surface hardness than the untreated specimens did. In addition, the plasma nitrided specimens at 700 °C presented significantly better performance than the other plasma nitrided specimens (at 500 °C and 600 °C) under dry wear conditions. Moreover, corrosion test results showed that corrosion behaviours of untreated and nitrided samples had similar characteristic. PMID:26666885

  18. Synthesis of cubic ruthenium nitride by reactive pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Armenta, M. G.; Diaz, J.; Martinez-Ruiz, A.; Soto, G.

    2007-10-01

    The recent synthesis of platinum nitride opens the possibility of novel platinum-group metal nitrides to exist. In this work we report the synthesis of ruthenium nitride by reactive pulsed laser ablation. Several plausible structures have been evaluated by ab initio calculations using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method, in order to investigate the ruthenium nitride structural and electronic properties. In fact, the predicted symmetry of stoichiometric RuN matches the experimental diffraction data. RuN crystallizes with NaCl-type structure at room temperature with cell-parameter somewhat larger than predicted by calculations. However we found a marginal chemical strength in these nitrides. The material is destroyed by mild acid and basic solutions. Under annealing RuN decomposes abruptly for temperatures beyond 100 °C. Since the thermal stability correlates directly with the mechanical properties our finding cast doubts than the latter transition metal nitrides can be ultra-hard materials at ambient conditions.

  19. Hydrogen Effect on Nanomechanical Properties of the Nitrided Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnoush, Afrooz; Asgari, Masoud; Johnsen, Roy; Hoel, Rune

    2013-02-01

    In situ electrochemical nanoindentation is used to examine the effect of electrochemically charged hydrogen on mechanical properties of the nitride layer on low-alloy 2.25Cr-1Mo martensitic structural steel. By application of this method, we were able to trace the changes in the mechanical properties due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen to different depths within the compound and diffusion layers. The results clearly show that the hydrogen charging of the nitriding layer can soften the layer and reduce the hardness within both the compound and the diffusion layers. The effect is completely reversible and by removal of the hydrogen, the hardness recovers to its original value. The reduction in hardness of the nitride layer does not correlate to the nitrogen concentration, but it seems to be influenced by the microstructure and residual stress within the compound and diffusion layers. Findings show that nitriding can be a promising way to control the hydrogen embrittlement of the tempered martensitic steels.

  20. Ion-nitriding of the AISI M2 high speed tool steel and comparison of its mechanical properties with nitrided steels

    SciTech Connect

    Cimen, O.; Alnipak, B.

    1995-12-31

    In the past it was shown that plasma diffusion treatment of steels has several advantages over conventional processes such as gas or salt bath nitriding and nitrocarburizing. Plasma diffusion treatment allows close control of the process so that surface layers with defined microstructures and properties can be obtained. The amount of {gamma}{prime} and {epsilon} phase present can be easily controlled. In this paper, variation of surfaces hardness properties of AISI M2 high speed tool speed after ion nitriding treatments were investigated. The mechanical and electro-chemical advantages of the ion nitrided structures were compared with the other methods.

  1. Abnormal Nitride Morphologies upon Nitriding Iron-Based Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meka, Sai Ramudu; Mittemeijer, Eric Jan

    2013-06-01

    Nitriding of iron-based components is a very well-known surface engineering method for bringing about great improvement of the mechanical and chemical properties. An overview is presented of the strikingly different nitride morphologies developing upon nitriding iron-based alloy substrates. Observed abnormal morphologies are the result of intricate interplay of the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints for the nucleation and growth of both alloying element nitride particles in the matrix and iron nitrides at the surface of the substrate. Alloying elements having strong Me-N interaction, such as Cr, V, and Ti, precipitate instantaneously as internal Me-nitrides, thus allowing the subsequent nucleation and growth of "normal" layer-type iron nitride. Alloying elements having weak Me-N interaction, such as Al, Si, and Mo, and simultaneously having low solubility in iron nitride, obstruct/delay the nucleation and growth of iron nitrides at the surface, thus leading to very high nitrogen supersaturation over an extended depth range from the surface. Eventually, the nucleation and growth of "abnormal" plate-type iron nitride occurs across the depth range of high nitrogen supersaturation. On this basis, strategies can be devised for tuned development of specific nitride morphologies at the surface of nitrided components.

  2. Boron nitride housing cools transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Boron nitride ceramic heat sink cools transistors in r-f transmitter and receiver circuits. Heat dissipated by the transistor is conducted by the boron nitride housing to the metal chassis on which it is mounted.

  3. Superconductive articles

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    An article of manufacture including a substrate, a patterned interlayer of magnesium oxide, barium-titanium oxide or barium-zirconium oxide, the patterned interlayer material overcoated with a secondary interlayer material of yttria-stabilized zirconia or magnesium-aluminum oxide, upon the surface of the substrate whereby an intermediate article with an exposed surface of both the overcoated patterned interlayer and the substrate is formed, a coating of a buffer layer selected from the group consisting of oxides of Ce, Y, Cm, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Gd, Ho, In, La, Mn, Lu, Nd, Pr, Pu, Sm, Tb, Tl, Tm, Y, and Yb over the entire exposed surface of the intermediate article, and, a ceramic superconductive material layer as an overcoat upon the buffer layer whereby the ceramic superconductive material situated directly above the substrate has a crystal structure substantially different than the ceramic superconductive material situated above the overcoated patterned interlayer.

  4. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.; Dahl, P.; Herrera, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a self-consistent description of a magnetic field in the aperture of a superconducting magnet and details how this field can be calculated in a magnet with cos theta current distribution in the coils. A description of an apparatus that can be used to measure the field uniformity in the aperture has been given. Finally, a detailed description of the magnet being developed for use in the Superconducting Super Collider is given. When this machine is built, it will be by far the largest application of superconductivity to date and promises to make possible the experimental discoveries needed to understand the basic laws of nature governing the world in which we live.

  5. Must "Hard Problems" Be Hard?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1985-01-01

    To determine how hard it is for computers to solve problems, researchers have classified groups of problems (polynomial hierarchy) according to how much time they seem to require for their solutions. A difficult and complex proof is offered which shows that a combinatorial approach (using Boolean circuits) may resolve the problem. (JN)

  6. PREFACE: Superconducting materials Superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charfi Kaddour, Samia; Singleton, John; Haddad, Sonia

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in 1911 was a great milestone in condensed matter physics. This discovery has resulted in an enormous amount of research activity. Collaboration among chemists and physicists, as well as experimentalists and theoreticians has given rise to very rich physics with significant potential applications ranging from electric power transmission to quantum information. Several superconducting materials have been synthesized. Crucial progress was made in 1987 with the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in copper-based compounds (cuprates) which have revealed new fascinating properties. Innovative theoretical tools have been developed to understand the striking features of cuprates which have remained for three decades the 'blue-eyed boy' for researchers in superconductor physics. The history of superconducting materials has been notably marked by the discovery of other compounds, particularly organic superconductors which despite their low critical temperature continue to attract great interest regarding their exotic properties. Last but not least, the recent observation of superconductivity in iron-based materials (pnictides) has renewed hope in reaching room temperature superconductivity. However, despite intense worldwide studies, several features related to this phenomenon remain unveiled. One of the fundamental key questions is the mechanism by which superconductivity takes place. Superconductors continue to hide their 'secret garden'. The new trends in the physics of superconductivity have been one of the two basic topics of the International Conference on Conducting Materials (ICoCoM2010) held in Sousse,Tunisia on 3-7 November 2010 and organized by the Tunisian Physical Society. The conference was a nice opportunity to bring together participants from multidisciplinary domains in the physics of superconductivity. This special section contains papers submitted by participants who gave an oral contribution at ICoCoM2010

  7. Low Temperature Plasma Nitriding Of Stainless Steel In N_2/H_2/Ar LFICP Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Luo, W.; Jiang, N.; Ostrikov, K. N.

    2001-10-01

    A low frequency, high density, inductively coupled plasma (LF ICP) source has been developed and used for nitriding of AISI stainless steels. A series of experiments has been conducted in a low temperature (320-400^circC), low pressure N_2/H_2/Ar gas mixture discharges. The results show that the nitriding process is very fast, ~ 45μm/hr for AISI 304 and ~ 90μm/hr for AIS410, even at a low nitriding temperature. After nitriding, the micro hardness of the nitrided layer is increased by a factor of 7 and the free corrosion potential is also improved. The pin-on-disc measurement indicates that the wear resistance improved more than 10 times. The microstructure and composition of the nitrided surface layers characterised using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray diffraction and x-ray diffraction reveal that the nitrided layer has crystalline structure with various phases. The distribution of the nitrogen content varies sharply: high in the nitrided layer and almost zero elsewhere. The content of Cr, however, remains constant over the entire substrate/nitrided layer.

  8. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram; Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  9. Pressure induced structural phase transition in IB transition metal nitrides compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, Shubhangi; Kaurav, Netram Jain, A.; Shah, S.; Choudhary, K. K.

    2015-06-24

    Transition metal mononitrides are known as refractory compounds, and they have, relatively, high hardness, brittleness, melting point, and superconducting transition temperature, and they also have interesting optical, electronic, catalytic, and magnetic properties. Evolution of structural properties would be an important step towards realizing the potential technological scenario of this material of class. In the present study, an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP) is developed to investigate the pressure induced phase transitions in IB transition metal nitrides TMN [TM = Cu, Ag, and Au] compounds. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  10. Hard gap in epitaxial semiconductor-superconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chang, W; Albrecht, S M; Jespersen, T S; Kuemmeth, F; Krogstrup, P; Nygård, J; Marcus, C M

    2015-03-01

    Many present and future applications of superconductivity would benefit from electrostatic control of carrier density and tunnelling rates, the hallmark of semiconductor devices. One particularly exciting application is the realization of topological superconductivity as a basis for quantum information processing. Proposals in this direction based on the proximity effect in semiconductor nanowires are appealing because the key ingredients are currently in hand. However, previous instances of proximitized semiconductors show significant tunnelling conductance below the superconducting gap, suggesting a continuum of subgap states--a situation that nullifies topological protection. Here, we report a hard superconducting gap induced by the proximity effect in a semiconductor, using epitaxial InAs-Al semiconductor-superconductor nanowires. The hard gap, together with favourable material properties and gate-tunability, makes this new hybrid system attractive for a number of applications, as well as fundamental studies of mesoscopic superconductivity. PMID:25581886

  11. Nitride quantum light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    Prototype nitride quantum light sources, particularly single-photon emitters, have been successfully demonstrated, despite the challenges inherent in this complex materials system. The large band offsets available between different nitride alloys have allowed device operation at easily accessible temperatures. A wide range of approaches has been explored: not only self-assembled quantum dot growth but also lithographic methods for site-controlled nanostructure formation. All these approaches face common challenges, particularly strong background signals which contaminate the single-photon stream and excessive spectral diffusion of the quantum dot emission wavelength. If these challenges can be successfully overcome, then ongoing rapid progress in the conventional III-V semiconductors provides a roadmap for future progress in the nitrides.

  12. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  13. Determination of tribological properties of ion-nitrided AISI 5140 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Alsaran, Akguen

    2002-09-15

    AISI 5140 low-alloy steel is ion-nitrided under different process parameters, including time (1, 4, and 8 h), temperature (450, 500, and 550 deg. C), and various gas mixtures at a working pressure of 5 mbar. The ion-nitriding behaviors of AISI 5140 steel have been assessed by evaluating tribological properties, surface hardness, surface roughness, compound layer thickness, and case depth by using a pin-on-disk wear machine, microhardness tester, surface profilometer, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is found that ion nitriding improves the wear rate, and the presence of a hard and brittle compound layer on the surface causes an increase in wear of specimen surface. It is finally observed that ion nitriding parameters have no dominant effect on the friction coefficient.

  14. A low-power nitriding technique utilizing a microwave-excited radical flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itagaki, Hirotomo; Hirose, Shingo; Kim, Jaeho; Ogura, Mutsuo; Wang, Xuelun; Nonaka, Atsushi; Ogiso, Hisato; Sakakita, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    We report a novel low-power nitriding technique by utilizing a 2.45 GHz microwave-excited nitrogen radical flow system. Nitrogen plasma was produced at the nozzle with dimensions of 50 × 0.5 mm2 and blown onto the surface of a target substrate. A titanium substrate has been used as a target plate since it is easy to visualize a nitriding effect. The titanium substrate was treated under the conditions of 60 W microwave power, 20 Torr of nitrogen gas pressure, and a plate temperature of ∼800 °C. As a result, we have succeeded in nitriding of the titanium substrate in a quasi-atmospheric region of 20 Torr and of a very low power of 60 W with the hardness kept high, which is almost the same as the hardness processed by conventional nitriding methods.

  15. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Tortorelli, Peter F; Pihl, Josh A; Toops, Todd J; More, Karren Leslie; Meyer III, Harry M; Vitek, John Michael; Wang, Heli; Turner, John; Wilson, Mahlon; Garzon, Fernando; Rockward, Tommy; Connors, Dan; Rakowski, Jim; Gervasio, Don

    2008-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

  16. Corrosion behavior of PIRAC nitrided Ti-6Al-4V surgical alloy.

    PubMed

    Starosvetsky, D; Shenhar, A; Gotman, I

    2001-02-01

    Hard titanium nitride (TiN) coatings were obtained on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V alloy using an original PIRAC nitriding method, based on annealing the samples under a low pressure of monatomic nitrogen created by selective diffusion of N from the atmosphere. PIRAC nitrided samples exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution in both potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests. The anodic current and metal ion release rate of PIRAC nitrided Ti-6Al-4V at the typical corrosion potential values were significantly lower than those of the untreated alloy. This, together with the excellent adhesion and high wear resistance of the TiN coatings, makes PIRAC nitriding an attractive surface treatment for Ti-6Al-4V alloy surgical implants. PMID:15348321

  17. Cubic nitride templates

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K; McCleskey, Thomas Mark; Jia, Quanxi; Mueller, Alexander H; Luo, Hongmei

    2013-04-30

    A polymer-assisted deposition process for deposition of epitaxial cubic metal nitride films and the like is presented. The process includes solutions of one or more metal precursor and soluble polymers having binding properties for the one or more metal precursor. After a coating operation, the resultant coating is heated at high temperatures under a suitable atmosphere to yield metal nitride films and the like. Such films can be used as templates for the development of high quality cubic GaN based electronic devices.

  18. Demonstration of 10 K Superconducting Electronics in an Infrared Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressler, Michael E.

    1997-04-01

    We report the successful operation of a superconducting niobium nitride (NbN) Josephson Junction-based analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in an infrared imaging system. This system is a flexible testbed which will allow the evaluation of a large variety of cryogenic components (e.g. detector arrays, ADC's, etc.), while still following the general architecture of a scientific instrument, permitting us to determine how well the component will perform in the ``real world''. The testbed is currently composed of a Rockwell International HF-16 128x128 pixel Si:As BIB array, a JPL-developed GaAs 16-to-1 analog multiplexer, and a TRW 12-bit, 10 mega-samples per second, NbN ADC. All three components are located inside a pour/fill liquid helium dewar and operated at 10 K. Simple cold optics along with an 8.5 micron filter image objects onto the focal plane. The images are read out at rates up to 600 frames per second; data can either be stored to hard disk at this rate or every 20th frame can be displayed on a monitor providing ``real-time'' video. We describe the layout and operation of the testbed, with particular emphasis on the lessons learned about operating superconducting electronics as merely another component in a system. We also discuss images and other data comparing the performance of the NbN ADC with a commercially available, equal speed and resolution, silicon ADC. Finally, we explore the future of superconducting electronics; potential products as well as their impact on instrument and spacecraft design.

  19. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of ion-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1983-01-01

    Three steels AISI 4140, AISI 4340 and AISI 304 stainless steel were ion nitrided in a plasma consisting of a 75:25 mixture of H2:N2, sometimes with a trace of CH4. Their surface topography was characterized by SEM and two distinct compound phases were identified: the gamma and the epsilon. The core-case hardness profiles were also established. The low Cr alloy steels have an extended diffusion zone in contrast to the 304 stainless steels which have a sharp interface. The depth of ion-nitriding is increased as the Cr content is decreased. Friction tests reveal that the gamma surface phase has a lower coefficient of friction than the epsilon phase. The lowest coefficient of friction is achieved when both the rider and the specimen surface are ion nitrided.

  20. Measurement and analysis of forces in grinding of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Jahanmir, S.; Hwang, T.; Whitenton, E.P.; Job, L.S.; Evans, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Using an instrumented surface grinder, the two components of grinding forces (normal and tangential) were measured for different types of silicon nitride ceramics. The influences of grinding parameters, such as down feed and table speed, and grinding fluids on forces were determined. In addition to these measurements, the specific grinding energy defined as the energy per unit volume of removed material was calculated. This parameter and the measured forces were then analyzed to determine possible correlations with mechanical properties of the silicon nitrides. It was found that, in general, the grinding forces and the specific grinding energy increase with the hardness. Both the grinding forces and the specific grinding energy were influenced by the grinding fluid and the grinding parameters. The implication of these results on the mechanisms of material removal in grinding of silicon nitride and the possible tribological effects are discussed.

  1. Tribological and microstructural characteristics of ion-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1983-01-01

    Three steels AISI 4140, AISI 4340 and AISI 304 stainless steel were ion nitrided in a plasma consisting of a 75:25 mixture of H2:N2, sometimes with a trace of CH4. Their surface topography was characterized by SEM and two distinct compound phases were identified: the gamma and the epsilon. The core-case hardness profiles were also established. The low Cr alloy steels have an extended diffusion zone in contrast to the 3034 stainless steels which have a sharp interface. The depth of ion-nitriding is increased as the Cr content is decreased. Friction tests reveal that the gamma surface phase has a lower coefficient of friction than the epsilon phase. The lowest coefficient of friction is achieved when both the rider and the specimen surface are ion nitrided. Previously announced in STAR as N83-24635

  2. Fractal superconductivity near localization threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel'man, M.V.; Ioffe, L.B.; Kravtsov, V.E.; Cuevas, E.

    2010-07-15

    spectral weight. The insulating state is realized due to the presence of local pairing gap but without superconducting correlations; it is characterized by a hard insulating gap in the density of single electrons and by purely activated low-temperature resistivity ln R(T) {approx} 1/T. Based on these results we propose a new 'pseudo-spin' scenario of superconductor-insulator transition and argue that it is realized in a particular class of disordered superconducting films. We conclude by the discussion of the experimental predictions of the theory and the theoretical issues that remain unsolved.

  3. Lattice dynamics and electron/phonon interactions in epitaxial transition-metal nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Antonio Rodolph Bighetti

    Transition metal (TM) nitrides, due to their unique combination of remarkable physical properties and simple NaCl structure, are presently utilized in a broad range of applications and as model systems in the investigation of complex phenomena. Group-IVB nitrides TiN, ZrN, and HfN have transport properties which include superconductivity and high electrical conductivity; consequentially, they have become technologically important as electrodes and contacts in the semiconducting and superconducting industries. The Group-VB nitride VN, which exhibits enhanced ductility, is a fundamental component in superhard and tough nanostructured hard coatings. In this thesis, I investigate the lattice dynamics responsible for controlling superconductivity and electrical conductivities in Group-IVB nitrides and elasticity and structural stability of the NaCl-structure Group-VB nitride VN. Our group has already synthesized high-quality epitaxial TiN, HfN, and CeN layers on MgO(001) substrates. By irradiating the growth surface with high ion fluxes at energies below the bulk lattice-atom displacement threshold, dense epitaxial single crystal TM nitride films with extremely smooth surfaces have been grown using ultra-high vacuum magnetically-unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Using this approach, I completed the Group-IVB nitride series by growing epitaxial ZrN/MgO(001) films and then grew Group-VB nitride VN films epitaxially on MgO(001), MgO(011), and MgO(111). The combination of high-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD) reciprocal lattice maps (RLMs), high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR-XTEM), and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) show that single-crystal stoichiometric ZrN films grown at 450 °C are epitaxially oriented cube-on-cube with respect to their MgO(001) substrates, (001) ZrN||(001)MgO and [100]ZrN||[100]MgO. The layers are essentially fully relaxed with a lattice parameter of 0.4575 nm. X-ray reflectivity results reveal that

  4. Sintering silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  5. Superconducting Graphene Nanodevices in Ballistic Transport Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-An; Wang, Joel I.-Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Pablo Jarillo-Herrero's Group Team

    2013-03-01

    Superconductivity carried by Dirac fermions can be realized through induced superconductivity in grapheme. Observation of novel phenomena anticipated by theories requires graphene devices with low disorder whereas the carrier transport is ballistic. Current fabrication procedures to make graphene devices with low disorder like suspension or ultra-flat substrates all call for certain kinds of annealing to remove organic residues derived from the fabrication process. Applying these methods to superconducting devices can be challenging since the transparency at the graphene/superconductor interface will be destroyed. Here we present a method to do dry transfer of patterned hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) flakes onto graphene. The ultra flatness and lack of dangling bond in the boron nitride substrate reduces the disorder in graphene, and the top layer hBN can protect the graphene from contamination in the nanofabrication procedures and yield the geometry desired for different experimental exploration. National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan

  6. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  7. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOINJECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL, A.; CALAGA, R.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; GUPTA, R.; HAHN, H.; HAMMONS, L.; KAYRAN, D.; KEWISCH, J.; LAMBIASE, R.; LITVINENKO, V.; MCINTYRE, G.; NAIK, D.; PATE, D.; PHILLIPS, D.; POZDEYEV, E.; RAO, T.; SMEDLEY, J.; THAN, R.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.; WU, Q.; ZALTSMAN, A.; ET AL.

    2007-08-26

    One of the frontiers in FEL science is that of high power. In order to reach power in the megawatt range, one requires a current of the order of one ampere with a reasonably good emittance. The superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photocathode is the most natural candidate to provide this performance. The development of a 1/2 cell superconducting photoinjector designed to operate at up to a current of 0.5 amperes and beam energy of 2 MeV and its photocathode system are the subjects covered in this paper. The main issues are the photocathode and its insertion mechanism, the power coupling and High Order Mode damping. This technology is being developed at BNL for DOE nuclear physics applications such as electron cooling at high energy and electron ion colliders..

  8. Quantum electromechanics on silicon nitride nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Fink, J M; Kalaee, M; Pitanti, A; Norte, R; Heinzle, L; Davanço, M; Srinivasan, K; Painter, O

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure has recently been used to effectively couple the quantum motion of mechanical elements to the fields of optical or microwave light. Integration of all three degrees of freedom-mechanical, optical and microwave-would enable a quantum interconnect between microwave and optical quantum systems. We present a platform based on silicon nitride nanomembranes for integrating superconducting microwave circuits with planar acoustic and optical devices such as phononic and photonic crystals. Using planar capacitors with vacuum gaps of 60 nm and spiral inductor coils of micron pitch we realize microwave resonant circuits with large electromechanical coupling to planar acoustic structures of nanoscale dimensions and femtoFarad motional capacitance. Using this enhanced coupling, we demonstrate microwave backaction cooling of the 4.48 MHz mechanical resonance of a nanobeam to an occupancy as low as 0.32. These results indicate the viability of silicon nitride nanomembranes as an all-in-one substrate for quantum electro-opto-mechanical experiments. PMID:27484751

  9. Quantum electromechanics on silicon nitride nanomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Fink, J. M.; Kalaee, M.; Pitanti, A.; Norte, R.; Heinzle, L.; Davanço, M.; Srinivasan, K.; Painter, O.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure has recently been used to effectively couple the quantum motion of mechanical elements to the fields of optical or microwave light. Integration of all three degrees of freedom—mechanical, optical and microwave—would enable a quantum interconnect between microwave and optical quantum systems. We present a platform based on silicon nitride nanomembranes for integrating superconducting microwave circuits with planar acoustic and optical devices such as phononic and photonic crystals. Using planar capacitors with vacuum gaps of 60 nm and spiral inductor coils of micron pitch we realize microwave resonant circuits with large electromechanical coupling to planar acoustic structures of nanoscale dimensions and femtoFarad motional capacitance. Using this enhanced coupling, we demonstrate microwave backaction cooling of the 4.48 MHz mechanical resonance of a nanobeam to an occupancy as low as 0.32. These results indicate the viability of silicon nitride nanomembranes as an all-in-one substrate for quantum electro-opto-mechanical experiments. PMID:27484751

  10. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  11. Secret of formulating a selective etching or cleaning solution for boron nitride (BN) thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Wing C.

    2004-04-01

    Boron nitride thin film has a very unique characteristic of extremely high chemical inertness. Thus, it is a better hard mask than silicon nitride for aggressive etching solutions, such as the isotropic HF/HNO3/CH3COOH (or HNA) etchant for silicon. However, because of its high chemical inertness, it is also difficult to remove it. Plasma etching with Freon gases can etch the boron nitride film, but it is unselective to silicon, silicon dioxide or silicon nitride. Cleaning up the boron nitride film with plasma etching will usually leave a damaged or foggy surface. A special wet chemical solution has been developed for etching or cleaning boron nitride film selectively. It can etch boron nitride, but not the coatings or substrates of silicon, silicon nitride and silicon dioxide. It is a very strong oxidizing agent consisting of concentrated sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but different from the common Piranha Etch. It may be even more interesting to understand the logic or secret behind of how to formulate a new selective etching solution. Various chemical and chemical engineering aspects were considered carefully in our development process. These included creating the right electrochemical potential for the etchant, ensuring large differences in chemical kinetics to make the reactions selective, providing proper mass transfer for removing the by products, etc.

  12. Analysis of plasma nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  13. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, Prakash C.; Seydel, Edgar R.; Raj, Rishi

    1988-03-22

    The invention relates to producing relatively flaw free silicon nitride ceramic shapes requiring little or no machining by superplastic forging This invention herein was made in part under Department of Energy Grant DE-AC01-84ER80167, creating certain rights in the United States Government. The invention was also made in part under New York State Science and Technology Grant SB1R 1985-10.

  14. Cavity piezomechanical strong coupling and frequency conversion on an aluminum nitride chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Han, Xu; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-07-01

    Schemes to achieve strong coupling between mechanical modes of aluminum nitride microstructures and microwave cavity modes due to the piezoelectric effect are proposed. We show that the strong-coupling regime is feasible for an on-chip aluminum nitride device that is either enclosed by a three-dimensional microwave cavity or integrated with a superconducting coplanar resonator. Combining with optomechanics, the piezomechanical strong coupling permits coherent conversion between microwave and optical modes with high efficiency. Hence, the piezomechanical system will be an efficient transducer for applications in hybrid quantum systems.

  15. Gallium nitride electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Siddharth; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-07-01

    In the past two decades, there has been increasing research and industrial activity in the area of gallium nitride (GaN) electronics, stimulated first by the successful demonstration of GaN LEDs. While the promise of wide band gap semiconductors for power electronics was recognized many years before this by one of the contributors to this issue (J Baliga), the success in the area of LEDs acted as a catalyst. It set the field of GaN electronics in motion, and today the technology is improving the performance of several applications including RF cell phone base stations and military radar. GaN could also play a very important role in reducing worldwide energy consumption by enabling high efficiency compact power converters operating at high voltages and lower frequencies. While GaN electronics is a rapidly evolving area with active research worldwide, this special issue provides an opportunity to capture some of the great advances that have been made in the last 15 years. The issue begins with a section on epitaxy and processing, followed by an overview of high-frequency HEMTs, which have been the most commercially successful application of III-nitride electronics to date. This is followed by review and research articles on power-switching transistors, which are currently of great interest to the III-nitride community. A section of this issue is devoted to the reliability of III-nitride devices, an area that is of increasing significance as the research focus has moved from not just high performance but also production-worthiness and long-term usage of these devices. Finally, a group of papers on new and relatively less studied ideas for III-nitride electronics, such as interband tunneling, heterojunction bipolar transistors, and high-temperature electronics is included. These areas point to new areas of research and technological innovation going beyond the state of the art into the future. We hope that the breadth and quality of articles in this issue will make it

  16. Surface Participation Effects in Titanium Nitride and Niobium Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, Allison; Kreikebaum, John Mark; Livingston, William; Delva, Remy; Qiu, Yanjie; Lolowang, Reinhard; Ramasesh, Vinay; O'Brien, Kevin; Siddiqi, Irfan

    Improving the coherence time of superconducting qubits requires a precise understanding of the location and density of surface defects. Superconducting microwave resonators are commonly used for quantum state readout and are a versatile testbed to systematically characterize materials properties as a function of device geometry and fabrication method. We report on sputter deposited titanium nitride and niobium on silicon coplanar waveguide resonators patterned using reactive ion etches to define the device geometry. We discuss the impact of different growth conditions (temperature and electrical bias) and processing techniques on the internal quality factor (Q) of these devices. In particular, to investigate the effect of surface participation, we use a Bosch process to etch many-micron-deep trenches in the silicon substrate and quantify the impact of etch depth and profile on the internal Q. This research was supported by the ARO.

  17. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Gilad; Migonney, Véronique; Castner, David G

    2014-09-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film from titanium nitride surfaces via a two-step procedure: first modifying the surface with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and then grafting the pNaSS film from the MPS modified titanium through free radical polymerization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used after each step to characterize success and completeness of each reaction. The surface region of the titanium nitride prior to MPS functionalization and NaSS grafting contained a mixture of titanium nitride, oxy-nitride, oxide species as well as adventitious surface contaminants. After MPS functionalization, Si was detected by XPS, and characteristic MPS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. After NaSS grafting, Na and S were detected by XPS and characteristic NaSS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. The XPS determined thicknesses of the MPS and NaSS overlayers were ∼1.5 and ∼1.7 nm, respectively. The pNaSS film density was estimated by the toluidine blue colorimetric assay to be 260 ± 70 ng/cm(2). PMID:25280842

  18. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, Gilad; Migonney, Véronique; Castner, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film from titanium nitride surfaces via a two-step procedure: first modifying the surface with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and then grafting the pNaSS film from the MPS modified titanium through free radical polymerization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used after each step to characterize success and completeness of each reaction. The surface region of the titanium nitride prior to MPS functionalization and NaSS grafting contained a mixture of titanium nitride, oxy-nitride, oxide species as well as adventitious surface contaminants. After MPS functionalization, Si was detected by XPS, and characteristic MPS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. After NaSS grafting, Na and S were detected by XPS and characteristic NaSS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. The XPS determined thicknesses of the MPS and NaSS overlayers were ∼1.5 and ∼1.7 nm, respectively. The pNaSS film density was estimated by the toluidine blue colorimetric assay to be 260 ± 70 ng/cm2. PMID:25280842

  19. Space applications of superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. B.; Vorreiter, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Some potential applications of superconductivity in space are summarized, e.g., the use of high field magnets for cosmic ray analysis or energy storage and generation, space applications of digital superconducting devices, such as the Josephson switch and, in the future, a superconducting computer. Other superconducting instrumentation which could be used in space includes: low frequency superconducting sensors, microwave and infrared detectors, instruments for gravitational studies, and high-Q cavities for use as stabilizing elements in clocks and oscillators.

  20. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  1. Surface hardening of titanium alloys by gas phase nitridation under kinetic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lizhi

    This work describes a nitriding process for titanium and its alloys, which will improve the wear and corrosion resistance by forming a single phase Ti (N) solid solution that has the same lattice properties as the substrate, but not forming any nitrides on the surface. By kinetically controlling the chemical potential of nitrogen as diffusional interstitials, a large solubility can be achieved, which results in a super-hard surface. The nitrogen pressure, heat treatment temperature, and heat treatment time were investigated to form a desired diffusion profile without the formation of surface nitride compounds. This process can improve the wear resistance without the cost of reduced corrosion and fatigue resistance. A thermodynamic calculation has shown that the partial pressure of nitrogen acquired to avoiding the formation of nitrides is extremely low. A kinetic calculation, however, has indicated that a much higher nitrogen partial pressure can be afforded to nitride titanium alloys without forming nitrides. This kinetic calculation considers the impingement rate at the gas-solid interface, the sticking coefficient, and the interstitial diffusion coefficient. The conception of nitridation under kinetic control is verified in a laboratory-scale system, the design and construction of which is part of this work. Nitridation under well-defined and reproducible conditions was achieved by using a long fused silica tube as the reactor and sealing it with a hydrogen/oxygen torch. To clean the gas atmosphere in the tube prior to nitridation, titanium foil was integrated into the system as a getter material. After the titanium getter has cleaned the atmosphere from undesired impurities, the titanium or titanium alloy specimen was nitrided by exposing it to a well-controlled but very low nitrogen partial pressure, generated by a metal nitride/metal powder pack. With the Cr2N/Cr powder pack, for example, nitrogen pressure from 10-4 Pa to 10-1 Pa can be achieved by adjusting

  2. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  3. Sulfide Stress Cracking and Electrochemical Corrosion of Precipitation Hardening Steel After Plasma Oxy-Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granda-Gutiérrez, E. E.; Díaz-Guillén, J. C.; Díaz-Guillén, J. A.; González, M. A.; García-Vázquez, F.; Muñóz, R.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a duplex plasma nitriding followed by an oxidizing stage process (which is also referred as oxy-nitriding) on the corrosion behavior of a 17-4PH precipitation hardening stainless steel. The formation of both, expanded martensite (b.c.t. α'N-phase) and chromium oxide (type Cr2O3) in the subsurface of oxy-nitrided samples at specific controlled conditions, leads in a noticeable increasing in the time-to-rupture during the sulfide stress cracking test, in comparison with an untreated reference sample. Oxy-nitriding improves the corrosion performance of the alloy when it is immersed in solutions saturated by sour gas, which extends the application potential of this type of steel in the oil and gas extraction and processing industry. The presence of the oxy-nitrided layer inhibits the corrosion process that occurs in the near-surface region, where hydrogen is liberated after the formation of iron sulfides, which finally produces a fragile fracture by micro-crack propagation; the obtained results suggest that oxy-nitriding slows this process, thus delaying the rupture of the specimen. Moreover, oxy-nitriding produces a hard, sour gas-resistant surface, but do not significantly affect the original chloride ion solution resistance of the material.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Metal Nitrides for Radiation Resistant Coating Applications: A DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, Oscar U. Ojeda; Araujo, Roy A.; Wang, Haiyan; Çağın, Tahir

    Metal nitrides compounds like aluminum nitride (AlN), titanium nitride (TiN), tantalum nitride (TaN), hafnium nitride (HfN) and zirconium nitride (ZrN) are of great interesting because of their chemical and physical properties such as: high melting point, resistivity, thermal conductivity and extremely high hardness. They are the materials of choice for various applications like protective coating for tools, diffusion barriers or metal gate contact in microelectronics, and lately their potential applications as radiation-resistive shields. In order to assess their use for radiation tolerance we have studied the structural, mechanical and electronic properties. We have evaluated the anisotropic elastic constants and their pressure dependence for three different crystalline phases: B1-NaCl, B2-CsCl, and B3-ZnS crystal structures. In addition to these cubic polymorphs, we also have studied potential hexagonal structures of some of the same metal nitrides. All computations are carried out using first principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) approach.

  5. Corrosion behavior of titanium nitride coated Ni-Ti shape memory surgical alloy.

    PubMed

    Starosvetsky, D; Gotman, I

    2001-07-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi, nitinol) shape memory alloy was nitrided using an original powder immersion reaction assisted coating (PIRAC) method in order to modify its surface properties. PIRAC nitriding method is based on annealing the samples in the atmosphere of highly reactive nitrogen supplied by decomposition of unstable nitride powders or, alternatively, by selective diffusion of the atmospheric nitrogen to the sample surface. Being a non-line-of-sight process, PIRAC nitriding allows uniform treatment of complex shape surgical implants. Hard two-layer titanium nitride (TiN)/Ti2, Ni coatings were obtained on NiTi surface after PIRAC anneals at 900 and 1000 degrees C. PIRAC coating procedure was found to considerably improve the corrosion behavior of NiTi alloy in Ringer's solution. In contrast to untreated nitinol, no pitting was observed in the samples PIRAC nitrided at 1000 degrees C, 1 h up to 1.1 V. The coated samples were also characterized by very low anodic currents in the passive region and by an exceedingly low metal ion release rate. The research results suggest that PIRAC nitriding procedure could improve the in vivo performance of NiTi alloys implanted into the human body. PMID:11396890

  6. Superconducting circuits for quantum information: an outlook.

    PubMed

    Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2013-03-01

    The performance of superconducting qubits has improved by several orders of magnitude in the past decade. These circuits benefit from the robustness of superconductivity and the Josephson effect, and at present they have not encountered any hard physical limits. However, building an error-corrected information processor with many such qubits will require solving specific architecture problems that constitute a new field of research. For the first time, physicists will have to master quantum error correction to design and operate complex active systems that are dissipative in nature, yet remain coherent indefinitely. We offer a view on some directions for the field and speculate on its future. PMID:23471399

  7. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  8. Low loss superconducting titanium nitride coplanar waveguide resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Vissers, M. R.; Gao, J.; Wisbey, D. S.; Hite, D. A.; Pappas, D. P.; Tsuei, C. C.; Corcoles, A. D.; Steffen, M.

    2010-12-06

    Thin films of TiN were sputter-deposited onto Si and sapphire wafers with and without SiN buffer layers. The films were fabricated into rf coplanar waveguide resonators, and internal quality factor measurements were taken at millikelvin temperatures in both the many photon and single photon limits, i.e., high and low electric field regimes, respectively. At high field, we found the highest internal quality factors ({approx}10{sup 7}) were measured for TiN with predominantly a (200)-TiN orientation. The (200)-TiN is favored for growth at high temperature on either bare Si or SiN buffer layers. However, growth on bare sapphire or Si(100) at low temperature resulted in primarily a (111)-TiN orientation. Ellipsometry and Auger measurements indicate that the (200)-TiN growth on the bare Si substrates is correlated with the formation of a thin, {approx_equal}2 nm, layer of SiN during the predeposition procedure. On these surfaces we found a significant increase of Q{sub i} for both high and low electric field regimes.

  9. Lattice dynamics of superconducting zirconium and hafnium nitride halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.; Beltrán-Porter, D.; Oró-Solé, J.; Fuertes, A.

    2003-03-01

    We have performed a study of the Raman active modes of β-HfNCl, β-ZrNCl, and β-ZrNBr and Na-doped β-HfNCl in various scattering configurations. The experimental values are compared with a lattice dynamical calculation and assigned to definite atomic motions. The variation of the atomic force constants are analyzed as a function of the bond length, relating their relative strength with the atomic characteristics of the compound.

  10. Effects of the Treating Time on Microstructure and Erosion Corrosion Behavior of Salt-Bath-Nitrided 17-4PH Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Li, Mingxing; Fan, Hongyuan; Zeng, Dezhi; Xiong, Ji

    2013-08-01

    The effects of salt-bath nitriding time on the microstructure, microhardness, and erosion-corrosion behavior of nitrided 17-4PH stainless steel at 703 K (430 °C) were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and erosion-corrosion testing. The experimental results revealed that the microstructure and phase constituents of the nitrided surface alloy are highly process condition dependent. When 17-4PH stainless steel was subjected to complex salt-bathing nitriding, the main phase of the nitrided layer was expanded martensite ( α`), expanded austenite (S), CrN, Fe4N, and Fe2N. The thickness of nitrided layers increased with the treating time. The salt-bath nitriding improves effectively the surface hardness. The maximum values measured from the treated surface are observed to be 1100 HV0.1 for 40 hours approximately, which is about 3.5 times as hard as the untreated material (309 HV0.1). Low-temperature nitriding can improve the erosion-corrosion resistance against two-phase flow. The sample nitrided for 4 hours has the best corrosion resistance.

  11. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  12. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Xu, Huiwen; Luk, Ting Shan; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Brener, Igal; Brueck, Steven R. J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of actinide nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Jaques, Brian; Butt, Darryl P.; Marx, Brian M.; Hamdy, A.S.; Osterberg, Daniel; Balfour, Gordon

    2007-07-01

    A carbothermic reduction of the metal oxides in a hydrogen/nitrogen mixed gas stream prior to nitriding in a nitrogen gas stream was used to synthesize uranium nitride at 1500 deg. C, cerium nitride at 1400 deg. C, and dysprosium nitride at 1500 deg. C. Cerium nitride and dysprosium nitride were also synthesized via hydriding and nitriding the metal shavings at 900 deg. C and 1500 deg. C, respectively. Also, a novel ball-milling synthesis route was used to produce cerium nitride and dysprosium nitride from the metal shavings at room temperature. Dysprosium nitride was also produced by reacting the metal shavings in a high purity nitrogen gas stream at 1300 deg. C. All materials were characterized by phase analysis via X-ray diffraction. Only the high purity materials were further analyzed via chemical analysis to characterize the trace oxygen concentration. (authors)

  14. Effects of various gas mixtures on plasma nitriding behavior of AISI 5140 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Karakan, Mehmet; Alsaran, Akguen; Celik, Ayhan

    2002-10-15

    AISI 5140 steel was plasma nitrided at various gas mixtures of nitrogen, hydrogen, and argon to investigate the actions of hydrogen and argon on plasma nitriding. The structural and mechanical properties of ion-nitrided AISI 5140 steel have been assessed by evaluating composition of phases, surface hardness, compound layer thickness, and case depth by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), microhardness tests, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the growth of compound layer can be controlled and the diffusion improved when the gas mixture includes H{sub 2} gas. Additionally, it was determined that the amount of Ar in dual gas mixture must be at 20% minimum to obtain distinctive surface hardness and compound layer thickness.

  15. Frictional and structural characterization of ion-nitrided low and high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    Low Cr steels AISI 41410, AISI 4340, and high Cr austenitic stainless steels AISI 304, AISI 316 were ion nitrided in a dc glow discharge plasma consisting of a 75 percent H2 - 25 percent N2 mixture. Surface compound layer phases were identified, and compound layer microhardness and diffusion zone microhardness profiles were established. Distinct differences in surface compound layer hardness and diffusion zone profiles were determined between the low and high Cr alloy steels. The high Cr stainless steels after ion nitriding displayed a hard compound layer and an abrupt diffusion zone. The compound layers of the high Cr stainless steels had a columnar structure which accounts for brittleness when layers are exposed to contact stresses. The ion nitrided surfaces of high and low Cr steels displayed a low coefficient of friction with respect to the untreated surfaces when examined in a pin and disk tribotester.

  16. A nitriding process for the recovery of niobium from ferroniobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suri, A. K.; Singh, Kulwant; Gupta, C. K.

    1992-08-01

    A three-step process based on nitriding-leaching-pyrovacuum decomposition has been developed for the recovery of niobium metal relatively free of iron from ferroniobium. The process essentially involves nitriding of ferroniobium powder with ammonia at 950 °C to 1000 °C. Nitrided ferroalloy was then treated with a 9:1 mixture of 30 pct HNO3 and HC1 to leach out iron nitrides. The residue was then pyrovacuum treated at 1825 °C under a dynamic vacuum of 0.02 m torr to finally yield metal containing about 0.2 pct iron starting from ferroniobium containing about 35 pct iron. The treated material has been further purified by electron-beam melt refining. The refined metal showed a hardness in the range of 80 to 84 VHN under a load of 100 g. The metal on analysis was found to contain 200 ppm of oxygen, less than 100 ppm of nitrogen, and about 100 ppm of carbon. The process appears to be quite attractive because it does not involve the treatment of ferroniobium with halogens or halides at elevated temperatures.

  17. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  18. Enhanced wear resistance of ball-and-socket joints of dental implants by means of titanium gaseous nitriding.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Canedo, R; Padrós, A; Sada, E

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this research is the surface hardening of the ball-and-socket joint of dental implants by means of heat treatments in order to obtain titanium nitrides. These nitrides minimize the wear of the titanium used in prosthesis. In this paper the optimum heat treatment, the hardness and the wear resistance are described in relation to the ball-and-socket joint without heat treatment. PMID:12222756

  19. Non-uniform absorption of terahertz radiation on superconducting hot electron bolometer microbridges

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, W.; Zhang, W.; Zhong, J. Q.; Shi, S. C.; Delorme, Y.; Lefevre, R.; Feret, A.; Vacelet, T.

    2014-02-03

    We interpret the experimental observation of a frequency-dependence of superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixers by taking into account the non-uniform absorption of the terahertz radiation on the superconducting HEB microbridge. The radiation absorption is assumed to be proportional to the local surface resistance of the HEB microbridge, which is computed using the Mattis-Bardeen theory. With this assumption the dc and mixing characteristics of a superconducting niobium-nitride (NbN) HEB device have been modeled at frequencies below and above the equilibrium gap frequency of the NbN film.

  20. Argon gas concentration effects on nanostructured molybdenum nitride layer growth using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlaq, U.; Ahmad, R.; Saleem, S.; Shah, M. S.; Umm-i-Kalsoom; Khan, N.; Khalid, N.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of argon concentration (10%-40%) on the surface properties of molybdenum is studied in nitrogen-argon mixture using 100 Hz pulsed dc glow discharge. The analysis is carried out by using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Vickers microhardness tester to investigate surface properties of the nitrided samples. XRD results exhibit the formation of molybdenum nitrides. Crystallite size analysis and SEM morphology confirm the growth of nanostructured molybdenum nitride layers. Moreover, significant increase in surface hardness (by a factor of about two times) is found when the sample is treated for 30% argon in nitrogen-argon mixed plasma.

  1. The hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance of coatings developed for cobalt-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.; Wilson, W.L.

    2000-05-01

    One potential approach for reducing the level of nuclear plant radiation exposure that results from activated cobalt wear debris is the use of a wear resistant coating. However, large differences in stiffness between a coating/substrate can result in high interfacial stresses that produce coating de-adhesion when a coated substrate is subjected to high stress wear contact. Scratch adhesion and indentation tests have been used to identify four promising coating processes [1,2]: (1) the use of a thin Cr-nitride coating with a hard and less-stiff interlayer, (2) the use of a thick, multilayered Cr-nitride coating with graded layers, (3) use of the duplex approach, or nitriding to harden the material subsurface followed by application of a multilayered Cr-nitride coating, and (4) application of nitriding alone. The processing, characterization, and adhesion of these coating systems are discussed. The wear resistance and performance has been evaluated using laboratory pin-on-disc, 4-ball, and high stress rolling contact tests. Based on the results of these tests, the best coating candidate from the high-stress rolling contact wear test was the thin duplex coating, which consists of ion nitriding followed deposition of a thin Cr-nitride coating, while the thin Cr-nitride coating exhibited the best results in the 4-ball wear test.

  2. Cordierite silicon nitride filters

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, J.; Buchan, B. ); Duiven, R.; Berger, M. ); Cleveland, J.; Ferri, J. )

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a silicon nitride based crossflow filter. This report summarizes the findings and results of the project. The project was phased with Phase I consisting of filter material development and crossflow filter design. Phase II involved filter manufacturing, filter testing under simulated conditions and reporting the results. In Phase I, Cordierite Silicon Nitride (CSN) was developed and tested for permeability and strength. Target values for each of these parameters were established early in the program. The values were met by the material development effort in Phase I. The crossflow filter design effort proceeded by developing a macroscopic design based on required surface area and estimated stresses. Then the thermal and pressure stresses were estimated using finite element analysis. In Phase II of this program, the filter manufacturing technique was developed, and the manufactured filters were tested. The technique developed involved press-bonding extruded tiles to form a filter, producing a monolithic filter after sintering. Filters manufactured using this technique were tested at Acurex and at the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center. The filters did not delaminate during testing and operated and high collection efficiency and good cleanability. Further development in areas of sintering and filter design is recommended.

  3. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Melendez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-19

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH{sub 3} flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  4. High upper critical field in disordered niobium nitride superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R. Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Janawadkar, M. P.

    2014-10-28

    Superconducting Niobium Nitride thin films have been deposited on glass, aluminum nitride buffered glass, and oxidized silicon substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering at ambient substrate temperatures. The crystal structure of these thin films has been determined to be cubic fcc B1 structure by Glancing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction analysis. The superconducting transition temperatures of the thin films were measured to be greater than 11.6 K with a maximum of 13.4 K. The negative temperature coefficient of resistance observed in these thin films indicates the presence of disorder. Magneto-resistance measurements have been carried out on these thin films patterned into standard four probe geometry upto a maximum magnetic field of 12 T for two films and upto 15 T for the other two films. The dependence of transition temperature on the applied field is analyzed to estimate the upper critical field. The upper critical field for most of the films was estimated to exceed 35 T, while one of the most disordered films had an estimated upper critical field greater than 70 T.

  5. Nitriding iron at lower temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tong, W P; Tao, N R; Wang, Z B; Lu, J; Lu, K

    2003-01-31

    The microstructure in the surface layer of a pure iron plate was refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation of the surface layer. The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the treated iron with the nanostructured surface layer were greatly enhanced, so that the nitriding temperature could be as low as 300 degrees C, which is much lower than conventional nitriding temperatures (above 500 degrees C). This enhanced processing method demonstrates the technological significance of nanomaterials in improving traditional processing techniques and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. PMID:12560546

  6. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  7. Mechanical properties of sputtered silicon nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, M.; Cáceres, D.; Prieto, C.

    2003-12-01

    Silicon nitride thin films were prepared by reactive sputtering from different sputtering targets and using a range of Ar/N2 sputtering gas mixtures. The hardness and the Young's modulus of the samples were determined by nanoindentation measurements. Depending on the preparation parameters, the obtained values were in the ranges 8-23 and 100-210 GPa, respectively. Additionally, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction were used to characterize samples with respect to different types of bonding, atomic concentrations, and structure of the films to explain the variation of mechanical properties. The hardness and Young's modulus were determined as a function of film composition and structure and conditions giving the hardest film were found. Additionally, a model that assumes a series coupling of the elastic components, corresponding to the Si-O and Si-N bonds present in the sample has been proposed to explain the observed variations of hardness and Young's modulus.

  8. Nanohardness and chemical bonding of Boron Nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F

    1998-07-08

    Boron-nitride (BN) films are deposited by the reactive sputter deposition of fully dense, boron targets utilizing a planar magnetron source and an argon-nitrogen working gas mixture. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis reveals distinguishing features of chemical bonding within the boron is photoabsorption cross-section. The hardness of the BN film surface is measured using nanoindentation. The sputter deposition conditions as well as the post-deposition treatments of annealing and nitrogen-ion implantation effect the chemical bonding and the film hardness. A model is proposed to quantify the film hardness using the relative peak intensities of the p*-resonances to the boron 1s spectra.

  9. Predicting hardness of covalent/ionic solid solution from first-principles theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Q. M.; Kádas, K.; Hogmark, S.; Yang, R.; Johansson, B.; Vitos, L.

    2007-09-01

    We introduce a hardness formula for the multicomponent covalent and ionic solid solutions. This expression is tested on nitride spinel materials A3N4 (A=C,Si,Ge) and applied to titanium nitrogen carbide (TiN1-xCx with 0⩽x ⩽1), off-stoichiometric transition-metal nitride (TiN1-x and VN1-x with x ⩽0.25), and B-doped semiconductors (C1-xBx, Si1-xBx, and Ge1-xBx with x ⩽0.1). In all cases, the theoretical hardness is in good agreement with experiments.

  10. Caracterisation of Titanium Nitride Layers Deposited by Reactive Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Popescu, Mihaela; Uţu, Dragoş

    2011-01-01

    Forming and cutting tools are subjected to the intense wear solicitations. Usually, they are either subject to superficial heat treatments or are covered with various materials with high mechanical properties. In recent years, thermal spraying is used increasingly in engineering area because of the large range of materials that can be used for the coatings. Titanium nitride is a ceramic material with high hardness which is used to cover the cutting tools increasing their lifetime. The paper presents the results obtained after deposition of titanium nitride layers by reactive plasma spraying (RPS). As deposition material was used titanium powder and as substratum was used titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Macroscopic and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy) images of the deposited layers and the X ray diffraction of the coatings are presented. Demonstration program with layers deposited with thickness between 68,5 and 81,4 μm has been achieved and presented.

  11. Surface Brillouin scattering of cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinin, P.; Manghnani, M. H.; Zhang, X.; Feldermann, H.; Ronning, C.; Hofsäss, H.

    2002-04-01

    Surface Brillouin scattering has been used to determine the elastic properties of thin hard submicron cubic boron nitride (cBN) films grown on silicon by mass selected ion beam deposition. The elastic properties of the films have been determined by fitting experimental data to theoretical dispersion curves. A Green's function method was used to predict Brillouin scattering spectra of the acoustic excitation at the free surface. Our results demonstrate that the effect of the thin hexagonal boron nitride interlayer located between cBN film and the Si substrate on the velocity of the surface acoustic wave does not exceed 2% for a thin (16 nm) film and is negligible for cBN films thicker than 100 nm. The elastic properties of the cBN films are not softer than those of bulk cBN.

  12. Endstates in multichannel spinless p-wave superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, M.-T.; Kells, G.; Duckheim, M.; Meidan, D.; Brouwer, P. W.

    2012-09-01

    Multimode spinless p-wave superconducting wires with a width W much smaller than the superconducting coherence length ξ are known to have multiple low-energy subgap states localized near the wire's ends. Here we compare the typical energies of such endstates for various terminations of the wire: A superconducting wire coupled to a normal-metal stub, a weakly disordered superconductor wire and a wire with smooth confinement. Depending on the termination, we find that the energies of the subgap states can be higher or lower than for the case of a rectangular wire with hard-wall boundaries.

  13. Method for producing edge geometry superconducting tunnel junctions utilizing an NbN/MgO/NbN thin film structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Brian D. (Inventor); Leduc, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for fabricating an edge geometry superconducting tunnel junction device is discussed. The device is comprised of two niobium nitride superconducting electrodes and a magnesium oxide tunnel barrier sandwiched between the two electrodes. The NbN electrodes are preferably sputter-deposited, with the first NbN electrode deposited on an insulating substrate maintained at about 250 C to 500 C for improved quality of the electrode.

  14. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  15. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  16. Method for producing refractory nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1989-01-24

    A process for making fine, uniform metal nitride powders that can be hot pressed or sintered. A metal salt is placed in a solvent with Melamine and warmed until a metal-Melamine compound forms. The solution is cooled and the metal-Melamine precipitate is calcined at a temperature below 700.degree. C. to form the metal nitrides and to avoid formation of the metal oxide.

  17. Superplastic forging nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Panda, P.C.; Seydel, E.R.; Raj, R.

    1988-03-22

    A process is disclosed for preparing silicon nitride ceramic parts which are relatively flaw free and which need little or no machining, said process comprising the steps of: (a) preparing a starting powder by wet or dry mixing ingredients comprising by weight from about 70% to about 99% silicon nitride, from about 1% to about 30% of liquid phase forming additive and from 1% to about 7% free silicon; (b) cold pressing to obtain a preform of green density ranging from about 30% to about 75% of theoretical density; (c) sintering at atmospheric pressure in a nitrogen atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 1,400 C to about 2,200 C to obtain a density which ranges from about 50% to about 100% of theoretical density and which is higher than said preform green density, and (d) press forging workpiece resulting from step (c) by isothermally uniaxially pressing said workpiece in an open die without initial contact between said workpiece and die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing and so that pressed workpiece does not contact die wall perpendicular to the direction of pressing, to substantially final shape in a nitrogen atmosphere utilizing a temperature within the range of from about 1,400 C to essentially 1,750 C and strain rate within the range of about 10[sup [minus]7] to about 10[sup [minus]1] seconds[sup [minus]1], the temperature and strain rate being such that surface cracks do not occur, said pressing being carried out to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30% whereby superplastic forging is effected.

  18. Low-Temperature Nitriding of Deformed Austenitic Stainless Steels with Various Nitrogen Contents Obtained by Prior High-Temperature Solution Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-08-01

    In the past decades, high nitrogen steels (HNS) have been regarded as substitutes for conventional austenitic stainless steels because of their superior mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the main limitation to their wider application is their expensive production process. As an alternative, high-temperature solution nitriding has been applied to produce HNS from three commercially available stainless steel grades (AISI 304L, AISI 316, and EN 1.4369). The nitrogen content in each steel alloy is varied and its influence on the mechanical properties and the stability of the austenite investigated. Both hardness and yield stress increase and the alloys remain ductile. In addition, strain-induced transformation of austenite to martensite is suppressed, which is beneficial for subsequent low-temperature nitriding of the surface of deformed alloys. The combination of high- and low-temperature nitriding results in improved properties of both bulk and surface.

  19. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  20. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. PMID:25666075

  1. How to estimate hardness of crystals on a pocket calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Simunek, Antonin

    2007-05-01

    A generalization of the semiempirical microscopic model of hardness is presented and applied to currently studied borides, carbides, and nitrides of heavy transition metals. The hardness of OsB, OsC, OsN, PtN, RuC, RuB{sub 2}, ReB{sub 2}, OsB{sub 2}, IrN{sub 2}, PtN{sub 2}, and OsN{sub 2} crystals in various structural phases is predicted. It is found that none of the transition metal crystals is superhard, i.e., with hardness greater than 40 GPa. The presented method provides materials researchers with a practical tool in the search for new hard materials.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and spreading on microwave plasma-nitrided titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Clem, William C; Konovalov, Valery V; Chowdhury, S; Vohra, Yogesh K; Catledge, Shane A; Bellis, Susan L

    2006-02-01

    Improved methods to increase surface hardness of metallic biomedical implants are being developed in an effort to minimize the formation of wear debris particles that cause local pain and inflammation. However, for many implant surface treatments, there is a risk of film delamination due to the mismatch of mechanical properties between the hard surface and the softer underlying metal. In this article, we describe the surface modification of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition to induce titanium nitride formation by nitrogen diffusion. The result is a gradual transition from a titanium nitride surface to the bulk titanium alloy, without a sharp interface that could otherwise lead to delamination. We demonstrate that vitronectin adsorption, as well as the adhesion and spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells to plasma-nitrided titanium is equivalent to that of Ti-6Al-4V, while hardness is improved 3- to 4-fold. These in vitro results suggest that the plasma nitriding technique has the potential to reduce wear, and the resulting debris particle release, of biomedical implants without compromising osseointegration; thus, minimizing the possibility of implant loosening over time. PMID:16265649

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and spreading on microwave plasma-nitrided titanium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Clem, William C.; Konovalov, Valery V.; Chowdhury, S.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Catledge, Shane A.; Bellis, Susan L.

    2008-01-01

    Improved methods to increase surface hardness of metallic biomedical implants are being developed in an effort to minimize the formation of wear debris particles that cause local pain and inflammation. However, for many implant surface treatments, there is a risk of film delamination due to the mismatch of mechanical properties between the hard surface and the softer underlying metal. In this article, we describe the surface modification of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition to induce titanium nitride formation by nitrogen diffusion. The result is a gradual transition from a titanium nitride surface to the bulk titanium alloy, without a sharp interface that could otherwise lead to delamination. We demonstrate that vitronectin adsorption, as well as the adhesion and spreading of human mesenchymal stem cells to plasma-nitrided titanium is equivalent to that of Ti-6Al-4V, while hardness is improved 3- to 4-fold. These in vitro results suggest that the plasma nitriding technique has the potential to reduce wear, and the resulting debris particle release, of biomedical implants without compromising osseointegration; thus, minimizing the possibility of implant loosening over time. PMID:16265649

  4. Nitride precipitation in salt-bath nitrided interstitial-free steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Oh, Chang-Seok; Lee, Min-Ku; Han, Sang-Won

    2010-10-15

    Nitride precipitation and its effect on microstrain in salt-bath nitrided interstitial-free steel were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction. As the cooling rate after nitriding decreased, two nitrides, {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N and {alpha}{sup -}Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2}, were identified in diffusion zone. Combined analyses using Rietveld whole-profile fitting and size-strain analysis revealed that the microstrain in the nitrided specimen increased due to nitrogen supersaturation and then decreased after nitride precipitation, whereas the effective particle size continuously decreased. It was found that microstrain is the dominant factor in peak broadening of the nitrided specimen.

  5. Processing study of injection molding of silicon nitride for engine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorabaugh, M. E.; Yeh, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    The high hardness of silicon nitride, which is currently under consideration as a structural material for such hot engine components as turbine blades, renders machining of the material prohibitively costly; the near net shape forming technique of injection molding is accordingly favored as a means for component fabrication. Attention is presently given to the relationships between injection molding processing parameters and the resulting microstructural and mechanical properties of the resulting engine parts. An experimental program has been conducted under NASA sponsorship which tests the quality of injection molded bars of silicon nitride at various stages of processing.

  6. Formation of cubic boron-nitride by the reactive sputter deposition of boron

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; Makowiecki, D.W.; McKeman, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    Boron-nitride films are synthesized by RF magnetron sputtering boron targets where the deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are analyzed using Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nanoindentation, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. These techniques provide characterization of film composition, crystalline structure, hardness and chemical bonding, respectively. Reactive, rf-sputtering process parameters are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. The deposition of stable and adherent boron nitride coatings consisting of the cubic phase requires 400 `C substrate heating and the application of a 300 V negative bias.

  7. Aluminum nitride insulating films for MOSFET devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.; Maserjian, J.

    1972-01-01

    Application of aluminum nitrides as electrical insulator for electric capacitors is discussed. Electrical properties of aluminum nitrides are analyzed and specific use with field effect transistors is defined. Operational limits of field effect transistors are developed.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoidentation of silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P.; Omeltchenko, A.; Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, R.K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, P.

    1999-08-01

    This is a report of work in progress on 10 million atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoindentation of crystalline and amorphous silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). Nanoindentation is used to determine mechanical properties of extremely thin films such as hardness and elastic moduli. The authors report load-displacement curves for several Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} configurations using an idealized non-deformable indenter and analyze the local stress distributions in the vicinity of the indenter tip. Preliminary results for surface adhesion using Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} for both tip and substrate are also reported.

  9. Wear of hard materials by hard particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2003-10-01

    Hard materials, such as WC-Co, boron carbide, titanium diboride and composite carbide made up of Mo2C and WC, have been tested in abrasion and erosion conditions. These hard materials showed negligible wear in abrasion against SiC particles and erosion using Al2O3 particles. The WC-Co materials have the highest wear rate of these hard materials and a very different material removal mechanism. Wear mechanisms for these materials were different for each material with the overall wear rate controlled by binder composition and content and material grain size.

  10. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the ion beam technique to the nitriding of steels is described. It is indicated that the technique can be successfully applied to nitriding. Some of the structural changes obtained by this technique are similar to those obtained by ion nitriding. The main difference is the absence of the iron nitride diffraction lines. It is found that the dependence of the resultant microhardness on beam voltage for super nitralloy is different from that of 304 stainless steel.

  11. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1984-01-01

    The application of the ion beam technique to the nitriding of steels is described. It is indicated that the technique can be successfully applied to nitriding. Some of the structural changes obtained by this technique are similar to those obtained by ion nitriding. The main difference is the absence of the iron nitride diffraction lines. It is found that the dependence of the resultant microhardness on beam voltage for super nitralloy is different from that of 304 stainless steel.

  12. Effect of ion nitriding on the abrasive wear resistance of ultrahigh-strength steels with different silicon contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofano, R. M. Muñoz; Casteletti, L. C.; Nascente, P. A. P.

    2005-02-01

    This article studies the effect of silicon (Si) on ultrahigh-strength AISI 4340 steels in connection with the thermal treatment, as well as the influence of this element on nitriding and, consequently, abrasive wear. Four alloys with different Si contents were nitrided at 350 °C (4 and 8 h) and 500 and 550 °C (2 and 4 h) in a gas mixture of 80 vol.% H2 and 20 vol.% N2. The nitrided layers were characterized by microhardness and pin-on-disk tests, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The increase in Si enhanced the tempering resistance of the steels and also improved considerably the hardness of the nitrided layers. The increase in Si produced thinner compound layers with better hardness quality and high abrasive wear resistance. XRD analysis detected a mixture of nitrides in the layers γ‧-Fe4N, ɛ-Fe2 3N, CrN, MoN, and Si3N4 with their proportions varying with the nitriding conditions.

  13. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  14. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-04-12

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Process for making transition metal nitride whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making metal nitrides, particularly titanium nitride whiskers, using a cyanide salt as a reducing agent for a metal compound in the presence of an alkali metal oxide. Sodium cyanide, various titanates and titanium oxide mixed with sodium oxide react to provide titanium nitride whiskers that can be used as reinforcement to ceramic composites.

  16. Radiation tolerance of piezoelectric bulk single-crystal aluminum nitride.

    PubMed

    Parks, David A; Tittmann, Bernhard R

    2014-07-01

    For practical use in harsh radiation environments, we pose selection criteria for piezoelectric materials for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and material characterization. Using these criteria, piezoelectric aluminum nitride is shown to be an excellent candidate. The results of tests on an aluminum-nitride- based transducer operating in a nuclear reactor are also presented. We demonstrate the tolerance of single-crystal piezoelectric aluminum nitride after fast and thermal neutron fluences of 1.85 x 10(18) neutron/cm(2) and 5.8 x 10(18) neutron/ cm(2), respectively, and a gamma dose of 26.8 MGy. The radiation hardness of AlN is most evident from the unaltered piezoelectric coefficient d33, which measured 5.5 pC/N after a fast and thermal neutron exposure in a nuclear reactor core for over 120 MWh, in agreement with the published literature value. The results offer potential for improving reactor safety and furthering the understanding of radiation effects on materials by enabling structural health monitoring and NDE in spite of the high levels of radiation and high temperatures, which are known to destroy typical commercial ultrasonic transducers. PMID:24960710

  17. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  18. Nitriding molybdenum: Effects of duration and fill gas pressure when using 100-Hz pulse DC discharge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlaq, U.; R., Ahmad; Shafiq, M.; Saleem, S.; S. Shah, M.; Hussain, T.; A. Khan, I.; K., Abbas; S. Abbas, M.

    2014-10-01

    Molybdenum is nitrided by a 100-Hz pulsed DC glow discharge technique for various time durations and fill gas pressures to study the effects on the surface properties of molybdenum. X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used for the structural and morphological analysis of the nitrided layers. Vickers' microhardness tester is utilized to investigate surface microhardness. Phase analysis shows the formation of more molybdenum nitride molecules for longer nitriding durations at fill gas pressures of 2 mbar and 3 mbar (1 bar = 105 Pa). A considerable increase in surface microhardness (approximately by a factor of 2) is observed for longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar pressure. Longer duration (10 h) and 2-mbar fill gas pressure favors the formation of homogeneous, smooth, hard layers by the incorporation of more nitrogen.

  19. Superhard Monoborides: Hardness Enhancement through Alloying in W1- x Tax B.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Michael T; Lei, Jialin; Mohammadi, Reza; Turner, Christopher L; Wang, Yue; Tolbert, Sarah H; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-08-01

    In tungsten monoboride (WB), the boron atoms are linked in parallel serpentine arrays, with tungsten atoms in between. This lattice is metallic, unlike conventional covalent superhard materials such as diamond or cubic boron nitride. By selectively substituting tungsten atoms with tantalum, the Vickers hardness can be increased to 42.8 GPa, creating a new superhard metal. PMID:27200469

  20. Superconducting levitating bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Francis C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A superconducting bearing assembly includes a coil field source that may be superconducting and a superconducting structure. The coil field source assembly and superconducting structure are positioned so as to enable relative rotary movement therebetween. The structure and coil field source are brought to a supercooled temperature before a power supply induces a current in the coil field source. A Meissner-like effect is thereby obtained and little or no penetration of the field lines is seen in the superconducting structure. Also, the field that can be obtained from the superconducting coil is 2-8 times higher than that of permanent magnets. Since the magnetic pressure is proportioned to the square of the field, magnetic pressures from 4 to 64 times higher are achieved.

  1. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  2. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  3. Advanced Manufacturing of Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senti, Mark W.

    1996-01-01

    The development of specialized materials, processes, and robotics technology allows for the rapid prototype and manufacture of superconducting and normal magnets which can be used for magnetic suspension applications. Presented are highlights of the Direct Conductor Placement System (DCPS) which enables automatic design and assembly of 3-dimensional coils and conductor patterns using LTS and HTS conductors. The system enables engineers to place conductors in complex patterns with greater efficiency and accuracy, and without the need for hard tooling. It may also allow researchers to create new types of coils and patterns which were never practical before the development of DCPS. The DCPS includes a custom designed eight-axis robot, patented end effector, CoilCAD(trademark) design software, RoboWire(trademark) control software, and automatic inspection.

  4. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  5. Frequency Comb Generation in Superconducting Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, David; Erickson, Robert; Vissers, Michael; Ku, Hsiang-Sheng

    2015-03-01

    We have generated frequency combs spanning 0.5 to 20 GHz in superconducting λ = 2 resonators at T =3 K. Thin films of niobium-titanium nitride enabled this development due to their low loss, high nonlinearity, low frequency dispersion, and high critical temperature. The combs nucleate as sidebands around multiples of the pump frequency. Selection rules for the allowed frequency emission are calculated using perturbation theory, and the measured spectrum is shown to agree with the theory. Sideband spacing is measured to be accurate to 1 part in 108 The sidebands coalesce into a continuous comb structure observed to cover at least several frequency octaves. Generation of combs in this frequency range allows for unprecedented analysis of this non-linear phenomena in the time domain. We acknowledge DARPA and the NIST Quantum Information program.

  6. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  7. Nitride tuning of lanthanide chromites.

    PubMed

    Black, Ashley P; Johnston, Hannah E; Oró-Solé, Judith; Bozzo, Bernat; Ritter, Clemens; Frontera, Carlos; Attfield, J Paul; Fuertes, Amparo

    2016-03-21

    LnCrO(3-x)N(x) perovskites with Ln = La, Pr and Nd and nitrogen contents up to x = 0.59 have been synthesised through ammonolysis of LnCrO4 precursors. These new materials represent one of the few examples of chromium oxynitrides. Hole-doping through O(2-)/N(3-) anion substitution suppresses the magnetic transition far less drastically than Ln(3+)/M(2+) (M = Ca, Sr) cation substitutions because of the greater covalency of metal-nitride bonds. Hence, nitride-doping is a more benign method for doping metal oxides without suppressing electronic transitions. PMID:26916315

  8. Deposition of titanium nitride and hydroxyapatite-based biocompatible composite by reactive plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roşu, Radu Alexandru; Şerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bucur, Alexandra Ioana; Dragoş, Uţu

    2012-02-01

    Titanium nitride is a bioceramic material successfully used for covering medical implants due to the high hardness meaning good wear resistance. Hydroxyapatite is a bioactive ceramic that contributes to the restoration of bone tissue, which together with titanium nitride may contribute to obtaining a superior composite in terms of mechanical and bone tissue interaction matters. The paper presents the experimental results in obtaining composite layers of titanium nitride and hydroxyapatite by reactive plasma spraying in ambient atmosphere. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that in both cases of powders mixtures used (10% HA + 90% Ti; 25% HA + 75% Ti), hydroxyapatite decomposition occurred; in variant 1 the decomposition is higher compared with the second variant. Microstructure of the deposited layers was investigated using scanning electron microscope, the surfaces presenting a lamellar morphology without defects such as cracks or microcracks. Surface roughness values obtained vary as function of the spraying distance, presenting higher values at lower thermal spraying distances.

  9. Thermodynamic stability and unusual strength of ultra-incompressible rhenium nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R. F.; Lin, Zhijun; Mao, Ho-kwang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-02-11

    We report on a comprehensive study of thermodynamic and mechanical properties as well as a bond-deformation mechanism on ultra-incompressible Re{sub 2} N and Re{sub 3} N. The introduction of nitrogen into the rhenium lattice leads to thermodynamic instability in Re{sub 2} N at ambient conditions and enhanced incompressibility and strength for both rhenium nitrides. Rhenium nitrides, however, show substantially lower ideal shear strength than hard ReB{sub 2} and superhard c -BN, suggesting that they cannot be intrinsically superhard. An intriguing soft “ionic bond mediated plastic deformation” mechanism is revealed to underline the physical origin of their unusual mechanical strength. These results suggest a need to reformulate the design concept of intrinsically superhard transition-metal nitrides, borides, and carbides.

  10. Properties of boron nitride coating films prepared by the ion beam and vapor deposition method (IVD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Y.; Ogata, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Kamijo, E.; Satou, M.; Fujimoto, F.

    The authors have studied coating films of boron nitride prepared by the ion implantation and vapor deposition method (IVD method) and it was found that the films consisted of the cubic, wurzite and hexagonal boron nitride. These films were manufactured by bombardment of nitrogen molecular ion with energy 25-40 keV. In the present work, we prepared films by the nitrogen molecular ions with much lower energy than the previous case. Boron was evaporated by electron beam bombardment on substrates of silicon crystal wafers and nitrogen molecular ions with energy 2-25 keV were simultaneously irradiated. Infrared absorption spectra showed a clear and strong peak due to the boron nitride of cubic structures together with a broad peak of hexagonal one. The hardness of the films was tested. The result showed that the films had 3000-5000 Hv which is much harder than titanium carbide.

  11. Mechanical performance of thermally post-treated ion-nitrided steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, I.; Martinez, H.; Guardian, R.

    2016-05-01

    To obtain an enlarged nitrided layer, a new diffusion heat treatment was applied to three different ion-nitriding steels. Selected steels were from the AISI series: 1045, O1, and H13. Fractographic analyses showed that layers of each one of the steels considerably grew after being exposed to diffusion heat treatment. Micro-hardness tests indicated that the modified steels showed a similar value when is compared with the nitrided condition. By comparing the results in fracture toughness tests, it was observed that the most positively affected steel by the treatment was the AISI-1045 steel. Wear analyses showed that diffusion heat-treated samples exhibited an enhanced wear behavior under moderate loads.

  12. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  13. Precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, S.A.; Miller, W.E.; Willit, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Precipitation of actinides, lanthanides, and fission products as nitrides from molten chloride melts is being investigated for use as a final cleanup step in treating radioactive salt wastes generated by electrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear fuel. The radioactive components (eg, fission products) need to be removed to reduce the volume of high-level waste that requires disposal. To extract the fission products from the salt, a nitride precipitation process is being developed. The salt waste is first contacted with a molten metal; after equilibrium is reached, a nitride is added to the metal phase. The insoluble nitrides can be recovered and converted to a borosilicate glass after air oxidation. For a bench-scale experimental setup, a crucible was designed to contact the salt and metal phases. Solubility tests were performed with candidate nitrides and metal nitrides for which there are no solubility data. Experiments were performed to assess feasibility of precipitation of metal nitrides from chloride melts.

  14. Homogeneous dispersion of gallium nitride nanoparticles in a boron nitride matrix by nitridation with urea.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2010-07-01

    A Gallium Nitride (GaN) dispersed boron nitride (BN) nanocomposite powder was synthesized by heating a mixture of gallium nitrate, boric acid, and urea in a hydrogen atmosphere. Before heat treatment, crystalline phases of urea, boric acid, and gallium nitrate were recognized, but an amorphous material was produced by heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and then was transformed into GaN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) by further heat treatment at 800 degrees C. TEM obsevations of this composite powder revealed that single nanosized GaN particles were homogeneously dispersed in a BN matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of GaN nanoparticles was thought to be attained by simultaneously nitriding gallium nitrate and boric acid to GaN and BN with urea. PMID:21128417

  15. Characterization of tantalum nitride thin films synthesized by magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Anna

    Tantalum Nitride is chemically inert, oxidation resistant and hard. TaN finds its application as a protective coating on steel due to their excellent wear properties. It has become a very promising diffusion barrier material in Cu interconnect technology in microelectronics. TaN has not been analyzed as much as other transition metal nitrides like the TiN system because TaN exhibits various stable and metastable phases. The emergence of these phases and the different physical, chemical and mechanical properties depend on the growth technique and deposition conditions. TaN thin films were deposited using the magnetron PVD system in the SaNEL lab. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of processing parameters like N2/Ar ratio, substrate bias and temperature, on the emergence of the different phases present in TaN thin films and the effect of deposition conditions on the mechanical properties of these films. The phases present in the films, deposited at varying conditions were explored via low angle X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), hardness of the films was measured by Nanoindentation and tribological tests were carried out to measure the frictional and wear behavior. It was observed that at high percentage of Nitrogen (10%-25%) the main phase present was FCC TaN and as the nitrogen content was decreased a mixture of phases was present in these films. The hardness of the films increases as we decrease the Nitrogen content, yielding a film with a hardness of 37.1 GPa at 3% N2 with a substrate bias voltage of -100 V.

  16. Tailoring the mesoporous texture of graphitic carbon nitride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae-Hun; Kim, Gain; Domen, Kazunari; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2013-11-01

    Recently, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) materials have received a great attention from many researchers due to their various roles as a visible light harvesting photocatalyst, metal-free catalyst, reactive template, nitrogen source of nitridation reaction, etc. g-C3N4 could be prepared by temperature-induced polymerization of cyanamide or melamine. In this study, we report a preparation of mesoporous graphitic carbon nitrides with tailored porous texture including pore size, and specific surface area from cyanamide and colloidal silica nanoparticles (Ludox). At first, cyanamide-silica nanocomposites were prepared by mixing colloidal silica with different size in the range of 7-22 nm and cyanamide, followed by evaporating the solvent in the resulting mixture. Mesoporous g-C3N4 samples were prepared by calcining cyanamide-silica nanocomposite at 550 degrees C for 4 hrs and removing the silica nanoparticles by using ammonium hydrogen fluoride. The formation of g-C3N4 was confirmed by the sharp (002) peak (d = 3.25 A) of graphitic interlayer stacking, and the broad (100) peak (d = 6.86 A) of in-plane repeating unit in the X-ray diffraction patterns. According to N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, the pore size of mesoporous carbon nitrides was similar to the size of colloidal silica used as hard template (7-22 nm). The specific surface area of mesoporous g-C3N4 could be tailored in the range of 189 m2/g-288 m2/g. PMID:24245279

  17. Prospective barrier coatings for superconducting cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipatov, Y.; Dolgosheev, P.; Sytnikov, V.

    1997-07-01

    Known and prospective types of chromium coatings, used in the production of superconducting `cable-in-conduit' conductors designed for the ITER and other projects, are considered. The influence of the technological conditions during the galvanic plating of hard, grey, black and combined chromium coatings in various electrolytes and the annealing conditions in air and in vacuum on the contact electrical resistance of copper and superconducting wire at room temperature and 4.2 K as well as on other physical properties, e.g. resistance to abrasion, elasticity and thickness of the coatings, is investigated. Black oxide - chromium coatings and combined chromium coatings, containing oxides of chromium and a number of other metals, ensure the possibility of a significant increase of contact resistance as well as its regulation in a broad range of values in comparison with hard chromium. The results of the present work and also an independent investigation of the cable containing the strand, manufactured in JSC `VNIIKP', allow us to propose the oxide - chromium coating as a barrier layer for multistrand superconducting cables.

  18. Titanium Nitride Coatings Prepared by Reactive Sputtering on Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadia, Saoula; Karim, Henda; Rafika, Kesri

    2007-10-01

    Titanium nitride is used as coating on cutting tools because of their excellent mechanical properties such as high hardness and high wear resistance. Its chemical inertness gives rise to its application as corrosion protective coating. It's an excellent barrier material with good electrical conductivity in various metallization structures of advanced microelectronic devices. Finally, the golden glance of TiN established its use as decorative coating in the fashion jewellery and in architecture. The deposition process studied, in this work, use RF sputtering of a pure titanium target in a reactive nitrogen/ argon gas mixture, at various conditions. The substrates are steel. The main variables investigated are the composition of the Ar/N2 gas mixture, the total pressure, the deposition time and the discharge power. The aim of this work is to evaluate the performances of a local-made RF plasma reactor. The attention was given to the study of the structure, the composition of titanium nitride deposits, which have a considerable influence on their hardness. The deposited coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and micro-indentation.

  19. Alloying Element Nitride Development in Ferritic Fe-Based Materials Upon Nitriding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, T.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2016-04-01

    With the aim of achieving a better understanding of the nitriding process of iron-based components (steels), as applied in engineering practice, the theoretical background and experimental observations currently available on the crystallographic, morphological, and compositional properties of the nitride precipitates in nitrided model binary and ternary, ferritic Fe-based alloys are summarily presented. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations are employed in order to highlight their importance for the nitriding reaction and the resulting properties of the nitrided zone, thereby providing a more fundamental understanding of the nitriding process.

  20. Alloying Element Nitride Development in Ferritic Fe-Based Materials Upon Nitriding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, T.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    With the aim of achieving a better understanding of the nitriding process of iron-based components (steels), as applied in engineering practice, the theoretical background and experimental observations currently available on the crystallographic, morphological, and compositional properties of the nitride precipitates in nitrided model binary and ternary, ferritic Fe-based alloys are summarily presented. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations are employed in order to highlight their importance for the nitriding reaction and the resulting properties of the nitrided zone, thereby providing a more fundamental understanding of the nitriding process.

  1. Ordering of hard particles between hard walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowska, A.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Ehrentraut, H.; Cleaver, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    The structure of a fluid of hard Gaussian overlap particles of elongation κ = 5, confined between two hard walls, has been calculated from density-functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. By using the exact expression for the excluded volume kernel (Velasco E and Mederos L 1998 J. Chem. Phys. 109 2361) and solving the appropriate Euler-Lagrange equation entirely numerically, we have been able to extend our theoretical predictions into the nematic phase, which had up till now remained relatively unexplored due to the high computational cost. Simulation reveals a rich adsorption behaviour with increasing bulk density, which is described semi-quantitatively by the theory without any adjustable parameters.

  2. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, M.; Newman, N.; Fu, T.; Ross, J.; Chan, J.

    1997-08-12

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5{times}10{sup 11} /cm{sup 3} and hole mobilities of about 500 cm{sup 2} /V-sec, measured at 250 K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al. 9 figs.

  3. P-type gallium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan; Fu, Tracy; Ross, Jennifer; Chan, James

    1997-01-01

    Several methods have been found to make p-type gallium nitride. P-type gallium nitride has long been sought for electronic devices. N-type gallium nitride is readily available. Discovery of p-type gallium nitride and the methods for making it will enable its use in ultraviolet and blue light-emitting diodes and lasers. pGaN will further enable blue photocathode elements to be made. Molecular beam epitaxy on substrates held at the proper temperatures, assisted by a nitrogen beam of the proper energy produced several types of p-type GaN with hole concentrations of about 5.times.10.sup.11 /cm.sup.3 and hole mobilities of about 500 cm.sup.2 /V-sec, measured at 250.degree. K. P-type GaN can be formed of unintentionally-doped material or can be doped with magnesium by diffusion, ion implantation, or co-evaporation. When applicable, the nitrogen can be substituted with other group III elements such as Al.

  4. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buranova, Yu. S. Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-15

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  5. Effect of nitrogen pressure on the hardness and chemical states of TiAlCrN coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Jonathan F.; Huang Feng; Barnard, John A.; Weaver, Mark L.

    2005-01-01

    TiAlCrN coatings were reactively sputtered from a Ti{sub 0.37}Al{sub 0.51}Cr{sub 0.12} alloy target in this study with a nitrogen partial pressure ranging from 0% to 25% of the total pressure. The effects of the incorporation of nitrogen into the coatings on the hardness, elastic modulus, and chemical state of the metal atoms in the coatings were investigated. The hardness and reduced modulus of the coatings increased with increasing nitrogen partial pressures. The formation of ternary nitrides was inferred from the noticeable difference in the chemical states from those for the corresponding binary nitrides.

  6. Method of producing high T(subc) superconducting NBN films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita (Inventor); Lamb, James L. (Inventor); Thakoor, Anilkumar P. (Inventor); Khanna, Satish K. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Thin films of niobium nitride with high superconducting temperature (T sub c) of 15.7 K are deposited on substrates held at room temperature (approx 90 C) by heat sink throughout the sputtering process. Films deposited at P sub Ar 12.9 + or - 0.2 mTorr exhibit higher T sub c with increasing P sub N2,I with the highest T sub c achieved at P sub n2,I= 3.7 + or - 0.2 mTorr and total sputtering pressure P sub tot = 16.6 + or - 0.4. Further increase of N2 injection starts decreasing T sub c.

  7. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  8. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-01

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In this article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. In particular, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  9. Superconductivity in bad metals

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    It is argued that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals`` with such a poor conductivity that the usual mean-field theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Some consequences for high temperature superconductors are described.

  10. Superconducting gyroscope research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, J. B.; Karr, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Four basic areas of research and development of superconducting gyroscopes are studied. Chapter 1 studies the analysis of a SQUID readout for a superconducting gyroscope. Chapter 2 studies the dependence of spin-up torque on channel and gas properties. Chapter 3 studies the theory of super fluid plug operation. And chapter 4 studies the gyro rotor and housing manufacture.

  11. Superconducting properties of protactinium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Spirlet, J C; Müller, W

    1979-07-13

    The superconducting transition temperature and upper critical magnetic field of protactinium were measured by alternating-current susceptibility techniques. Since the superconducting behavior of protactinium is affected by its 5f electron character, it is clear now that protactinium is a true actinide element. PMID:17750320

  12. Rapid cycling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Gambardella, U.; Greco, M.; Volpini, G.

    2006-04-01

    The paper deals with the general problematic related to the development of fast cycled superconducting magnets for application in particle accelerator machines. Starting from the requirements of SIS300 synchrotron under design at GSI and an envisaged future Super-SPS injector at CERN, it is shown which developments are mandatory in the superconducting wire technology and in the magnet design field.

  13. Development of superconductive magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurence, J. C.

    1970-01-01

    Survey of superconductive magnets considers - stabilization problems, advances in materials and their uses, and design evolution. Uses of superconducting magnets in particle accelerators and bubble chambers, as well as possible applications in magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear power generation and levitation are discussed.

  14. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  15. Some Temperature Effects on AISI-304 Nitriding in an Inductively Coupled RF Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Munoz-Castro, A. E.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Rosa-Vazquez, J. de la; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.

    2006-12-04

    Some recent results obtained from nitriding AISI 304 stainless steel samples, 1.2 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm thick are reported here in the case of an 85% hydrogen and 15% nitrogen mixture work gas. The process was carried out from 300 to 400 W for (13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma within a 60 cm long pyrex glass tube 3.5 cm in diameter where the samples were biased up to -300 V with respect to earth. The resulting hardness appears to be a function of the substrate temperature which varied from 200 deg. C at a 0 V bias to 550 deg. C at -300 V. The plasma density at 400 W reached 3x1010 cm-3 with a 4 eV electron temperature. Prior to nitriding, all the samples were polished with 0.05 {mu}m diamond paste, leading to a 30 nm average roughness (Ra). After nitriding at -300 V, the Ra rose until {approx}400 nm while hardness values of 1500 HV under 300 g loads were measured. X ray diffraction indicates that the extended phase amplitude ({gamma}N), Fe and Cr nitride depends on the substrate temperature.

  16. Thermal properties of silicon nitride beams below 1 Kelvin.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Novosad, V.; Datesman, A.; Pearson, J.; Shustakova, G.; Divan, R.; Chang, C.; McMahon, J.; Bleem, L.; Crites, A. T.; Downes, T.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the thermal transport of long, narrow beams of silicon nitride at cryogenic temperatures. Simultaneously employing a superconducting Transition Edge Sensor (TES) as both a heater and a sensor, we measured the thermal conductance of 1 {micro}m thick silicon nitride beams of different lateral dimensions. Based upon these measurements, we calculate the thermal parameters of the beams. We utilize a boundary limited phonon scattering model and assume the phonon mean free path to be temperature independent in the calculation. In the temperature range from 300 mK to 530 mK, the following results are obtained for 20 (30) {micro}m beams: the volume heat capacity is 0.083 T+0.509 T{sup 3} J/m{sup 3}-K, the width dependent phonon mean free path is 9.60 (11.05) {micro}m, and the width dependent thermal conductivity is 5.60 x 10{sup -3} T+3.41 x 10{sup -2} T{sup 3} (6.50 x 10{sup -3} T+3.93 x 10{sup -2} T{sup 3}) W/m-K.

  17. Thermal Properties of Silicon Nitride Beams Below 1 Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Novosad, V.; Datesman, A.; Pearson, J.; Shustakova, G.; Divan, R.; Chang, C.; McMahon, J.; Bleem, L.; Crites, A. T.; Downes, T.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S. S.; Carlstrom, J. E.

    2010-04-01

    We have investigated the thermal transport of long, narrow beams of silicon nitride at cryogenic temperatures. Simultaneously employing a superconducting Transition Edge Sensor (TES) as both a heater and a sensor, we measured the thermal conductance of 1 μm thick silicon nitride beams of different lateral dimensions. Based upon these measurements, we calculate the thermal parameters of the beams. We utilize a boundary limited phonon scattering model and assume the phonon mean free path to be temperature independent in the calculation. In the temperature range from 300 mK to 530 mK, the following results are obtained for 20 (30) μm beams: the volume heat capacity is 0.083 T+0.509 T3 J/m3-K, the width dependent phonon mean free path is 9.60 (11.05) μm, and the width dependent thermal conductivity is 5.60×10-3 T+3.41×10-2 T3 (6.50×10-3 T+3.93×10-2 T3) W/m-K.

  18. Hardness of CNx films deposited by MCECR plasma sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Changlong; Li, Junpeng; Mi, Qian; Ma, Weihong; Yan, Yixin; Liang, Haifeng

    2007-12-01

    The CNx (carbon nitride) films were deposited on silicon (100) with Mirror-Confinement-type Electron Cyclotron Resonance (MCECR) plasma sputtering method, which sputters pure carbon target with the Ar/N II plasma. The thickness of CNx films was about 80nm. In this paper, the hardness of CNx films was investigated, and it is measured by the nanoindenter. The technical parameters of MCECR plasma sputtering influencing the hardness of CNx films include the substrate bias, microwave power, target voltage, gas pressure, and the Ar/N II ratio. Results shown that, the hardness of CNx films is bigger, when the substrate bias is at +30V, the microwave power is 200W, the target voltage is +500V, the gas pressure is 2×10 -2Pa, and the Ar/N II ratio is 9/1.

  19. Improvement of titanium alloy for biomedical applications by nitriding and carbonitriding processes under glow discharge conditions.

    PubMed

    Czarnowska, E; Wierzchoń, T; Maranda-Niedbała, A; Karczmarewicz, E

    2000-02-01

    Although titanium alloys are used in medicine, they present low wear resistance. In this paper we present the results of studies on surface layers produced by nitriding at three different temperatures, and by carbonitriding under glow discharge conditions in order to improve wear resistance, hardness, and to modulate microstructure and chemical composition of surface layers. A cell culture model using human fibroblasts was chosen to study the effect of such treatments on the cytocompatibility of these materials. The results showed that nitrided and carbonitrided surface layers were cytocompatible. Modulation of surface microstructure by temperature in the nitriding process and chemical composition of surface layers by carbonitriding led to differences in cellular behaviour. Cell proliferation appeared to be slightly reduced from the 6th day of culture on nitrided surfaces produced at 730 degrees C and 1000 degrees C, however after 12 days of culture, the best growth was on surface layers produced at 850 degrees C. The best viability was observed on the carbonitrided layer. The orientation and shape of the cells corresponded to surface topography. Nitriding and carbonitriding under glow discharge conditions may constitute interesting techniques allowing the formation of surface layers on parts with sophisticated shapes. They may also permit modulating surface topography in a way improving the features of titanium alloys for various applications in medicine. PMID:15348050

  20. Mechanical and metallurgical properties of ion-nitrided austenitic-stainless steel welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinarslan, C. S.; Sahin, M.; Karaman Genç, S.; Sevil, C.

    2012-12-01

    Ion nitriding is an operation widely used in industry to harden materials surface. Nowadays, friction welding is one of the special welding methods used for welding the same or different kinds of materials. Especially in industry, it can be necessary to use materials after having operated them with different techniques or to use materials obtained by different manufacturing techniques. Investigating the mechanical and metallurgical properties of this kind of materials can be crucial. In this study, austenitic-stainless steel was used as an experimental material. Additionally, the samples of austenitic stainless steel with a diameter of 10 mm were joined by friction welding. The samples were subjected to ion nitriding process at 550 °C for 24 and 60 h. Then, tensile, fatigue, notch-impact and hardness tests were applied to the weldless and welded parts, and metallographic examinations were carried out. It was found that chromium and iron nitrides precipitated along the grain boundaries and in the middle of the grains. Spectrum patterns revealed that the most dominant phases resulted from the formation of CrN, Fe4N and Fe3N. However, the tests revealed that high temperature and longer time of ion nitriding caused a decrease in the values of fatigue and tensile strengths as well as in the notch-impact toughness in the ion nitrided joints.

  1. Superconducting Graphene Nanoelectronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Joel; Zaffalon, Michele; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2010-03-01

    Graphene, a single atom-thick sheet of graphite discovered in recent years, has attracted tremendous attention due to its exotic electronic properties. At low energy, its gapless linear band structure results in transport properties described by the Dirac equation, making it an ideal system for the study of exotic quantum phenomena and other new physics. Graphene may also exhibit many novel transport characteristics in the superconducting regime. New phenomena, such as pseudo-diffusive dynamics of ballistic electrons, the relativistic Josephson effect, and specular Andreev reflection are predicted by theoretical models combining relativistic quantum mechanics and superconductivity. We study these phenomena experimentally with superconductor-graphene-superconductor junctions. The supercurrent in graphene is induced by the superconducting contacts through proximity effect. Various superconducting materials are considered for different explorations. Preliminary tests indicate clean electrical contact with graphene and superconducting properties as expected.

  2. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  3. Nitriding of AISI 4140 steel by a low energy broad ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoa, E. A.; Figueroa, C. A.; Alvarez, F.

    2006-11-15

    A comprehensive study of the thermochemical nitriding process of steel AISI 4140 by low energy ion implantation (Kaufmann cell) is reported. Different times of implantation were employed and the studied samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, in situ photoemission electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and hardness (nanoindentation) measurements. The linear relationship between nitrogen content and hardness was verified. The structure of the nitrided layer was characterized yielding that the compound layer is formed by coarse precipitates, around small grains, constituted principally by {epsilon}-Fe{sub 2-3}N and {gamma}-Fe{sub 4}N phases and the diffusion zone is formed by fine precipitates, around big grains of the original martensitic phase, constituted principally by {gamma}-Fe{sub 4}N phase. Finally, a diffusion model for multiphase systems was applied to determine effective diffusion coefficients of nitrogen in the different phases.

  4. Microstructures and Mechanical Performance of Plasma-Nitrided Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wei-Yeh; Chuang, Ming-Hao; Lin, Su-Jien; Yeh, Jien-Wei

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates the effect of plasma nitriding at 798 K (525 °C) on microstructures and the mechanical performance of Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 high-entropy alloys (HEAs) obtained using different cast and wrought processing. All the alloys can be well nitride, with a thickness of around 80 μm, and attain a peak hardness level around Hv 1300 near the surface. The main nitride phases are CrN, AlN, and (Mn, Fe)4N. Those of the substrates are bcc, fcc, Al-, and Ni-rich B2 precipitates, and ρ phase. Their relative amounts depend on the prior processing and also change under the heat treatment during nitriding. The formation of ρ phase during nitriding could in-situ harden the substrate to attain the suitable level required for wear applications. This gives the advantage in simplifying the processing for making a wear-resistance component or a mold since austenitizing, quench hardening, and tempering required for steels such as SACM and SKD steels are no longer required and final finishing can be accomplished before nitriding. Nitrided Al0.3CrFe1.5MnNi0.5 samples have much better wear resistance than un-nitrided ones by 49 to 80 times and also exhibit superior adhesive wear resistance to conventional nitrided alloys: nitriding steel SACM-645 (AISI 7140), 316 stainless steel, and hot-mold steel SKD-61 (AISI H13) by 22 to 55 times depending on prior processing. The superiority is due to the fact that the present nitrided alloys possess a much thicker highly hardened layer than the conventional alloys.

  5. Frequency-tunable superconducting resonators via nonlinear kinetic inductance

    SciTech Connect

    Vissers, M. R.; Hubmayr, J.; Sandberg, M.; Gao, J.; Chaudhuri, S.; Bockstiegel, C.

    2015-08-10

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested a frequency-tunable high-Q superconducting resonator made from a niobium titanium nitride film. The frequency tunability is achieved by injecting a DC through a current-directing circuit into the nonlinear inductor whose kinetic inductance is current-dependent. We have demonstrated continuous tuning of the resonance frequency in a 180 MHz frequency range around 4.5 GHz while maintaining the high internal quality factor Q{sub i} > 180 000. This device may serve as a tunable filter and find applications in superconducting quantum computing and measurement. It also provides a useful tool to study the nonlinear response of a superconductor. In addition, it may be developed into techniques for measurement of the complex impedance of a superconductor at its transition temperature and for readout of transition-edge sensors.

  6. Graphitic carbon nitride based nanocomposites: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zaiwang; Sun, Yanjuan; Dong, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C(3)N(4)), as an intriguing earth-abundant visible light photocatalyst, possesses a unique two-dimensional structure, excellent chemical stability and tunable electronic structure. Pure g-C(3)N(4) suffers from rapid recombination of photo-generated electron-hole pairs resulting in low photocatalytic activity. Because of the unique electronic structure, the g-C(3)N(4) could act as an eminent candidate for coupling with various functional materials to enhance the performance. According to the discrepancies in the photocatalytic mechanism and process, six primary systems of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites can be classified and summarized: namely, the g-C(3)N(4) based metal-free heterojunction, the g-C(3)N(4)/single metal oxide (metal sulfide) heterojunction, g-C(3)N(4)/composite oxide, the g-C(3)N(4)/halide heterojunction, g-C(3)N(4)/noble metal heterostructures, and the g-C(3)N(4) based complex system. Apart from the depiction of the fabrication methods, heterojunction structure and multifunctional application of the g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites, we emphasize and elaborate on the underlying mechanisms in the photocatalytic activity enhancement of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites. The unique functions of the p-n junction (semiconductor/semiconductor heterostructures), the Schottky junction (metal/semiconductor heterostructures), the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect, photosensitization, superconductivity, etc. are utilized in the photocatalytic processes. Furthermore, the enhanced performance of g-C(3)N(4)-based nanocomposites has been widely employed in environmental and energetic applications such as photocatalytic degradation of pollutants, photocatalytic hydrogen generation, carbon dioxide reduction, disinfection, and supercapacitors. This critical review ends with a summary and some perspectives on the challenges and new directions in exploring g-C(3)N(4)-based advanced nanomaterials. PMID:25407808

  7. Analytical and Empirical Modeling of Wear and Forces of CBN Tool in Hard Turning - A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vallabh Dahyabhai; Gandhi, Anishkumar Hasmukhlal

    2016-06-01

    Machining of steel material having hardness above 45 HRC (Hardness-Rockwell C) is referred as a hard turning. There are numerous models which should be scrutinized and implemented to gain optimum performance of hard turning. Various models in hard turning by cubic boron nitride tool have been reviewed, in attempt to utilize appropriate empirical and analytical models. Validation of steady state flank and crater wear model, Usui's wear model, forces due to oblique cutting theory, extended Lee and Shaffer's force model, chip formation and progressive flank wear have been depicted in this review paper. Effort has been made to understand the relationship between tool wear and tool force based on the different cutting conditions and tool geometries so that appropriate model can be used according to user requirement in hard turning.

  8. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  9. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  10. The hard metal diseases.

    PubMed

    Cugell, D W

    1992-06-01

    Hard metal is a mixture of tungsten carbide and cobalt, to which small amounts of other metals may be added. It is widely used for industrial purposes whenever extreme hardness and high temperature resistance are needed, such as for cutting tools, oil well drilling bits, and jet engine exhaust ports. Cobalt is the component of hard metal that can be a health hazard. Respiratory diseases occur in workers exposed to cobalt--either in the production of hard metal, from machining hard metal parts, or from other sources. Adverse pulmonary reactions include asthma, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis. A peculiar, almost unique form of lung fibrosis, giant cell interstitial pneumonia, is closely linked with cobalt exposure. PMID:1511554

  11. Nanoindentation of silicon nitride: A multimillion-atom molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Phillip; Omeltchenko, Andrey; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Saini, Subhash

    2003-01-01

    Nanoindentation of crystalline and amorphous silicon nitride films is studied using 10-million-atom molecular dynamics simulations. A rigid pyramid-shaped indenter tip is used. Load-displacement curves are computed and are used to derive hardness and elastic moduli of the simulated crystalline and amorphous films. Computer images of local pressure distributions and configuration snapshots show that plastic deformation in the film extends to regions far from the actual indent.

  12. The new Polish nitriding and nitriding like processes in the modern technology

    SciTech Connect

    Has, Z.; Kula, P.

    1995-12-31

    Modern technological methods for making nitrided layers and low-friction combined layers have been described. The possibilities of structures and properties forming were analyzed as well as the area and examples of application were considered. Nitrided layers are applied in high loaded frictional couples, widely. They can be formed on steel or cast iron machine parts by the classic gas nitriding process or by modern numerous nitriding technologies.

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of Superconducting NbN Nanowire Single Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jeffrey A.; Farr, William H.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the fabrication of large area superconducting Niobium Nitride nanowire single photon detectors. The topics include: 1) Introduction and Motivation; 2) Operation of SNSPD Detectors; 3) NbTiN Deposition; 4) Fabrication Details; 5) Backside Coupled SNSPD; 6) Measurement Apparatus; 7) Electrical Response of a 15x15 micrometer SNSPD to 1064nm radiation; 8) Detector Efficiency vs Bias Current; 9) Interarrival Time Plot; 10) Detector Linearity; and 11) Conclusion.

  14. High temperature behavior of simulated mixed nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. G.; Lunev, A. V.; Mikhalchik, V. V.; Tenishev, A. V.; Shornikov, D. P.

    2016-04-01

    Specimen of uranium-based mixed nitrides were synthesized by high-temperature nitriding of metal powder. To investigate thermal stability, samples were annealed at high temperature in a helium atmosphere. During these experiments, the effect of increasing the exposure temperature is studied. Raising the exposure temperature results in a multifold increase of mass loss. A comparison with data on pure uranium nitride shows that increasing the complexity of the nitride systems also results in higher mass loss. Later microscopic investigation of test samples revealed that metal precipitates may be found only on the surface of test samples. Electron probe micro-analysis indicates these precipitates to be uranium metal. Nevertheless, compared to pure uranium nitride, uranium-based mixed nitrides exhibit active evaporation at lower temperatures

  15. Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Quan; Yu, Dongli; Xu, Bo; Hu, Wentao; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-06-01

    Although diamond is the hardest material for cutting tools, poor thermal stability has limited its applications, especially at high temperatures. Simultaneous improvement of the hardness and thermal stability of diamond has long been desirable. According to the Hall-Petch effect, the hardness of diamond can be enhanced by nanostructuring (by means of nanograined and nanotwinned microstructures), as shown in previous studies. However, for well-sintered nanograined diamonds, the grain sizes are technically limited to 10-30 nm (ref. 3), with degraded thermal stability compared with that of natural diamond. Recent success in synthesizing nanotwinned cubic boron nitride (nt-cBN) with a twin thickness down to ~3.8 nm makes it feasible to simultaneously achieve smaller nanosize, ultrahardness and superior thermal stability. At present, nanotwinned diamond (nt-diamond) has not been fabricated successfully through direct conversions of various carbon precursors (such as graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon and C60). Here we report the direct synthesis of nt-diamond with an average twin thickness of ~5 nm, using a precursor of onion carbon nanoparticles at high pressure and high temperature, and the observation of a new monoclinic crystalline form of diamond coexisting with nt-diamond. The pure synthetic bulk nt-diamond material shows unprecedented hardness and thermal stability, with Vickers hardness up to ~200 GPa and an in-air oxidization temperature more than 200 °C higher than that of natural diamond. The creation of nanotwinned microstructures offers a general pathway for manufacturing new advanced carbon-based materials with exceptional thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  16. Metal optics and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The articles contained in this collection are dedicated to the study of the electron structure of transition metals and superconducting alloys and compounds based on them. The study of the electron structure of materials is one of the central problems of solid-state physics and defines the solution of a number of problems. One of them is the problem of high-temperature superconductivity which has attracted exceptional attention from physicists in connection with the discovery of new classes of ceramic oxides which are superconducting at liquid-nitrogen temperature. The electron structure is one of the three whales on which all of superconductivity rests. It is frequently our ignorance of the electronic properties of a metal, alloy or compound in its normal state which makes it impossible to predict superconductivity in the material, preventing use from calculating the parameters of the superconducting state. There are now a number of effective methods for investigation of the electron structure of the metals and allows. This collection discusses metal optics, tunneling and magnetic measurements in superconductors. These methods are quite informative and allow us to obtain many important electron characteristics and temperature relations. Various characteristics of the superconducting compounds Nb{sub 3}Ge, Nb{sub 3}Al, nb{sub 3}Sn and Nb{sub 3}Ga with A15 structure and NbN with B1 structure, having rather high critical temperatures, are experimentally studied.

  17. Ferromagnetic/Superconducting Multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, S. D.

    1998-03-01

    Although it is well known that magnetism influences superconductivity, the converse issue has been less well explored. Recent theoretical predictions for ferromagnetic/ superconducting/ ferromagnetic trilayers exhibiting interlayer magnetic coupling in the normal state indicate that the coupling should be suppressed below the superconducting transition temperature.(C.A. R. Sá de Melo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79), 1933 (1997); O. Sipr, B.L. Györffy, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 7, 5239 (1995). To realize such a situation, a requirement (when the magnetic layers are thick) is that the superconducting layer thickness must simultaneously be less than the range over which the magnetic interlayer coupling decays, but greater than the superconducting coherence length. This introduces serious materials constraints. The present work describes initial explorations of three sputtered multilayer systems in an attempt to observe coupling of the ferromagnetic layers across a superconducting spacer:((a) J.E. Mattson, R.M. Osgood III, C.D. Potter, C.H. Sowers, and S.D. Bader, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 15), 1774 (1997); (b) J.E. Mattson, C.D. Potter, M.J. Conover, C.H. Sowers, and S.D. Bader, Phys. Rev. B 55, 70 (1997), and (c) R.M. Osgood III, J.E. Pearson, C.H. Sowers, and S.D. Bader, submitted (1997). (a) Ni/Nb, (b) Fe_4N/NbN, and (c) GdN/NbN. In these systems we have retained thinner superconducting layers than had been achieved previously, but interlayer magnetic coupling is not observed even in the normal state. For Ni/Nb the interfacial Ni loses its moment, which also reduces the superconducting pair-breaking. GdN is an insulating ferromagnet, so itinerancy is sacrificed, and, probably as a result of this, no coupling is observed. Each system gives rise to interesting and anisotropic superconducting properties. Thus, although the goal remains elusive, our search highlights the challenges and opportunities.

  18. Super-Hard induced gap in InSb nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Yu, Peng; Hocevar, Moïra; Plissard, Sébastien; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Frolov, Sergey

    In recent years, Majorana bound states were observed experimentally in InSb nanowire-superconductor hybrid devices, which manifested themselves as a zero-bias conductance peak (ZBP). However, there was still significant conductance inside the superconducting gap, which would smear sub-gap features. Moreover, fermionic states inside the gap would also break topological protection. Therefore, a hard gap is required in search of more deterministic signatures of Majorana bound states, and building up Majorana qubits. We report the observation of a hard induced gap in an InSb Josephson junction with an optimized superconducting contact recipe. The gap is resolved in magnetic field up to 2 Tesla, and demonstrates a peculiar kinked field dependence. In addition, we observed rich sub-gap features: Andreev levels appeared close to pinch off regime, while multiple Andreev reflection appeared in open regime.

  19. Effect of Temperature on Microstructure, Corrosion Resistance, and Toughness of Salt Bath Nitrided Tool Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Hangtao; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Jinfeng; Lian, Yong; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a type of hot work tool steel was modified through salt bath nitriding for 4 h at 540 and 560 °C, and post-oxidation was subsequently performed. Surface and cross-sectional hardness test results revealed that the surface hardness increased after the treatment because of the formation of compound layers and diffusion zones. Microstructures and phase analyses showed that more homogeneous compound layers and Fe3O4-phase could be generated after treatment at 560 than at 540 °C. As a result, the corrosion potential was elevated, and the corrosion current density was clearly reduced. The thickness and porosity of the compound layer were also increased with the elevated nitriding temperature. Because of the nitrogen atom solution, XRD diffraction peaks broadened, and the position of the peaks shifted to a lower angle in different degrees at different depths, thus showing the same tendency as the hardness curves. Salt bath nitriding significantly deteriorated the impact toughness from 32.3 to 5.2 J.

  20. Surface nitriding and oxidation of nitinol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazochaharbakhsh, Edin

    Nitinol has been widely employed in biomedical devices due to its unique mechanical properties such as superelasticity, shape memory, and good biocompatibility. However, nickel ion release from the surface of the Nitinol is an issue. Surface nitriding and oxidation was performed on the Nitinol specimens to develop a nickel-free oxide layer on the surface. Nitinol specimens were nitrided in nitrogen + 4% hydrogen at 800--1000°C for 10--30 min and further nitrided in nitrogen + 5% ammonia at 500--675°C for 0--30 min. The thickness and chemical composition, specifically the nickel content of the surface layer, were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The effect of the nitriding time and temperature on the thickness and chemical composition of the nitride layer was evaluated. Nitriding temperature was found to be more effective than nitriding time on the thickness of TiN layer. Titanium nitride, the dominant phase on the surface of the nitrided specimens, was nickel free. The nitrided Nitinol specimens were then oxidized at 675°C and 700°C for 30 and 60 min, respectively. The chemical composition and elemental depth profile showed that oxidizing Nitinol specimens with a 0.4 microm thick nitride layer on the surface did not provide a nickel-free oxide layer on the surface of the Nitinol. However, oxidizing the Nitinol specimens with a surface nitride layer that was thicker than 6 microm resulted in a nickel-free oxide layer.

  1. Analysis of plasma-nitrided steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.; Ferrante, J.; Honecy, F.; Hoffman, R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of plasma nitrided steels can be divided to two main categories - structural and chemical. Structural analysis can provide information not only on the hardening mechanisms but also on the fundamental processes involved. Chemical analysis can be used to study the kinetics for the nitriding process and its mechanisms. In this paper preliminary results obtained by several techniques of both categories are presented and the applicability of those techniques to the analysis of plasma-nitrided steels is discussed.

  2. Structures behind superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.

    1988-07-01

    The previously reported preparation and structures of superconducting materials are reviewed. The two systems, Y-Ba-Cu-O and La-Cu-O, previously reported with high transition temperatures are discussed in some detail. The new systems introduced in 1987 that were not based on a rare earth but including Bi-Sr-Cu-O are also reviewed. Superconductive materials including thallium rather than bismuth that have been reported but not thoroughly studied are discussed briefly. It is pointed out that many superconducting materials have been prepared, but good documentation of the structures and properties of these materials need much more study.

  3. Superconductivity in doped insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    It is shown that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals``, with such a poor conductivity that the usual meanfield theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. It is argued that the supression of a first order phase transition (phase separation) by the long-range Coulomb interaction leads to high temperature superconductivity accompanied by static or dynamical charge inhomogeneIty. Evidence in support of this picture for high temperature superconductors is described.

  4. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  5. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  6. Tunneling in superconducting structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.

    2010-12-01

    Here we review our results on the breakpoint features in the coupled system of IJJ obtained in the framework of the capacitively coupled Josephson junction model with diffusion current. A correspondence between the features in the current voltage characteristics (CVC) and the character of the charge oscillations in superconducting layers is demonstrated. Investigation of the correlations of superconducting currents in neighboring Josephson junctions and the charge correlations in neighboring superconducting layers reproduces the features in the CVC and gives a powerful method for the analysis of the CVC of coupled Josephson junctions. A new method for determination of the dissipation parameter is suggested.

  7. Nanomechanical properties and nanotribology of ternary metal nitrides nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihut, Dorina M.

    Ternary metal nitride nanocomposite thin films have great potential as hard protective coatings for applications where high hardness, good wear resistance, high corrosion resistance and low surface roughness are required. The aim of the present research was to investigate nanocomposite thin films of Metal-BN and Metal-ZrN types (e.g. Cr-BN, Ti-BN, Cr-ZrN, Nb-ZrN and Inconel-ZrN), to explore their deposition conditions, nanomechanical properties and nanotribological behavior. Ternary metal nitride nanocomposite thin films were produced by DC unbalanced magnetron sputtering. Nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of thin films were characterized using a Hysistron Triboscope in conjunction with an atomic force microscope. The study aims to provide a better understanding of the correlation between static nanomechanical properties (nanohardness (H), elastic modulus (E), H/E and H3/E2 ratio) and dynamic properties (resulting from nanoscratch and nanowear measurements) for three groups of Metal-ZrN thin films (Inconel-ZrN, Cr-ZrN and Nb-ZrN) and monolayer polycrystalline ZrN thin films. It was demonstrated for the first time that elastic recovery after nanoscratching may be a better predictor of wear-resistance than conventional static nanoindentation testing, H/E and H3/E2 ratio evaluations that are currently used in the area of thin films, especially wear coatings. In order to predict the best ternary metal nitride thin film compositions for abrasive wear resistant applications (dry and lubricated contacts), the nanotribological performances for three groups of Metal-ZrN: Inconel-ZrN, Cr-ZrN, Nb-ZrN and ZrN thin films have been correlated with surface energy evaluation. Additionally, the chemical composition and microstructure of Me-BN and Me-ZrN thin films were investigated using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy, as well as analyzing their optical properties using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The chemical

  8. The effects of laser surface modification on the microstructure and properties of gas-nitrided 42CrMo4 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulka, M.; Panfil, D.; Michalski, J.; Wach, P.

    2016-08-01

    Gas nitriding, together with gas carburizing and gas carbonitriding, was the most commonly used thermochemical treatment, resulting in many advantageous properties: high hardness, enhanced corrosion resistance, considerably improved wear resistance and fatigue strength. However, an unfavorable increase in the thickness of compound layer (ε+γ‧) close to the surface was observed after conventional gas nitriding. This was the reason for undesirable embrittlement and flaking. Therefore, a controlled gas nitriding was developed, reducing the thickness of compound layer. In this study, laser modification with or without re-melting was carried out after the controlled gas nitriding in order to change microstructure and to improve wear resistance. The effects of laser beam power on the dimensions of simple laser tracks were analyzed. It enabled to control the obtained microstructure and to select the laser processing parameters during producing the multiple tracks. Such a treatment was necessary to investigate wear resistance. Laser re-melting resulted in dissolving the majority of nitrides as well as in producing the martensitic structure in re-melted and heat-affected zones. This treatment required argon shielding in order to protect the surface against uncontrolled oxidation. Laser heat treatment without re-melting caused a modification of ε nitrides which became less porous and more compact. Simultaneously, it provided heat-affected zone with the partially martensitic structure of increased hardness below compound zone. Argon shielding was not necessary in this case because of the resistance of nitrides to oxidation during rapid heating and cooling. All the laser-modified layers, irrespective if the nitrided layer was re-melted or not, were characterized by the improved wear resistance compared to the typical gas-nitrided layer.

  9. Silicon Nitride Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Pazhayannur; Brown, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This report presents the development a global, multi-phase equation of state (EOS) for the ceramic silicon nitride (Si3N4) . Structural forms include amorphous silicon nitride normally used as a thin film and three crystalline polymorphs. Crystalline phases include hexagonal α-Si3N4, hexagonalβ-Si3N4, and the cubic spinel c-Si3N4. Decomposition at about 1900 °C results in a liquid silicon phase and gas phase products such as molecular nitrogen, atomic nitrogen, and atomic silicon. The silicon nitride EOS was developed using EOSPro which is a new and extended version of the PANDA II code. Both codes are valuable tools and have been used successfully for a variety of material classes. Both PANDA II and EOSPro can generate a tabular EOS that can be used in conjunction with hydrocodes. The paper describes the development efforts for the component solid phases and presents results obtained using the EOSPro phase transition model to investigate the solid-solid phase transitions in relation to the available shock data. Furthermore, the EOSPro mixture model is used to develop a model for the decomposition products and then combined with the single component solid models to study the global phase diagram. Sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Living With a Star program office.

  10. Shock Response of Silicon Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, D. P.; Casem, D. T.; Motoyashiki, Y.; Sato, E.

    2009-06-01

    Silicon nitride is suitable for varied applications. The properties of silicon nitride have been tailored through processing and doping. The current work presents shock response of silicon nitride marketed as SN282. The density of this material, 3.4 Mg/m^3, exceeds its single crystal density due to the presence of lutetium oxide as an additive in ca. 5% by weight in the material. While the average grain size is 3.4 microns, aspect ratio of the grains exceed 3. Preliminary results of shock wave experiments may be summarized as follows: (1) The Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) of SN282 is 11.2 GPa. (2) The magnitude of the inelastic wave velocity just above the HEL is 8.73 km/s, suggesting that inelastic deformation above the HEL is due to shock induced plasticity in the material. (3) The estimated value of the spall strength is 0.5 GPa. The spall strength of SN282 remains unchanged even when shocked beyond the HEL. The non-vanishing spall strength suggests that doping plays a role in the retention of spall strength of SN282. The role of doping needs to be further investigated.

  11. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  12. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  13. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, John D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  14. Supertubes and Superconducting Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Ruben; Miguel-Pilar, Zelin

    2007-02-09

    We show the equivalence between configurations that arise from string theory of type IIA, called supertubes, and superconducting membranes at the bosonic level. We find equilibrium and oscillating configurations for a tubular membrane carrying a current along its axis.

  15. Hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Tixador, P.; Hiebel, P.; Brunet, Y.

    1996-07-01

    Superconductors, especially high T{sub c} ones, are the most attractive materials to design stable and fully passive magnetic suspensions which have to control five degrees of freedom. The hybrid superconducting magnetic suspensions present high performances and a simple cooling mode. They consist of a permanent magnet bearing, stabilized by a suitable magnet-superconductor structure. Several designs are given and compared in terms of forces and stiffnesses. The design of the magnet bearing plays an important part. The superconducting magnetic bearing participates less in levitation but must provide a high stabilizing stiffness. This is achieved by the magnet configuration, a good material in term of critical current density and field cooling. A hybrid superconducting suspension for a flywheel is presented. This system consists of a magnet thrust bearing stabilized by superconductors interacting with an alternating polarity magnet structure. First tests and results are reported. Superconducting materials are magnetically melt-textured YBaCuO.

  16. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  17. Superconductive ceramic oxide combination

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, D.K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Mir, J.M.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes the combination of a superconductive ceramic oxide which degrades in conductivity upon contact of ambient air with its surface and, interposed between the ceramic oxide surface and ambient air in the amount of at least 1 mg per square meter of surface area of the superconductive ceramic oxide, a passivant polymer selected from the group consisting of a polyester ionomer and an alkyl cellulose.

  18. Electron pairing without superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Joshua P; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Hellberg, C Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-05-14

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances-paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. PMID:25971511

  19. Electron pairing without superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guanglei; Tomczyk, Michelle; Lu, Shicheng; Veazey, Joshua P.; Huang, Mengchen; Irvin, Patrick; Ryu, Sangwoo; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Hellberg, C. Stephen; Levy, Jeremy

    2015-05-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity.

  20. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bozovic, Ivan; Logvenov, Gennady; Gozar, Adrian Mihai

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  1. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  2. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  3. Electron pairing without superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is the first and best known superconducting semiconductor. It exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to that of high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. Despite sustained interest for 50 years, direct experimental insight into the nature of electron pairing in SrTiO3 has remained elusive. Here we perform transport experiments with nanowire-based single-electron transistors at the interface between SrTiO3 and a thin layer of lanthanum aluminate, LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical pairing field Bp of about 1-4 tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For magnetic fields below Bp, these resonances are insensitive to the applied magnetic field; for fields in excess of Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as 900 millikelvin, well above the superconducting transition temperature (about 300 millikelvin). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by a model involving an attractive Hubbard interaction that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. Support from AFOSR, ONR, ARO, NSF, DOE and NSSEFF is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1989-01-01

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non-superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propogating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N.sup.2 ambiguity of charged particle events.

  5. Superconducting transmission line particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, K.E.

    1988-07-28

    A microvertex particle detector for use in a high energy physic collider including a plurality of parallel superconducting thin film strips separated from a superconducting ground plane by an insulating layer to form a plurality of superconducting waveguides. The microvertex particle detector indicates passage of a charged subatomic particle by measuring a voltage pulse measured across a superconducting waveguide caused by the transition of the superconducting thin film strip from a superconducting to a non- superconducting state in response to the passage of a charged particle. A plurality of superconducting thin film strips in two orthogonal planes plus the slow electromagnetic wave propagating in a superconducting transmission line are used to resolve N/sup 2/ ambiguity of charged particle events. 6 figs.

  6. Aluminum nitride, Scandium nitride, and Aluminum-Scandium-Nitride ternary alloys : Structural, optical, and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ruopeng

    Al and Sc are iso-electric, both of which have three valence electrons. Their nitrides AlN and ScN both have high melting points, high hardness, and good chemical inertness. And their distinct properties find applications in different areas: AlN in piezoelectric acoustic-wave devices, and ScN as candidate for high-temperature thermoelectricity. While there are unsettled problems to solve for AlN and ScN alone, which are to obtain tilted c-axis texture in AlN for shear mode acoustic-wave devices to maximize performance, and to determine electronic band structure of ScN that has been long debated due to free carrier effect, the alloying between AlN and ScN is also intriguing in that the ternary alloy Al-Sc-N connects their similarity and opens even wider possibility and greater potential. The significantly enhanced piezoelectric coefficient in the alloy compared to pure AlN is one of the best examples that is little understood, and alternate bandgap engineering in LED fabrication would probably be another contribution from the alloy. Structural, optical, and electrical properties of AlN, ScN, and Al-Sc-N ternary alloys are thus studied in order to answer these questions, and to explore more fundamental physics characteristics within these nitride materials. For the purpose of achieving tilted c-axis texture in AlN, off-axis deposition is conducted with a variable deposition angle α = 0-84° in 5 mTorr pure N2 at room temperature. XRD pole figure analysis show that layers deposited from a normal angle (α = 0°) exhibit fiber texture, with the c-axis tilted by 42+/-2° off the substrate normal. However, as α is increased to 45°, two preferred in-plane grain orientations emerge, with populations I and II having the c-axis tilted towards and away from the deposition flux, by 53+/-2° and 47+/-1° off the substrate normal, respectively. Increasing alpha further to 65 and 84°, results in the development of a single population II with a 43+/-1° tilt. The observed tilt

  7. Titanium thermodiffusional nitriding by CO{sub 2} laser: Process parameters controlling the nitride growth

    SciTech Connect

    L`Enfant, H.; Laurens, P.; Catherine, M.C.S.

    1996-12-31

    Solid state nitriding of titanium under cw CO{sub 2} laser was investigated. The nitriding kinetics were studied in the case of CO{sub 2} laser treatment in isothermal conditions, and were compared to those obtained by using a conventional heating system. Identical kinetics rate constants and activation energy were obtained; therefore CO{sub 2} irradiation of the titanium surface did not influence nitride growth. Studying nitriding treatment in non isothermal conditions showed that high heating rates induced modifications of the nitride morphology (compared to isothermal treatments). At last, the authors investigated the evolution of the CO{sub 2}-surface coupling during the nitriding treatment. It was found that it depended only on the surface temperature and the substrate surface roughness since the growth of a few micrometers thick nitride layer did not modify the coupling.

  8. How 'hard' are hard-rock deformations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, A. J.

    2003-04-01

    The study of soft-rock deformations has received increasing attention during the past two decades, and much progress has been made in the understanding of their genesis. It is also recognized now that soft-rock deformations—which show a wide variety in size and shape—occur frequently in sediments deposited in almost all types of environments. In spite of this, deformations occurring in lithified rocks are still relatively rarely attributed to sedimentary or early-diagenetic processes. Particularly faults in hard rocks are still commonly ascribed to tectonics, commonly without a discussion about a possible non-tectonic origin at a stage that the sediments were still unlithified. Misinterpretations of both the sedimentary and the structural history of hard-rock successions may result from the negligence of a possible soft-sediment origin of specific deformations. It is therefore suggested that a re-evaluation of these histories, keeping the present-day knowledge about soft-sediment deformations in mind, may give new insights into the geological history of numerous sedimentary successions in which the deformations have not been studied from both a sedimentological and a structural point of view.

  9. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, Joshua (Inventor); Hubbell, Theodore E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A surface of a steel substrate is nitrided without external heating by exposing it to a beam of nitrogen ions under low pressure, a pressure much lower than that employed for ion-nitriding. An ion source is used instead of a glow discharge. Both of these features reduce the introduction of impurities into the substrate surface.

  10. Titanium carbon nitride coating. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, S.D.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the advantages of titanium carbon nitride (TiCN) coated tools. Cutting tests were conducted comparing TiCN coating directly against titanium nitride (TiN) coated and uncoated T-15 CPM end mills.

  11. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  12. Feasibility study of silicon nitride regenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fucinari, C. A.; Rao, V. D. N.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of silicon nitride as a regenerator matrix material for applications requiring inlet temperatures above 1000 C is examined. The present generation oxide ceramics are used as a reference to examine silicon nitride from a material characteristics, manufacturing, thermal stress and aerothermodynamic viewpoint.

  13. Silicon surface passivation by silicon nitride deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Silicon nitride deposition was studied as a method of passivation for silicon solar cell surfaces. The following three objectives were the thrust of the research: (1) the use of pecvd silicon nitride for passivation of silicon surfaces; (2) measurement techniques for surface recombination velocity; and (3) the importance of surface passivation to high efficiency solar cells.

  14. An evaluation of indentation and finishing properties of bearing grade silicon nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, J.F.; Gardos, M.N.; Hardisty, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the results of studies of the machining performance and the indentation hardness and fracture toughness of different silicon nitride materials as part of an effort to better define the optimum machining conditions for bearing components. This work builds on prior efforts by two of the authors, Gardos and Hardisty (1993) who formulated a simple relationship between diamond grinding performance of silicon nitride bearing balls and a wear equation first detailed by Evans and Wilshaw (1976). The goal of this present work was to determine the general applicability of such a relationship, i.e., could simple indentation studies be used to define finishing conditions for different silicon nitride materials? The availability of such a simple test would reduce the time required for developing an acceptable process when a supplier changes his formulation, or when a new material becomes available. Quicker development of optimum finishing conditions would eventually result in a lower-cost product for users. The initial study by Gardos and Hardisty (1993) was based on limited data taken at a fixed set of conditions. This study expanded the range of conditions evaluated and the number of ceramic materials studied in an effort to define the universality of the relationship between grinding wear, hardness, and toughness. This study has shown that no simple relationship like that first envisioned by the authors exists. The results showed that the grinding wear of the individual silicon nitride materials increased at different rates as a function of load. Because of the differences found in the load dependence of grinding rates, no simple relationship between hardness, fracture toughness, and grinding rate could be found that fit the data over the range of conditions studied.

  15. Nitriding of large-sized aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Shigeru; Yoshida, Kazuharu; Sato, Shin-ichi

    1996-06-01

    Aluminum chips with 2mm in size have been successfully nitrided with 99.3% of conversion, using yttrium oxide as a promoter. The product consisted of hollow spheres with 2mm in dia. and fine particles of aluminum nitride. This nitriding is divided into two steps. In the first step, nitriding begins from the surface of aluminum chip. Because the surface is activated by the addition of yttrium oxide, the reaction heat raises the temperature of aluminum enough to generate the aluminum vapor, followed by the second step; exothermic reaction of aluminum vapor and nitrogen gas. In addition, to accelerate the first step without additive, electrolytic etching was applied to aluminum wires with 2mm in dia. In this case, aluminum wires were also completely nitrided.

  16. Alloy Effects on the Gas Nitriding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Sisson, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    Alloy elements, such as Al, Cr, V, and Mo, have been used to improve the nitriding performance of steels. In the present work, plain carbon steel AISI 1045 and alloy steel AISI 4140 were selected to compare the nitriding effects of the alloying elements in AISI 4140. Fundamental analysis is carried out by using the "Lehrer-like" diagrams (alloy specific Lehrer diagram and nitriding potential versus nitrogen concentration diagram) and the compound layer growth model to simulate the gas nitriding process. With this method, the fundamental understanding for the alloy effect based on the thermodynamics and kinetics becomes possible. This new method paves the way for the development of new alloy for nitriding.

  17. Macroscopic Models of Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. J.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. After giving a description of the basic physical phenomena to be modelled, we begin by formulating a sharp -interface free-boundary model for the destruction of superconductivity by an applied magnetic field, under isothermal and anisothermal conditions, which takes the form of a vectorial Stefan model similar to the classical scalar Stefan model of solid/liquid phase transitions and identical in certain two-dimensional situations. This model is found sometimes to have instabilities similar to those of the classical Stefan model. We then describe the Ginzburg-Landau theory of superconductivity, in which the sharp interface is 'smoothed out' by the introduction of an order parameter, representing the number density of superconducting electrons. By performing a formal asymptotic analysis of this model as various parameters in it tend to zero we find that the leading order solution does indeed satisfy the vectorial Stefan model. However, at the next order we find the emergence of terms analogous to those of 'surface tension' and 'kinetic undercooling' in the scalar Stefan model. Moreover, the 'surface energy' of a normal/superconducting interface is found to take both positive and negative values, defining Type I and Type II superconductors respectively. We discuss the response of superconductors to external influences by considering the nucleation of superconductivity with decreasing magnetic field and with decreasing temperature respectively, and find there to be a pitchfork bifurcation to a superconducting state which is subcritical for Type I superconductors and supercritical for Type II superconductors. We also examine the effects of boundaries on the nucleation field, and describe in more detail the nature of the superconducting solution in Type II superconductors--the so-called 'mixed state'. Finally, we present some open questions concerning both the modelling and analysis of

  18. Superconducting wind turbine generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsen, A. B.; Mijatovic, N.; Seiler, E.; Zirngibl, T.; Træholt, C.; Nørgård, P. B.; Pedersen, N. F.; Andersen, N. H.; Østergård, J.

    2010-03-01

    We have examined the potential of 10 MW superconducting direct drive generators to enter the European offshore wind power market and estimated that the production of about 1200 superconducting turbines until 2030 would correspond to 10% of the EU offshore market. The expected properties of future offshore turbines of 8 and 10 MW have been determined from an up-scaling of an existing 5 MW turbine and the necessary properties of the superconducting drive train are discussed. We have found that the absence of the gear box is the main benefit and the reduced weight and size is secondary. However, the main challenge of the superconducting direct drive technology is to prove that the reliability is superior to the alternative drive trains based on gearboxes or permanent magnets. A strategy of successive testing of superconducting direct drive trains in real wind turbines of 10 kW, 100 kW, 1 MW and 10 MW is suggested to secure the accumulation of reliability experience. Finally, the quantities of high temperature superconducting tape needed for a 10 kW and an extreme high field 10 MW generator are found to be 7.5 km and 1500 km, respectively. A more realistic estimate is 200-300 km of tape per 10 MW generator and it is concluded that the present production capacity of coated conductors must be increased by a factor of 36 by 2020, resulting in a ten times lower price of the tape in order to reach a realistic price level for the superconducting drive train.

  19. Characterization of titanium chromium nitride nanocomposite protective coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouadi, S. M.; Wong, K. C.; Mitchell, K. A. R.; Namavar, F.; Tobin, E.; Mihut, D. M.; Rohde, S. L.

    2004-05-01

    The structural, chemical, optical and mechanical properties of titanium chromium nitride nanocrystalline films deposited by ion beam-assisted deposition were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, nanoindentation and wear testing. Coatings were deposited on silicon and stainless steel substrates with growth temperatures of 150 and 400 °C. The concentration of titanium and chromium in the film was regulated by controlling their evaporation rates. The nitrogen concentration was controlled by varying the nitrogen ion current. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements indicated that the films deposited at 150 °C formed solid solutions whereas those produced at 400 °C formed nanocomposites. The optical constants were measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry. A correlation between the elemental/phase composition and optical constants was established. The mechanical properties of the coatings were evaluated using nanohardness testing and were found to depend on composition. The nanocomposite films were the hardest (hardness of 30 GPa and elastic modulus of 300 GPa). Tribological properties of titanium chromium nitride coated 440 C stainless steel coupons were evaluated using a ball-on-disk tribometer. These tests were conducted under a load of 50 N for 1.5 million cycles at 180 rpm. Coatings deposited at high temperature did not show any signs of wear.

  20. Radiation tolerance of piezoelectric bulk single-crystal aluminum nitride

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Parks; Bernhard R. Tittmann

    2014-07-01

    For practical use in harsh radiation environments, we pose selection criteria for piezoelectric materials for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and material characterization. Using these criteria, piezoelectric aluminum nitride is shown to be an excellent candidate. The results of tests on an aluminumnitride-based transducer operating in a nuclear reactor are also presented. We demonstrate the tolerance of single-crystal piezoelectric aluminum nitride after fast and thermal neutron fluences of 1.85 × 1018 neutron/cm2 and 5.8 × 1018 neutron/cm2, respectively, and a gamma dose of 26.8 MGy. The radiation hardness of AlN is most evident from the unaltered piezoelectric coefficient d33, which measured 5.5 pC/N after a fast and thermal neutron exposure in a nuclear reactor core for over 120 MWh, in agreement with the published literature value. The results offer potential for improving reactor safety and furthering the understanding of radiation effects on materials by enabling structural health monitoring and NDE in spite of the high levels of radiation and high temperatures, which are known to destroy typical commercial ultrasonic transducers.

  1. Molten-Salt-Based Growth of Group III Nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Waldrip, Karen E.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Kerley, Thomas M.

    2008-10-14

    A method for growing Group III nitride materials using a molten halide salt as a solvent to solubilize the Group-III ions and nitride ions that react to form the Group III nitride material. The concentration of at least one of the nitride ion or Group III cation is determined by electrochemical generation of the ions.

  2. Low Temperature Unbalanced Magnetron Deposition of Hard, Wear-Resistant Coatings for Liquid-Film Bearing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sproul, William D.

    1996-01-01

    The original program for evaluating the tribological properties several different hard coatings for liquid film bearing applications was curtailed when the time for the program was reduced from 3 years to 1. Of the several different coatings originally planned for evaluation, we decided to concentrate on one coating, carbon nitride. At BIRL, we have been instrumental in the development of reactively sputtered carbon nitride coatings, and we have found that it is a very interesting new material with very good tribological properties. In this program, we found that the reactively sputtered carbon nitride does not bond well directly to hardened 440C stainless steel; but if an interlayer of titanium nitride is added between the carbon nitride and the 440C, the adhesion of the dual coating combination is very good. Statistically designed experiments were run with the dual layer combination, and 3 variables were chosen for the Box-Benken design, which were the titanium nitride interlayer thickness, the nitrogen partial pressure during the reactive sputtering of the carbon nitride, and the carbon nitride substrate bias voltage. Two responses were studied from these three variables; the adhesion of the dual coating combination to the 440C substrate and the friction coefficient of the carbon nitride in dry sliding contact with 52100 steel in air. The best adhesion came with the thickness interlayer thickness studied, which was 4 micrometers, and the lowest coefficient of friction was 0.1, which was achieved when the bias voltage was in the range of -80 to - 120 V and the nitrogen partial pressure was 3 mTorr.

  3. The Powder-Pack Nitriding Process: Growth Kinetics of Nitride Layers on Pure Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Ortiz-Dominguez, M.; Elias-Espinosa, M.; Vega-Morón, R. C.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Figueroa-López, U.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of nitride layers that develop during the powder-pack nitriding process on the surface of ARMCO pure iron was estimated. The powder-pack nitriding of pure iron was performed according to the Pulnieren© (H.E.F. Durferrit) method using a "Pulnier" powder and an activator, at 798-848 K with different exposure times (2-12 h) for each temperature. In addition, for the entire set of nitriding conditions, three different activator/"Pulnier" powder ratios (0.20, 0.25, and 0.35) were used to evaluate the activation level during the growth of nitride layers. The kinetics of the nitride layers over the surface of ARMCO pure iron were estimated by two mathematical approaches, that consider the mass balance equations at the growth interphases. The resulting expressions for the effective diffusion coefficients in the nitride layers were evaluated as a function of nitriding temperatures and activator/"Pulnier" powder ratio. Finally, based on the experimental parameters ascribed to the powder-pack nitriding process, two expressions were proposed to estimate the nitride layer thicknesses at 798 and 823 K after 9 h of exposure for each temperature, to validate the diffusion models used in this work.

  4. Physicochemical characteristics of the internal nitriding of multicomponent alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, L.G.

    1995-07-01

    Internal nitriding is the saturation of the deep layers of an alloy with nitrogen, which produces a structure composed of disperse nitride particles distributed in a solid solution. This distinguishes internal nitriding from conventional nitriding where a continuous nitride zone is formed in the surface layer. Therefore, internal nitrogenization, as in other processes of alloy saturation with implantation elements (e.g., internal oxidation), ensures the disperse strengthening of the alloy. The degree of strengthening is dependent on the amount and dispersion of the evolved nitrides and is associated with their thermodynamic stability and coagulation resistance. The study of the characteristics of internal nitriding of multicomponent alloys is of interest.

  5. Dense and homogenous silicon nitride composites containing carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Osendi, M I; Gautheron, F; Miranzo, P; Belmonte, M

    2009-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) materials with 1.8 and 5.3 vol.% of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were densified using 7 wt% of sintering additives (Y2O3 +Al2O3). The mixing and sintering procedures produced quite homogenous and dense MWCNT/Si3N4 composites. The nanotubes condition was followed by micro-Raman spectroscopy and no alteration was observed in spite of the relatively high sintering temperatures (approximately 1600 degrees C). Mechanical parameters (hardness, elastic modulus and fracture toughness) of the composites and comparative blank specimens were measured by instrumented indentation and discussed in parallel. Thermal conductivity was also estimated for these specimens. The nanotube orientation effect inherent to pressure assisted sintering methods and the weak interfacial bond between nanotubes and Si3N4 are important factors to explain the mechanical and thermal behaviours of these composites. PMID:19908514

  6. Microstructure and abrasive wear in silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Cynthia P.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2001-10-01

    It is well known that abrasive wear resistance is not strictly a materials property, but also depends upon the specific conditions of the wear environment. Nonetheless, characteristics of the ceramic microstructure do influence its hardness and fracture toughness and must, therefore, play an active role in determining howa ceramic will respond to the specific stress states imposed upon it by the wear environment. In this study, the ways in which composition and microstructure influence the abrasive wear behavior of six commercially-produced silicon nitride based ceramics are examined. Results indicate that microstructural parameters, such as matrix grain size and orientation, porosity, and grain boundary microstructure, and thermal expansion mismatch stresses created as the result of second phase formation, influence the wear rate through their effect on wear sheet formation and subsurface fracture. It is also noted that the potential impact of these variables on the wear rate may not be reflected in conventional fracture toughness measurements.

  7. Nitride and carbide coatings for high speed steel cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Hard nitride and carbide coatings of Ti, Zr, and Hf were deposited by physical vapor deposition processes on high-speed steel cutting tools to determine their effectiveness in improving the wear properties of the inserts and increasing cutting-tool performance. A collaborative research program involving industrial, university, and government laboratories was established to develop coating processes and tool wear models, to characterize the coating properties and the effect of process parameters on the coating properties, and to evaluate the cutting performance of coated inserts. Two coating processes were selected for investigation: high-rate reactive sputtering and activated reactive evaporation. The lifetimes of coated inserts were extended 2 to 10 times, depending on the coating composition and process. Analysis of the wear modes that occurred during the cutting tests indicated that the coatings failed by fracture after plastic deformation of the underlying substrate occurred as a result of substrate softening at the high cutting speeds. 14 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Nanotribological performance of fullerene-like carbon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Ruiz, Francisco Javier; Enriquez-Flores, Christian Ivan; Chiñas-Castillo, Fernando; Espinoza-Beltrán, Francisco Javier

    2014-09-01

    Fullerene-like carbon nitride films exhibit high elastic modulus and low friction coefficient. In this study, thin CNx films were deposited on silicon substrate by DC magnetron sputtering and the tribological behavior at nanoscale was evaluated using an atomic force microscope. Results show that CNx films with fullerene-like structure have a friction coefficient (CoF ∼ 0.009-0.022) that is lower than amorphous CNx films (CoF ∼ 0.028-0.032). Analysis of specimens characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that films with fullerene-like structure have a higher number of sp3 CN bonds and exhibit the best mechanical properties with high values of elastic modulus (E > 180 GPa) and hardness (H > 20 GPa). The elastic recovery determined on specimens with a fullerene-like CNx structure was of 95% while specimens of amorphous CNx structure had only 75% elastic recovery.

  9. Hard tissue laser procedures.

    PubMed

    Gimbel, C B

    2000-10-01

    A more conservative, less invasive treatment of the carious lesion has intrigued researchers and clinicians for decades. With over 170 million restorations placed worldwide each year, many of which could be treated using a laser, there exists an increasing need for understanding hard tissue laser procedures. An historical review of past scientific and clinical hard research, biophysics, and histology are discussed. A complete review of present applications and procedures along with their capabilities and limitations will give the clinician a better understanding. Clinical case studies, along with guidelines for tooth preparation and hard tissue laser applications and technological advances for diagnosis and treatment will give the clinician a look into the future. PMID:11048281

  10. Synthesis of transition metal nitride by nitridation of metastable oxide precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Huamin; Wu, Zijie; Kong, Jing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Minghui

    2012-10-15

    Metastable transition metal oxides were used as precursors to synthesize transition metal nitrides at low temperature. Amorphous MoO{sub 2} was prepared by reduction of (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24} solution with hydrazine. As-synthesized amorphous MoO{sub 2} was transformed into fcc {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N at 400 Degree-Sign C and then into hexagonal {delta}-MoN by further increasing the temperature to 600 Degree-Sign C under a NH{sub 3} flow. The nitridation temperature employed here is much lower than that employed in nitridation of crystalline materials, and the amorphous materials underwent a unique nitridation process. Besides this, the bimetallic nitride Ni{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}N was also synthesized by nitridating amorphous bimetallic precursor. These results suggested that the nitridation of amorphous precursor possessed potential to be a general method for synthesizing many interstitial metallic compounds, such as nitrides and carbides at low temperature. - graphical abstract: Amorphous oxide was used as new precursor to prepare nitride at low temperature. Pure {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and {delta}-MoN were obtained at 400 Degree-Sign C and at 600 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We bring out a new method to synthesize transition metal nitrides at low temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both mono- and bimetallic molybdenum nitrides were synthesized at a mild condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of two different molybdenum nitrides {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and {delta}-MoN can be controlled from the same metastable precursor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nitridation temperature was much lower than that reported from crystalline precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metastable precursor had different reaction process in comparison with crystalline precursor.

  11. Electron Pairing Without Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Jeremy; Cheng, G.; Tomczyk, M.; Lu, S.; Veazey, J. P.; Huang, M.; Irvin, P.; Ryu, S.; Lee, H.; Eom, C.-B.; Hellberg, C. S.

    2015-03-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) exhibits an extremely low carrier density threshold for superconductivity, and possesses a phase diagram similar to high-temperature superconductors--two factors that suggest an unconventional pairing mechanism. We describe transport experiments with nanowire-based quantum dots localized at the interface between SrTiO3 and LaAlO3. Electrostatic gating of the quantum dot reveals a series of two-electron conductance resonances--paired electron states--that bifurcate above a critical magnetic field Bp 1-4 Tesla, an order of magnitude larger than the superconducting critical magnetic field. For B Bp, the resonances exhibit a linear Zeeman-like energy splitting. Electron pairing is stable at temperatures as high as T = 900 mK, far above the superconducting transition temperature (Tc 300 mK). These experiments demonstrate the existence of a robust electronic phase in which electrons pair without forming a superconducting state. Key experimental signatures are captured by an attractive-U Hubbard model that describes real-space electron pairing as a precursor to superconductivity. This work was supported by ARO MURI W911NF-08-1-0317 (J.L.), AFOSR MURI FA9550-10-1-0524 (C.-B.E., J.L.) and FA9550-12-1-0342 (C.-B.E.), and grants from the National Science Foundation DMR-1104191 (J.L.), DMR.

  12. Effect of pulsed plasma nitriding on mechanical and tribological performance of Ck45 steel.

    PubMed

    Rastkar, A R; Kiani, A; Alvand, F; Shokri, B; Amirzadeh, M

    2011-06-01

    We studied the mechanical properties and wear performance of AISI 1045 (Ck45) carbon steel under the influence of pulsed plasma nitriding. The treatments were performed at temperatures of 500 and 550 degrees C in N2:H2 gas ratios of 1:3 and 3:1 and the working pressure of 10 mbar for 1 to 4 hours. Samples were examined by X-ray diffraction, optical, electron and atomic force microscopy, microhardness tests, roughness measurements and wear tests. Nitride layers were mainly composed of epsilon-(Fe2-3N) or gamma'-(Fe4N) depending on the gas ratio and/or temperature and time. When the nitriding time is increased, the composition of the compound layer varies from monophase gamma'-(Fe4N) to the two phase of epsilon-(Fe2-3N) and gamma'-(Fe4N). The highest thickness and hardness of the layers were obtained at 550 degrees C in the N2:H2 gas ratios of 3:1 for 4 h. The topographical evolution and surface roughness of the samples showed that all the roughness parameters increase with increasing the temperature. The friction coefficient of all samples was higher than that of untreated material. Wear performance of all nitrided samples was significantly better than that of untreated material. PMID:21770190

  13. TEM studies of the nitrided/oxided Ni-Ti surface layer.

    PubMed

    Lelatko, J; Goryczka, T; Paczkowski, P; Wierzchoń, T; Morawiec, H

    2010-03-01

    TiN and TiO(2) coatings, which are known from their low chemical reactivity, high hardness and wear and corrosion resistance, are used for protecting the NiTi surface. In the present work, nearly equiatomic NiTi (50.6 at.%) shape memory alloy was covered with the layers obtained by nitriding under glow discharge at 1073 K. Additionally, at the end of the process some amount of oxygen was added. Characterization of the nitrided/oxided layers structure was carried out using transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The investigations were focused on the structure of the multilayer nitrided/oxided NiTi surface. The surface is formed from nanocrystalline and columnar grains of the TiN phase. Between the top layer and beta-NiTi substrate the interface Ti(2)Ni layer was formed. Addition of oxygen at the end of the process created a thin layer of TiO(2) phase nanograins at the surface of the TiN phase. In the same areas, small amount of amorphous phase was identified. The combination of nitriding and oxidation formed layers that reveal relatively high corrosion resistance. PMID:20500413

  14. Investigation of light elements in nitrided steel using elastic backscattering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumié, M.; Nsouli, B.; Soukieh, M.

    2006-08-01

    This work describes the ability of ion beam analysis techniques IBA to simultaneously determine the concentration and the possible depth profile of some light elements, such as carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, in matrices of high atomic number Z, such as stainless steel materials. In fact, the nitriding process of some materials has the potential to improve their tribological and mechanical properties and to offer various advantages as compared with other methods used in the modification of surfaces. Gas and Plasma nitriding were applied to certain types of steel, such as AISI-304 and H-13 which are commonly used in the industry, in order to improve their hardness and their surface corrosion resistance. The improvement was correlated with the depth profile of N and the consequent structure variations. More specifically, non-Rutherford elastic backscattering (alpha, alpha) at 5 MeV was performed on different samples, before and after nitriding, in order to determine the stoichiometry and the thickness of the newly formed surface nitrided layers.

  15. Influence of chromium content on corrosion of plasma-nitrided steels

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesan, K.; Subramanian, C.; Green, L.K.; Strafford, K.N.

    1997-07-01

    Commercial steels with varying chromium contents were plasma nitrided for 25 h in a 70% nitrogen + 30% hydrogen gas atmosphere at 520 C under a pressure of 670 Pa. Steels tested included AISI types 4140, with 1% Cr (UNS G41400); H-13, with 5% Cr (UNS T20813); D-2, with 12% Cr (UNS T30402); and 431, with 16% Cr (UNS S43100). Surface layers obtained were characterized using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Potentiodynamic polarization curves were obtained at room temperature (RT) on samples immersed in an aerated 0.05 M sodium sulfate solution of pH 3.0. Polarization tests were repeated at various depths beneath the surface after grinding successively with abrasives and finishing with 3-{micro}m diamond paste. Potential-vs-time graphs were recorded. Nitrided steels with up to and including 12% Cr showed an increase in corrosion resistance, whereas a decrease was observed for the 16% Cr steel compared to untreated samples. The nitrogen diffusion zones in all the steels studied exhibited reduced corrosion resistance compared to both the nitrided surface and to untreated specimens. Observations were discussed in light of the passivation theory. The role of chromium in nitriding was found to be mainly in hardness enhancement rather than improvement of corrosion resistance.

  16. Effect of Plasma Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing on HVOF-Sprayed Stainless Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gayoung; Bae, Gyuyeol; Moon, Kyungil; Lee, Changhee

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the effects of plasma nitriding (PN) and nitrocarburizing on HVOF-sprayed stainless steel nitride layers were investigated. 316 (austenitic), 17-4PH (precipitation hardening), and 410 (martensitic) stainless steels were plasma-nitrided and nitrocarburized using a N2 + H2 gas mixture and the gas mixture containing C2H2, respectively, at 550 °C. The results showed that the PN and nitrocarburizing produced a relatively thick nitrided layer consisting of a compound layer and an adjacent nitrogen diffusion layer depending on the crystal structures of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings. Also, the diffusion depth of nitrogen increased when a small amount of C2H2 (plasma nitrocarburizing process) was added. The PN and nitrocarburizing resulted in not only an increase of the surface hardness, but also improvement of the load bearing capacity of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings because of the formation of CrN, Fe3N, and Fe4N phases. Also, the plasma-nitrocarburized HVOF-sprayed 410 stainless steel had a superior surface microhardness and load bearing capacity due to the formation of Cr23C6 on the surface.

  17. Structural/magnetic phase transitions and superconductivity in Ba(Fe1-xTMx)2As2 (TM=Co, Ni, Cu, Co/Cu, Rh and Pd) single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Ni

    2009-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1911, superconductivity has been one of the most actively studied fields in condensed matter physics and has attracted immense experimental and theoretical effort. At this point in time, with more and more superconductors discovered in elements, alloys, intermetallic compounds and oxides, it is becoming clear that superconductivity is actually not so rare in nature. Almost half of the elements in the periodic table and hundreds of compounds have been found to be superconducting. Fig. 1.1 shows the milestones in discovering higher Tc superconductors. Among the elemental superconductors, Niobium has the highest superconducting transition temperature, Tc, of 9.5 K. This record held for more than ten years, until the discovery of niobium nitride which superconducts below 16 K. It took another thirty years for Tc to increase from 16 K in niobium nitride to 23 K in niobium germanium.

  18. Highly flexible, mechanically robust superconducting wire consisting of NbN-carbon-nanotube nanofibril composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyun; Kang, Haeyong; Kim, Joonggyu; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    A flexible superconducting fiber is prepared by twisting carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets coated with sputter-deposited niobium nitride (NbN) layer to form the shape of yarn. Twisted CNT yarn, which has been extensively studied due to its high flexibility as well as excellent mechanical properties, and NbN, which is a superconducting material with high transition temperature (Tc) and critical magnetic field (Hc), are combined together by the deposition of NbN layer on free-standing CNT-sheet substrate followed by the biscrolling process. We tried many experimental conditions to investigate the superconducting properties of NbN-CNT yarn as a function of NbN thickness and number of CNT-sheet layers, and found out that the superconducting property of NbN on CNT-sheet can be comparable to that of NbN thin film on the normal solid substrate. In addition, the superconducting property survived even under the condition of severe mechanical deformation such as knotting. These results show the potential application of this technology as a large-scale fabrication method of flexible, mechanically robust, high performance superconducting wire. This work is supported by the Institute for Basic Science (IBS-R011-D1), and by the National Research Foundation (BSR-2013R1A1A1076063) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning, Republic of Korea.

  19. Kinetic process of nitridation on the α-sapphire surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xingzhou, Tang; Shuping, Li; Junyong, Kang; Jiaqi, Chen

    2014-11-01

    We established a model to simulate the growth process of nitridation and clarified the inner mechanisms of nitridation and over-nitridation by combining the kinetic Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics methods. Supported by reflection high-energy electron diffraction results with growth in an MBE system, the tendency of nitridation on α-sapphire in different conditions was observed and analyzed. The best conditions for nitridation on the α-sapphire surface are found by our simulation.

  20. Process for the production of metal nitride sintered bodies and resultant silicon nitride and aluminum nitride sintered bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yajima, S.; Omori, M.; Hayashi, J.; Kayano, H.; Hamano, M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the manufacture of metal nitride sintered bodies, in particular, a process in which a mixture of metal nitrite powders is shaped and heated together with a binding agent is described. Of the metal nitrides Si3N4 and AIN were used especially frequently because of their excellent properties at high temperatures. The goal is to produce a process for metal nitride sintered bodies with high strength, high corrosion resistance, thermal shock resistance, thermal shock resistance, and avoidance of previously known faults.

  1. Superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paik, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The employment of superconductivity and other material properties at cryogenic temperatures to fabricate sensitive, low-drift, gravity gradiometer is described. The device yields a reduction of noise of four orders of magnitude over room temperature gradiometers, and direct summation and subtraction of signals from accelerometers in varying orientations are possible with superconducting circuitry. Additional circuits permit determination of the linear and angular acceleration vectors independent of the measurement of the gravity gradient tensor. A dewar flask capable of maintaining helium in a liquid state for a year's duration is under development by NASA, and a superconducting tensor gravity gradiometer for the NASA Geodynamics Program is intended for a LEO polar trajectory to measure the harmonic expansion coefficients of the earth's gravity field up to order 300.

  2. Magnetically levitated superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, B.R.; Lynds, L. Jr.

    1993-10-26

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet mounted on a shaft that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor supported on a stator in proximity to the magnet. The superconductor is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet and supports a load on the shaft. The interaction between the superconductor and magnet also produces surface screening currents that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature. The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet is supported on the stator and the superconductor is mounted on the shaft. The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field. 6 figures.

  3. Fabrication of Aluminum Nitride Coatings by Reactive Plasma Spraying and Evaluation of Its Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Motohiro; Lee, Chaechul; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Takahashi, Koyata

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has excellent properties such as high corrosion resistance, hardness and thermal conductivity. In this study, AlN coatings were fabricated by reactive plasma spraying by using Al-AlN mixed powder for feedstock. The optimal mixing ratio of Al-AlN particles and spray conditions were investigated. Al-AlN particles were injected into Ar/N2 plasma and were deposited onto graphite substrate. It was possible to fabricate the coatings using Al-10˜40 wt.%AlN powders for feedstock. Especially, using Al-20 wt.%AlN and Al-30 wt.%AlN powders enabled to fabricate dense coatings which consisted of almost completely AlN phase. The nitride phase concentration in the coatings was controlled by RF power and N2 gas flow rate in the plasma gas. Furthermore, it became clear that the hardness of the coatings depended on the nitride concentration in the coatings. The thermal conductivity of the coating was achieved 71.2 (W/m•K). Therefore, it was possible to fabricate AlN based coatings with high thermal conductivity by reactive plasma spraying by using Al-AlN mixed powder.

  4. Nitridation and CVD reactions with hydrazine

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, K.W.; Kohl, P.A.; Abys, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    The low-temperature nitridation of gallium arsenide, silicon and transition metals was investigated using hydrazine. Gallium nitride films were grown on gallium arsenide (GaAs) by direct reaction of the semiconductor surface layers with hydrazine at 200--400 C. Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses show that the films are primarily gallium nitride with a small oxide impurity. Thin nitride films ({approximately}15{angstrom}) were grown on silicon by reaction with hydrazine at 300--500 C. Ellipsometry results suggest that the film growth goes through different phases following linear, parabolic and logarithmic functions with time. XPS analysis shows that the nitride films could be formed at much lower temperatures than possible with ammonia (300 vs. 600 C). The formation of numerous transition metal nitrides (Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, Si, Ta, Ti, V, and W) by reaction with hydrazine at 400 C is demonstrated, as well as the chemical vapor deposition of boron nitride films from diborane and hydrazine reactants. The temperature at the mixing point was critical in determining the final composition of the film. A 1-D transport model suggests that the reaction rate at 400 C was kinetically limited. The results also agree qualitatively with thermodynamic equilibrium calculations.

  5. Method of synthesizing cubic system boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzu, S.; Sumiya, H.; Degawa, J.

    1987-10-13

    A method is described for synthetically growing cubic system boron nitride crystals by using boron nitride sources, solvents for dissolving the boron nitride sources, and seed crystals under conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature for maintaining the cubic system boron nitride stable. The method comprises the following steps: preparing a synthesizing vessel having at least two chambers, arrayed in order in the synthesizing vessel so as to be heated according to a temperature gradient; placing the solvents having different eutectic temperatures in each chamber with respect to the boron nitride sources according to the temperature gradient; placing the boron nitride source in contact with a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively higher temperature and placing at least a seed crystal in a portion of each of the solvents heated at a relatively lower temperature; and growing at least one cubic system boron nitride crystal in each of the solvents in the chambers by heating the synthesizing vessel for establishing the temperature gradient while maintaining conditions of ultra-high pressure and high temperature.

  6. Shock Response of Silicon Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandekar, D. P.; Casem, D. T.; Motoyashiki, Y.; Sato, E.

    2009-12-01

    Silicon nitride is suitable for varied applications because its properties can be tailored through processing and doping. The current work presents shock response of silicon nitride marketed as SN282. The density of this material, 3.4 Mg/m3, exceeds its single crystal density, 3.2 Mg/m3, due to the presence of lutetium oxide as an additive around 5% by weight in the material. While the average grain size is 3.4 microns, the aspect ratio of the grains exceed 3. Preliminary results of shock wave experiments may be summarized as follows: (1) The Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) of SN282 lies between 10.8 and 11.9 GPa. (2) The magnitude of the inelastic wave velocity just above the HEL is 8.73 km/s, suggesting that inelastic deformation above the HEL is due to shock induced plasticity in the material. (3) The value of the spall strength lies between 0.57 and 0.65 GPa. The spall strength of SN282 remains unchanged even when shocked beyond the HEL to at least 19.2 GPa unlike other brittle ceramics.

  7. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meléndez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  8. Ultralow wear of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guosong; Tan, Chee-Keong; Tansu, Nelson; Krick, Brandon A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we reveal a remarkable (and surprising) physical property of GaN: it is extremely wear resistant. In fact, we measured the wear rate of GaN is approaching wear rates reported for diamond. Not only does GaN have an ultralow wear rate but also there are quite a few experimental factors that control the magnitude of its wear rate, further contributing to the rich and complex physics of wear of GaN. Here, we discovered several primary controlling factors that will affect the wear rate of III-Nitride materials: crystallographic orientation, sliding environment, and coating composition (GaN, InN and InGaN). Sliding in the ⟨ 1 2 ¯ 10 ⟩ is significantly lower wear than ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩ . Wear increases by 2 orders of magnitude with increasing humidity (from ˜0% to 50% RH). III-Nitride coatings are promising as multifunctional material systems for device design and sliding wear applications.

  9. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  10. Superconductivity in doped semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustarret, E.

    2015-07-01

    A historical survey of the main normal and superconducting state properties of several semiconductors doped into superconductivity is proposed. This class of materials includes selenides, tellurides, oxides and column-IV semiconductors. Most of the experimental data point to a weak coupling pairing mechanism, probably phonon-mediated in the case of diamond, but probably not in the case of strontium titanate, these being the most intensively studied materials over the last decade. Despite promising theoretical predictions based on a conventional mechanism, the occurrence of critical temperatures significantly higher than 10 K has not been yet verified. However, the class provides an enticing playground for testing theories and devices alike.

  11. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Liedl, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium's, MISCON, mission is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems: synthesis and processing; and limiting features in transport phenomena. During the past twenty-one projects produced over eighty-seven talks and seventy-two publications. Key achievements this past year expand our understanding of processing phenomena relating to crystallization and texture, metal superconductor composites, and modulated microstructures. Further noteworthy accomplishments include calculations on 2-D superconductor insulator transition, prediction of flux line lattice melting, and an expansion of our understanding and use of microwave phenomena as related to superconductors.

  12. Technology of RF superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This work has several parts, two of which are collaborative development projects with the majority of the work being performed at Argonne. The first is the development of a superconducting RFQ structure in collaboration with AccSys Technology Inc. of Pleasanton, California, funded as a Phase II SBIR grant. Another is a collaborative project with the Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi, India (who are funding the work) to develop new superconducting ion accelerating structures. Other initiatives are developing various aspects of the technology required to utilize ATLAS as a secondary beam linac for radioactive beams.

  13. Gambling with Superconducting Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltyn, Marek; Zgirski, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    Josephson junctions and superconducting nanowires, when biased close to superconducting critical current, can switch to a nonzero voltage state by thermal or quantum fluctuations. The process is understood as an escape of a Brownian particle from a metastable state. Since this effect is fully stochastic, we propose to use it for generating random numbers. We present protocol for obtaining random numbers and test the experimentally harvested data for their fidelity. Our work is prerequisite for using the Josephson junction as a tool for stochastic (probabilistic) determination of physical parameters such as magnetic flux, temperature, and current.

  14. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  15. Running in Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    Roberta Stevens and Kent Oliver are campaigning hard for the presidency of the American Library Association (ALA). Stevens is outreach projects and partnerships officer at the Library of Congress. Oliver is executive director of the Stark County District Library in Canton, Ohio. They have debated, discussed, and posted web sites, Facebook pages,…

  16. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  17. Diffractive hard scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.; Collins, J.C.; Soper, D.E.; Sterman, G.

    1986-03-01

    I discuss events in high energy hadron collisions that contain a hard scattering, in the sense that very heavy quarks or high P/sub T/ jets are produced, yet are diffractive, in the sense that one of the incident hadrons is scattered with only a small energy loss. 8 refs.

  18. Improved dispersion of silicon nitride whiskers

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.H.; Buchta, M.

    1995-10-01

    To improve the dispersion of silicon nitride whiskers in aqueous suspensions, a standard dispersant used in glass fiber industry, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) is added. It was found that the viscosity of the whisker suspensions is lowered and the centrifuged density of the suspensions is increased with the addition of the APS. The pH values of suspensions before and after the addition of APS indicate that ASP extracts H{sup +} ions from the solutions and the adsorption of APS on silicon nitride is saturated in the experiment. The results indicate a colloidal route to the processing of ceramic composites with silicon nitride whiskers as reinforcements.

  19. Silicon Nitride Membranes for Filtration and Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, Paul; Zavadil, Kevin; Shul, Randy; Willison, Christi Gober; Miller, Sam

    1999-07-19

    Semi-Permeable silicon nitride membranes have been developed using a Bosch etch process followed by a reactive ion etch (NE) process. These membranes were observed to allow air but not water to pass through them into surface micromachined, silicon nitride microfluidic channels. Membranes with this property have potential use in microfluidic systems as gas bubble traps and vents, filters to remove particles and gas partitioning membranes. Membrane permeation was measured as 1.6 x 10{sup {minus}8} mol/m{sup 2}Pa s of helium for inline membranes at the entrance and exit of the silicon nitride microfluidic channels.

  20. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy of carbon nitride powder

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Th.; Fiechter, S.; Thomas, A.

    2011-08-22

    Powder of carbon nitride has been investigated by surface photovoltage spectroscopy at temperatures between 30 deg. C and 150 deg. C. Photo-generated holes were preferentially separated towards the external surface. Electronic states below the optical band gap from which charge separation may be possible have not been observed. The band gap of the investigated carbon nitride decreased from 2.93 to 2.80 eV with increasing temperature from 30 deg. C to 150 deg. C. The material exhibits a higher optical transition at E = 3.6 eV. Results are discussed from the point of view of photo-catalytic water splitting with carbon nitride.

  1. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Misra, Mira

    1997-01-01

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector.

  2. Uranium nitride behavior at thermionic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using uranium nitride for in-core thermionic applications was evaluated in electrically heated thermal gradient tests and in flat plate thermionic converters. These tests indicated that grain boundary penetration of uranium nitride into both tungsten and rhenium will occur under thermal gradient conditions. In the case of the tungsten thermionic converter, this led to grain boundary rupture of the emitter and almost total loss of electrical output from the converter. It appears that uranium nitride is unsuitable for thermionic applications at the 2000 K temperatures used in these tests.

  3. Photodetectors using III-V nitrides

    DOEpatents

    Moustakas, T.D.; Misra, M.

    1997-10-14

    A photodetector using a III-V nitride and having predetermined electrical properties is disclosed. The photodetector includes a substrate with interdigitated electrodes formed on its surface. The substrate has a sapphire base layer, a buffer layer formed from a III-V nitride and a single crystal III-V nitride film. The three layers are formed by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (ECR-assisted MBE). Use of the ECR-assisted MBE process allows control and predetermination of the electrical properties of the photodetector. 24 figs.

  4. Boron Nitride Nanoribbons: Synthesis and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Ashley; Erikson, Kris; Sinitskii, Alex; Rousseas, Michael; Alem, Nasim; Tour, James; Zettl, Alex

    2012-02-01

    Boron Nitride Nanoribbons (BNNR) have been theorized to have many interesting electrical and magnetic properties and edge states, but these characteristics have not been experimentally verified due to challenges in synthesis and purification. We have produced BNNRs by longitudinally splitting boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) using potassium vapor as an intercalant. Due to the strong interactions between boron nitride sheets, separation of nanoribbons from their parent tubes is challenging. We have used various solvent systems to assist with separation of the ribbons with the goal of probing their properties.

  5. Nanoindentation Studies Of Hard Nanocomposite Ti-B-N Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Rupa, P. Karuna Purnapu; Chakraborty, P. C.; Mishra, Suman Kumari

    2011-12-12

    Titanium boron nitride (Ti-B-N) films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering using single Titanium diboride (TiB{sub 2}) target in different Ar-N{sub 2} gas mixtures. The influence of N{sub 2}:Ar ratio on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the deposited films have been investigated. Atomic force microscopy analysis indicated the grain size decreases with incorporation of nitrogen in the films. Nanoindentation studies have shown the hardness decreases with nitrogen incorporation.

  6. Duality picture of Superconductor-insulator transitions on Superconducting nanowire

    PubMed Central

    Makise, Kazumasa; Terai, Hirotaka; Tominari, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Shukichi; Shinozaki, Bunju

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the electrical transport properties of niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) nanowire with four-terminal geometries to clarify the superconducting phase slip phenomena and superconducting-insulator transitions (SIT) for one-dimensional superconductors. We fabricated various nanowires with different widths and lengths from epitaxial NbTiN films using the electron beam lithography method. The temperature dependence of resistance R(T) below the superconducting transition temperature Tc was analyzed using thermal activation phase slip (TAPS) and quantum phase slip (QPS) theories. Although the accuracy of experimental data at low temperatures can deviate when using the TAPS model, the QPS model thoroughly represents the R(T) characteristic with resistive tail at low temperatures. From the analyses of data on Tc, we found that NbTiN nanowires exhibit SIT because of the change in the ratio of kinetic inductance energy and QPS amplitude energy with respect to the flux-charge duality theory. PMID:27311595

  7. Duality picture of Superconductor-insulator transitions on Superconducting nanowire.

    PubMed

    Makise, Kazumasa; Terai, Hirotaka; Tominari, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Shukichi; Shinozaki, Bunju

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the electrical transport properties of niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) nanowire with four-terminal geometries to clarify the superconducting phase slip phenomena and superconducting-insulator transitions (SIT) for one-dimensional superconductors. We fabricated various nanowires with different widths and lengths from epitaxial NbTiN films using the electron beam lithography method. The temperature dependence of resistance R(T) below the superconducting transition temperature Tc was analyzed using thermal activation phase slip (TAPS) and quantum phase slip (QPS) theories. Although the accuracy of experimental data at low temperatures can deviate when using the TAPS model, the QPS model thoroughly represents the R(T) characteristic with resistive tail at low temperatures. From the analyses of data on Tc, we found that NbTiN nanowires exhibit SIT because of the change in the ratio of kinetic inductance energy and QPS amplitude energy with respect to the flux-charge duality theory. PMID:27311595

  8. Duality picture of Superconductor-insulator transitions on Superconducting nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makise, Kazumasa; Terai, Hirotaka; Tominari, Yukihiro; Tanaka, Shukichi; Shinozaki, Bunju

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the electrical transport properties of niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) nanowire with four-terminal geometries to clarify the superconducting phase slip phenomena and superconducting-insulator transitions (SIT) for one-dimensional superconductors. We fabricated various nanowires with different widths and lengths from epitaxial NbTiN films using the electron beam lithography method. The temperature dependence of resistance R(T) below the superconducting transition temperature Tc was analyzed using thermal activation phase slip (TAPS) and quantum phase slip (QPS) theories. Although the accuracy of experimental data at low temperatures can deviate when using the TAPS model, the QPS model thoroughly represents the R(T) characteristic with resistive tail at low temperatures. From the analyses of data on Tc, we found that NbTiN nanowires exhibit SIT because of the change in the ratio of kinetic inductance energy and QPS amplitude energy with respect to the flux-charge duality theory.

  9. Integrated superconducting detectors on semiconductors for quantum optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniber, M.; Flassig, F.; Reithmaier, G.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum photonic circuits can be used to efficiently generate, manipulate, route and exploit nonclassical states of light for distributed photon-based quantum information technologies. In this article, we review our recent achievements on the growth, nanofabrication and integration of high-quality, superconducting niobium nitride thin films on optically active, semiconducting GaAs substrates and their patterning to realize highly efficient and ultra-fast superconducting detectors on semiconductor nanomaterials containing quantum dots. Our state-of-the-art detectors reach external detection quantum efficiencies up to 20 % for ~4 nm thin films and single-photon timing resolutions <72 ps. We discuss the integration of such detectors into quantum dot-loaded, semiconductor ridge waveguides, resulting in the on-chip, time-resolved detection of quantum dot luminescence. Furthermore, a prototype quantum optical circuit is demonstrated that enabled the on-chip generation of resonance fluorescence from an individual InGaAs quantum dot, with a linewidth <15 μeV displaced by 1 mm from the superconducting detector on the very same semiconductor chip. Thus, all key components required for prototype quantum photonic circuits with sources, optical components and detectors on the same chip are reported.

  10. Improving the empirical model for plasma nitrided AISI 316L corrosion resistance based on Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, M.; de Souza, S. D.; de Souza, S.; Olzon-Dionysio, M.

    2011-11-01

    Traditional plasma nitriding treatments using temperatures ranging from approximately 650 to 730 K can improve wear, corrosion resistance and surface hardness on stainless steels. The nitrided layer consists of some iron nitrides: the cubic γ ' phase (Fe4N), the hexagonal phase ɛ (Fe2 - 3N) and a nitrogen supersatured solid phase γ N . An empirical model is proposed to explain the corrosion resistance of AISI 316L and ASTM F138 nitrided samples based on Mössbauer Spectroscopy results: the larger the ratio between ɛ and γ ' phase fractions of the sample, the better its resistance corrosion is. In this work, this model is examined using some new results of AISI 316L samples, nitrided under the same previous conditions of gas composition and temperature, but at different pressure, for 3, 4 and 5 h. The sample nitrided for 4 h, whose value for ɛ/ γ ' is maximum (= 0.73), shows a slightly better response than the other two samples, nitrided for 5 and 3 h ( ɛ/ γ ' = 0.72 and 0.59, respectively). Moreover, these samples show very similar behavior. Therefore, this set of samples was not suitable to test the empirical model. However, the comparison between the present results of potentiodynamic polarization curves and those obtained previously at 4 and 4.5 torr, could indicated that the corrosion resistance of the sample which only presents the γ N phase was the worst of them. Moreover, the empirical model seems not to be ready to explain the response to corrosion and it should be improved including the γ N phase.

  11. Tribological properties of reactively sputtered nitrides and carbides of titanium, zirconium and hafnium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, M.E.; Chang, P.; Sproul, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    Objective was to determine the tribological properties of hard, wear-resistant coatings on steel substrates in order to expedite their use on coated roller bearings, transmission gears, cams, etc. Specific coatings investigated were TiN, TiC, ZrN, ZrC, HfN, and HfC; they were deposited by high-rate-reactive magnetron sputtering. Both nitrides and carbides improved the wear performance of steel, often by orders of magnitude. These coatings have proven to be beneficial for dry sliding, lubricated sliding, rolling, and mixed rolling/sliding wear. The rolling contact fatigue studies showed remarkable improvements of lifetime that could be achieved with very thin coatings (less than one micron); thicker coatings were not useful. Coating and substrate properties (hardness) should be matched for best performance. Properties and performance of the hard coatings are controlled by process parameter settings; these parameters can be controlled in magnetron sputtering to achieve excellent results.

  12. Design of Integrated III-Nitride/Non-III-Nitride Tandem Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Toledo, N. G.; Friedman, D.J.; Farrell, R. M.; Perl, E. E.; Lin, C. T.; Bowers, J. E.; Speck, J. S.; Mishra, U. K.

    2012-03-01

    The integration of III-nitride and non-III-nitride materials for tandem solar cell applications can improve the efficiency of the photovoltaic device due to the added power contributed by the III-nitride top cell to that of high-efficiency multi-junction non-III-nitride solar cells if the device components are properly designed and optimized. The proposed tandem solar cell is comprised of a III-nitride top cell bonded to a non-III-nitride, series-constrained, multi-junction subcell. The top cell is electrically isolated, but optically coupled to the underlying subcell. The use of a III-nitride top cell is potentially beneficial when the top junction of a stand-alone non-III-nitride subcell generates more photocurrent than the limiting current of the non-III-nitride subcell. Light producing this excess current can either be redirected to the III-nitride top cell through high energy photon absorption, redirected to the lower junctions through layer thickness optimization, or a combination of both, resulting in improved total efficiency. When the non-III-nitride cell's top junction is the limiting junction, the minimum power conversion efficiency that the III-nitride top cell must contribute should compensate for the spectrum filtered from the multi-junction subcell for this design to be useful. As the III-nitride absorption edge wavelength, {lambda}{sub N}, increases, the performance of the multi-junction subcell decreases due to spectral filtering. In the most common spectra of interest (AM1.5G, AM1.5 D, and AM0), the technology to grow InGaN cells with {lambda}{sub N}<520 nm is found to be sufficient for III-nitride top cell applications. The external quantum efficiency performance, however, of state-of-the-art InGaN solar cells still needs to be improved. The effects of surface/interface reflections are also presented. The management of these reflection issues determines the feasibility of the integrated III-nitride/non-III-nitride design to improve overall cell

  13. Fabrication of translucent boron nitride dispersed polycrystalline silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, B.; Fu, Z.; Niihara, K.; Lee, S. W.

    2011-03-01

    Optical transparency was achieved at infrared region and overall translucent silicon nitride was fabricated using hot press sintering (HPS). The increase in h-BN content decreased the optical transparency. Microstructral observations shows that the optical, mechanical and tribological properties of BN dispersed polycrystalline Si3N4 ceramics were affected by the density, α:β-phase ratio and content of h-BN in sintered ceramics. The hot pressed samples were prepared from the mixture of α-Si3N4, AlN, MgO and h-BN at 1850°C. The composite contained from 0.25 to 2 mass % BN powder with sintering aids (9% AlN + 3% MgO). Maximum transmittance of 57% was achieved for 0.25 mass % BN doped Si3N4 ceramics. Fracture toughness was increased and wear volume and friction coefficient were decreased with increase in BN content.

  14. Nitriding of a tool steel with an electron-beam-excited plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shoyama, H.; Hishida, T.; Hara, T.; Dake, Y.; Mori, T.; Nagai, H.; Hori, M.; Goto, T.

    2006-11-15

    Nitriding of a tool steel was carried out with an electron-beam-excited plasma (EBEP). EBEP is sustained with energetic electron beams over the pressure range of 10{sup -3}-10{sup 1} Pa by electron-impact ionization. Samples whose temperatures were controlled by electric radiant heater were exposed to EBEP. A nitrided layer of 100 {mu}m and a surface hardness of 1000 HV(0.1) were achieved for tool steel SKD61 (JIS) at 800 K and a treatment time of 3 h. In order to measure the density of nitrogen atoms in EBEP, a vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system was used. It was found that the density of nitrogen atoms increased from 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} linearly with an increase of electron beam current from 2 to 20 A.

  15. Chemical reaction of hexagonal boron nitride and graphite nanoclusters in mechanical milling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Y.; Grush, M.; Callcott, T.A.

    1997-04-01

    Synthesis of boron-carbon-nitride (BCN) hybrid alloys has been attempted extensively by many researchers because the BCN alloys are considered an extremely hard material called {open_quotes}super diamond,{close_quotes} and the industrial application for wear-resistant materials is promising. A mechanical alloying (MA) method of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with graphite has recently been studied to explore the industrial synthesis of the BCN alloys. To develop the MA method for the BCN alloy synthesis, it is necessary to confirm the chemical reaction processes in the mechanical milling systems and to identify the reaction products. Therefore, the authors have attempted to confirm the chemical reaction process of the h-BN and graphite in mechanical milling systems using x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) methods.

  16. High-Temperature Thermodynamic Investigation of Nano-Dispersed Nitrides Obtained in Thermal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, M.; Vissokov, G. Grancharov, IV; Brakalov, L.

    2007-04-01

    The nitrides of transient metals have a high hardness, thermal stability, remarkable wear resistance in aggressive chemical mediums, melted metals and alloys, high corrosion resistance, and low coefficient of electric resistance. Under the conditions of low-temperature argon plasma (LTP), thermodynamic investigations were conducted in the process of obtaining of AlN, TiN and Si3N4 in a temperature range of 1000 K to 6000 K. To investigate the thermodynamic possibility of obtaining nitrides, a computer model was used which provided the equilibrium composition of gaseous and solid phases at different temperatures. The conditions for chemical equilibrium of the system were based on the minimization of Gibbs' energy.

  17. Transition metals and their carbides and nitrides: Trends in electronic and structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Jeffrey C.; Mizel, Ari; Côté, Michel; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    1999-09-01

    A study of the structural and electronic properties of selected transition metals and their carbides and nitrides is presented. We focus on assessing trends of possible importance for understanding their hardness. Lattice constants, bulk moduli (Bo), and charge densities are calculated using the local density approximation with a pseudopotential plane wave approach. An fcc lattice is employed for the transition metal elements in order to make comparisons and study trends relateable to their carbides and nitrides. Our results show that both increasing the number of valence d electrons and the presence of f electrons in the core lead to larger (Bo). Charge density plots and histograms enable us to explain the nature of the charge distribution in the interstitial region for the different compounds considered. In addition, we include the heavier elements seaborgium, bohrium, and hasnium in order to test further trends. Surprisingly, the calculated Bo for Hs is comparable to that of diamond.

  18. Spin-orbit-coupled superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Sheng-Di; Liang, C.-T.

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity and spin-orbit (SO) interaction have been two separate emerging fields until very recently that the correlation between them seemed to be observed. However, previous experiments concerning SO coupling are performed far beyond the superconducting state and thus a direct demonstration of how SO coupling affects superconductivity remains elusive. Here we investigate the SO coupling in the critical region of superconducting transition on Al nanofilms, in which the strength of disorder and spin relaxation by SO coupling are changed by varying the film thickness. At temperatures T sufficiently above the superconducting critical temperature Tc, clear signature of SO coupling reveals itself in showing a magneto-resistivity peak. When T < Tc, the resistivity peak can still be observed; however, its line-shape is now affected by the onset of the quasi two-dimensional superconductivity. By studying such magneto-resistivity peaks under different strength of spin relaxation, we highlight the important effects of SO interaction on superconductivity. PMID:24961726

  19. Free-standing superconductive articles

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.D.; Muenchausen, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    A substrate-free, free-standing epitaxially oriented superconductive film including a layer of a template material and a layer of a ceramic superconducting material is provided together with a method of making such a substrate-free ceramic superconductive film by coating an etchable material with a template layer, coating the template layer with a layer of a ceramic superconductive material, coating the layer of ceramic superconductive material with a protective material, removing the etchable material by an appropriate means so that the etchable material is separated from a composite structure including the template layer, the ceramic superconductive material layer and the protective material layer, removing the protective material layer from the composite structure whereby a substrate-free, free-standing ceramic superconductive film remains.

  20. Applications of Superconductivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodkind, John M.

    1971-01-01

    Presents a general review of current practical applications of the properties of superconducters. The devices are classified into groups according to the property that is of primary importance. The article is inteded as a first introduction for students and professionals. (Author/DS)

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  2. Levitation Kits Demonstrate Superconductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1987-01-01

    Describes the "Project 1-2-3" levitation kit used to demonstrate superconductivity. Summarizes the materials included in the kit. Discusses the effect demonstrated and gives details on how to obtain kits. Gives an overview of the documentation that is included. (CW)

  3. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  4. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-01

    It is shown that, in the "jelly" model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  5. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  6. Superconducting thermometer for cryogenics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Digital electronic device uses superconducting filaments as sensors. Simple solid-state circuitry combined with filaments comprise highly-reliable temperature monitor. Device has ability to track very fast thermal transients and "on/off" output is adaptable to remote sensing and telemetry.

  7. Langmuir vacuum and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Veklenko, B. A.

    2012-06-15

    It is shown that, in the 'jelly' model of cold electron-ion plasma, the interaction between electrons and the quantum electromagnetic vacuum of Langmuir waves involves plasma superconductivity with an energy gap proportional to the energy of the Langmuir quantum.

  8. Superconductive electromagnet apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mine, S.

    1982-12-14

    Disclosed is a superconductive electromagnet apparatus having a coil with a coiled conductor with a channel between adjacently disposed the paths of the coil conductor of which width is selected in accordance with amounts of heat produced at the corresponding portions of the coil section as viewed in cross section.

  9. New research in Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorrami, Mona

    2013-03-01

    Superconductors are materials that have no resistance to electricity's flow; they are one of the last great frontiers of scientific discovery. The theories that explain superconductor behavior seem to be constantly under review. In 1911 superconductivity was first observed in mercury by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes When he cooled it to the temperature of liquid helium, 4 degrees Kelvin (-452F, -269C), its resistance suddenly disappeared. It was necessary for Onnes to come within 4 degrees of the coldest temperature that is theoretically attainable to witness the phenomenon of superconductivity. In 1933 German researchers Walther Meissner and Robert Ochsenfeld discovered that a superconducting material will repel a magnetic field. A magnet moving by a conductor induces currents in the conductor, but, in a superconductor the induced currents exactly mirror the field that would have otherwise penetrated the superconducting material - causing the magnet to be repulsed. This phenomenon is known as strong diamagnetism and is today often referred to as the ``Meissner effect'' (an eponym). Later on the theory developed by American physicists John Bardeen, Leon Cooper, and John Schrieffer together with extensions and refinements of the theory, which followed in the years after 1957, succeeded in explaining in considerable detail the properties of superconductors.

  10. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Merlo, V.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-16

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, {sup 10}B + n → α + {sup 7}Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current I{sub c}, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  11. Superconducting magnets 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Superconducting Magnets; SSC Magnet Industrialization; Collider Quadrupole Development; A Record-Setting Magnet; D20: The Push Beyond 10T; Nonaccelerator Applications; APC Materials Development; High-T{sub c} at Low Temperature; Cable and Cabling-Machine Development; and Analytical Magnet Design.

  12. Hybrid superconducting neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, V.; Salvato, M.; Cirillo, M.; Lucci, M.; Ottaviani, I.; Scherillo, A.; Celentano, G.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2015-03-01

    A neutron detection concept is presented that is based on superconductive niobium (Nb) strips coated by a boron (B) layer. The working principle of the detector relies on the nuclear reaction, 10B + n → α + 7Li, with α and Li ions generating a hot spot on the current-biased Nb strip which in turn induces a superconducting-normal state transition. The latter is recognized as a voltage signal which is the evidence of the incident neutron. The above described detection principle has been experimentally assessed and verified by irradiating the samples with a pulsed neutron beam at the ISIS spallation neutron source (UK). It is found that the boron coated superconducting strips, kept at a temperature T = 8 K and current-biased below the critical current Ic, are driven into the normal state upon thermal neutron irradiation. As a result of the transition, voltage pulses in excess of 40 mV are measured while the bias current can be properly modulated to bring the strip back to the superconducting state, thus resetting the detector. Measurements on the counting rate of the device are presented and the basic physical features of the detector are discussed.

  13. Superstructures and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, Z.; Aeppli, G.

    1993-04-02

    Heavy fermion materials - so named because their conduction electrons behave as though they had extra mass - are like the cuprates in that they exhibit unusual superconducting properties. By the time the cuprates had been discovered, a good understanding of these materials was in hand. Unlike theories of high-[Tc] superconductivity, however, ideas about heavy fermions have not been the subject of great controversy. Thus, most of the effort in this backwater of condensed matter physics has focused on certain details of the behavior of one particularly well-studied compounds, UPt[sub 3]. The cause for sustained interest was that the process of developing ever more elaborate explanations for ever more elaborate experiments did not seem to converage. A recent paper by Midgley et al. reporting modulations in the crystal lattice of UPt[sub 3] suggests that theory and experiment might finally converge in a way that, while it does not threaten the broad understanding of heavy fermion systems, involves a degree of freedom ignored until now even in the face of past experience with elemental metallic uranium. Their transmission electron micrograph evidence for the existence of an incommensurate lattice modulation in UPt[sub 3] implicates this modulation as a probable source of the double superconducting transitions. Remarkably, the superconducting and magnetic coherence lengths, and the now discovered modulation period, are all of the same magnitude. For some time people have felt that stacking faults might be relevant to the properties of UPt[sub 3], but these new results are distinct from this. What Midgley et al. suggest is that the complicated superconducting phase diagram of UPt[sub 3] derives from the internal strain field caused by the modulation, and that this strain field lifts the degeneracy associated with unconventional pairing.

  14. Plasmonic spectral tunability of conductive ternary nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassavetis, S.; Bellas, D. V.; Abadias, G.; Lidorikis, E.; Patsalas, P.

    2016-06-01

    Conductive binary transition metal nitrides, such as TiN and ZrN, have emerged as a category of promising alternative plasmonic materials. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides such as TixTa1-xN, TixZr1-xN, TixAl1-xN, and ZrxTa1-xN share the important plasmonic features with their binary counterparts, while having the additional asset of the exceptional spectral tunability in the entire visible (400-700 nm) and UVA (315-400 nm) spectral ranges depending on their net valence electrons. In particular, we demonstrate that such ternary nitrides can exhibit maximum field enhancement factors comparable with gold in the aforementioned broadband range. We also critically evaluate the structural features that affect the quality factor of the plasmon resonance and we provide rules of thumb for the selection and growth of materials for nitride plasmonics.

  15. Determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Tetzlaff, J. E.

    1970-01-01

    Quantitative determination of nitrogen in titanium nitride involves dissolution of TiN in 10M hydrofluoric acid containing an oxidant. Released nitrogen is determined as ammonia. Best oxidizers are ferric chloride, potassium iodate, and potassium dichromate.

  16. Joining of silicon nitrides using oxynitride glasses

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, M.H.

    1993-03-01

    This report presents a study on commercial silicon nitrides that were successfully joined using oxynitride glasses. Sintered silicon nitride was joined by either closed or glass-filled joints. Glass-filled joints were successfully used on hot-pressed silicon nitrides and were comparable in fast fracture strength to unjoined silicon nitrides up to approximately 1000C. Above that temperature, strengths decreased rapidly and glass flow failure began. The study observed that time-dependent failure currently limits the service temperatures of glass-filled joints. Creep failure occurred in excess of 1000C. Between 900 and 1000C, slow crack growth failure was observed. Cavitation (or viscous deformation) was the rate-controlling mechanism of slow crack growth.

  17. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.; Young, Albert C.

    1994-01-01

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  18. Silicon nitride reinforced with molybdenum disilicide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.

    1990-12-31

    Compositions of matter comprised of silicon nitride and molybdenum disilicide and methods of making the compositions, where the molybdenum disilicide is present in amounts ranging from about 5 to about 50 vol%.

  19. Silicon nitride reinforced with molybdenum disilicide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Honnell, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprised of silicon nitride and molybdenum disilicide and methods of making the compositions, where the molybdenum disilicide is present in amounts ranging from about 5 to about 50 vol. %.

  20. Low temperature route to uranium nitride

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Yeamans, Charles; Hartmann, Thomas; Silva, G. W. Chinthaka; Cerefice, Gary; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2009-09-01

    A method of preparing an actinide nitride fuel for nuclear reactors is provided. The method comprises the steps of a) providing at least one actinide oxide and optionally zirconium oxide; b) mixing the oxide with a source of hydrogen fluoride for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the oxide to a fluoride salt; c) heating the fluoride salt to remove water; d) heating the fluoride salt in a nitrogen atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the fluorides to nitrides; and e) heating the nitrides under vacuum and/or inert atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to convert the nitrides to mononitrides.

  1. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Holcombe, C.E.; Dykes, N.L.; Omatete, O.O.; Young, A.C.

    1994-03-15

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  2. Knoop Hardness - Apparent Yield Stress Relationship in Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Swab, Jeffrey J; LaSalvia, Jerry; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Strong, Kevin T; Danna, Dominic; Ragan, Meredith E; Ritt, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    In Tabor's classical studies of the deformation of metals, the yield stress (Y) and hardness (H) were shown to be related according to H/Y {approx} 3 for complete or fully plastic deformation. Since then it has been anecdotally shown for ceramics that this ratio is <3. Interest exists to explore this further so Hertzian indentation was used to measure the apparent yield stress of numerous ceramics and metals and their results were compared with each material's load-dependent Knoop hardness. The evaluated ceramics included standard reference materials for hardness (silicon nitride and tungsten carbide), silicon carbide, alumina, and glass. Several steel compositions were also tested for comparison. Knoop hardness measurements at 19.6 N (i.e., toward 'complete or fully plastic deformation'), showed that 2 < H/Y < 3 for the metals and 0.8 < H/Y < 1.8 for the glasses and ceramics. Being that H/Y {ne} 3 for the ceramics indicates that Tabor's analysis is either not applicable to ceramics or that full plastic deformation is not achieved with a Knoop indentation or both.

  3. Hard Times Hit Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Hard-to-grasp dollar amounts are forcing real cuts in K-12 education at a time when the cost of fueling buses and providing school lunches is increasing and the demands of the federal No Child Left Behind Act still loom larger over states and districts. "One of the real challenges is to continue progress in light of the economy," said Gale Gaines,…

  4. Work Hard. Be Nice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Jay

    2009-01-01

    In 1994, fresh from a two-year stint with Teach for America, Mike Feinberg and Dave Levin inaugurated the Knowledge Is Power Program (KIPP) in Houston with an enrollment of 49 5th graders. By this Fall, 75 KIPP schools will be up and running, setting children from poor and minority families on a path to college through a combination of hard work,…

  5. SUPER HARD SURFACED POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, Louis K; Bhattacharya, R; Blau, Peter Julian; Clemons, Art; Eberle, Cliff; Evans, H B; Janke, Christopher James; Jolly, Brian C; Lee, E H; Leonard, Keith J; Trejo, Rosa M; Rivard, John D

    2010-01-01

    High energy ion beam surface treatments were applied to a selected group of polymers. Of the six materials in the present study, four were thermoplastics (polycarbonate, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polystyrene) and two were thermosets (epoxy and polyimide). The particular epoxy evaluated in this work is one of the resins used in formulating fiber reinforced composites for military helicopter blades. Measures of mechanical properties of the near surface regions were obtained by nanoindentation hardness and pin on disk wear. Attempts were also made to measure erosion resistance by particle impact. All materials were hardness tested. Pristine materials were very soft, having values in the range of approximately 0.1 to 0.5 GPa. Ion beam treatment increased hardness by up to 50 times compared to untreated materials. For reference, all materials were hardened to values higher than those typical of stainless steels. Wear tests were carried out on three of the materials, PET, PI and epoxy. On the ion beam treated epoxy no wear could be detected, whereas the untreated material showed significant wear.

  6. Piezoelectric aluminum nitride nanoelectromechanical actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Nipun; Wabiszewski, Graham E.; Mahameed, Rashed; Felmetsger, Valery V.; Tanner, Shawn M.; Carpick, Robert W.; Piazza, Gianluca

    2009-08-01

    This letter reports the implementation of ultrathin (100 nm) aluminum nitride (AlN) piezoelectric layers for the fabrication of vertically deflecting nanoactuators. The films exhibit an average piezoelectric coefficient (d31˜-1.9 pC/N), which is comparable to its microscale counterpart. This allows vertical deflections as large as 40 nm from 18 μm long and 350 nm thick multilayer cantilever bimorph beams with 2 V actuation. Furthermore, in-plane stress and stress gradients have been simultaneously controlled. The films exhibit leakage currents lower than 2 nA/cm2 at 1 V, and have an average relative dielectric constant of approximately 9.2 (as in thicker films). These material characteristics and actuation results make the AlN nanofilms ideal candidates for the realization of nanoelectromechanical switches for low power logic applications.

  7. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  8. Silicon nitride microwave photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Roeloffzen, Chris G H; Zhuang, Leimeng; Taddei, Caterina; Leinse, Arne; Heideman, René G; van Dijk, Paulus W L; Oldenbeuving, Ruud M; Marpaung, David A I; Burla, Maurizio; Boller, Klaus-J

    2013-09-23

    We present an overview of several microwave photonic processing functionalities based on combinations of Mach-Zehnder and ring resonator filters using the high index contrast silicon nitride (TriPleX™) waveguide technology. All functionalities are built using the same basic building blocks, namely straight waveguides, phase tuning elements and directional couplers. We recall previously shown measurements on high spurious free dynamic range microwave photonic (MWP) link, ultra-wideband pulse generation, instantaneous frequency measurements, Hilbert transformers, microwave polarization networks and demonstrate new measurements and functionalities on a 16 channel optical beamforming network and modulation format transformer as well as an outlook on future microwave photonic platform integration, which will lead to a significantly reduced footprint and thereby enables the path to commercially viable MWP systems. PMID:24104179

  9. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    SciTech Connect

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  10. Mass dependence of nitride sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elovikov, S. S.; Khrustachev, I. K.; Mosunov, A. S.; Yurasova, V. E.

    2003-08-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the sputtering yield Y for BN, AlN and GaN polycrystals of wurtzite structure as a function of the masses m 1 of bombarding ions with energies from 200 to 2000 eV. A nonmonotonic behavior of the Y ( m 1 ) curve was obtained for the irradiation by low-energy ions, the curve having a maximum with a position being dependent on m 2 / m 1 ( m 2 is the average mass of atoms in a compound). For AlN and GaN the maximum was observed at m 2 / m 1 = 2, and for BN at m 2 / m 1 = 1. The effect of the mass of bombarding ions on the mean energies and energy spectra of sputtered particles, the depth of sputtering origin, and the generation of emitted atoms for nitrides was also investigated and discussed.

  11. Precursors for Carbon Nitride Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Prashantha, M.; Gopal, E. S. R.; Ramesh, K.

    2011-07-15

    Nano structured carbon nitride films were prepared by pyrolysis assisted chemical vapour deposition. Pyrrole (C{sub 4}H{sub 5}N), Pyrrolidine (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}N), Azabenzimidazole (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}N{sub 3}) and Triazine (C{sub 6}H{sub 15}N{sub 3}) were used as precursors. The vibrational modes observed for C-N and C = N from FTIR spectra confirms the bonding of nitrogen with carbon. XPS core level spectra of C 1s and N 1s also show the formation of bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms. The nitrogen content in the prepared samples was found to be around 25 atomic %.

  12. Repair welding on nitrided carbon steel pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Baumert, K.L.

    1994-12-31

    A carbon steel pipe containing primarily ammonia at 750--850 F developed a nitrided case 15--20 mils (0.4--0.5mm) deep. This did not affect the performance of the pipe during operation, however, repair welding was not possible because of cracking. A laboratory procedure was developed wherein nitrided pipe could be successfully welded. The technique consisted of stress relieving the pipe before welding. No post weld stress relief was necessary to effect a sound weld.

  13. Nitride fuels irradiation performance data base

    SciTech Connect

    Brozak, D.E.; Thomas, J.K.; Peddicord, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    An irradiation performance data base for nitride fuels has been developed from an extensive literature search and review that emphasized uranium nitride, but also included performance data for mixed nitrides ((U,Pu)N) and carbonitrides ((U,Pu)C,N) to increase the quantity and depth of pin data available. This work represents a very extensive effort to systematically collect and organize irradiation data for nitride-based fuels. The data base has many potential applications. First, it can facilitate parametric studies of nitride-based fuels to be performed using a wide range of pin designs and operating conditions. This should aid in the identification of important parameters and design requirements for multimegawatt and SP-100 fuel systems. Secondly, the data base can be used to evaluate fuel performance models. For detailed studies, it can serve as a guide to selecting a small group of pin specimens for extensive characterization. Finally, the data base will serve as an easily accessible and expandable source of irradiation performance information for nitride fuels.

  14. Modelling of the layer evolution during nitriding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, U.; Oseguera, J.; Schabes, P.

    1995-12-31

    The evolution of concomitant layers of nitrides is presented. The layer formation is experimentally achieved through two processes: Nitriding with a weakly ionized plasma and nitrogen post-discharge nitriding. The nitriding processes were performed on samples of pure iron and carbon steel. Nitriding temperatures were close but different from the eutectoid transformation point temperature. The experimental layer growth pattern is compared with a model of mass transfer, in which interface mass balance is considered. In the model the authors have considered the formation of one and two compact nitride layers. For short time of treatment, it is shown that a parabolic profile does not satisfactorily describe the layer growth.

  15. Ultrasonic characterization of materials hardness

    PubMed

    Badidi Bouda A; Benchaala; Alem

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental technique has been developed to measure velocities and attenuation of ultrasonic waves through a steel with a variable hardness. A correlation between ultrasonic measurements and steel hardness was investigated. PMID:10829663

  16. Functionally gradient hard carbon composites for improved adhesion and wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Roger Jagdish

    A new approach is proposed for fabricating biomedical devices that last longer and are more biocompatible than those presently available. In this approach, a bulk material is chosen that has desirable mechanical properties (low modulus, high strength, high ductility and high fatigue strength). This material is coated with corrosion-resistant, wear-resistant, hard, and biocompatible hard carbon films. One of the many forms of carbon, tetrahedral amorphous carbon, consists mainly of sp3-bonded atoms. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon possesses properties close to diamond in terms of hardness, atomic smoothness, and inertness. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon and diamond films usually contain large amounts of compressive and sometimes tensile stresses; adhesive failure from these stresses has limited widespread use of these materials. This research involves processing, characterization and modeling of functionally gradient tetrahedral amorphous carbon and diamond composite films on metals (cobalt-chromium and titanium alloys) and polymers (polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene) used in biomedical applications. Multilayer discontinuous thin films of titanium carbide, titanium nitride, aluminum nitride, and tungsten carbide have been developed to control stresses and graphitization in diamond films. A morphology of randomly interconnected micron sized diamond crystallites provides increased toughness and stress reduction. Internal stresses in tetrahedral amorphous carbon were reduced via incorporation of carbide forming elements (silicon and titanium) and noncarbide forming elements (copper, platinum, and silver). These materials were produced using a novel target design during pulsed laser deposition. These alloying atoms reduce hardness and sp3-bonded carbon content, but increase adhesion and wear resistance. Silver and platinum provide the films with antimicrobial properties, and silicon provides bioactivity and aids bone formation. Bilayer coatings were created that couple

  17. Electron/phonon coupling in group-IV transition-metal and rare-earth nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, A. B.; Rockett, A.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2013-11-21

    Transport electron/phonon coupling parameters and Eliashberg spectral functions α{sub tr}{sup 2}F(ℏω) are determined for group-IV transition-metal (TM) nitrides TiN, ZrN, and HfN, and the rare-earth (RE) nitride CeN using an inversion procedure based upon temperature-dependent (4 < T < 300 K) resistivity measurements of high-crystalline-quality stoichiometric epitaxial films grown on MgO(001) by magnetically-unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering. Transport electron/phonon coupling parameters λ{sub tr} vary from 1.11 for ZrN to 0.82 for HfN, 0.73 for TiN, and 0.44 for CeN. The small variation in λ{sub tr} among the TM nitrides and the weak coupling in CeN are consistent with measured superconducting transition temperatures 10.4 (ZrN), 9.18 (HfN), 5.35 (TiN), and <4 K for CeN. The Eliashberg spectral function describes the strength and energy spectrum of electron/phonon coupling in conventional superconductors. Spectral peaks in α{sup 2}F(ℏω), corresponding to regions in energy-space for which electrons couple to acoustic ℏω{sub ac} and optical ℏω{sub op} phonon modes, are centered at ℏω{sub ac} = 33 and ℏω{sub op} = 57 meV for TiN, 25 and 60 meV for ZrN, 18 and 64 meV for HfN, and 21 and 39 meV for CeN. The acoustic modes soften with increasing cation mass; optical mode energies remain approximately constant for the TM nitrides, but are significantly lower for the RE nitride due to a lower interatomic force constant. Optical/acoustic peak-intensity ratios are 1.15 ± 0.1 for all four nitrides, indicating similar electron/phonon coupling strengths α{sub tr}(ℏω) for both modes.

  18. Direct access to macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with inverse opal structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weitian; DiSalvo, Francis J

    2015-03-21

    We report a facile synthesis of single-phase, nanocrystalline macroporous chromium nitride and chromium titanium nitride with an inverse opal morphology. The material is characterized using XRD, SEM, HR-TEM/STEM, TGA and XPS. Interconversion of macroporous CrN to Cr2O3 and back to CrN while retaining the inverse opal morphology is also demonstrated. PMID:25705745

  19. Surface modification by gas nitriding for improving cavitation erosion resistance of CP-Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haibin; Cui, Zhenduo; Li, Zhaoyang; Zhu, Shengli; Yang, Xianjin

    2014-04-01

    Gas nitriding process has been used to increase the surface hardness of titanium, in this study we used this technique to improve the cavitation erosion resistance (Rce) of commercial purity titanium (CP-Ti). We also studied microstructure, phase constituents, hardness and the effect of processing parameters on Rce of the treated samples. The results indicated that the Rce of the treated samples was related to the processing parameters. The sample treated at 850 °C for 4 h has the highest Rce, which was attributed to the compound layer (CL) with a hard, dense and free-defects microstructure. With increasing the nitriding temperature and duration, the Rce of the treated samples decreased due to the excessive oxide and defects formed in the CL. When the CL was removed, the treated sample exhibited an excellent cavitation erosion behavior. It was supposed to be due to the existence of the residual compressive stresses field in the nitrogen diffusion zone, which played an important role in preventing microcracks initiation and propagation to interior for cavitation damage.

  20. Plasma surface interaction in hot filament cathode arc discharge used to nitride steel substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, R. P.; Singh, O.; Aggarwal, V.; Malik, H. K.; Kumari, Nisha

    2012-10-01

    Plasma-assisted nitriding process is a well developed technique for increasing the surface hardness. The process is energy efficient, environment friendly and versatile to treat samples of various shapes and sizes. Though the use of this process in industry is established, there are several scientific questions in the basic understanding of the migration of ions, electrons and radicals and plasma surface interaction. We have studied these processes in an experimental system developed with hot cathode arc discharge plasma. A mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen is utilized for plasma generation. Negatively biased steel substrate is nitrided in this plasma. The hot cathode arc discharge plasma source is utilized to independently monitor and optimise the plasma and the work piece parameters. Substrate bias and temperature, which are the important parameters for achieving the desirable surface hardness, are regulated. Hardness depth profile and nitrogen content in the hardened sample are also measured. Transport and diffusion of ions, electrons, radicals and neutrals are considered to explain the results.

  1. Hard-pan soils - Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hard pans, hard layers, or compacted horizons, either surface or subsurface, are universal problems that limit crop production. Hard layers can be caused by traffic or soil genetic properties that result in horizons with high density or cemented soil particles; these horizons have elevated penetrati...

  2. Materials processing and in-vivo animal studies of nitrided hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Nancy Elizabeth

    2000-10-01

    Calcium phosphate bioceramics are currently being used in medicine and dentistry, for reconstruction or repair of diseased or injured bone, but with limited success. Incorporating nitrogen into phosphate glasses has resulted in improved properties, and it is proposed that similar benefits may be gained from nitriding calcium phosphate bioceramics for bone implants as well. This work focuses on processing of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate bioceramics nitrided by using solid, liquid, gas and ion sources. These materials were characterized by chemical, structural, mechanical, and biological methods to determine both the material structure and their suitability as implant materials. Calcium nitride and NaPON glass were unsatisfactory sources of nitrogen for hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramics. Calcium nitride, Ca3N2, is reacts with water vapor in the air, releasing ammonia, and leaving behind crystals of calcium oxide, CaO. The calcium oxide byproduct decreases the chemical stability of hydroxyapatite and HA/TCP composites in simulated body fluid. Sodium phosphorus oxynitride (NaPON) glass, in the form of a liquid sintering aid for HA, produces an inhomogeneous, composite as well. Hydroxyapatite heated at 800C in an ammonia atmosphere produces a homogeneous material with up to 2 wt% N. Infrared spectroscopy indicates cyanamide ions, CN22-, are formed by the incorporated nitrogen and impurity carbon. The use of 15N-doped ammonia results in an 15N NMR peak at 83.2 ppm, indicating P--N bonding. Raman spectroscopy may also indicate P--N bonding, but it is inconclusive. In a limited study, nitrogen may decrease the hardness and fracture toughness of the phosphate ceramic, hydroxyapatite, contrary to results expected for nitrogen in phosphate glasses. Nitrogen ions are incorporated in hydroxyapatite by ion implantation, with lower energies producing higher nitrogen contents. The highest concentration achieved was 3.55 wt% N, as determined

  3. Fretting wear behavior of laser-nitrided Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe alloy fabricated by laser melting deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Shangguan, Y. J.; Tang, H. B.; Wang, H. M.

    2014-09-01

    Fretting wear behavior of laser-nitrided titanium alloy (Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe) fabricated by laser melting deposition (LMD) has been investigated to explore surface engineering for protection against wear damage of laser melting deposited titanium alloy. The morphology and volume of the wear scars of unmodified and laser-nitrided LMD Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-1Cr-1Fe tested at different frequencies, 10 and 50 Hz, were studied using non-contact three-dimensional surface profilometer and scanning electron microscope. Friction coefficients measured at different frequencies or loading forces were compared for unmodified and laser-nitrided LMD specimens. Experimental results show that laser-nitrided LMD specimens have shown fretting resistance superior to unmodified LMD specimens due to the presence of hard TiN dendrites in the laser-nitrided layer. W-shaped wear scar caused by local rotation of fretting ball at the two ends of the scar was observed. Given a constant loading force of 50 N, unmodified and laser-nitrided LMD specimens exhibited similar friction coefficients and their friction coefficients increased with test frequency. The friction coefficients of both specimens increased with the reduction of normal load, which corresponds to the trend in Hertzian contact model.

  4. Effect of active screen plasma nitriding pretreatment on wear behavior of TiN coating deposited by PACVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoufi, M.; Mirdamadi, Sh.; Mahboubi, F.; Ahangarani, Sh.; Mahdipoor, M. S.; Elmkhah, H.

    2012-08-01

    Titanium based alloys are used extensively for improving wear properties of different parts due to their high hardness contents. Titanium nitride (TiN) is among these coatings which can be deposited on surface using various techniques such as CVD, PVD and PACVD. Their weak interface with substrate is one major drawback which can increase the total wear in spite of favorite wear behavior of TiN. Disc shaped samples from AISI H13 (DIN 1.2344) steel were prepared in this study. Single TiN coating was deposited on some of them while others have experienced a TiN deposition by active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN). Hardness at the surface and depth of samples was measured through Vickers micro hardness test which revealed 1810 Hv hardness as the maximum values for a dual-layered ASPN-TiN. Pin-on-disc wear test was done in order to study the wear mechanism. In this regard, the wear behavior of samples was investigated against pins from 100Cr6 (Din 1.3505) bearing steel and tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) steel. It was evidenced that the dual-layer ASPN-TiN coating has shown the least weight loss with the best wearing behavior because of its high hardness values, stable interface and acceptable resistance against peeling during wearing period.

  5. Growth of epitaxial iron nitride ultrathin film on zinc-blende gallium nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, J.; Lin, W.; Wang, K.; Chinchore, A.; Shi, M.; Ingram, D. C.; Smith, A. R.; Sun, K.; Lucy, J. M.; Hauser, A. J.; Yang, F. Y.

    2010-07-15

    The authors report the growth of iron nitride on zinc-blende gallium nitride using molecular beam epitaxy. First, zinc-blende GaN is grown on a magnesium oxide substrate having (001) orientation; second, an ultrathin layer of FeN is grown on top of the GaN layer. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction is used to monitor the surface during growth, and a well-defined epitaxial relationship is observed. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to reveal the epitaxial continuity at the gallium nitride-iron nitride interface. Surface morphology of the iron nitride, similar to yet different from that of the GaN substrate, can be described as plateau valley. The FeN chemical stoichiometry is probed using both bulk and surface sensitive methods, and the magnetic properties of the sample are revealed.

  6. Identification of nitriding mechanisms in high purity reaction bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The rapid, low-temperature nitriding results from surface effects on the Si particles beginning with loss of chemisorbed H and sequential formation of thin amorphous Si nitride layers. Rapid complete conversion to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} during the fast reaction can be inhibited when either too few or too many nuclei form on Si particels. Optimally, {approximately} 10 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nuclei form per Si particles under rapid, complete nitridation conditions. Nitridation during the slow reaction period appears to progress by both continued reaction of nonpreferred Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} growth interfaces and direct nitridation of the remaining Si/vapor interfaces.

  7. Identification of nitriding mechanisms in high purity reaction bonded silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    The rapid, low-temperature nitriding results from surface effects on the Si particles beginning with loss of chemisorbed H and sequential formation of thin amorphous Si nitride layers. Rapid complete conversion to Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] during the fast reaction can be inhibited when either too few or too many nuclei form on Si particels. Optimally, [approximately] 10 Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] nuclei form per Si particles under rapid, complete nitridation conditions. Nitridation during the slow reaction period appears to progress by both continued reaction of nonpreferred Si[sub 3]N[sub 4] growth interfaces and direct nitridation of the remaining Si/vapor interfaces.

  8. Nitride Fuel Modeling Recommendation for Nitride Fuel Material Property Measurement Priority

    SciTech Connect

    William Carmack; Richard Moore

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this effort was to provide the basis for a model that effectively predicts nitride fuel behavior. Material property models developed for the uranium nitride fuel system have been used to approximate the general behavior of nitride fuels with specific property models for the transuranic nitride fuels utilized as they become available. The AFCI fuel development program now has the means for predicting the behavior of the transuranic nitride fuel compositions. The key data and models needed for input into this model include: Thermal conductivity with burnup Fuel expansion coefficient Fuel swelling with burnup Fission gas release with burnup. Although the fuel performance model is a fully functional FEA analysis tool, it is limited by the input data and models.

  9. Nitride precipitation in compositionally heterogeneous alloys: Nucleation, growth and coarsening during nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Landeghem, H. P.; Gouné, M.; Redjaïmia, A.

    2012-02-01

    A theoretical approach is proposed to take into the account nucleation, growth and coarsening of nitrides in alloys featuring heterogeneous nitrogen content. It is based on physical considerations and accounts for both bulk nitrogen diffusion, which results from the nitriding process and nitrides precipitation kinetics. It predicts local information such as average particle density, radius and volume fraction of nitrides as a function of depth. The work presented in this paper leads to two important conclusions. First, the precipitation rate is not so high that precipitation can be considered as infinitely faster than the diffusion of nitrogen into the bulk. Second, the precipitation state at a given depth depends on the local interaction between nucleation, growth and coarsening phenomena, themselves depending on the local nitrogen content. Finally, the precipitation in alloys with heterogeneous nitrogen content induced by nitriding is radically different from classical precipitation in a single phase where the driving force for precipitation is consumed.

  10. Titanium nitride as a seed layer for Heusler compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niesen, Alessia; Glas, Manuel; Ludwig, Jana; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Sahoo, Roshnee; Ebke, Daniel; Arenholz, Elke; Reiss, Günter

    2015-12-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) shows low resistivity at room temperature (27 μΩ cm), high thermal stability and thus has the potential to serve as seed layer in magnetic tunnel junctions. High quality TiN thin films with regard to the crystallographic and electrical properties were grown and characterized by x-ray diffraction and 4-terminal transport measurements. Element specific x-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed pure TiN inside the thin films. To investigate the influence of a TiN seed layer on a ferro(i)magnetic bottom electrode in magnetic tunnel junctions, an out-of-plane magnetized Mn2.45Ga as well as in- and out-of-plane magnetized Co2FeAl thin films were deposited on a TiN buffer, respectively. The magnetic properties were investigated using a superconducting quantum interference device and anomalous Hall effect for Mn2.45Ga. Magneto optical Kerr effect measurements were carried out to investigate the magnetic properties of Co2FeAl. TiN buffered Mn2.45Ga thin films showed higher coercivity and squareness ratio compared to unbuffered samples. The Heusler compound Co2FeAl showed already good crystallinity when grown at room temperature on a TiN seed-layer.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  12. Titanium nitride as a seed layer for Heusler compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Niesen, Alessia Glas, Manuel; Ludwig, Jana; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Reiss, Günter; Sahoo, Roshnee; Ebke, Daniel; Arenholz, Elke

    2015-12-28

    Titanium nitride (TiN) shows low resistivity at room temperature (27 μΩ cm), high thermal stability and thus has the potential to serve as seed layer in magnetic tunnel junctions. High quality TiN thin films with regard to the crystallographic and electrical properties were grown and characterized by x-ray diffraction and 4-terminal transport measurements. Element specific x-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed pure TiN inside the thin films. To investigate the influence of a TiN seed layer on a ferro(i)magnetic bottom electrode in magnetic tunnel junctions, an out-of-plane magnetized Mn{sub 2.45}Ga as well as in- and out-of-plane magnetized Co{sub 2}FeAl thin films were deposited on a TiN buffer, respectively. The magnetic properties were investigated using a superconducting quantum interference device and anomalous Hall effect for Mn{sub 2.45}Ga. Magneto optical Kerr effect measurements were carried out to investigate the magnetic properties of Co{sub 2}FeAl. TiN buffered Mn{sub 2.45}Ga thin films showed higher coercivity and squareness ratio compared to unbuffered samples. The Heusler compound Co{sub 2}FeAl showed already good crystallinity when grown at room temperature on a TiN seed-layer.

  13. Superconducting multipole corrector magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    A novel concept of superconducting multipole corrector magnet is discussed. This magnet assembled from 12 identical racetrack type coils and can generate any combination of dipole, quadrupole and sextupole magnetic fields. The coil groups are powered from separate power supplies. In the case of normal dipole, quadrupole and sextupole fields the total field is symmetrical relatively the magnet median plane and there are only five powered separately coil groups. This type multipole corrector magnet was proposed for BTeV, Fermilab project and has following advantages: universal configuration, simple manufacturing and high mechanical stability. The results of magnetic design including the field quality and magnetic forces in comparison with known shell type superconducting correctors are presented.

  14. Landscape of superconducting membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Denef, Frederik; Hartnoll, Sean A.

    2009-06-15

    The AdS/CFT correspondence may connect the landscape of string vacua and the 'atomic landscape' of condensed matter physics. We study the stability of a landscape of IR fixed points of N=2 large N gauge theories in 2+1 dimensions, dual to Sasaki-Einstein compactifications of M theory, toward a superconducting state. By exhibiting instabilities of charged black holes in these compactifications, we show that many of these theories have charged operators that condense when the theory is placed at a finite chemical potential. We compute a statistical distribution of critical superconducting temperatures for a subset of these theories. With a chemical potential of 1 mV, we find critical temperatures ranging between 0.24 and 165 K.

  15. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  16. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  17. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  18. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, Robert P.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-02-26

    This study examines the field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds which has a history dating back to the 1960s. This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC₆ and YbC₆ in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic statesmore » and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.« less

  19. Tunable superconductivity in decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zheng; Allain, Adrien; Marty, Laetitia; Bendiab, Nedjma; Toulemonde, Pierre; Strobel, Pierre; Coraux, Johann; Bouchiat, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    Graphene offers an exposed bidimensional gas of high mobility charge carriers with gate tunable density. Its chemical inertness offers an outstanding platform to explore exotic 2D superconductivity. Superconductivity can be induced in graphene by means of proximity effect (by depositing a set of superconducting metal clusters such as lead or tin nanoparticles). The influence of decoration material, density or particles and disorder of graphene will be discussed. In the case of disordered graphene, Tin decoration leads to a gate-tunable superconducting-to-insulator quantum phase transition. Superconductivity in graphene is also expected to occur under strong charge doping (induced either by gating or under chemical decoration, in analogy with graphite intercalated compounds). I will also show preliminary results showing the influence of Calcium intercalation of few layer graphene and progress toward the demonstration of intrinsic superconductivity in such systems. Work supported by EU GRANT FP7-NMP GRENADA.

  20. Plasma model of superconducting crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netesova, Nadezhda P.

    2016-04-01

    Within inharmonious plasma oscillation model the superconducting crystal AB is considered consisting of two subsystems 2AB=A2+B2. In high-temperature superconductors spontaneous division into two phases: superconducting and isolating was revealed. Phase separation was caused by plasma instability. It is obtained the transition superconducting phase temperature dependence Tc = F (q12, q1, q2, V12, V1, V2) on the isotopic substitution physical parameters: q - initial and component interaction parameters, V - volume in initial and component crystal lattices. The isotopic transition superconducting phase temperature displacement ΔTc is associated with the change of the initial and component interaction and crystal lattice parameters. From the plasma mechanism of superconductivity follows superconducting crystals exist at room temperature.

  1. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  2. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  3. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A; Batista, Cristian D

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  4. TPX superconducting PF magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, H.; Christiansen, O.; Cizek, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Westinghouse team has extended the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory advanced conceptual design for the TPX PF magnets through preliminary design. This is the first time superconducting PF magnets have been designed for application in a tokamak. Particular challenges were encountered and solved in developing the coil insulation system, welding the helium stubs, and winding the coil. The authors fabricated a coil using copper stranded CIC conductor, to surface manufacturability issues and demonstrate the solutions.

  5. Superconducting Magnetic Projectile Launcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Lawson, Daniel D.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed projectile launcher exploits Meissner effect to transfer much of kinetic energy of relatively massive superconducting plunger to smaller projectile, accelerating projectile to high speed. Because it operates with magnetic fields, launcher not limited by gas-expansion thermodynamics. Plunger energized mechanically and/or chemically, avoiding need for large electrical power supplies and energy-storage systems. Potential applications include launching of projectiles for military purposes and for scientific and industrial tests of hypervelocity impacts.

  6. High-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Ken C.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and near-term prospects are briefly reviewed with particular reference to Lockheed's experience. Emphasis is placed on an integrated approach to systems applications of HTSC thin films, which hold the greatest near-term promise. These new materials are applied in the production of smaller, more sensitive, and more efficient electronic components to meet the ever-increasing demands for higher-performance signal acquisition and processing systems, communications systems, and computers.

  7. Superconducting cascade electron refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Camarasa-Gómez, M.; Giazotto, F.; Di Marco, A.; Hekking, F. W. J.; Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, H.

    2014-05-12

    The design and operation of an electronic cooler based on a combination of superconducting tunnel junctions is described. The cascade extraction of hot-quasiparticles, which stems from the energy gaps of two different superconductors, allows for a normal metal to be cooled down to about 100 mK starting from a bath temperature of 0.5 K. We discuss the practical implementation, potential performance, and limitations of such a device.

  8. Supercurrent in superconducting graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopnin, N. B.; Sonin, E. B.

    2010-07-01

    The problem of supercurrent in superconducting graphene is revisited and the supercurrent is calculated within the mean-field model employing the two-component wave functions on a honeycomb lattice with pairing between different valleys in the Brillouin zone. We show that the supercurrent within the linear approximation in the order-parameter-phase gradient is always finite even if the doping level is exactly zero.

  9. Superconducting terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong; Singh, Ranjan; O' Hara, John F; Azad, Abul K; Trugman, Stuart A; Jia, Quanxi; Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    During the past ten years subwavelength metallic structures have enabled metamaterials exhibiting exotic physical properties that are not possible or difficult to realize using naturally occurring materials, This bottom-up metamaterial approach is particularly attractive in the terahertz (THz) frequency range, where the THz gap is inherently associated with the lack of materials with appropriate reponse. In fact THz metamaterial devices have accomplished unprecedented performance towards practical applications. In these devices, the key is to incorporate natural materials, e,g, semiconductors, as the metamaterial substrates or integration parts of metamaterial structures. The active or dynamic tunability of metamaterials is through the application of external stimuli such as temperature, photoexcitation, or electric field. to modify the capacitive gaps in split-ring resonators (SRRs), It becomes clear that we would not be able to do much on the metallic SRRs, i.e. the metal conductivity and therefore the inductance largely remain constant not affected by external stimuli. Recently, there has been increasing interest in superconducting metamaterials towards loss reduction. Significant Joule losses have often prevented resonant metal metamaterials from achieving proposed applications. particularly in the optical frequency range. At low temperatures, superconducting materials possess superior conductivity than metals at frequencies up to THz. and therefore it is expected that superconducting melamaterials will have a lower loss than metal metamatetials, More interestingly, superconductors exhibit tunable complex conductivity over a wide range of values through change of temperature and application of photoexcitation, electrical currents and magnetic fields. Therefore, we would expect correspondingly tunable metamaterials. which originate from the superconducting materials composing the metamaterial, in contrast to tuning the metamaterial embedded environment.

  10. Superconducting cascade electron refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camarasa-Gómez, M.; Di Marco, A.; Hekking, F. W. J.; Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, H.; Giazotto, F.

    2014-05-01

    The design and operation of an electronic cooler based on a combination of superconducting tunnel junctions is described. The cascade extraction of hot-quasiparticles, which stems from the energy gaps of two different superconductors, allows for a normal metal to be cooled down to about 100 mK starting from a bath temperature of 0.5 K. We discuss the practical implementation, potential performance, and limitations of such a device.

  11. US Navy superconductivity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, Donald U.

    1991-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of the Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion) use LTS materials while space applications (millimeter wave electronics) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment to be conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity.

  12. Navy superconductivity efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  13. Superconducting dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shi-Dong; Harko, Tiberiu

    2015-04-01

    Based on the analogy with superconductor physics we consider a scalar-vector-tensor gravitational model, in which the dark energy action is described by a gauge invariant electromagnetic type functional. By assuming that the ground state of the dark energy is in a form of a condensate with the U(1) symmetry spontaneously broken, the gauge invariant electromagnetic dark energy can be described in terms of the combination of a vector and of a scalar field (corresponding to the Goldstone boson), respectively. The gravitational field equations are obtained by also assuming the possibility of a nonminimal coupling between the cosmological mass current and the superconducting dark energy. The cosmological implications of the dark energy model are investigated for a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker homogeneous and isotropic geometry for two particular choices of the electromagnetic type potential, corresponding to a pure electric type field, and to a pure magnetic field, respectively. The time evolutions of the scale factor, matter energy density and deceleration parameter are obtained for both cases, and it is shown that in the presence of the superconducting dark energy the Universe ends its evolution in an exponentially accelerating vacuum de Sitter state. By using the formalism of the irreversible thermodynamic processes for open systems we interpret the generalized conservation equations in the superconducting dark energy model as describing matter creation. The particle production rates, the creation pressure and the entropy evolution are explicitly obtained.

  14. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  15. Silicon superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Duvauchelle, J. E.; Francheteau, A.; Marcenat, C.; Lefloch, F.; Chiodi, F.; Débarre, D.; Hasselbach, K.; Kirtley, J. R.

    2015-08-17

    We have studied a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) made from a single layer thin film of superconducting silicon. The superconducting layer is obtained by heavily doping a silicon wafer with boron atoms using the gas immersion laser doping technique. The SQUID is composed of two nano-bridges (Dayem bridges) in a loop and shows magnetic flux modulation at low temperature and low magnetic field. The overall behavior shows very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the Ginzburg-Landau equations.

  16. Model for excess noise in voltage-biased superconducting bolometers.

    PubMed

    Gildemeister, J M; Lee, A T; Richards, P L

    2001-12-01

    We are developing superconducting transition-edge bolometers for far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. The bolometers described here are suspended by thin legs of silicon nitride for thermal isolation. At frequencies between 200 mHz and 10-50 Hz these devices show white noise at their thermal fluctuation limit (NEP approximately 10(-17) W/ radicalHz). At higher frequencies a broad peak appears in the noise spectrum, which we attribute to a combination of thermal fluctuations in complex thermal circuits and electrothermal feedback. Detailed noise calculations fit the noise measured in three different devices that were specifically designed to test the model. We discuss how changes in bolometer materials can shift the noise peak above the frequency range of interest for most applications. PMID:18364926

  17. Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K

    2013-08-06

    The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

  18. Korea's developmental program for superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Gye-Won; Won, Dong-Yeon; Kuk, Il-Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul

    1995-01-01

    Superconductivity research in Korea was firstly carried out in the late 70's by a research group in Seoul National University (SNU), who fabricated a small scale superconducting magnetic energy storage system under the financial support from Korea Electric Power Company (KEPCO). But a few researchers were involved in superconductivity research until the oxide high Tc superconductor was discovered by Bednorz and Mueller. After the discovery of YBaCuO superconductor operating above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K)(exp 2), Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) sponsored a special fund for the high Tc superconductivity research to universities and national research institutes by recognizing its importance. Scientists engaged in this project organized 'High Temperature Superconductivity Research Association (HITSRA)' for effective conducting of research. Its major functions are to coordinate research activities on high Tc superconductivity and organize the workshop for active exchange of information. During last seven years the major superconductivity research has been carried out through the coordination of HITSRA. The major parts of the Korea's superconductivity research program were related to high temperature superconductor and only a few groups were carrying out research on conventional superconductor technology, and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI) have led this research. In this talk, the current status and future plans of superconductivity research in Korea will be reviewed based on the results presented in interim meeting of HITSRA, April 1-2, 1994. Taejeon, as well as the research activity of KAERI.

  19. Superconductivity in intercalated molybdenum disulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R.; Hadek, V.; Rembaum, A.

    1972-01-01

    X-ray studies show the existence of two different types of expansions of the intercalated unit cell in both Na and K compounds. Two different phases are also indicated in the superconducting behavior of the K compound. All intercalated samples studied show a superconducting transition. K and Rb compounds become superconductors in the temperature range from 6.5 to 6.0 K. The Na compounds become superconductors at about 4.5 K. In all cases, the superconductivity disappears upon a short exposure of the sample to air. This phenomenon confirms that the superconductivity is due to the presence of the alkali metal.

  20. Superconducting linacs: some recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper is a review of superconducting linacs that are of interest for heavy-ion acceleration. Most of the paper is concerned with energy boosters for projectiles from tandem electrostatic accelerators, the only application for which superconducting linacs are now used for heavy-ion acceleration. There is also a brief discussion of the concept of a superconducting injector linac being developed as a replacement of the tandem in a multi-stage acceleration system. Throughout, the emphasis is on the technology of the superconducting linac, including some attention to the relationships between resonator design parameters and accelerator performance characteristics. 21 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Cosmic sparks from superconducting strings.

    PubMed

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-01

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents approximately 10{5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{-1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model. PMID:18851517

  2. Cosmic Sparks from Superconducting Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2008-10-03

    We investigate cosmic sparks from cusps on superconducting cosmic strings in light of the recently discovered millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al.. We find that the observed duration, fluence, spectrum, and event rate can be reasonably explained by grand unification scale superconducting cosmic strings that carry currents {approx}10{sup 5} GeV. The superconducting string model predicts an event rate that falls off only as S{sup -1/2}, where S is the energy flux, and hence predicts a population of very bright bursts. Other surveys, with different observational parameters, are shown to impose tight constraints on the superconducting string model.

  3. Superconducting tape characterization under flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, A.; Suárez, P.; Cáceres, D.; Pérez, B.; Cordero, E.; Castaño, A.

    2002-08-01

    Electrotechnical applications of high temperature superconducting materials are limited by the difficulty of constructing classical windings with ceramic materials. While Bi-2223 tape may be a solution, it cannot be bent to radii less than a certain value since its superconducting capacity disappears. We describe an automated measurement system of the characteristics of this tape under flexion. It consists of a device that coils the tape over cylinders with different radii. At the same time, the parameters of its superconducting behaviour (e.g. resistance) are taken and processed. This system was developed at the “Benito Mahedero Laboratory of Superconducting Electrical Applications” in the University of Extremadura.

  4. Hard Metal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bech, A. O.; Kipling, M. D.; Heather, J. C.

    1962-01-01

    In Great Britain there have been no published reports of respiratory disease occurring amongst workers in the hard metal (tungsten carbide) industry. In this paper the clinical and radiological findings in six cases and the pathological findings in one are described. In two cases physiological studies indicated mild alveolar diffusion defects. Histological examination in a fatal case revealed diffuse pulmonary interstitial fibrosis with marked peribronchial and perivascular fibrosis and bronchial epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia. Radiological surveys revealed the sporadic occurrence and low incidence of the disease. The alterations in respiratory mechanics which occurred in two workers following a day's exposure to dust are described. Airborne dust concentrations are given. The industrial process is outlined and the literature is reviewed. The toxicity of the metals is discussed, and our findings are compared with those reported from Europe and the United States. We are of the opinion that the changes which we would describe as hard metal disease are caused by the inhalation of dust at work and that the component responsible may be cobalt. Images PMID:13970036

  5. Spins, phonons, and hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    In crystals (and/or glasses) with localized sp{sup 3} or spd-bonding orbitals, dislocations have very low mobilities, making the crystals very hard. Classical Peierls-Nabarro theory does not account for the low mobility. The breaking of spin-pair bonds which creates internal free-radicals must be considered. Therefore, a theory based on quantum mechanics has been proposed (Science, 261, 1436 (1993)). It has been applied successfully to diamond, Si, Ge, SiC, and with a modification to TiC and WC. It has recently been extended to account for the temperature independence of the hardness of silicon at low temperatures together with strong softening at temperatures above the Debye temperature. It is quantitatively consistent with the behaviors of the Group 4 elements (C, Si, Ge, Sn) when their Debye temperatures are used as normalizing factors; and appears to be consistent with data for TiC if an Einstein temperature for carbon is used. Since the Debye temperature marks the approximate point at which phonons of atomic wavelengths become excited (as contrasted with collective acoustic waves), this confirms the idea that the process which limits dislocation mobility is localized to atomic dimensions (sharp kinks).

  6. Transition Metal Nitrides: A First Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    The present work describes the structural stability and electronic and mechanical properties of transition metal nitrides (TmNs: B1 cubic structure (cF8, Fm ‾ overline 3 m)) using first principles density functional theory (DFT) within generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The lattice constant of TmNs increases with increasing the atomic radii of the transition metals. Stability of the TmNs decreases from IVB to VIB groups due to increase in formation energy/atom. The bonding characteristics of these nitrides have been explained based on electronic density of states and charge density. All the TmNs satisfy Born stability criteria in terms of elastic constants except CrN and MoN that do not exist in equilibrium binary phase diagrams. The groups IVB and V-VIB nitrides are associated with brittle and ductile behaviour based on G/B ratios, respectively. The estimated melting temperatures of these nitrides exhibit reasonably good agreement with calculated with B than those of the C11 for all nitrides.

  7. Silicon nitride ceramic having high fatigue life and high toughness

    DOEpatents

    Yeckley, Russell L.

    1996-01-01

    A sintered silicon nitride ceramic comprising between about 0.6 mol % and about 3.2 mol % rare earth as rare earth oxide, and between about 85 w/o and about 95 w/o beta silicon nitride grains, wherein at least about 20% of the beta silicon nitride grains have a thickness of greater than about 1 micron.

  8. X-ray diffraction investigation of ultrafine boron nitride powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gurov, S.V.; Chukalin, V.I.; Rezchikova, T.V.; Torbov, V.J.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an x-ray diffraction analysis of ultrafine boron nitride powders of different mean particle sizes. Diffraction spectra of the ultrafine boron nitride powders were obtained using a DRON-1 apparatus. The experimental facts are indicative of a turbostratic character of deformation of the hexagonal lattice of ultrafinely divided boron nitride.

  9. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures.

  10. Optimization of superconducting tiling pattern for superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1996-09-17

    An apparatus and method for reducing magnetic field inhomogeneities which produce rotational loss mechanisms in high temperature superconducting magnetic bearings are disclosed. Magnetic field inhomogeneities are reduced by dividing high temperature superconducting structures into smaller structures, and arranging the smaller structures into tiers which stagger the magnetic field maximum locations of the smaller structures. 20 figs.

  11. Single gallium nitride nanowire lasers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Justin C; Choi, Heon-Jin; Knutsen, Kelly P; Schaller, Richard D; Yang, Peidong; Saykally, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    There is much current interest in the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, because the cylindrical geometry and strong two-dimensional confinement of electrons, holes and photons make them particularly attractive as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronic devices, including lasersand nonlinear optical frequency converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor of much practical interest, because it is widely used in electrically pumped ultraviolet-blue light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. Recent progress in microfabrication techniques has allowed stimulated emission to be observed from a variety of GaN microstructures and films. Here we report the observation of ultraviolet-blue laser action in single monocrystalline GaN nanowires, using both near-field and far-field optical microscopy to characterize the waveguide mode structure and spectral properties of the radiation at room temperature. The optical microscope images reveal radiation patterns that correlate with axial Fabry-Perot modes (Q approximately 10(3)) observed in the laser spectrum, which result from the cylindrical cavity geometry of the monocrystalline nanowires. A redshift that is strongly dependent on pump power (45 meV microJ x cm(-2)) supports the idea that the electron-hole plasma mechanism is primarily responsible for the gain at room temperature. This study is a considerable advance towards the realization of electron-injected, nanowire-based ultraviolet-blue coherent light sources. PMID:12618824

  12. Boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Huang, Yang; Terao, Takeshi; Mitome, Masanori; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2010-06-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered material with a graphite-like structure in which planar networks of BN hexagons are regularly stacked. As the structural analogue of a carbon nanotube (CNT), a BN nanotube (BNNT) was first predicted in 1994; since then, it has become one of the most intriguing non-carbon nanotubes. Compared with metallic or semiconducting CNTs, a BNNT is an electrical insulator with a band gap of ca. 5 eV, basically independent of tube geometry. In addition, BNNTs possess a high chemical stability, excellent mechanical properties, and high thermal conductivity. The same advantages are likely applicable to a graphene analogue-a monatomic layer of a hexagonal BN. Such unique properties make BN nanotubes and nanosheets a promising nanomaterial in a variety of potential fields such as optoelectronic nanodevices, functional composites, hydrogen accumulators, electrically insulating substrates perfectly matching the CNT, and graphene lattices. This review gives an introduction to the rich BN nanotube/nanosheet field, including the latest achievements in the synthesis, structural analyses, and property evaluations, and presents the purpose and significance of this direction in the light of the general nanotube/nanosheet developments. PMID:20462272

  13. Hardness of covalent compounds: Roles of metallic component and d valence electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Li, Lei; Liu, Zhongyuan; Yu, Dongli; He, Julong; Liu, Riping; Xu, Bo; Tian, Yongjun; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2008-07-01

    Based on the detailed analysis of chemical bonds, we present a Vickers hardness expression for the covalency-dominant crystals such as transition-metal carbides and nitrides. Hardness is dependent not only on bond length, bond density, and ionicity of bond [F. M. Gao et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 015502 (2003)] but also on the metallicity of bond and orbital form in the crystal structure of a compound, and all of these parameters can be determined by first-principles calculations. The calculated hardness using our expression has a good agreement with the experimental values for known monocarbides, mononitrides of transition metals, and cubic Zr3N4 with Th3P4 structure. In addition, we have predicted the Vickers hardness of the recently predicted tetragonal BC3 and tetragonal B2CN, and the recently synthesized pyrite PtN2 and marcasite OsN2. Our method offers one useful technique to search for superhard materials in transition-metal carbides and nitrides.

  14. Tunable TiN or NbTiN resonators and couplers using nonlinear kinetic inductance for superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, Michael; Gao, Jiansong; Bockstiegel, Clint; Sandberg, Martin; Pappas, David

    2014-03-01

    Nitride superconductors such as TiN and NbTiN have a nonlinear kinetic inductance when driven at high current. Using this current-tunable reactance, we have designed superconducting devices that are tunable with a DC current without using Josephson junctions. We show that when the DC current is directly coupled to a lumped element resonator, the resonant frequency can be tuned by >4% without inducing loss. In other circuits, we can use a DC current to independently tune the coupling of a long microwave transmission line to a standard superconducting resonator from zero to maximum coupling. In addition to characterizing the non-linear current response of these materials, these tunable devices could be used as a tunable coupler in transmon qubits, by adjusting the strength of the cavity's Purcell effect to the qubit as needed. They also have potential to be used as tunable filters or parametric amplifiers in superconducting circuits.

  15. Indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride quantum wells grown on polar and nonpolar gallium nitride substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Kun-Yu

    Nonpolar (m-plane or a-plane) gallium nitride (GaN) is predicted to be a potential substrate material to improve luminous efficiencies of nitride-based quantum wells (QWs). Numerical calculations indicated that the spontaneous emission rate in a single In0.15Ga0.85N/GaN QW could be improved by ˜2.2 times if the polarization-induced internal field was avoided by epitaxial deposition on nonpolar substrates. A challenge for nonpolar GaN is the limited size (less than 10x10 mm2) of substrates, which was addressed by expansion during the regrowth by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy (HVPE). Subsurface damage in GaN substrates were reduced by annealing with NH3 and N2 at 950°C for 60 minutes. It was additionally found that the variation of m-plane QWs' emission properties was significantly increased when the substrate miscut toward a-axis was increased from 0° to 0.1°. InGaN/GaN QWs were grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane and m-plane GaN substrates. The QWs were studied by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy with different incident electron beam probe currents (0.1 nA ˜ 1000 nA). Lower emission intensities and longer peak wavelengths from c-plane QWs were attributed to the Quantum-confined Stark Effect (QCSE). The emission intensity ratios of m-plane QWs to c-plane QWs decreased from 3.04 at 1 nA to 1.53 at 1000 nA. This was identified as the stronger screening effects of QCSE at higher current densities in c-plane QWs. To further investigate these effects in a fabricated structure, biased photoluminescence measurements were performed on m-plane InGaN/GaN QWs. The purpose was to detect the possible internal fields induced by the dot-like structure in the InGaN layer through the response of these internal fields under externally applied fields. No energy shifts of the QWs were observed, which was attributed to strong surface leakage currents.

  16. A study on various fabrication routes for preparing multilayered cubic boron nitride films and sp(3)-like boron nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sing Fai

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) has a sp3-bonded structure which leads to excellent mechanical properties. Though cBN-rich films have been successfully fabricated by many techniques, the adhesion of the films is still unsatisfactory due to the high stresses. The maximum sustainable thickness of cBN-rich films with good adhesion is widely reported to be around 200 nm, so many practical applications of cBN coatings are hindered. In this study, we designed a series of deposition schemes in a logical sequence, in order to explore whether stress can be released, or other structural forms of BN with potential applications can be made, and to gain more fundamental understanding on the growth mechanisms of various phases observed in the films. Various fabrication processes were employed according to the following sequence: (1) A single-step process. It was showed that the maximum tolerable thickness of the cBN-rich films prepared by our system (183nm) was compatible with the result in literatures (200nm). (2) A multilayered deposition process. A thick sp2-bonded boron nitride (sP2-BN) buffer layer which was relatively deformable was added, and hence some stresses were released so as to allow a 643nm-thick, 87vol.% cBN-rich layer with acceptable adhesion to grow on top. (3) An advanced multilayer process with subsequent annealing process. A zirconium layer was pre-deposited to remove the soft buffer layer after postannealing. The interface could be strengthened as the zirconium-boride/nitride was formed. (4) Ion assist deposition at unheated condition. Composite BN films containing sp3 nanoclusters embedded in a sp2-BN matrix were fabricated. The IR technique was not sensitive enough to detect spa nanoclusters, but their presence was verified by the results of other measurements. In particular, the sp3 content can be over 30vo1.%, with a hardness 20GPa. The influences of the assist beam energy and substrate temperature on the generation of the sp3 nanoclusters were investigated

  17. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I.; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M.; Veerapandian, Savita K. P.; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A.; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B. G.; Silhanek, Alejandro V.

    2016-06-01

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories.

  18. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer.

    PubMed

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M; Veerapandian, Savita K P; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B G; Silhanek, Alejandro V

    2016-01-01

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories. PMID:27263660

  19. Imprinting superconducting vortex footsteps in a magnetic layer

    PubMed Central

    Brisbois, Jérémy; Motta, Maycon; Avila, Jonathan I.; Shaw, Gorky; Devillers, Thibaut; Dempsey, Nora M.; Veerapandian, Savita K. P.; Colson, Pierre; Vanderheyden, Benoît; Vanderbemden, Philippe; Ortiz, Wilson A.; Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Kramer, Roman B. G.; Silhanek, Alejandro V.

    2016-01-01

    Local polarization of a magnetic layer, a well-known method for storing information, has found its place in numerous applications such as the popular magnetic drawing board toy or the widespread credit cards and computer hard drives. Here we experimentally show that a similar principle can be applied for imprinting the trajectory of quantum units of flux (vortices), travelling in a superconducting film (Nb), into a soft magnetic layer of permalloy (Py). In full analogy with the magnetic drawing board, vortices act as tiny magnetic scribers leaving a wake of polarized magnetic media in the Py board. The mutual interaction between superconducting vortices and ferromagnetic domains has been investigated by the magneto-optical imaging technique. For thick Py layers, the stripe magnetic domain pattern guides both the smooth magnetic flux penetration as well as the abrupt vortex avalanches in the Nb film. It is however in thin Py layers without stripe domains where superconducting vortices leave the clearest imprints of locally polarized magnetic moment along their paths. In all cases, we observe that the flux is delayed at the border of the magnetic layer. Our findings open the quest for optimizing magnetic recording of superconducting vortex trajectories. PMID:27263660

  20. Adiabatic shear mechanisms for the hard cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Caixu; Wang, Bo; Liu, Xianli; Feng, Huize; Cai, Chunbin

    2015-05-01

    The most important consequence of adiabatic shear phenomenon is formation of sawtooth chip. Lots of scholars focused on the formation mechanism of sawtooth, and the research often depended on experimental approach. For the present, the mechanism of sawtooth chip formation still remains some ambiguous aspects. This study develops a combined numerical and experimental approach to get deeper understanding of sawtooth chip formation mechanism for Polycrystalline Cubic Boron Nitride (PCBN) tools orthogonal cutting hard steel GCr15. By adopting the Johnson-Cook material constitutive equations, the FEM simulation model established in this research effectively overcomes serious element distortions and cell singularity in high strain domain caused by large material deformation, and the adiabatic shear phenomenon is simulated successfully. Both the formation mechanism and process of sawtooth are simulated. Also, the change features regarding the cutting force as well as its effects on temperature are studied. More specifically, the contact of sawtooth formation frequency with cutting force fluctuation frequency is established. The cutting force and effect of cutting temperature on mechanism of adiabatic shear are investigated. Furthermore, the effects of the cutting condition on sawtooth chip formation are researched. The researching results show that cutting feed has the most important effect on sawtooth chip formation compared with cutting depth and speed. This research contributes a better understanding of mechanism, feature of chip formation in hard turning process, and supplies theoretical basis for the optimization of hard cutting process parameters.

  1. High-coercivity samarium-iron-nitrogen from nitriding melt-spun ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkerton, F.E.; Fuerst, C.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Melt spinning has proven to be an excellent technique for magnetic hardening of a variety of permanent magnet materials, especially Nd-Fe-B. Recently, a new permanent magnet material has been discovered by nitriding the compound Sm[sub 2]Fe[sub 17] to obtain Sm[sub 2]Fe[sub 17]N[sub x]. The authors have obtained magnetically hard Sm-Fe-N ribbons with a room-temperature intrinsic coercivity H[sub ci] = 22 kOe (1.8 MA/m) by nitriding melt-spun Sm-Fe precursor ribbons. Best results were obtained by grinding the ribbons to a <25 [mu]m powder, then heat treating the powder in vacuum for 1 h at 700 C prior to nitriding in N[sub 2] gas at 450 to 480 C. X-ray diffraction shows that the primary phase is TbCu[sub 7]-type Sm[sub 2]Fe[sub 17]N[sub x], a disordered hexagonal modification of the rhombohedral Sm[sub 2]Fe[sub 17] phase.

  2. Auger recombination and free-carrier absorption in nitrides from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2010-03-01

    Solid-state optoelectronic devices in the blue/green part of the visible spectrum, based on group-III-nitride materials and their alloys, have a wide array of applications as well as the potential to replace incandescent and fluorescent light bulbs for general illumination. Progress in nitride light emitters research, however, is hampered by the efficiency droop effect, a severe drop in quantum efficiency at high drive currents that particularly affects devices emitting at longer wavelengths. The efficiency droop has been the subject of extensive research and several mechanisms have been proposed as its origin. One such mechanism is the Auger recombination process, a non-radiative recombination mechanism induced by free carrier scattering via the Coulomb interaction. An additional loss mechanism that affects laser devices in particular is the reabsorption of the generated light by free carriers in the device. We used first-principles calculations to study the direct as well as the indirect Auger recombination and free-carrier absorption processes, mediated by electron-phonon and alloy scattering, and identify their importance in nitride light emitters. Since the various loss processes are hard to decouple experimentally, first-principles calculations are an indispensable tool to investigate the various loss mechanisms in isolation and determine their significance.

  3. Influence of argon gas flow on mechanical and electrical properties of sputtered titanium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojier, Kaykhosrow; Savaloni, Hadi; Shokrai, Ebrahim; Dehghani, Zohreh; Dehnavi, Naser Zare

    2013-07-01

    Titanium nitrides have good mechanical, tribological, electrical, biomedical, and optical properties; therefore, they are used to harden and protect cutting and sliding surfaces, as semiconductor devices, and as a nontoxic exterior for biomedical applications. The dependence of the mechanical and electrical properties of titanium nitride thin films deposited on silicon substrates by direct-current reactive magnetron sputtering technique on argon gas flow (in the range of 8 to 20 sccm) was investigated. The crystallographic structure of the films was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), while surface morphology was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Mechanical and electrical properties of these films were investigated by nanoindentation test and a four-point probe instrument, respectively. The XRD patterns showed titanium nitride (TiN) formation with a face-centered cubic structure for all samples. It was also observed that (111) crystallographic direction was the preferred orientation for TiN thin films which became more pronounced with increasing argon gas flow. The AFM images showed a granular structure for TiN layers. The hardness, crystallite/grain size (obtained from XRD and AFM), and surface roughness increased with the flow of argon gas, while elastic modulus and dislocation density in the films decreased. The study on electrical properties showed that the dependence of voltage with current for all samples was linear, and film resistivity was increased with argon gas flow.

  4. Scale-up of microwave nitridation of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitride parts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Kiggans, J.O.; Garvey, G.A.

    1997-10-01

    Scale-up were performed in which microwave heating was used to fabricate reaction-bonded silicon nitride and sintered reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN). Tests were performed in both a 2.45 GHz, 500 liter and a 2.45 GHz, 4000 liter multimode cavities. The silicon preforms processed in the studies were clevis pins for diesel engines. Up to 230 samples were processed in a single microwave furnace run. Data were collected which included weight gains for nitridation and sintering studies were performed using a conventional resistance-heated furnace.

  5. High T(c) superconducting NbN films deposited at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, S.; Lamb, J. L.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The dc reactive magnetron sputtering process yields stoichiometric NbN films with superconducting transition temperature T(c) as high as 15.7 K on substrates as varied as glass, glazed ceramic, fused quartz, and sapphire. These films posses fcc (B1) structure and (111) texture. The most dominant factors governing the formation of the transition metal nitrides are the relative metal and nitrogen fluxes incident on the substrate and the background argon pressure (which dictates the overall reactive sites and residence times for nitrogen).

  6. Waveguide-integrated single- and multi-photon detection at telecom wavelengths using superconducting nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, Simone; Kahl, Oliver; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-04-13

    We investigate single- and multi-photon detection regimes of superconducting nanowire detectors embedded in silicon nitride nanophotonic circuits. At near-infrared wavelengths, simultaneous detection of up to three photons is observed for 120 nm wide nanowires biased far from the critical current, while narrow nanowires below 100 nm provide efficient single photon detection. A theoretical model is proposed to determine the different detection regimes and to calculate the corresponding internal quantum efficiency. The predicted saturation of the internal quantum efficiency in the single photon regime agrees well with plateau behavior observed at high bias currents.

  7. PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films mechanical characterization using membrane point load deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagolini, Alvise; Picciotto, Antonino; Crivellari, Michele; Conci, Paolo; Bellutti, Pierluigi

    2016-02-01

    An analysis of the mechanical properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) silicon nitrides is presented, using micro fabricated silicon nitride membranes under point load deflection. The membranes are made of PECVD silicon-rich nitride and low stress nitride films. The mechanical performance of the bended membranes is examined both with analytical models and finite element simulation in order to extract the elastic modulus and residual stress values. The elastic modulus of low stress silicon nitride is calculated using stress free analytical models, while for silicon-rich silicon nitride and annealed low stress silicon nitride it is estimated with a pre-stressed model of point-load deflection. The effect of annealing both in nitrogen and hydrogen atmosphere is evaluated in terms of residual stress, refractive index and thickness variation. It is demonstrated that a hydrogen rich annealing atmosphere induces very little change in low stress silicon nitride. Nitrogen annealing effects are measured and shown to be much higher in silicon-rich nitride than in low stress silicon nitride. An estimate of PECVD silicon-rich nitride elastic modulus is obtained in the range between 240-320 GPa for deposited samples and 390 GPa for samples annealed in nitrogen atmosphere. PECVD low stress silicon nitride elastic modulus is estimated to be 88 GPa as deposited and 320 GPa after nitrogen annealing.

  8. Mononuclear and Terminally Bound Titanium Nitrides.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Maria E; Pinter, Balazs; Carroll, Patrick J; Mindiola, Daniel J

    2015-07-22

    The Ti(III) azido complex (PN)2Ti(N3) (PN(-) = (N-(2-(diisopropylphosphino)-4-methylphenyl)-2,4,6-trimethylanilide), can be reduced with KC8 to afford the nitride salt [μ2-K(OEt2)]2[(PN)2Ti≡N]2 in excellent yield. While treatment of the dimer with 18-crown-6 yields a mononuclear nitride, complete encapsulation of the alkali metal with cryptand provides the terminally bound nitride as a discrete salt [K(2,2,2-Kryptofix)][(PN)2Ti≡N]. All complexes reported here have been structurally confirmed and also spectroscopically, and the Ti-Nnitride bonding has been probed theoretically via DFT-based methods. PMID:26132335

  9. Infrared bolometers with silicon nitride micromesh absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Turner, A. D.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive far infrared and millimeter wave bolometers fabricated from a freestanding membrane of low stress silicon nitride are reported. The absorber, consisting of a metallized silicon nitride micromesh thermally isolated by radial legs of silicon nitride, is placed in an integrating cavity to efficiently couple to single mode or multiple mode infrared radiation. This structure provides low heat capacity, low thermal conduction and minimal cross section to energetic particles. A neutron transmutation doped Ge thermister is bump bonded to the center of the device and read out with evaporated Cr-Au leads. The limiting performance of the micromesh absorber is discussed and the recent results obtained from a 300 mK cold stage are summarized.

  10. Microstructural characterization of nitrided Timetal 834.

    PubMed

    Moskalewicz, T; Grogger, W; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A

    2006-09-01

    The microstructure of Timetal 834, in as-received condition and after nitriding under glow discharge has been examined by light microscopy and analytical transmission electorn microscopy (TEM) methods (SAED, EDS, EELS and EFTEM). The microstructure of the as-received alloy consists of the alpha phase and a small amount of the beta phase. Silicide precipitates (Zr5Si4) are present both inside the grains and at the grain boundaries. TEM investigations of cross-sectional thin foils allow for detailed analysis of the nitrided layer microstructure. It was found that the nitrided layer exhibits a graded character with continuously varying nitrogen content. The outermost sublayer consists of nanocrystals of delta-TiN. The following sublayers consist mainly of delta'-Ti2N and epsilon-Ti2N grains. The last sublayer, closest to the substrate, is identified as a nitrogen-rich alpha(N) solid solution containing up to 14 at% of nitrogen. PMID:17059528

  11. Superconducting Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1995-01-01

    Devices offer switching speeds greater than semiconducting counterparts. High-Tc superconducting field-effect transistors (SUPEFETs) investigated for use as electronic switches in delay-line-type microwave phase shifters. Resemble semiconductor field-effect transistors in some respects, but their operation based on different principle; namely, electric-field control of transition between superconductivity and normal conductivity.

  12. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  13. Power superconducting power transmission cable

    DOEpatents

    Ashworth, Stephen P.

    2003-06-10

    The present invention is for a compact superconducting power transmission cable operating at distribution level voltages. The superconducting cable is a conductor with a number of tapes assembled into a subconductor. These conductors are then mounted co-planarly in an elongated dielectric to produce a 3-phase cable. The arrangement increases the magnetic field parallel to the tapes thereby reducing ac losses.

  14. High critical current superconducting tapes

    DOEpatents

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-09-23

    Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of a superconducting RE-BCO layer including a mixture of rare earth metals, e.g., yttrium and europium, where the ratio of yttrium to europium in the RE-BCO layer ranges from about 3 to 1 to from about 1.5 to 1.

  15. A superconducting magnetic gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  16. Superconducting Nanotube Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönenberger, Christian

    2007-03-01

    In this talk, I will focus on charge transport in carbon nanotube devices with superconducting source and drain contacts in the finite-bias non-equilibrium transport regime. As contact material, bi-layers of Au and Al were used and transport has been studied at temperatures in the 0.1 K range. Because carbon nanotubes are quantum dots (qdots), we in fact explore the physics of qdots with superconducting contacts, something which only recently became possible thanks to carbon nanotubes and most recently to semiconducting nanowires. In my talk, I will first summarize our pioneering work on multiwalled carbon nanotubes in which we could demonstrate proximity induced effects both in the weak and the strong coupling regime. In the latter an intriguing interplay between superconductivity and Kondo physics appears. Then, I will discuss the physics of multiple Andreev reflection in a situation when only one resonant state is present and compare this with experimental results. Finally, I will compare our early results with our recent measurements on single-wall carbon nanotubes. This work has been supported by the Swiss Institute on Nanoscience, the Swiss National Science Foundation, EU projects DIENOW and HYSWITCH. I gratefully acknowledge contribution of the following persons to this work (in alphabetic order): B. Babic, W. Belzig, C. Bruder, M. R. Buitelaar, J.-C. Cuevas, A. Eichler, L. Forro, J. Gobrecht, M. Gr"aber, M. Iqbal, T. Kontos, A. Levy Yeyati, A. Martin-Rodero, T. Nussbaumer, S. Oberholzer, C. Strunk, H. Scharf, J. Trbovic, E. Vecino, M. Weiss

  17. Rolling-contact fatigue resistance of hard coatings on bearing steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.

    1999-08-18

    Ball- and roller-bearings of the 21st Century are expected to perform better and last longer while operating under more stringent conditions than before. To meet these great expectations, researchers have been constantly exploring new bearing designs or refining existing ones, optimizing microstructure and chemistry of bearing materials, and alternatively, they have been considering the use of thin hard coatings for improved bearing performance and durability. Already, some laboratory tests have demonstrated that hard nitride, carbide (such as TiN, TiC, etc.) and diamondlike carbon (DLC) coatings can be very effective in prolonging the fatigue lives of bearing steels. This paper provides an overview of the recent developments in hard coatings for bearing applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that thin, hard coatings can effectively prolong the fatigue lives of bearing steel substrates. In particular, thinner hard coatings (i.e., 0.2 - 1 {micro}m thick) provide exceptional improvements in the fatigue lives of bearing steel substrates. In contrast, thicker hard coatings suffer micro fracture and delamination when tested under high contact stresses, hence are ineffective and may even have a negative effect on bearing life. Overall, it was concluded that thin hard coatings may offer new possibilities for bearing industry in meeting the performance and durability needs of the 21st Century.

  18. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  19. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Lundy, R.A.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Remsbottom, R.H.

    1987-07-01

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed.

  20. Superconducting dipole electromagnet

    DOEpatents

    Purcell, John R.

    1977-07-26

    A dipole electromagnet of especial use for bending beams in particle accelerators is wound to have high uniformity of magnetic field across a cross section and to decrease evenly to zero as the ends of the electromagnet are approached by disposing the superconducting filaments of the coil in the crescent-shaped nonoverlapping portions of two intersecting circles. Uniform decrease at the ends is achieved by causing the circles to overlap increasingly in the direction of the ends of the coil until the overlap is complete and the coil is terminated.