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Sample records for harnessing endogenous mirnas

  1. Harnessing endogenous growth factor activity modulates stem cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hudalla, Gregory A.; Kouris, Nicholas A.; Koepsel, Justin T.; Ogle, Brenda M.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of specific serum-borne biomolecules (e.g. heparin) on growth factor-dependent cell behavior is often difficult to elucidate in traditional cell culture due to the random, non-specific nature of biomolecule adsorption from serum. We hypothesized that chemically well-defined cell culture substrates could be used to study the influence of sequestered heparin on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) behavior. Specifically, we used bio-inert self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) chemically modified with a bioinspired heparin-binding peptide (termed “HEPpep”) and an integrin-binding peptide (RGDSP) as stem cell culture substrates. Our results demonstrate that purified heparin binds to HEPpep SAMs in a dose-dependent manner, and serum-borne heparin binds specifically and in a dose-dependent manner to HEPpep SAMs. These heparin-sequestering SAMs enhance hMSC proliferation by amplifying endogenous fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and enhance hMSC osteogenic differentiation by amplifying endogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. The effects of heparin-sequestering are similar to the effects of supraphysiologic concentrations of recombinant FGF-2. hMSC phenotype is maintained over multiple population doublings on heparin-sequestering substrates in growth medium, while hMSC osteogenic differentiation is enhanced in a bone morphogenetic protein-dependent manner on the same substrates during culture in osteogenic induction medium. Together, these observations demonstrate that the influence of the substrate on stem cell phenotype is sensitive to the culture medium formulation. Our results also demonstrate that enhanced hMSC proliferation can be spatially localized by patterning the location of HEPpep on the substrate. Importantly, the use of chemically well-defined SAMs in this study eliminated the confounding factor of random, non-specific biomolecule adsorption, and identified serum-borne heparin as a key mediator of hMSC response to endogenous

  2. Harnessing endogenous stem/progenitor cells for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang H.; Lee, Francis Y.; Tarafder, Solaiman; Kao, Kristy; Jun, Yena; Yang, Guodong; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Current stem cell–based strategies for tissue regeneration involve ex vivo manipulation of these cells to confer features of the desired progenitor population. Recently, the concept that endogenous stem/progenitor cells could be used for regenerating tissues has emerged as a promising approach that potentially overcomes the obstacles related to cell transplantation. Here we applied this strategy for the regeneration of injured tendons in a rat model. First, we identified a rare fraction of tendon cells that was positive for the known tendon stem cell marker CD146 and exhibited clonogenic capacity, as well as multilineage differentiation ability. These tendon-resident CD146+ stem/progenitor cells were selectively enriched by connective tissue growth factor delivery (CTGF delivery) in the early phase of tendon healing, followed by tenogenic differentiation in the later phase. The time-controlled proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells by CTGF delivery successfully led to tendon regeneration with densely aligned collagen fibers, normal level of cellularity, and functional restoration. Using siRNA knockdown to evaluate factors involved in tendon generation, we demonstrated that the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates CTGF-induced proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells. Together, our findings support the use of endogenous stem/progenitor cells as a strategy for tendon regeneration without cell transplantation and suggest this approach warrants exploration in other tissues. PMID:26053662

  3. Harnessing endogenous miR-181a to segregate transgenic antigen receptor expression in developing versus post-thymic T cells in murine hematopoietic chimeras.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Kovalovsky, Damian; Beloeil, Laurent; Sant'angelo, Derek; Sadelain, Michel

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting complementary sequences, referred to as miRNA recognition elements (MREs), typically located in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. miR-181a is highly expressed in developing thymocytes and markedly downregulated in post-thymic T cells. We investigated whether endogenous miR-181a can be harnessed to segregate expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and TCRs between developing and mature T cells. Lentiviral-encoded antigen receptors were tagged with a miR-181a-specific MRE and transduced into mouse BM cells that were used to generate hematopoietic chimeras. Expression of a CAR specific for human CD19 (hCD19) was selectively suppressed in late double-negative and double-positive thymocytes, coinciding with the peak in endogenous miR-181a expression. Receptor expression was fully restored in post-thymic resting and activated T cells, affording protection against a subsequent challenge with hCD19+ tumors. Hematopoietic mouse chimeras engrafted with a conalbumin-specific TCR prone to thymic clonal deletion acquired peptide-specific T cell responsiveness only when the vector-encoded TCR transcript was similarly engineered to be subject to regulation by miR-181a. These results demonstrate the potential of miRNA-regulated transgene expression in stem cell-based therapies, including cancer immunotherapy. PMID:19033646

  4. Identification of Endogenous Controls for Analyzing Serum Exosomal miRNA in Patients with Hepatitis B or Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Liqun; Liu, Fei; Xiang, Guiming; Jiang, Dongneng; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Serum exosomal microRNAs (miRNAs) have received considerable attention as potential biomarkers for diagnosing cancer. The canonical technique for measuring miRNA transcript levels is reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). One prerequisite for validating RT-qPCR data is proper normalization with respect to stably expressed endogenous reference genes. However, genes that meet all of the criteria of a control gene for exosomal miRNAs have not yet been identified. To find out the control gene for exosomal miRNAs, we evaluated the expression stability of 11 well-known reference genes in circulating exosomes. In this study, we found that the combination of miR-221, miR-191, let-7a, miR-181a, and miR-26a can be an optimal gene reference set for normalizing the expression of liver-specific miRNAs. This combination enhanced the robustness of the relative quantification analyses. These findings highlight the importance of validating reference genes before quantifying target miRNAs. Furthermore, our findings will improve studies that monitor hepatitis progression and will aid in the discovery of noninvasive biomarkers to diagnose early stage HCC. PMID:25814782

  5. Harnessing heterologous and endogenous CRISPR-Cas machineries for efficient markerless genome editing in Clostridium

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Michael E.; Bruder, Mark R.; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A.; Chou, C. Perry

    2016-01-01

    Application of CRISPR-Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome editing across all domains of life. Here we report implementation of the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system in Clostridium pasteurianum for markerless genome editing. Since 74% of species harbor CRISPR-Cas loci in Clostridium, we also explored the prospect of co-opting host-encoded CRISPR-Cas machinery for genome editing. Motivation for this work was bolstered from the observation that plasmids expressing heterologous cas9 result in poor transformation of Clostridium. To address this barrier and establish proof-of-concept, we focus on characterization and exploitation of the C. pasteurianum Type I-B CRISPR-Cas system. In silico spacer analysis and in vivo interference assays revealed three protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences required for site-specific nucleolytic attack. Introduction of a synthetic CRISPR array and cpaAIR gene deletion template yielded an editing efficiency of 100%. In contrast, the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system generated only 25% of the total yield of edited cells, suggesting that native machinery provides a superior foundation for genome editing by precluding expression of cas9 in trans. To broaden our approach, we also identified putative PAM sequences in three key species of Clostridium. This is the first report of genome editing through harnessing native CRISPR-Cas machinery in Clostridium. PMID:27157668

  6. Harnessing heterologous and endogenous CRISPR-Cas machineries for efficient markerless genome editing in Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Michael E; Bruder, Mark R; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2016-01-01

    Application of CRISPR-Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome editing across all domains of life. Here we report implementation of the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system in Clostridium pasteurianum for markerless genome editing. Since 74% of species harbor CRISPR-Cas loci in Clostridium, we also explored the prospect of co-opting host-encoded CRISPR-Cas machinery for genome editing. Motivation for this work was bolstered from the observation that plasmids expressing heterologous cas9 result in poor transformation of Clostridium. To address this barrier and establish proof-of-concept, we focus on characterization and exploitation of the C. pasteurianum Type I-B CRISPR-Cas system. In silico spacer analysis and in vivo interference assays revealed three protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences required for site-specific nucleolytic attack. Introduction of a synthetic CRISPR array and cpaAIR gene deletion template yielded an editing efficiency of 100%. In contrast, the heterologous Type II CRISPR-Cas9 system generated only 25% of the total yield of edited cells, suggesting that native machinery provides a superior foundation for genome editing by precluding expression of cas9 in trans. To broaden our approach, we also identified putative PAM sequences in three key species of Clostridium. This is the first report of genome editing through harnessing native CRISPR-Cas machinery in Clostridium. PMID:27157668

  7. Genome-wide analysis of single non-templated nucleotides in plant endogenous siRNAs and miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Johnson, Nathan R; Coruh, Ceyda; Axtell, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Plant small RNAs are subject to various modifications. Previous reports revealed widespread 3' modifications (truncations and non-templated tailing) of plant miRNAs when the 2'-O-methyltransferase HEN1 is absent. However, non-templated nucleotides in plant heterochromatic siRNAs have not been deeply studied, especially in wild-type plants. We systematically studied non-templated nucleotide patterns in plant small RNAs by analyzing small RNA sequencing libraries from Arabidopsis, tomato, Medicago, rice, maize and Physcomitrella Elevated rates of non-templated nucleotides were observed at the 3' ends of both miRNAs and endogenous siRNAs from wild-type specimens of all species. 'Off-sized' small RNAs, such as 25 and 23 nt siRNAs arising from loci dominated by 24 nt siRNAs, often had very high rates of 3'-non-templated nucleotides. The same pattern was observed in all species that we studied. Further analysis of 24 nt siRNA clusters in Arabidopsis revealed distinct patterns of 3'-non-templated nucleotides of 23 nt siRNAs arising from heterochromatic siRNA loci. This pattern of non-templated 3' nucleotides on 23 nt siRNAs is not affected by loss of known small RNA 3'-end modifying enzymes, and may result from modifications added to longer heterochromatic siRNA precursors. PMID:27207877

  8. Genome-wide analysis of single non-templated nucleotides in plant endogenous siRNAs and miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Johnson, Nathan R.; Coruh, Ceyda; Axtell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant small RNAs are subject to various modifications. Previous reports revealed widespread 3′ modifications (truncations and non-templated tailing) of plant miRNAs when the 2′-O-methyltransferase HEN1 is absent. However, non-templated nucleotides in plant heterochromatic siRNAs have not been deeply studied, especially in wild-type plants. We systematically studied non-templated nucleotide patterns in plant small RNAs by analyzing small RNA sequencing libraries from Arabidopsis, tomato, Medicago, rice, maize and Physcomitrella. Elevated rates of non-templated nucleotides were observed at the 3′ ends of both miRNAs and endogenous siRNAs from wild-type specimens of all species. ‘Off-sized’ small RNAs, such as 25 and 23 nt siRNAs arising from loci dominated by 24 nt siRNAs, often had very high rates of 3′-non-templated nucleotides. The same pattern was observed in all species that we studied. Further analysis of 24 nt siRNA clusters in Arabidopsis revealed distinct patterns of 3′-non-templated nucleotides of 23 nt siRNAs arising from heterochromatic siRNA loci. This pattern of non-templated 3′ nucleotides on 23 nt siRNAs is not affected by loss of known small RNA 3′-end modifying enzymes, and may result from modifications added to longer heterochromatic siRNA precursors. PMID:27207877

  9. Harnessing NGS and Big Data Optimally: Comparison of miRNA Prediction from Assembled versus Non-assembled Sequencing Data--The Case of the Grass Aegilops tauschii Complex Genome.

    PubMed

    Budak, Hikmet; Kantar, Melda

    2015-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, endogenous, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. As high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) and Big Data rapidly accumulate for various species, efforts for in silico identification of miRNAs intensify. Surprisingly, the effect of the input genomics sequence on the robustness of miRNA prediction was not evaluated in detail to date. In the present study, we performed a homology-based miRNA and isomiRNA prediction of the 5D chromosome of bread wheat progenitor, Aegilops tauschii, using two distinct sequence data sets as input: (1) raw sequence reads obtained from 454-GS FLX Titanium sequencing platform and (2) an assembly constructed from these reads. We also compared this method with a number of available plant sequence datasets. We report here the identification of 62 and 22 miRNAs from raw reads and the assembly, respectively, of which 16 were predicted with high confidence from both datasets. While raw reads promoted sensitivity with the high number of miRNAs predicted, 55% (12 out of 22) of the assembly-based predictions were supported by previous observations, bringing specificity forward compared to the read-based predictions, of which only 37% were supported. Importantly, raw reads could identify several repeat-related miRNAs that could not be detected with the assembly. However, raw reads could not capture 6 miRNAs, for which the stem-loops could only be covered by the relatively longer sequences from the assembly. In summary, the comparison of miRNA datasets obtained by these two strategies revealed that utilization of raw reads, as well as assemblies for in silico prediction, have distinct advantages and disadvantages. Consideration of these important nuances can benefit future miRNA identification efforts in the current age of NGS and Big Data driven life sciences innovation. PMID:26061358

  10. Safety harness

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, Larry W.

    1993-01-01

    A safety harness to be worn by a worker, especially a worker wearing a plastic suit thereunder for protection in a radioactive or chemically hostile environment, which safety harness comprises a torso surrounding portion with at least one horizontal strap for adjustably securing the harness about the torso, two vertical shoulder straps with rings just forward of the of the peak of the shoulders for attaching a life-line and a pair of adjustable leg supporting straps releasibly attachable to the torso surrounding portion. In the event of a fall, the weight of the worker, when his fall is broken and he is suspended from the rings with his body angled slightly back and chest up, will be borne by the portion of the leg straps behind his buttocks rather than between his legs. Furthermore, the supporting straps do not restrict the air supplied through hoses into his suit when so suspended.

  11. miRNA and Vascular Cell Movement

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Junming

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs are a new class of endogenous small RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Accumulating experimental evidence shows that miRNAs regulate cellular apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Dysregulation of miRNA expression leads to various human diseases including cancer and cardiovascular disease. miRNA maturation is regulated at multiple steps by different mechanisms, including miRNA editing, hairpin loop binding, self-regulation, and cross-talk with other signaling pathways. Vascular cell movement plays a pivotal role in the development of various cancers and cardiovascular diseases. miRNAs have been found to regulate vascular cell movement. Presently the chemically synthesized antagomir, miRNA mimics have been widely used in investigating the biological functions of miRNA genes. The viral vectors, including adenoviral, lentiviral, and adeno-associated viral vectors, have been used to efficiently overexpress or knockdown miRNAs in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, targeting vascular cell movement using miRNA-based drug or gene therapy would provide a novel therapeutic approach in the treatment of cancers and vascular diseases. PMID:21241758

  12. Phytoalexins, miRNAs and breast cancer: a review of phytochemical mediated miRNA regulation in breast cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A specific class of endogenous, non-coding RNAs, classified as microRNAs (miRNAs), has been identified. It has been found that miRNAs are associated with many biological processes and disease states, including all stages of cancer from initiation to tumor promotion and progression. These studies d...

  13. Unique expression, processing regulation, and regulatory network of peach (Prunus persica) miRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous single-stranded small RNA molecules (sRNA) that are fundamental post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Many conserved plant miRNAs play important roles in plant growth and development, but more species-specific miRNAs remain to be identified and charact...

  14. miRNA Inhibition in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Beavers, Kelsey R.; Nelson, Christopher E.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are noncoding RNA that provide an endogenous negative feedback mechanism for translation of messenger RNA (mRNA) into protein. Single miRNAs can regulate hundreds of mRNAs, enabling miRNAs to orchestrate robust biological responses by simultaneously impacting multiple gene networks. MiRNAs can act as master regulators of normal and pathological tissue development, homeostasis, and repair, which has recently motivated expanding efforts toward development of technologies for therapeutically modulating miRNA activity for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. This review highlights the tools currently available for miRNA inhibition and their recent therapeutic applications for improving tissue repair. PMID:25553957

  15. Viral miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Renne, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Since 2004, more than 200 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered in double-stranded DNA viruses, mainly herpesviruses and polyomaviruses (Nucleic Acids Res 32:D109-D111, 2004). miRNAs are short 22  ±  3 nt RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression by binding to 3'-untranslated regions (3'UTR) of target mRNAs, thereby inducing translational silencing and/or transcript degradation (Nature 431:350-355, 2004; Cell 116:281-297, 2004). Since miRNAs require only limited complementarity for binding, miRNA targets are difficult to determine (Mol Cell 27:91-105, 2007). To date, targets have only been experimentally verified for relatively few viral miRNAs, which either target viral or host cellular gene expression: For example, SV40 and related polyomaviruses encode miRNAs which target viral large T antigen expression (Nature 435:682-686, 2005; J Virol 79:13094-13104, 2005; Virology 383:183-187, 2009; J Virol 82:9823-9828, 2008) and miRNAs of α-, β-, and γ-herpesviruses have been implicated in regulating the transition from latent to lytic gene expression, a key step in the herpesvirus life cycle. Viral miRNAs have also been shown to target various host cellular genes. Although this field is just beginning to unravel the multiple roles of viral miRNA in biology and pathogenesis, the current data strongly suggest that virally encoded miRNAs are able to regulate fundamental biological processes such as immune recognition, promotion of cell survival, angiogenesis, proliferation, and cell differentiation. This chapter aims to summarize our current knowledge of viral miRNAs, their targets and function, and the challenges lying ahead to decipher their role in viral biology, pathogenesis, and for γ-herepsvirus-encoded miRNAs, potentially tumorigenesis. PMID:21431678

  16. miRNAs: roles and clinical applications in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Weakley, Sarah M; Zhang, Lidong; Kougias, Panagiotis; Lin, Peter H; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs are small, endogenously expressed noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, mainly at the post-transcriptional level, via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs. Functionally, an individual miRNA can regulate the expression of multiple target genes. The study of miRNAs is rapidly growing and recent studies have revealed a significant role of miRNAs in vascular biology and disease. Many miRNAs are highly expressed in the vasculature, and their expression is dysregulated in diseased vessels. Several miRNAs have been found to be critical modulators of vascular pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, lipoprotein metabolism, inflammation, arterial remodeling, angiogenesis, smooth muscle cell regeneration, hypertension, apoptosis, neointimal hyperplasia and signal transduction pathways. Thus, miRNAs may serve as novel biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for vascular disease. This article summarizes the current studies related to the disease correlations and functional roles of miRNAs in the vascular system and discusses the potential applications of miRNAs in vascular disease. PMID:21171923

  17. miRNAs: roles and clinical applications in vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Jamaluddin, Md Saha; Weakley, Sarah M; Zhang, Lidong; Kougias, Panagiotis; Lin, Peter H; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs are small, endogenously expressed noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression, mainly at the post-transcriptional level, via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs. Functionally, an individual miRNA can regulate the expression of multiple target genes. The study of miRNAs is rapidly growing and recent studies have revealed a significant role of miRNAs in vascular biology and disease. Many miRNAs are highly expressed in the vasculature, and their expression is dysregulated in diseased vessels. Several miRNAs have been found to be critical modulators of vascular pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, lipoprotein metabolism, inflammation, arterial remodeling, angiogenesis, smooth muscle cell regeneration, hypertension, apoptosis, neointimal hyperplasia and signal transduction pathways. Thus, miRNAs may serve as novel biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for vascular disease. This article summarizes the current studies related to the disease correlations and functional roles of miRNAs in the vascular system and discusses the potential applications of miRNAs in vascular disease. PMID:21171923

  18. Regulation of Gene Expression in Plants through miRNA Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanji; Ziegler, Todd E.; Roberts, James K.; Heck, Gregory R.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms possess a complex RNA-directed gene expression regulatory network allowing the production of unique gene expression patterns. A recent addition to the repertoire of RNA-based gene regulation is miRNA target decoys, endogenous RNA that can negatively regulate miRNA activity. miRNA decoys have been shown to be a valuable tool for understanding the function of several miRNA families in plants and invertebrates. Engineering and precise manipulation of an endogenous RNA regulatory network through modification of miRNA activity also affords a significant opportunity to achieve a desired outcome of enhanced plant development or response to environmental stresses. Here we report that expression of miRNA decoys as single or heteromeric non-cleavable microRNA (miRNA) sites embedded in either non-protein-coding or within the 3′ untranslated region of protein-coding transcripts can regulate the expression of one or more miRNA targets. By altering the sequence of the miRNA decoy sites, we were able to attenuate miRNA inactivation, which allowed for fine regulation of native miRNA targets and the production of a desirable range of plant phenotypes. Thus, our results demonstrate miRNA decoys are a flexible and robust tool, not only for studying miRNA function, but also for targeted engineering of gene expression in plants. Computational analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome revealed a number of potential miRNA decoys, suggesting that endogenous decoys may have an important role in natural modulation of expression in plants. PMID:21731706

  19. Impacts of Whole-Genome Triplication on MIRNA Evolution in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Wu, Jian; Liang, Jianli; Schnable, James C; Yang, Wencai; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short non-coding, endogenous RNAs that play essential roles in eukaryotes. Although the influence of whole-genome triplication (WGT) on protein-coding genes has been well documented in Brassica rapa, little is known about its impacts on MIRNAs. In this study, through generating a comprehensive annotation of 680 MIRNAs for B. rapa, we analyzed the evolutionary characteristics of these MIRNAs from different aspects in B. rapa. First, while MIRNAs and genes show similar patterns of biased distribution among subgenomes of B. rapa, we found that MIRNAs are much more overretained than genes following fractionation after WGT. Second, multiple-copy MIRNAs show significant sequence conservation than that of single-copy MIRNAs, which is opposite to that of genes. This indicates that increased purifying selection is acting upon these highly retained multiple-copy MIRNAs and their functional importance over singleton MIRNAs. Furthermore, we found the extensive divergence between pairs of miRNAs and their target genes following the WGT in B. rapa. In summary, our study provides a valuable resource for exploring MIRNA in B. rapa and highlights the impacts of WGT on the evolution of MIRNA. PMID:26527651

  20. NCCS Regression Test Harness

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-09-09

    The NCCS Regression Test Harness is a software package that provides a framework to perform regression and acceptance testing on NCCS High Performance Computers. The package is written in Python and has only the dependency of a Subversion repository to store the regression tests.

  1. Identification and Expression Analyses of miRNAs from Two Contrasting Flower Color Cultivars of Canna by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Amrita; Mishra, Parneeta; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are endogenous small RNA (sRNA) that play critical roles in plant development processes. Canna is an ornamental plant belonging to family Cannaceae. Here, we report for the first time the identification and differential expression of miRNAs in two contrasting flower color cultivars of Canna, Tropical sunrise and Red president. A total of 313 known miRNAs belonging to 78 miRNA families were identified from both the cultivars. Thirty one miRNAs (17 miRNA families) were specific to Tropical sunrise and 43 miRNAs (10 miRNA families) were specific to Red president. Thirty two and 18 putative new miRNAs were identified from Tropical sunrise and Red president, respectively. One hundred and nine miRNAs were differentially expressed in the two cultivars targeting 1343 genes. Among these, 16 miRNAs families targeting60 genes were involved in flower development related traits and five miRNA families targeting five genes were involved in phenyl propanoid and pigment metabolic processes. We further validated the expression analysis of a few miRNA and their target genes by qRT-PCR. Transcription factors were the major miRNA targets identified. Target validation of a few randomly selected miRNAs by RLM-RACE was performed but was successful with only miR162. These findings will help in understanding flower development processes, particularly the color development in Canna. PMID:26799570

  2. Identification and Expression Analyses of miRNAs from Two Contrasting Flower Color Cultivars of Canna by Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sribash; Tripathi, Abhinandan Mani; Yadav, Amrita; Mishra, Parneeta; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are endogenous small RNA (sRNA) that play critical roles in plant development processes. Canna is an ornamental plant belonging to family Cannaceae. Here, we report for the first time the identification and differential expression of miRNAs in two contrasting flower color cultivars of Canna, Tropical sunrise and Red president. A total of 313 known miRNAs belonging to 78 miRNA families were identified from both the cultivars. Thirty one miRNAs (17 miRNA families) were specific to Tropical sunrise and 43 miRNAs (10 miRNA families) were specific to Red president. Thirty two and 18 putative new miRNAs were identified from Tropical sunrise and Red president, respectively. One hundred and nine miRNAs were differentially expressed in the two cultivars targeting 1343 genes. Among these, 16 miRNAs families targeting 60 genes were involved in flower development related traits and five miRNA families targeting five genes were involved in phenyl propanoid and pigment metabolic processes. We further validated the expression analysis of a few miRNA and their target genes by qRT-PCR. Transcription factors were the major miRNA targets identified. Target validation of a few randomly selected miRNAs by RLM-RACE was performed but was successful with only miR162. These findings will help in understanding flower development processes, particularly the color development in Canna. PMID:26799570

  3. Quick-donning backpack harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D. F., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Harness device permits user to quickly put on or take off load carried in backpack arrangement. It can be attached with one hand; has controlled deformation belt that automatically encircles user upon application of pressure; has rigid shoulder harness elements which move automatically into place; and primary attachment components cannot be displaced while harness is in place.

  4. Identification of miRNA encoded by Jatropha curcas from EST and GSS

    PubMed Central

    Vishwakarma, Nutan Prakash; Jadeja, Vasant J.

    2013-01-01

    miRNAs are endogenous approx 22 nucleotide RNA which mediates transcriptional or Post-transcriptional gene regulation and play a critical role in diverse aspects of plant development. miRNA identification in wet lab have various constraints, it is time consuming and expensive. It also faces the limitation of identifying miRNAs expressed at specific time and/or at special conditions. Due to the nature of strong conservation of miRNA in plant species, the use of comparative genomics approach for expressed sequence tags (ESTs), Genome Survey Sequence (GSS) and structural feature criteria filter has paved the way toward the identification of conserved miRNAs from the plant species whose genomes are not yet available in public domain. To identify the novel miRNA from Jatropha curcas, a total of 46862 EST sequences and 1569 GSS were searched for homology to previously known viridiplantae 2502 mature miRNA. After predicting the RNA secondary structure, 24 new potential miRNA were identified in J. curcas. Using the newly identified miRNA sequences, a total of 78 potential target genes were identified for 3 miRNA families. Most of the miRNA targeted genes were predicted to encode transcription factors that regulate cell growth and development, signaling, and metabolism. These findings considerably broaden the scope of understanding the functions of miRNA in J. curcas. PMID:23299511

  5. Har Crater on Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image shows a heavily cratered region near Callisto's equator. It was taken by the Galileo spacecraft Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on its ninth orbit around Jupiter. North is to the top of the image. The 50 kilometer (30 mile) double ring crater in the center of the image is named Har. Har displays an unusual rounded mound on its floor. The origin of the mound is unclear but probably involves uplift of ice-rich materials from below, either as a 'rebound' immediately following the impact that formed the crater or as a later process. Har is older than the prominent 20 kilometer (12 mile) crater superposed on its western rim. The large crater partially visible in the northeast corner of the image is called Tindr. Chains of secondary craters (craters formed from the impact of materials thrown out of the main crater during an impact) originating from Tindr crosscut the eastern rim of Har.

    The image, centered at 3.3 degrees south latitude and 357.9 degrees west longitude, covers an area of 120 kilometers by 115 kilometers (75 miles by 70 miles). The sun illuminates the scene from the west (left). The smallest distinguishable features in the image are about 294 meters (973 feet) across. This image was obtained on June 25, 1997, when Galileo was 14,080 kilometers (8,590 miles) from Callisto.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  6. Revisiting absorption of dietary plant-based miRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We are continuing to test the hypothesis that consumption of genetic information in plant-based foods can modulate animal metabolism. Several studies (1,2,3) have failed to replicate the finding (4) that a rice miRNA survives digestion, enters circulation in copy numbers rivaling endogenous RNAs, an...

  7. PEI-complexed LNA antiseeds as miRNA inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Maren; Lange-Grünweller, Kerstin; Dayyoub, Eyas; Bakowsky, Udo; Weirauch, Ulrike; Aigner, Achim; Hartmann, Roland K.; Grünweller, Arnold

    2012-01-01

    Antisense inhibition of oncogenic or other disease-related miRNAs and miRNA families in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies. However, this approach relies on the development of potent miRNA inhibitors and their efficient delivery into cells. Here, we introduce short seed-directed LNA oligonucleotides (12- or 14-mer antiseeds) with a phosphodiester backbone (PO) for efficient miRNA inhibition. We have analyzed such LNA (PO) antiseeds using a let-7a-controlled luciferase reporter assay and identified them as active miRNA inhibitors in vitro. Moreover, LNA (PO) 14-mer antiseeds against ongogenic miR-17–5p and miR-20a derepress endogenous p21 expression more persistently than corresponding miRNA hairpin inhibitors, which are often used to inhibit miRNA function. Further analysis of the antiseed-mediated derepression of p21 in luciferase reporter constructs - containing the 3′-UTR of p21 and harboring two binding sites for miRNAs of the miR-106b family - provided evidence that the LNA antiseeds inhibit miRNA families while hairpin inhibitors act in a miRNA-specific manner. The derepression caused by LNA antiseeds is specific, as demonstrated via seed mutagenesis of the miR-106b target sites. Importantly, we show functional delivery of LNA (PO) 14-mer antiseeds into cells upon complexation with polyethylenimine (PEI F25-LMW), which leads to the formation of polymeric nanoparticles. In contrast, attempts to deliver a functional seed-directed tiny LNA 8-mer with a phosphorothioate backbone (PS) by formulation with PEI F25-LMW remained unsuccessful. In conclusion, LNA (PO) 14-mer antiseeds are attractive miRNA inhibitors, and their PEI-based delivery may represent a promising new strategy for therapeutic applications. PMID:22894918

  8. miRNAs: Key Players in Neurodegenerative Disorders and Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Karnati, Hanuma Kumar; Panigrahi, Manas Kumar; Gutti, Ravi Kumar; Greig, Nigel H; Tamargo, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, ∼22 nucleotide, non-coding RNA molecules that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. miRNA dysregulation has been observed in cancer and in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and the neurological disorder, epilepsy. Neuronal degradation and death are important hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders. Additionally, abnormalities in metabolism, synapsis and axonal transport have been associated with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and frontotemporal dementia. A number of recently published studies have demonstrated the importance of miRNAs in the nervous system and have contributed to the growing body of evidence on miRNA dysregulation in neurological disorders. Knowledge of the expressions and activities of such miRNAs may aid in the development of novel therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the significance of miRNA dysregulation in the development of neurodegenerative disorders and the use of miRNAs as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26402105

  9. Hydroxytyrosol supplementation modulates the expression of miRNAs in rodents and in humans.

    PubMed

    Tomé-Carneiro, Joao; Crespo, María Carmen; Iglesias-Gutierrez, Eduardo; Martín, Roberto; Gil-Zamorano, Judit; Tomas-Zapico, Cristina; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Correa, Carlos; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Lasunción, Miguel A; Herrera, Emilio; Visioli, Francesco; Dávalos, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Dietary microRNAs (miRNAs) modulation could be important for health and wellbeing. Part of the healthful activities of polyphenols might be due to a modulation of miRNAs' expression. Among the most biologically active polyphenols, hydroxytyrosol (HT) has never been studied for its actions on miRNAs. We investigated whether HT could modulate the expression of miRNAs in vivo. We performed an unbiased intestinal miRNA screening in mice supplemented (for 8 weeks) with nutritionally relevant amounts of HT. HT modulated the expression of several miRNAs. Analysis of other tissues revealed consistent HT-induced modulation of only few miRNAs. Also, HT administration increased triglycerides levels. Acute treatment with HT and in vitro experiments provided mechanistic insights. The HT-induced expression of one miRNA was confirmed in healthy volunteers supplemented with HT in a randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled trial. HT consumption affects specific miRNAs' expression in rodents and humans. Our findings suggest that the modulation of miRNAs' action through HT consumption might partially explain its healthful activities and might be pharmanutritionally exploited in current therapies targeting endogenous miRNAs. However, the effects of HT on triglycerides warrant further investigations. PMID:27322812

  10. Regulation of the alkaloid biosynthesis by miRNA in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Boke, Hatice; Ozhuner, Esma; Turktas, Mine; Parmaksiz, Iskender; Ozcan, Sebahattin; Unver, Turgay

    2015-04-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is an important medicinal plant producing benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIA). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) of approximately 21 nucleotides. They are noncoding, but regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Although many studies have been conducted on the identification and functions of plant miRNA, scarce researches on miRNA regulation of alkaloid biosynthesis have been reported. In this study, a total of 316 conserved and 11 novel miRNAs were identified in opium poppy using second-generation sequencing and direct cloning. Tissue-specific regulation of miRNA expression was comparatively analysed by miRNA microarray assays. A total of 232 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed among four tissues. Likewise, 1469 target transcripts were detected using in silico and experimental approaches. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses indicated that miRNA putatively regulates carbohydrate metabolism and genetic-information processing. Additionally, miRNA target transcripts were mostly involved in response to stress against various factors and secondary-metabolite biosynthesis processes. Target transcript identification analyses revealed that some of the miRNAs might be involved in BIA biosynthesis, such as pso-miR13, pso-miR2161 and pso-miR408. Additionally, three putatively mature miRNA sequences were predicted to be targeting BIA-biosynthesis genes. PMID:25735537

  11. Harnessing our very life.

    PubMed

    Wills, Peter R; Williams, David L F; Trussell, Denys; Mann, L R B

    2013-01-01

    The Aristotelian ideas of nature (physis) and technology (techné) are taken as a starting point for understanding what it would mean for technology to be truly living. Heidegger's critique of the conflation of scientific and technological thinking in the current era is accepted as demonstrating that humanity does not have a deep enough appreciation of the nature of life to harness its essence safely. Could the vision of harnessing life be realized, which we strongly doubt, living technology would give selected humans transforming powers that could be expected to exacerbate, rather than solve, current global problems. The source of human purposefulness, and hence of both technology and ethics, is identified in nature's emergent capability to instantiate informational representations in material forms. Ethics that are properly grounded in an appreciation of intrinsic value, especially that of life, demand that proposals to give humanity the capabilities of living technology address the social, political, economic, and environmental problems inherent in its development and potential deployment. Before any development is embarked on, steps must be taken to avoid living technology, whatever the term eventually designates, becoming available for destructive or antisocial purposes such as those that might devastate humanity or irrevocably damage the natural world. PMID:23889745

  12. Harnessing DNA intercalation.

    PubMed

    Persil, Ozgül; Hud, Nicholas V

    2007-10-01

    Numerous small molecules are known to bind to DNA through base pair intercalation. Fluorescent dyes commonly used for nucleic acid staining, such as ethidium, are familiar examples. Biological and physical studies of DNA intercalation have historically been motivated by mutation and drug discovery research. However, this same mode of binding is now being harnessed for the creation of novel molecular assemblies. Recent studies have used DNA scaffolds and intercalators to construct supramolecular assemblies that function as fluorescent 'nanotags' for cell labeling. Other studies have demonstrated how intercalators can be used to promote the formation of otherwise unstable nucleic acid assemblies. These applications illustrate how intercalators can be used to facilitate and expand DNA-based nanotechnology. PMID:17825446

  13. miRNAs in the Pathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Bo; Shen, Nan

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were first discovered as regulatory RNAs that controlled the timing of the larval development of Caenorhabditis elegans. Since then, nearly 30,000 mature miRNA products have been found in many species, including plants, warms, flies and mammals. Currently, miRNAs are well established as endogenous small (~22 nt) noncoding RNAs, which have functions in regulating mRNA stability and translation. Owing to intensive investigations during the last decade, miRNAs were found to play essential roles in regulating many physiological and pathological processes. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by elevated autoantibodies against nuclear antigens and excessive inflammatory responses affecting multiple organs. Although efforts were taken and theories were produced to elucidate the pathogenesis of SLE, we still lack sufficient knowledge about the disease for developing effective therapies for lupus patients. Recent advances indicate that miRNAs are involved in the development of SLE, which gives us new insights into the pathogenesis of SLE and might lead to the finding of new therapeutic targets. Here, we will review recent discoveries about how miRNAs are involved in the pathogenesis of SLE and how it can promote the development of new therapy. PMID:25927578

  14. Mammalian Endogenous Retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Mager, Dixie L; Stoye, Jonathan P

    2015-02-01

    Over 40% of mammalian genomes comprise the products of reverse transcription. Among such retrotransposed sequences are those characterized by the presence of long terminal repeats (LTRs), including the endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), which are inherited genetic elements closely resembling the proviruses formed following exogenous retrovirus infection. Sequences derived from ERVs make up at least 8 to 10% of the human and mouse genomes and range from ancient sequences that predate mammalian divergence to elements that are currently still active. In this chapter we describe the discovery, classification and origins of ERVs in mammals and consider cellular mechanisms that have evolved to control their expression. We also discuss the negative effects of ERVs as agents of genetic disease and cancer and review examples of ERV protein domestication to serve host functions, as in placental development. Finally, we address growing evidence that the gene regulatory potential of ERV LTRs has been exploited multiple times during evolution to regulate genes and gene networks. Thus, although recently endogenized retroviral elements are often pathogenic, those that survive the forces of negative selection become neutral components of the host genome or can be harnessed to serve beneficial roles. PMID:26104559

  15. Potent degradation of neuronal miRNAs induced by highly complementary targets

    PubMed Central

    de la Mata, Manuel; Gaidatzis, Dimos; Vitanescu, Mirela; Stadler, Michael B; Wentzel, Corinna; Scheiffele, Peter; Filipowicz, Witold; Großhans, Helge

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate target mRNAs by silencing them. Reciprocally, however, target mRNAs can also modulate miRNA stability. Here, we uncover a remarkable efficacy of target RNA-directed miRNA degradation (TDMD) in rodent primary neurons. Coincident with degradation, and while still bound to Argonaute, targeted miRNAs are 3′ terminally tailed and trimmed. Absolute quantification of both miRNAs and their decay-inducing targets suggests that neuronal TDMD is multiple turnover and does not involve co-degradation of the target but rather competes with miRNA-mediated decay of the target. Moreover, mRNA silencing, but not TDMD, relies on cooperativity among multiple target sites to reach high efficacy. This knowledge can be harnessed for effective depletion of abundant miRNAs. Our findings bring insight into a potent miRNA degradation pathway in primary neurons, whose TDMD activity greatly surpasses that of non-neuronal cells and established cell lines. Thus, TDMD may be particularly relevant for miRNA regulation in the nervous system. PMID:25724380

  16. JWST ISIM Harness Thermal Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobel, Mark; Glazer, Stuart; Tuttle, Jim; Martins, Mario; Ruppel, Sean

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror. Launch is planned for 2013. JWST wl1 be the premier observatory of the next decade serving thousands of astronomers worldwide. The Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) is the unit that will house thc four main JWST instruments. The ISIM enclosure passively cooled to 37 Kelvin and has a tightly managed thermal budget. A significant portion of the ISIM heat load is due to parasitic heat gains from the instrument harnesses. These harnesses provide a thermal path from the Instrument Electronics Control (IEC) to the ISIM. Because of the impact of this load to the ISIM thermal design, understanding the harness parasitic heat gains is critical. To this effect, a thermal test program has been conducted in order to characterize these parasitic loads and verify harness thermal models. Recent parasitic heat loads tests resulted in the addition of a dedicated multiple stage harness radiator. In order for the radiator to efficiently reject heat from the harness, effective thermal contact conductance values for multiple harnesses had to be determined. This presentation will describe the details and the results of this test program.

  17. Comparative studies of two methods for miRNA isolation from milk whey*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao-lu; Wei, Zi-hai; Liu, Lan; Liu, Hong-yun; Liu, Jian-xin

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) from milk whey have been considered for their potential as noninvasive biomarkers for milk quality control and disease diagnosis. However, standard protocols for miRNA isolation and quantification from milk whey are not well established. The objective of this study was to compare two methods for the isolation of miRNAs from milk whey. These two methods were modified phenol-based technique (Trizol LS® followed by phenol precipitation, the TP method) and combined phenol and column-based approach (Trizol LS® followed by cleanup using the miRNeasy kit, the TM method). Yield and quality of RNA were rigorously measured using a NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer and then the distribution of RNA was precisely detected in a Bioanalyzer 2100 instrument by microchip gel electrophoresis. Several endogenous miRNAs (bta-miR-141, bta-miR-146a, bta-miR-148a, bta-miR-200c, bta-miR-362, and bta-miR-375) and an exogenous spike-in synthetic control miRNA (cel-miR-39) were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to examine the apparent recovery efficiency of milk whey miRNAs. Both methods could successfully isolate sufficient small RNA (<200 nt) from milk whey, and their yields were quite similar. However, the quantification results show that the total miRNA recovery efficiency by the TM method is superior to that by the TP method. The TM method performed better than the TP for recovery of milk whey miRNA due to its consistency and good repeatability in endogenous and spike-in miRNA recovery. Additionally, quantitative recovery analysis of a spike-in miRNA may be more accurate to reflect the milk whey miRNA recovery efficiency than using traditional RNA quality analysis instruments (NanoDrop or Bioanalyzer 2100). PMID:26055915

  18. MiRNA-20 and MiRNA-106a Regulate Spermatogonial Stem Cell Renewal at the Post-transcriptional Level via Targeting STAT3 and Ccnd1

    PubMed Central

    He, Zuping; Jiang, Jiji; Kokkinaki, Maria; Tang, Lin; Zeng, Wenxian; Gallicano, Ian; Dobrinski, Ina; Dym, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Studies onspermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are of unusual significance because they are the unique stem cells that transmit genetic information to subsequent generations and they can acquire pluripotency to become embryonic stem-like cells that have therapeutic applications in human diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as critical endogenous regulators in mammalian cells. However, the function and mechanisms of individual miRNAs in regulating SSC fate remain unknown. Here we report for the first time that miRNA-20 and miRNA-106a are preferentially expressed in mouse SSCs. Functional assays in vitro and in vivo using miRNA mimics and inhibitors reveal that miRNA-20 and miRNA-106a are essential for renewal of SSCs. We further demonstrate that these two miRNAs promote renewal at the post-transcriptional level via targeting STAT3 and Ccnd1 and that knockdown of STAT3, Fos, and Ccnd1 results in renewal of SSCs. This study thus provides novel insights into molecular mechanisms regulating renewal and differentiation of SSCs and may have important implications for regulating male reproduction. PMID:23836497

  19. Environmental Control Unit Harness Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Testing four new Environmental Control Unit Harnesses for improved user comfort during SCAPE operations. Phase I, testing in a lab environment, Phase II will continue testing the best candidates in a field environment.

  20. Uptake of dietary milk miRNAs by adult humans: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Amanda; Vyas, Gopi; Li, Anne; Halushka, Marc; Witwer, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Breast milk is replete with nutritional content as well as nucleic acids including microRNAs (miRNAs). In a recent report, adult humans who drank bovine milk appeared to have increased circulating levels of miRNAs miR-29b-3p and miR-200c-3p. Since these miRNAs are homologous between human and cow, these results could be explained by xeno-miRNA influx, endogenous miRNA regulation, or both. More data were needed to validate the results and explore for additional milk-related alterations in circulating miRNAs. Samples from the published study were obtained, and 223 small RNA features were profiled with a custom OpenArray, followed by individual quantitative PCR assays for selected miRNAs. Additionally, small RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data obtained from plasma samples of the same project were analyzed to find human and uniquely bovine miRNAs. OpenArray revealed no significantly altered miRNA signals after milk ingestion, and this was confirmed by qPCR. Plasma sequencing data contained no miR-29b or miR-200c reads and no intake-consistent mapping of uniquely bovine miRNAs. In conclusion, the results do not support transfer of dietary xenomiRs into the circulation of adult humans. PMID:27158459

  1. Mutant p53 inhibits miRNA biogenesis by interfering with the microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, F; Falcone, E; Trisciuoglio, D; Colombo, T; Lisek, K; Walerych, D; Del Sal, G; Paci, P; Bossi, G; Piaggio, G; Gurtner, A

    2016-07-21

    Downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in cancers and promotes tumorigenesis suggesting that miRNAs may function as tumor suppressors. However, the mechanism through which miRNAs are regulated in cancer, and the connection between oncogenes and miRNA biogenesis remain poorly understood. The TP53 tumor-suppressor gene is mutated in half of human cancers resulting in an oncogene with gain-of-function activities. Here we demonstrate that mutant p53 (mutp53) oncoproteins modulate the biogenesis of a subset of miRNAs in cancer cells inhibiting their post-transcriptional maturation. Interestingly, among these miRNAs several are also downregulated in human tumors. By confocal, co-immunoprecipitation and RNA-chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that endogenous mutp53 binds and sequesters RNA helicases p72/82 from the microprocessor complex, interfering with Drosha-pri-miRNAs association. In agreement with this, the overexpression of p72 leads to an increase of mature miRNAs levels. Moreover, functional experiments demonstrate the oncosuppressive role of mutp53-dependent miRNAs (miR-517a, -519a, -218, -105). Our study highlights a previously undescribed mechanism by which mutp53 interferes with Drosha-p72/82 association leading, at least in part, to miRNA deregulation observed in cancer. PMID:26996669

  2. Computational identification of miRNAs that modulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Seenprachawong, Kanokwan; Nuchnoi, Pornlada; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous noncoding RNAs that play an instrumental role in post-transcriptional modulation of gene expression. Genes related to osteogenesis (i.e., RUNX2, COL1A1 and OSX) is important in controlling the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to bone tissues. The regulated expression level of miRNAs is critically important for the differentiation of MSCs to preosteoblasts. The understanding of miRNA regulation in osteogenesis could be applied for future applications in bone defects. Therefore, this study aims to shed light on the mechanistic pathway underlying osteogenesis by predicting miRNAs that may modulate this pathway. This study investigates RUNX2, which is a major transcription factor for osteogenesis that drives MSCs into preosteoblasts. Three different prediction tools were employed for identifying miRNAs related to osteogenesis using the 3’UTR of RUNX2 as the target gene. Of the 1,023 miRNAs, 70 miRNAs were found by at least two of the tools. Candidate miRNAs were then selected based on their free energy values, followed by assessing the probability of target accessibility. The results showed that miRNAs 23b, 23a, 30b, 143, 203, 217, and 221 could regulate the RUNX2 gene during the differentiation of MSCs to preosteoblasts. PMID:27168985

  3. Computational identification of miRNAs that modulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Seenprachawong, Kanokwan; Nuchnoi, Pornlada; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Supokawej, Aungkura

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous noncoding RNAs that play an instrumental role in post-transcriptional modulation of gene expression. Genes related to osteogenesis (i.e., RUNX2, COL1A1 and OSX) is important in controlling the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to bone tissues. The regulated expression level of miRNAs is critically important for the differentiation of MSCs to preosteoblasts. The understanding of miRNA regulation in osteogenesis could be applied for future applications in bone defects. Therefore, this study aims to shed light on the mechanistic pathway underlying osteogenesis by predicting miRNAs that may modulate this pathway. This study investigates RUNX2, which is a major transcription factor for osteogenesis that drives MSCs into preosteoblasts. Three different prediction tools were employed for identifying miRNAs related to osteogenesis using the 3'UTR of RUNX2 as the target gene. Of the 1,023 miRNAs, 70 miRNAs were found by at least two of the tools. Candidate miRNAs were then selected based on their free energy values, followed by assessing the probability of target accessibility. The results showed that miRNAs 23b, 23a, 30b, 143, 203, 217, and 221 could regulate the RUNX2 gene during the differentiation of MSCs to preosteoblasts. PMID:27168985

  4. Argonaute 2-dependent Regulation of Gene Expression by Single-stranded miRNA Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Masayuki; Prakash, Thazha P; Corey, David R

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding transcripts that regulate gene expression. Aberrant expression of miRNAs can affect development of cancer and other diseases. Synthetic miRNA mimics can modulate gene expression and offer an approach to therapy. Inside cells, mature miRNAs are produced as double-stranded RNAs and miRNA mimics typically retain both strands. This need for two strands has the potential to complicate drug development. Recently, synthetic chemically modified single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNA) have been shown to function through the RNAi pathway to induce gene silencing in cell culture and animals. Here, we test the hypothesis that single-stranded miRNA (ss-miRNA) can also mimic the function of miRNAs. We show that ss-miRNAs can act as miRNA mimics to silence the expression of target genes. Gene silencing requires expression of argonaute 2 (AGO2) protein and involves recruitment of AGO2 to the target transcripts. Chemically modified ss-miRNAs function effectively inside cells through endogenous RNAi pathways and broaden the options for miRNA-based oligonucleotide drug development. PMID:26903376

  5. DIANA-microT Web server upgrade supports Fly and Worm miRNA target prediction and bibliographic miRNA to disease association.

    PubMed

    Maragkakis, Manolis; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Alexiou, Panagiotis; Reczko, Martin; Plomaritou, Kyriaki; Gousis, Mixail; Kourtis, Kornilios; Koziris, Nectarios; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2011-07-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous RNA molecules that are implicated in many biological processes through post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The DIANA-microT Web server provides a user-friendly interface for comprehensive computational analysis of miRNA targets in human and mouse. The server has now been extended to support predictions for two widely studied species: Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. In the updated version, the Web server enables the association of miRNAs to diseases through bibliographic analysis and provides insights for the potential involvement of miRNAs in biological processes. The nomenclature used to describe mature miRNAs along different miRBase versions has been extensively analyzed, and the naming history of each miRNA has been extracted. This enables the identification of miRNA publications regardless of possible nomenclature changes. User interaction has been further refined allowing users to save results that they wish to analyze further. A connection to the UCSC genome browser is now provided, enabling users to easily preview predicted binding sites in comparison to a wide array of genomic tracks, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms. The Web server is publicly accessible in www.microrna.gr/microT-v4. PMID:21551220

  6. A common set of developmental miRNAs are upregulated in Nicotiana benthamiana by diverse begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Begomoviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that cause economically important diseases of many crops throughout the world and induce symptoms in plants, including enations, leaf curling and stunting, that resemble developmental abnormalities. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous RNAs that are involved in a variety of activities, including plant development, signal transduction and protein degradation, as well as response to environmental stress, and pathogen invasion. Results The present study was aimed at understanding the deregulation of miRNAs upon begomovirus infection. Four distinct begomoviruses African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV), Cabbage leaf curl virus (CbLCuV), Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and Cotton leaf curl Multan virus/Cotton leaf curl betasatellite (CLCuV/CLCuMB), were used in this study. Ten developmental miRNA were studied. N. benthamiana plants were inoculated with begomoviruses and their miRNA profiles were analysed by northern blotting using specific miRNA probes. The levels of most developmental miRNA were increased in N. benthamiana by TYLCV, CLCuMV/CLCuMB and CbLCuV infection with a common pattern despite their diverse genomic components. However, the increased levels of individual miRNAs differed for distinct begomoviruses, reflecting differences in severity of symptom phenotypes. Some of these miRNA were also common to ACMV infection. Conclusions Our results have shown a common pattern of miRNAs accumulation upon begomovirus infection. It was found that begomoviruses generally increase the accumulation of miRNA and thus result in the decreased translation of genes involved in the development of plants. Identification of common miRNAs that are deregulated upon begomovirus infection may provide novel targets for control strategies aimed at developing broad-spectrum resistance. PMID:21447165

  7. Transcriptome-Wide Identification of miRNA Targets under Nitrogen Deficiency in Populus tomentosa Using Degradome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Bao, Hai; Wu, Qiuming; Wang, Yanwei

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are endogenous non-coding small RNAs with important regulatory roles in stress responses. Nitrogen (N) is an indispensable macronutrient required for plant growth and development. Previous studies have identified a variety of known and novel miRNAs responsive to low N stress in plants, including Populus. However, miRNAs involved in the cleavage of target genes and the corresponding regulatory networks in response to N stress in Populus remain largely unknown. Consequently, degradome sequencing was employed for global detection and validation of N-responsive miRNAs and their targets. A total of 60 unique miRNAs (39 conserved, 13 non-conserved, and eight novel) were experimentally identified to target 64 mRNA transcripts and 21 precursors. Among them, we further verified the cleavage of 11 N-responsive miRNAs identified previously and provided empirical evidence for the cleavage mode of these miRNAs on their target mRNAs. Furthermore, five miRNA stars (miRNA*s) were shown to have cleavage function. The specificity and diversity of cleavage sites on the targets and miRNA precursors in P. tomentosa were further detected. Identification and annotation of miRNA-mediated cleavage of target genes in Populus can increase our understanding of miRNA-mediated molecular mechanisms of woody plants adapted to low N environments. PMID:26096002

  8. Harness the Power of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Arne

    2011-01-01

    Today, U.S. educators are teaching in the midst of a technological revolution. Technology promises to provide innovative solutions in the nation's classrooms, just as it has transformed the way people communicate, socialize, and conduct business. In this article, the author argues that now is the time to harness technology to revolutionize the way…

  9. Differential and Dynamic Regulation of miRNA398 in Response to ABA and Salt Stress in Populus tremula and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs of ~22 nucleotides (nt) that play a key role in down regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level in plants and animals. Various studies have identified numerous miRNAs that were either up regulated or down regulated upon stress treatme...

  10. Endogenous ochronosis.

    PubMed

    Turgay, E; Canat, D; Gurel, M S; Yuksel, T; Baran, M F; Demirkesen, C

    2009-12-01

    Endogenous ochronosis or alkaptonuria is a rare, autosomal recessive disease of tyrosine metabolism that is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme homogentisic acid oxidase. The disease results in the accumulation and deposition of homogentisic acid in the cartilage, eyelids, forehead, cheeks, axillae, genital region, buccal mucosa, larynx, tympanic membranes, and tendons. The disease generally presents in adults with arthritis and skin abnormalities; occasionally, involvement of other organs may be seen. A 49-year-old man was referred to our clinic with verrucous lesions on his hands. On physical examination, caviar-like ochronotic papules were found around his eyes and the helix cartilage of his ears, and on the dorsa of both hands. There were brown macules on the sclera (Osler's sign). The patient had arthritis and nephrolithiasis, and a sample of his urine darkened upon standing. Histopathological examination showed deposition of ochronotic pigment. High-dose ascorbic acid was given, and the patient showed improvement on follow-up examination 6 months later. PMID:20055850

  11. Noncanonical MicroRNAs and Endogenous siRNAs in Lytic Infection of Murine Gammaherpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Zhang, Weixiong

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) and endogenous small interfering RNA (endo-siRNA) are two essential classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs) in eukaryotes. The class of miRNA is diverse and there exist noncanonical miRNAs that bypass the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway. In order to identify noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs responding to virus infection and study their potential function, we sequenced small-RNA species from cells lytically infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68). In addition to three novel canonical miRNAs in mouse, two antisense miRNAs in virus and 25 novel noncanonical miRNAs, including miRNAs derived from transfer RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs and introns, in the host were identified. These noncanonical miRNAs exhibited features distinct from that of canonical miRNAs in lengths of hairpins, base pairings and first nucleotide preference. Many of the novel miRNAs are conserved in mammals. Besides several known murine endo-siRNAs detected by the sequencing profiling, a novel locus in the mouse genome was identified to produce endo-siRNAs. This novel endo-siRNA locus is comprised of two tandem inverted B4 short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs). Unexpectedly, the SINE-derived endo-siRNAs were found in a variety of sequencing data and virus-infected cells. Moreover, a murine miRNA was up-regulated more than 35 fold in infected than in mock-treated cells. The putative targets of the viral and the up-regulated murine miRNAs were potentially involved in processes of gene transcription and protein phosphorylation, and localized to membranes, suggesting their potential role in manipulating the host basal immune system during lytic infection. Our results extended the number of noncanonical miRNAs in mammals and shed new light on their potential functions of lytic infection of MHV68. PMID:23110115

  12. miRNAs Related to Skeletal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Claudine; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; van Griensven, Martijn

    2016-09-01

    miRNAs as non-coding, short, double-stranded RNA segments are important for cellular biological functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. miRNAs mainly contribute to the inhibition of important protein translations through their cleavage or direct repression of target messenger RNAs expressions. In the last decade, miRNAs got in the focus of interest with new publications on miRNAs in the context of different diseases. For many types of cancer or myocardial damage, typical signatures of local or systemically circulating miRNAs have already been described. However, little is known about miRNA expressions and their molecular effect in skeletal diseases. An overview of published studies reporting miRNAs detection linked with skeletal diseases was conducted. All regulated miRNAs were summarized and their molecular interactions were illustrated. This review summarizes the involvement and interaction of miRNAs in different skeletal diseases. Thereby, 59 miRNAs were described to be deregulated in tissue, cells, or in the circulation of osteoarthritis (OA), 23 miRNAs deregulated in osteoporosis, and 107 miRNAs deregulated in osteosarcoma (OS). The molecular influences of miRNAs regarding OA, osteoporosis, and OS were illustrated. Specific miRNA signatures for skeletal diseases are described in the literature. Some overlapped, but also unique ones for each disease exist. These miRNAs may present useful targets for the development of new therapeutic approaches and are candidates for diagnostic evaluations. PMID:27418331

  13. Real-time quantitative PCR and droplet digital PCR for plant miRNAs in mammalian blood provide little evidence for general uptake of dietary miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Witwer, Kenneth W.; McAlexander, Melissa A.; Queen, Suzanne E.; Adams, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence that exogenous dietary miRNAs enter the bloodstream and tissues of ingesting animals has been accompanied by an indication that at least one plant miRNA, miR168, participates in “cross-kingdom” regulation of a mammalian transcript. If confirmed, these findings would support investigation of miRNA-based dietary interventions in disease. Here, blood was obtained pre- and post-prandially (1, 4, 12 h) from pigtailed macaques that received a miRNA-rich plant-based substance. Plant and endogenous miRNAs were measured by RT-qPCR. Although low-level amplification was observed for some plant miRNA assays, amplification was variable and possibly non-specific, as suggested by droplet digital PCR. A consistent response to dietary intake was not observed. While our results do not support general and consistent uptake of dietary plant miRNAs, additional studies are needed to establish whether or not plant or animal xenomiRs are transferred across the gut in sufficient quantity to regulate endogenous genes. PMID:23770773

  14. miRNAs Signature in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastasis: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Head and neck cancers include epithelial tumors arising in the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, paranasal sinuses, and nasal cavity. Metastasis is a hallmark of cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small non-coding RNAs involved in cell proliferation, development, differentiation and metastasis. It is believed that miRNA alterations correlate with initiation and progression of cancer cell proliferation or inhibition of tumorigenesis. Moreover, miRNAs have different roles in development, progression, and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Altered expression of miRNAs could be novel molecular biomarkers for the definite diagnosis of cancer, metastatic site, cancer stage, and its progression. Purpose The purpose of this review was to provide a comprehensive literature review of the role of miRNAs in head and neck cancer metastasis. Search strategy A relevant English literature search in PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar was performed. The keywords ‘miRNA’, ‘head and neck’, and ‘cancer’ were searched in title and abstract of publications; limited from 1990 to 2015. The inclusion criterion was the role of miRNAs in cancer metastasis. The exclusion criterion was the other functions of miRNAs in cancers. Out of 15221 articles, the full texts of 442 articles were retrieved and only 133 articles met the inclusion criteria. Conclusion Despite the advances in cancer treatment, the mortality rate of HNSCC is still high. The potential application of miRNAs for cancer therapy has been demonstrated in many studies; miRNAs function as either tumor suppressor or oncogene. The recognition of metastamir and their targets may lead to better understanding of HNSCC oncogenesis, and consequently, development of new therapeutic strategies which is a necessity in cancer treatment. Development of therapeutic agents based on miRNAs is a promising target. PMID:27284551

  15. A deeply conserved, noncanonical miRNA hosted by ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chak, Li-Ling; Mohammed, Jaaved; Lai, Eric C.; Tucker-Kellogg, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Advances in small RNA sequencing technologies and comparative genomics have fueled comprehensive microRNA (miRNA) gene annotations in humans and model organisms. Although new miRNAs continue to be discovered in recent years, these have universally been lowly expressed, recently evolved, and of debatable endogenous activity, leading to the general assumption that virtually all biologically important miRNAs have been identified. Here, we analyzed small RNAs that emanate from the highly repetitive rDNA arrays of Drosophila. In addition to endo-siRNAs derived from sense and antisense strands of the pre-rRNA sequence, we unexpectedly identified a novel, deeply conserved, noncanonical miRNA. Although this miRNA is widely expressed, this miRNA was not identified by previous studies due to bioinformatics filters removing such repetitive sequences. Deep-sequencing data provide clear evidence for specific processing with precisely defined 5′ and 3′ ends. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the mature miRNA species is incorporated in the effector complexes and has detectable trans regulatory activity. Processing of this miRNA requires Dicer-1, whereas the Drosha–Pasha complex is dispensable. The miRNA hairpin sequence is located in the internal transcribed spacer 1 region of rDNA and is highly conserved among Dipteran species that were separated from their common ancestor ∼100 million years ago. Our results suggest that biologically active miRNA genes may remain unidentified even in well-studied organisms. PMID:25605965

  16. Current trends in miRNAs and their relationship with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sayáns, Mario; Pilar, Gayoso-Diz; Barros-Angueira, Francisco; Suárez-Peñaranda, José Manuel; Fernández, Alexia Conde; Gándara-Rey, José Manuel; García-García, Abel

    2012-07-01

    A micro RNA (miRNA) is a single-stranded endogenous, non-coding RNA, with length ranging between 18 and 24 nucleotides and the ability of regulating the expression of other genes on a post-transcriptional level by means of various processes, degradation or repression of target mRNA. miRNAs play a crucial role in regulating fundamental processes such as cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis; thus, their deregulation can affect normal cell growth and development, and even participate in carcinogenesis. The goals of this paper are: to outline the formation and functions of miRNAs; to determine their role in oral squamous cell carcinoma; to analyze the different miRNAs described and their roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, depending on their overexpression or subexpression; to describe the different polymorphisms and epigenetic alterations identified; and to determine their role in multidrug resistance. PMID:22188431

  17. Genome-wide identification and characterization of miRNAs in the hypocotyl and cotyledon of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Geng, Meijuan; Li, Hui; Jin, Chuan; Liu, Qian; Chen, Chengbin; Song, Wenqin; Wang, Chunguo

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small endogenous, non-coding RNAs that have key regulatory functions in plant growth, development, and other biological processes. Hypocotyl and cotyledon are the two major tissues of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) seedlings. Tissue culture experiments have indicated that the regenerative abilities of these two tissues are significantly different. However, the characterization of miRNAs and their roles in regulating organ development in cauliflower remain unexplored. In the present study, two small RNA libraries were sequenced by Solexa sequencing technology. 99 known miRNAs belonging to 28 miRNA families were identified, in which 6 miRNA families were detected only in Brassicaceae. A total of 162 new miRNA sequences with single nucleotide substitutions corresponding to the known miRNAs, and 32 potentially novel miRNAs were also first discovered. Comparative analysis indicated that 42 of 99 known miRNAs and 17 of 32 novel miRNAs exhibited significantly differential expression between hypocotyl and cotyledon, and the differential expression of several miRNAs was further validated by stem-loop RT-PCR. In addition, 235 targets for 89 known miRNAs and 198 targets for 24 novel miRNAs were predicted, and their functions were further discussed. The expression patterns of several representative targets were also confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. The results identified that the transcriptional expression patterns of miRNAs were negatively correlated with their targets. These findings gave new insights into the characteristics of miRNAs in cauliflower, and provided important clues to elucidate the roles of miRNAs in the tissue differentiation and development of cauliflower. PMID:24170336

  18. LMTK3 escapes tumour suppressor miRNAs via sequestration of DDX5.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Jimmy; Favicchio, Rosy; Karimian, Negin; Mehrabi, Maryam; Harding, Victoria; Castellano, Leandro; Stebbing, Justin; Giamas, Georgios

    2016-03-01

    Lemur tyrosine kinase-3 (LMTK3) plays an important role in cancer progression and is associated with breast, lung, gastric and colorectal cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous non-coding RNAs that typically repress target genes at post-transcriptional level and have an important role in tumorigenesis. By performing a miRNA expression profile, we identified a subset of miRNAs modulated by LMTK3. We show that LMTK3 induces miR-34a, miR-196-a2 and miR-182 levels by interacting with DEAD-box RNA helicase p68 (DDX5). LMTK3 binds via DDX5 to the pri-miRNA of these three mature miRNAs, thereby sequestrating them from further processing. Ectopic expression of miR-34a and miR-182 in LMTK3-overexpressing cell lines (MCF7-LMTK3 and MDA-MB-231-LMTK3) inhibits breast cancer proliferation, invasion and migration. Interestingly, miR-34a and miR-182 directly bind to the 3'UTR of LMTK3 mRNA and consequently inhibit both its stability and translation, acting as tumour suppressor-like miRNAs. In aggregate, we show that LMTK3 is involved in miRNA biogenesis through modulation of the Microprocessor complex, inducing miRNAs that target LMTK3 itself. PMID:26739063

  19. A Panel of Serum MiRNA Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Severe to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bhomia, Manish; Balakathiresan, Nagaraja S; Wang, Kevin K; Papa, Linda; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (MiRNAs) are small endogenous RNA molecules and have emerged as novel serum diagnostic biomarkers for several diseases due to their stability and detection at minute quantities. In this study, we have identified a serum miRNA signature in human serum samples of mild to severe TBI, which can be used for diagnosis of mild and moderate TBI (MMTBI). Human serum samples of MMTBI, severe TBI (STBI), orthopedic injury and healthy controls were used and miRNA profiling was done using taqman real time PCR. The real time PCR data for the MMTBI, STBI and orthopedic injury was normalized to the control samples which showed upregulation of 39, 37 and 33 miRNAs in MMTBI, STBI and orthopedic injury groups respectively. TBI groups were compared to orthopedic injury group and an up-regulation of 18 and 20 miRNAs in MMTBI and STBI groups was observed. Among these, a signature of 10 miRNAs was found to be present in both MMTBI and STBI groups. These 10 miRNAs were validated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from STBI and four miRNAs were found to be upregulated in CSF. In conclusion, we identified a subset of 10 unique miRNAs which can be used for diagnosis of MMTBI and STBI. PMID:27338832

  20. A Panel of Serum MiRNA Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Severe to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bhomia, Manish; Balakathiresan, Nagaraja S.; Wang, Kevin K.; Papa, Linda; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (MiRNAs) are small endogenous RNA molecules and have emerged as novel serum diagnostic biomarkers for several diseases due to their stability and detection at minute quantities. In this study, we have identified a serum miRNA signature in human serum samples of mild to severe TBI, which can be used for diagnosis of mild and moderate TBI (MMTBI). Human serum samples of MMTBI, severe TBI (STBI), orthopedic injury and healthy controls were used and miRNA profiling was done using taqman real time PCR. The real time PCR data for the MMTBI, STBI and orthopedic injury was normalized to the control samples which showed upregulation of 39, 37 and 33 miRNAs in MMTBI, STBI and orthopedic injury groups respectively. TBI groups were compared to orthopedic injury group and an up-regulation of 18 and 20 miRNAs in MMTBI and STBI groups was observed. Among these, a signature of 10 miRNAs was found to be present in both MMTBI and STBI groups. These 10 miRNAs were validated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from STBI and four miRNAs were found to be upregulated in CSF. In conclusion, we identified a subset of 10 unique miRNAs which can be used for diagnosis of MMTBI and STBI. PMID:27338832

  1. Identification of miRNAs and their target genes in developing maize ears by combined small RNA and degradome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In plants, microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous ~22 nt RNAs that play important regulatory roles in many aspects of plant biology, including metabolism, hormone response, epigenetic control of transposable elements, and stress response. Extensive studies of miRNAs have been performed in model plants such as rice and Arabidopsis thaliana. In maize, most miRNAs and their target genes were analyzed and identified by clearly different treatments, such as response to low nitrate, salt and drought stress. However, little is known about miRNAs involved in maize ear development. The objective of this study is to identify conserved and novel miRNAs and their target genes by combined small RNA and degradome sequencing at four inflorescence developmental stages. Results We used deep-sequencing, miRNA microarray assays and computational methods to identify, profile, and describe conserved and non-conserved miRNAs at four ear developmental stages, which resulted in identification of 22 conserved and 21-maize-specific miRNA families together with their corresponding miRNA*. Comparison of miRNA expression in these developmental stages revealed 18 differentially expressed miRNA families. Finally, a total of 141 genes (251 transcripts) targeted by 102 small RNAs including 98 miRNAs and 4 ta-siRNAs were identified by genomic-scale high-throughput sequencing of miRNA cleaved mRNAs. Moreover, the differentially expressed miRNAs-mediated pathways that regulate the development of ears were discussed. Conclusions This study confirmed 22 conserved miRNA families and discovered 26 novel miRNAs in maize. Moreover, we identified 141 target genes of known and new miRNAs and ta-siRNAs. Of these, 72 genes (117 transcripts) targeted by 62 differentially expressed miRNAs may attribute to the development of maize ears. Identification and characterization of these important classes of regulatory genes in maize may improve our understanding of molecular mechanisms controlling ear development

  2. Identification and analysis of miRNAs and their targets in ginger using bioinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    Singh, Noopur; Srivastava, Swati; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-01-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a large family of endogenous small RNAs derived from the non-protein coding genes. miRNA regulates the gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and plays an important role in plant development. Zingiber officinale is an important medicinal plant having numerous therapeutic properties. Its bioactive compound gingerol and essential oil posses important pharmacological and physiological activities. In this study, we used a homology search based computational approach for identifying miRNAs in Z. officinale. A total of 16 potential miRNA families (miR167, miR407, miR414, miR5015, miR5021, miR5644, miR5645, miR5656, miR5658, miR5664, miR827, miR838, miR847, miR854, miR862 and miR864) were predicted in ginger. Phylogenetic and conserved analyses were performed for predicted miRNAs. Thirteen miRNA families were found to regulate 300 target transcripts and play an important role in cell signaling, reproduction, metabolic process and stress. To understand the miRNA mediated gene regulatory control and to validate miRNA target predictions, a biological network was also constructed. Gene ontology and pathway analyses were also done. miR5015 was observed to regulate the biosynthesis of gingerol by inhibiting phenyl ammonia lyase (PAL), a precursor enzyme in the biosynthesis of gingerol. Our results revealed that most of the predicted miRNAs were involved in the regulation of rhizome development. miR5021, miR854 and miR838 were identified to regulate the rhizome development and the essential oil biosynthesis in ginger. PMID:26392033

  3. Harnessing spin precession with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A. D.; Datta, S.; Viennot, J. J.; Delbecq, M. R.; Cottet, A.; Kontos, T.

    2016-01-01

    Non-collinear spin transport is at the heart of spin or magnetization control in spintronics devices. The use of nanoscale conductors exhibiting quantum effects in transport could provide new paths for that purpose. Here we study non-collinear spin transport in a quantum dot. We use a device made out of a single-wall carbon nanotube connected to orthogonal ferromagnetic electrodes. In the spin transport signals, we observe signatures of out of equilibrium spin precession that are electrically tunable through dissipation. This could provide a new path to harness spin precession in nanoscale conductors.

  4. Harnessing spin precession with dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Crisan, A. D.; Datta, S.; Viennot, J. J.; Delbecq, M. R.; Cottet, A.; Kontos, T.

    2016-01-01

    Non-collinear spin transport is at the heart of spin or magnetization control in spintronics devices. The use of nanoscale conductors exhibiting quantum effects in transport could provide new paths for that purpose. Here we study non-collinear spin transport in a quantum dot. We use a device made out of a single-wall carbon nanotube connected to orthogonal ferromagnetic electrodes. In the spin transport signals, we observe signatures of out of equilibrium spin precession that are electrically tunable through dissipation. This could provide a new path to harness spin precession in nanoscale conductors. PMID:26816050

  5. Comparative studies of two methods for miRNA isolation from milk whey.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiao-lu; Wei, Zi-hai; Liu, Lan; Liu, Hong-yun; Liu, Jian-xin

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) from milk whey have been considered for their potential as noninvasive biomarkers for milk quality control and disease diagnosis. However, standard protocols for miRNA isolation and quantification from milk whey are not well established. The objective of this study was to compare two methods for the isolation of miRNAs from milk whey. These two methods were modified phenol-based technique (Trizol LS(®) followed by phenol precipitation, the TP method) and combined phenol and column-based approach (Trizol LS(®) followed by cleanup using the miRNeasy kit, the TM method). Yield and quality of RNA were rigorously measured using a NanoDrop ND-1000 spectrophotometer and then the distribution of RNA was precisely detected in a Bioanalyzer 2100 instrument by microchip gel electrophoresis. Several endogenous miRNAs (bta-miR-141, bta-miR-146a, bta-miR-148a, bta-miR-200c, bta-miR-362, and bta-miR-375) and an exogenous spike-in synthetic control miRNA (cel-miR-39) were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to examine the apparent recovery efficiency of milk whey miRNAs. Both methods could successfully isolate sufficient small RNA (<200 nt) from milk whey, and their yields were quite similar. However, the quantification results show that the total miRNA recovery efficiency by the TM method is superior to that by the TP method. The TM method performed better than the TP for recovery of milk whey miRNA due to its consistency and good repeatability in endogenous and spike-in miRNA recovery. Additionally, quantitative recovery analysis of a spike-in miRNA may be more accurate to reflect the milk whey miRNA recovery efficiency than using traditional RNA quality analysis instruments (NanoDrop or Bioanalyzer 2100). PMID:26055915

  6. Assessing the ceRNA hypothesis with quantitative measurements of miRNA and target abundance.

    PubMed

    Denzler, Rémy; Agarwal, Vikram; Stefano, Joanna; Bartel, David P; Stoffel, Markus

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have reported that competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) can act as sponges for a microRNA (miRNA) through their binding sites and that changes in ceRNA abundances from individual genes can modulate the activity of miRNAs. Consideration of this hypothesis would benefit from knowing the quantitative relationship between a miRNA and its endogenous target sites. Here, we altered intracellular target site abundance through expression of an miR-122 target in hepatocytes and livers and analyzed the effects on miR-122 target genes. Target repression was released in a threshold-like manner at high target site abundance (≥1.5 × 10(5) added target sites per cell), and this threshold was insensitive to the effective levels of the miRNA. Furthermore, in response to extreme metabolic liver disease models, global target site abundance of hepatocytes did not change sufficiently to affect miRNA-mediated repression. Thus, modulation of miRNA target abundance is unlikely to cause significant effects on gene expression and metabolism through a ceRNA effect. PMID:24793693

  7. Replication of Many Human Viruses Is Refractory to Inhibition by Endogenous Cellular MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Skalsky, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Furuse, Yuki; Whisnant, Adam W.; Flores, Omar; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Putnam, Nicole; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Sherry, Barbara; Scholle, Frank; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Griffin, Diane E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The issue of whether viruses are subject to restriction by endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) and/or by virus-induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in infected human somatic cells has been controversial. Here, we address this question in two ways. First, using deep sequencing, we demonstrate that infection of human cells by the RNA virus dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV) does not result in the production of any virus-derived siRNAs or viral miRNAs. Second, to more globally assess the potential of small regulatory RNAs to inhibit virus replication, we used gene editing to derive human cell lines that lack a functional Dicer enzyme and that therefore are unable to produce miRNAs or siRNAs. Infection of these cells with a wide range of viruses, including DENV, WNV, yellow fever virus, Sindbis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, reovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), failed to reveal any enhancement in the replication of any of these viruses, although HSV-1, which encodes at least eight Dicer-dependent viral miRNAs, did replicate somewhat more slowly in the absence of Dicer. We conclude that most, and perhaps all, human viruses have evolved to be resistant to inhibition by endogenous human miRNAs during productive replication and that dependence on a cellular miRNA, as seen with hepatitis C virus, is rare. How viruses have evolved to avoid inhibition by endogenous cellular miRNAs, which are generally highly conserved during metazoan evolution, remains to be determined. IMPORTANCE Eukaryotic cells express a wide range of small regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, that have the potential to inhibit the expression of mRNAs that show sequence complementarity. Indeed, previous work has suggested that endogenous miRNAs have the potential to inhibit viral gene expression and replication. Here, we demonstrate that the replication of a wide range of

  8. Identification of precursor transcripts for 6 novel miRNAs expands the diversity on the genomic organisation and expression of miRNA genes in rice

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, Séverine; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Santi, Carole; Duval, David; Piégu, Benoît; Bangratz, Martine; Breitler, Jean-Christophe; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Brugidou, Christophe; Hirsch, Judith; Cao, Xiaofeng; Brice, Claire; Panaud, Olivier; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Sato, Yutaka; Echeverria, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Background The plant miRNAs represent an important class of endogenous small RNAs that guide cleavage of an mRNA target or repress its translation to control development and adaptation to stresses. MiRNAs are nuclear-encoded genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II, producing a primary precursor that is subsequently processed by DCL1 an RNase III Dicer-like protein. In rice hundreds of miRNAs have been described or predicted, but little is known on their genes and precursors which are important criteria to distinguish them from siRNAs. Here we develop a combination of experimental approaches to detect novel miRNAs in rice, identify their precursor transcripts and genes and predict or validate their mRNA targets. Results We produced four cDNA libraries from small RNA fractions extracted from distinct rice tissues. By in silico analysis we selected 6 potential novel miRNAs, and confirmed that their expression requires OsDCL1. We predicted their targets and used 5'RACE to validate cleavage for three of them, targeting a PPR, an SPX domain protein and a GT-like transcription factor respectively. In addition, we identified precursor transcripts for the 6 miRNAs expressed in rice, showing that these precursors can be efficiently processed using a transient expression assay in transfected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Most interestingly, we describe two precursors producing tandem miRNAs, but in distinct arrays. We focus on one of them encoding osa-miR159a.2, a novel miRNA produced from the same stem-loop structure encoding the conserved osa-miR159a.1. We show that this dual osa-miR159a.2-osa-miR159a.1 structure is conserved in distant rice species and maize. Finally we show that the predicted mRNA target of osa-miR159a.2 encoding a GT-like transcription factor is cleaved in vivo at the expected site. Conclusion The combination of approaches developed here identified six novel miRNAs expressed in rice which can be clearly distinguished from siRNAs. Importantly, we show that

  9. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A

    2016-09-01

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2'OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs. PMID:27270083

  10. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A.

    2016-01-01

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2′OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs. PMID:27270083

  11. The emerging role of miRNAs in inflammatory bowel disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), comprised of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, is believed to develop as a result of a deregulated inflammatory response to environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals. Despite advances in understanding the genetic risks of IBD, associated single nucleotide polymorphisms have low penetrance, monozygotic twin studies suggest a low concordance rate, and increasing worldwide IBD incidence leave gaps in our understanding of IBD heritability and highlight the importance of environmental influences. Operating at the interface between environment and heritable molecular and cellular phenotypes, microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression. Studies to date have identified unique miRNA expression profile signatures in IBD and preliminary functional analyses associate these deregulated miRNAs to canonical pathways associated with IBD pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize and discuss the miRNA expression signatures associated with IBD in tissue and peripheral blood, highlight miRNAs with potential future clinical applications as diagnostic and therapeutic targets, and provide an outlook on how to develop miRNA based therapies. PMID:25553076

  12. Delivery and targeting of miRNAs for treating liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virender; Mahato, Ram I

    2015-02-01

    Liver fibrosis is a pathological condition originating from liver damage that leads to excess accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the liver. Viral infection, chronic injury, local inflammatory responses and oxidative stress are the major factors contributing to the onset and progression of liver fibrosis. Multiple cell types and various growth factors and inflammatory cytokines are involved in the induction and progression of this disease. Various strategies currently being tried to attenuate liver fibrosis include the inhibition of HSC activation or induction of their apoptosis, reduction of collagen production and deposition, decrease in inflammation, and liver transplantation. Liver fibrosis treatment approaches are mainly based on small drug molecules, antibodies, oligonucleotides (ODNs), siRNA and miRNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNA or miR) are endogenous noncoding RNA of ~22 nucleotides that regulate gene expression at post transcription level. There are several miRNAs having aberrant expressions and play a key role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. Single miRNA can target multiple mRNAs, and we can predict its targets based on seed region pairing, thermodynamic stability of pairing and species conservation. For in vivo delivery, we need some additional chemical modification in their structure, and suitable delivery systems like micelles, liposomes and conjugation with targeting or stabilizing the moiety. Here, we discuss the role of miRNAs in fibrogenesis and current approaches of utilizing these miRNAs for treating liver fibrosis. PMID:25186440

  13. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  14. Harness cavitation to improve processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, A.G.; Moholkar, V.S.

    1996-07-01

    Mention cavitation to most chemical engineers, and they undoubtedly think of it as an operational problem. Indeed, the rapid creation and then collapse of bubbles, which is after all what cavitation involves, can destroy pumps and erode other equipment. Cavitation, however, also can have a positive side--presuming it is designed for and not unplanned. In this article, the authors look at how cavitation can be harnessed to improve processes, and the mechanisms for inducing cavitation--ultrasonics and hydrodynamics--and their likely roles. Sonication, that is, the use of ultrasound, is the conventional approach for creating cavitation, and so they turn to it first. Over the past few years, a number of groups have attempted to solve the problem of scale-up and design of ultrasonic reactors. The authors review the systems that already exist and also explore a simpler and efficient alternative to the ultrasonic reactor, the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor.

  15. Identification of AGO3-Associated miRNAs and Computational Prediction of Their Targets in the Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Voshall, Adam; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Ma, Xinrong; Moriyama, Etsuko N.; Cerutti, Heriberto

    2015-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii harbors many types of small RNAs (sRNAs) but little is known about their role(s) in the regulation of endogenous genes and cellular processes. To define functional microRNAs (miRNAs) in Chlamydomonas, we characterized sRNAs associated with an argonaute protein, AGO3, by affinity purification and deep sequencing. Using a stringent set of criteria for canonical miRNA annotation, we identified 39 precursor miRNAs, which produce 45 unique, AGO3-associated miRNA sequences including 13 previously reported miRNAs and 32 novel ones. Potential miRNA targets were identified based on the complementarity of miRNAs with candidate binding sites on transcripts and classified, depending on the extent of complementarity, as being likely to be regulated through cleavage or translational repression. The search for cleavage targets identified 74 transcripts. However, only 6 of them showed an increase in messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in a mutant strain almost devoid of sRNAs. The search for translational repression targets, which used complementarity criteria more stringent than those empirically required for a reduction in target protein levels, identified 488 transcripts. However, unlike observations in metazoans, most predicted translation repression targets did not show appreciable changes in transcript abundance in the absence of sRNAs. Additionally, of three candidate targets examined at the protein level, only one showed a moderate variation in polypeptide amount in the mutant strain. Our results emphasize the difficulty in identifying genuine miRNA targets in Chlamydomonas and suggest that miRNAs, under standard laboratory conditions, might have mainly a modulatory role in endogenous gene regulation in this alga. PMID:25769981

  16. Platelets in Patients with Premature Coronary Artery Disease Exhibit Upregulation of miRNA340* and miRNA624*

    PubMed Central

    Sondermeijer, Brigitte M.; Bakker, Annemieke; Halliani, Amalia; de Ronde, Maurice W. J.; Marquart, Arnoud A.; Tijsen, Anke J.; Mulders, Ties A.; Kok, Maayke G. M.; Battjes, Suzanne; Maiwald, Steffi; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Trip, Mieke D.; Moerland, Perry D.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Creemers, Esther E.; Pinto-Sietsma, Sara-Joan

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide, underscoring the need to improve diagnostic strategies. Platelets play a major role, not only in the process of acute thrombosis during plaque rupture, but also in the formation of atherosclerosis itself. MicroRNAs are endogenous small non-coding RNAs that control gene expression and are expressed in a tissue and disease-specific manner. Therefore they have been proposed to be useful biomarkers. It remains unknown whether differences in miRNA expression levels in platelets can be found between patients with premature CAD and healthy controls. Methodology/Principal Findings In this case-control study we measured relative expression levels of platelet miRNAs using microarrays from 12 patients with premature CAD and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Six platelet microRNAs were significantly upregulated (miR340*, miR451, miR454*, miR545:9.1. miR615-5p and miR624*) and one miRNA (miR1280) was significantly downregulated in patients with CAD as compared to healthy controls. To validate these results, we measured the expression levels of these candidate miRNAs by qRT-PCR in platelets of individuals from two independent cohorts; validation cohort I consisted of 40 patients with premature CAD and 40 healthy controls and validation cohort II consisted of 27 patients with artery disease and 40 healthy relatives. MiR340* and miR624* were confirmed to be upregulated in patients with CAD as compared to healthy controls in both validation cohorts. Conclusion/Significance Two miRNAs in platelets are significantly upregulated in patients with CAD as compared to healthy controls. Whether the two identified miRNAs can be used as biomarkers and whether they are cause or consequence of the disease remains to be elucidated in a larger prospective study. PMID:22022480

  17. miRSponge: a manually curated database for experimentally supported miRNA sponges and ceRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Jizhou; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Ning, Shangwei; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe miRSponge, a manually curated database, which aims at providing an experimentally supported resource for microRNA (miRNA) sponges. Recent evidence suggests that miRNAs are themselves regulated by competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) or 'miRNA sponges' that contain miRNA binding sites. These competitive molecules can sequester miRNAs to prevent them interacting with their natural targets to play critical roles in various biological and pathological processes. It has become increasingly important to develop a high quality database to record and store ceRNA data to support future studies. To this end, we have established the experimentally supported miRSponge database that contains data on 599 miRNA-sponge interactions and 463 ceRNA relationships from 11 species following manual curating from nearly 1200 published articles. Database classes include endogenously generated molecules including coding genes, pseudogenes, long non-coding RNAs and circular RNAs, along with exogenously introduced molecules including viral RNAs and artificial engineered sponges. Approximately 70% of the interactions were identified experimentally in disease states. miRSponge provides a user-friendly interface for convenient browsing, retrieval and downloading of dataset. A submission page is also included to allow researchers to submit newly validated miRNA sponge data. Database URL: http://www.bio-bigdata.net/miRSponge. PMID:26424084

  18. miRNAs in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farazi, Thalia A.; Spitzer, Jessica I.; Morozov, Pavel; Tuschl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mature microRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNA molecules of 20- to 23-nucleotide (nt) length that control gene expression in many cellular processes. These molecules typically reduce the stability of mRNAs, including those of genes that mediate processes in tumorigenesis, such as inflammation, cell cycle regulation, stress response, differentiation, apoptosis, and invasion. miRNA targeting is mostly achieved through specific base-pairing interactions between the 5′ end (“seed” region) of the miRNA and sites within coding and untranslated regions (UTRs) of mRNAs; target sites in the 3′ UTR lead to more effective mRNA destabilization. Since miRNAs frequently target hundreds of mRNAs, miRNA regulatory pathways are complex. To provide a critical overview of miRNA dysregulation in cancer we first discuss the methods currently available for studying the role of miRNAs in cancer and then review miRNA genomic organization, biogenesis, and mechanism of target recognition examining how these processes are altered in tumorigenesis. Given the critical role miRNAs play in tumorigenesis processes and their disease specific expression, they hold potential as therapeutic targets and novel biomarkers. PMID:21125669

  19. Ambulatory purchasing: harnessing supply costs.

    PubMed

    Jager, P A

    1997-04-01

    The healthcare system remains in a dynamic state of flux. We have all heard the story: the changing healthcare market brings reduced reimbursement for services, increased competition, and steadily increasing supply, maintenance, and equipment costs. Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) must keep in sync with this change or fail to survive the current market forces. However, because they represent a small contract to various vendors, many ASCs pay premium prices for inventory while receiving less from Managed Care Plans (MCPs) and Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs). This dilemma makes control of supply costs a top priority for ASCs. In reality, purchasing is becoming more strategically connected to the ASC balance sheet than ever before. Apart from personnel costs, supply and pharmaceutical purchasing represents the greatest expense category on our financial statement. Harnessing these costs directly relates to bottom line profitability. In addition, while performing cost savings magic, ASCs must maintain patient and surgeon satisfaction with the superior outcomes and state-of-the-art technology their reputations are based upon. Sound impossible? This article details how Surgery Center Plus, Inc. (SCP) implemented a cost containment project. PMID:10167012

  20. Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 is Regulated Post-Transcriptionally by miRNA-29a

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Lau, Pierre; Hudson, Lynn; Murashov, Alexander K.; Renne, Rolf; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a dose-sensitive, disease-associated protein primarily expressed in myelinating Schwann cells. Either reduction or overproduction of PMP22 can result in hereditary neuropathy, suggesting a requirement for correct protein expression for peripheral nerve biology. PMP22 is post-transcriptionally regulated and the 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) of the gene exerts a negative effect on translation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory molecules that function at a post-transcriptional level by targeting the 3′UTR in a reverse complementary manner. We used cultured Schwann cells to demonstrate that alterations in the miRNA biogenesis pathway affect PMP22 levels, and endogenous PMP22 is subjected to miRNA regulation. GW-body formation, the proposed cytoplasmic site for miRNA-mediated repression, and Dicer expression, an RNase III family ribonuclease involved in miRNA biogenesis, are co-regulated with the differentiation state of Schwann cells. Furthermore, the levels of Dicer inversely correlate with PMP22, while the inhibition of Dicer leads to elevated PMP22. Microarray analysis of actively-proliferating and differentiated Schwann cells, in conjunction with bioinformatics programs, identified several candidate PMP22-targeting miRNAs. Here we demonstrate that miR-29a binds and inhibits PMP22 reporter expression through a specific miRNA seed binding region. Over-expression of miR-29a enhances the association of PMP22 RNA with Argonaute 2, a protein involved in miRNA function, and reduces the steady-state levels of PMP22. In contrast, inhibition of endogenous miR-29a relieves the miRNA-mediated repression of PMP22. Correlation analyses of miR-29 and PMP22 in sciatic nerves reveal an inverse relationship, both developmentally and in post-crush injury. These results identify PMP22 as a target of miRNAs and suggest that myelin gene expression by Schwann cells is regulated by miRNAs. PMID:19170179

  1. Assessing the ceRNA hypothesis with quantitative measurements of miRNA and target abundance

    PubMed Central

    Denzler, Rémy; Agarwal, Vikram; Stefano, Joanna; Bartel, David P; Stoffel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies have reported that competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) can act as sponges for a microRNA (miRNA) through their binding sites and that changes in ceRNA abundances from individual genes can modulate the miRNA’s activity. Consideration of this hypothesis would benefit from knowing the quantitative relationship between a miRNA and its endogenous target sites. Here, we altered intracellular target-site abundance through expression of a miR-122 target in hepatocytes and livers, and analyzed the effects on miR-122 target genes. Target repression was released in a threshold-like manner at high target-site abundance (≥1.5×105 added target sites per cell), and this threshold was insensitive to the effective levels of the miRNA. Furthermore, in response to extreme metabolic liver disease models, global target-site abundance of hepatocytes did not change sufficiently to affect miRNA-mediated repression. Thus, modulation of miRNA target abundance is unlikely to cause significant effects on gene expression and metabolism through a ceRNA effect. PMID:24793693

  2. Identification of miRNAs Involved in Stolon Formation in Tulipa edulis by High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaibiao; Miao, Yuanyuan; Guo, Qiaosheng; Zhu, Yunhao; Yang, Xiaohua; Sun, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding small RNAs that play an important role in transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation. However, the sequence information and functions of miRNAs are still unexplored in Tulipa edulis. In this study, high-throughput sequencing was used to identify small RNAs in stolon formation stages (stage 1, 2, and 3) in T. edulis. A total of 12,890,912, 12,182,122, and 12,061,434 clean reads were obtained from stage 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Among the reads, 88 conserved miRNAs and 70 novel miRNAs were identified. Target prediction of 122 miRNAs resulted in 531 potential target genes. Nr, Swiss-Prot, GO, COG, and KEGG annotations revealed that these target genes participate in many biologic and metabolic processes. Moreover, qRT-PCR was performed to analyze the expression levels of the miRNAs and target genes in stolon formation. The results revealed that miRNAs play a key role in T. edulis stolon formation. PMID:27446103

  3. Identification of miRNAs Involved in Stolon Formation in Tulipa edulis by High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zaibiao; Miao, Yuanyuan; Guo, Qiaosheng; Zhu, Yunhao; Yang, Xiaohua; Sun, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous, non-coding small RNAs that play an important role in transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation. However, the sequence information and functions of miRNAs are still unexplored in Tulipa edulis. In this study, high-throughput sequencing was used to identify small RNAs in stolon formation stages (stage 1, 2, and 3) in T. edulis. A total of 12,890,912, 12,182,122, and 12,061,434 clean reads were obtained from stage 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Among the reads, 88 conserved miRNAs and 70 novel miRNAs were identified. Target prediction of 122 miRNAs resulted in 531 potential target genes. Nr, Swiss-Prot, GO, COG, and KEGG annotations revealed that these target genes participate in many biologic and metabolic processes. Moreover, qRT-PCR was performed to analyze the expression levels of the miRNAs and target genes in stolon formation. The results revealed that miRNAs play a key role in T. edulis stolon formation. PMID:27446103

  4. A TCP-Over-UDP Test Harness

    SciTech Connect

    Dunigan, TH

    2002-10-31

    This report describes an implementation of a TCP-like protocol that runs over UDP. This TCP-like implementation, which does not require kernel modifications, provides a test harness for evaluating variations of the TCP transport protocol over the Internet. The test harness provides a tunable and instrumented version of TCP that supports Reno, NewReno, and SACK/FACK. The test harness can also be used to characterize the TCP-performance of a network path. Several case studies illustrate how one can tune the transport protocol to improve performance.

  5. Implication of miRNAs for inflammatory bowel disease treatment: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Xu; Ren, Li-Hua; Shi, Rui-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is believed to develop via a complex interaction between genetic, environmental factors and the mucosal immune system. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are two major clinical forms of IBD. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, endogenous, noncoding RNA molecules, and evolutionary conserved in animals and plants. It controls protein production at the post-transcriptional level by targeting mRNAs for translational repression or degradation. MiRNAs are important in many biological processes, such as signal transduction, cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Considerable attention has been paid on the key role of miRNAs in autoimmune and inflammatory disease, especially IBD. Recent studies have identified altered miRNA profiles in ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and inflammatory bowel disease-associated colorectal cancer. In addition, emerging data have implicated that special miRNAs which suppress functional targets play a critical role in regulating key pathogenic mechanism in IBD. MiRNAs were found involving in regulation of nuclear transcription factor kappa B pathway (e.g., miR-146a, miR-146b, miR-122, miR-132, miR-126), intestinal epithelial barrier function (e.g., miR-21, miR-150, miR-200b) and the autophagic activity (e.g., miR-30c, miR-130a, miR-106b, miR-93, miR-196). This review aims at discussing recent advances in our understanding of miRNAs in IBD pathogenesis, their role as disease biomarkers, and perspective for future investigation and clinical application. PMID:24891977

  6. miRNA Tagging and Affinity-purification (miRAP)

    PubMed Central

    He, Miao

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs(miRNAs) are a group of endogenously expressed 20~23 nt small noncoding RNAs, which can directly regulate mRNA stability or translation in a sequence specific manner by incomplete base pairing at the 3′UTR of target mRNA, or indirectly affect transcriptional network by regulating transcription factors. As key regulators of gene expression, miRNAs are involved in the control of diverse developmental and physiological processes, including embryogenesis, differentiation, developmental timing, organogenesis, growth control, and programmed cell death. Aberrant miRNA expression profiles have been observed in many pathological conditions, including cancers, psychiatric diseases, virus infection, etc. However, the underlying mechanisms have been difficult to study in part due to the cellular heterogeneity of complex tissue. To systematically analyze miRNA expression in complex tissue, we present here a novel miRNA tagging and Affinity Purification method, miRAP, which can be applied to genetically defined cell types in any complex tissues in mice. This method is based on the fact that mature miRNAs are incorporated into RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), in which the Argonaute protein AGO2 directly binds miRNAs and their mRNA targets. We demonstrate that epitope tagging of AGO2 protein allows direct purification of miRNAs from tissue homogenates using antibodies against the engineered molecular tag. We further established a Cre-loxP binary expression system to deliver epitope-tagged AGO2 (tAGO2) to genetically defined cell types.

  7. Distributed Real-Time Computing with Harness

    SciTech Connect

    Di Saverio, Emanuele; Cesati, Marco; Di Biagio, Christian; Pennella, Guido; Engelmann, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Modern parallel and distributed computing solutions are often built onto a ''middleware'' software layer providing a higher and common level of service between computational nodes. Harness is an adaptable, plugin-based middleware framework for parallel and distributed computing. This paper reports recent research and development results of using Harness for real-time distributed computing applications in the context of an industrial environment with the needs to perform several safety critical tasks. The presented work exploits the modular architecture of Harness in conjunction with a lightweight threaded implementation to resolve several real-time issues by adding three new Harness plug-ins to provide a prioritized lightweight execution environment, low latency communication facilities, and local timestamped event logging.

  8. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... inertia load factors established under the certification basis of the airplane. (b) No person may operate... used; and (2) Safety belt and shoulder harness restraint systems may be designed to the inertia...

  9. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... inertia load factors established under the certification basis of the airplane. (b) No person may operate... used; and (2) Safety belt and shoulder harness restraint systems may be designed to the inertia...

  10. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... inertia load factors established under the certification basis of the airplane. (b) No person may operate... used; and (2) Safety belt and shoulder harness restraint systems may be designed to the inertia...

  11. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... inertia load factors established under the certification basis of the airplane. (b) No person may operate... used; and (2) Safety belt and shoulder harness restraint systems may be designed to the inertia...

  12. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... inertia load factors established under the certification basis of the airplane. (b) No person may operate... used; and (2) Safety belt and shoulder harness restraint systems may be designed to the inertia...

  13. Intelligent electrical harness connector assembly using Bell Helicopter Textron's 'Wire Harness Automated Manufacturing System'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, D. W.

    Bell Helicopter Textron, Incorporated (BHTI) installed two Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-11 computers and an American Can Inc. Ink Jet printer in 1980 as the cornerstone of the Wire Harness Automated Manufacturing System (WHAMS). WHAMS is based upon the electrical assembly philosophy of continuous filament harness forming. This installation provided BHTI with a 3 to 1 return-on-investment by reducing wire and cable identification cycle time by 80 percent and harness forming, on dedicated layout tooling, by 40 percent. Yet, this improvement in harness forming created a bottle neck in connector assembly. To remove this bottle neck, BHTI has installed a prototype connector assembly cell that integrates the WHAMS' data base and innovative computer technologies to cut harness connector assembly cycle time. This novel connector assembly cell uses voice recognition, laser identification, and animated computer graphics to help the electrician in the correct assembly of harness connectors.

  14. miRNA–target chimeras reveal miRNA 3′-end pairing as a major determinant of Argonaute target specificity

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael J.; Scheel, Troels K. H.; Luna, Joseph M.; Park, Christopher Y.; Fak, John J.; Nishiuchi, Eiko; Rice, Charles M.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) act as sequence-specific guides for Argonaute (AGO) proteins, which mediate posttranscriptional silencing of target messenger RNAs. Despite their importance in many biological processes, rules governing AGO–miRNA targeting are only partially understood. Here we report a modified AGO HITS-CLIP strategy termed CLEAR (covalent ligation of endogenous Argonaute-bound RNAs)-CLIP, which enriches miRNAs ligated to their endogenous mRNA targets. CLEAR-CLIP mapped ∼130,000 endogenous miRNA–target interactions in mouse brain and ∼40,000 in human hepatoma cells. Motif and structural analysis define expanded pairing rules for over 200 mammalian miRNAs. Most interactions combine seed-based pairing with distinct, miRNA-specific patterns of auxiliary pairing. At some regulatory sites, this specificity confers distinct silencing functions to miRNA family members with shared seed sequences but divergent 3′-ends. This work provides a means for explicit biochemical identification of miRNA sites in vivo, leading to the discovery that miRNA 3′-end pairing is a general determinant of AGO binding specificity. PMID:26602609

  15. Identification of novel and conserved miRNAs involved in pollen development in Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis by high-throughput sequencing and degradome analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding, small RNAs that have essential regulatory functions in plant growth, development, and stress response processes. However, limited information is available about their functions in sexual reproduction of flowering plants. Pollen development is an important process in the life cycle of a flowering plant and is a major factor that affects the yield and quality of crop seeds. Results This study aims to identify miRNAs involved in pollen development. Two independent small RNA libraries were constructed from the flower buds of the male sterile line (Bcajh97-01A) and male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B) of Brassica campestris ssp. chinensis. The libraries were subjected to high-throughput sequencing by using the Illumina Solexa system. Eight novel miRNAs on the other arm of known pre-miRNAs, 54 new conserved miRNAs, and 8 novel miRNA members were identified. Twenty-five pairs of novel miRNA/miRNA* were found. Among all the identified miRNAs, 18 differentially expressed miRNAs with over two-fold change between flower buds of male sterile line (Bcajh97-01A) and male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B) were identified. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that most of the differentially expressed miRNAs were preferentially expressed in flower buds of the male fertile line (Bcajh97-01B). Degradome analysis showed that a total of 15 genes were predicted to be the targets of seven miRNAs. Conclusions Our findings provide an overview of potential miRNAs involved in pollen development and interactions between miRNAs and their corresponding targets, which may provide important clues on the function of miRNAs in pollen development. PMID:24559317

  16. miRNA Digger: a comprehensive pipeline for genome-wide novel miRNA mining.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lan; Shao, Chaogang; Ye, Xinghuo; Meng, Yijun; Zhou, Yincong; Chen, Ming

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. The recent advances in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technique have greatly facilitated large-scale detection of the miRNAs. However, thoroughly discovery of novel miRNAs from the available HTS data sets remains a major challenge. In this study, we observed that Dicer-mediated cleavage sites for the processing of the miRNA precursors could be mapped by using degradome sequencing data in both animals and plants. In this regard, a novel tool, miRNA Digger, was developed for systematical discovery of miRNA candidates through genome-wide screening of cleavage signals based on degradome sequencing data. To test its sensitivity and reliability, miRNA Digger was applied to discover miRNAs from four organs of Arabidopsis. The results revealed that a majority of already known mature miRNAs along with their miRNA*s expressed in these four organs were successfully recovered. Notably, a total of 30 novel miRNA-miRNA* pairs that have not been registered in miRBase were discovered by miRNA Digger. After target prediction and degradome sequencing data-based validation, eleven miRNA-target interactions involving six of the novel miRNAs were identified. Taken together, miRNA Digger could be applied for sensitive detection of novel miRNAs and it could be freely downloaded from http://www.bioinfolab.cn/miRNA_Digger/index.html. PMID:26732371

  17. 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulates miRNA expression in human bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyu; Hu, Qiang; Luo, Wei; Pratt, Rachel N.; Glenn, Sean T.; Liu, Song; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and eighth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. Epidemiological and experimental studies strongly suggest a role for 1α,25(OH)2D3 in cancer prevention and treatment. The antitumor activities of 1α,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and the inhibition of angiogenesis and metastasis. MiRNAs play important regulatory roles in cancer development and progression. However, the role of 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the regulation of miRNA expression and the potential impact in bladder cancer has not been investigated. Therefore, we studied 1α,25(OH)2D3-regulated miRNA expression profiles in human bladder cancer cell line 253J and the highly tumorigenic and metastatic derivative line 253J-BV by miRNA qPCR panels. 253 J and 253J-BV cells express endogenous vitamin D receptor (VDR) which can be further induced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. VDR target gene 24-hydroxylase was induced by 1α,25(OH)2D3 in both cell lines, indicating functional 1α,25(OH)2D3 signaling. The miRNA qPCR panel assay results showed that 253J and 253J-BV cells have distinct miRNA expression profiles. Further, 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulated miRNA expression profiles in 253J and 253 J-BV cells in a dynamic manner. Pathway analysis of the miRNA target genes revealed distinct patterns of contribution to the molecular functions and biological processes in the two cell lines. In conclusion, 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulates the expression of miRNAs, which may contribute to distinct biological functions, in human bladder 253J and 253J-BV cells. PMID:25263658

  18. miRSponge: a manually curated database for experimentally supported miRNA sponges and ceRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Zhi, Hui; Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Jizhou; Gao, Yue; Guo, Maoni; Ning, Shangwei; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe miRSponge, a manually curated database, which aims at providing an experimentally supported resource for microRNA (miRNA) sponges. Recent evidence suggests that miRNAs are themselves regulated by competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) or ‘miRNA sponges’ that contain miRNA binding sites. These competitive molecules can sequester miRNAs to prevent them interacting with their natural targets to play critical roles in various biological and pathological processes. It has become increasingly important to develop a high quality database to record and store ceRNA data to support future studies. To this end, we have established the experimentally supported miRSponge database that contains data on 599 miRNA-sponge interactions and 463 ceRNA relationships from 11 species following manual curating from nearly 1200 published articles. Database classes include endogenously generated molecules including coding genes, pseudogenes, long non-coding RNAs and circular RNAs, along with exogenously introduced molecules including viral RNAs and artificial engineered sponges. Approximately 70% of the interactions were identified experimentally in disease states. miRSponge provides a user-friendly interface for convenient browsing, retrieval and downloading of dataset. A submission page is also included to allow researchers to submit newly validated miRNA sponge data. Database URL: http://www.bio-bigdata.net/miRSponge. PMID:26424084

  19. Regulation of PP2Cm expression by miRNA-204/211 and miRNA-22 in mouse and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Bang-fen; Gao, Chen; Ren, Shu-xun; Wang, Yi-bin; Sun, Hai-peng; Zhou, Mei-yi

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The mitochondrial targeted 2C-type serine/threonine protein phosphatase (PP2Cm) is encoded by the gene PPM1K and is highly conserved among vertebrates. PP2Cm plays a critical role in branched-chain amino acid catabolism and regulates cell survival. Its expression is dynamically regulated by the nutrient environment and pathological stresses. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of PPM1K gene expression. In this study, we aimed to reveal how PPM1K expression is affected by miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. Methods: Computational analysis based on conserved miRNA binding motifs was applied to predict the candidate miRNAs that potentially affect PPM1K expression. Dual-luciferase reporter assay was performed to verify the miRNAs' binding sites in the PPM1K gene and their influence on PPM1K 3′UTR activity. We further over-expressed the mimics of these miRNAs in human and mouse cells to examine whether miRNAs affected the mRNA level of PPM1K. Results: Computational analysis identified numerous miRNAs potentially targeting PPM1K. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the 3′UTR of PPM1K gene contained the recognition sites of miR-204 and miR-211. Overexpression of these miRNAs in human and mouse cells diminished the 3′UTR activity and the endogenous mRNA level of PPM1K. However, the miR-22 binding site was found only in human and not mouse PPM1K 3′UTR. Accordingly, PPM1K 3′UTR activity was suppressed by miR-22 overexpression in human but not mouse cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that different miRNAs contribute to the regulation of PP2Cm expression in a species-specific manner. miR-204 and miR-211 are efficient in both mouse and human cells, while miR-22 regulates PP2Cm expression only in human cells. PMID:26592513

  20. Regulation of the miRNA expression by TEL/AML1, BCR/ABL, MLL/AF4 and TCF3/PBX1 oncoproteins in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Review).

    PubMed

    Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice; Leyva-Vázquez, Marco Antonio

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs that play important regulatory roles by targeting mRNAs for cleavage or translational repression. miRNAs act in diverse biological processes including development, cell growth, apoptosis, and hematopoiesis. The miRNA expression is associated with specific cytogenetic changes and can also be used to discriminate between the different subtypes of leukemia in acute lymphoblastic leukemia with common translocations, it is shown that the miRNAs have the potential to be used for clinical diagnosis and prognosis. We reviewed the roles of miRNA here with emphasis on their function in human leukemia and the mechanisms of the TEL/AML1, BCR/ABL, MLL/AF4 and TCF3/PBX1 oncoproteins on miRNAs expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27431573

  1. Grafting-responsive miRNAs in cucumber and pumpkin seedlings identified by high-throughput sequencing at whole genome level.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaohan; Li, Yansu; Bai, Longqiang; Zhang, Tieyao; He, Chaoxing; Yan, Yan; Yu, Xianchang

    2014-08-01

    Grafting is an important agricultural technique widely used for improving growth, yields and tolerance of crops to abiotic and biotic stresses. As one type of endogenous, non-coding small RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate development and responsiveness to biotic and abiotic stresses by negatively mediating expression of target genes at the post-transcriptional level. However, there have been few detailed studies to evaluate the role of miRNAs in mediation of grafting-induced physiological processes in plants. Cucumis sativus and Cucurbita moschata are important vegetables worldwide. We constructed eight small RNA libraries from leaves and roots of seedlings that were grafted in the following four ways: (1) hetero-grafting, using cucumber as scion and pumpkin as rootstock; (2) hetero-grafting, with pumpkin as scion and cucumber as rootstock; (3) auto-grafting of cucumbers and (4) auto-grafting of pumpkins. High-throughput sequencing was employed, and more than 120 million raw reads were obtained. We annotated 112 known miRNAs belonging to 40 miRNA families and identified 48 new miRNAs in the eight libraries, and the targets of these known and novel miRNAs were predicted by bioinformatics. Grafting led to changes in expression of most miRNAs and their predicted target genes, suggesting that miRNAs may play significant roles in mediating physiological processes of grafted seedlings by regulating the expression of target genes. The potential role of the grafting-responsive miRNAs in seedling growth and long-distance transport of miRNA was discussed. These results are useful for functional characterization of miRNAs in mediation of grafting-dependent physiological processes. PMID:24279842

  2. Endogenous Pyrogen Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisel, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the physiology of endogenous pyrogen (EP), the fever-producing factor of cellular origin. Included are: its hormone-like role, its molecular nature, bioassay procedures, cellular production and mechanisms of EP action. (SA)

  3. Bacillus cereus endogenous panophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Bouza, E; Grant, S; Jordan, C; Yook, R H; Sulit, H L

    1979-03-01

    A case of severe suppurative endogenous panophthalmitis caused by Bacillus cereus resulted from intravenously administered medications. This is the first, to our knowledge, well-documented case of endogenous endophthalmitis associated with this organism. It is recommended that if on Gram's stain of the anterior chamber fluid, Gram-positive rods are seen, chloramphenicol should be administered in addition to penicillin because of the possibility of B cereus infection. PMID:105693

  4. Citrus psorosis virus 24K protein interacts with citrus miRNA precursors, affects their processing and subsequent miRNA accumulation and target expression.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Carina A; Ocolotobiche, Eliana E; Marmisollé, Facundo E; Robles Luna, Gabriel; Borniego, María B; Bazzini, Ariel A; Asurmendi, Sebastian; García, María L

    2016-04-01

    Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis), one of the most important fruit crops worldwide, may suffer from disease symptoms induced by virus infections, thus resulting in dramatic economic losses. Here, we show that the infection of sweet orange plants with two isolates of Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV) expressing different symptomatology alters the accumulation of a set of endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs). Within these miRNAs, miR156, miR167 and miR171 were the most down-regulated, with almost a three-fold reduction in infected samples. This down-regulation led to a concomitant up-regulation of some of their targets, such as Squamosa promoter-binding protein-like 9 and 13, as well as Scarecrow-like 6. The processing of miRNA precursors, pre-miR156 and pre-miR171, in sweet orange seems to be affected by the virus. For instance, virus infection increases the level of unprocessed precursors, which is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in mature species accumulation. miR156a primary transcript accumulation remained unaltered, thus strongly suggesting a processing deregulation for this transcript. The co-immunoprecipitation of viral 24K protein with pre-miR156a or pre-miR171a suggests that the alteration in the processing of these precursors might be caused by a direct or indirect interaction with this particular viral protein. This result is also consistent with the nuclear localization of both miRNA precursors and the CPsV 24K protein. This study contributes to the understanding of the manner in which a virus can alter host regulatory mechanisms, particularly miRNA biogenesis and target expression. PMID:26033697

  5. Prediction of miRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Oulas, Anastasis; Karathanasis, Nestoras; Louloupi, Annita; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Poirazi, Panayiota; Kalantidis, Kriton; Iliopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods for miRNA target prediction are currently undergoing extensive review and evaluation. There is still a great need for improvement of these tools and bioinformatics approaches are looking towards high-throughput experiments in order to validate predictions. The combination of large-scale techniques with computational tools will not only provide greater credence to computational predictions but also lead to the better understanding of specific biological questions. Current miRNA target prediction tools utilize probabilistic learning algorithms, machine learning methods and even empirical biologically defined rules in order to build models based on experimentally verified miRNA targets. Large-scale protein downregulation assays and next-generation sequencing (NGS) are now being used to validate methodologies and compare the performance of existing tools. Tools that exhibit greater correlation between computational predictions and protein downregulation or RNA downregulation are considered the state of the art. Moreover, efficiency in prediction of miRNA targets that are concurrently verified experimentally provides additional validity to computational predictions and further highlights the competitive advantage of specific tools and their efficacy in extracting biologically significant results. In this review paper, we discuss the computational methods for miRNA target prediction and provide a detailed comparison of methodologies and features utilized by each specific tool. Moreover, we provide an overview of current state-of-the-art high-throughput methods used in miRNA target prediction. PMID:25577381

  6. TP53 regulates miRNA association with AGO2 to remodel the miRNA-mRNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Krell, Jonathan; Stebbing, Justin; Carissimi, Claudia; Dabrowska, Aleksandra F; de Giorgio, Alexander; Frampton, Adam E; Harding, Victoria; Fulci, Valerio; Macino, Giuseppe; Colombo, Teresa; Castellano, Leandro

    2016-03-01

    DNA damage activates TP53-regulated surveillance mechanisms that are crucial in suppressing tumorigenesis. TP53 orchestrates these responses directly by transcriptionally modulating genes, including microRNAs (miRNAs), and by regulating miRNA biogenesis through interacting with the DROSHA complex. However, whether the association between miRNAs and AGO2 is regulated following DNA damage is not yet known. Here, we show that, following DNA damage, TP53 interacts with AGO2 to induce or reduce AGO2's association of a subset of miRNAs, including multiple let-7 family members. Furthermore, we show that specific mutations in TP53 decrease rather than increase the association of let-7 family miRNAs, reducing their activity without preventing TP53 from interacting with AGO2. This is consistent with the oncogenic properties of these mutants. Using AGO2 RIP-seq and PAR-CLIP-seq, we show that the DNA damage-induced increase in binding of let-7 family members to the RISC complex is functional. We unambiguously determine the global miRNA-mRNA interaction networks involved in the DNA damage response, validating them through the identification of miRNA-target chimeras formed by endogenous ligation reactions. We find that the target complementary region of the let-7 seed tends to have highly fixed positions and more variable ones. Additionally, we observe that miRNAs, whose cellular abundance or differential association with AGO2 is regulated by TP53, are involved in an intricate network of regulatory feedback and feedforward circuits. TP53-mediated regulation of AGO2-miRNA interaction represents a new mechanism of miRNA regulation in carcinogenesis. PMID:26701625

  7. The Type I IFN-Induced miRNA, miR-21

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chuan He; Li, Kui; Pfeffer, Susan R.; Pfeffer, Lawrence M.

    2015-01-01

    The interferon (IFN) family of cytokines not only has antiviral properties at various steps in the viral replication cycle, but also anticancer activity through multiple pathways that include inhibiting cell proliferation, regulating cellular responses to inducers of apoptosis and modulating angiogenesis and the immune system. IFNs are known to induce their biological activity through the induction of protein encoding IFN-stimulated genes. However, recent studies have established that IFNs also induce the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small endogenous non-coding RNAs that suppress gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNAs play critical roles in tumorigenesis and have been implicated to act as either oncogenes or tumor suppressors in various human cancers. Therefore, IFN-induced miRNAs play an important role, not only in the host response to innate immune response to cancer, but also in the tumorigenic process itself. Furthermore, IFN-induced miRNAs may participate in and/or orchestrate antiviral defense in certain viral infections. In this review, we describe our recent studies on the induction of miR-21 by type I IFN, the role of the STAT3 and NFκB signaling pathways in IFN-induced miR-21 expression, the role of miR-21 in different cancers and the role of miR-21 in regulating the antiviral response. PMID:26610525

  8. SRB Altitude Switch Assembly Wire Harness Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanche, Jim

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of two wire harness failures that had occurred in Solid Rocket Booster Altitude Switch Assemblies S/N 200001 and S/N 20002. A list of modifications to EDU #4 and modification of qualification units 2000001 and 2000002 are also presented.

  9. Seizing the Moment: Harnessing the Information Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankes, Steve; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the scope of the Information Revolution, considers initiatives for harnessing information technology, and proposes a research agenda. Seven appendices detail specific initiatives relating to a global communication network, a Council for North American Information, the news media, a pan-European security information agency, multinational…

  10. Harnessing Collective Knowledge Inherent in Tag Clouds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cress, U.; Held, C.

    2013-01-01

    Tagging systems represent the conceptual knowledge of a community. We experimentally tested whether people harness this collective knowledge when navigating through the Web. As a within-factor we manipulated people's prior knowledge (no knowledge vs. prior knowledge that was congruent/incongruent to the collective knowledge inherent in the tags).…

  11. Harnessing Collaborative Annotations on Online Formative Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This paper harnesses collaborative annotations by students as learning feedback on online formative assessments to improve the learning achievements of students. Through the developed Web platform, students can conduct formative assessments, collaboratively annotate, and review historical records in a convenient way, while teachers can generate…

  12. Harnessing the Power of Interactivity for Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borsook, Terry K.

    Arguing that what sets the computer apart from all other teaching devices is its potential for interactivity, this paper examines the concept of interactivity and explores ways in which its power can be harnessed and put to work. A discussion of interactivity in human-to-human communication sets a context within which to view human/computer…

  13. The Endogenous Exposome

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Mutlu, Esra; Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard; Bodnar, Wanda; Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Moeller, Benjamin; Lu, Kun; Swenberg, James

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the Exposome, is a compilation of diseases and one’s lifetime exposure to chemicals, whether the exposure comes from environmental, dietary, or occupational exposures; or endogenous chemicals that are formed from normal metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, infections, and other natural metabolic processes such as alteration of the gut microbiome. In this review, we have focused on the Endogenous Exposome, the DNA damage that arises from the production of endogenous electrophilic molecules in our cells. It provides quantitative data on endogenous DNA damage and its relationship to mutagenesis, with emphasis on when exogenous chemical exposures that produce identical DNA adducts to those arising from normal metabolism cause significant increases in total identical DNA adducts. We have utilized stable isotope labeled chemical exposures of animals and cells, so that accurate relationships between endogenous and exogenous exposures can be determined. Advances in mass spectrometry have vastly increased both the sensitivity and accuracy of such studies. Furthermore, we have clear evidence of which sources of exposure drive low dose biology that results in mutations and disease. These data provide much needed information to impact quantitative risk assessments, in the hope of moving towards the use of science, rather than default assumptions. PMID:24767943

  14. Telomere Length, TERT, and miRNA Expression.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Pellatt, Andrew J; Wolff, Roger K; Mullany, Lila E

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that miRNAs are involved in the control of telomeres. We test that hypothesis by examining the association between miRNAs and telomere length (TL). Additionally, we evaluate if genetic variation in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is associated with miRNA expression levels. We use data from a population-based study of colorectal cancer (CRC), where we have previously shown associations between TL and TERT and CRC, to test associations between TL and miRNA expression and TERT and miRNA expression. To gain insight into functions of miRNAs associated with TERT we tested linear associations between miRNAs and their targeted gene mRNAs. An Agilent platform that contained information on over 2000 miRNAs was used. TL was measured using a multiplexed quantitative PCR (qPCR). RNAseq was used to assess gene expression. Our sample consisted of 1152 individuals with SNP data and miRNA expression data; 363 individuals with both TL and miRNA; and 148 individuals with miRNA and mRNA data. Thirty-three miRNAs were directly associated with TL after adjusting for age and sex (false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05). TERT rs2736118 was associated with differences in miRNA expression between carcinoma and normal colonic mucosa for 75 miRNAs (FDR <0.05). Genes regulated by these miRNAs, as indicated by mRNA/miRNA associations, were associated with major signaling pathways beyond their TL-related functions, including PTEN, and PI3K/AKT signaling. Our data support a direct association between miRNAs and TL; differences in miRNA expression levels by TERT genotype were observed. Based on miRNA and targeted mRNA associations our data suggest that TERT is involved in non-TL-related functions by acting through altered miRNA expression. PMID:27627813

  15. Harness Traction Technique (HARNESS): Novel Method for Controlling the Transection Plane During Laparoscopic Hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Itano, Osamu; Oshima, Go; Kitago, Minoru; Suzuki, Keiichi; Hayatsu, Shigeo; Shinoda, Masahiro; Abe, Yuta; Hibi, Taizo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Ikoma, Naruhiko; Aiko, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-08-01

    We present our experience using a novel method for controlling the transection plane, which we termed as the Harness Traction Technique (HARNESS) and evaluate its usefulness. From May 2009 to March 2012, laparoscopic hepatectomies using HARNESS were performed on 35 patients. After the superficial hepatic parenchyma on the line was transected at 1 to 2 cm depth, 5 mm tape was placed along the groove of the line and tied to prevent it from slipping off. Tape was tied and pulled using a forceps toward the best direction for minimizing the bleeding, moving the transection point to the appropriate position and creating good tension for parenchymal transection at the transection point. There were no conversions to laparotomy or intraoperative complications. HARNESS is useful for controlling the dissection line during laparoscopic hepatectomy, leading to precise and safe laparoscopic liver parenchymal dissection. PMID:26121541

  16. Endogenous opioids and reward.

    PubMed

    Van Ree, J M; Niesink, R J; Van Wolfswinkel, L; Ramsey, N F; Kornet, M M; Van Furth, W R; Vanderschuren, L J; Gerrits, M A; Van den Berg, C L

    2000-09-29

    The discovery of endogenous opioids has markedly influenced the research on the biology of addiction and reward brain processes. Evidence has been presented that these brain substances modulate brain stimulation reward, self-administration of different drugs of abuse, sexual behaviour and social behaviour. There appears to be two different domains in which endogenous opioids, present in separate and distinct brain regions, are involved. One is related to the modulation of incentive motivational processes and the other to the performance of certain behaviours. It is concluded that endogenous opioids may play a role in the vulnerability to certain diseases, such as addiction and autism, but also when the disease is present, such as alcoholism. PMID:11033317

  17. Identification and Comparative Profiling of miRNAs in an Early Flowering Mutant of Trifoliate Orange and Its Wild Type by Genome-Wide Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Yang; Guo, Wen-Wu; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of small, endogenous RNAs that play a regulatory role in various biological and metabolic processes by negatively affecting gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. While the number of known Arabidopsis and rice miRNAs is continuously increasing, information regarding miRNAs from woody plants such as citrus remains limited. Solexa sequencing was performed at different developmental stages on both an early flowering mutant of trifoliate orange (precocious trifoliate orange, Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf.) and its wild-type in this study, resulting in the obtainment of 141 known miRNAs belonging to 99 families and 75 novel miRNAs in four libraries. A total of 317 potential target genes were predicted based on the 51 novel miRNAs families, GO and KEGG annotation revealed that high ranked miRNA-target genes are those implicated in diverse cellular processes in plants, including development, transcription, protein degradation and cross adaptation. To characterize those miRNAs expressed at the juvenile and adult development stages of the mutant and its wild-type, further analysis on the expression profiles of several miRNAs through real-time PCR was performed. The results revealed that most miRNAs were down-regulated at adult stage compared with juvenile stage for both the mutant and its wild-type. These results indicate that both conserved and novel miRNAs may play important roles in citrus growth and development, stress responses and other physiological processes. PMID:22952759

  18. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  19. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  20. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  1. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  2. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  3. Cell-free 3D scaffold with two-stage delivery of miRNA-26a to regenerate critical-sized bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojin; Li, Yan; Chen, Y. Eugene; Chen, Jihua; Ma, Peter X.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are being developed to enhance tissue regeneration. Here we show that a hyperbranched polymer with high miRNA-binding affinity and negligible cytotoxicity can self-assemble into nano-sized polyplexes with a ‘double-shell' miRNA distribution and high transfection efficiency. These polyplexes are encapsulated in biodegradable microspheres to enable controllable two-stage (polyplexes and miRNA) delivery. The microspheres are attached to cell-free nanofibrous polymer scaffolds that spatially control the release of miR-26a. This technology is used to regenerate critical-sized bone defects in osteoporotic mice by targeting Gsk-3β to activate the osteoblastic activity of endogenous stem cells, thus addressing a critical challenge in regenerative medicine of achieving cell-free scaffold-based miRNA therapy for tissue engineering. PMID:26765931

  4. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27488468

  5. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  6. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease. PMID:27488468

  7. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  8. 42 CFR 84.121 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.121... § 84.121 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses, designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.1138... Gas Masks § 84.1138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  10. 42 CFR 84.138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.138... Respirators § 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and...

  11. 42 CFR 84.1138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.1138... Gas Masks § 84.1138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  12. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  13. 42 CFR 84.121 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.121... § 84.121 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses, designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an...

  14. 42 CFR 84.78 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.78 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.78 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate...

  15. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  16. 42 CFR 84.138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.138... Respirators § 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and...

  17. 42 CFR 84.1138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.1138... Gas Masks § 84.1138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  18. 42 CFR 84.78 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.78 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.78 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate...

  19. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  20. 42 CFR 84.121 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.121... § 84.121 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses, designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an...

  1. 42 CFR 84.178 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.178... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.178 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension...

  2. 42 CFR 84.78 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.78 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.78 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate...

  3. 42 CFR 84.138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.138... Respirators § 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and...

  4. 42 CFR 84.1138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.1138... Gas Masks § 84.1138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  5. 42 CFR 84.78 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.78 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.78 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.1138... Gas Masks § 84.1138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) All facepieces shall be equipped with head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an even...

  7. 42 CFR 84.121 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.121... § 84.121 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses, designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an...

  8. 42 CFR 84.138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.138... Respirators § 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and...

  9. 42 CFR 84.138 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.138... Respirators § 84.138 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses which are designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use, and...

  10. 42 CFR 84.78 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.78 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.78 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses designed and constructed to provide adequate...

  11. 42 CFR 84.121 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head harnesses; minimum requirements. 84.121... § 84.121 Head harnesses; minimum requirements. (a) Facepieces shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable head harnesses, designed and constructed to provide adequate tension during use and an...

  12. BayMiR: inferring evidence for endogenous miRNA-induced gene repression from mRNA expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Popular miRNA target prediction techniques use sequence features to determine the functional miRNA target sites. These techniques commonly ignore the cellular conditions in which miRNAs interact with their targets in vivo. Gene expression data are rich resources that can complement sequence features to take into account the context dependency of miRNAs. Results We introduce BayMiR, a new computational method, that predicts the functionality of potential miRNA target sites using the activity level of the miRNAs inferred from genome-wide mRNA expression profiles. We also found that mRNA expression variation can be used as another predictor of functional miRNA targets. We benchmarked BayMiR, the expression variation, Cometa, and the TargetScan “context scores” on two tasks: predicting independently validated miRNA targets and predicting the decrease in mRNA abundance in miRNA overexpression assays. BayMiR performed better than all other methods in both benchmarks and, surprisingly, the variation index performed better than Cometa and some individual determinants of the TargetScan context scores. Furthermore, BayMiR predicted miRNA target sets are more consistently annotated with GO and KEGG terms than similar sized random subsets of genes with conserved miRNA seed regions. BayMiR gives higher scores to target sites residing near the poly(A) tail which strongly favors mRNA degradation using poly(A) shortening. Our work also suggests that modeling multiplicative interactions among miRNAs is important to predict endogenous mRNA targets. Conclusions We develop a new computational method for predicting the target mRNAs of miRNAs. BayMiR applies a large number of mRNA expression profiles and successfully identifies the mRNA targets and miRNA activities without using miRNA expression data. The BayMiR package is publicly available and can be readily applied to any mRNA expression data sets. PMID:24001276

  13. miRNAs as potential biomarkers in early breast cancer detection following mammography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Sidney W; Lee, Woojin; Coffey, Caitrin; Lean, Alexa; Wu, Xiaoling; Tan, Xiaohui; Man, Yan-Gao; Brem, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers. About 12 % women in the United States will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. Currently one of the most accepted model/theories is that ductal breast cancer (most common type of breast cancer) follows a linear progression: from normal breast epithelial cells to ductal hyperplasia to atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and finally to invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Distinguishing pure ADH diagnosis from DCIS and/or IDC on mammography, and even combined with follow-up core needle biopsy (CNB) is still a challenge. Therefore subsequent surgical excision cannot be avoided to make a definitive diagnosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a highly abundant class of endogenous non-coding RNAs, which contribute to cancer initiation and progression, and are differentially expressed between normal and cancer tissues. They can function as either tumor suppressors or oncogenes. With accumulating evidence of the role of miRNAs in breast cancer progression, including our own studies, we sought to summarize the nature of early breast lesions and the potential use of miRNA molecules as biomarkers in early breast cancer detection. In particular, miRNA biomarkers may potentially serve as a companion tool following mammography screening and CNB. In the long-term, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the miRNA signatures associated with breast cancer development could potentially result in the development of novel strategies for disease prevention and therapy. PMID:26819702

  14. miRNAs in Bone Development

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Garyfallia

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal development is a multistage process during which mesenchymal progenitor cells undergo proliferation and differentiation and subsequently give rise to bone and cartilage forming cells. Each step is regulated by various transcription factors and signaling molecules. microRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Several in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that miRNAs play significant roles in skeletal development. Identifying their functions may give insights into the treatment of developmental disorders of the skeleton. This review summarizes miRNAs that have been shown to participate in various stages of skeletal development by targeting crucial factors. PMID:27019617

  15. Expression of Muscle-Specific MiRNA 206 in the Progression of Disease in a Murine SMA Model.

    PubMed

    Valsecchi, Valeria; Boido, Marina; De Amicis, Elena; Piras, Antonio; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe neuromuscular disease, the most common in infancy, and the third one among young people under 18 years. The major pathological landmark of SMA is a selective degeneration of lower motor neurons, resulting in progressive skeletal muscle denervation, atrophy, and paralysis. Recently, it has been shown that specific or general changes in the activity of ribonucleoprotein containing micro RNAs (miRNAs) play a role in the development of SMA. Additionally miRNA-206 has been shown to be required for efficient regeneration of neuromuscular synapses after acute nerve injury in an ALS mouse model. Therefore, we correlated the morphology and the architecture of the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) of quadriceps, a muscle affected in the early stage of the disease, with the expression levels of miRNA-206 in a mouse model of intermediate SMA (SMAII), one of the most frequently used experimental model. Our results showed a decrease in the percentage of type II fibers, an increase in atrophic muscle fibers and a remarkable accumulation of neurofilament (NF) in the pre-synaptic terminal of the NMJs in the quadriceps of SMAII mice. Furthermore, molecular investigation showed a direct link between miRNA-206-HDAC4-FGFBP1, and in particular, a strong up-regulation of this pathway in the late phase of the disease. We propose that miRNA-206 is activated as survival endogenous mechanism, although not sufficient to rescue the integrity of motor neurons. We speculate that early modulation of miRNA-206 expression might delay SMA neurodegenerative pathway and that miRNA-206 could be an innovative, still relatively unexplored, therapeutic target for SMA. PMID:26030275

  16. TP53 regulates miRNA association with AGO2 to remodel the miRNA–mRNA interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Krell, Jonathan; Stebbing, Justin; Carissimi, Claudia; Dabrowska, Aleksandra F.; de Giorgio, Alexander; Frampton, Adam E.; Harding, Victoria; Fulci, Valerio; Macino, Giuseppe; Colombo, Teresa; Castellano, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage activates TP53-regulated surveillance mechanisms that are crucial in suppressing tumorigenesis. TP53 orchestrates these responses directly by transcriptionally modulating genes, including microRNAs (miRNAs), and by regulating miRNA biogenesis through interacting with the DROSHA complex. However, whether the association between miRNAs and AGO2 is regulated following DNA damage is not yet known. Here, we show that, following DNA damage, TP53 interacts with AGO2 to induce or reduce AGO2's association of a subset of miRNAs, including multiple let-7 family members. Furthermore, we show that specific mutations in TP53 decrease rather than increase the association of let-7 family miRNAs, reducing their activity without preventing TP53 from interacting with AGO2. This is consistent with the oncogenic properties of these mutants. Using AGO2 RIP-seq and PAR-CLIP-seq, we show that the DNA damage–induced increase in binding of let-7 family members to the RISC complex is functional. We unambiguously determine the global miRNA–mRNA interaction networks involved in the DNA damage response, validating them through the identification of miRNA-target chimeras formed by endogenous ligation reactions. We find that the target complementary region of the let-7 seed tends to have highly fixed positions and more variable ones. Additionally, we observe that miRNAs, whose cellular abundance or differential association with AGO2 is regulated by TP53, are involved in an intricate network of regulatory feedback and feedforward circuits. TP53-mediated regulation of AGO2–miRNA interaction represents a new mechanism of miRNA regulation in carcinogenesis. PMID:26701625

  17. Expression of Muscle-Specific MiRNA 206 in the Progression of Disease in a Murine SMA Model

    PubMed Central

    Valsecchi, Valeria; Boido, Marina; De Amicis, Elena; Piras, Antonio; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe neuromuscular disease, the most common in infancy, and the third one among young people under 18 years. The major pathological landmark of SMA is a selective degeneration of lower motor neurons, resulting in progressive skeletal muscle denervation, atrophy, and paralysis. Recently, it has been shown that specific or general changes in the activity of ribonucleoprotein containing micro RNAs (miRNAs) play a role in the development of SMA. Additionally miRNA-206 has been shown to be required for efficient regeneration of neuromuscular synapses after acute nerve injury in an ALS mouse model. Therefore, we correlated the morphology and the architecture of the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) of quadriceps, a muscle affected in the early stage of the disease, with the expression levels of miRNA-206 in a mouse model of intermediate SMA (SMAII), one of the most frequently used experimental model. Our results showed a decrease in the percentage of type II fibers, an increase in atrophic muscle fibers and a remarkable accumulation of neurofilament (NF) in the pre-synaptic terminal of the NMJs in the quadriceps of SMAII mice. Furthermore, molecular investigation showed a direct link between miRNA-206-HDAC4-FGFBP1, and in particular, a strong up-regulation of this pathway in the late phase of the disease. We propose that miRNA-206 is activated as survival endogenous mechanism, although not sufficient to rescue the integrity of motor neurons. We speculate that early modulation of miRNA-206 expression might delay SMA neurodegenerative pathway and that miRNA-206 could be an innovative, still relatively unexplored, therapeutic target for SMA. PMID:26030275

  18. Risk miRNA screening of ovarian cancer based on miRNA functional synergistic network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background miRNAs are proved to have causal roles in tumorgenesis involving various types of human cancers, but the mechanism is not clear. We aimed to explore the effect of miRNAs on the development of ovarian cancer and the underlying mechanism. Methods The miRNA expression profile GSE31801 was downloaded from GEO (Gene Expression Omnibus) database. Firstly, the differentially expressed miRNAs were screened. Target genes of the miRNAs were collected from TargetScan, PicTar, miRanda, and DIANA-microT database, then the miRNA-miRNA co-regulating network was constructed using miRNA pairs with common regulated target genes. Next, the functional modules in the network were studied, the miRNA pairs regulated at least one modules were enriched to form the miRNA functional synergistic network (MFSN). Results Risk miRNA were selected in MFSN according to the topological structure. Transcript factors (TFs) in MFSN were identified, followed by the miRNA-transcript factor networks construction. Totally, 42 up- and 61 down-regulated differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, of which 68 formed 2292 miRNA pairs in the miRNA-miRNA co-regulating network. GO: 0007268 (synaptic transmission) and GO: 0019226 (transmission of nerve impulse) were the two common functions of miRNAs in MFSN, and hsa-miR-579 (36), hsa-miR-942 (31), hsa-miR-105 (31), hsa-miR-150 (34), and hsa-miR-27a* (32) were selected as the hub nodes in MFSN. Conclusions In all, 17 TFs, including CREM, ERG, and CREB1 were screened as the cancer related TFs in MFSN. Other TFs, such as BIN1, FOXN3, FOXK1, FOXP2, and ESRRG with high degrees may be inhibited in ovarian cancer. MFSN gave us a new shed light on the mechanism studies in ovarian cancer. PMID:24444095

  19. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in normal and psoriatic human skin

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Joyce, Cailin E.; Bowcock, Anne M.; Zhang, Weixiong

    2013-01-01

    Noncanonical microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) are key gene regulators in eukaryotes. Noncanonical miRNAs, which bypass part of the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway, can originate from a variety of genomic loci, which include small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and introns, whereas endo-siRNAs can arise from repetitive elements, some of which are transposable. The roles of noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in complex diseases have yet to be characterized. To investigate their potential expression and function in psoriasis, we carried out a comprehensive, genome-wide search for noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in small RNA deep-sequencing data sets from normal and psoriatic human skin. By analyzing more than 670 million qualified reads from 67 small RNA libraries, we identified 21 novel, noncanonical miRNAs (3 snoRNA-derived and 2 tRNA-derived miRNAs and 16 miRtrons) and 39 novel endo-siRNAs that were expressed in skin. The expression of four novel small RNAs was validated by qRT–PCR in human skin, and their Argonaute association was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of ectopic small RNAs in HEK293 cells. Fifteen noncanonical miRNAs or endo-siRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in psoriatic-involved versus normal skin, including an Alu-short interspersed element-derived siRNA which was 17-fold up-regulated in psoriatic-involved skin. These and other differentially expressed small noncoding RNAs may function as regulators of gene expression in skin and potentially play a role in psoriasis pathogenesis. PMID:23175445

  20. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in normal and psoriatic human skin.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Joyce, Cailin E; Bowcock, Anne M; Zhang, Weixiong

    2013-02-15

    Noncanonical microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) are key gene regulators in eukaryotes. Noncanonical miRNAs, which bypass part of the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway, can originate from a variety of genomic loci, which include small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and introns, whereas endo-siRNAs can arise from repetitive elements, some of which are transposable. The roles of noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in complex diseases have yet to be characterized. To investigate their potential expression and function in psoriasis, we carried out a comprehensive, genome-wide search for noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs in small RNA deep-sequencing data sets from normal and psoriatic human skin. By analyzing more than 670 million qualified reads from 67 small RNA libraries, we identified 21 novel, noncanonical miRNAs (3 snoRNA-derived and 2 tRNA-derived miRNAs and 16 miRtrons) and 39 novel endo-siRNAs that were expressed in skin. The expression of four novel small RNAs was validated by qRT-PCR in human skin, and their Argonaute association was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of ectopic small RNAs in HEK293 cells. Fifteen noncanonical miRNAs or endo-siRNAs were significantly differentially expressed in psoriatic-involved versus normal skin, including an Alu-short interspersed element-derived siRNA which was 17-fold up-regulated in psoriatic-involved skin. These and other differentially expressed small noncoding RNAs may function as regulators of gene expression in skin and potentially play a role in psoriasis pathogenesis. PMID:23175445

  1. RNA Binding Proteins in the miRNA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Connerty, Patrick; Ahadi, Alireza; Hutvagner, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22 nucleotides (nt) ribonucleic acids which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are key regulators of all cellular processes, and the correct expression of miRNAs in an organism is crucial for proper development and cellular function. As a result, the miRNA biogenesis pathway is highly regulated. In this review, we outline the basic steps of miRNA biogenesis and miRNA mediated gene regulation focusing on the role of RNA binding proteins (RBPs). We also describe multiple mechanisms that regulate the canonical miRNA pathway, which depends on a wide range of RBPs. Moreover, we hypothesise that the interaction between miRNA regulation and RBPs is potentially more widespread based on the analysis of available high-throughput datasets. PMID:26712751

  2. Combination of miRNA499 and miRNA133 Exerts a Synergic Effect on Cardiac Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Federica; Altomare, Claudia; Cervio, Elisabetta; Barile, Lucio; Rocchetti, Marcella; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Copes, Francesco; Mura, Manuela; Danieli, Patrizia; Viarengo, Gianluca; Zaza, Antonio; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that miRNA are involved in cardiac development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. In particular, it has been shown that miRNA133, miRNA1, and miRNA499 are involved in progenitor cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes. However, it is unknown whether different miRNA may act synergistically to improve cardiac differentiation. We used mouse P19 cells as a cardiogenic differentiation model. miRNA499, miRNA1, or miRNA133 were transiently over-expressed in P19 cells individually or in different combinations. The over-expression of miRNA499 alone increased the number of beating cells and the association of miRNA499 with miRNA133 exerted a synergistic effect, further increasing the number of beating cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the combination of miRNA499 + 133 enhanced the expression of cardiac genes compared with controls. Western blot and immunocytochemistry for connexin43 and cardiac troponin T confirmed these findings. Importantly, caffeine responsiveness, a clear functional parameter of cardiac differentiation, was increased by miRNA499 in association with miRNA133 and was directly correlated with the activation of the cardiac troponin I isoform promoter. Cyclic contractions were reversibly abolished by extracellular calcium depletion, nifedipine, ryanodine, and IP3R blockade. Finally, we demonstrated that the use of miRNA499 + 133 induced cardiac differentiation even in the absence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Our results show that the areas spontaneously contracting possess electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics compatible with true cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. The translational relevance of our findings was reinforced by the demonstration that the over-expression of miRNA499 and miRNA133 was also able to induce the differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells toward the cardiac lineage. Stem Cells 2015;33:1187–1199 PMID:25534971

  3. Combination of miRNA499 and miRNA133 exerts a synergic effect on cardiac differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Federica; Altomare, Claudia; Cervio, Elisabetta; Barile, Lucio; Rocchetti, Marcella; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Copes, Francesco; Mura, Manuela; Danieli, Patrizia; Viarengo, Gianluca; Zaza, Antonio; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that miRNA are involved in cardiac development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. In particular, it has been shown that miRNA133, miRNA1, and miRNA499 are involved in progenitor cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes. However, it is unknown whether different miRNA may act synergistically to improve cardiac differentiation. We used mouse P19 cells as a cardiogenic differentiation model. miRNA499, miRNA1, or miRNA133 were transiently over-expressed in P19 cells individually or in different combinations. The over-expression of miRNA499 alone increased the number of beating cells and the association of miRNA499 with miRNA133 exerted a synergistic effect, further increasing the number of beating cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the combination of miRNA499 + 133 enhanced the expression of cardiac genes compared with controls. Western blot and immunocytochemistry for connexin43 and cardiac troponin T confirmed these findings. Importantly, caffeine responsiveness, a clear functional parameter of cardiac differentiation, was increased by miRNA499 in association with miRNA133 and was directly correlated with the activation of the cardiac troponin I isoform promoter. Cyclic contractions were reversibly abolished by extracellular calcium depletion, nifedipine, ryanodine, and IP3R blockade. Finally, we demonstrated that the use of miRNA499 + 133 induced cardiac differentiation even in the absence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Our results show that the areas spontaneously contracting possess electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics compatible with true cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. The translational relevance of our findings was reinforced by the demonstration that the over-expression of miRNA499 and miRNA133 was also able to induce the differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells toward the cardiac lineage. PMID:25534971

  4. Behavior of sandhill cranes harnessed with different satellite transmitters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Ellis, D.H.; Landfried, S.E.; Miller, L.H.; Klugman, S.S.; Fuller, M.R.; Vermillion, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    The effectiveness of various attachment methods and designs of platform transmitting terminals (PTT's) was tested on captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, during 1989-91. Combinations of attachment and transmitter designs included neoprene cord harness with batteries separate from the transmitter (2 harness designs), Teflon ribbon harness with batteries incorporated into the transmitter package (4 transmitter models), and a package attached directly to the bird with epoxy glue only. Physical effects seen on cranes wearing PTT's ranged from skin lacerations (caused by rubbing of harness material) to no observed effects (other than feather wear). The most successful harness material and design utilized a Teflon ribbon harness with the 4 ribbon ends from the transmitter forming a neck loop and a body loop joined at the sternum. Time spent by sandhill cranes performing most activities did not change after transmitter attachment using this harness method.

  5. Discovery of miRNAs and Their Corresponding miRNA Genes in Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua): Use of Stable miRNAs as Reference Genes Reveals Subgroups of miRNAs That Are Highly Expressed in Particular Organs

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Rune; Rangnes, Fredrik; Sivertsen, Maria; Chiang, Michelle; Tran, Michelle; Worren, Merete Molton

    2016-01-01

    Background Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is among the economically most important species in the northern Atlantic Ocean and a model species for studying development of the immune system in vertebrates. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of small RNA molecules that regulate fundamental biological processes at the post-transcriptional level. Detailed knowledge about a species miRNA repertoire is necessary to study how the miRNA transcriptome modulate gene expression. We have therefore discovered and characterized mature miRNAs and their corresponding miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. We have also performed a validation study to identify suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression in Atlantic cod. Finally, we utilized the newly characterized miRNA repertoire and the dedicated RT-qPCR method to reveal miRNAs that are highly expressed in certain organs. Results The discovery analysis revealed 490 mature miRNAs (401 unique sequences) along with precursor sequences and genomic location of the miRNA genes. Twenty six of these were novel miRNA genes. Validation studies ranked gmo-miR-17-1—5p or the two-gene combination gmo-miR25-3p and gmo-miR210-5p as most suitable qPCR reference genes. Analysis by RT-qPCR revealed 45 miRNAs with significantly higher expression in tissues from one or a few organs. Comparisons to other vertebrates indicate that some of these miRNAs may regulate processes like growth, lipid metabolism, immune response to microbial infections and scar damage repair. Three teleost-specific and three novel Atlantic cod miRNAs were among the differentially expressed miRNAs. Conclusions The number of known mature miRNAs was considerably increased by our identification of miRNAs and miRNA genes in Atlantic cod. This will benefit further functional studies of miRNA expression using deep sequencing methods. The validation study showed that stable miRNAs are suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of miRNA expression. Applying RT-qPCR we

  6. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  7. PGC-Enriched miRNAs Control Germ Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Bhin, Jinhyuk; Jeong, Hoe-Su; Kim, Jong Soo; Shin, Jeong Oh; Hong, Ki Sung; Jung, Han-Sung; Kim, Changhoon; Hwang, Daehee; Kim, Kye-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the translation of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) involved in the growth and development of a variety of cells, including primordial germ cells (PGCs) which play an essential role in germ cell development. However, the target mRNAs and the regulatory networks influenced by miRNAs in PGCs remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate a novel miRNAs control PGC development through targeting mRNAs involved in various cellular pathways. We reveal the PGC-enriched expression patterns of nine miRNAs, including miR-10b, -18a, -93, -106b, -126-3p, -127, -181a, -181b, and -301, using miRNA expression analysis along with mRNA microarray analysis in PGCs, embryonic gonads, and postnatal testes. These miRNAs are highly expressed in PGCs, as demonstrated by Northern blotting, miRNA in situ hybridization assay, and miRNA qPCR analysis. This integrative study utilizing mRNA microarray analysis and miRNA target prediction demonstrates the regulatory networks through which these miRNAs regulate their potential target genes during PGC development. The elucidated networks of miRNAs disclose a coordinated molecular mechanism by which these miRNAs regulate distinct cellular pathways in PGCs that determine germ cell development. PMID:26442865

  8. Profiling of T helper cell-derived small RNAs reveals unique antisense transcripts and differential association of miRNAs with argonaute proteins 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Polikepahad, Sumanth; Corry, David B.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference mediated through antisense transcripts is a fundamentally important mechanism regulating gene expression that remains incompletely understood. Here, we have used next-generation sequencing to determine from mouse CD4+ T cells the functional implications of antisense transcripts binding to argonaute (AGO) proteins that mediate RNA interference and post-transcriptional gene silencing. This effort identified 90 new microRNAs (miRNAs) and six endogenous hairpin RNA-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) mapping to distinct introns. Unexpectedly, 69 miRNAs were expressed as non-canonical isomiRs as the dominant AGO-binding transcript, with extensive 3′ terminal nucleotide modifications. Furthermore, differential expression analysis between AGO1- and AGO2-bound miRNAs suggested preferential binding of isomiRs ending with 3′ adenine residues to AGO1 and 3′ uridine residues to AGO2. Analysis of the putative targets of all miRNAs suggested a striking preference for regulating transcription and transcription factors with additional evidence of a functional division of labor between AGO proteins in this regard. We further provide evidence that multiple mitochondrial genomic loci serve as the source of endogenous cis-natural antisense transcripts. These findings imply diversity in AGO protein function based on differential miRNA binding and indicate that RNA interference-based gene regulation is more complex than previously recognized. PMID:23185045

  9. Alterations in SiRNA and MiRNA Expression Profiles Detected by Deep Sequencing of Transgenic Rice with SiRNA-Mediated Viral Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xifeng; Liang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    RNA-mediated gene silencing has been demonstrated to serve as a defensive mechanism against viral pathogens by plants. It is known that specifically expressed endogenous siRNAs and miRNAs are involved in the self-defense process during viral infection. However, research has been rarely devoted to the endogenous siRNA and miRNA expression changes under viral infection if the resistance has already been genetically engineered in plants. Aiming to gain a deeper understanding of the RNA-mediated gene silencing defense process in plants, the expression profiles of siRNAs and miRNAs before and after viral infection in both wild type and transgenic anti-Rice stripe virus (RSV) rice plants were examined by small RNA high-throughput sequencing. Our research confirms that the newly generated siRNAs, which are derived from the engineered inverted repeat construct, is the major contributor of the viral resistance in rice. Further analysis suggests the accuracy of siRNA biogenesis might be affected when siRNAs machinery is excessively used in the transgenic plants. In addition, the expression levels of many known miRNAs are dramatically changed due to RSV infection on both wild type and transgenic rice plants, indicating potential function of those miRNAs involved in plant-virus interacting process. PMID:25559820

  10. Harnessing the Microbiome to Enhance Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Diven, Marshall A.; Huff, Logan W.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota plays a key role in regulating the innate and adaptive immune system. Herein, we review the immunological aspects of the microbiota in tumor immunity in mice and man, with a focus on toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, vaccines, checkpoint modulators, chemotherapy, and adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) therapies. We propose innovative treatments that may safely harness the microbiota to enhance T cell-based therapies in cancer patients. Finally, we highlight recent developments in tumor immunotherapy, particularly novel ways to modulate the microbiome and memory T cell responses to human malignancies. PMID:26101781

  11. Quantification of therapeutic miRNA mimics in whole blood from nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kelnar, Kevin; Peltier, Heidi J; Leatherbury, Neil; Stoudemire, Jay; Bader, Andreas G

    2014-02-01

    MRX34, a microRNA (miRNA)-based therapy for cancer, has recently entered clinical trials as the first clinical candidate in its class. It is a liposomal nanoparticle loaded with a synthetic mimic of the tumor suppressor miRNA miR-34a as the active pharmaceutical ingredient. To understand the pharmacokinetic properties of the drug and to rationalize an optimal dosing regimen in the clinic, a method is needed to quantitatively detect the miRNA mimic. Here, we report the development and qualification of a quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay in support of pharmacokinetic and toxicokinetic assessments in the nonhuman primate. Detection and quantification were performed on total ribonucleic acid (RNA) isolated from whole blood. The qualified range of the standard curve spans 6 orders of magnitude from 2.5 × 10(-7) to 2.5 × 10(-1) ng per reverse transcription (RT) reaction, corresponding to an estimated blood concentration from 6.2 × 10(-5) to 6.2 × 10(1) ng/mL. Our results demonstrate that endogenous as well as the exogenous miR-34a can be accurately and precisely quantified. The assay was used to establish the pharmacokinetic profile of MRX34, showing a favorable residence time and exposure of the miRNA mimic in whole blood from nonhuman primates. PMID:24397447

  12. Protein mediated miRNA detection and siRNA enrichment using p19.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jingmin; Cid, Melissa; Poole, Catherine B; McReynolds, Larry A

    2010-06-01

    p19 RNA binding protein from the Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV) is an RNA-silencing suppressor that binds small interfering RNA (siRNA) with high affinity. We created a bifunctional p19 fusion protein with an N-terminal maltose binding protein (MBP), for protein purification, and a C-terminal chitin binding domain (CBD) to bind p19 to chitin magnetic beads. The fusion protein binds dsRNAs in the size range of 20-23 nucleotides, but does not bind ssRNA or dsDNA. Relative affinities of the p19 fusion protein for different-length RNA and DNA substrates were determined. Binding specificity of the p19 fusion protein for small dsRNA allows detection of miRNA:RNA probe duplexes. Using radioactive RNA probes, we were able to detect low levels of miRNAs in the sub-femtomole range and in the presence of a million-fold excess of total RNA. Detection is linear over three logs. Unlike most nucleic acid detection methods, p19 selects for RNA hybrids of correct length and structure. Rules for designing optimal RNA probes for p19 detection of miRNAs were determined by in vitro binding of 18 different dsRNA oligos to p19. These studies demonstrate the potential of p19 fusion protein to detect miRNAs and isolate endogenous siRNAs. PMID:20569217

  13. Identification of Aberrantly Expressed miRNAs in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Hu, Xiaowei; Zhou, Hongfeng; Shi, Guangyue; Wu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The noncoding components of the genome, including miRNA, can contribute to pathogenesis of gastric cancer. Their expression has been profiled in many human cancers, but there are a few published studies in gastric cancer. It is necessary to identify novel aberrantly expressed miRNAs in gastric cancer. In this study, the expression profile of 1891 miRNAs was analyzed using a miRCURY array LNA miRNA chip from three gastric cancer tissues and three normal tissues. The expression levels of 4 miRNAs were compared by real-time PCR between cancerous and normal tissues. We found that 31 miRNAs are upregulated in gastric cancer (P < 0.05) and 10 miRNAs have never been reported by other studies; 30 miRNA are downregulated (P < 0.05) in gastric cancer tissues. Gene ontology analysis revealed that those dysregulated miRNAs mainly take part in regulating cell proliferation. The levels of has-miR-105, -213∗, -514b, and -548n were tested by real-time PCR and have high levels in cancerous tissues. Here, we report a miRNA profile of gastric cancer and provide new perspective to understand this malignant disease. This novel information suggests the potential roles of these miRNAs in the diagnosis, prognosis biomarkers, or therapy targets of gastric cancer. PMID:24982669

  14. Harnessing microtubule dynamic instability for nanostructure assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Ann Marie; Osbourn, Gordon Cecil

    2004-06-01

    Intracellular molecular machines synthesize molecules, tear apart others, transport materials, transform energy into different forms, and carry out a host of other coordinated processes. Many molecular processes have been shown to work outside of cells, and the idea of harnessing these molecular machines to build nanostructures is attractive. Two examples are microtubules and motor proteins, which aid cell movement, help determine cell shape and internal structure, and transport vesicles and organelles within the cell. These molecular machines work in a stochastic, noisy fashion: microtubules switch randomly between growing and shrinking in a process known as dynamic instability; motor protein movement along microtubules is randomly interrupted by the motor proteins falling off. A common strategy in attempting to gain control over these highly dynamic, stochastic processes is to eliminate some processes (e.g., work with stabilized microtubules) in order to focus on others (interaction of microtubules with motor proteins). In this paper, we illustrate a different strategy for building nanostructures, which, rather than attempting to control or eliminate some dynamic processes, uses them to advantage in building nanostructures. Specifically, using stochastic agent-based simulations, we show how the natural dynamic instability of microtubules can be harnessed in building nanostructures, and discuss strategies for ensuring that 'unreliable' stochastic processes yield a robust outcome.

  15. 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulates miRNA expression in human bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingyu; Hu, Qiang; Luo, Wei; Pratt, Rachel N; Glenn, Sean T; Liu, Song; Trump, Donald L; Johnson, Candace S

    2015-04-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer in men and eighth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. Epidemiological and experimental studies strongly suggest a role for 1α,25(OH)2D3 in cancer prevention and treatment. The antitumor activities of 1α,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, differentiation and the inhibition of angiogenesis and metastasis. miRNAs play important regulatory roles in cancer development and progression. However, the role of 1α,25(OH)2D3 in the regulation of miRNA expression and the potential impact in bladder cancer has not been investigated. Therefore, we studied 1α,25(OH)2D3-regulated miRNA expression profiles in human bladder cancer cell line 253J and the highly tumorigenic and metastatic derivative line 253J-BV by miRNA qPCR panels. 253J and 253J-BV cells express endogenous vitamin D receptor (VDR), which can be further induced by 1α,25(OH)2D3. VDR target gene 24-hydroxylase was induced by 1α,25(OH)2D3 in both cell lines, indicating functional 1α,25(OH)2D3 signaling. The miRNA qPCR panel assay results showed that 253J and 253J-BV cells have distinct miRNA expression profiles. Further, 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulated miRNA expression profiles in 253J and 253J-BV cells in a dynamic manner. Pathway analysis of the miRNA target genes revealed distinct patterns of contribution to the molecular functions and biological processes in the two cell lines. In conclusion, 1α,25(OH)2D3 differentially regulates the expression of miRNAs, which may contribute to distinct biological functions, in human bladder 253J and 253J-BV cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:25263658

  16. A multiplexed miRNA and transgene expression platform for simultaneous repression and expression of protein coding sequences.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Attila A

    2016-01-01

    Knockdown of single or multiple gene targets by RNA interference (RNAi) is necessary to overcome escape mutants or isoform redundancy. It is also necessary to use multiple RNAi reagents to knockdown multiple targets. It is also desirable to express a transgene or positive regulatory elements and inhibit a target gene in a coordinated fashion. This study reports a flexible multiplexed RNAi and transgene platform using endogenous intronic primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) as a scaffold located in the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model for any functional transgene. The multiplexed intronic miRNA - GFP transgene platform was designed to co-express multiple small RNAs within the polycistronic cluster from a Pol II promoter at more moderate levels to reduce potential vector toxicity. The native intronic miRNAs are co-transcribed with a precursor GFP mRNA as a single transcript and presumably cleaved out of the precursor-(pre) mRNA by the RNA splicing machinery, spliceosome. The spliced intron with miRNA hairpins will be further processed into mature miRNAs or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) capable of triggering RNAi effects, while the ligated exons become a mature messenger RNA for the translation of the functional GFP protein. Data show that this approach led to robust RNAi-mediated silencing of multiple Renilla Luciferase (R-Luc)-tagged target genes and coordinated expression of functional GFP from a single transcript in transiently transfected HeLa cells. The results demonstrated that this design facilitates the coordinated expression of all mature miRNAs either as individual miRNAs or as multiple miRNAs and the associated protein. The data suggest that, it is possible to simultaneously deliver multiple negative (miRNA or shRNA) and positive (transgene) regulatory elements. Because many cellular processes require simultaneous repression and activation of downstream pathways, this approach offers a platform technology to achieve that dual manipulation efficiently

  17. Widespread evidence of viral miRNAs targeting host pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNA) are regulatory genes that target and repress other RNA molecules via sequence-specific binding. Several biological processes are regulated across many organisms by evolutionarily conserved miRNAs. Plants and invertebrates employ their miRNA in defense against viruses by targeting and degrading viral products. Viruses also encode miRNAs and there is evidence to suggest that virus-encoded miRNAs target specific host genes and pathways that may be beneficial for their infectivity and/or proliferation. However, it is not clear whether there are general patterns underlying cellular targets of viral miRNAs. Results Here we show that for several of the 135 known viral miRNAs in human viruses, the human genes targeted by the viral miRNA are enriched for specific host pathways whose targeting is likely beneficial to the virus. Given that viral miRNAs continue to be discovered as technologies evolve, we extended the investigation to 6809 putative miRNAs encoded by 23 human viruses. Our analysis further suggests that human viruses have evolved their miRNA repertoire to target specific human pathways, such as cell growth, axon guidance, and cell differentiation. Interestingly, many of the same pathways are also targeted in mice by miRNAs encoded by murine viruses. Furthermore, Human Cytomegalovirus (CMV) miRNAs that target specific human pathways exhibit increased conservation across CMV strains. Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that viruses may have evolved their miRNA repertoire to target specific host pathways as a means for their survival. PMID:23369080

  18. Endogenous lung stem cells: what is their potential for use in regenerative medicine?

    PubMed

    Bertoncello, Ivan; McQualter, Jonathan L

    2010-06-01

    Advances in stem cell technologies in recent years have generated considerable interest in harnessing the potential of adult and embryonic stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell-based therapies are a particularly attractive option for the treatment of intractable lung diseases for which current therapies are essentially palliative. Proof-of-principle experiments in animal models demonstrate the efficacy of exogenous stem cells in mediating lung repair by attenuating fibrotic responses to injury, but also suggest that their ability to contribute to lung epithelial regeneration and repair is limited. Consequently, attention has turned to endogenous lung stem cells as targets or vehicles for the delivery of lung regenerative therapies. In this article, we discuss the potential and promise of endogenous lung stem cells in regenerative medicine, and the problems and challenges faced by researchers and clinicians in harnessing their potential to repair the lung. PMID:20524918

  19. miRNA Isolation from FFPET Specimen: A Technical Comparison of miRNA and Total RNA Isolation Methods.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsófia Brigitta; Wichmann, Barnabás; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-07-01

    MiRNA remain stable for detection and PCR-based amplification in FFPE tissue samples. Several miRNA extraction kits are available, however miRNA fraction, as part of total RNA can be isolated using total RNA purification methods, as well. Our primary aim was to compare four different miRNA and total RNA isolation methods from FFPE tissues. Further purposes were to evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the yield of the isolated miRNA. MiRNAs were isolated from normal colorectal cancer FFPE specimens from the same patients. Two miRNA isolation kits (High Pure miRNA Isolation Kit, miRCURY™ RNA Isolation Kit) and two total RNA isolation kits were compared (High Pure RNA Paraffin Kit, MagNA Pure 96 Cellular RNA LV Kit). Quantity and quality were determined, expression analysis was performed by real-time PCR using qPCR Human Panel I + II (Exiqon) method detecting 742 human miRNAs in parallel. The yield of total RNA was found to be higher than miRNA purification protocols (in CRC: Ex: 0203 ± 0021 μg; HPm: 1,45 ± 0,8 μg; HPp: 21,36 ± 4,98 μg; MP: 8,6 ± 5,1 μg). MiRNAs were detected in lower relative quantity of total RNA compared to the miRNA kits. Higher number of miRNAs could be detected by the miRNA isolation kits in comparison to the total RNA isolation methods. (Ex: 497 ± 16; HPm: 542 ± 11; HPp: 332 ± 36; MP: 295 ± 74). Colon specific miRNAs (miR-21-5p;-34-5p) give satisfying results by miRNA isolation kits. Although miRNA can be detected also after total RNA isolation methods, for reliable and reproducible miRNA expression profiling the use of miRNA isolation kits are more suitable. PMID:26678076

  20. Circulating miRNAs as Potential Marker for Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chuanyu; Henderson, Heather; Spradley, Christopher; Li, Li; Kim, Il-Kwon; Kumar, Sandeep; Hong, Nayeon; Arroliga, Alejandro C.; Gupta, Sudhiranjan

    2013-01-01

    MircoRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that govern the gene expression and, play significant role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. The detection of miRNAs in circulation of pulmonary hypertensive (PH) human subjects remains elusive. In the current study, we determined the pattern of miRNAs of mild-to-severe human PH subjects and, compared them with the control subjects by miRNA array. Blood was obtained using fluoroscopic and waveform guided catheterization from the distal (pulmonary artery) port of the catheter. A total 40 human subjects were included in the study and, the degree of PH was determined by mean pulmonary arterial pressure. Among several miRNAs in the array, we validated 14 miRNAs and, the data were consistent with the array profile. We identified several novel downregulated miRNAs (miR-451, miR-1246) and upregulated miRNAs (miR-23b, miR-130a and miR-191) in the circulation of PH subjects. Our study showed novel set of miRNAs which are dysregulated in PH and, are directly proportional to the degree of PH. These miRNAs may be considered as potential biomarker for early detection of PH. PMID:23717609

  1. Semirna: searching for plant miRNAs using target sequences.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Perkins, James R; Viguera, Enrique; Thode, Guillermo; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Pérez-Pulido, Antonio J

    2012-04-01

    Many plant genomes are already known, and new ones are being sequenced every year. The next step for researchers is to identify all of the functional elements in these genomes, including the important class of functional elements known as microRNAs (miRNAs), which are involved in posttranscriptional regulatory pathways. However, computational tools for predicting new plant miRNAs are limited, and there is a particular need for tools that can be used easily by laboratory researchers. We present semirna, a new tool for predicting miRNAs in plant genomes, available as a Web server. This tool takes a putative target sequence such as a messenger RNA (mRNA) as input, and allows users to search for miRNAs that target this sequence. It can also be used to determine whether small RNA sequences from massive sequencing analysis represent true miRNAs and to search for miRNAs in new genomes using homology. Semirna has shown a high level of accuracy using various test sets, and gives users the ability to search for miRNAs with several different adjustable parameters. Semirna, a user-friendly and intuitive Web server for predicting miRNA sequences, can be reached at http://www.bioinfocabd.upo.es/semirna/ . It is useful for researchers searching for miRNAs involved in particular pathways, as well as those searching for miRNAs in newly sequenced genomes. PMID:22433074

  2. Endogenous pulmonary antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, M A; Bowdish, D M; Davidson, D J; Sallenave, J M; Simpson, A J

    2006-05-01

    The human lung produces a variety of peptides and proteins which have intrinsic antimicrobial activity. In general these molecules have broad spectra of antimicrobial activity, kill micro-organisms rapidly, and evade resistance generated by pathogens. In recent years it has become increasingly apparent that the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) simultaneously possess immunomodulatory functions, suggesting complex roles for these molecules in regulating the clearance of, and immune response to, invading pathogens. These collective properties have stimulated considerable interest in the potential clinical application of endogenous AMPs. This article outlines the biology of AMPs, their pattern of expression in the lung, and their functions, with reference to both antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activity. We then consider the biological importance of AMPs, before concentrating on the potential to use AMPs to therapeutic effect. The principles discussed in the article apply to innate immune defence throughout the body, but particular emphasis is placed on AMPs in the lung and the potential application to pulmonary infection. PMID:16722137

  3. Computational identification and characterization of conserved miRNAs and their target genes in beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Li, J L; Cui, J; Cheng, D Y

    2015-01-01

    Highly conserved endogenous non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in plants and animals by silencing genes via destruction or blocking of translation of homologous mRNA. Sugar beet, Beta vulgaris, is one of the most important sugar crops in China, with properties that include wide adaptability and strong tolerance to salinity and impoverished soils. Seedlings of B. vulgaris can grow in soils containing up to 0.6% salt; it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance to enrich genetic resources for breeding salt-tolerant sugar beets. Here, we report 13 mature miRNAs from 12 families, predicted using an in silico approach from 29,857 expressed sequence tags and 279,223 genome survey sequences. The psRNATarget server predicted 25 target genes for the 13 miRNAs. Most of the target genes appeared to encode transcription factors or were involved in metabolism, signal transduction, stress response, growth, and development. These results improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of miRNA in beet and may aid in the development of novel and precise techniques for understanding post-transcriptional gene-silencing mechanisms in response to stress tolerance. PMID:26345842

  4. PlantMirnaT: miRNA and mRNA integrated analysis fully utilizing characteristics of plant sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Rhee, S; Chae, H; Kim, S

    2015-07-15

    miRNA is known to regulate up to several hundreds coding genes, thus the integrated analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression data is an important problem. Unfortunately, the integrated analysis is challenging since it needs to consider expression data of two different types, miRNA and mRNA, and target relationship between miRNA and mRNA is not clear, especially when microarray data is used. Fortunately, due to the low sequencing cost, small RNA and RNA sequencing are routinely processed and we may be able to infer regulation relationships between miRNAs and mRNAs more accurately by using sequencing data. However, no method is developed specifically for sequencing data. Thus we developed PlantMirnaT, a new miRNA-mRNA integrated analysis system. To fully leverage the power of sequencing data, three major features are developed and implemented in PlantMirnaT. First, we implemented a plant-specific short read mapping tool based on recent discoveries on miRNA target relationship in plant. Second, we designed and implemented an algorithm considering miRNA targets in the full intragenic region, not just 3' UTR. Lastly but most importantly, our algorithm is designed to consider quantity of miRNA expression and its distribution on target mRNAs. The new algorithm was used to characterize rice under drought condition using our proprietary data. Our algorithm successfully discovered that two miRNAs, miRNA1425-5p, miRNA 398b, that are involved in suppression of glucose pathway in a naturally drought resistant rice, Vandana. The system can be downloaded at https://sites.google.com/site/biohealthinformaticslab/resources. PMID:25863133

  5. Manufacturing and quality control of interconnecting wire harnesses, Volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The document covers interconnecting wire harnesses defined in the design standard, including type 8, flat conductor cable. Volume breadth covers installations of groups of harnesses in a major assembly and the associated post installation inspections and electrical tests. Knowledge gained through experience on the Saturn 5 program coupled with recent advances in techniques, materials, and processes was incorporated into this document.

  6. miRNAs in the pathogenesis of oncogenic human viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhen; Flemington, Erik K.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor viruses are a class of pathogens with well established roles in the development of malignant diseases. Numerous bodies of work have highlighted miRNAs (microRNAs) as critical regulators of tumor pathways and it is clear that the dysregulation of cellular miRNA expression can promote tumor formation. Tumor viruses encode their own miRNAs and/or manipulate the expression of cellular miRNAs to modulate their host cell environment, thereby facilitating their respective infection cycles. The modulation of these miRNA responsive pathways, however, often influences certain signal transduction cascades in ways that favor tumorigenesis. In this review, we discuss the roles of virally-encoded and virally-regulated cellular miRNAs in the respective viral life-cycles and in virus associated pathogenesis. PMID:20943311

  7. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas). PMID:26921406

  8. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10−8) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas). PMID:26921406

  9. MDM4 regulation by the let-7 miRNA family in the DNA damage response of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chen; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Mengdie; Cai, Qiuxian; Xu, Weiyi; Li, Xiaodi; Jiang, Songshan

    2015-07-01

    Despite extensive investigation into the role of let-7 miRNAs in pathological tumor processes, their involvement in the DNA damage response remains unclear. Here we show that most let-7 family members down-regulate MDM4 expression via binding to MDM4 mRNA at a conserved DNA sequence. Expression of exogenous let-7 miRNA mimics decreased MDM4 protein but not mRNA levels. Several DNA damage reagents increased let-7 expression, thereby decreasing MDM4 protein levels in glioma cells. Inhibition of endogenous let-7 with antisense RNAs rescued MDM4 protein levels with or without MG132, a proteasome-dependent degradation inhibitor. An MDM4 mutation identified in a glioma patient was associated with loss of the putative MDM4 target site. Therefore, let-7 binding to MDM4 is implicated in the DNA damage response. PMID:26028311

  10. miRNA expression during prickly pear cactus fruit development.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Cárdenas, Flor de Fátima; Caballero-Pérez, Juan; Gutiérrez-Ramos, Ximena; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression. They are involved in the control of many developmental processes, including fruit development. The increasing amount of information on miRNAs, on their expression, abundance, and conservation between various species, provides a new opportunity to study the role of miRNAs in non-model plant species. In this work, we used a combination of Northern blot and tissue print hybridization analysis to identify conserved miRNAs expressed during prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica) fruit development. Comparative profiling detected the expression of 34 miRNAs, which were clustered in three different groups that were associated with the different phases of fruit development. Variation in the level of miRNA expression was observed. Gradual expression increase of several miRNAs was observed during fruit development, including miR164. miR164 was selected for stem-loop RT-PCR and for a detailed spatial-temporal expression analysis. At early floral stages, miR164 was mainly localized in meristematic tissues, boundaries and fusion zones, while it was more homogenously expressed in fruit tissues. Our results provide the first evidence of miRNA expression in the prickly pear cactus and provide the basis for future research on miRNAs in Opuntia. Moreover, our analyses suggest that miR164 plays different roles during prickly pear cactus fruit development. PMID:25366556

  11. Exploration of miRNA families for hypotheses generation.

    PubMed

    Kamanu, Timothy K K; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2013-01-01

    Technological improvements have resulted in increased discovery of new microRNAs (miRNAs) and refinement and enrichment of existing miRNA families. miRNA families are important because they suggest a common sequence or structure configuration in sets of genes that hint to a shared function. Exploratory tools to enhance investigation of characteristics of miRNA families and the functions of family-specific miRNA genes are lacking. We have developed, miRNAVISA, a user-friendly web-based tool that allows customized interrogation and comparisons of miRNA families for hypotheses generation, and comparison of per-species chromosomal distribution of miRNA genes in different families. This study illustrates hypothesis generation using miRNAVISA in seven species. Our results unveil a subclass of miRNAs that may be regulated by genomic imprinting, and also suggest that some miRNA families may be species-specific, as well as chromosome- and/or strand-specific. PMID:24126940

  12. Exploration of miRNA families for hypotheses generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanu, Timothy K. K.; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Archer, John A. C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2013-10-01

    Technological improvements have resulted in increased discovery of new microRNAs (miRNAs) and refinement and enrichment of existing miRNA families. miRNA families are important because they suggest a common sequence or structure configuration in sets of genes that hint to a shared function. Exploratory tools to enhance investigation of characteristics of miRNA families and the functions of family-specific miRNA genes are lacking. We have developed, miRNAVISA, a user-friendly web-based tool that allows customized interrogation and comparisons of miRNA families for hypotheses generation, and comparison of per-species chromosomal distribution of miRNA genes in different families. This study illustrates hypothesis generation using miRNAVISA in seven species. Our results unveil a subclass of miRNAs that may be regulated by genomic imprinting, and also suggest that some miRNA families may be species-specific, as well as chromosome- and/or strand-specific.

  13. MiRNA in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rudnicka, Lidia; Samochocki, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are relatively new molecules that have been widely studied in recent years as to determine their exact function in the human body. It is suggested that microRNAs control approx. 30% of all genes, making them one of the largest groups that control the expression of proteins. Various functions of miRNAs have already been described. In skin diseases, there are more and more studies describing an altered expression of microRNAs in the skin or serum. Relatively little is known about the function of these molecules in atopic dermatitis, which prompted us to gather current reports on this subject. PMID:27512348

  14. Registration of two double rust resistant germplasms, HA-R12 and HA-R13 for confection sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasms HA-R12 (Reg. No. ______, PI 673104) and HA-R13 (Reg. No. ______, PI 673105) were developed by the USDA-ARS, Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, and released in Jul...

  15. Registration of two confection sunflower germplasm Lines, HA-R10 and HA-R11, Resistant to sunflower rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm lines, HA-R10 (Reg. No.xxx, PI670043) and HA-R11 (Reg. No.xxx, PI670044) were developed by the USDA-ARS Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and released December, 20...

  16. Endogenous strategy in exploration.

    PubMed

    Solman, Grayden J F; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-12-01

    We examined the characteristics of endogenous exploratory behaviors in a generalized search task in which guidance signals (e.g., landmarks, semantics, visual saliency, layout) were limited or precluded. Individuals looked for the highest valued cell in an array and were scored on the quality of the best value they could find. Exploration was guided only by the cells that had been previously examined, and the value of this guidance was manipulated by adjusting spatial autocorrelation to produce relatively smooth and rough landscapes-that is, arrays in which nearby cells had unrelated values (low correlation = rough) or similar values (high correlation = smooth). For search in increasingly rough as compared with smooth arrays, we found reduced performance despite increased sampling and increased time spent searching after revelation of a searcher's best cell. Spatially, sampling strategies tended toward more excursive, branching, and space-filling patterns as correlation decreased. Using a novel generalized-recurrence analysis, we report that these patterns reflect an increase in systematic search paths, characterized by regularized sweeps with localized infilling. These tendencies were likewise enhanced for high-performance as compared with low-performance participants. The results suggest a trade-off between guidance (in smooth arrays) and systematicity (in rough arrays), and they provide insight into the particular strategic approaches adopted by searchers when exogenous guiding information is minimized. PMID:26214501

  17. [Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis].

    PubMed

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis, also called metastatic bacterial endophthalmitis, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a rare and potentially sight-threatening ocular infection that occurs when bacteria reach the eye via the bloodstream, cross the blood-ocular barrier, and multiply within the eye. It usually affects immunocompromised patients and those suffering from diabetes mellitus, malignancy, or cardiac disease, but has also been reported after invasive procedures or in previously healthy people. In most cases, the ocular symptoms occur after the diagnosis of septicemia or systemic infection. Ocular symptoms include decreased vision, redness, discharge, pain, and floaters. The ocular inflammatory signs may be anterior and/or posterior. Bilateral involvement occurs in nearly 25% of cases. A wide range of microorganisms are involved, with differences in their frequency according to geography as well as the patient's age and past medical history, because of variations in the predisposing conditions and the source of the sepsis. The majority of patients are initially misdiagnosed, and ophthalmologists should be aware of this because prompt local and general management is required to save the eye and/or the patient's life. PMID:21145128

  18. Rapid divergence and high diversity of miRNAs and miRNA targets in the Camelineae.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa M; Burbano, Hernán A; Wang, Xi; Fitz, Joffrey; Wang, George; Ural-Blimke, Yonca; Weigel, Detlef

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNAs involved in gene regulation through translational inhibition and transcript cleavage. After processing from imperfect fold-back structures, miRNAs are incorporated into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs) before targeting transcripts with varying degrees of complementarity. Some miRNAs are evolutionarily deep-rooted, and sequence complementarity with their targets is maintained through purifying selection. Both Arabidopsis and Capsella belong to the tribe Camelineae in the Brassicaceae, with Capsella rubella serving as an outgroup to the genus Arabidopsis. The genome sequence of C. rubella has recently been released, which allows characterization of its miRNA complement in comparison with Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. Through next-generation sequencing, we identify high-confidence miRNA candidates specific to the C. rubella lineage. Only a few lineage-specific miRNAs have been studied for evolutionary constraints, and there have been no systematic studies of miRNA target diversity within or divergence between closely related plant species. Therefore we contrast sequence variation in miRNAs and their targets within A. thaliana, and between A. thaliana, A. lyrata and C. rubella. We document a surprising amount of small-scale variation in miRNA-target pairs, where many miRNAs are predicted to have species-specific targets in addition to ones that are shared between species. Our results emphasize that the transitive nature of many miRNA-target pairs can be observed even on a relatively short evolutionary time-scale, with non-random occurrences of differences in miRNAs and their complements in the miRNA precursors, the miRNA* sequences. PMID:25557441

  19. Parameter optimization for constructing competing endogenous RNA regulatory network in glioblastoma multiforme and other cancers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background In addition to direct targeting and repressing mRNAs, recent studies reported that microRNAs (miRNAs) can bridge up an alternative layer of post-transcriptional gene regulatory networks. The competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) regulation depicts the scenario where pairs of genes (ceRNAs) sharing, fully or partially, common binding miRNAs (miRNA program) can establish coexpression through competition for a limited pool of the miRNA program. While the dynamics of ceRNA regulation among cellular conditions have been verified based on in silico and in vitro experiments, comprehensive investigation into the strength of ceRNA regulation in human datasets remains largely unexplored. Furthermore, pan-cancer analysis of ceRNA regulation, to our knowledge, has not been systematically investigated. Results In the present study we explored optimal conditions for ceRNA regulation, investigated functions governed by ceRNA regulation, and evaluated pan-cancer effects. We started by investigating how essential factors, such as the size of miRNA programs, the number of miRNA program binding sites, and expression levels of miRNA programs and ceRNAs affect the ceRNA regulation capacity in tumors derived from glioblastoma multiforme patients captured by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We demonstrated that increased numbers of common targeting miRNAs as well as the abundance of binding sites enhance ceRNA regulation and strengthen coexpression of ceRNA pairs. Also, our investigation revealed that the strength of ceRNA regulation is dependent on expression levels of both miRNA programs and ceRNAs. Through functional annotation analysis, our results indicated that ceRNA regulation is highly associated with essential cellular functions and diseases including cancer. Furthermore, the highly intertwined ceRNA regulatory relationship enables constitutive and effective intra-function regulation of genes in diverse types of cancer. Conclusions Using gene and microRNA expression

  20. Harnessing Listeria monocytogenes to target tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia; Paterson, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Because of its cytosolic localization, Listeria monocytogenes (LM) has long been considered an attractive tool for delivering tumor-associated antigens (TAA) antigens in vivoto combat cancer. LM directly infects antigen-presenting cells (APC) such as monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), thereby delivering the TAA into their cytoplasm, resulting in processing, and presentation of the antigen to the immune system. This activates adaptive and innate immune responses to the TAA, mediating tumor cell cytolysis. Recently we discovered additional pathways by which Listeria can be harnessedto induce tumor cell death, which suggest new directions in the development of vaccines or therapies against cancer. In one approach, we have used Listeria to induce immune responses that destroy tumor vasculature. Another new pathway involves selective infection of cancer cells with Listeria, followed by tumor cell death through the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and through Listeria-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). This review will focus on the most recent studies on the multiple pathways of LM and how they can be harnessed in the battle against cancer. PMID:20139702

  1. Patterns of MiRNA Expression in Arctic Charr Development

    PubMed Central

    Kapralova, Kalina H.; Franzdóttir, Sigrídur Rut; Jónsson, Hákon; Snorrason, Sigurður S.; Jónsson, Zophonías O.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as a major class of developmental regulators. Sequences of many miRNAs are highly conserved, yet they often exhibit temporal and spatial heterogeneity in expression among species and have been proposed as an important reservoir for adaptive evolution and divergence. With this in mind we studied miRNA expression during embryonic development of offspring from two contrasting morphs of the highly polymorphic salmonid Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), a small benthic morph from Lake Thingvallavatn (SB) and an aquaculture stock (AC). These morphs differ extensively in morphology and adult body size. We established offspring groups of the two morphs and sampled at several time points during development. Four time points (3 embryonic and one just before first feeding) were selected for high-throughput small-RNA sequencing. We identified a total of 326 conserved and 427 novel miRNA candidates in Arctic charr, of which 51 conserved and 6 novel miRNA candidates were differentially expressed among developmental stages. Furthermore, 53 known and 19 novel miRNAs showed significantly different levels of expression in the two contrasting morphs. Hierarchical clustering of the 53 conserved miRNAs revealed that the expression differences are confined to the embryonic stages, where miRNAs such as sal-miR-130, 30, 451, 133, 26 and 199a were highly expressed in AC, whereas sal-miR-146, 183, 206 and 196a were highly expressed in SB embryos. The majority of these miRNAs have previously been found to be involved in key developmental processes in other species such as development of brain and sensory epithelia, skeletogenesis and myogenesis. Four of the novel miRNA candidates were only detected in either AC or SB. miRNA candidates identified in this study will be combined with available mRNA expression data to identify potential targets and involvement in developmental regulation. PMID:25170615

  2. Structure and activity of putative intronic miRNA promoters.

    PubMed

    Monteys, Alex Mas; Spengler, Ryan M; Wan, Ji; Tecedor, Luis; Lennox, Kimberly A; Xing, Yi; Davidson, Beverly L

    2010-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are RNA sequences of approximately 22 nucleotides that mediate post-transcriptional regulation of specific mRNAs. miRNA sequences are dispersed throughout the genome and are classified as intergenic (between genes) or intronic (embedded into a gene). Intergenic miRNAs are expressed by their own promoter, and until recently, it was supposed that intronic miRNAs are transcribed from their host gene. Here, we performed a genomic analysis of currently known intronic miRNA regions and observed that approximately 35% of intronic miRNAs have upstream regulatory elements consistent with promoter function. Among all intronic miRNAs, 30% have associated Pol II regulatory elements, including transcription start sites, CpG islands, expression sequence tags, and conserved transcription factor binding sites, while 5% contain RNA Pol III regulatory elements (A/B box sequences). We cloned intronic regions encompassing miRNAs and their upstream Pol II (miR-107, miR-126, miR-208b, miR-548f-2, miR-569, and miR-590) or Pol III (miR-566 and miR-128-2) sequences into a promoterless plasmid, and confirmed that miRNA expression occurs independent of host gene transcription. For miR-128-2, a miRNA overexpressed in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, ChIP analysis suggests dual regulation by both intronic (Pol III) and host gene (Pol II) promoters. These data support complex regulation of intronic miRNA expression, and have relevance to disregulation in disease settings. PMID:20075166

  3. Expression of miRNA and Occurrence of Distant Metastases in Patients with Hürthle Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gazic, Barbara; Goricar, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hürthle cell thyroid carcinoma (HCTC) is a rare type of thyroid carcinoma. In the present study, we investigated whether the expression of miRNAs of interest is associated with the occurrence of metastases in patients with HCTC. Materials and Methods. In 39 patients with HCTC (22 with nonmetastatic and 17 with regional or distant metastatic disease), the expression levels of six miRNAs (miR-138, miR-183, miR-221, miR-222, miR-768-3p, and miR-885-5p) and U6 snRNA as endogenous control were determined in FFPE samples of primary tumor and normal thyroid tissue using TaqMan miRNA assays. Results. In patients with HCTC, miR-138 and miR-768-3p were downregulated in tumor samples compared to normal tissue (p = 0.013 and p = 0.010, resp.). These two miRNAs were also significantly downregulated in tumor samples of patients with metastatic disease (p = 0.030 and p = 0.048, resp.) but not in patients with nonmetastatic disease (p = 0.249 and p = 0.101, resp.). In patients with nonmetastatic disease, miR-221 and miR-885-5p were slightly, albeit significantly, upregulated in tumorous compared to normal tissue (p = 0.042 and p = 0.027, resp.). Conclusion. Expression of miRNA (miR-183, miR-221, and miR-885-5p) in tumor tissue is associated with the occurrence of distant metastases in patients with HCTC. PMID:27547222

  4. SSME Electrical Harness and Cable Development and Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Russ; Heflin, Johnny; Burns, Bob; Camper, Scott J.; Hill, Arthur J.

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) electrical harness and cable system consists of the various interconnecting devices necessary for operation of complex rocket engine functions. Thirty seven harnesses incorporate unique connectors, backshell adapters, conductors, insulation, shielding, and physical barriers for a long maintenance-free life while providing the means to satisfy performance requirements and to mitigate adverse environmental influences. The objective of this paper is to provide a description of the SSME electrical harness and cable designs as well as the development history and lessons learned.

  5. High Performance Computing with Harness over InfiniBand

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Alessandro; Di Biagio, Christian; Batino, Fabrizio; Pennella, Guido; Palma, Fabrizio; Engelmann, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Harness is an adaptable and plug-in-based middleware framework able to support distributed parallel computing. By now, it is based on the Ethernet protocol which cannot guarantee high performance throughput and real time (determinism) performance. During last years, both, the research and industry environments have developed new network architectures (InfiniBand, Myrinet, iWARP, etc.) to avoid those limits. This paper concerns the integration between Harness and InfiniBand focusing on two solutions: IP over InfiniBand (IPoIB) and Socket Direct Protocol (SDP) technology. They allow the Harness middleware to take advantage of the enhanced features provided by the InfiniBand Architecture.

  6. Oscillating primary transcripts harbor miRNAs with circadian functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haifang; Fan, Zenghua; Zhao, Meng; Li, Juan; Lu, Minghua; Liu, Wei; Ying, Hao; Liu, Mofang; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The roles of miRNAs as important post-transcriptional regulators in the circadian clock have been suggested in several studies. But the search for circadian miRNAs has led to disparate results. Here we demonstrated that at least 57 miRNA primary transcripts are rhythmically transcribed in mouse liver. Most of these transcripts are under the regulation of circadian transcription factors such as BMAL1/CLOCK and REV-ERBα/β. However, the mature miRNAs derived from these transcripts are either not oscillating or oscillating at low amplitudes, which could explain the inconsistency of different circadian miRNA studies. In order to show that these circadian primary transcripts can give rise to miRNAs with circadian functions, we over-expressed one of them, miR-378, in mouse by adenovirus injection. We found a significant over-representation of circadian oscillating genes under-expressed by miR-378 over-expression in liver. In particular, we observed that miR-378 modulates the oscillation amplitudes of Cdkn1a in the control of cell cycle and Por in the regulation of oxidation reduction by forming partnership with different circadian transcription factors. Our study suggests that circadian transcription of miRNA at primary transcript level can be a good indicator for circadian miRNA functions. PMID:26898952

  7. Genome-wide characterization of maize miRNA genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that play essential roles in plant growth and development. We conducted a genome-wide survey of maize miRNA genes, characterizing their structure, expression, and evolution. Computational approaches based on homology and secondary structure modeling ident...

  8. miRNAs and Melanoma: How Are They Connected?

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Adriana Taveira; Jasiulionis, Miriam Galvonas

    2012-01-01

    miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that bind to mRNA targets and disturb their stability and/or translation, thus acting in gene posttranscriptional regulation. It is predicted that over 30% of mRNAs are regulated by miRNAs. Therefore these molecules are considered essential in the processing of many biological responses, such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, and stress responsiveness. As miRNAs participate of virtually all cellular pathways, their deregulation is critical to cancer development. Consequently, loss or gain of miRNAs function may contribute to tumor progression. Little is known about the regulation of miRNAs and understanding the events that lead to changes in their expression may provide new perspectives for cancer treatment. Among distinct types of cancer, melanoma has special implications. It is characterized as a complex disease, originated from a malignant transformation of melanocytes. Despite being rare, its metastatic form is usually incurable, which makes melanoma the major death cause of all skin cancers. Some molecular pathways are frequently disrupted in melanoma, and miRNAs probably have a decisive role on these alterations. Therefore, this review aims to discuss new findings about miRNAs in melanoma fields, underlying epigenetic processes, and also to argue possibilities of using miRNAs in melanoma diagnosis and therapy. PMID:21860617

  9. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  10. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  11. Harnessing Earth Observations for Disaster Application Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Earth observations have made substantive contributions to the understanding of natural hazards, answering key science questions on the mechanisms, processes and dynamics of changes in the land, air and water. This has been achieved through the ability to advance models and interpret the results through maps and assessments. Disaster application science is focused on the two-way flow of data and information between hazard understanding and the knowledge required for disaster response, relief and recovery. This presentation will examine the integration of results from mature science and technology development in areas including optical imagery, synthetic-aperture radar and geodetic sensors, which together provide new levels of situational awareness. Specific examples will be highlighted from the recent Nepal "Gorkha" earthquake. Optical imagery from a host of satellite missions was used to create a comprehensive mosaic across the region, which when analyzed by a global network of volunteer scientists yielded insight into the extent of induced hazards and impacts. In some cases unique day/night band images provided guidance on areas where energy-dependent infrastructure of livelihoods were disrupted. Earthquake modeling and historical trend analysis revealed areas of potential vulnerability and combined with aftershock analysis to guide areas for urgent analysis and action. The combination of SAR and GPS data, innovative integration and processing approaches and nontraditional data integration approaches resulted in damage proxy maps or where combination with airborne photography, field sightings and crowd sourced reports to assess susceptibility to induced hazards (floods and landslides). Opportunities and challenges to build the science and community relationships, harness the earth observations from multiple agencies and institutions and co-develop timely applications to users will be areas for ongoing collaboration and study.Earth observations have made

  12. Harnessing quantum transport by transient chaos.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso; Pecora, Louis M

    2013-03-01

    Chaos has long been recognized to be generally advantageous from the perspective of control. In particular, the infinite number of unstable periodic orbits embedded in a chaotic set and the intrinsically sensitive dependence on initial conditions imply that a chaotic system can be controlled to a desirable state by using small perturbations. Investigation of chaos control, however, was largely limited to nonlinear dynamical systems in the classical realm. In this paper, we show that chaos may be used to modulate or harness quantum mechanical systems. To be concrete, we focus on quantum transport through nanostructures, a problem of considerable interest in nanoscience, where a key feature is conductance fluctuations. We articulate and demonstrate that chaos, more specifically transient chaos, can be effective in modulating the conductance-fluctuation patterns. Experimentally, this can be achieved by applying an external gate voltage in a device of suitable geometry to generate classically inaccessible potential barriers. Adjusting the gate voltage allows the characteristics of the dynamical invariant set responsible for transient chaos to be varied in a desirable manner which, in turn, can induce continuous changes in the statistical characteristics of the quantum conductance-fluctuation pattern. To understand the physical mechanism of our scheme, we develop a theory based on analyzing the spectrum of the generalized non-Hermitian Hamiltonian that includes the effect of leads, or electronic waveguides, as self-energy terms. As the escape rate of the underlying non-attracting chaotic set is increased, the imaginary part of the complex eigenenergy becomes increasingly large so that pointer states are more difficult to form, making smoother the conductance-fluctuation pattern. PMID:23556962

  13. Endogenous Small-Noncoding RNAs and Potential Functions in Desiccation Tolerance in Physcomitrella Patens

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jing; Wang, Xiaoqin; Perroud, Pierre-François; He, Yikun; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhang, Weixiong

    2016-01-01

    Early land plants like moss Physcomitrella patens have developed remarkable drought tolerance. Phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) protects seeds during water stress by activating genes through transcription factors such as ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE (ABI3). Small noncoding RNA (sncRNA), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small-interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), are key gene regulators in eukaryotes, playing critical roles in stress tolerance in plants. Combining next-generation sequencing and computational analysis, we profiled and characterized sncRNA species from two ABI3 deletion mutants and the wild type P. patens that were subject to ABA treatment in dehydration and rehydration stages. Small RNA profiling using deep sequencing helped identify 22 novel miRNAs and 6 genomic loci producing trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs) including TAS3a to TAS3e and TAS6. Data from degradome profiling showed that ABI3 genes (ABI3a/b/c) are potentially regulated by the plant-specific miR536 and that other ABA-relevant genes are regulated by miRNAs and ta-siRNAs. We also observed broad variations of miRNAs and ta-siRNAs expression across different stages, suggesting that they could potentially influence desiccation tolerance. This study provided evidence on the potential roles of sncRNA in mediating desiccation-responsive pathways in early land plants. PMID:27443635

  14. Endogenous Small-Noncoding RNAs and Potential Functions in Desiccation Tolerance in Physcomitrella Patens.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Wang, Xiaoqin; Perroud, Pierre-François; He, Yikun; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhang, Weixiong

    2016-01-01

    Early land plants like moss Physcomitrella patens have developed remarkable drought tolerance. Phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) protects seeds during water stress by activating genes through transcription factors such as ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE (ABI3). Small noncoding RNA (sncRNA), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small-interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), are key gene regulators in eukaryotes, playing critical roles in stress tolerance in plants. Combining next-generation sequencing and computational analysis, we profiled and characterized sncRNA species from two ABI3 deletion mutants and the wild type P. patens that were subject to ABA treatment in dehydration and rehydration stages. Small RNA profiling using deep sequencing helped identify 22 novel miRNAs and 6 genomic loci producing trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs) including TAS3a to TAS3e and TAS6. Data from degradome profiling showed that ABI3 genes (ABI3a/b/c) are potentially regulated by the plant-specific miR536 and that other ABA-relevant genes are regulated by miRNAs and ta-siRNAs. We also observed broad variations of miRNAs and ta-siRNAs expression across different stages, suggesting that they could potentially influence desiccation tolerance. This study provided evidence on the potential roles of sncRNA in mediating desiccation-responsive pathways in early land plants. PMID:27443635

  15. Harnessing Energy from the Sun for Six Billion People

    ScienceCinema

    Daniel Nocera

    2013-07-19

    Daniel Nocera, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor whose recent research focuses on solar-powered fuels, presents a Brookhaven Science Associates Distinguished Lecture, titled "Harnessing Energy from the Sun for Six Billion People -- One at a Time."

  16. Harnessing Power from Tides: State of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the current, world-wide status of tidal energy as a potential power source. Potential sites and global tidal power prospects are identified. New engineering concepts relevant to the harnessing of tidal power are identified and described. (BT)

  17. 42 CFR 84.151 - Harness test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... concrete floor without disarranging the harness or exerting a pull on the facepiece. (5) The arrangement... manner that prevents a pull equivalent to dragging the maximum length of the hose over a concrete...

  18. Harnessing Energy from the Sun for Six Billion People

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Nocera

    2011-09-12

    Daniel Nocera, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor whose recent research focuses on solar-powered fuels, presents a Brookhaven Science Associates Distinguished Lecture, titled "Harnessing Energy from the Sun for Six Billion People -- One at a Time."

  19. 42 CFR 84.151 - Harness test; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... concrete floor without disarranging the harness or exerting a pull on the facepiece. (5) The arrangement... manner that prevents a pull equivalent to dragging the maximum length of the hose over a concrete...

  20. Manufacturing and quality control of interconnecting wire harnesses, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Interconnecting wire harnesses defined in the design standard are considered, including type 4, open bundle (not enclosed). Knowledge gained through experience on the Saturn 5 program coupled with recent advances in techniques, materials, and processes was incorporated into the document.

  1. A Toolbox for Herpesvirus miRNA Research: Construction of a Complete Set of KSHV miRNA Deletion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vaibhav; Plaisance-Bonstaff, Karlie; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Lanier, Curtis; Dolce, Alexander; Hu, Jianhong; Brulois, Kevin; Haecker, Irina; Turner, Peter; Renne, Rolf; Krueger, Brian

    2016-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 viral microRNAs (miRNAs) that are expressed during latency. Research into KSHV miRNA function has suffered from a lack of genetic systems to study viral miRNA mutations in the context of the viral genome. We used the Escherichia coli Red recombination system together with a new bacmid background, BAC16, to create mutants for all known KSHV miRNAs. The specific miRNA deletions or mutations and the integrity of the bacmids have been strictly quality controlled using PCR, restriction digestion, and sequencing. In addition, stable viral producer cell lines based on iSLK cells have been created for wildtype KSHV, for 12 individual miRNA knock-out mutants (ΔmiR-K12-1 through -12), and for mutants deleted for 10 of 12 (ΔmiR-cluster) or all 12 miRNAs (ΔmiR-all). NGS, in combination with SureSelect technology, was employed to sequence the entire latent genome within all producer cell lines. qPCR assays were used to verify the expression of the remaining viral miRNAs in a subset of mutants. Induction of the lytic cycle leads to efficient production of progeny viruses that have been used to infect endothelial cells. Wt BAC16 and miR mutant iSLK producer cell lines are now available to the research community. PMID:26907327

  2. Serum miRNA-499 and miRNA-210: A potential role in early diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Sally M; El-Shal, Amal S; Shoukry, Amira; Khedr, Mohamad H; Abdelraheim, Nader

    2016-08-01

    In clinical practice, there is still a need for novel biomarkers, which can reliably rule in or rule out acute coronary syndrome (ACS) immediately on admission. This is of particular interest in patients with unstable angina (UA) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) in whom diagnostic uncertainty is high. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential role of miRNA-499 and miRNA-210 as novel molecular biomarkers for early diagnosis of UA and NSTEMI suspected patients presented at the emergency unit. A total of 110 patients presenting to the intensive care unit (ICU) within 24 h of onset of chest pain suggestive of ACS were enrolled in the study. They included 37 UA, 48 NSTEMI and 25 noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) patients. Immediately at enrollment, blood samples were taken for estimation of serum miRNA-499 and miRNA-210 expression levels by real time PCR. miRNA-499 and miRNA-210 expression levels were significantly increased in UA and NSTEMI patients compared with NCCP patients (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed that the area under curve (AUC) of miR-499 for the diagnosis of UA and NSTEMI was 0.98 and 0.97, respectively; while the AUC of miRNA-210 was 0.84 and 0.90, respectively. The important finding of our study was that the AUC of miRNA-499 for the diagnosis of ACS patients with symptoms onset <3 h was 0.89, while the AUC of miRNA-210 was 0.86. Interestingly, combining miRNA-499 and miRNA-210 significantly improved the diagnostic value by increasing the AUC to 0.96, P < 0.001. In conclusion, serum miRNA-499 and miRNA-210 are associated with UA and NSTEMI and with those presenting within 3 h of symptom onset. Both miRNAs might be potentially novel biomarkers for accelerating the diagnosis of ACS patients in emergency unit. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(8):673-682, 2016. PMID:27346801

  3. Phytoalexins, miRNAs and breast cancer: a review of phytochemical-mediated miRNA regulation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tilghman, Syreeta L; Rhodes, Lyndsay V; Bratton, Melyssa R; Carriere, Patrick; Preyan, Lynez C; Boue, Stephen M; Vasaitis, Tadas Sean; McLachlan, John A; Burow, Matthew E

    2013-02-01

    There is growing interest in the diverse signaling pathways that regulate and affect breast tumorigenesis, including the role of phytochemicals and the emerging role of microRNAs (miRNAs). Recent studies demonstrate that miRNAs regulate fundamental cellular and developmental processes at the transcriptional and translational level under normal and disease conditions. While there is growing evidence to support the role of phytoalexin-mediated miRNA regulation of cancer, few reports address this role in breast cancer. Recent reports by our group and others demonstrate that natural products, including stilbenes, curcumin, and glyceollins, could alter the expression of specific miRNAs, which may lead to increased sensitivity of cancer cells to conventional anti-cancer agents and, therefore, hormone-dependent and hormone-independent tumor growth inhibition. This review will discuss how dietary intake of natural products, by regulating specific miRNAs, contribute to the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:23395943

  4. Phytoalexins, miRNAs and Breast Cancer: A Review of Phytochemical-mediated miRNA Regulation in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Lyndsay V.; Bratton, Melyssa R.; Carriere, Patrick; Preyan, Lynez C.; Boue, Stephen M.; Vasaitis, Tadas Sean; McLachlan, John A.; Burow, Matthew E.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in the diverse signaling pathways that regulate and affect breast tumorigenesis, including the role of phytochemicals and the emerging role of microRNAs (miRNAs). Recent studies demonstrate that miRNAs regulate fundamental cellular and developmental processes at the transcriptional and translational level under normal and disease conditions. While there is growing evidence to support the role of phytoalexin-mediated miRNA regulation of cancer, few reports address this role in breast cancer. Recent reports by our group and others demonstrate that natural products, including stilbenes, curcumin, and glyceollins, could alter the expression of specific miRNAs, which may lead to increased sensitivity of cancer cells to conventional anti-cancer agents and, therefore, hormone-dependent and hormone-independent tumor growth inhibition. This review will discuss how dietary intake of natural products, by regulating specific miRNAs, contribute to the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:23395943

  5. [The role of miRNA in endometrial cancer in the context of miRNA 205].

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Miłosz; Danielska, Justyna; Dzieniecka, Monika; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    MiRNAs are small, non-coding molecules of ribonucleic acids of approximately 22 bp length, which serve as regulators of gene expression and protein translation due to interference with messenger RNA (mRNA). MiRNAs, which take part in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis, may be associated with carcinogenesis. Aberrant expression of miRNAs in endometrial cancer might contribute to the endometrial cancer initiation or progression, as well as metastasis formation, and may influence cancer invasiveness. Specific-miRNAs expressed in endometrial cancer tissues may serve as diagnostic markers of the disease, prognostic biomarkers, or play an important part in oncological therapy We aimed to describe the role of miRNAs in endometrial cancer with special consideration of miRNA 205. PMID:26817318

  6. miRNA 206 and miRNA 574-5p are highly expression in coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianqing; Shao, Guofeng; Chen, Xiaoliang; Yang, Xi; Huang, Xiaoyan; Peng, Ping; Ba, Yanna; Zhang, Lin; Jehangir, Tashina; Bu, Shizhong; Liu, Ningsheng; Lian, Jiangfang

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Innovative diagnostic biomarkers are a pressing need for this disease. miRNAs profiling is an innovative method of identifying biomarkers for many diseases and could be proven as a powerful tool in the diagnosis and treatment of CAD. We performed miRNA microarray analysis from the plasma of three CAD patients and three healthy controls. Subsequently, we performed quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of miRNA expression in plasma of another 67 CAD patients and 67 healthy controls. We identified two miRNAs (miR-206 and miR-574-5p) that were significantly up-regulated in CAD patients as compared with healthy controls (P<0.05). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicated these two miRNAs had great potential to provide sensitive and specific diagnostic value for CAD. PMID:26685009

  7. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  8. Exosomal miRNAs as cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Thind, Arron; Wilson, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Intercommunication between cancer cells and with their surrounding and distant environments is key to the survival, progression and metastasis of the tumour. Exosomes play a role in this communication process. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is frequently dysregulated in tumour cells and can be reflected by distinct exosomal miRNA (ex-miRNA) profiles isolated from the bodily fluids of cancer patients. Here, the potential of ex-miRNA as a cancer biomarker and therapeutic target is critically analysed. Exosomes are a stable source of miRNA in bodily fluids but, despite a number of methods for exosome extraction and miRNA quantification, their suitability for diagnostics in a clinical setting is questionable. Furthermore, exosomally transferred miRNAs can alter the behaviour of recipient tumour and stromal cells to promote oncogenesis, highlighting a role in cell communication in cancer. However, our incomplete understanding of exosome biogenesis and miRNA loading mechanisms means that strategies to target exosomes or their transferred miRNAs are limited and not specific to tumour cells. Therefore, if ex-miRNA is to be employed in novel non-invasive diagnostic approaches and as a therapeutic target in cancer, two further advances are necessary: in methods to isolate and detect ex-miRNA, and a better understanding of their biogenesis and functions in tumour-cell communication. PMID:27440105

  9. Mechanisms of regulation of mature miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Towler, Benjamin P; Jones, Christopher I; Newbury, Sarah F

    2015-12-01

    miRNAs are short RNA molecules of ∼22-nt in length that play important roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. miRNAs normally function as negative regulators of mRNA expression by binding complementary sequences in the 3'-UTR of target mRNAs and causing translational repression and/or target degradation. Much research has been undertaken to enhance understanding of the biogenesis, function and targeting of miRNAs. However, until recently, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the levels of mature miRNAs themselves have been largely overlooked. Although it has generally been assumed that miRNAs are stable molecules, recent evidence indicates that the stability of specific mature miRNAs can be regulated during key cellular and developmental processes in certain cell types. Here we discuss the current knowledge of the mechanisms by which mature miRNAs are regulated in the cell and the factors that contribute to the control of their stability. PMID:26614662

  10. Finding cancer-associated miRNAs: methods and tools.

    PubMed

    Oulas, Anastasis; Karathanasis, Nestoras; Louloupi, Annita; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2011-09-01

    Changes in the structure and/or the expression of protein coding genes were thought to be the major cause of cancer for many decades. The recent discovery of non-coding RNA (ncRNA) transcripts (i.e., microRNAs) suggests that the molecular biology of cancer is far more complex. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been under investigation due to their involvement in carcinogenesis, often taking up roles of tumor suppressors or oncogenes. Due to the slow nature of experimental identification of miRNA genes, computational procedures have been applied as a valuable complement to cloning. Numerous computational tools, implemented to recognize the features of miRNA biogenesis, have resulted in the prediction of novel miRNA genes. Computational approaches provide clues as to which are the dominant features that characterize these regulatory units and furthermore act by narrowing down the search space making experimental verification faster and cheaper. In combination with large scale, high throughput methods, such as deep sequencing, computational methods have aided in the discovery of putative molecular signatures of miRNA deregulation in human tumors. This review focuses on existing computational methods for identifying miRNA genes, provides an overview of the methodology undertaken by these tools, and underlies their contribution towards unraveling the role of miRNAs in cancer. PMID:21607762

  11. miRNA and methylation: a multifaceted liaison.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Ravindresh

    2015-01-19

    miRNAs and DNA methylation are both critical regulators of gene expression. Aberration in miRNA expression or DNA methylation is a causal factor for numerous pathological conditions. DNA methylation can inhibit the transcription of miRNAs, just like coding genes, by methylating the CpG islands in the promoter regions of miRNAs. Conversely, certain miRNAs can directly target DNA methyltransferases and bring about their inhibition, thereby affecting the whole genome methylation pattern. Recently, methylation patterns have also been revealed in mRNA. Surprisingly, the two most commonly studied methylation states in mRNA (m6A and m5C) are found to be enriched in 3'-UTRs (untranslated regions), the target site for the majority of miRNAs. Whereas m5C is reported to stabilise mRNA, m6A has a destabilising effect on mRNA. However, the effect of mRNA methylation on its interaction with miRNAs is largely unexplored. The review highlights the complex interplay between microRNA and methylation at DNA and mRNA level. PMID:25469751

  12. Milk miRNAs: simple nutrients or systemic functional regulators?

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C; Kakulas, Foteini; Geddes, Donna T; Hartmann, Peter E; John, Swen Malte; Carrera-Bastos, Pedro; Cordain, Loren; Schmitz, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Milk is rich in miRNAs that appear to play important roles in the postnatal development of all mammals. Currently, two competing hypotheses exist: the functional hypothesis, which proposes that milk miRNAs are transferred to the offspring and exert physiological regulatory functions, and the nutritional hypothesis, which suggests that these molecules do not reach the systemic circulation of the milk recipient, but merely provide nutrition without conferring active regulatory signals to the offspring. The functional hypothesis is based on indirect evidence and requires further investigation. The nutritional hypothesis is primarily based on three mouse models, which are inherently problematic: 1) miRNA-375 KO mice, 2) miRNA-200c/141 KO mice, and 3) transgenic mice presenting high levels of miRNA-30b in milk. This article presents circumstantial evidence that these mouse models may all be inappropriate to study the physiological traffic of milk miRNAs to the newborn mammal, and calls for new studies using more relevant mouse models or human milk to address the fate and role of milk miRNAs in the offspring and the adult consumer of cow's milk. PMID:27330539

  13. Protocol for miRNA isolation from biofluids.

    PubMed

    Lekchnov, Evgeny A; Zaporozhchenko, Ivan A; Morozkin, Evgeny S; Bryzgunova, Olga E; Vlassov, Valentin V; Laktionov, Pavel P

    2016-04-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified as promising biomarkers in cancer and other diseases. Packaging of miRNAs into vesicles and complexes with proteins ensures their stability in biological fluids but also complicates their isolation. Conventional protocols used to isolate cell-free RNA are generally successful in overcoming these difficulties; however, they are costly, labor-intensive, or heavily reliant on the use of hazardous chemicals. Here we describe a protocol that is suitable for isolating miRNAs from biofluids, including blood plasma and urine. The protocol is based on precipitation of proteins, denaturation of miRNA-containing complexes with octanoic acid and guanidine isothiocyanate, and subsequent purification of miRNA on spin columns. The efficacy of miRNA extraction by phenol-chloroform extraction, miRCURY RNA isolation kit--biofluids (Exiqon), and the proposed protocol was compared by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR of miR-16 and miR-126. The proposed protocol was slightly more effective for isolating miRNA from plasma and significantly superior to the other two methods for miRNA isolation from urine. Spectrophotometry and SDS-PAGE data suggest that the disparity in performance between miRCURY Biofluids and the proposed protocol can be attributed to differences in precipitation mechanisms, as confirmed by the retention of different proteins in the supernatant. PMID:26874020

  14. miRNA and miRNA target genes in copy number variations occurring in individuals with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of short, non-coding RNAs modulating expression of human protein coding genes (miRNA target genes). Their dysfunction is associated with many human diseases, including neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been recently shown that genomic copy number variations (CNVs) can cause aberrant expression of integral miRNAs and their target genes, and contribute to intellectual disability (ID). Results To better understand the CNV-miRNA relationship in ID, we investigated the prevalence and function of miRNAs and miRNA target genes in five groups of CNVs. Three groups of CNVs were from 213 probands with ID (24 de novo CNVs, 46 familial and 216 common CNVs), one group of CNVs was from a cohort of 32 cognitively normal subjects (67 CNVs) and one group of CNVs represented 40 ID related syndromic regions listed in DECIPHER (30 CNVs) which served as positive controls for CNVs causing or predisposing to ID. Our results show that 1). The number of miRNAs is significantly higher in de novo or DECIPHER CNVs than in familial or common CNV subgroups (P < 0.01). 2). miRNAs with brain related functions are more prevalent in de novo CNV groups compared to common CNV groups. 3). More miRNA target genes are found in de novo, familial and DECIPHER CNVs than in the common CNV subgroup (P < 0.05). 4). The MAPK signaling cascade is found to be enriched among the miRNA target genes from de novo and DECIPHER CNV subgroups. Conclusions Our findings reveal an increase in miRNA and miRNA target gene content in de novo versus common CNVs in subjects with ID. Their expression profile and participation in pathways support a possible role of miRNA copy number change in cognition and/or CNV-mediated developmental delay. Systematic analysis of expression/function of miRNAs in addition to coding genes integral to CNVs could uncover new causes of ID. PMID:23937676

  15. Infiltration related miRNAs in bladder urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Peng; Xu, Feng; Cheng, Wen; Gao, Jianping; Zhang, Zhengyu; Ge, Jingping; Wei, Zhifeng; Xu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Youhuang

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate infiltration related microRNAs (miRNAs) in bladder urothelial carcinoma (BUC). Twenty patients with BUC were enrolled and divided into 2 groups according to infiltration or not: infiltrating BUC group (n=12) and non-infiltrating BUC group (n=8). Gene chip was used to detect infiltration related miRNAs in the BUC samples. In other recruited 17 patients with BUC who were divided into infiltrating BUC samples (n=14) and non-infiltrating BUC samples (n=3), and in 4 BUC cell lines (EJ, 5637, T24 and BIU-87), the expression of miRNAs was assayed by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In infiltrating BUC group, as compared with non-infiltrating BUC group, there were 7 differentially expressed miRNAs: hsa-miR-29c, hsa-miR-200a, hsa-miR-378, hsa-miR-429, hsa-miR-200c and hsa-miR-141 were up-regulated, while hsa-miR-451 was down-regulated. In the BUC samples, the results of RT-PCR were consistent with those by the miRNA array. In the cancer cell lines, RT-PCR in T24 only revealed the similar expression pattern of miRNAs to that by the miRNA array. It is suggested that infiltration of BUC is related with different expression of miRNAs, which may provide a novel platform for further study on function and action mechanism of miRNAs. PMID:22886973

  16. tRFs: miRNAs in disguise.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Suresh, Padmanaban S; Tsutsumi, Rie

    2016-04-01

    tRFs and tiRNAs are two new classes of regulatory non-coding small RNAs that are derived from the cleavage of pre-existing tRNAs. tRFs are 18-22 nt long and are classified into the tRF-5, tRF-3, and tRF-1 series. Here, we discuss in detail the regulatory roles of tRFs in translation, viral infections, and carcinogenesis. Moreover, we have reviewed the association of tRFs with Argonaute proteins, including their potential to function as miRNAs. Interestingly, few miRNAs are generated from pre-existing tRNAs. Hence, tRNAs generate similar-sized tRFs and miRNAs, leading to misannotations due to cross mapping of tRFs and tRNA-derived miRNAs during deep sequencing data analysis. Therefore, it is important to catalogue the overlapping sequences between tRNA-derived miRNAs and tRFs. We have catalogued the miRNAs that overlap with tRFs sequences in humans using miRBase. We identified 20 tRNA-derived miRNAs that share sequences with tRFs. Of the 20 miRNAs, 5 miRNAs (miR-3182, miR-4521, miR-1260a, miR-1260b, and miR-7977) showed significant prediction scores. Furthermore, we have identified a lysine degradation pathway as a common regulatory pathway for miR-1260a, miR-1260b, and miR-3182 by using DIANA-mirPath. PMID:26743126

  17. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26820249

  18. Functions of miRNAs during Mammalian Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shun; Jiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles during mammalian heart development and have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. The mammalian embryonic heart is mainly derived from four major cell types during development. These include cardiomyocytes, endocardial cells, epicardial cells, and neural crest cells. Recent data have identified various miRNAs as critical regulators of the proper differentiation, proliferation, and survival of these cell types. In this review, we briefly introduce the contemporary understanding of mammalian cardiac development. We also focus on recent developments in the field of cardiac miRNAs and their functions during the development of different cell types. PMID:27213371

  19. Targeting oncomiRNAs and mimicking tumor suppressor miRNAs: New trends in the development of miRNA therapeutic strategies in oncology (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GAMBARI, ROBERTO; BROGNARA, ELEONORA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; FABBRI, ENRICA

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA or miR) therapeutics in cancer are based on targeting or mimicking miRNAs involved in cancer onset, progression, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis. Several studies conclusively have demonstrated that miRNAs are deeply involved in tumor onset and progression, either behaving as tumor-promoting miRNAs (oncomiRNAs and metastamiRNAs) or as tumor suppressor miRNAs. This review focuses on the most promising examples potentially leading to the development of anticancer, miRNA-based therapeutic protocols. The inhibition of miRNA activity can be readily achieved by the use of miRNA inhibitors and oligomers, including RNA, DNA and DNA analogues (miRNA antisense therapy), small molecule inhibitors, miRNA sponges or through miRNA masking. On the contrary, the enhancement of miRNA function (miRNA replacement therapy) can be achieved by the use of modified miRNA mimetics, such as plasmid or lentiviral vectors carrying miRNA sequences. Combination strategies have been recently developed based on the observation that i) the combined administration of different antagomiR molecules induces greater antitumor effects and ii) some anti-miR molecules can sensitize drug-resistant tumor cell lines to therapeutic drugs. In this review, we discuss two additional issues: i) the combination of miRNA replacement therapy with drug administration and ii) the combination of antagomiR and miRNA replacement therapy. One of the solid results emerging from different independent studies is that miRNA replacement therapy can enhance the antitumor effects of the antitumor drugs. The second important conclusion of the reviewed studies is that the combination of anti-miRNA and miRNA replacement strategies may lead to excellent results, in terms of antitumor effects. PMID:27175518

  20. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013

  1. Quantitative analysis of endogenous compounds.

    PubMed

    Thakare, Rhishikesh; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Gautam, Nagsen; Alamoudi, Jawaher Abdullah; Alnouti, Yazen

    2016-09-01

    Accurate quantitative analysis of endogenous analytes is essential for several clinical and non-clinical applications. LC-MS/MS is the technique of choice for quantitative analyses. Absolute quantification by LC/MS requires preparing standard curves in the same matrix as the study samples so that the matrix effect and the extraction efficiency for analytes are the same in both the standard and study samples. However, by definition, analyte-free biological matrices do not exist for endogenous compounds. To address the lack of blank matrices for the quantification of endogenous compounds by LC-MS/MS, four approaches are used including the standard addition, the background subtraction, the surrogate matrix, and the surrogate analyte methods. This review article presents an overview these approaches, cite and summarize their applications, and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In addition, we discuss in details, validation requirements and compatibility with FDA guidelines to ensure method reliability in quantifying endogenous compounds. The standard addition, background subtraction, and the surrogate analyte approaches allow the use of the same matrix for the calibration curve as the one to be analyzed in the test samples. However, in the surrogate matrix approach, various matrices such as artificial, stripped, and neat matrices are used as surrogate matrices for the actual matrix of study samples. For the surrogate analyte approach, it is required to demonstrate similarity in matrix effect and recovery between surrogate and authentic endogenous analytes. Similarly, for the surrogate matrix approach, it is required to demonstrate similar matrix effect and extraction recovery in both the surrogate and original matrices. All these methods represent indirect approaches to quantify endogenous compounds and regardless of what approach is followed, it has to be shown that none of the validation criteria have been compromised due to the indirect analyses. PMID

  2. Endogenized viral sequences in mammals.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Nicholas F; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2016-06-01

    Reverse-transcribed RNA molecules compose a significant portion of the human genome. Many of these RNA molecules were retrovirus genomes either infecting germline cells or having done so in a previous generation but retaining transcriptional activity. This mechanism itself accounts for a quarter of the genomic sequence information of mammals for which there is data. We understand relatively little about the causes and consequences of retroviral endogenization. This review highlights functions ascribed to sequences of viral origin endogenized into mammalian genomes and suggests some of the most pressing questions raised by these observations. PMID:27128186

  3. miRNA-216 and miRNA-499 target cyb561d2 in zebrafish in response to fipronil exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongyong; Huang, Hannian; Zhang, Kai; Ding, Xianfeng; Jia, Longlue; Yu, Liang; Zhu, Guonian; Guo, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) can regulate the expression of its target gene by mediating mRNA cleavage or by translational repression at a post-transcriptional level. Usually, one miRNA may regulate many genes as its targets, while one gene may also be targeted by many miRNAs. We previously demonstrated that cyb561d2, whose protein product is involved in cell defense, and chemical stress, is targeted by miR-155 in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) when exposed to fipronil (5-amino-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl) phenyl]-4-[(trifluoromethyl) sulphinyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile). Microcosm Targets prediction showed that the cyb561d2 gene is also highly possibly targeted by miR-194a, miR-216b, miR-429, and miR-499. These interactions need to be further validated experimentally. In this study, we evaluated the effects of fipronil on miR-194a, miR-216b, miR-429, miR-499 and cyb561d2 in zebrafish and investigated whether these four miRNAs could regulate the expression of cyb561d2 in both mRNA and protein levels. The expression of cyb561d2 was upregulated in both mRNA and protein level in a dose-dependent manner upon stimulation of fipronil, and miR-216b and miR-499 were downregulated concurrently, whereas there was no significant changes were observed in the expression level of miR-194a and miR-429. The dual luciferase report assay demonstrated that miR-216b and miR-499 interacted with cyb561d2 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTR), miR-194a and miR-429 did not stimulate degradation of cyb561d2 mRNA. The expression of cyb561d2 was reduced in both mRNA and protein level when ZF4 cells were transfected with miR-499 mimic, whereas expression level of both mRNA and protein was increased when endogenous miR-499 was inhibited by transfection with miR-499 inhibitor. Likewise, the mRNA and protein level of cyb561d2 was affected by treatment with the mimics and the inhibitor of miR-216b. In contrast, when ZF4 cells were transfected with a mimic of miR-194a or miR-429, the expression of cyb561d2

  4. Essential Role for Endogenous siRNAs during Meiosis in Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Paula; Rozhkov, Nikolay V.; Li, Fan; Cárdenas, Fabián L.; Davydenk, Olga; Vandivier, Lee E.; Gregory, Brian D.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Schultz, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The RNase III enzyme DICER generates both microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous short interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs). Both small RNA species silence gene expression post-transcriptionally in association with the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family of proteins. In mammals, there are four AGO proteins (AGO1-4), of which only AGO2 possesses endonucleolytic activity. siRNAs trigger endonucleolytic cleavage of target mRNAs, mediated by AGO2, whereas miRNAs cause translational repression and mRNA decay through association with any of the four AGO proteins. Dicer deletion in mouse oocytes leads to female infertility due to defects during meiosis I. Because mouse oocytes express both miRNAs and endo-siRNAs, this phenotype could be due to the absence of either class of small RNA, or both. However, we and others demonstrated that miRNA function is suppressed in mouse oocytes, which suggested that endo-siRNAs, not miRNAs, are essential for female meiosis. To determine if this was the case we generated mice that express a catalytically inactive knock-in allele of Ago2 (Ago2ADH) exclusively in oocytes and thereby disrupted the function of siRNAs. Oogenesis and hormonal response are normal in Ago2ADH oocytes, but meiotic maturation is impaired, with severe defects in spindle formation and chromosome alignment that lead to meiotic catastrophe. The transcriptome of these oocytes is widely perturbed and shows a highly significant correlation with the transcriptome of Dicer null and Ago2 null oocytes. Expression of the mouse transcript (MT), the most abundant transposable element in mouse oocytes, is increased. This study reveals that endo-siRNAs are essential during meiosis I in mouse females, demonstrating a role for endo-siRNAs in mammals. PMID:25695507

  5. Evaluation of Cable Harness Post-Installation Testing. Part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. S.; Iannello, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Cable Harness Post-Installation Testing Report was written in response to an action issued by the Ares Project Control Board (PCB). The action for the Ares I Avionics & Software Chief Engineer and the Avionics Integration and Vehicle Systems Test Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Manager in the Vehicle Integration Office was to develop a set of guidelines for electrical cable harnesses. Research showed that post-installation tests have been done since the Apollo era. For Ares I-X, the requirement for post-installation testing was removed to make it consistent with the avionics processes used on the Atlas V expendable launch vehicle. Further research for the report involved surveying government and private sector launch vehicle developers, military and commercial aircraft, spacecraft developers, and harness vendors. Responses indicated crewed launch vehicles and military aircraft perform post-installation tests. Key findings in the report were as follows: Test requirements identify damage, human-rated vehicles should be tested despite the identification of statistically few failures, data does not support the claim that post-installation testing damages the harness insulation system, and proper planning can reduce overhead associated with testing. The primary recommendation of the report is for the Ares projects to retain the practice of post-fabrication and post-installation cable harness testing.

  6. N6-adenosine methylation in MiRNAs.

    PubMed

    Berulava, Tea; Rahmann, Sven; Rademacher, Katrin; Klein-Hitpass, Ludgar; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of N6-adenosine (m6A) has been observed in many different classes of RNA, but its prevalence in microRNAs (miRNAs) has not yet been studied. Here we show that a knockdown of the m6A demethylase FTO affects the steady-state levels of several miRNAs. Moreover, RNA immunoprecipitation with an anti-m6A-antibody followed by RNA-seq revealed that a significant fraction of miRNAs contains m6A. By motif searches we have discovered consensus sequences discriminating between methylated and unmethylated miRNAs. The epigenetic modification of an epigenetic modifier as described here adds a new layer to the complexity of the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. PMID:25723394

  7. N6-Adenosine Methylation in MiRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Berulava, Tea; Rahmann, Sven; Rademacher, Katrin; Klein-Hitpass, Ludgar; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of N6-adenosine (m6A) has been observed in many different classes of RNA, but its prevalence in microRNAs (miRNAs) has not yet been studied. Here we show that a knockdown of the m6A demethylase FTO affects the steady-state levels of several miRNAs. Moreover, RNA immunoprecipitation with an anti-m6A-antibody followed by RNA-seq revealed that a significant fraction of miRNAs contains m6A. By motif searches we have discovered consensus sequences discriminating between methylated and unmethylated miRNAs. The epigenetic modification of an epigenetic modifier as described here adds a new layer to the complexity of the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. PMID:25723394

  8. Impact of miRNAs on cardiovascular aging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seahyoung; Choi, Eunhyun; Cha, Min-Ji; Park, Ae-Jun; Yoon, Cheesoon; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2015-09-01

    Aging is a multidimensional process that leads to an increased risk of developing severe diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, and immunological diseases. Recently, small non-coding RNAs known as microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to regulate gene expression, which contributes to many physiological and pathophysiological processes in humans. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in miRNA expression profiles contribute to cellular senescence, aging and aging-related diseases. However, only a few miRNAs whose functions have been elucidated have been associated with aging and/or aging-related diseases. This article reviews the currently available findings regarding the roles of aging-related miRNAs, with a focus on cardiac and cardiovascular aging. PMID:26512249

  9. Circulating miRNAs as biomarkers for endocrine disorders.

    PubMed

    Butz, H; Kinga, N; Racz, K; Patocs, A

    2016-01-01

    Specific, sensitive and non-invasive biomarkers are always needed in endocrine disorders. miRNAs are short, non-coding RNA molecules with well-known role in gene expression regulation. They are frequently dysregulated in metabolic and endocrine diseases. Recently it has been shown that they are secreted into biofluids by nearly all kind of cell types. As they can be taken up by other cells they may have a role in a new kind of paracrine, cell-to-cell communication. Circulating miRNAs are protected by RNA-binding proteins or microvesicles hence they can be attractive candidates as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of extracellular miRNA's and our knowledge about their origin and potential roles in endocrine and metabolic diseases. Discussions about the technical challenges occurring during identification and measurement of extracellular miRNAs and future perspectives about their roles are also highlighted. PMID:26015318

  10. A systematic analysis of the skeletal muscle miRNA transcriptome of chicken varieties with divergent skeletal muscle growth identifies novel miRNAs and differentially expressed miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Functional studies have demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) play critical roles in a wide spectrum of biological processes including development and disease pathogenesis. To investigate the functional roles that miRNAs play during chicken skeletal muscle development, the miRNA transcriptomes of skeletal muscles from broiler and layer chickens were profiled using Solexa deep sequencing. Results Some miRNAs have multiple isoforms and several miRNAs* are present at higher levels than their corresponding miRNAs. Thirty three novel and 189 known chicken miRNAs were identified using computational approaches. Subsequent miRNA transcriptome comparisons and real-time PCR validation experiments revealed 17 miRNAs that were differentially expressed between broilers and layers, and a number of targets of these miRNAs have been implicated in myogenesis regulation. Using integrative miRNA target-prediction and network-analysis approaches an interaction network of differentially expressed and muscle-related miRNAs and their putative targets was constructed, and miRNAs that could contribute to the divergent muscle growth of broiler and layer chickens by targeting the ACVR2B gene were identified, which can causes dramatic increases in muscle mass. Conclusions The present study provides the first transcriptome profiling-based evaluation of miRNA function during skeletal muscle development in chicken. Systematic predictions aided the identification of potential miRNAs and their targets, which could contribute to divergent muscle growth in broiler and layer chickens. Furthermore, these predictions generated information that can be utilized in further research investigating the involvement of interaction networks, containing miRNAs and their targets, in the regulation of muscle development. PMID:21486491

  11. Airway Epithelial miRNA Expression Is Altered in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Owen D.; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Love, Michael I.; Peng, Jeffrey C.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Nguyen, Christine; Solon, Margaret; Nguyen, Cindy; Barczak, Andrea J.; Zlock, Lorna T.; Blagev, Denitza P.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Ansel, K. Mark; Arron, Joseph R.; Erle, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Changes in airway epithelial cell differentiation, driven in part by IL-13, are important in asthma. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation in many systems and could contribute to epithelial abnormalities in asthma. Objectives: To determine whether airway epithelial miRNA expression is altered in asthma and identify IL-13–regulated miRNAs. Methods: We used miRNA microarrays to analyze bronchial epithelial brushings from 16 steroid-naive subjects with asthma before and after inhaled corticosteroids, 19 steroid-using subjects with asthma, and 12 healthy control subjects, and the effects of IL-13 and corticosteroids on cultured bronchial epithelial cells. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction to confirm selected microarray results. Measurements and Main Results: Most (12 of 16) steroid-naive subjects with asthma had a markedly abnormal pattern of bronchial epithelial miRNA expression by microarray analysis. Compared with control subjects, 217 miRNAs were differentially expressed in steroid-naive subjects with asthma and 200 in steroid-using subjects with asthma (false discovery rate < 0.05). Treatment with inhaled corticosteroids had modest effects on miRNA expression in steroid-naive asthma, inducing a statistically significant (false discovery rate < 0.05) change for only nine miRNAs. qPCR analysis confirmed differential expression of 22 miRNAs that were highly differentially expressed by microarrays. IL-13 stimulation recapitulated changes in many differentially expressed miRNAs, including four members of the miR-34/449 family, and these changes in miR-34/449 family members were resistant to corticosteroids. Conclusions: Dramatic alterations of airway epithelial cell miRNA levels are a common feature of asthma. These alterations are only modestly corrected by inhaled corticosteroids. IL-13 effects may account for some of these alterations, including repression of miR-34/449 family members that have established roles in airway

  12. Exploring the miRNA Regulatory Network Using Evolutionary Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Obermayer, Benedikt; Levine, Erel

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation by miRNAs is a widespread and highly conserved phenomenon in metazoans, with several hundreds to thousands of conserved binding sites for each miRNA, and up to two thirds of all genes under miRNA regulation. At the same time, the effect of miRNA regulation on mRNA and protein levels is usually quite modest and associated phenotypes are often weak or subtle. This has given rise to the notion that the highly interconnected miRNA regulatory network exerts its function less through any individual link and more via collective effects that lead to a functional interdependence of network links. We present a Bayesian framework to quantify conservation of miRNA target sites using vertebrate whole-genome alignments. The increased statistical power of our phylogenetic model allows detection of evolutionary correlation in the conservation patterns of site pairs. Such correlations could result from collective functions in the regulatory network. For instance, co-conservation of target site pairs supports a selective benefit of combinatorial regulation by multiple miRNAs. We find that some miRNA families are under pronounced co-targeting constraints, indicating a high connectivity in the regulatory network, while others appear to function in a more isolated way. By analyzing coordinated targeting of different curated gene sets, we observe distinct evolutionary signatures for protein complexes and signaling pathways that could reflect differences in control strategies. Our method is easily scalable to analyze upcoming larger data sets, and readily adaptable to detect high-level selective constraints between other genomic loci. We thus provide a proof-of-principle method to understand regulatory networks from an evolutionary perspective. PMID:25299225

  13. Competing endogenous RNA networks in human cancer: hypothesis, validation, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yinji; Wang, Dong; Wang, Tianzhen; Li, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs represent a majority of the human transcriptome. However, less is known about the functions and regulatory mechanisms of most non-coding species. Moreover, little is known about the potential non-coding functions of coding RNAs. The competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) hypothesis is proposed recently. This hypothesis describes potential communication networks among all transcript RNA species mediated by miRNAs and miRNA-recognizing elements (MREs) within RNA transcripts. Here we review the evolution of the ceRNA hypothesis, summarize the validation experiments and discusses the significance and perspectives of this hypothesis in human cancer. PMID:26872371

  14. Targeting CSCs in Tumor Microenvironment: The Potential Role of ROS-Associated miRNAs in Tumor Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Azmi, Asfar S.; Li, Yiwei; Ahmad, Aamir; Ali, Shadan; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Kong, Dejuan; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been widely considered as critical cellular signaling molecules involving in various biological processes such as cell growth, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. The homeostasis of ROS is critical to maintain normal biological processes. Increased production of ROS, namely oxidative stress, due to either endogenous or exogenous sources causes irreversible damage of bio-molecules such as DNA, proteins, lipids, and sugars, leading to genomic instability, genetic mutation, and altered gene expression, eventually contributing to tumorigenesis. A great amount of experimental studies in vitro and in vivo have produced solid evidence supporting that oxidative stress is strongly associated with increased tumor cell growth, treatment resistance, and metastasis, and all of which contribute to tumor aggressiveness. More recently, the data have indicated that altered production of ROS is also associated with cancer stem cells (CSCs), epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and hypoxia, the most common features or phenomena in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. However, the exact mechanism by which ROS is involved in the regulation of CSC and EMT characteristics as well as hypoxia- and, especially, HIF-mediated pathways is not well known. Emerging evidence suggests the role of miRNAs in tumorigenesis and progression of human tumors. Recently, the data have indicated that altered productions of ROS are associated with deregulated expression of miRNAs, suggesting their potential roles in the regulation of ROS production. Therefore, targeting ROS mediated through the deregulation of miRNAs by novel approaches or by naturally occurring anti-oxidant agents such as genistein could provide a new therapeutic approach for the prevention and/or treatment of human malignancies. In this article, we will discuss the potential role of miRNAs in the regulation of ROS production during tumorigenesis. Finally, we will discuss

  15. The Role of miRNA in Haematological Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Gounaris-Shannon, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there are over 1,800 annotated human miRNAs, many of which have tissue-specific expression. Numerous studies have highlighted their role in haematopoietic differentiation and proliferation, acting as master regulators of haematopoietic stem cell function. Aberrant expression of miRNAs has been observed in haematological cancers, exhibiting unique expression signatures in comparison to normal counterparts. Functional and target analyses as well as animal models have attempted to annotate how different miRNA may contribute to the pathophysiology of these malignancies from modulating cancer associated genes, functioning directly as oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes or acting as bystanders or regulators of the epigenetic mechanisms in cancer. miRNAs have also been shown to play a role in modulating drug resistance and determining prognosis between the various subtypes of blood cancers. This review discusses the important role that miRNAs play in haematological malignancies by exploring associations that exist between the two and trying to examine evidence of causality to support the tantalising possibility that miRNAs might serve as therapeutic targets in blood cancers. PMID:24416592

  16. Cell-free Circulating miRNA Biomarkers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Meng-Hsuan; Chen, Liang; Fu, Yebo; Wang, Wendy; Fu, Sidney W.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable attention and an enormous amount of resources have been dedicated to cancer biomarker discovery and validation. However, there are still a limited number of useful biomarkers available for clinical use. An ideal biomarker should be easily assayed with minimally invasive medical procedures but possess high sensitivity and specificity. Commonly used circulating biomarkers are proteins in serum, most of which require labor-intensive analysis hindered by low sensitivity in early tumor detection. Since the deregulation of microRNA (miRNA) is associated with cancer development and progression, profiling of circulating miRNAs has been used in a number of studies to identify novel minimally invasive miRNA biomarkers. In this review, we discuss the origin of the circulating cell-free miRNAs and their carriers in blood. We summarize the clinical use and function of potentially promising miRNA biomarkers in a variety of different cancers, along with their downstream target genes in tumor initiation and development. Additionally, we analyze some technical challenges in applying miRNA biomarkers to clinical practice. PMID:23074383

  17. New insights about miRNAs in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sonneville, Florence; Ruffin, Manon; Guillot, Loïc; Rousselet, Nathalie; Le Rouzic, Philippe; Corvol, Harriet; Tabary, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    The molecular basis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is a mutation-related defect in the epithelial-cell chloride channel called CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This defect alters chloride ion transport and impairs water transport across the cell membrane. Marked clinical heterogeneity occurs even among patients carrying the same mutation in the CFTR gene. Recent studies suggest that such heterogeneity could be related to epigenetic factors and/or miRNAs, which are small noncoding RNAs that modulate the expression of various proteins via post-transcriptional inhibition of gene expression. In the respiratory system, it has been shown that the dysregulation of miRNAs could participate in and lead to pathogenicity in several diseases. In CF airways, recent studies have proposed that miRNAs may modulate disease progression by affecting the production of either CFTR or various proteins that are dysregulated in the CF lung. Herein, we provide an overview of studies showing how miRNAs may modulate CF pathology and the efforts to develop miRNA-based treatments and/or to consider miRNAs as biomarkers. The identification of miRNAs involved in CF disease progression opens up new avenues toward treatments targeting selected clinical components of CF, independently from the CFTR mutation. PMID:25687559

  18. [Endogenous hyperlactatemia and insulin secretion].

    PubMed

    Ribes, G; Valette, G; Lignon, F; Loubatières-Mariani, M M

    1978-01-01

    In the normal anesthetized dog, the endogenous hyperlactatemia induced either by intense muscular work or by a high dose of phenformin (20 mg/kg subtucaneously) is followed by an increase in the pancreaticoduodenal insulin output. A previous perfusion of sodium dichloroacetate (50 mg/kg. h) opposes the hyperlactatemia, and reduces or suppresses the increase in insulin output. PMID:150887

  19. Spectrally formulated modeling of a cable-harnessed structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiduck; Inman, Daniel J.

    2014-07-01

    To obtain predictive modeling of the spacecraft, we investigate the effects of adding cables to a simple structure with the goal of developing an understanding of the effects of cables interacting with a structure. In this paper, we present modeling of a cable-harnessed structure by means of the Spectral Element Method (SEM). A double beam model is used to emulate a cable-harnessed structure. SEM modeling can define the location and the number of connections between the two beams in a convenient fashion. The presented modeling is applied and compared with the conventional FEM. The modeling approach was compared and validated with experimental measurements. The validated modeling was implemented to investigate the effect of the number of connections and of the spring stiffness of interconnections. The results show that the proposed modeling can be used as an accurate and efficient solution methodology for a cable-harnessed structure.

  20. Comparison of phenotypes produced in response to transient expression of genes encoded by four distinct begomoviruses in Nicotiana benthamiana and their correlation with the levels of developmental miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses (begomoviruses) are a major limiting factor for the production of numerous dicotyledonous crops throughout the world. Begomoviruses differ in the number of components that make up their genomes and association with satellites, and yet they cause strikingly similar phenotypes, such as leaf curling, chlorosis and stunted plant growth. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous RNAs that regulate plant growth and development. The study described here was aimed at investigating the effects of each virus encoded gene on the levels of developmental miRNAs to identify common trends between distinct begomoviruses. Results All genes encoded by four distinct begomoviruses (African cassava mosaic virus [ACMV], Cabbage leaf curl virus [CbLCuV], Tomato yellow leaf curl virus [TYLCV] and Cotton leaf curl virus/Cotton leaf curl betasatellite [CLCuV/CLCuMB]) were expressed from a Potato virus X (PVX) vector in Nicotiana benthamiana. Changes in the levels of ten miRNAs in response to the virus genes were determined by northern blotting using specific miRNA probes. For the monopartite begomoviruses (TYLCV and CLCuMV) the V2 gene product was identified as the major symptom determinant while for bipartite begomoviruses (ACMV and CbLCuV) more than one gene appears to contribute to symptoms and this is reflected in changes in miRNA levels. The phenotype induced by expression of the βC1 gene of the betasatellite CLCuMB was the most distinct and consisted of leaf curling, vein swelling, thick green veins and enations and the pattern of changes in miRNA levels was the most distinct. Conclusions Our results have identified symptom determinants encoded by begomoviruses and show that developmental abnormalities caused by transient expression of begomovirus genes correlates with altered levels of developmental miRNAs. Additionally, all begomovirus genes were shown to modulate miRNA levels, the first time this has been shown to be the case. PMID

  1. Polysome arrest restricts miRNA turnover by preventing exosomal export of miRNA in growth-retarded mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Souvik; Bose, Mainak; Ray, Anirban; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are tiny posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression in metazoan cells, where activity and abundance of miRNAs are tightly controlled. Regulated turnover of these regulatory RNAs is important to optimize cellular response to external stimuli. We report that the stability of mature miRNAs increases inversely with cell proliferation, and the increased number of microribonucleoproteins (miRNPs) in growth-restricted mammalian cells are in turn associated with polysomes. This heightened association of miRNA with polysomes also elicits reduced degradation of target mRNAs and impaired extracellular export of miRNA via exosomes. Overall polysome sequestration contributes to an increase of cellular miRNA levels but without an increase in miRNA activity. Therefore miRNA activity and turnover can be controlled by subcellular distribution of miRNPs that may get differentially regulated as a function of cell growth in mammalian cells. PMID:25609084

  2. Novel miRNA-31 and miRNA-200a-Mediated Regulation of Retinoblastoma Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Vanessa; Fan, Hanli; Bryar, Paul J; Weinstein, Joanna L; Mets, Marilyn B; Feng, Gang; Martin, Joshua; Martin, Alissa; Jiang, Hongmei; Laurie, Nikia A

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children. Current management includes broad-based treatments such as chemotherapy, enucleation, laser therapy, or cryotherapy. However, therapies that target specific pathways important for retinoblastoma progression could provide valuable alternatives for treatment. MicroRNAs are short, noncoding RNA transcripts that can regulate the expression of target genes, and their aberrant expression often facilitates disease. The identification of post-transcriptional events that occur after the initiating genetic lesions could further define the rapidly aggressive growth displayed by retinoblastoma tumors. In this study, we used two phenotypically different retinoblastoma cell lines to elucidate the roles of miRNA-31 and miRNA-200a in tumor proliferation. Our approach confirmed that miRNAs-31 and -200a expression is significantly reduced in human retinoblastomas. Moreover, overexpression of these two miRNAs restricts the expansion of a highly proliferative cell line (Y79), but does not restrict the growth rate of a less aggressive cell line (Weri1). Gene expression profiling of miRNA-31 and/or miRNA-200a-overexpressing cells identified differentially expressed mRNAs associated with the divergent response of the two cell lines. This work has the potential to enhance the development of targeted therapeutic approaches for retinoblastoma and improve the efficacy of treatment. PMID:26379276

  3. Novel miRNA-31 and miRNA-200a-Mediated Regulation of Retinoblastoma Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Vanessa; Fan, Hanli; Bryar, Paul J.; Weinstein, Joanna L.; Mets, Marilyn B.; Feng, Gang; Martin, Joshua; Martin, Alissa; Jiang, Hongmei; Laurie, Nikia A.

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular tumor in children. Current management includes broad-based treatments such as chemotherapy, enucleation, laser therapy, or cryotherapy. However, therapies that target specific pathways important for retinoblastoma progression could provide valuable alternatives for treatment. MicroRNAs are short, noncoding RNA transcripts that can regulate the expression of target genes, and their aberrant expression often facilitates disease. The identification of post-transcriptional events that occur after the initiating genetic lesions could further define the rapidly aggressive growth displayed by retinoblastoma tumors. In this study, we used two phenotypically different retinoblastoma cell lines to elucidate the roles of miRNA-31 and miRNA-200a in tumor proliferation. Our approach confirmed that miRNAs-31 and -200a expression is significantly reduced in human retinoblastomas. Moreover, overexpression of these two miRNAs restricts the expansion of a highly proliferative cell line (Y79), but does not restrict the growth rate of a less aggressive cell line (Weri1). Gene expression profiling of miRNA-31 and/or miRNA-200a-overexpressing cells identified differentially expressed mRNAs associated with the divergent response of the two cell lines. This work has the potential to enhance the development of targeted therapeutic approaches for retinoblastoma and improve the efficacy of treatment. PMID:26379276

  4. Targeting oncomiRNAs and mimicking tumor suppressor miRNAs: Νew trends in the development of miRNA therapeutic strategies in oncology (Review).

    PubMed

    Gambari, Roberto; Brognara, Eleonora; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Fabbri, Enrica

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA or miR) therapeutics in cancer are based on targeting or mimicking miRNAs involved in cancer onset, progression, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis. Several studies conclusively have demonstrated that miRNAs are deeply involved in tumor onset and progression, either behaving as tumor-promoting miRNAs (oncomiRNAs and metastamiRNAs) or as tumor suppressor miRNAs. This review focuses on the most promising examples potentially leading to the development of anticancer, miRNA-based therapeutic protocols. The inhibition of miRNA activity can be readily achieved by the use of miRNA inhibitors and oligomers, including RNA, DNA and DNA analogues (miRNA antisense therapy), small molecule inhibitors, miRNA sponges or through miRNA masking. On the contrary, the enhancement of miRNA function (miRNA replacement therapy) can be achieved by the use of modified miRNA mimetics, such as plasmid or lentiviral vectors carrying miRNA sequences. Combination strategies have been recently developed based on the observation that i) the combined administration of different antagomiR molecules induces greater antitumor effects and ii) some anti-miR molecules can sensitize drug-resistant tumor cell lines to therapeutic drugs. In this review, we discuss two additional issues: i) the combination of miRNA replacement therapy with drug administration and ii) the combination of antagomiR and miRNA replacement therapy. One of the solid results emerging from different independent studies is that miRNA replacement therapy can enhance the antitumor effects of the antitumor drugs. The second important conclusion of the reviewed studies is that the combination of anti-miRNA and miRNA replacement strategies may lead to excellent results, in terms of antitumor effects. PMID:27175518

  5. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2014.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (endogenous opioids and receptors), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (pain and analgesia); stress and social status (human studies); tolerance and dependence (opioid mediation of other analgesic responses); learning and memory (stress and social status); eating and drinking (stress-induced analgesia); alcohol and drugs of abuse (emotional responses in opioid-mediated behaviors); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (opioid involvement in stress response regulation); mental illness and mood (tolerance and dependence); seizures and neurologic disorders (learning and memory); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (opiates and conditioned place preferences (CPP)); general activity and locomotion (eating and drinking); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (alcohol and drugs of abuse); cardiovascular responses (opiates and ethanol); respiration and thermoregulation (opiates and THC); and immunological responses (opiates and stimulants). This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular

  6. Endogenous Mechanisms of Cardiac Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xiang, M S W; Kikuchi, K

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish possess a remarkable capacity for cardiac regeneration throughout their lifetime, providing a model for investigating endogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating myocardial regeneration. By contrast, adult mammals have an extremely limited capacity for cardiac regeneration, contributing to mortality and morbidity from cardiac diseases such as myocardial infarction and heart failure. However, the viewpoint of the mammalian heart as a postmitotic organ was recently revised based on findings that the mammalian heart contains multiple undifferentiated cell types with cardiogenic potential as well as a robust regenerative capacity during a short period early in life. Although it occurs at an extremely low level, continuous cardiomyocyte turnover has been detected in adult mouse and human hearts, which could potentially be enhanced to restore lost myocardium in damaged human hearts. This review summarizes and discusses recent advances in the understanding of endogenous mechanisms of cardiac regeneration. PMID:27572127

  7. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2004.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Klein, Gad E

    2005-12-01

    This paper is the 27th consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning over 30 years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2004 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior, and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia; stress and social status; tolerance and dependence; learning and memory; eating and drinking; alcohol and drugs of abuse; sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology; mental illness and mood; seizures and neurologic disorders; electrical-related activity and neurophysiology; general activity and locomotion; gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions; cardiovascular responses; respiration and thermoregulation; and immunological responses. PMID:16039752

  8. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2013.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2014-12-01

    This paper is the thirty-sixth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2013 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior, and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia; stress and social status; tolerance and dependence; learning and memory; eating and drinking; alcohol and drugs of abuse; sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology; mental illness and mood; seizures and neurologic disorders; electrical-related activity and neurophysiology; general activity and locomotion; gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions; cardiovascular responses; respiration and thermoregulation; and immunological responses. PMID:25263178

  9. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2007.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2008-12-01

    This paper is the thirtieth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2007 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior, and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia; stress and social status; tolerance and dependence; learning and memory; eating and drinking; alcohol and drugs of abuse; sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology; mental illness and mood; seizures and neurologic disorders; electrical-related activity and neurophysiology; general activity and locomotion; gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions; cardiovascular responses; respiration and thermoregulation; and immunological responses. PMID:18851999

  10. Endogenous respiration of Polyporus sulphureus

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.M.W.; Siehr, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty percent of the dry weight of the basidiomycete Polyporus sulphureus is triterpenoid acid. The endogenous respiratory quotient of this organism is 0.8 indicating that the triterpenoid is being used as an endogenous storage material. Monosaccharides did not seem to be utilized as exogenous substrates but Krebs-cycle intermediates stimulated oxygen uptake. Pyruvic acid inhibited oxygen uptake. Studies with /sup 14/C-labeled glucose indicated that 27% of the glucose was metabolized by way of glycolysis. The hexose-monophosphate pathway was the major metabolic path for the utilization of glucose. Despite the fact that P. sulphureus is associated with brown rot, its carbon metabolism suggests that it utilizes substances associated with the degradation of lignin more readily than it does glucose.

  11. 42 CFR 84.201 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cartridge respirators other than single-use vinyl chloride shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable... of pressure over the entire area in contact with the face. (2) Facepieces for single-use vinyl chloride respirators shall be equipped with adjustable head harnesses designed and constructed to...

  12. 42 CFR 84.201 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cartridge respirators other than single-use vinyl chloride shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable... of pressure over the entire area in contact with the face. (2) Facepieces for single-use vinyl chloride respirators shall be equipped with adjustable head harnesses designed and constructed to...

  13. 42 CFR 84.201 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cartridge respirators other than single-use vinyl chloride shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable... of pressure over the entire area in contact with the face. (2) Facepieces for single-use vinyl chloride respirators shall be equipped with adjustable head harnesses designed and constructed to...

  14. 42 CFR 84.201 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cartridge respirators other than single-use vinyl chloride shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable... of pressure over the entire area in contact with the face. (2) Facepieces for single-use vinyl chloride respirators shall be equipped with adjustable head harnesses designed and constructed to...

  15. 42 CFR 84.201 - Head harnesses; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cartridge respirators other than single-use vinyl chloride shall be equipped with adjustable and replaceable... of pressure over the entire area in contact with the face. (2) Facepieces for single-use vinyl chloride respirators shall be equipped with adjustable head harnesses designed and constructed to...

  16. Harnessing the crowd to accelerate molecular medicine research.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert J; Merchant, Raina M

    2015-07-01

    Crowdsourcing presents a novel approach to solving complex problems within molecular medicine. By leveraging the expertise of fellow scientists across the globe, broadcasting to and engaging the public for idea generation, harnessing a scalable workforce for quick data management, and fundraising for research endeavors, crowdsourcing creates novel opportunities for accelerating scientific progress. PMID:26141797

  17. Residual dysplasia after successful Pavlik harness treatment: early ultrasound predictors.

    PubMed

    Alexiev, Venelin Alexandrov; Harcke, H Theodore; Kumar, S Jay

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a group of children treated with Pavlik harness for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) to determine early ultrasound characteristics that predict poor acetabular development after walking age. From a group of 487 infants with DDH, 55 met inclusion criteria of (1) ultrasound documentation of major neonatal hip instability, (2) treatment with Pavlik harness, and (3) a minimum of 4 years of follow-up. These 55 infants had 100 abnormal hips. Harness treatment alone was successful in treating 87 of 100 hips. Persistent or late acetabular dysplasia was defined from serial radiographs. At a mean follow-up of 5.3 years, 5 of the 87 (6%) were found to have sequelae (late acetabular dysplasia, avascular necrosis of the femoral head, or both). Three sonographic findings present on the initial ultrasound predicted late sequelae: (1) dynamic coverage index of 22% or less, (2) alpha angle less than 43 degrees, and (3) abnormal echogenicity of the cartilaginous roof on initial ultrasound. Abnormal echogenicity was the most specific single predictor of residual dysplasia (sensitivity 100% and specificity 88%). The structurally normal cartilaginous roof is non-echogenic except for a short triangular fibrous tip (the labrum). Pathologic cartilage becomes echogenic beyond the tip as hyaline cartilage becomes fibrous and deformed. In unstable hips that respond well to Pavlik harness treatment, it would appear that midterm acetabular development can be affected when early transformation of roof cartilage accompanies displacement and instability. PMID:16439895

  18. Harnessing Linguistic Variation to Improve Education. Rethinking Education. Volume 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiakoumetti, Androula, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This volume brings together research carried out in a variety of geographic and linguistic contexts including Africa, Asia, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe and the United States and explores efforts to incorporate linguistic diversity into education and to "harness" this diversity for learners' benefit. It challenges the largely…

  19. Using Discussion Methods to Inspire Diversity: Harnessing Social & Cultural Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raison, Brian; Gordon, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    How can you better harness the powerful social capital that exists within diverse individuals, families, businesses, and schools to make positive impacts in your community? What could you add to your next meeting--a Chamber strategic planning session, an employee wellness program, a non-profit board development--to better connect participants with…

  20. Manufacture and quality control of interconnecting wire harnesses, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The document covers interconnecting wire harnesses defined in the design standard, including type 6, enclosed in TFE heat shrink tubing; and type 7, flexible armored. Knowledge gained through experience on the Saturn 5 program coupled with recent advances in techniques, materials, and processes was incorporated into this document.

  1. Moving ahead on harnessing synthetic lethality to fight cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jerby-Arnon, Livnat; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed a data-mining pipeline that comprehensively identifies cancer unique susceptibilities, following the concept of Synthetic Lethality (SL). The approach enables, for the first time, to identify and harness genome-scale SL-networks to accurately predict gene essentiality, drug response, and clinical prognosis in cancer. PMID:27308440

  2. Detecting miRNA Mentions and Relations in Biomedical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bagewadi, Shweta; Bobić, Tamara; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Fluck, Juliane; Klinger, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have demonstrated their potential as post-transcriptional gene expression regulators, participating in a wide spectrum of regulatory events such as apoptosis, differentiation, and stress response. Apart from the role of miRNAs in normal physiology, their dysregulation is implicated in a vast array of diseases. Dissection of miRNA-related associations are valuable for contemplating their mechanism in diseases, leading to the discovery of novel miRNAs for disease prognosis, diagnosis, and therapy. Motivation: Apart from databases and prediction tools, miRNA-related information is largely available as unstructured text. Manual retrieval of these associations can be labor-intensive due to steadily growing number of publications. Additionally, most of the published miRNA entity recognition methods are keyword based, further subjected to manual inspection for retrieval of relations. Despite the fact that several databases host miRNA-associations derived from text, lower sensitivity and lack of published details for miRNA entity recognition and associated relations identification has motivated the need for developing comprehensive methods that are freely available for the scientific community. Additionally, the lack of a standard corpus for miRNA-relations has caused difficulty in evaluating the available systems. We propose methods to automatically extract mentions of miRNAs, species, genes/proteins, disease, and relations from scientific literature. Our generated corpora, along with dictionaries, and miRNA regular expression are freely available for academic purposes. To our knowledge, these resources are the most comprehensive developed so far. Results: The identification of specific miRNA mentions reaches a recall of 0.94 and precision of 0.93.  Extraction of miRNA-disease and miRNA-gene relations lead to an F 1 score of up to 0.76. A comparison of the information extracted by our approach to the databases miR2Disease and miRSel for

  3. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves.

    PubMed

    Rosani, Umberto; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs) guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves. PMID:26989613

  4. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Rosani, Umberto; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs) guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves. PMID:26989613

  5. Modulation of miRNAs in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudhiranjan; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as a new class of posttranscriptional regulators of many cardiac and vascular diseases. They are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that contributes crucial roles typically through binding of the 3′-untranslated region of mRNA. A single miRNA may influence several signaling pathways associated with cardiac remodeling by targeting multiple genes. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of pulmonary (micro) vasculature that results in elevated vascular resistance, leading to right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure. The pathology of PH involves vascular cell remodeling including pulmonary arterial endothelial cell (PAEC) dysfunction and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. There is no cure for this disease. Thus, novel intervention pathways that govern PH induced RVH may result in new treatment modalities. Current therapies are limited to reverse the vascular remodeling. Recent studies have demonstrated the roles of various miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PH and pulmonary disorders. This review provides an overview of recent discoveries on the role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of PH and discusses the potential for miRNAs as therapeutic targets and biomarkers of PH at clinical setting. PMID:25861465

  6. miRNA therapeutics in cardiovascular diseases: promises and problems

    PubMed Central

    Nouraee, Nazila; Mowla, Seyed J.

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of non-coding RNAs which found their way into the clinic due to their fundamental roles in cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Recently, miRNAs have been known as micromodulators in cellular communications being involved in cell signaling and microenvironment remodeling. In this review, we will focus on the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and their reliability as diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers in these conditions. CVDs comprise a variety of blood vessels and heart disorders with a high rate of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This necessitates introduction of novel molecular biomarkers for early detection, prevention, or treatment of these diseases. miRNAs, due to their stability, tissue-specific expression pattern and secretion to the corresponding body fluids, are attractive targets for cardiovascular-associated therapeutics. Explaining the challenges ahead of miRNA-based therapies, we will discuss the exosomes as delivery packages for miRNA drugs and promising novel strategies for the future of miRNA-based therapeutics. These approaches provide insights to the future of personalized medicine for the treatment of CVDs. PMID:26175755

  7. The Role of miRNAs in Cartilage Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong Ping; Wei, Xiao Chun; Li1, Peng Cu; Chen, Chun Wei; Wang, Xiao Hu; Jiao, Qiang; Wang, Dong Ming; Wei, Fang Yuan; Zhang, Jian Zhong; Wei, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an age-related disease with poorly understood pathogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated that miRNA might play a key role in OA initiation and development. We reviewed recent publications and elucidated the connection between miRNA and OA cartilage anabolic and catabolic signals, including four signaling pathways: TGF-β/Smads and BMPs signaling, associated with cartilage anabolism; and MAPK and NF-KB signaling, associated with cartilage catabolism. We also explored the relationships with MMP, ADAMTS and NOS (NitricOxide Synthases) families, as well as with the catabolic cytokines IL-1 and TNF-α. The potential role of miRNAs in biological processes such as cartilage degeneration, chondrocyte proliferation, and differentiation is discussed. Collective evidence indicates that miRNAs play a critical role in cartilage degeneration. These findings will aid in understanding the molecular network that governs articular cartilage homeostasis and in to elucidate the role of miRNA in the pathogenesis of OA. PMID:27019614

  8. Divergent patterns of endogenous small RNA populations from seed and vegetative tissues of Glycine max

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Small non-coding RNAs (smRNAs) are known to have major roles in gene regulation in eukaryotes. In plants, knowledge of the biogenesis and mechanisms of action of smRNA classes including microRNAs (miRNAs), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) has been gained mostly through studies with Arabidopsis. In recent years, high throughput sequencing of smRNA populations has enabled extension of knowledge from model systems to plants with larger, more complex genomes. Soybean (Glycine max) now has many genomics resources available including a complete genome sequence and predicted gene models. Relatively little is known, however, about the full complement of its endogenous smRNAs populations and the silenced genes. Results Using Illumina sequencing and computational analysis, we characterized eight smRNA populations from multiple tissues and organs of soybean including developing seed and vegetative tissues. A total of 41 million raw sequence reads collapsed into 135,055 unique reads were mapped to the soybean genome and its predicted cDNA gene models. Bioinformatic analyses were used to distinguish miRNAs and siRNAs and to determine their genomic origins and potential target genes. In addition, we identified two soybean TAS3 gene homologs, the miRNAs that putatively guide cleavage of their transcripts, and the derived tasiRNAs that could target soybean genes annotated as auxin response factors. Tissue-differential expression based on the flux of normalized miRNA and siRNA abundances in the eight smRNA libraries was evident, some of which was confirmed by smRNA blotting. Our global view of these smRNA populations also revealed that the size classes of smRNAs varied amongst different tissues, with the developing seed and seed coat having greater numbers of unique smRNAs of the 24-nt class compared to the vegetative tissues of germinating seedlings. The 24-nt class is known to be derived from repetitive elements including transposons

  9. MiRNA Analysis by Quantitative PCR in Preterm Human Breast Milk Reveals Daily Fluctuations of hsa-miR-16-5p

    PubMed Central

    Floris, Ilaria; Billard, Hélène; Boquien, Clair-Yves; Joram-Gauvard, Evelyne; Simon, Laure; Legrand, Arnaud; Boscher, Cécile; Rozé, Jean-Christophe; Bolaños-Jiménez, Francisco; Kaeffer, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Human breast milk is an extremely dynamic fluid containing many biologically-active components which change throughout the feeding period and throughout the day. We designed a miRNA assay on minimized amounts of raw milk obtained from mothers of preterm infants. We investigated changes in miRNA expression within month 2 of lactation and then over the course of 24 hours. Materials and Methods Analyses were performed on pooled breast milk, made by combining samples collected at different clock times from the same mother donor, along with time series collected over 24 hours from four unsynchronized mothers. Whole milk, lipids or skim milk fractions were processed and analyzed by qPCR. We measured hsa-miR-16-5p, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-146-5p, and hsa-let-7a, d and g (all -5p). Stability of miRNA endogenous controls was evaluated using RefFinder, a web tool integrating geNorm, Normfinder, BestKeeper and the comparative ΔΔCt method. Results MiR-21 and miR-16 were stably expressed in whole milk collected within month 2 of lactation from four mothers. Analysis of lipids and skim milk revealed that miR-146b and let-7d were better references in both fractions. Time series (5H-23H) allowed the identification of a set of three endogenous reference genes (hsa-let-7d, hsa-let-7g and miR-146b) to normalize raw quantification cycle (Cq) data. We identified a daily oscillation of miR-16-5p. Perspectives Our assay allows exploring miRNA levels of breast milk from mother with preterm baby collected in time series over 48–72 hours. PMID:26474056

  10. Human milk miRNAs primarily originate from the mammary gland resulting in unique miRNA profiles of fractionated milk

    PubMed Central

    Alsaweed, Mohammed; Lai, Ching Tat; Hartmann, Peter E.; Geddes, Donna T.; Kakulas, Foteini

    2016-01-01

    Human milk (HM) contains regulatory biomolecules including miRNAs, the origin and functional significance of which are still undetermined. We used TaqMan OpenArrays to profile 681 mature miRNAs in HM cells and fat, and compared them with maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma, and bovine and soy infant formulae. HM cells and PBMCs (292 and 345 miRNAs, respectively) had higher miRNA content than HM fat and plasma (242 and 219 miRNAs, respectively) (p < 0.05). A strong association in miRNA profiles was found between HM cells and fat, whilst PBMCs and plasma were distinctly different to HM, displaying marked inter-individual variation. Considering the dominance of epithelial cells in mature milk of healthy women, these results suggest that HM miRNAs primarily originate from the mammary epithelium, whilst the maternal circulation may have a smaller contribution. Our findings demonstrate that unlike infant formulae, which contained very few human miRNA, HM is a rich source of lactation-specific miRNA, which could be used as biomarkers of the performance and health status of the lactating mammary gland. Given the recently identified stability, uptake and functionality of food- and milk-derived miRNA in vivo, HM miRNA are likely to contribute to infant protection and development. PMID:26854194

  11. Control of mitochondrial activity by miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peifeng; Jiao, Jianqing; Gao, Guifeng; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria supply energy for physiological function and they participate in the regulation of other cellular events including apoptosis, calcium homeostasis and production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mitochondria play a critical role in the cells. However, dysfunction of mitochondria is related to a variety of pathological processes and diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs about 22 nucleotides long, and they can bind to the 3′ un-translated region (3′UTR) of mRNAs, thereby inhibiting mRNA translation or promoting mRNA degradation. We summarize the molecular regulation of mitochondrial metabolism, structure and function by miRNAs. Modulation of miRNAs levels may provide a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of mitochondria-related diseases. PMID:22135235

  12. miRNAs in atherosclerotic plaque initiation, progression, and rupture

    PubMed Central

    Andreou, Ioannis; Sun, Xinghui; Stone, Peter H.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Feinberg, Mark W.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic immune-inflammatory disorder that integrates multiple cell types and a diverse set of inflammatory mediators. miRNAs are emerging as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in most, if not all, vertebrate cells and constitute central players in many physiological and pathological processes. Rapidly accumulating experimental studies reveal their key role in cellular and molecular processes related to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we review the current evidence for the involvement of miRNAs in early atherosclerotic lesion formation to plaque rupture and erosion. We conclude with a perspective on the clinical relevance, therapeutic opportunities, and future challenges of miRNA biology in the pathogenesis of this complex disease. PMID:25771097

  13. miRNAs in atherosclerotic plaque initiation, progression, and rupture.

    PubMed

    Andreou, Ioannis; Sun, Xinghui; Stone, Peter H; Edelman, Elazer R; Feinberg, Mark W

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic immune-inflammatory disorder that integrates multiple cell types and a diverse set of inflammatory mediators. miRNAs are emerging as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in most, if not all, vertebrate cells, and constitute central players in many physiological and pathological processes. Rapidly accumulating experimental studies reveal their key role in cellular and molecular processes related to the development of atherosclerosis. We review current evidence for the involvement of miRNAs in early atherosclerotic lesion formation and in plaque rupture and erosion. We conclude with a perspective on the clinical relevance, therapeutic opportunities, and future challenges of miRNA biology in understanding the pathogenesis of this complex disease. PMID:25771097

  14. Key principles of miRNA involvement in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Giza, Dana Elena; Vasilescu, Catalin; Calin, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Although rapid progress in our understanding of the functions of miRNA has been made by experimentation and computational approach, a considerable effort still has to be done in determining the general principles that govern the miRNA’s mode of action in human diseases. We will further discuss how these principles are being progressively approached by molecular studies, as well as the importance of miRNA in regulating different target genes and functions in specific biological contexts. There is a great demand to understand the principles of context - specific miRNA target recognition in order to design future experiments and models of normal developmental and disease states. PMID:26317116

  15. Vitamin D activation of functionally distinct regulatory miRNAs in primary human osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lisse, Thomas S.; Chun, Rene F.; Rieger, Sandra; Adams, John S.; Hewison, Martin

    2013-01-01

    When bound to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D ) is a potent regulator of osteoblast transcription. Less clear is the impact of 1,25D on post-transcriptional events in osteoblasts, such as the generation and action of microRNAs (miRNAs). Microarray analysis using replicate (n = 3) primary cultures of human osteoblasts (HOB) identified human miRNAs that were differentially regulated by > 1.5-fold following treatment with 1,25D (10nM, 6 hrs), which included miRNAs 637 and 1228. RT-PCR analyses showed that the host gene for miR-1228, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), was co-induced with miR-1228 in a dose-dependent fashion following treatment with 1,25D (0.1 – 10nM, 6hrs). By contrast, the endogenous host gene for miR-637, death-associated protein kinase 3 (DAPK3), was transcriptionally repressed by following treatment with 1,25D. Analysis of two potential targets for miR-637 and miR-1228 in HOB, type IV collagen (COL4A1) and bone morphogenic protein 2 kinase (BMP2K) respectively, showed that 1,25D-mediates suppression of these targets via distinct mechanisms. In the case of miR-637, suppression of COL4A1 appears to occur via decreased levels of COL4A1 mRNA. By contrast, suppression of BMP2K by miR-1228 appears to occur by inhibition of protein translation. In mature HOBs, siRNA inactivation of miR-1228 alone was sufficient to abrogate 1,25D-mediated down regulation of BMP2K protein expression. This was associated with suppression of pro-differentiation responses to 1,25D in HOB, as represented by parallel decrease in osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase expression. These data show for the first time that the effects of 1,25D on human bone cells are not restricted to classical VDR-mediated transcriptional responses but also involve miRNA-directed post-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:23362149

  16. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Marc; Gomez-Valadés, Alicia G.; Ramirez, Sara; Gomis, Ramon; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control. PMID:25729348

  17. Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Activities of miRNAs in Small Animal Models Using Molecular Imaging Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Baril, Patrick; Ezzine, Safia; Pichon, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding mRNA targets via sequence complementary inducing translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. A current challenge in the field of miRNA biology is to understand the functionality of miRNAs under physiopathological conditions. Recent evidence indicates that miRNA expression is more complex than simple regulation at the transcriptional level. MiRNAs undergo complex post-transcriptional regulations such miRNA processing, editing, accumulation and re-cycling within P-bodies. They are dynamically regulated and have a well-orchestrated spatiotemporal localization pattern. Real-time and spatio-temporal analyses of miRNA expression are difficult to evaluate and often underestimated. Therefore, important information connecting miRNA expression and function can be lost. Conventional miRNA profiling methods such as Northern blot, real-time PCR, microarray, in situ hybridization and deep sequencing continue to contribute to our knowledge of miRNA biology. However, these methods can seldom shed light on the spatiotemporal organization and function of miRNAs in real-time. Non-invasive molecular imaging methods have the potential to address these issues and are thus attracting increasing attention. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of methods used to detect miRNAs and discusses their contribution in the emerging field of miRNA biology and therapy. PMID:25749473

  18. 14 CFR 137.42 - Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fastening of safety belts and shoulder... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.42 Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses. No... belt and shoulder harness properly secured about that person except that the shoulder harness need...

  19. 14 CFR 91.107 - Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and child restraint systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Safety Standard No. 213 (49 CFR 571.213)), vest- and harness-type child restraint systems, and lap held... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Flight Rules General § 91.107 Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and...

  20. 14 CFR 137.42 - Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fastening of safety belts and shoulder... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.42 Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses. No... belt and shoulder harness properly secured about that person except that the shoulder harness need...

  1. 14 CFR 137.42 - Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fastening of safety belts and shoulder... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.42 Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses. No... belt and shoulder harness properly secured about that person except that the shoulder harness need...

  2. 14 CFR 137.42 - Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fastening of safety belts and shoulder... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.42 Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses. No... belt and shoulder harness properly secured about that person except that the shoulder harness need...

  3. 14 CFR 91.107 - Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and child restraint systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Safety Standard No. 213 (49 CFR 571.213)), vest- and harness-type child restraint systems, and lap held... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Flight Rules General § 91.107 Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and...

  4. 14 CFR 137.42 - Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fastening of safety belts and shoulder... AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Operating Rules § 137.42 Fastening of safety belts and shoulder harnesses. No... belt and shoulder harness properly secured about that person except that the shoulder harness need...

  5. 14 CFR 91.107 - Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and child restraint systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Safety Standard No. 213 (49 CFR 571.213)), vest- and harness-type child restraint systems, and lap held... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Flight Rules General § 91.107 Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and...

  6. PROmiRNA: a new miRNA promoter recognition method uncovers the complex regulation of intronic miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of intragenic miRNAs by their own intronic promoters is one of the open problems of miRNA biogenesis. Here, we describe PROmiRNA, a new approach for miRNA promoter annotation based on a semi-supervised statistical model trained on deepCAGE data and sequence features. We validate our results with existing annotation, PolII occupancy data and read coverage from RNA-seq data. Compared to previous methods PROmiRNA increases the detection rate of intronic promoters by 30%, allowing us to perform a large-scale analysis of their genomic features, as well as elucidate their contribution to tissue-specific regulation. PROmiRNA can be downloaded from http://promirna.molgen.mpg.de. PMID:23958307

  7. Harnessing the secretome of cardiac stem cells as therapy for ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Khanabdali, Ramin; Rosdah, Ayeshah A; Dusting, Gregory J; Lim, Shiang Y

    2016-08-01

    Adult stem cells continue to promise opportunities to repair damaged cardiac tissue. However, precisely how adult stem cells accomplish cardiac repair, especially after ischemic damage, remains controversial. It has been postulated that the clinical benefit of adult stem cells for cardiovascular disease results from the release of cytokines and growth factors by the transplanted cells. Studies in animal models of myocardial infarction have reported that such paracrine factors released from transplanted adult stem cells contribute to improved cardiac function by several processes. These include promoting neovascularization of damaged tissue, reducing inflammation, reducing fibrosis and scar formation, as well as protecting cardiomyocytes from apoptosis. In addition, these factors might also stimulate endogenous repair by activating cardiac stem cells. Interestingly, stem cells discovered to be resident in the heart appear to be functionally superior to extra-cardiac adult stem cells when transplanted for cardiac repair and regeneration. In this review, we discuss the therapeutic potential of cardiac stem cells and how the proteins secreted from these cells might be harnessed to promote repair and regeneration of damaged cardiac tissue. We also highlight how recent controversies about the efficacy of adult stem cells in clinical trials of ischemic heart disease have not dampened enthusiasm for the application of cardiac stem cells and their paracrine factors for cardiac repair: the latter have proved superior to the mesenchymal stem cells used in most clinical trials in the past, some of which appear to have been conducted with sub-optimal rigor. PMID:26903387

  8. HARNESS: Heterogeneous Adaptable Reconfigurable Networked Systems. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fagg, G. E.

    2004-01-20

    HARNESS was proposed as a system that combined the best of emerging technologies found in current distributed computing research and commercial products into a very flexible, dynamically adaptable framework that could be used by applications to allow them to evolve and better handle their execution environment. The HARNESS system was designed using the considerable experience from previous projects such as PVM, MPI, IceT and Cumulvs. As such, the system was designed to avoid any of the common problems found with using these current systems, such as no single point of failure, ability to survive machine, node and software failures. Additional features included improved intercomponent connectivity, with full support for dynamic down loading of addition components at run-time thus reducing the stress on application developers to build in all the libraries they need in advance.

  9. Uncovering Listeria monocytogenes hypervirulence by harnessing its biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Maury, Mylène M; Tsai, Yu-Huan; Charlier, Caroline; Touchon, Marie; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Leclercq, Alexandre; Criscuolo, Alexis; Gaultier, Charlotte; Roussel, Sophie; Brisabois, Anne; Disson, Olivier; Rocha, Eduardo P C; Brisse, Sylvain; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Microbial pathogenesis studies are typically performed with reference strains, thereby overlooking within-species heterogeneity in microbial virulence. Here we integrated human epidemiological and clinical data with bacterial population genomics to harness the biodiversity of the model foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and decipher the basis of its neural and placental tropisms. Taking advantage of the clonal structure of this bacterial species, we identify clones epidemiologically associated either with food or with human central nervous system (CNS) or maternal-neonatal (MN) listeriosis. The latter clones are also most prevalent in patients without immunosuppressive comorbidities. Strikingly, CNS- and MN-associated clones are hypervirulent in a humanized mouse model of listeriosis. By integrating epidemiological data and comparative genomics, we have uncovered multiple new putative virulence factors and demonstrate experimentally the contribution of the first gene cluster mediating L. monocytogenes neural and placental tropisms. This study illustrates the exceptional power in harnessing microbial biodiversity to identify clinically relevant microbial virulence attributes. PMID:26829754

  10. Uncovering Listeria monocytogenes hypervirulence by harnessing its biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Caroline; Touchon, Marie; Chenal-Francisque, Viviane; Leclercq, Alexandre; Criscuolo, Alexis; Gaultier, Charlotte; Roussel, Sophie; Brisabois, Anne; Disson, Olivier; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Brisse, Sylvain; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Microbial pathogenesis studies are typically performed with reference strains, thereby overlooking microbial intra-species virulence heterogeneity. Here we integrated human epidemiological and clinical data with bacterial population genomics to harness the biodiversity of the model foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and decipher the basis of its neural and placental tropisms. Taking advantage of the clonal structure of this bacterial species, we identify clones epidemiologically associated with either food or human central nervous system (CNS) and maternal-neonatal (MN) listeriosis. The latter are also most prevalent in patients without immunosuppressive comorbidities. Strikingly, CNS and MN clones are hypervirulent in a humanized mouse model of listeriosis. By integrating epidemiological data and comparative genomics, we uncovered multiple novel putative virulence factors and demonstrated experimentally the contribution of the first gene cluster mediating Listeria monocytogenes neural and placental tropisms. This study illustrates the exceptional power of harnessing microbial biodiversity to identify clinically relevant microbial virulence attributes. PMID:26829754

  11. The Role of miRNA in Papillary Thyroid Cancer in the Context of miRNA Let-7 Family

    PubMed Central

    Perdas, Ewelina; Stawski, Robert; Nowak, Dariusz; Zubrzycka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. RET/PTC rearrangement is the most common genetic modification identified in this category of cancer, increasing proliferation and dedifferentiation by the activation of the RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF-MAPK-ERK signaling pathway. Recently, let-7 miRNA was found to reduce RAS levels, acting as a tumor suppressor gene. Circulating miRNA profiles of the let-7 family may be used as novel noninvasive diagnostic, prognostic, treatment and surveillance markers for PTC. PMID:27314338

  12. The Role of miRNA in Papillary Thyroid Cancer in the Context of miRNA Let-7 Family.

    PubMed

    Perdas, Ewelina; Stawski, Robert; Nowak, Dariusz; Zubrzycka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common endocrine malignancy. RET/PTC rearrangement is the most common genetic modification identified in this category of cancer, increasing proliferation and dedifferentiation by the activation of the RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF-MAPK-ERK signaling pathway. Recently, let-7 miRNA was found to reduce RAS levels, acting as a tumor suppressor gene. Circulating miRNA profiles of the let-7 family may be used as novel noninvasive diagnostic, prognostic, treatment and surveillance markers for PTC. PMID:27314338

  13. Hello World: Harnessing social media for the Rosetta mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, E.; Mignone, C.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Homfeld, A.-M.; Bauer, M.; McCaughrean, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    The European Space Agency's (ESA) comet-chasing Rosetta mission was launched in 2004, before social media became a popular tool for mainstream communication. By harnessing a range of platforms for communicating the key messages of this unprecedented space adventure as the spacecraft reached its destination ten years later, a wide range of new audiences were reached and could follow this once-in-a-lifetime mission.

  14. High-Density Terminal Box for Testing Wire Harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, W. B.; Collins, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    Compact terminal box provides access to complex wiring harnesses for testing. Box accommodates more than twice as many wires as previous boxes. Box takes in wires via cable connectors and distributes them to contacts on box face. Instead of separate insulated jacks in metal face panel, box uses pairs of small military-standard metal sockets in precision-drilled plastic panel. Shorting plug provides continuity for wires when not being tested.

  15. Endogenous endostatin inhibits choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Marneros, Alexander G; She, Haicheng; Zambarakji, Hadi; Hashizume, Hiroya; Connolly, Edward J; Kim, Ivana; Gragoudas, Evangelos S; Miller, Joan W; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2007-12-01

    Endostatin, a fragment of the basement membrane component collagen XVIII, exhibits antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo when high doses are administered. It is not known whether endogenous endostatin at physiological levels has a protective role as an inhibitor of pathological angiogenesis, such as choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration. Using a laser injury model, we induced CNV in mice lacking collagen XVIII/endostatin and in control mice. CNV lesions in mutant mice were approximately 3-fold larger than in control mice and showed increased vascular leakage. These differences were independent of age-related changes at the choroid-retina interface. Ultrastructural analysis of the choroidal vasculature in mutant mice excluded morphological vascular abnormalities as a cause for the larger CNV lesions. When recombinant endostatin was administered to collagen XVIII/endostatin-deficient mice, CNV lesions were similar to those seen in control mice. In control mice treated with recombinant endostatin, CNV lesions were almost undetectable. These findings demonstrate that endogenous endostatin is an inhibitor of induced angiogenesis and that administration of endostatin potently inhibits CNV growth and vascular leakage. Endostatin may have a regulatory role in the pathogenesis of CNV and could be used therapeutically to inhibit growth and leakage of CNV lesions. PMID:17526870

  16. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2012.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    This paper is the thirty-fifth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2012 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurologic disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:24126281

  17. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2009.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2010-12-01

    This paper is the 32nd consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2009 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurologic disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:20875476

  18. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2005.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Klein, Gad E

    2006-12-01

    This paper is the 28th consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning over a quarter-century of research. It summarizes papers published during 2005 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurologic disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity, neurophysiology and transmitter release (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:16973239

  19. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2008.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    This paper is the 31st consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2008 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurologic disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:19793543

  20. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2010.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2011-12-01

    This paper is the thirty-third consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2010 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurologic disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:21983105

  1. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2006.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2007-12-01

    This paper is the 29th consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning 30 years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2006 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurological disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:17949854

  2. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2011.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    This paper is the thirty-fourth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2011 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurologic disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:23041439

  3. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2002.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Hadjimarkou, Maria M

    2003-08-01

    This paper is the twenty-fifth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning over a quarter-century of research. It summarizes papers published during 2002 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurologic disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:14612197

  4. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2003.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Klein, Gad E

    2004-12-01

    This paper is the 26th consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning over a quarter-century of research. It summarizes papers published during 2003 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurologic disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:15572211

  5. Endogenous Opiates and Behavior: 2006

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the twenty-ninth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning thirty years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2006 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurological disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:17949854

  6. Network harness: bundles of routes in public transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berche, B.; von Ferber, C.; Holovatch, T.

    2009-12-01

    Public transport routes sharing the same grid of streets and tracks are often found to proceed in parallel along shorter or longer sequences of stations. Similar phenomena are observed in other networks built with space consuming links such as cables, vessels, pipes, neurons, etc. In the case of public transport networks (PTNs) this behavior may be easily worked out on the basis of sequences of stations serviced by each route. To quantify this behavior we use the recently introduced notion of network harness. It is described by the harness distribution P(r, s): the number of sequences of s consecutive stations that are serviced by r parallel routes. For certain PTNs that we have analyzed we observe that the harness distribution may be described by power laws. These power laws indicate a certain level of organization and planning which may be driven by the need to minimize the costs of infrastructure and secondly by the fact that points of interest tend to be clustered in certain locations of a city. This effect may be seen as a result of the strong interdependence of the evolutions of both the city and its PTN. To further investigate the significance of the empirical results we have studied one- and two-dimensional models of randomly placed routes modeled by different types of walks. While in one dimension an analytic treatment was successful, the two dimensional case was studied by simulations showing that the empirical results for real PTNs deviate significantly from those expected for randomly placed routes.

  7. Endogenous neural precursors influence grafted neural stem cells and contribute to neuroprotection in the Parkinsonian rat

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Lalitha; Daley, Brian F; Sortwell, Caryl E; Collier, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    Neuroprotective and neurorescue effects after neural stem/precursor cell (NPC) transplantation have been reported, but the mechanisms underlying such phenomena are not well understood. Our recent findings in a rat Parkinson’s disease (PD) model indicate that transplantation of NPCs before a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) insult can result in nigrostriatal protection which is associated with endogenous NPC proliferation, migration and neurogenesis. Here, we sought to determine whether the observed endogenous NPC response (1) contributes to transplanted NPC - mediated neuroprotection and/or (2) affects graft phenotype and function. Host Fischer 344 rats were administered the antimitotic agent cytosine-β-D-arabinofuranoside (Ara-C) to eliminate actively proliferating endogenous neural precursors before being transplanted with NPCs and treated with 6-OHDA to induce nigrostriatal degeneration. Behavioral and histological analyses demonstrate that the neuroprotective response observed in NPC transplanted animals which had not received Ara-C was significantly attenuated in animals which did receive pre-transplant Ara-C. Also, while grafts in Ara-C treated animals showed no decrease in cell number, they exhibited significantly reduced expression of the neural stem cell regulators nestin and sonic hedgehog. In addition, inhibition of the endogenous NPC response resulted in an exaggerated host glial reaction. Overall, the study establishes for the first time that endogenous NPCs contribute to transplanted NPC-mediated therapeutic effects by affecting both grafted and mature host cells in unique ways. Thus, both endogenous and transplanted NPCs are important in creating an environment suitable for neural protection and rescue, and harnessing their synergistic interaction may lead to the optimization of cell-based therapies for PD. PMID:22417168

  8. Normalization of Affymetrix miRNA Microarrays for the Analysis of Cancer Samples.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Gantier, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    microRNA (miRNA) microarray normalization is a critical step for the identification of truly differentially expressed miRNAs. This is particularly important when dealing with cancer samples that have a global miRNA decrease. In this chapter, we provide a simple step-by-step procedure that can be used to normalize Affymetrix miRNA microarrays, relying on robust normal-exponential background correction with cyclic loess normalization. PMID:25971910

  9. miRNA sensitivity to Drosha levels correlates with pre-miRNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Sperber, Henrik; Beem, Alan; Shannon, Sandra; Jones, Ross; Banik, Pratyusha; Chen, Yu; Ku, Sherman; Varani, Gabriele; Yao, Shuyuan; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial for cellular development and homeostasis. In order to better understand regulation of miRNA biosynthesis, we studied cleavage of primary miRNAs by Drosha. While Drosha knockdown triggers an expected decrease of many mature miRNAs in human embryonic stem cells (hESC), a subset of miRNAs are not reduced. Statistical analysis of miRNA secondary structure and fold change of expression in response to Drosha knockdown showed that absence of mismatches in the central region of the hairpin, 5 and 9–12 nt from the Drosha cutting site conferred decreased sensitivity to Drosha knockdown. This suggests that, when limiting, Drosha processes miRNAs without mismatches more efficiently than mismatched miRNAs. This is important because Drosha expression changes over cellular development and the fold change of expression for miRNAs with mismatches in the central region correlates with Drosha levels. To examine the biochemical relationship directly, we overexpressed structural variants of miRNA-145, miRNA-137, miRNA-9, and miRNA-200b in HeLa cells with and without Drosha knockdown; for these miRNAs, elimination of mismatches in the central region increased, and addition of mismatches decreased their expression in an in vitro assay and in cells with low Drosha expression. Change in Drosha expression can be a biologically relevant mechanism by which eukaryotic cells control miRNA profiles. This phenomenon may explain the impact of point mutations outside the seed region of certain miRNAs. PMID:24677349

  10. MiRNAs from cotton roots infected with Meloidogyne incognita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular activities associated with the resistance of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) to the root-knot nematode (RKN) are largely unknown. Small RNAs or microRNAs (miRNA), a well-conserved gene regulatory system, have an important role in plant development, stress responses, and epigeneti...

  11. Challenges in using circulating miRNAs as cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tiberio, Paola; Callari, Maurizio; Angeloni, Valentina; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Appierto, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, circulating miRNAs have emerged as a new class of promising cancer biomarkers. Independent studies have shown the feasibility of using these small RNAs as tools for the diagnosis and prognosis of different types of malignancies as well as for predicting and possibly monitoring treatment response. However, despite an initial enthusiasm for their possible clinical application, widespread inconsistencies have been observed among the studies, and miRNA-based tools still represent the object of research within clinical diagnostic or treatment protocols. The poor overlap of results could be explained, at least in part, by preanalytical and analytical variables and donor-related factors that could generate artefacts, impairing an accurate quantification of circulating miRNAs. In fact, critical issues are represented by nonuniform sample choice, handling, and processing, as well as by blood cell contamination in sample preparation and lack of consensus for data normalization. In this review, we address the potential technical biases and individual-related parameters that can influence circulating miRNA studies' outcome. The exciting potential of circulating miRNAs as cancer biomarkers could confer an important advance in the disease management, but their clinical significance might not be proven without a global consensus of procedures and standardized protocols for their accurate detection. PMID:25874226

  12. Challenges in Using Circulating miRNAs as Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Tiberio, Paola; Callari, Maurizio; Angeloni, Valentina; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Appierto, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, circulating miRNAs have emerged as a new class of promising cancer biomarkers. Independent studies have shown the feasibility of using these small RNAs as tools for the diagnosis and prognosis of different types of malignancies as well as for predicting and possibly monitoring treatment response. However, despite an initial enthusiasm for their possible clinical application, widespread inconsistencies have been observed among the studies, and miRNA-based tools still represent the object of research within clinical diagnostic or treatment protocols. The poor overlap of results could be explained, at least in part, by preanalytical and analytical variables and donor-related factors that could generate artefacts, impairing an accurate quantification of circulating miRNAs. In fact, critical issues are represented by nonuniform sample choice, handling, and processing, as well as by blood cell contamination in sample preparation and lack of consensus for data normalization. In this review, we address the potential technical biases and individual-related parameters that can influence circulating miRNA studies' outcome. The exciting potential of circulating miRNAs as cancer biomarkers could confer an important advance in the disease management, but their clinical significance might not be proven without a global consensus of procedures and standardized protocols for their accurate detection. PMID:25874226

  13. Direct sequencing and expression analysis of a large number of miRNAs in Aedes aegypti and a multi-species survey of novel mosquito miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of gene regulators whose biogenesis involves hairpin structures called precursor miRNAs, or pre-miRNAs. A pre-miRNA is processed to make a miRNA:miRNA* duplex, which is then separated to generate a mature miRNA and a miRNA*. The mature miRNAs play key regulatory roles during embryonic development as well as other cellular processes. They are also implicated in control of viral infection as well as innate immunity. Direct experimental evidence for mosquito miRNAs has been recently reported in anopheline mosquitoes based on small-scale cloning efforts. Results We obtained approximately 130, 000 small RNA sequences from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, by 454 sequencing of samples that were isolated from mixed-age embryos and midguts from sugar-fed and blood-fed females, respectively. We also performed bioinformatics analysis on the Ae. aegypti genome assembly to identify evidence for additional miRNAs. The combination of these approaches uncovered 98 different pre-miRNAs in Ae. aegypti which could produce 86 distinct miRNAs. Thirteen miRNAs, including eight novel miRNAs identified in this study, are currently only found in mosquitoes. We also identified five potential revisions to previously annotated miRNAs at the miRNA termini, two cases of highly abundant miRNA* sequences, 14 miRNA clusters, and 17 cases where more than one pre-miRNA hairpin produces the same or highly similar mature miRNAs. A number of miRNAs showed higher levels in midgut from blood-fed female than that from sugar-fed female, which was confirmed by northern blots on two of these miRNAs. Northern blots also revealed several miRNAs that showed stage-specific expression. Detailed expression analysis of eight of the 13 mosquito-specific miRNAs in four divergent mosquito genera identified cases of clearly conserved expression patterns and obvious differences. Four of the 13 miRNAs are specific to certain lineage(s) within mosquitoes. Conclusion

  14. Serum miRNAs Signature Plays an Important Role in Keloid Disease.

    PubMed

    Luan, Y; Liu, Y; Liu, C; Lin, Q; He, F; Dong, X; Xiao, Z

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of keloid is largely unknown. MicroRNA (miRNA) is a class of small regulatory RNA that has emerged as a group of posttranscriptional gene repressors, participating in diverse pathophysiological processes of skin diseases. We investigated the expression profiles of miRNAs in the sera of patients to decipher the complicated factors involved in the development of keloid disease. MiRNA expression profiling in the sera from 9 keloid patients and 7 normal controls were characterized using a miRNA microarray containing established human mature and precursor miRNA sequences. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to confirm the expression of miRNAs. The putative targets of differentially expressed miRNAs were functionally annotated by bioinformatics. MiRNA microarray analysis identified 37 differentially expressed miRNAs (17 upregulated and 20 downregulated) in keloid patients, compared to the healthy controls. Functional annotations revealed that the targets of those differentially expressed miRNAs were enriched in signaling pathways essential for scar formation and wound healing. The expression profiling of miRNAs is altered in the keloid, providing a clue for the molecular mechanisms underlying its initiation and progression. MiRNAs may partly contribute to the etiology of keloids by affecting the critical signaling pathways relevant to keloid pathogenesis. PMID:27132794

  15. Profiling miRNA Expression in Bovine Tissues by Deep Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    miRNA are short RNA sequences ( ~ 21 nt long) that have been recently identified and were found to play an important role in gene regulation and controlling major cellular processes. Several miRNA are found to be evolutionarily conserved among the mammalian species. Some miRNAs are even conserved be...

  16. MYCN-targeting miRNAs are predominantly downregulated during MYCN‑driven neuroblastoma tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Anneleen; Van Peer, Gert; Carter, Daniel R; Mets, Evelien; Althoff, Kristina; Cheung, Belamy B; Schulte, Johannes H; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo; Marshall, Glenn M; De Preter, Katleen; Speleman, Frank

    2015-03-10

    MYCN is a transcription factor that plays key roles in both normal development and cancer. In neuroblastoma, MYCN acts as a major oncogenic driver through pleiotropic effects regulated by multiple protein encoding genes as well as microRNAs (miRNAs). MYCN activity is tightly controlled at the level of transcription and protein stability through various mechanisms. Like most genes, MYCN is further controlled by miRNAs, but the full complement of all miRNAs implicated in this process has not been determined through an unbiased approach. To elucidate the role of miRNAs in regulation of MYCN, we thus explored the MYCN-miRNA interactome to establish miRNAs controlling MYCN expression levels. We combined results from an unbiased and genome-wide high-throughput miRNA target reporter screen with miRNA and mRNA expression data from patients and a murine neuroblastoma progression model. We identified 29 miRNAs targeting MYCN, of which 12 miRNAs are inversely correlated with MYCN expression or activity in neuroblastoma tumor tissue. The majority of MYCN-targeting miRNAs in neuroblastoma showed a decrease in expression during murine MYCN-driven neuroblastoma tumor development. Therefore, we provide evidence that MYCN-targeting miRNAs are preferentially downregulated in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma, suggesting that MYCN negatively controls the expression of these miRNAs, to safeguard its expression. PMID:25294817

  17. Deregulation of the miRNAs Expression in Cervical Cancer: Human Papillomavirus Implications

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gariglio, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non coding RNAs of 18–25 nucleotides in length. The temporal or short-lived expression of the miRNAs modulates gene expression post transcriptionally. Studies have revealed that miRNAs deregulation correlates and is involved with the initiation and progression of human tumors. Cervical cancer (CC) displays notably increased or decreased expression of a large number of cellular oncogenic or tumor suppressive miRNAs, respectively. However, understanding the potential role of miRNAs in CC is still limited. In CC, the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) infection can affect the miRNAs expression through oncoprotein E6 and E7 that contribute to viral pathogenesis, although other viral proteins might also be involved. This deregulation in the miRNAs expression has an important role in the hallmarks of CC. Interestingly, the miRNA expression profile in CC can discriminate between normal and tumor tissue and the extraordinary stability of miRNAs makes it suitable to serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of cancer. In this review, we will summarize the role of the HR-HPVs in miRNA expression, the role of miRNAs in the hallmarks of CC, and the use of miRNAs as potential prognostic biomarkers in CC. PMID:24490161

  18. [Web server for prediction of miRNAs and their precursors and binding sites].

    PubMed

    Vorozheykin, P S; Titov, I I

    2015-01-01

    A microRNA (miRNA) is a small noncoding RNA molecule about 22 nucleotides in length. The paper describes a web server for predicting miRNAs and their precursors and binding sites. The predictions are based on either sequence similarity to known miRNAs of 223 organisms or context-structural hidden Markov models. It has been shown that the proposed methods of prediction of human miRNAs and pre-miRNAs outperform the existing ones in accuracy. The average deviation of predicted 5'-ends of human miRNAs from actual positions is 3.13 nt in the case of predicting one pair of complementary miRNAs (miRNA-miRNA* duplex). A useful option for our application is the prediction of an additional miRNA pair. In this mode, the pairs closest to actual miRNA deviate by 1.61 nt on average. The proposed method also shows good performance in predicting mouse miRNAs. Binding sites for miRNAs are predicted by two known approaches based on complementarity and thermodynamic stability of the miRNA-mRNA duplex and on a new approach, which takes into account miRNAs competition for the site. The role of the secondary structure in miRNA processing is considered. The web server is available at http://wwwmgs.bionet.nsc.ru/mgs/programs/rnaanalys/. PMID:26510603

  19. Upregulation of miRNA3195 and miRNA374b Mediates the Anti-Angiogenic Properties of Melatonin in Hypoxic PC-3 Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Eun Jung; Won, Gunho; Lee, Jihyun; Lee, Sangyoon; Kim, Sung-hoon

    2015-01-01

    Recently microRNAs (miRNAs) have been attractive targets with their key roles in biological regulation through post-transcription to control mRNA stability and protein translation. Though melatonin was known as an anti-angiogenic agent, the underlying mechanism of melatonin in PC-3 prostate cancer cells under hypoxia still remains unclear. Thus, in the current study, we elucidated the important roles of miRNAs in melatonin-induced anti-angiogenic activity in hypoxic PC-3 cells. miRNA array revealed that 33 miRNAs (>2 folds) including miRNA3195 and miRNA 374b were significantly upregulated and 16 miRNAs were downregulated in melatonin-treated PC-3 cells under hypoxia compared to untreated control. Melatonin significantly attenuated the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 alpha, HIF-2 alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) at mRNA level in hypoxic PC-3 cells. Consistently, melatonin enhanced the expression of miRNA3195 and miRNA 374b in hypoxic PC-3 cells by qRT-PCR analysis. Of note, overexpression of miRNA3195 and miRNA374b mimics attenuated the mRNA levels of angiogenesis related genes such as HIF-1alpha, HIF-2 alpha and VEGF in PC-3 cells under hypoxia. Furthermore, overexpression of miRNA3195 and miRNA374b suppressed typical angiogenic protein VEGF at the protein level and VEGF production induced by melatonin, while antisense oligonucleotides against miRNA 3195 or miRNA 374b did not affect VEGF production induced by melatonin. Also, overexpression of miR3195 or miR374b reduced HIF-1 alpha immunofluorescent expression in hypoxic PC-3 compared to untreated control. Overall, our findings suggest that upregulation of miRNA3195 and miRNA374b mediates anti-angiogenic property induced by melatonin in hypoxic PC-3 cells. PMID:25553085

  20. Flight performance energetics and water turnovers of Tippler Pigeons with a harness and doorsal load

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gessaman, James A.; Workman, Gar W.; Fuller, Mark R.

    1991-01-01

    We measured carbon dioxide production and water efflux of 12 tippler pigeons (Columba spp.) during seven experimental flights using the doubly labeled water (DLW) method. Prior to the experiment birds were randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group flew as controls (no load or harness) on all seven flights. The other group wore a harness on two flights, a dorsal load/harness package (weighing about 5% of a birda??s mass) on two flights, and they were without a load in three flights. Plight duration of pigeons with only a harness and with a dorsal load/harness package was 21 and 26% less, respectively, than the controls. Pigeons wearing a harness, or wearing a dorsal load/harness package lost water 50-90%, and 57-100% faster, respectively, than control pigeons. The mean CO, production of pigeons wearing a harness or a load/harness package was not significantly different than pigeons without a harness or load. The small sample sizes and large variability in DLW measurements precluded a good test of the energetic cost of flying with a harness and dorsal load.

  1. Flight performance, energetics and water turnover of tippler pigeons with a harness and dorsal load

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gessaman, J.A.; Workman, G.W.; Fuller, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    We measured carbon dioxide production and water efflux of 12 tippler pigeons (Columba spp.) during seven experimental flights using the doubly labeled water (DLW) method. Prior to the experiment birds were randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group flew as controls (no load or harness) on all seven flights. The other group wore a harness on two flights, a dorsal load/harness package (weighing about 5% of a bird's mass) on two flights, and they were without a load in three flights. Flight duration of pigeons with only a harness and with a dorsal load/harness package was 21 and 26% less, respectively, than the controls. Pigeons wearing a harness, or wearing a dorsal load/harness package lost water 50-90%, and 57-100% faster, respectively, than control pigeons. The mean CO2 production of pigeons wearing a harness or a load/harness package was not significantly different than pigeons without a harness or load. The small sample sizes and large variability in DLW measuremets precluded a good test of the energetic cost of flying with a harness and dorsal load.

  2. Endogenous Retroviruses and Human Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Yuri; Sverdlov, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    Humans share about 99% of their genomic DNA with chimpanzees and bonobos; thus, the differences between these species are unlikely to be in gene content but could be caused by inherited changes in regulatory systems. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise ∼ 5% of the human genome. The LTRs of ERVs contain many regulatory sequences, such as promoters, enhancers, polyadenylation signals and factor-binding sites. Thus, they can influence the expression of nearby human genes. All known human-specific LTRs belong to the HERV-K (human ERV) family, the most active family in the human genome. It is likely that some of these ERVs could have integrated into regulatory regions of the human genome, and therefore could have had an impact on the expression of adjacent genes, which have consequently contributed to human evolution. This review discusses possible functional consequences of ERV integration in active coding regions. PMID:18629260

  3. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2001.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J; Hadjimarkou, Maria M

    2002-12-01

    This paper is the twenty-fourth installment of the annual review of research concerning the opiate system. It summarizes papers published during 2001 that studied the behavioral effects of the opiate peptides and antagonists. The particular topics covered this year include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology(Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurologic disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:12535711

  4. Endogenous microRNAs in human microvascular endothelial cells regulate mRNAs encoded by hypertension-related genes.

    PubMed

    Kriegel, Alison J; Baker, Maria Angeles; Liu, Yong; Liu, Pengyuan; Cowley, Allen W; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to systematically identify endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) in endothelial cells that regulate mRNAs encoded by genes relevant to hypertension. Small RNA deep sequencing was performed in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Of the 50 most abundant miRNAs identified, 30 had predicted target mRNAs encoded by genes with known involvement in hypertension or blood pressure regulation. The cells were transfected with anti-miR oligonucleotides to inhibit each of the 30 miRNAs and the mRNA abundance of predicted targets was examined. Of 95 miRNA-target pairs examined, the target mRNAs were significantly upregulated in 35 pairs and paradoxically downregulated in 8 pairs. The result indicated significant suppression of the abundance of mRNA encoded by ADM by endogenous miR-181a-5p, ATP2B1 by the miR-27 family, FURIN by miR-125a-5p, FGF5 by the let-7 family, GOSR2 by miR-27a-3p, JAG1 by miR-21-5p, SH2B3 by miR-30a-5p, miR-98, miR-181a-5p, and the miR-125 family, TBX3 by the miR-92 family, ADRA1B by miR-22-3p, ADRA2A by miR-30a-5p and miR-30e-5p, ADRA2B by miR-30e-5p, ADRB1 by the let-7 family and miR-98, EDNRB by the miR-92 family, and NOX4 by the miR-92 family, miR-100-5p, and miR-99b-5p (n=3-9; P<0.05 versus scrambled anti-miR). Treatment with anti-miR-21 decreased blood pressure in mice fed a 4% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the miRNAs targeting NOX4 mRNA increased H2O2 release from endothelial cells. The findings indicate widespread, tonic control of mRNAs encoded by genes relevant to blood pressure regulation by endothelial miRNAs and provide a novel and uniquely informative basis for studying the role of miRNAs in hypertension. PMID:26283043

  5. Curbing Inflammation through Endogenous Pathways: Focus on Melanocortin Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tazeen J.; Montero-Melendez, Trinidad; Perretti, Mauro; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    The resolution of inflammation is now known to be an active process, armed with a multitude of mediators both lipid and protein in nature. Melanocortins are peptides endowed with considerable promise with their proresolution and anti-inflammatory effects in preclinical models of inflammatory disease, with tissue protective effects. These peptides and their targets are appealing because they can be seen as a natural way of inducing these effects as they harness endogenous pathways of control. Whereas most of the information generated about these mediators derives from several acute models of inflammation (such as zymosan induced peritonitis), there is some indication that these mediators may inhibit chronic inflammation by modulating cytokines, chemokines, and leukocyte apoptosis. In addition, proresolving mediators and their mimics have often been tested alongside therapeutic protocols, hence have been tested in settings more relevant to real life clinical scenarios. We provide here an overview on some of these mediators with a focus on melanocortin peptides and receptors, proposing that they may unveil new opportunities for innovative treatments of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23738228

  6. Complexity of murine cardiomyocyte miRNA biogenesis, sequence variant expression and function.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, David T; Hynes, Carly J; Patel, Hardip R; Wei, Grace H; Cannon, Leah; Fatkin, Diane; Suter, Catherine M; Clancy, Jennifer L; Preiss, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are critical to heart development and disease. Emerging research indicates that regulated precursor processing can give rise to an unexpected diversity of miRNA variants. We subjected small RNA from murine HL-1 cardiomyocyte cells to next generation sequencing to investigate the relevance of such diversity to cardiac biology. ∼40 million tags were mapped to known miRNA hairpin sequences as deposited in miRBase version 16, calling 403 generic miRNAs as appreciably expressed. Hairpin arm bias broadly agreed with miRBase annotation, although 44 miR* were unexpectedly abundant (>20% of tags); conversely, 33 -5p/-3p annotated hairpins were asymmetrically expressed. Overall, variability was infrequent at the 5' start but common at the 3' end of miRNAs (5.2% and 52.3% of tags, respectively). Nevertheless, 105 miRNAs showed marked 5' isomiR expression (>20% of tags). Among these was miR-133a, a miRNA with important cardiac functions, and we demonstrated differential mRNA targeting by two of its prevalent 5' isomiRs. Analyses of miRNA termini and base-pairing patterns around Drosha and Dicer cleavage regions confirmed the known bias towards uridine at the 5' most position of miRNAs, as well as supporting the thermodynamic asymmetry rule for miRNA strand selection and a role for local structural distortions in fine tuning miRNA processing. We further recorded appreciable expression of 5 novel miR*, 38 extreme variants and 8 antisense miRNAs. Analysis of genome-mapped tags revealed 147 novel candidate miRNAs. In summary, we revealed pronounced sequence diversity among cardiomyocyte miRNAs, knowledge of which will underpin future research into the mechanisms involved in miRNA biogenesis and, importantly, cardiac function, disease and therapy. PMID:22319597

  7. Multiplexed miRNA Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, Neil; Cekan, Pavol; Bognanni, Claudia; Tuschl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed miRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (miRNA FISH) is an advanced method for visualizing differentially expressed miRNAs, together with other reference RNAs, in archival tissues. Some miRNAs are excellent disease biomarkers due to their abundance and cell-type specificity. However, these short RNA molecules are difficult to visualize due to loss by diffusion, probe mishybridization, and signal detection and signal amplification issues. Here, we describe a reliable and adjustable method for visualizing and normalizing miRNA signals in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue sections. PMID:25218385

  8. The biological functions of miRNAs: lessons from in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Vidigal, Joana A.; Ventura, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Despite their clear importance as a class of regulatory molecules, pinpointing the relevance of individual miRNAs has been challenging. Studies querying miRNA functions by overexpressing or silencing specific miRNAs have yielded data that are often at odds with those collected from loss-of-functions models. In addition, knockout studies suggest that many conserved miRNAs are dispensable for animal development or viability. In this review we discuss these observations in the context of our current knowledge of miRNA biology and review the evidence implicating miRNA-mediated gene regulation in the mechanisms that ensure biological robustness. PMID:25484347

  9. Differential expression of miRNA between the monolayer and three dimensional cells after ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dong; Ren, Zhenxin; Hu, Burong

    2014-04-01

    We detect the expression of miRNA in 2D and 3D human lung epithelial cells (3KT). And our primary experimental results showed that more miRNA in 3D 3KT down regulated than in 2D 3KT cells after not only X-ray but also C-beam irradiation using the miRNA chip assay. Meanwhile, X-ray induced more significantly differential expression of miRNA when the relative expression value of miRNA in 3D cells were compared to 2D cells after irradiation.

  10. miRNAs as biomarkers of myocardial infarction: a step forward towards personalized medicine?

    PubMed

    Goretti, Emeline; Wagner, Daniel R; Devaux, Yvan

    2014-12-01

    miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs known to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. miRNAs are expressed in the heart where they regulate multiple pathophysiological processes. The discovery of stable cardiac miRNAs in the bloodstream has also motivated the investigation of their potential as biomarkers. This review gathers the current knowledge on the use of miRNAs as novel biomarkers to improve risk stratification, diagnosis, and prognosis of patients with myocardial infarction. In the rapidly evolving era of biomarkers, the potential of miRNAs as promising tools to move personalized medicine a step forward is discussed. PMID:25457620

  11. The biological functions of miRNAs: lessons from in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Vidigal, Joana A; Ventura, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Despite their clear importance as a class of regulatory molecules, pinpointing the relevance of individual miRNAs has been challenging. Studies querying miRNA functions by overexpressing or silencing specific miRNAs have yielded data that are often at odds with those collected from loss-of-functions models. In addition, knockout studies suggest that many conserved miRNAs are dispensable for animal development or viability. In this review, we discuss these observations in the context of our current knowledge of miRNA biology and review the evidence implicating miRNA-mediated gene regulation in the mechanisms that ensure biological robustness. PMID:25484347

  12. How can developing countries harness biotechnology to improve health?

    PubMed Central

    Daar, Abdallah S; Berndtson, Kathryn; Persad, Deepa L; Singer, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    Background The benefits of genomics and biotechnology are concentrated primarily in the industrialized world, while their potential to combat neglected diseases in the developing world has been largely untapped. Without building developing world biotechnology capacity to address local health needs, this disparity will only intensify. To assess the potential of genomics to address health needs in the developing world, the McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health, along with local partners, organized five courses on Genomics and Public Health Policy in the developing world. The overall objective of the courses was to collectively explore how to best harness genomics to improve health in each region. This article presents and analyzes the recommendations from all five courses. Discussion In this paper we analyze recommendations from 232 developing world experts from 58 countries who sought to answer how best to harness biotechnology to improve health in their regions. We divide their recommendations into four categories: science; finance; ethics, society and culture; and politics. Summary The Courses' recommendations can be summarized across the four categories listed above: Science - Collaborate through national, regional, and international networks - Survey and build capacity based on proven models through education, training, and needs assessments Finance - Develop regulatory and intellectual property frameworks for commercialization of biotechnology - Enhance funding and affordability of biotechnology - Improve the academic-industry interface and the role of small and medium enterprise Ethics, Society, Culture - Develop public engagement strategies to inform and educate the public about developments in genomics and biotechnology - Develop capacity to address ethical, social and cultural issues - Improve accessibility and equity Politics - Strengthen understanding, leadership and support at the political level for biotechnology - Develop policies outlining

  13. A Burst of miRNA Innovation in the Early Evolution of Butterflies and Moths

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Shan; Hui, Jerome H.L.; Holland, Peter W.H.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Because several miRNAs are known to affect the stability or translation of developmental regulatory genes, the origin of novel miRNAs may have contributed to the evolution of developmental processes and morphology. Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) is a species-rich clade with a well-established phylogeny and abundant genomic resources, thereby representing an ideal system in which to study miRNA evolution. We sequenced small RNA libraries from developmental stages of two divergent lepidopterans, Cameraria ohridella (Horse chestnut Leafminer) and Pararge aegeria (Speckled Wood butterfly), discovering 90 and 81 conserved miRNAs, respectively, and many species-specific miRNA sequences. Mapping miRNAs onto the lepidopteran phylogeny reveals rapid miRNA turnover and an episode of miRNA fixation early in lepidopteran evolution, implying that miRNA acquisition accompanied the early radiation of the Lepidoptera. One lepidopteran-specific miRNA gene, miR-2768, is located within an intron of the homeobox gene invected, involved in insect segmental and wing patterning. We identified cubitus interruptus (ci) as a likely direct target of miR-2768, and validated this suppression using a luciferase assay system. We propose a model by which miR-2768 modulates expression of ci in the segmentation pathway and in patterning of lepidopteran wing primordia. PMID:25576364

  14. VIRmiRNA: a comprehensive resource for experimentally validated viral miRNAs and their targets.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Abid; Thakur, Nishant; Monga, Isha; Thakur, Anamika; Kumar, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    Viral microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression of viral and/or host genes to benefit the virus. Hence, miRNAs play a key role in host-virus interactions and pathogenesis of viral diseases. Lately, miRNAs have also shown potential as important targets for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics. Although several miRNA and their target repositories are available for human and other organisms in literature, but a dedicated resource on viral miRNAs and their targets are lacking. Therefore, we have developed a comprehensive viral miRNA resource harboring information of 9133 entries in three subdatabases. This includes 1308 experimentally validated miRNA sequences with their isomiRs encoded by 44 viruses in viral miRNA ' VIRMIRNA: ' and 7283 of their target genes in ' VIRMIRTAR': . Additionally, there is information of 542 antiviral miRNAs encoded by the host against 24 viruses in antiviral miRNA ' AVIRMIR': . The web interface was developed using Linux-Apache-MySQL-PHP (LAMP) software bundle. User-friendly browse, search, advanced search and useful analysis tools are also provided on the web interface. VIRmiRNA is the first specialized resource of experimentally proven virus-encoded miRNAs and their associated targets. This database would enhance the understanding of viral/host gene regulation and may also prove beneficial in the development of antiviral therapeutics. Database URL: http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/virmirna. PMID:25380780

  15. On Measuring miRNAs after Transient Transfection of Mimics or Antisense Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Daniel W.; Bracken, Cameron P.; Szubert, Jan M.; Goodall, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to alter microRNA (miRNA) abundance is crucial for studying miRNA function. To achieve this there is widespread use of both exogenous double-stranded miRNA mimics for transient over-expression, and single stranded antisense RNAs (antimiRs) for miRNA inhibition. The success of these manipulations is often assessed using qPCR, but this does not accurately report the level of functional miRNA. Here, we draw attention to this discrepancy, which is overlooked in many published reports. We measured the functionality of exogenous miRNA by comparing the total level of transfected miRNA in whole cell extracts to the level of miRNA bound to Argonaute following transfection and show that the supraphysiological levels of transfected miRNA frequently seen using qPCR do not represent the functional levels, because the majority of transfected RNA that is detected is vesicular and not accessible for loading into Argonaute as functionally active miRNAs. In the case of microRNA inhibition by transient transfection with antisense inhibitors, there is also the potential for discrepancy, because following cell lysis the abundant inhibitor levels from cellular vesicles can directly interfere with the PCR reaction used to measure miRNA level. PMID:23358900

  16. Microevolution of nematode miRNAs reveals diverse modes of selection.

    PubMed

    Jovelin, Richard; Cutter, Asher D

    2014-01-01

    Micro-RNA (miRNA) genes encode abundant small regulatory RNAs that play key roles during development and in homeostasis by fine tuning and buffering gene expression. This layer of regulatory control over transcriptional networks is preserved by selection across deep evolutionary time, yet selection pressures on individual miRNA genes in contemporary populations remain poorly characterized in any organism. Here, we quantify nucleotide variability for 129 miRNAs in the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei to understand the microevolution of this important class of regulatory genes. Our analysis of three population samples and C. remanei's sister species revealed ongoing natural selection that constrains evolution of all sequence domains within miRNA hairpins. We also show that new miRNAs evolve faster than older miRNAs but that selection nevertheless favors their persistence. Despite the ongoing importance of purging of new mutations, we discover a trove of >400 natural miRNA sequence variants that include single nucleotide polymorphisms in seed motifs, indels that ablate miRNA functional domains, and origination of new miRNAs by duplication. Moreover, we demonstrate substantial nucleotide divergence of pre-miRNA hairpin alleles between populations and sister species. These findings from the first global survey of miRNA microevolution in Caenorhabditis support the idea that changes in gene expression, mediated through divergence in miRNA regulation, can contribute to phenotypic novelty and adaptation to specific environments in the present day as well as the distant past. PMID:25355809

  17. On-Orbit Evaluation of a New Treadmill Harness for Improved Crewmember Comfort and Load Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perusek, G. P.; Sheehan, C. C.; Savina, M. C.; Owings, T. M.; Davis, B. L.; Ryder, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    The current design of the International Space Station (ISS) Treadmill Harness has been reported to cause pain and discomfort to crewmembers during exercise. The Harness Station Development Test Objective (SDTO) provided participating crewmembers (n = 6) with a new harness design, the "Glenn Harness," to evaluate for comfort and loading as compared to the current Treadmill Harness. A novel suite of load-sensing instrumentation was developed to noninvasively measure load distribution and provided a first-ever quantification of actual dynamic loads during treadmill exercise. In addition, crew debriefs provided feedback on harness preference and overall impressions. Conclusions: Post-flight analysis in returned Glenn Harnesses (n = 3) showed minimal wear and tear. Four of the six subjects found the Glenn Harness to be more comfortable in this on-orbit, side-by-side comparison as measured by the crew comfort questionnaire and crew debriefs. Specific areas for improvement have been identified, and forward recommendations will be provided to the Human Research Program. The protocol developed for the SDTO provided valuable insight into crew comfort issues, design improvements, and loading preferences for exercise harnessing, which lays the groundwork for better harnessing systems and training protocols.

  18. miRClassify: an advanced web server for miRNA family classification and annotation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Quan; Mao, Yaozong; Hu, Lingling; Wu, Yunfeng; Ji, Zhiliang

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) family is a group of miRNAs that derive from the common ancestor. Normally, members from the same miRNA family have similar physiological functions; however, they are not always conserved in primary sequence or secondary structure. Proper family prediction from primary sequence will be helpful for accurate identification and further functional annotation of novel miRNA. Therefore, we introduced a novel machine learning-based web server, the miRClassify, which can rapidly identify miRNA from the primary sequence and classify it into a miRNA family regardless of similarity in sequence and structure. Additionally, the medical implication of the miRNA family is also provided when it is available in PubMed. The web server is accessible at the link http://datamining.xmu.edu.cn/software/MIR/home.html. PMID:24480175

  19. miRNA Repertoires of Demosponges Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria.

    PubMed

    Liew, Yi Jin; Ryu, Taewoo; Aranda, Manuel; Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs that are involved in many biological process in eukaryotes. They play a crucial role in modulating genetic expression of their targets, which makes them integral components of transcriptional regulatory networks. As sponges (phylum Porifera) are commonly considered the most basal metazoan, the in-depth capture of miRNAs from these organisms provides additional clues to the evolution of miRNA families in metazoans. Here, we identified the core proteins involved in the biogenesis of miRNAs, and obtained evidence for bona fide miRNA sequences for two marine sponges Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria (11 and 19 respectively). Our analysis identified several miRNAs that are conserved amongst demosponges, and revealed that all of the novel miRNAs identified in these two species are specific to the class Demospongiae. PMID:26871907

  20. miRNA Repertoires of Demosponges Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Manuel; Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory RNAs that are involved in many biological process in eukaryotes. They play a crucial role in modulating genetic expression of their targets, which makes them integral components of transcriptional regulatory networks. As sponges (phylum Porifera) are commonly considered the most basal metazoan, the in-depth capture of miRNAs from these organisms provides additional clues to the evolution of miRNA families in metazoans. Here, we identified the core proteins involved in the biogenesis of miRNAs, and obtained evidence for bona fide miRNA sequences for two marine sponges Stylissa carteri and Xestospongia testudinaria (11 and 19 respectively). Our analysis identified several miRNAs that are conserved amongst demosponges, and revealed that all of the novel miRNAs identified in these two species are specific to the class Demospongiae. PMID:26871907

  1. miRNA regulation during cardiac development and remodeling in cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chaitra, K.L.; Ulaganathan, Kayalvili; James, Anita; Ananthapur, Venkateshwari; Nallari, Pratibha

    2013-01-01

    miRNAs have been found to play a major role in cardiomyopathy, a heart muscle disorder characterized by cardiac dysfunction. Several miRNAs including those involved in heart development are found to be dysregulated in cardiomyopathy. These miRNAs act either directly or indirectly by controlling the genes involved in normal development and functioning of the heart. Indirectly it also targets modifier genes and genes involved in signaling pathways. In this review, miRNAs involved in heart development, including dysregulation of miRNA which regulate various genes, modifiers and notch signaling pathway genes leading to cardiomyopathy are discussed. A study of these miRNAs would give an insight into the mechanisms involved in the processes of heart development and disease. Apart from this, information gathered from these studies would also generate suitable therapeutic targets in the form of antagomirs which are chemically engineered oligonucleotides used for silencing miRNAs. PMID:27092038

  2. Expression Profiling of LPS Responsive miRNA in Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Afsar Raza; Zhong, Sheng; Dang, Hong; Fordham, Jezrom B; Nares, Salvador; Khan, Asma

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of the innate and adaptive immune response. The purpose of the present study was to interrogate miRNA profiles of primary human macrophages challenged with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with focus on expression kinetics. We employed Nanostring platform to precisely characterize the changes in miRNA expression following different doses and durations of LPS exposure. Differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in response to LPS challenge with convergent and divergent expression profiles. Pathway analysis of LPS-responsive miRNAs revealed regulation of biological processes linked to key cell signaling (including PIK3-Akt, MAP kinase, ErbB) and pathogen response pathways. Our data provide a comprehensive miRNA profiling of human primary macrophages treated with LPS. These results show that bacterial Toll like receptor (TLR) ligands can temporally modulate macrophage miRNA expression. PMID:27307950

  3. Computational identification of miRNAs in medicinal plant Senecio vulgaris (Groundsel).

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sarika; Khushwaha, Anjana; Dixit, Rekha

    2011-01-01

    RNAs Interference plays a very important role in gene silencing. In vitro identification of miRNAs is a slow process as it is difficult to isolate them. Nucleotide sequences of miRNAs are highly conserved among the plants and, this form the key feature behind the identification of miRNAs in plant species by homology alignment. In silico identification of miRNAs from EST database is emerging as a novel, faster and reliable approach. Here EST sequences of Senecio vulgaris (Groundsel) were searched against known miRNA sequences by using BLASTN tool. A total of 10 miRNAs were identified from 1956 EST sequences and 115 GSS sequences. The most stable miRNA identified is svu-mir-1. This approach will accelerate advance research in regulation of gene expression in Groundsel by interfering RNAs. PMID:22347777

  4. Computational identification of miRNAs in medicinal plant Senecio vulgaris (Groundsel)

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sarika; Khushwaha, Anjana; Dixit, Rekha

    2011-01-01

    RNAs Interference plays a very important role in gene silencing. In vitro identification of miRNAs is a slow process as it is difficult to isolate them. Nucleotide sequences of miRNAs are highly conserved among the plants and, this form the key feature behind the identification of miRNAs in plant species by homology alignment. In silico identification of miRNAs from EST database is emerging as a novel, faster and reliable approach. Here EST sequences of Senecio vulgaris (Groundsel) were searched against known miRNA sequences by using BLASTN tool. A total of 10 miRNAs were identified from 1956 EST sequences and 115 GSS sequences. The most stable miRNA identified is svu-mir-1. This approach will accelerate advance research in regulation of gene expression in Groundsel by interfering RNAs. PMID:22347777

  5. miRNAs and their putative roles in the development and progression of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Garry; Nass, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs, such as miRNAs, are increasingly being recognized not only as regulators of developmental processes but contributors to pathological states. The number of miRNAs determined experimentally to be involved in Parkinson's disease (PD) development and progression is small and includes regulators of pathologic proteins, neurotrophic factors, and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. PD gene-association studies have also indicated miRNAs in the pathology. In this review, we present known miRNAs and their validated targets that contribute to PD development and progression. We also incorporate data mining methods to link additional miRNAs with non-experimentally validated targets and propose additional roles of miRNAs in neurodegenerative processes. Furthermore, we present the potential contribution of next-generation-sequencing approaches to elucidate mechanisms and etiology of PD through discovery of novel miRNAs and other non-coding RNA classes. PMID:23316214

  6. Harnessing natural product assembly lines: structure, promiscuity, and engineering.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Christopher C; Williams, Gavin J

    2016-03-01

    Many therapeutically relevant natural products are biosynthesized by the action of giant mega-enzyme assembly lines. By leveraging the specificity, promiscuity, and modularity of assembly lines, a variety of strategies has been developed that enables the biosynthesis of modified natural products. This review briefly summarizes recent structural advances related to natural product assembly lines, discusses chemical approaches to probing assembly line structures in the absence of traditional biophysical data, and surveys efforts that harness the inherent or engineered promiscuity of assembly lines for the synthesis of non-natural polyketides and non-ribosomal peptide analogues. PMID:26527577

  7. "Hello, World!" Harnessing Social Media for the Rosetta Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, E.; Mignone, C.; Scuka, D.; Homfeld, A. M.; Ranero, K.; Rolfe, E.; Bennett, M.; Schepers, A.; O'Flaherty, K. S.; Bauer, M.; McCaughrean, M.

    2016-03-01

    The European Space Agency's comet-chasing Rosetta mission was launched in 2004, before social media became a popular tool for mainstream communication. As it reached its destination ten years later, new audiences were reached and inspired by this once-in-a-lifetime event by harnessing a range of outlets for communicating the key messages. These included traditional online platforms, such as news websites, blogs, and Livestream, as well as Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Flickr, YouTube, Google+ and SoundCloud. In this article, we outline the role social media channels played in making Rosetta one of the European Space Agency's biggest communication and public engagement successes.

  8. Harnessing geometric and magnetic nonlinearities in phononic meta-plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Osama; Foehr, Andre; Daraio, Chiara

    Owing to their physical realization, locally resonant metamaterials retain narrow subwavelength band gaps. Moreover, the fixed geometry and dimensions of the unit cell set a hardbound on the central frequency of the operational bandwidth. Real-time tunable metamaterials extend the range of applications and further enable the realization of new sensors, filters, and switches. Our work harnesses the interaction between geometric nonlinearity and nonlinear magnetic potentials to engineer frequency-agile subwavelength band gaps. The concept is general and applicable to various metamaterials systems. Both numerical simulations and experimental realization of the proposed concept will be presented.

  9. Understanding and Harnessing Placebo Effects: Clearing Away the Underbrush

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Franklin G.; Brody, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Despite strong growth in scientific investigation of the placebo effect, understanding of this phenomenon remains deeply confused. We investigate critically seven common conceptual distinctions that impede clear understanding of the placebo effect: (1) verum/placebo, (2) active/inactive, (3) signal/noise, (4) specific/nonspecific, (5) objective/subjective, (6) disease/illness, and (7) intervention/context. We argue that some of these should be eliminated entirely, whereas others must be used with caution to avoid bias. Clearing away the conceptual underbrush is needed to lay down a path to understanding and harnessing placebo effects in clinical medicine. PMID:21220523

  10. Endogenous Peer Effects: Fact or Fiction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Ryan; Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine endogenous peer effects, which occur when a student's behavior or outcome is a function of the behavior or outcome of his or her peer group. Endogenous peer effects have important implications for educational policies such as busing, school choice and tracking. In this study, the authors quantitatively review the literature on…

  11. Endogenous timing factors in bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwinner, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    Several species of warbler birds were observed in an effort to determine what initiates and terminates migration. Environmental and endogenous timing mechanisms were analyzed. The results indicate that endogenous stimuli are dominant factors for bird migration especially for long distances. It was concluded that environmental factors act as an assist mechanism.

  12. Combining miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in Wilms Tumor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Werner, Tamara V.; Backes, Christina; Trampert, Patrick; Gessler, Manfred; Keller, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Graf, Norbert; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood renal cancer. Recent findings of mutations in microRNA (miRNA) processing proteins suggest a pivotal role of miRNAs in WT genesis. We performed miRNA expression profiling of 36 WTs of different subtypes and four normal kidney tissues using microarrays. Additionally, we determined the gene expression profile of 28 of these tumors to identify potentially correlated target genes and affected pathways. We identified 85 miRNAs and 2107 messenger RNAs (mRNA) differentially expressed in blastemal WT, and 266 miRNAs and 1267 mRNAs differentially expressed in regressive subtype. The hierarchical clustering of the samples, using either the miRNA or mRNA profile, showed the clear separation of WT from normal kidney samples, but the miRNA pattern yielded better separation of WT subtypes. A correlation analysis of the deregulated miRNA and mRNAs identified 13,026 miRNA/mRNA pairs with inversely correlated expression, of which 2844 are potential interactions of miRNA and their predicted mRNA targets. We found significant upregulation of miRNAs-183, -301a/b and -335 for the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs-181b, -223 and -630 for the regressive subtype. We found marked deregulation of miRNAs regulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, especially in the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs influencing chemosensitivity, especially in regressive subtypes. Further research is needed to assess the influence of preoperative chemotherapy and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on the miRNA and mRNA patterns in WT. PMID:27043538

  13. Plasma miRNA-506 as a Prognostic Biomarker for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Ping; Su, Hong-Xin; Zhao, Da; Guan, Quan-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are responsible for regulating proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, invasion, and metastasis in tumor cells. miRNA-506 is abnormally expressed in multiple tumors, indicating that it might be oncogenic or tumor-suppressive. However, little is known about the association between miRNA-506 expression and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Material/Methods We examined the expression of miRNA-506 in the plasma of ESCC patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to determine the association between miRNA-506 expression and clinicopathological features of ESCC. ROC curves were produced for ESCC diagnosis by plasma miRNA-506 and the area under curve was calculated to explore its diagnostic value. Results Average miRNA-506 expression levels were remarkably higher in the plasma of ESCC patients than in healthy volunteers (P<0.001). The expression of miRNA-506 in the plasma was closely associated with lymph node status (P=0.004), TNM stage (P=0.031), and tumor length (P<0.001). According to ROC curves, the area under the curve for plasma miRNA-506 was 0.835, indicating statistical significance for ESCC diagnosis by plasma miRNA-506 (P<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with high miRNA-506 expression had significantly shorter survival time than those with low miRNA-506 expression. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that T stage, N stage, tumor length, and miRNA-506 expression levels were significantly correlated with prognosis in ESCC patients. Conclusions miRNA-506 can serve as an important molecular marker for diagnosis and prognostic prediction of ESCC. PMID:27345473

  14. Plasma miRNA-506 as a Prognostic Biomarker for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Ping; Su, Hong-Xin; Zhao, Da; Guan, Quan-Lin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are responsible for regulating proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, invasion, and metastasis in tumor cells. miRNA-506 is abnormally expressed in multiple tumors, indicating that it might be oncogenic or tumor-suppressive. However, little is known about the association between miRNA-506 expression and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). MATERIAL AND METHODS We examined the expression of miRNA-506 in the plasma of ESCC patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to determine the association between miRNA-506 expression and clinicopathological features of ESCC. ROC curves were produced for ESCC diagnosis by plasma miRNA-506 and the area under curve was calculated to explore its diagnostic value. RESULTS Average miRNA-506 expression levels were remarkably higher in the plasma of ESCC patients than in healthy volunteers (P<0.001). The expression of miRNA-506 in the plasma was closely associated with lymph node status (P=0.004), TNM stage (P=0.031), and tumor length (P<0.001). According to ROC curves, the area under the curve for plasma miRNA-506 was 0.835, indicating statistical significance for ESCC diagnosis by plasma miRNA-506 (P<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with high miRNA-506 expression had significantly shorter survival time than those with low miRNA-506 expression. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that T stage, N stage, tumor length, and miRNA-506 expression levels were significantly correlated with prognosis in ESCC patients. CONCLUSIONS miRNA-506 can serve as an important molecular marker for diagnosis and prognostic prediction of ESCC. PMID:27345473

  15. miRNA genes of an invasive vector mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jinbao; Hu, Wanqi; Wu, Jinya; Zheng, Peiming; Chen, Maoshan; James, Anthony A; Chen, Xiaoguang; Tu, Zhijian

    2013-01-01

    Aedes albopictus, a vector of Dengue and Chikungunya viruses, is a robust invasive species in both tropical and temperate environments. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and biological processes including embryonic development, innate immunity and infection. While a number of miRNAs have been discovered in some mosquitoes, no comprehensive effort has been made to characterize them from different developmental stages from a single species. Systematic analysis of miRNAs in Ae. albopictus will improve our understanding of its basic biology and inform novel strategies to prevent virus transmission. Between 10-14 million Illumina sequencing reads per sample were obtained from embryos, larvae, pupae, adult males, sugar-fed and blood-fed adult females. A total of 119 miRNA genes represented by 215 miRNA or miRNA star (miRNA*) sequences were identified, 15 of which are novel. Eleven, two, and two of the newly-discovered miRNA genes appear specific to Aedes, Culicinae, and Culicidae, respectively. A number of miRNAs accumulate predominantly in one or two developmental stages and the large number that showed differences in abundance following a blood meal likely are important in blood-induced mosquito biology. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the targets of all Ae. albopictus miRNAs provides a useful starting point for the study of their functions in mosquitoes. This study is the first systematic analysis of miRNAs based on deep-sequencing of small RNA samples of all developmental stages of a mosquito species. A number of miRNAs are related to specific physiological states, most notably, pre- and post-blood feeding. The distribution of lineage-specific miRNAs is consistent with mosquito phylogeny and the presence of a number of Aedes-specific miRNAs likely reflects the divergence between the Aedes and Culex genera. PMID:23840875

  16. Characterization of miRNAs in response to short-term waterlogging in three inbred lines of Zea mays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To characterize the involvement of miRNAs and their targets in response to short-term hypoxia conditions, a quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay was used to quantify the expression of the 24 candidate mature miRNA signatures (22 known and 2 novel mature miRNAs, representing 66 miRNA loci) and ...

  17. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A.

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche.

  18. KRAS-dependent sorting of miRNA to exosomes.

    PubMed

    Cha, Diana J; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Dou, Yongchao; Liu, Qi; Higginbotham, James N; Demory Beckler, Michelle; Weaver, Alissa M; Vickers, Kasey; Prasad, Nirpesh; Levy, Shawn; Zhang, Bing; Coffey, Robert J; Patton, James G

    2015-01-01

    Mutant KRAS colorectal cancer (CRC) cells release protein-laden exosomes that can alter the tumor microenvironment. To test whether exosomal RNAs also contribute to changes in gene expression in recipient cells, and whether mutant KRAS might regulate the composition of secreted microRNAs (miRNAs), we compared small RNAs of cells and matched exosomes from isogenic CRC cell lines differing only in KRAS status. We show that exosomal profiles are distinct from cellular profiles, and mutant exosomes cluster separately from wild-type KRAS exosomes. miR-10b was selectively increased in wild-type exosomes, while miR-100 was increased in mutant exosomes. Neutral sphingomyelinase inhibition caused accumulation of miR-100 only in mutant cells, suggesting KRAS-dependent miRNA export. In Transwell co-culture experiments, mutant donor cells conferred miR-100-mediated target repression in wild-type-recipient cells. These findings suggest that extracellular miRNAs can function in target cells and uncover a potential new mode of action for mutant KRAS in CRC. PMID:26132860

  19. Assessing Agreement between miRNA Microarray Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Bassani, Niccolò P.; Ambrogi, Federico; Biganzoli, Elia M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, miRNA microarray platforms have provided great insights into the biological mechanisms underlying the onset and development of several diseases. However, only a few studies have evaluated the concordance between different microarray platforms using methods that took into account measurement error in the data. In this work, we propose the use of a modified version of the Bland–Altman plot to assess agreement between microarray platforms. To this aim, two samples, one renal tumor cell line and a pool of 20 different human normal tissues, were profiled using three different miRNA platforms (Affymetrix, Agilent, Illumina) on triplicate arrays. Intra-platform reliability was assessed by calculating pair-wise concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) between technical replicates and overall concordance correlation coefficient (OCCC) with bootstrap percentile confidence intervals, which revealed moderate-to-good repeatability of all platforms for both samples. Modified Bland–Altman analysis revealed good patterns of concordance for Agilent and Illumina, whereas Affymetrix showed poor-to-moderate agreement for both samples considered. The proposed method is useful to assess agreement between array platforms by modifying the original Bland–Altman plot to let it account for measurement error and bias correction and can be used to assess patterns of concordance between other kinds of arrays other than miRNA microarrays.

  20. Fine tuning by miRNAs in development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, Peter; Levine, Erel; Levine, Herbert

    2007-03-01

    The unique role played by microRNA in a developing embryo is a topic of much current research interest. One possibility is that microRNA diffuse within a developing tissue, acting as communicators between different cells. Here we pursue this possibility in two different contexts. The first case occurs when the transcription profiles of the microRNA and its target are spatially anticorrelated, as for example is the case in the iab4-Ubx system in fly. Conversely, in the second context the two transcription profiles are correlated in space, as may be the case for the mir10-Hoxb4 system in mouse. In each context we identify a major function for a mobile miRNA. In the first, miRNA serve to induce an all-or-nothing response of the mRNA profile to its morphogen by generating a sharp boundary between domains of high and (ultimately) low target expression. In the second, miRNA amplify polarity in the target expression pattern by removing residual mRNAs. Importantly, our model predicts that these two functions require very different type of diffusion. While our results are highly quantitative, we propose ways of realizing them in experiments, taking into account limitations of standard experimental techniques.

  1. Which is the better forecasting model? A comparison between HAR-RV and multifractality volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Feng; Wei, Yu; Huang, Dengshi; Chen, Yixiang

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, by taking the 5-min high frequency data of the Shanghai Composite Index as example, we compare the forecasting performance of HAR-RV and Multifractal volatility, Realized volatility, Realized Bipower Variation and their corresponding short memory model with rolling windows forecasting method and the Model Confidence Set which is proved superior to SPA test. The empirical results show that, for six loss functions, HAR-RV outperforms other models. Moreover, to make the conclusions more precise and robust, we use the MCS test to compare the performance of their logarithms form models, and find that the HAR-log(RV) has a better performance in predicting future volatility. Furthermore, by comparing the two models of HAR-RV and HAR-log(RV), we conclude that, in terms of performance forecasting, the HAR-log(RV) model is the best model among models we have discussed in this paper.

  2. Comparative Analysis of mRNA Targets for Human PUF-Family Proteins Suggests Extensive Interaction with the miRNA Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Galgano, Alessia; Forrer, Michael; Jaskiewicz, Lukasz; Kanitz, Alexander; Zavolan, Mihaela; Gerber, André P.

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide identification of mRNAs regulated by RNA-binding proteins is crucial to uncover post-transcriptional gene regulatory systems. The conserved PUF family RNA-binding proteins repress gene expression post-transcriptionally by binding to sequence elements in 3′-UTRs of mRNAs. Despite their well-studied implications for development and neurogenesis in metazoa, the mammalian PUF family members are only poorly characterized and mRNA targets are largely unknown. We have systematically identified the mRNAs associated with the two human PUF proteins, PUM1 and PUM2, by the recovery of endogenously formed ribonucleoprotein complexes and the analysis of associated RNAs with DNA microarrays. A largely overlapping set comprised of hundreds of mRNAs were reproducibly associated with the paralogous PUM proteins, many of them encoding functionally related proteins. A characteristic PUF-binding motif was highly enriched among PUM bound messages and validated with RNA pull-down experiments. Moreover, PUF motifs as well as surrounding sequences exhibit higher conservation in PUM bound messages as opposed to transcripts that were not found to be associated, suggesting that PUM function may be modulated by other factors that bind conserved elements. Strikingly, we found that PUF motifs are enriched around predicted miRNA binding sites and that high-confidence miRNA binding sites are significantly enriched in the 3′-UTRs of experimentally determined PUM1 and PUM2 targets, strongly suggesting an interaction of human PUM proteins with the miRNA regulatory system. Our work suggests extensive connections between the RBP and miRNA post-transcriptional regulatory systems and provides a framework for deciphering the molecular mechanism by which PUF proteins regulate their target mRNAs. PMID:18776931

  3. Genome-wide analysis for discovery of new rice miRNA reveals natural antisense miRNA (nat-miRNAs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small RNAs (21-24nt) are involved in gene regulation through translation inhibition, mRNA cleavage, or directing chromatin modifications. In rice, currently ~240 miRNAs have been annotated. We sequenced more than four million small RNAs from rice and identified another 24 miRNA genes. Among these, w...

  4. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  5. Towards Clinical Applications of Blood-Borne miRNA Signatures: The Influence of the Anticoagulant EDTA on miRNA Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Leidinger, Petra; Backes, Christina; Rheinheimer, Stefanie; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) from blood are increasingly recognized as biomarker candidates for human diseases. Clinical routine settings frequently include blood sampling in tubes with EDTA as anticoagulant without considering the influence of phlebotomy on the overall miRNA expression pattern. We collected blood samples from six healthy individuals each in an EDTA blood collection tube. Subsequently, the blood was transferred into PAXgeneTM tubes at three different time points, i.e. directly (0 min), 10 min, and 2 h after phlebotomy. As control blood was also directly collected in PAXgeneTM blood RNA tubes that contain a reagent to directly lyse blood cells and stabilize their content. For all six blood donors at the four conditions (24 samples) we analyzed the abundance of 1,205 miRNAs by human Agilent miRNA V16 microarrays. Results While we found generally a homogenous pattern of the miRNA abundance in all 24 samples, the duration of the EDTA treatment appears to influence the miRNA abundance of specific miRNAs. The most significant changes are observed after longer EDTA exposition. Overall, the impact of the different blood sample conditions on the miRNA pattern was substantially lower than intra-individual variations. While samples belonging to one of the six individuals mostly cluster together, there was no comparable clustering for any of the four tested blood sampling conditions. The most affected miRNA was miR-769-3p that was not detected in any of the six PAXgene blood samples, but in all EDTA 2h samples. Accordingly, hsa-miR-769-3p was also the only miRNA that showed a significantly different abundance between the 4 blood sample conditions by an ANOVA analysis (Benjamini-Hochberg adjusted p-value of 0.003). Validation by qRT-PCR confirmed this finding. Conclusion The pattern of blood-borne miRNA abundance is rather homogenous between the four tested blood sample conditions of six blood donors. There was a clustering between the miRNA

  6. Quantitative analysis of miRNA expression in seven human foetal and adult organs.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanping; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Lijie; Ingvarsson, Sigurdur; Chen, Huiping

    2011-01-01

    miRNAs have been found to repress gene expression at posttranscriptional level in cells. Studies have shown that expression of miRNAs is tissue-specific and developmental-stage-specific. The mechanism behind this could be explained by miRNA pathways. In this study, totally 54 miRNAs were analysed in 7 matched human foetal and adult organs (brain, colon, heart, kidney, liver, lung and spleen) using real-time PCR. Quantitative analysis showed that a big proportion of the 54 miRNAs have higher general expression in the organs of the foetal period than the adult period, with the exception of the heart. The miRNA gene promoter methylation level in the adult stages was higher than in the foetal stages. Moreover, there is a high general expression level of several miRNAs in both stages of brain, kidney, liver, lung and spleen, but not seen in colon and heart. Our results indicate that the miRNAs may play a bigger role in the foetal stage than the adult stage of brain, colon, kidney, liver, lung and spleen. The majority of the miRNAs analysed may play an important role in the growth and development of brain, kidney, liver, lung and spleen. However, a minority of the miRNAs may be functional in colon and heart. PMID:22194897

  7. MiRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with central hypersomnias.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anja; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Knudsen, Stine; Modvig, Signe; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2014-12-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including some neurological disorders. Recently, we have reported dysregulated miRNAs in plasma from patients with central hypersomnias including type 1 and type 2 narcolepsy, and idiopathic hypersomnia. This study addressed whether miRNA levels are altered in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with central hypersomnias. We conducted high-throughput analyses of miRNAs in CSF from patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction panels. We identified 13, 9, and 11 miRNAs with a more than two-fold change in concentration in CSF from patients with type 1 and type 2 narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia, respectively, compared with matched healthy controls. Most miRNAs differed in more than one of the sleep disorders. However, all miRNAs were detected at low levels in CSF and varied between individuals. None of them showed significant differences in concentrations between groups after correcting for multiple testing, and none could be validated in an independent cohort. Nevertheless, approximately 60% of the most abundant miRNAs in the profile reported here have previously been identified in the CSF of healthy individuals, showing consistency with previous miRNA profiles found in CSF. In conclusion, we were not able to demonstrate distinct levels or patterns of miRNAs in CSF from central hypersomnia patients. PMID:25451005

  8. PmiRExAt: plant miRNA expression atlas database and web applications

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Anoop Kishor Singh; Panwar, Abhijeet Singh; Gupta, Rajinder; Mantri, Shrikant S.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput small RNA (sRNA) sequencing technology enables an entirely new perspective for plant microRNA (miRNA) research and has immense potential to unravel regulatory networks. Novel insights gained through data mining in publically available rich resource of sRNA data will help in designing biotechnology-based approaches for crop improvement to enhance plant yield and nutritional value. Bioinformatics resources enabling meta-analysis of miRNA expression across multiple plant species are still evolving. Here, we report PmiRExAt, a new online database resource that caters plant miRNA expression atlas. The web-based repository comprises of miRNA expression profile and query tool for 1859 wheat, 2330 rice and 283 maize miRNA. The database interface offers open and easy access to miRNA expression profile and helps in identifying tissue preferential, differential and constitutively expressing miRNAs. A feature enabling expression study of conserved miRNA across multiple species is also implemented. Custom expression analysis feature enables expression analysis of novel miRNA in total 117 datasets. New sRNA dataset can also be uploaded for analysing miRNA expression profiles for 73 plant species. PmiRExAt application program interface, a simple object access protocol web service allows other programmers to remotely invoke the methods written for doing programmatic search operations on PmiRExAt database. Database URL: http://pmirexat.nabi.res.in. PMID:27081157

  9. Analysis of Chromosome 17 miRNAs and Their Importance in Medulloblastomas

    PubMed Central

    López-Ochoa, Sebastian; Ramírez-García, Marina

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small sequences of nucleotides that regulate posttranscriptionally gene expression. In recent years they have been recognized as very important general regulators of proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, cell death, and others. In some cases, the characteristic presence of miRNAs reflects some of the cellular pathways that may be altered. Particularly medulloblastomas (MB) represent entities that undergo almost characteristic alterations of chromosome 17: from loss of discrete fragments and isochromosomes formation to complete loss of one of them. An analysis of the major loci on this chromosome revealed that it contains at least 19 genes encoding miRNAs which may regulate the development and differentiation of the brain and cerebellum. miRNAs are regulators of real complex networks; they can regulate from 100 to over 300 messengers of various proteins. In this review some miRNAs are considered to be important in MB studies. Some of them are miRNA-5047, miRNA-1253, miRNA-2909, and miRNA-634. Everyone can significantly affect the development, growth, and cell invasion of MB, and they have not been explored in this tumor. In this review, we propose some miRNAs that can affect some genes in MB, and hence the importance of its study. PMID:25866804

  10. PmiRExAt: plant miRNA expression atlas database and web applications.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Anoop Kishor Singh; Panwar, Abhijeet Singh; Gupta, Rajinder; Mantri, Shrikant S

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput small RNA (sRNA) sequencing technology enables an entirely new perspective for plant microRNA (miRNA) research and has immense potential to unravel regulatory networks. Novel insights gained through data mining in publically available rich resource of sRNA data will help in designing biotechnology-based approaches for crop improvement to enhance plant yield and nutritional value. Bioinformatics resources enabling meta-analysis of miRNA expression across multiple plant species are still evolving. Here, we report PmiRExAt, a new online database resource that caters plant miRNA expression atlas. The web-based repository comprises of miRNA expression profile and query tool for 1859 wheat, 2330 rice and 283 maize miRNA. The database interface offers open and easy access to miRNA expression profile and helps in identifying tissue preferential, differential and constitutively expressing miRNAs. A feature enabling expression study of conserved miRNA across multiple species is also implemented. Custom expression analysis feature enables expression analysis of novel miRNA in total 117 datasets. New sRNA dataset can also be uploaded for analysing miRNA expression profiles for 73 plant species. PmiRExAt application program interface, a simple object access protocol web service allows other programmers to remotely invoke the methods written for doing programmatic search operations on PmiRExAt database.Database URL:http://pmirexat.nabi.res.in. PMID:27081157

  11. miRNA Profiling Reveals Dysregulation of RET and RET-Regulating Pathways in Hirschsprung's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangshuang; Wang, Shiqi; Guo, Zhenhua; Wu, Huan; Jin, Xianqing; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiaoqing; Liang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR), the most common congenital malformation of the gut, is regulated by multiple signal transduction pathways. Several components of these pathways are important targets for microRNAs (miRNAs). Multiple miRNAs have been associated with the pathophysiology of HSCR, and serum miRNAs profiles of HSCR patients have been reported, but miRNA expression in HSCR colon tissue is almost completely unexplored. Using microarray technology, we screened colon tissue to detect miRNAs whose expression profiles were altered in HSCR and identify targets of differentially expressed miRNAs. Following filtering of low-intensity signals, data normalization, and volcano plot filtering, we identified 168 differentially expressed miRNAs (104 up-regulated and 64 down-regulated). Fifty of these mRNAs represent major targets of dysegulated miRNAs and may thus important roles in the pathophysiology of HSCR. Pathway analysis revealed that 7 of the miRNA targets encode proteins involved in regulation of cell proliferation and migration via RET and related signaling pathways (MAPK and PI3K/AKT). Our results identify miRNAs that play key roles in the pathophysiology of the complex multi-factorial disease HSCR. PMID:26933947

  12. miRNA Profiling Reveals Dysregulation of RET and RET-Regulating Pathways in Hirschsprung's Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangshuang; Wang, Shiqi; Guo, Zhenhua; Wu, Huan; Jin, Xianqing; Wang, Yi; Li, Xiaoqing; Liang, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR), the most common congenital malformation of the gut, is regulated by multiple signal transduction pathways. Several components of these pathways are important targets for microRNAs (miRNAs). Multiple miRNAs have been associated with the pathophysiology of HSCR, and serum miRNAs profiles of HSCR patients have been reported, but miRNA expression in HSCR colon tissue is almost completely unexplored. Using microarray technology, we screened colon tissue to detect miRNAs whose expression profiles were altered in HSCR and identify targets of differentially expressed miRNAs. Following filtering of low-intensity signals, data normalization, and volcano plot filtering, we identified 168 differentially expressed miRNAs (104 up-regulated and 64 down-regulated). Fifty of these mRNAs represent major targets of dysegulated miRNAs and may thus important roles in the pathophysiology of HSCR. Pathway analysis revealed that 7 of the miRNA targets encode proteins involved in regulation of cell proliferation and migration via RET and related signaling pathways (MAPK and PI3K/AKT). Our results identify miRNAs that play key roles in the pathophysiology of the complex multi-factorial disease HSCR. PMID:26933947

  13. Analysis of miRNAs and Their Targets during Adventitious Shoot Organogenesis of Acacia crassicarpa

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Lingyu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Fei; Wang, Weixuan; Liang, Di; Yang, Hailun; Jin, Yi; Xie, Xiangming

    2014-01-01

    Organogenesis is an important process for plant regeneration by tissue or cell mass differentiation to regenerate a complete plant. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an essential role in regulating plant development by mediating target genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, but the diversity of miRNAs and their potential roles in organogenesis of Acacia crassicarpa have rarely been investigated. In this study, approximately 10 million sequence reads were obtained from a small RNA library, from which 189 conserved miRNAs from 57 miRNA families, and 7 novel miRNAs from 5 families, were identified from A. crassicarpa organogenetic tissues. Target prediction for these miRNAs yielded 237 potentially unique genes, of which 207 received target Gene Ontology annotations. On the basis of a bioinformatic analysis, one novel and 13 conserved miRNAs were selected to investigate their possible roles in A. crassicarpa organogenesis by qRT-PCR. The stage-specific expression patterns of the miRNAs provided information on their possible regulatory functions, including shoot bud formation, modulated function after transfer of the culture to light, and regulatory roles during induction of organogenesis. This study is the first to investigate miRNAs associated with A. crassicarpa organogenesis. The results provide a foundation for further characterization of miRNA expression profiles and roles in the regulation of diverse physiological pathways during adventitious shoot organogenesis of A. crassicarpa. PMID:24718555

  14. Evaluation of the capability of the PCV2 genome to encode miRNAs: lack of viral miRNA expression in an experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Hernández, Fernando; Pérez, Lester J; Vera, Gonzalo; Córdoba, Sarai; Segalés, Joaquim; Sánchez, Armand; Núñez, José I

    2015-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is a ssDNA virus causing PCV2-systemic disease (PCV2-SD), one of the most important diseases in swine. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Viral miRNAs have recently been described and the number of viral miRNAs has been increasing in the past few years. In this study, small RNA libraries were constructed from two tissues of subclinically PCV2 infected pigs to explore if PCV2 can encode viral miRNAs. The deep sequencing data revealed that PCV2 does not express miRNAs in an in vivo subclinical infection. PMID:25934266

  15. Posttranscriptional deregulation of signaling pathways in meningioma subtypes by differential expression of miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Mueller, Sabine C.; Backes, Christina; Werner, Tamara V.; Galata, Valentina; Sartorius, Elke; Bohle, Rainer M.; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background Micro (mi)RNAs are key regulators of gene expression and offer themselves as biomarkers for cancer development and progression. Meningioma is one of the most frequent primary intracranial tumors. As of yet, there are limited data on the role of miRNAs in meningioma of different histological subtypes and the affected signaling pathways. Methods In this study, we compared expression of 1205 miRNAs in different meningioma grades and histological subtypes using microarrays and independently validated deregulation of selected miRNAs with quantitative real-time PCR. Clinical utility of a subset of miRNAs as biomarkers for World Health Organization (WHO) grade II meningioma based on quantitative real-time data was tested. Potential targets of deregulated miRNAs were discovered with an in silico analysis. Results We identified 13 miRNAs deregulated between different subtypes of benign meningiomas, and 52 miRNAs deregulated in anaplastic meningioma compared with benign meningiomas. Known and putative target genes of deregulated miRNAs include genes involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition for benign meningiomas, and Wnt, transforming growth factor–β, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling for higher-grade meningiomas. Furthermore, a 4-miRNA signature (miR-222, -34a*, -136, and -497) shows promise as a biomarker differentiating WHO grade II from grade I meningiomas with an area under the curve of 0.75. Conclusions Our data provide novel insights into the contribution of miRNAs to the phenotypic spectrum in benign meningiomas. By deregulating translation of genes belonging to signaling pathways known to be important for meningioma genesis and progression, miRNAs provide a second in line amplification of growth promoting cellular signals. MiRNAs as biomarkers for diagnosis of aggressive meningiomas might prove useful and should be explored further in a prospective manner. PMID:25681310

  16. Annotation of primate miRNAs by high throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to genome sequencing, accurate functional annotation of genomes is required in order to carry out comparative and evolutionary analyses between species. Among primates, the human genome is the most extensively annotated. Human miRNA gene annotation is based on multiple lines of evidence including evidence for expression as well as prediction of the characteristic hairpin structure. In contrast, most miRNA genes in non-human primates are annotated based on homology without any expression evidence. We have sequenced small-RNA libraries from chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan and rhesus macaque from multiple individuals and tissues. Using patterns of miRNA expression in conjunction with a model of miRNA biogenesis we used these high-throughput sequencing data to identify novel miRNAs in non-human primates. Results We predicted 47 new miRNAs in chimpanzee, 240 in gorilla, 55 in orangutan and 47 in rhesus macaque. The algorithm we used was able to predict 64% of the previously known miRNAs in chimpanzee, 94% in gorilla, 61% in orangutan and 71% in rhesus macaque. We therefore added evidence for expression in between one and five tissues to miRNAs that were previously annotated based only on homology to human miRNAs. We increased from 60 to 175 the number miRNAs that are located in orthologous regions in humans and the four non-human primate species studied here. Conclusions In this study we provide expression evidence for homology-based annotated miRNAs and predict de novo miRNAs in four non-human primate species. We increased the number of annotated miRNA genes and provided evidence for their expression in four non-human primates. Similar approaches using different individuals and tissues would improve annotation in non-human primates and allow for further comparative studies in the future. PMID:22453055

  17. 42 CFR 84.173 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE... body. (b) Harnesses shall be designed and constructed to permit easy removal and replacement...

  18. 42 CFR 84.1133 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE... hold the components of the respirator in position against the wearer's body. (b) Harnesses shall...

  19. Harnessing the Therapeutic Potential of MicroRNAs for Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Calway, Tyler; Kim, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the most common causes of death in humans and are responsible for billions of dollars in health care expenditures. As the molecular basis of cardiac diseases continues to be explored, there remains the hope for identification of more effective therapeutics. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recognized as important regulators of numerous biological pathways and stress responses, including those found in cardiovascular diseases. MicroRNA signatures of cardiovascular diseases can provide targets for miRNA adjustment and offer the possibility of changing gene and protein expression to treat certain pathologies. These adjustments can be conferred using advances in oligonucleotide delivery methods, which can target single miRNAs, families of miRNAs, and certain tissue types. In this review, we will discuss the use of miRNAs in vivo and recent advances in their use for cardiovascular disease in mammalian models. PMID:25261390

  20. Bispecific antibodies and CARs: generalized immunotherapeutics harnessing T cell redirection.

    PubMed

    Zhukovsky, Eugene A; Morse, Richard J; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-06-01

    To realize the full potential of cancer immunotherapy, the latest generation immunotherapeutics are designed to harness the potent tumor-killing capacity of T cells. Thus, to mobilize T cells, new optimized bispecific antibody (BsAb) designs, enabling efficient polyclonal redirection of cytotoxic activity through binding to CD3 and a Tumor Associated Antigen (TAA) and refined genetically modified T cells have recently expanded the arsenal of available options for cancer treatment. This review presents the current understanding of the parameters crucial to the design of optimal T cell redirecting BsAb and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells. However, there are additional questions that require thorough elucidation. Both modalities will benefit from design changes that may increase the therapeutic window. One such approach could employ the discrimination afforded by multiple TAA to significantly increase selectivity. PMID:26963133

  1. Harnessing plant-microbe interactions for enhancing farm productivity.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Catriona; Singh, Brajesh

    2014-01-01

    Declining soil fertility and farm productivity is a major global concern in order to achieve food security for a burgeoning world population. It is reported that improving soil health alone can increase productivity by 10-15% and in combination with efficient plant traits, farm productivity can be increased up to 50-60%. In this article we explore the emerging microbial and bioengineering technologies, which can be employed to achieve the transformational increase in farm productivity and can simultaneously enhance environmental outcomes i.e., low green house gas (GHG) emissions. We argue that metagenomics, meta-transcriptomics and metabolomics have potential to provide fundamental knowledge on plant-microbes interactions necessary for new innovations to increase farm productivity. Further, these approaches provide tools to identify and select novel microbial/gene resources which can be harnessed in transgenic and designer plant technologies for enhanced resource use efficiencies. PMID:23799872

  2. A method for clustering of miRNA sequences using fragmented programming.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, Anatoly; Pyrkova, Anna; Niyazova, Raigul

    2016-01-01

    Clustering of miRNA sequences is an important problem in molecular genetics associated cellular biology. Thousands of such sequences are known today through advancement in sophisticated molecular tools, sequencing techniques, computational resources and rule based mathematical models. Analysis of such large-scale miRNA sequences for inferring patterns towards deducing cellular function is a great challenge in modern molecular biology. Therefore, it is of interest to develop mathematical models specific for miRNA sequences. The process is to group (cluster) such miRNA sequences using well-defined known features. We describe a method for clustering of miRNA sequences using fragmented programming. Subsequently, we illustrated the utility of the model using a dendrogram (a tree diagram) for publically known A.thaliana miRNA nucleotide sequences towards the inference of observed conserved patterns. PMID:27212839

  3. Circulating miRNAs in Ageing and Ageing-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hwa Jin; Suh, Yousin

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. They are involved in important biological processes including development, homeostasis, and ageing. Recently, extracellular miRNAs have been discovered in the bloodstream and bodily fluids. These miRNAs are shown to be secreted and circulating in microvesicles (MVs), or in complex with other factors such as RNA-binding proteins and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. These cell-free, circulating miRNAs can be taken into and function as negative regulators of target genes in recipient cells. Here we review the biogenesis and uptake of circulating miRNAs as well as their profiles in ageing and ageing-related diseases. We discuss the emerging role of circulating miRNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:25269672

  4. A low-cost float method of harnessing wave energy

    SciTech Connect

    George, M.P.

    1983-12-01

    The author proposes in this paper a low-cost and simple method of harnessing wave energy that should enable coastal regions to be self-sufficient in electric power. The method is eminently applicable to India and such developing countries, being simple and involving a small capital investment. The method was evolved after study of the Indian West Coast fronting the Arabian Sea, and can harness about 50% of the wave energy. A log of wood about 5 metres long and 50 cm. in diameter, having a specific gravity of 0.8 to 0.9, is made to float parallel to the beach and about 50 metres away from it. Its movement is restricted to the vertical plane by means of poles. Two roller chains are attached to the ends of the log which pass over two sprocket free-wheels. When the log is lifted with the crest of the wave, the roller chain moves over the free-wheel. When the trough of the wave reaches the log, its weight is applied to the sprocket wheels through the roller chains. Each sprocket wheel rotates and the rotation is multiplied with a gear wheel. The torque from the high speed spindle of the gear is applied to a small alternating current generator. The AC output from the generator is rectified and used either for charging a battery bank, or connected to the lighting system, or supplied to electrolytic tank for producing hydrogen and other chemicals at the site. A chain of such systems along the coast can supply enough power to light the fishermen's hamlets stretching along the coast.

  5. New miRNA labeling method for bead-based quantification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background microRNAs (miRNAs) are small single-stranded non-coding RNAs that act as crucial regulators of gene expression. Different methods have been developed for miRNA expression profiling in order to better understand gene regulation in normal and pathological conditions. miRNAs expression values obtained from large scale methodologies such as microarrays still need a validation step with alternative technologies. Results Here we have applied with an innovative approach, the Luminex® xMAP™ technology validate expression data of differentially expressed miRNAs obtained from high throughput arrays. We have developed a novel labeling system of small RNA molecules (below 200 nt), optimizing the sensitive cloning method for miRNAs, termed miRNA amplification profiling (mRAP). The Luminex expression patterns of three miRNAs (miR-23a, miR-27a and miR-199a) in seven different cell lines have been validated by TaqMan miRNA assay. In all cases, bead-based meas were confirmed by the data obtained by TaqMan and microarray technologies. Conclusions We demonstrate that the measure of individual miRNA by the bead-based method is feasible, high speed, sensitive and low cost. The Luminex® xMAP™ technology also provides flexibility, since the central reaction can be scaled up with additional miRNA capturing beads, allowing validation of many differentially expressed miRNAs obtained from microarrays in a single experiment. We propose this technology as an alternative method to qRT-PCR for validating miRNAs expression data obtained with high-throughput technologies. PMID:20553585

  6. Dynamic regulation of novel and conserved miRNAs across various tissues of diverse Cucurbit spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNA genes (miRNAs) encoding small non-coding RNAs are abundant in plant genomes and play a key role in regulating several biological mechanisms. Five conserved miRNAs, miR156, miR168-1, miR168-2, miR164, and miR166 were selected for analysis from the 21 known plant miRNA families that were rec...

  7. Computational identification of putative miRNAs and their target genes in pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Padmashree, Dyavegowda; Swamy, Narayanaswamy Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a parasitic unicellular free living eukaryotic amoeba. The parasite spreads through contaminated water and causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Therefore, it is of interest to understand its molecular pathogenesis. Hence, we analyzed the parasite genome for miRNAs (microRNAs) that are non-coding, single stranded RNA molecules. We identified 245 miRNAs using computational methods in N. fowleri, of which five miRNAs are conserved. The predicted miRNA targets were analyzed by using miRanda (software) and further studied the functions by subsequently annotating using AmiGo (a gene ontology web tool). PMID:26770029

  8. Computational identification of putative miRNAs and their target genes in pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri

    PubMed Central

    Padmashree, Dyavegowda; Swamy, Narayanaswamy Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a parasitic unicellular free living eukaryotic amoeba. The parasite spreads through contaminated water and causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Therefore, it is of interest to understand its molecular pathogenesis. Hence, we analyzed the parasite genome for miRNAs (microRNAs) that are non-coding, single stranded RNA molecules. We identified 245 miRNAs using computational methods in N. fowleri, of which five miRNAs are conserved. The predicted miRNA targets were analyzed by using miRanda (software) and further studied the functions by subsequently annotating using AmiGo (a gene ontology web tool). PMID:26770029

  9. Reliable reference miRNAs for quantitative gene expression analysis of stress responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has become the “gold standard” for measuring expression levels of individual miRNAs. However, little is known about the validity of reference miRNAs, the improper use of which can result in misleading interpretation of data. Results Here we undertook a systematic approach to identify highly stable miRNAs in different stress conditions such as low oxygen (hypoxia), UV-stress and high temperature (heat-stress) in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We conducted genome-wide RNA-seq for small RNAs and selected abundant miRNAs with minimal variation of expression between the different conditions. We further validated the stable expression of a selection of those constitutively expressed candidates in the different stress conditions by SYBR Green qPCR. The selected miRNA candidates were analyzed for stability by applying the widely used geNorm logarithm. With this approach, we were able to successfully identify suitable reference miRNAs for each stress condition. Interestingly, we also found that 3 miRNAs, namely mir-2-5p, mir-46-3p and mir-47-3p, are stable in all the above-mentioned conditions suggesting that they might have general functions independent of stress. Conclusions Our analysis offers a comprehensive list of stably expressed miRNAs in different stress conditions that can be confidently used as reference miRNAs for qPCR analysis in C. elegans. PMID:24656064

  10. Development of a low-cost detection method for miRNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Botao; Jin, Youxin; Ruan, Kangcheng

    2010-04-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) microarray is a powerful tool to explore the expression profiling of miRNA. The current detection method used in miRNA microarray is mainly fluorescence based, which usually requires costly detection system such as laser confocal scanner of tens of thousands of dollars. Recently, we developed a low-cost yet sensitive detection method for miRNA microarray based on enzyme-linked assay. In this approach, the biotinylated miRNAs were captured by the corresponding oligonucleotide probes immobilized on microarray slide; and then the biotinylated miRNAs would capture streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase. A purple-black precipitation on each biotinylated miRNA spot was produced by the enzyme catalytic reaction. It could be easily detected by a charge-coupled device digital camera mounted on a microscope, which lowers the detection cost more than 100 fold compared with that of fluorescence method. Our data showed that signal intensity of the spot correlates well with the biotinylated miRNA concentration and the detection limit for miRNAs is at least 0.4 fmol and the detection dynamic range spans about 2.5 orders of magnitude, which is comparable to that of fluorescence method. PMID:20383469

  11. miRegulome: a knowledge-base of miRNA regulomics and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barh, Debmalya; Kamapantula, Bhanu; Jain, Neha; Nalluri, Joseph; Bhattacharya, Antaripa; Juneja, Lucky; Barve, Neha; Tiwari, Sandeep; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Blum, Kenneth; Kumar, Anil; Silva, Artur; Ghosh, Preetam

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs regulate post transcriptional gene expression by targeting multiple mRNAs and hence can modulate multiple signalling pathways, biological processes, and patho-physiologies. Therefore, understanding of miRNA regulatory networks is essential in order to modulate the functions of a miRNA. The focus of several existing databases is to provide information on specific aspects of miRNA regulation. However, an integrated resource on the miRNA regulome is currently not available to facilitate the exploration and understanding of miRNA regulomics. miRegulome attempts to bridge this gap. The current version of miRegulome v1.0 provides details on the entire regulatory modules of miRNAs altered in response to chemical treatments and transcription factors, based on validated data manually curated from published literature. Modules of miRegulome (upstream regulators, downstream targets, miRNA regulated pathways, functions, diseases, etc) are hyperlinked to an appropriate external resource and are displayed visually to provide a comprehensive understanding. Four analysis tools are incorporated to identify relationships among different modules based on user specified datasets. miRegulome and its tools are helpful in understanding the biology of miRNAs and will also facilitate the discovery of biomarkers and therapeutics. With added features in upcoming releases, miRegulome will be an essential resource to the scientific community. Availability: http://bnet.egr.vcu.edu/miRegulome. PMID:26243198

  12. Identification and characterization of miRNAs in the ovaries of a highly prolific sheep breed.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoju; Pokharel, Kisun; Peippo, Jaana; Ghanem, Nasser; Zhaboyev, Ismail; Kantanen, Juha; Li, Meng-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Until recently, there have been few studies concerning miRNAs or miRNA-mediated biological processes in sheep (Ovis aries). In the present study, we used a deep-sequencing approach to examine ovarian miRNAs and the mRNA transcriptomes in two ewes of a highly prolific breed, Finnsheep. We identified 113 known sheep miRNAs, 131 miRNAs conserved in other mammals and 60 novel miRNAs, the expression levels of which accounted for 78.22%, 21.73% and 0.05% of the total respectively. Furthermore, the 10 most abundantly expressed miRNAs in the two libraries were characterized in detail, and the putative target genes of these miRNAs were annotated using GO annotation and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses. Among the target genes, intracellular transducers (SMAD1, SMAD4, SMAD5 and SMAD9) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors (BMPR1B and BMPR2) were involved in the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling pathway in the reproductive axis, and the most significant GO terms were intracellular part (GO:0044424), binding (GO:0005488) and biological_process (GO:0008150) for cellular component, molecular function and biological process respectively. Thus, these results expanded the sheep miRNA database and provided additional information on the prolificacy trait regulated through specific miRNAs in sheep and other mammals. PMID:26582387

  13. Platelets confound the measurement of extracellular miRNA in archived plasma.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Adam J; Gray, Warren D; Hayek, Salim S; Ko, Yi-An; Thomas, Sheena; Rooney, Kim; Awad, Mosaab; Roback, John D; Quyyumi, Arshed; Searles, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular miRNAs are detectable in biofluids and represent a novel class of disease biomarker. Although many studies have utilized archived plasma for miRNA biomarker discovery, the effects of processing and storage have not been rigorously studied. Previous reports have suggested plasma samples are commonly contaminated by platelets, significantly confounding the measurement of extracellular miRNA, which was thought to be easily addressed by additional post-thaw plasma processing. In a case-control study of archived plasma, we noted a significant correlation between miRNA levels and platelet counts despite post-thaw processing. We thus examined the effects of a single freeze/thaw cycle on microparticles (MPs) and miRNA levels, and show that a single freeze/thaw cycle of plasma dramatically increases the number of platelet-derived MPs, contaminates the extracellular miRNA pool, and profoundly affects the levels of miRNAs detected. The measurement of extracellular miRNAs in archived samples is critically dependent on the removal of residual platelets prior to freezing plasma samples. Many previous clinical studies of extracellular miRNA in archived plasma should be interpreted with caution and future studies should avoid the effects of platelet contamination. PMID:27623086

  14. miRiadne: a web tool for consistent integration of miRNA nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bonnal, Raoul J P; Rossi, Riccardo L; Carpi, Donatella; Ranzani, Valeria; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-07-01

    The miRBase is the official miRNA repository which keeps the annotation updated on newly discovered miRNAs: it is also used as a reference for the design of miRNA profiling platforms. Nomenclature ambiguities generated by loosely updated platforms and design errors lead to incompatibilities among platforms, even from the same vendor. Published miRNA lists are thus generated with different profiling platforms that refer to diverse and not updated annotations. This greatly compromises searches, comparisons and analyses that rely on miRNA names only without taking into account the mature sequences, which is particularly critic when such analyses are carried over automatically. In this paper we introduce miRiadne, a web tool to harmonize miRNA nomenclature, which takes into account the original miRBase versions from 10 up to 21, and annotations of 40 common profiling platforms from nine brands that we manually curated. miRiadne uses the miRNA mature sequence to link miRBase versions and/or platforms to prevent nomenclature ambiguities. miRiadne was designed to simplify and support biologists and bioinformaticians in re-annotating their own miRNA lists and/or data sets. As Ariadne helped Theseus in escaping the mythological maze, miRiadne will help the miRNA researcher in escaping the nomenclature maze. miRiadne is freely accessible from the URL http://www.miriadne.org. PMID:25897123

  15. Methylation of miRNA genes in the response to temperature stress in Populus simonii.

    PubMed

    Ci, Dong; Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation and miRNAs provide crucial regulation of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional responses to abiotic stress. In this study, we used methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphisms to identify 1066 sites that were differentially methylated in response to temperature stress in Populus simonii. Among these loci, BLAST searches of miRBase identified seven miRNA genes. Expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR suggested that the methylation pattern of these miRNA genes probably influences their expression. Annotation of these miRNA genes in the sequenced genome of Populus trichocarpa found three target genes (Potri.007G090400, Potri.014G042200, and Potri.010G176000) for the miRNAs produced from five genes (Ptc-MIR396e and g, Ptc-MIR156i and j, and Ptc-MIR390c) respectively. The products of these target genes function in lipid metabolism to deplete lipid peroxide. We also constructed a network based on the interactions between DNA methylation and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes, and the products of target genes and the metabolic factors that they affect, including H2O2, malondialdehyde, catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase. Our results suggested that DNA methylation probably regulates the expression of miRNA genes, thus affecting expression of their target genes, likely through the gene-silencing function of miRNAs, to maintain cell survival under abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26579167

  16. Global miRNA expression is temporally correlated with acute kidney injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are negative regulators of gene expression and protein abundance. Current evidence shows an association of miRNAs with acute kidney injury (AKI) leading to substantially increased morbidity and mortality. Here, we investigated whether miRNAs are inductive regulators responsible for the pathological development of AKI. Microarray analysis was used to detect temporal changes in global miRNA expression within 48 h after AKI in mice. Results indicated that global miRNA expression gradually increased over 24 h from ischemia reperfusion injury after 24 h, and then decreased from 24 h to 48 h. A similar trend was observed for the index of tubulointerstitial injury and the level of serum creatinine, and there was a significant correlation between the level of total miRNA expression and the level of serum creatinine (p < 0.05). This expression-phenotype correlation was validated by quantitative reverse transcription PCR on individual miRNAs, including miR-18a, -134, -182, -210 and -214. Increased global miRNA expression may lead to widespread translational repression and reduced cellular activity. Furthermore, significant inflammatory cytokine release and peritubular capillary loss were observed, suggesting that the initiation of systematic destruction programs was due to AKI. Our findings provide new understanding of the dominant role of miRNAs in promoting the pathological development of AKI. PMID:26966664

  17. In-silico identification of miRNAs and their regulating target functions in Ocimum basilicum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Noopur; Sharma, Ashok

    2014-12-01

    microRNA is known to play an important role in growth and development of the plants and also in environmental stress. Ocimum basilicum (Basil) is a well known herb for its medicinal properties. In this study, we used in-silico approaches to identify miRNAs and their targets regulating different functions in O. basilicum using EST approach. Additionally, functional annotation, gene ontology and pathway analysis of identified target transcripts were also done. Seven miRNA families were identified. Meaningful regulations of target transcript by identified miRNAs were computationally evaluated. Four miRNA families have been reported by us for the first time from the Lamiaceae. Our results further confirmed that uracil was the predominant base in the first positions of identified mature miRNA sequence, while adenine and uracil were predominant in pre-miRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out to determine the relation between O. basilicum and other plant pre-miRNAs. Thirteen potential targets were evaluated for 4 miRNA families. Majority of the identified target transcripts regulated by miRNAs showed response to stress. miRNA 5021 was also indicated for playing an important role in the amino acid metabolism and co-factor metabolism in this plant. To the best of our knowledge this is the first in silico study describing miRNAs and their regulation in different metabolic pathways of O. basilicum. PMID:25256277

  18. Methylation of miRNA genes in the response to temperature stress in Populus simonii

    PubMed Central

    Ci, Dong; Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation and miRNAs provide crucial regulation of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional responses to abiotic stress. In this study, we used methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphisms to identify 1066 sites that were differentially methylated in response to temperature stress in Populus simonii. Among these loci, BLAST searches of miRBase identified seven miRNA genes. Expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR suggested that the methylation pattern of these miRNA genes probably influences their expression. Annotation of these miRNA genes in the sequenced genome of Populus trichocarpa found three target genes (Potri.007G090400, Potri.014G042200, and Potri.010G176000) for the miRNAs produced from five genes (Ptc-MIR396e and g, Ptc-MIR156i and j, and Ptc-MIR390c) respectively. The products of these target genes function in lipid metabolism to deplete lipid peroxide. We also constructed a network based on the interactions between DNA methylation and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes, and the products of target genes and the metabolic factors that they affect, including H2O2, malondialdehyde, catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase. Our results suggested that DNA methylation probably regulates the expression of miRNA genes, thus affecting expression of their target genes, likely through the gene-silencing function of miRNAs, to maintain cell survival under abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26579167

  19. Identification of miRNAs that modulate glucocerebrosidase activity in Gaucher disease cells.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Marina; Westbroek, Wendy; Chen, Yu-Chi; Moaven, Nima; Li, Yan; Velayati, Arash; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Martin, Scott E; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Although it is a monogenic disease, there is vast phenotypic heterogeneity, even among patients with the same genotype. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in many biological processes and diseases. To determine whether miRNAs can affect glucocerebrosidase activity, we performed a screen of 875 different miRNA mimics. The screen was performed using Gaucher fibroblasts, and glucocerebrosidase activity was used as the initial outcome parameter. We found several miRNAs that either up- or down-regulated glucocerebrosidase activity. In follow-up assays, we confirmed that one specific miRNA (miR-127-5p) down-regulated both glucocerebrosidase activity and protein levels by down-regulation of LIMP-2, the receptor involved in proper trafficking of glucocerebrosidase from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lysosome. A conditioned media assay demonstrated that cells treated with this miRNA secreted glucocerebrosidase into the extracellular environment, supporting impaired LIMP-2 function. Two other miRNAs, miR-16-5p and miR-195-5p, were found to up-regulate glucocerebrosidase activity by greater than 40% and to enhance expression and protein levels of the enzyme. In conclusion, we show that miRNAs can alter glucocerebrosidase activity in patient cells, indicating that miRNAs can potentially act as modifiers in Gaucher disease. PMID:25584808

  20. Identification of miRNAs that modulate glucocerebrosidase activity in Gaucher disease cells

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Marina; Westbroek, Wendy; Chen, Yu-Chi; Moaven, Nima; Li, Yan; Velayati, Arash; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Martin, Scott E; Sidransky, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Although it is a monogenic disease, there is vast phenotypic heterogeneity, even among patients with the same genotype. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in many biological processes and diseases. To determine whether miRNAs can affect glucocerebrosidase activity, we performed a screen of 875 different miRNA mimics. The screen was performed using Gaucher fibroblasts, and glucocerebrosidase activity was used as the initial outcome parameter. We found several miRNAs that either up- or down-regulated glucocerebrosidase activity. In follow-up assays, we confirmed that one specific miRNA (miR-127–5p) down-regulated both glucocerebrosidase activity and protein levels by down-regulation of LIMP-2, the receptor involved in proper trafficking of glucocerebrosidase from the endoplasmic reticulum to the lysosome. A conditioned media assay demonstrated that cells treated with this miRNA secreted glucocerebrosidase into the extracellular environment, supporting impaired LIMP-2 function. Two other miRNAs, miR-16–5p and miR-195–5p, were found to up-regulate glucocerebrosidase activity by greater than 40% and to enhance expression and protein levels of the enzyme. In conclusion, we show that miRNAs can alter glucocerebrosidase activity in patient cells, indicating that miRNAs can potentially act as modifiers in Gaucher disease. PMID:25584808

  1. Conserved miRNAs and Their Response to Salt Stress in Wild Eggplant Solanum linnaeanum Roots

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yong; Zhou, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The Solanaceae family includes some important vegetable crops, and they often suffer from salinity stress. Some miRNAs have been identified to regulate gene expression in plant response to salt stress; however, little is known about the involvement of miRNAs in Solanaceae species. To identify salt-responsive miRNAs, high-throughput sequencing was used to sequence libraries constructed from roots of the salt tolerant species, Solanum linnaeanum, treated with and without NaCl. The sequencing identified 98 conserved miRNAs corresponding to 37 families, and some of these miRNAs and their expression were verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Under the salt stress, 11 of the miRNAs were down-regulated, and 3 of the miRNAs were up-regulated. Potential targets of the salt-responsive miRNAs were predicted to be involved in diverse cellular processes in plants. This investigation provides valuable information for functional characterization of miRNAs in S. linnaeanum, and would be useful for developing strategies for the genetic improvement of the Solanaceae crops. PMID:24413753

  2. miRiadne: a web tool for consistent integration of miRNA nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Bonnal, Raoul J. P.; Rossi, Riccardo L.; Carpi, Donatella; Ranzani, Valeria; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    The miRBase is the official miRNA repository which keeps the annotation updated on newly discovered miRNAs: it is also used as a reference for the design of miRNA profiling platforms. Nomenclature ambiguities generated by loosely updated platforms and design errors lead to incompatibilities among platforms, even from the same vendor. Published miRNA lists are thus generated with different profiling platforms that refer to diverse and not updated annotations. This greatly compromises searches, comparisons and analyses that rely on miRNA names only without taking into account the mature sequences, which is particularly critic when such analyses are carried over automatically. In this paper we introduce miRiadne, a web tool to harmonize miRNA nomenclature, which takes into account the original miRBase versions from 10 up to 21, and annotations of 40 common profiling platforms from nine brands that we manually curated. miRiadne uses the miRNA mature sequence to link miRBase versions and/or platforms to prevent nomenclature ambiguities. miRiadne was designed to simplify and support biologists and bioinformaticians in re-annotating their own miRNA lists and/or data sets. As Ariadne helped Theseus in escaping the mythological maze, miRiadne will help the miRNA researcher in escaping the nomenclature maze. miRiadne is freely accessible from the URL http://www.miriadne.org. PMID:25897123

  3. Profiling cell-free and circulating miRNA: a clinical diagnostic tool for different cancers.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Das, Srijit

    2016-05-01

    Effective cancer management depends on early diagnosis and treatment. There are several microRNAs (miRNAs) which are used for detection of various cancers. Cell-free and circulating miRNAs originate from plasma, either from blood cells or endothelial cells. Cell-free and circulating miRNAs are very much important in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer therapy. Admittedly, biological knowledge of extracellular miRNAs is still at its preliminary level. Recent discoveries of novel cell-free and circulating miRNAs from the body fluids are now being considered as important biomarkers that may help us in the early diagnosis of any cancer. In the present review, we highlight the biogenesis of miRNAs and their current extracellular pattern, the discovery of circulating miRNA, significant advantages, and different profiling techniques. Finally, we discuss the different circulating miRNAs such as miR-21, miR-20a, miR-155, miR‑221, miR-210, miR-218, miR-200-family, miR-141, miR-122, miR-486-5p, miR‑423-5p, miR-29a, and miR-500 for clinical diagnosis of various cancers. The present review may be beneficial for future researches concerned with miRNAs which are used for detection of various cancers. PMID:26831657

  4. Identifying relevant group of miRNAs in cancer using fuzzy mutual information.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jayanta Kumar; Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as a major biomarker of cancer. All miRNAs in human body are not equally important for cancer identification. We propose a methodology, called FMIMS, which automatically selects the most relevant miRNAs for a particular type of cancer. In FMIMS, miRNAs are initially grouped by using a SVM-based algorithm; then the group with highest relevance is determined and the miRNAs in that group are finally ranked for selection according to their redundancy. Fuzzy mutual information is used in computing the relevance of a group and the redundancy of miRNAs within it. Superiority of the most relevant group to all others, in deciding normal or cancer, is demonstrated on breast, renal, colorectal, lung, melanoma and prostate data. The merit of FMIMS as compared to several existing methods is established. While 12 out of 15 selected miRNAs by FMIMS corroborate with those of biological investigations, three of them viz., "hsa-miR-519," "hsa-miR-431" and "hsa-miR-320c" are possible novel predictions for renal cancer, lung cancer and melanoma, respectively. The selected miRNAs are found to be involved in disease-specific pathways by targeting various genes. The method is also able to detect the responsible miRNAs even at the primary stage of cancer. The related code is available at http://www.jayanta.droppages.com/FMIMS.html . PMID:26264058

  5. Endogenous Repair Signaling after Brain Injury and Complementary Bioengineering Approaches to Enhance Neural Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Addington, Caroline P; Roussas, Adam; Dutta, Dipankar; Stabenfeldt, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects 5.3 million Americans annually. Despite the many long-term deficits associated with TBI, there currently are no clinically available therapies that directly address the underlying pathologies contributing to these deficits. Preclinical studies have investigated various therapeutic approaches for TBI: two such approaches are stem cell transplantation and delivery of bioactive factors to mitigate the biochemical insult affiliated with TBI. However, success with either of these approaches has been limited largely due to the complexity of the injury microenvironment. As such, this review outlines the many factors of the injury microenvironment that mediate endogenous neural regeneration after TBI and the corresponding bioengineering approaches that harness these inherent signaling mechanisms to further amplify regenerative efforts. PMID:25983552

  6. Endogenous neurogenic cell response in the mature mammalian brain following traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In the mature mammalian brain, new neurons are generated throughout life in the neurogenic regions of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. Over the past two decades, extensive studies have examined the extent of adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and DG, the role of the adult generated new neurons in normal brain function and the underlying mechanisms regulating the process of adult neurogenesis. The extent and the function of adult neurogenesis under neuropathological conditions have also been explored in varying types of disease models in animals. Increasing evidence has indicated that these endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells may play regenerative and reparative roles in response to CNS injuries or diseases. This review will discuss the potential functions of adult neurogenesis in the injured brain and will describe the recent development of strategies aimed at harnessing this neurogenic capacity in order to repopulate and repair the injured brain following trauma. PMID:25936874

  7. 14 CFR 27.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and... Cargo Accommodations § 27.785 Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses. (a) Each seat, safety belt, harness, and adjacent part of the rotorcraft at each station designated for occupancy...

  8. 14 CFR 91.107 - Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and child restraint systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...), booster-type child restraint systems (as defined in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard No. 213 (49 CFR... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Flight Rules General § 91.107 Use of safety belts, shoulder harnesses, and...

  9. 14 CFR 29.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and... and Cargo Accommodations § 29.785 Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and harnesses. (a) Each seat, safety belt, harness, and adjacent part of the rotorcraft at each station designated for occupancy...

  10. 42 CFR 84.116 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... components of the gas mask in position against the wearer's body. (b) Harnesses shall be designed and constructed to permit easy removal and replacement of gas mask parts, and where applicable, provide for... DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.116 Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. (a) Each...

  11. 42 CFR 84.116 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... components of the gas mask in position against the wearer's body. (b) Harnesses shall be designed and constructed to permit easy removal and replacement of gas mask parts, and where applicable, provide for... DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.116 Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. (a) Each...

  12. 42 CFR 84.116 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... components of the gas mask in position against the wearer's body. (b) Harnesses shall be designed and constructed to permit easy removal and replacement of gas mask parts, and where applicable, provide for... DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.116 Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. (a) Each...

  13. 42 CFR 84.116 - Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... components of the gas mask in position against the wearer's body. (b) Harnesses shall be designed and constructed to permit easy removal and replacement of gas mask parts, and where applicable, provide for... DEVICES Gas Masks § 84.116 Harnesses; installation and construction; minimum requirements. (a) Each...

  14. Harnessing the Power of Information Technology: Open Business Models in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheets, Robert G.; Crawford, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Higher education is under enormous pressure to improve outcomes and reduce costs. Information technology can help achieve these goals, but only if it is properly harnessed. This article argues that one key to harnessing information technology is business model innovation that results in more "open" and "unbundled" operations in learning and…

  15. 14 CFR 135.171 - Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations. 135.171 Section 135.171 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... harness installed for each flight crewmember station. (b) Each flight crewmember occupying a...

  16. 14 CFR 135.171 - Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations. 135.171 Section 135.171 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... harness installed for each flight crewmember station. (b) Each flight crewmember occupying a...

  17. 14 CFR 135.171 - Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations. 135.171 Section 135.171 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... harness installed for each flight crewmember station. (b) Each flight crewmember occupying a...

  18. 14 CFR 135.171 - Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations. 135.171 Section 135.171 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... harness installed for each flight crewmember station. (b) Each flight crewmember occupying a...

  19. 14 CFR 135.171 - Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shoulder harness installation at flight crewmember stations. 135.171 Section 135.171 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... harness installed for each flight crewmember station. (b) Each flight crewmember occupying a...

  20. 14 CFR 105.43 - Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of single-harness, dual-parachute... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and Packing § 105.43 Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems. No person may conduct a...

  1. 14 CFR 105.43 - Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of single-harness, dual-parachute... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and Packing § 105.43 Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems. No person may conduct a...

  2. 14 CFR 105.43 - Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of single-harness, dual-parachute... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and Packing § 105.43 Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems. No person may conduct a...

  3. 14 CFR 105.43 - Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of single-harness, dual-parachute... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and Packing § 105.43 Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems. No person may conduct a...

  4. 14 CFR 105.43 - Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of single-harness, dual-parachute... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES PARACHUTE OPERATIONS Parachute Equipment and Packing § 105.43 Use of single-harness, dual-parachute systems. No person may conduct a...

  5. Cancer Dormancy: A Regulatory Role for Endogenous Immunity in Establishing and Maintaining the Tumor Dormant State

    PubMed Central

    Baxevanis, Constantin N.; Perez, Sonia A.

    2015-01-01

    The significant contribution of host immunity in early tumorigenesis has been recently recognized as a result of our better understanding of the molecular pathways regulating tumor cell biology and tumor-lymphocyte interactions. Emerging evidence suggests that disseminated dormant tumor cells derived from primary tumors before or after immune surveillance, are responsible for subsequent metastases. Recent trends from the field of onco-immunology suggest that efficiently stimulating endogenous anticancer immunity is a prerequisite for the successful outcome of conventional cancer therapies. Harnessing the immune system to achieve clinical efficacy is realistic in the context of conventional therapies resulting in immunogenic cell death and/or immunostimulatory side effects. Targeted therapies designed to target oncogenic pathways in tumor cells can also positively regulate the endogenous immune response and tumor microenvironment. Identification of T cell inhibitory signals has prompted the development of immune checkpoint inhibitors, which specifically hinder immune effector inhibition, reinvigorating and potentially expanding the preexisting anticancer immune response. This anticancer immunity can be amplified in the setting of immunotherapies, mostly in the form of vaccines, which boost naturally occurring T cell clones specifically recognizing tumor antigens. Thus, a promising anticancer therapy will aim to activate patients’ naturally occurring anticancer immunity either to eliminate residual tumor cells or to prolong dormancy in disseminated tumor cells. Such an endogenous anticancer immunity plays a significant role for controlling the balance between dormant tumor cells and tumor escape, and restraining metastases. In this review, we mean to suggest that anticancer therapies aiming to stimulate the endogenous antitumor responses provide the concept of the therapeutic management of cancer. PMID:26350597

  6. Clinical value of integrated-signature miRNAs in colorectal cancer: miRNA expression profiling analysis and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YuQun; Song, Mei; Zhou, Wu; Tu, HongXiang; Lin, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiling of colorectal cancer (CRC) are often inconsistent among different studies. To determine candidate miRNA biomarkers for CRC, we performed an integrative analysis of miRNA expression profiling compared CRC tissues and paired neighboring noncancerous colorectal tissues. Using robust rank aggregation method, we identified a miRNA set of 10 integrated-signature miRNAs. In addition, the qRT-PCR validation demonstrated that 9 miRNAs were consistent dysregulated with the integrative analysis in CRC tissues, 4 miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-183-5p, miR-17-5p and miR-20a-5p) were up-regulated expression, and 5 miRNAs (miR-145-5p, miR-195-5p, miR-139-5p, miR-378a-5p and miR-143-3p) were down-regulated expression (all p < 0.05). Consistent with the initial analysis, 7 miRNAs were found to be significantly dysregulated in CRC tissues in TCGA data base, 4 miRNAs (miR-21-5p, miR-183-5p, miR-17-5p and miR-20a-5p) were significantly up-regulated expression, and 3 miRNAs (miR-145-5p, miR-139-5p and miR-378a-5p) were significantly down-regulated expression in CRC tissues (all p < 0.001). Furthermore, miR-17-5p (p = 0.011) and miR-20a-5p (p = 0.003) were up-regulated expression in the III/IV tumor stage, miR-145-5p (p = 0.028) and miR-195-5p (p = 0.001) were significantly increased expression with microscopic vascular invasion in CRC tissues, miR-17-5p (p = 0.037) and miR-145-5p (p = 0.023) were significantly increased expression with lymphovascular invasion. Moreover, Cox regression analysis of CRC patients in TCGA data base showed miR-20a-5p was correlated with survival (hazard ratio: 1.875, 95%CI: 1.088–3.232, p = 0.024). Hence, the finding of current study provides a basic implication of these miRNAs for further clinical application in CRC. PMID:26462034

  7. miRNA-197 and miRNA-223 Predict Cardiovascular Death in a Cohort of Patients with Symptomatic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Appelbaum, Sebastian; Karakas, Mahir; Ojeda, Francisco; Lau, Denise M.; Hartmann, Tim; Lackner, Karl J.; Westermann, Dirk; Schnabel, Renate B.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have been described as potential diagnostic biomarkers in cardiovascular disease and in particular, coronary artery disease (CAD). Few studies were undertaken to perform analyses with regard to risk stratification of future cardiovascular events. miR-126, miR-197 and miR-223 are involved in endovascular inflammation and platelet activation and have been described as biomarkers in the diagnosis of CAD. They were identified in a prospective study in relation to future myocardial infarction. Objectives The aim of our study was to further evaluate the prognostic value of these miRNAs in a large prospective cohort of patients with documented CAD. Methods Levels of miR-126, miR-197 and miR-223 were evaluated in serum samples of 873 CAD patients with respect to the endpoint cardiovascular death. miRNA quantification was performed using real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Results The median follow-up period was 4 years (IQR 2.78–5.04). The median age of all patients was 64 years (IQR 57–69) with 80.2% males. 38.9% of the patients presented with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), 61.1% were diagnosed with stable angina pectoris (SAP). Elevated levels of miRNA-197 and miRNA-223 reliably predicted future cardiovascular death in the overall group (miRNA-197: hazard ratio (HR) 1.77 per one standard deviation (SD) increase (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20; 2.60), p = 0.004, C-index 0.78; miRNA-223: HR 2.23 per one SD increase (1.20; 4.14), p = 0.011, C-index 0.80). In ACS patients the prognostic power of both miRNAs was even higher (miRNA-197: HR 2.24 per one SD increase (1.25; 4.01), p = 0.006, C-index 0.89); miRA-223: HR 4.94 per one SD increase (1.42; 17.20), p = 0.012, C-index 0.89). Conclusion Serum-derived circulating miRNA-197 and miRNA-223 were identified as predictors for cardiovascular death in a large patient cohort with CAD. These results reinforce the assumption that circulating miRNAs are promising biomarkers

  8. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Vrba, Lukas; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  9. Alterations in miRNA Levels in the Dentate Gyrus in Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Anna Maria; Dębski, Konrad Józef; Lukasiuk, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize changes in miRNA expression in the epileptic dentate gyrus. Status epilepticus evoked by amygdala stimulation was used to induce epilepsy in rats. The dentate gyri were isolated at 7 d, 14 d, 30 d and 90 d after stimulation (n=5). Sham-operated time-matched controls were prepared for each time point (n=5). The miRNA expression was evaluated using Exiqon microarrays. Additionally, mRNA from the same animals was profiled using Affymetrix microarrays. We detected miRNA expression signatures that differentiate between control and epileptic animals. Significant changes in miRNA expression between stimulated and sham operated animals were observed at 7 and 30 d following stimulation. Moreover, we found that there are ensembles of miRNAs that change expression levels over time. Analysis of the mRNA expression from the same animals revealed that the expression of several mRNAs that are potential targets for miRNA with altered expression level is regulated in the expected direction. The functional characterization of miRNAs and their potential mRNA targets indicate that miRNA can participate in several molecular events that occur in epileptic tissue, including immune response and neuronal plasticity. This is the first report on changes in the expression of miRNA and the potential functional impact of these changes in the dentate gyrus of epileptic animals. Complex changes in the expression of miRNAs suggest an important role for miRNA in the molecular mechanisms of epilepsy. PMID:24146813

  10. Altered expression of miRNAs in a dihydrotestosterone-induced rat PCOS model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex and heterogeneous endocrine condition characterized by hyperandrogenism, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and chronic anovulation. Regulation and interaction of a multitude of genes required for follicular development are found to be altered in PCOS. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) mediate posttranscriptional gene regulation by binding to the 3´ untranslated region of mRNAs to either inhibit or enhance translation. However, the extent and regulation of miRNA expression in PCOS is poorly understood and the current study is the first to describe altered expression of miRNAs in PCOS. Methods A chronically androgenized [5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated] rat model which recapitulates many of the phenotypes of human PCOS, and miRNA PCR array was used to investigate the expression of 349 miRNAs in DHT treated rat ovaries. The ovarian expression of several selected miRNAs was also analyzed by in situ localization experiment. Results DHT-treated rats exhibit increased body weight, disrupted estrus cyclicity, decreased insulin sensitivity and decreased ovarian weight, with the latter phenomenon readily rescued by gonadotropin treatment in vivo. In general, 24% of the 349 miRNAs investigated were found to be differentially expressed between DHT-treated and control rats. Most of the differentially expressed miRNAs were found to be predominantly localized in the theca cells of the follicles. In silico analysis of the potential target genes of dysregulated miRNAs revealed their possible involvement in various pathways in the regulation of ovarian function. Conclusion Our current findings suggest that miRNAs are differentially regulated in hyperandrogenism, a condition possibly involved in the dysregulation of steroid hormone receptors and intra-ovarian factors, and that miRNAs may be involved in the etiology of PCOS. PMID:23675970

  11. Role of Alix in miRNA packaging during extracellular vesicle biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    IAVELLO, ALESSANDRA; FRECH, VALESKA S.L.; GAI, CHIARA; DEREGIBUS, MARIA CHIARA; QUESENBERRY, PETER J.; CAMUSSI, GIOVANNI

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that Alix, an accessory protein of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT), is involved in the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs contain selected patterns of microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs); however, little is known about the mechanisms of miRNA enrichment in EVs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether Alix is involved in the packaging of miRNAs within EVs released by human liver stem-like cells (HLSCs). EVs released from HLSCs were enriched with miRNAs and expressed Alix and several RNA-binding proteins, including Argonaute 2 (Ago2), a member of the Argonaute family known to be involved in the transport and the processing of miRNAs. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed an association between Alix and Ago2. The results from RT-qPCR indicated that in the Alix/Ago2 immunoprecipitates, miRNAs were detectable. EVs were instrumental in transferring selected miRNAs from HLSCs to human endothelial cells absent in the latter cells. Alix knockdown did not influence the number of EVs released by HLSCs, but it significantly decreased miRNA expression levels in the EVs and consequently their transfer to the endothelium. Our findings indicate that Alix binds to Ago2 and miRNAs, suggesting that it plays a key role in miRNA enrichment during EV biogenesis. These results may represent a novel function of Alix, demonstrating its involvement in the EV-mediated transfer of miRNAs. PMID:26935291

  12. The lncRNA H19 promotes epithelial to mesenchymal transition by functioning as miRNA sponges in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wei-Cheng; Fu, Wei-Ming; Wong, Cheuk-Wa; Wang, Yan; Wang, Wei-Mao; Hu, Guo-Xin; Zhang, Li; Xiao, Li-Jia; Wan, David Chi-Cheong; Zhang, Jin-Fang; Waye, Mary Miu-Yee

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) H19 has been identified as an oncogenic gene in multiple cancer types and elevated expression of H19 was tightly linked to tumorigenesis and cancer progression. However, the molecular basis for this observation has not been characterized in colorectal cancer (CRC) especially during epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) progression. In our studies, H19 was characterized as a novel regulator of EMT in CRC. We found that H19 was highly expressed in mesenchymal-like cancer cells and primary CRC tissues. Stable expression of H19 significantly promotes EMT progression and accelerates in vivo and in vitro tumor growth. Furthermore, by using bioinformatics study and RNA immunoprecipitation combined with luciferase reporter assays, we demonstrated that H19 functioned as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) for miR-138 and miR-200a, antagonized their functions and led to the de-repression of their endogenous targets Vimentin, ZEB1, and ZEB2, all of which were core marker genes for mesenchymal cells. Taken together, these observations imply that the lncRNA H19 modulated the expression of multiple genes involved in EMT by acting as a competing endogenous RNA, which may build up the missing link between the regulatory miRNA network and EMT progression. PMID:26068968

  13. Targeting of Runx2 by miRNA-135 and miRNA-203 Impairs Progression of Breast Cancer and Metastatic Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taipaleenmäki, Hanna; Browne, Gillian; Akech, Jacqueline; Zustin, Jozef; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Hesse, Eric; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2015-01-01

    Progression of breast cancer to metastatic bone disease is linked to deregulated expression of the transcription factor Runx2. Therefore, our goal was to evaluate the potential for clinical use of Runx2-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) to reduce tumor growth and bone metastatic burden. Expression analysis of a panel of miRNAs regulating Runx2 revealed a reciprocal relationship between the abundance of Runx2 protein and two miRNAs, miR-135 and miR-203. These miRNAs are highly expressed in normal breast epithelial cells where Runx2 is not detected, and absent in metastatic breast cancer cells and tissue biopsies that express Runx2. Reconstituting metastatic MDA-MB-231-Luc cells with miR-135 and miR-203 reduced the abundance of Runx2 and expression of the metastasis-promoting Runx2 target genes IL-11, MMP-13, and PTHrP. Additionally, tumor cell viability was decreased and migration suppressed in vitro. Orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231-luc cells delivered with miR-135 or miR-203, followed by an intratumoral administration of the synthetic miRNAs reduced the tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis to bone. Furthermore, intratibial injection of these miRNA-delivered cells impaired tumor growth in the bone environment and inhibited bone resorption. Importantly, reconstitution of Runx2 in MDA-MB-231-luc cells delivered with miR-135 and miR-203 reversed the inhibitory effect of the miRNAs on tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, we have identified that aberrant expression of Runx2 in aggressive tumor cells is related to the loss of specific Runx2-targeting miRNAs and that a clinically relevant replacement strategy by delivery of synthetic miRNAs is a candidate therapeutic approach to prevent metastatic bone disease by this route. PMID:25634212

  14. miRNAs Need a Trim : Regulation of miRNA Activity by Trim-NHL Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wulczyn, F Gregory; Cuevas, Elisa; Franzoni, Eleonora; Rybak, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    Trim-NHL proteins are defined by RING, B-Box and Coiled-coil protein motifs (referred to collectively as the Trim domain) coupled to an NHL domain. The C. elegans, D. melanogaster, mouse and human Trim-NHL proteins are potential and in several cases confirmed, E3 ubiquitin ligases. Current research is focused on identifying targets and pathways for Trim-NHL-mediated ubiquitination and in assessing the contribution of the NHL protein-protein interaction domain for function and specificity. Several Trim-NHL proteins were discovered in screens for developmental genes in model organisms; mutations in one of the family members, Trim32, cause developmental disturbances in humans. In most instances, mutations that alter protein function map to the NHL domain. The NHL domain is a scaffold for the assembly of a translational repressor complex by the Brat proto-oncogene, a well-studied family member in Drosophila. The link to translational control is common to at least four Trim-NHLs that associate with miRNA pathway proteins. So far, two have been shown to repress (Mei-P26 and Lin41) and two to promote (NHL-2, Trim32) miRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this chapter we will describe structure-function relations for each of the proteins and then focus on the lessons being learned from these proteins about miRNA functions in development and in stem cell biology. PMID:21755476

  15. MiRNA need a TRIM regulation of miRNA activity by Trim-NHL proteins.

    PubMed

    Wulczyn, F Gregory; Cuevas, Elisa; Franzoni, Eleonora; Rybak, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Trim-NHL proteins are defined by RING, B-Box and Coiled-coil protein motifs (referred to collectively as the Trim domain) coupled to an NHL domain. The C. elegans, D. melanogaster, mouse and human Trim-NHL proteins are potential and in several cases confirmed, E3 ubiquitin ligases. Current research is focused on identifying targets and pathways for Trim-NHL-mediated ubiquitination and in assessing the contribution of the NHL protein-protein interactiondomain for function and specificity. Several Trim-NHL proteins were discovered in screens for developmental genes in model organisms; mutations in one of the family members, Trim32, cause developmental disturbances in humans. In most instances, mutations that alter protein function map to the NHL domain. The NHL domain is a scaffold for the assembly of a translational repressor complex by the Brat proto-oncogene, a well-studied family member in Drosophila. The link to translational control is common to at least four Trim-NHLs that associate with miRNA pathway proteins. So far, two have been shown to repress (Mei-P26 and Lin41) and two to promote (NHL-2, Trim32) miRNA-mediated gene silencing. In this chapter we will describe structure-function relations for each of the proteins and then focus on the lessons being learned from these proteins about miRNA functions in development and in stem cell biology. PMID:21627033

  16. Dysregulation of miRNA isoform level at 5' end in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengqin; Xu, Yuming; Li, Musheng; Tu, Jing; Lu, Zuhong

    2016-06-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, whose mechanism is still not yet fully understood. A miRNA-based signature method, commonly according to the changes of expression levels, is widely used for AD analysis in previous studies. Recently, miRNA isoforms called as isomiR variants, which is considered to play important biological roles, have been demonstrated as the applications of high throughput sequencing platforms. Here, we presented an entropy-based model to detect the miRNA isoform level at the 5' end, and found many miRNAs with significant changes of isoform levels between the early stage and the late stage of AD by the application of this model to the public data. The statistical significance of the overlap between isoform-level changed miRNAs and AD related miRNAs extracted from HMDD2 supports that these miRNA isoforms are not degradation products. Based on the most common isomiR seed analysis of isoform-level changed AD related miRNAs, the predicted targets are also found to be enriched for genes involved in transcriptional regulation and the nervous system. After comparing with the expression level based method, we detected that changes of 5' isoform levels are more stable than those of expression levels for AD related miRNA detecting. PMID:26899870

  17. Apple miRNAs and tasiRNAs with novel regulatory networks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MiRNAs, negatively affecting gene expression at the post-transcriptional levels, have been shown to control numerous genes involved in various biological and metabolic processes. To date, the identification of miRNAs in plants focused on certain model plants, such as Arabidopsis and rice. Investig...

  18. Identification, evolution, and expression partitioning of miRNAs in allopolyploid Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Shen, Enhui; Zou, Jun; Hubertus Behrens, Falk; Chen, Li; Ye, Chuyu; Dai, Shutao; Li, Ruiyan; Ni, Meng; Jiang, Xiaoxue; Qiu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Wang, Weidi; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Chalhoub, Boulos; Bancroft, Ian; Meng, Jinling; Cai, Daguang; Fan, Longjiang

    2015-12-01

    The recently published genome of Brassica napus offers for the first time the opportunity to gain insights into the genomic organization and the evolution of miRNAs in oilseed rape. In this study, 12 small RNA libraries from two B. napus cultivars (Tapidor and Ningyou7) and their four double-haploid lines were sequenced, employing the newly sequenced B. napus genome, together with genomes of its progenitors Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea. A total of 645 miRNAs including 280 conserved and 365 novel miRNAs were identified. Comparative analysis revealed a high level of genomic conservation of MIRNAs (75.9%) between the subgenomes of B. napus and its two progenitors' genomes, and MIRNA lost/gain events (133) occurred in B. napus after its speciation. Furthermore, significant partitioning of miRNA expressions between the two subgenomes in B. napus was detected. The data of degradome sequencing, miRNA-mediated cleavage, and expression analyses support specific interactions between miRNAs and their targets in the modulation of diverse physiological processes in roots and leaves, as well as in biosynthesis of, for example, glucosinolates and lipids in oilseed rape. These data provide a first genome-wide view on the origin, evolution, and genomic organization of B. napus MIRNAs. PMID:26357884

  19. New miRNAs network in human mesenchymal stem cells derived from skin and amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Lazzarini, R; Sorgentoni, G; Caffarini, M; Sayeed, M A; Olivieri, F; Di Primio, R; Orciani, M

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), isolated from different adult sources, have great appeal for therapeutic applications due to their simple isolation, extensive expansion potential, and high differentiative potential.In our previous studies we isolated MSCs form amniotic fluid (AF-MSCs) and skin (S-MSCs) and characterized them according to their phenotype, pluripotency, and mRNA/microRNAs (miRNAs) profiling using Card A from Life Technologies.Here, we enlarge the profiling of AF-MCSs and S-MSCs to the more recently discovered miRNAs (Card B by Life Technologies) to identify the miRNAs putative target genes and the relative signaling pathways. Card B, in fact, contains miRNAs whose role and target are not yet elucidated.The expression of the analyzed miRNAs is changing between S-MSCs and AF-MSCs, indicating that these two types of MSCs show differences potentially related to their source. Interestingly, the pathways targeted by the miRNAS deriving from Card B are the same found during the analysis of miRNAs from Card A.This result confirms the key role played by WNT and TGF-β pathways in stem cell fate, underlining as other miRNAs partially ignored up to now deserve to be reconsidered. In addition, this analysis allows including Adherens junction pathways among the mechanisms finely regulated in stem cell behavior. PMID:26684628

  20. miRNA143 Induces K562 Cell Apoptosis Through Downregulating BCR-ABL

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bing; Song, Yanbin; Zheng, Wenling; Ma, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    Background Leukemia seriously threats human health and life. MicroRNA regulates cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle. Whether microRNA could be treated as a target for leukemia is still unclear and the mechanism by which microRNA143 regulates K562 cells needs further investigation. Material/Methods miRNA143 and its scramble miRNA were synthesized and transfected to K562 cells. MTT assay was used to detect K562 cell proliferation. Flow cytometry and a caspase-3 activity detection kit were used to test K562 cell apoptosis. Western blot analysis was performed to determine breakpoint cluster region-Abelson (BCR-ABL) expression. BCR-ABL overexpression and siRNA were used to change BCR-ABL level, and cell apoptosis was detected again after lipofection transfection. Results miRNA143 transfection inhibited K562 cell growth and induced its apoptosis. miRNA143 transfection decreased BCR-ABL expression. BCR-ABL overexpression suppressed miRNA143-induced K562 cell apoptosis, while its reduction enhanced miRNA143-induced apoptosis. Conclusions miRNA143 induced K562 cell apoptosis through downregulating BCR-ABL. miRNA143 might be a target for a new leukemia therapy. PMID:27492780

  1. Characterization of miRNAs from hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yadong; He, Yaodong; Wang, Chunsheng; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent shrimp Rimicaris exoculata is a dominant species aggregating in vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Ridge. MicroRNAs play important roles in life cycles of eukaryotes. However, little is known about miRNAs of vent animals. In the present study, a small RNA cDNA library from the muscle of R. exoculata was constructed and the miRNA sequencing was performed. The results indicated that a total of 7,983,331 raw reads were obtained, representing 569,354 unique sequences. Based on sequence analysis, R. exoculata contained 159 conserved miRNAs and 34 novel miRNAs. The conserved miRNAs included 54 families belonging to three different taxonomic units (bilaterian, protostomes and arthropods). The results also showed that miR-2001, a lost miRNA in crustaceans, existed in R. exoculata. Among the conserved miRNAs, iso-miRs were detected. Therefore, this study presented the first insight into the miRNAs of deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals. PMID:26439286

  2. Identification and Characterization of Salvia miltiorrhizain miRNAs in Response to Replanting Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaole; Liu, Lin; He, Zhigui; Yang, Shushen; Liang, Zongsuo; Yan, Xijun; He, Yanfeng; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Replanting disease is a major factor limiting the artificial cultivation of the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. At present, little information is available regarding the role of miRNAs in response to replanting disease. In this study, two small RNA libraries obtained from first-year (FPR) and second-year plant (SPR) roots were subjected to a high-throughput sequencing method. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 110 known and 7 novel miRNAs were annotated in the roots of S. miltiorrhiza. Moreover, 39 known and 2 novel miRNAs were identified and validated for differential expression in FPR compared with SPR. Thirty-one of these miRNAs were further analyzed by qRT-PCR, which revealed that 5 miRNAs negatively regulated the expression levels of 7 target genes involved in root development or stress responses. This study not only provides novel insights into the miRNA content of S. miltiorrhiza in response to replanting disease but also demonstrates that 5 miRNAs may be involved in these responses. Interactions among the differentially expressed miRNAs with their targets may form an important component of the molecular basis of replanting disease in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:27483013

  3. Transcription Factors Are Targeted by Differentially Expressed miRNAs in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Dannemann, Michael; Prüfer, Kay; Lizano, Esther; Nickel, Birgit; Burbano, Hernán A.; Kelso, Janet

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules involved in the regulation of mammalian gene expression. Together with other transcription regulators, miRNAs modulate the expression of genes and thereby potentially contribute to tissue and species diversity. To identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed between tissues and/or species, and the genes regulated by these, we have quantified expression of miRNAs and messenger RNAs in five tissues from multiple human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque individuals using high-throughput sequencing. The breadth of this tissue and species data allows us to show that downregulation of target genes by miRNAs is more pronounced between tissues than between species and that downregulation is more pronounced for genes with fewer binding sites for expressed miRNAs. Intriguingly, we find that tissue- and species-specific miRNAs target transcription factor genes (TFs) significantly more often than expected. Through their regulatory effect on transcription factors, miRNAs may therefore exert an indirect influence on a larger proportion of genes than previously thought. PMID:22454130

  4. Deep-sequence profiling of miRNAs and their target prediction in Monotropa hypopitys.

    PubMed

    Shchennikova, Anna V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Shulga, Olga A; Mazur, Alexander M; Prokhortchouk, Egor B; Kochieva, Elena Z; Ravin, Nikolay V; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2016-07-01

    Myco-heterotroph Monotropa hypopitys is a widely spread perennial herb used to study symbiotic interactions and physiological mechanisms underlying the development of non-photosynthetic plant. Here, we performed, for the first time, transcriptome-wide characterization of M. hypopitys miRNA profile using high throughput Illumina sequencing. As a result of small RNA library sequencing and bioinformatic analysis, we identified 55 members belonging to 40 families of known miRNAs and 17 putative novel miRNAs unique for M. hypopitys. Computational screening revealed 206 potential mRNA targets for known miRNAs and 31 potential mRNA targets for novel miRNAs. The predicted target genes were described in Gene Ontology terms and were found to be involved in a broad range of metabolic and regulatory pathways. The identification of novel M. hypopitys-specific miRNAs, some with few target genes and low abundances, suggests their recent evolutionary origin and participation in highly specialized regulatory mechanisms fundamental for non-photosynthetic biology of M. hypopitys. This global analysis of miRNAs and their potential targets in M. hypopitys provides a framework for further investigation of miRNA role in the evolution and establishment of non-photosynthetic myco-heterotrophs. PMID:27097902

  5. Two novel aspects of the kinetics of gene expression including miRNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2013-04-01

    In eukaryotic cells, many genes are transcribed into non-coding RNAs. Small RNAs or, more specifically, microRNAs (miRNAs) form an abundant sub-class of such RNAs. miRNAs are transcribed as long noncoding RNA and then generated via a processing pathway down to the 20-24-nucleotide length. The key ability of miRNAs is to associate with target mRNAs and to suppress their translation and/or facilitate degradation. Using the mean-field kinetic equations and Monte Carlo simulations, we analyze two aspects of this interplay. First, we describe the situation when the formation of mRNA or miRNA is periodically modulated by a transcription factor which itself is not perturbed by these species. Depending on the ratio between the mRNA and miRNA formation rates, the corresponding induced periodic kinetics are shown to be either nearly harmonic or shaped as anti-phase pulses. The second part of the work is related to recent experimental studies indicating that differentiation of stem cells often involves changes in gene transcription into miRNAs and/or the interference between miRNAs, mRNAs and proteins. In particular, the regulatory protein obtained via mRNA translation may suppress the miRNA formation, and the latter may suppress in turn the miRNA-mRNA association and degradation. The corresponding bistable kinetics are described in detail.

  6. Differential expression profiling of miRNAs between Marek’s disease resistant and susceptible chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mounting evidence indicates microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in various biological processes including all aspects of cancer biology. The aim of this study was to profile and to assess the differences of miRNAs between the treatment groups of two lines of White Leghorns with or without viral ...

  7. Identification, evolution, and expression partitioning of miRNAs in allopolyploid Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Enhui; Zou, Jun; Hubertus Behrens, Falk; Chen, Li; Ye, Chuyu; Dai, Shutao; Li, Ruiyan; Ni, Meng; Jiang, Xiaoxue; Qiu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Wang, Weidi; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Chalhoub, Boulos; Bancroft, Ian; Meng, Jinling; Cai, Daguang; Fan, Longjiang

    2015-01-01

    The recently published genome of Brassica napus offers for the first time the opportunity to gain insights into the genomic organization and the evolution of miRNAs in oilseed rape. In this study, 12 small RNA libraries from two B. napus cultivars (Tapidor and Ningyou7) and their four double-haploid lines were sequenced, employing the newly sequenced B. napus genome, together with genomes of its progenitors Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea. A total of 645 miRNAs including 280 conserved and 365 novel miRNAs were identified. Comparative analysis revealed a high level of genomic conservation of MIRNAs (75.9%) between the subgenomes of B. napus and its two progenitors’ genomes, and MIRNA lost/gain events (133) occurred in B. napus after its speciation. Furthermore, significant partitioning of miRNA expressions between the two subgenomes in B. napus was detected. The data of degradome sequencing, miRNA-mediated cleavage, and expression analyses support specific interactions between miRNAs and their targets in the modulation of diverse physiological processes in roots and leaves, as well as in biosynthesis of, for example, glucosinolates and lipids in oilseed rape. These data provide a first genome-wide view on the origin, evolution, and genomic organization of B. napus MIRNAs. PMID:26357884

  8. Identification of Nutritional Stress-Responsive miRNAs in Phaseolus vulgaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators for Arabidopsis development and stress responses. A hybridization approach using miRNAs-macroarrays was used to identify miRNAs that respond to nutritional stress in Phaseolus vulgaris. miRNAs-macroarrays were prepared by printing nylon filters with DNA syntheti...

  9. Micromanaging metabolism-a role for miRNAs in teleost energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mennigen, Jan A

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-protein coding RNA sequences, which are found in most eukaryotes. Since their initial discovery, miRNAs have emerged as important regulators of many biological processes. One of the most important processes profoundly regulated by miRNAs is energy metabolism. Traditionally, metabolic functions of miRNAs have been studied in genome-sequenced mammalian organisms, especially the mouse model. However, partially driven by commercial interest in aquaculture, increasingly feasible large-scale molecular techniques have resulted in the characterization of miRNA repertoires, and importantly, several genome sequences of several (commercially important) teleost species, which also hold important roles as research models in the comparative physiology of energy metabolism. This review aims to introduce the recent advances in miRNA research in teleost fish and to describe the current knowledge of miRNA function in teleost energy metabolism. The most pressing research needs and questions to determine metabolic roles of miRNAs in teleost models are presented, as well as applicable technical approaches and current bottlenecks. Rainbow trout, which possess the advantages of newly available molecular tools and a long history as comparative research model in teleost energy metabolism, are discussed as a promising research model to address these questions. PMID:26384523

  10. MiRNA expression signatures induced by Marek disease virus infection in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Emerging evidence suggests that differential miRNA expression is associated with viral infection and cancer. Marek's disease virus infection induces lymphoma in chickens. However, the host...

  11. Spatiotemporal plasticity of miRNAs functions: The miR-17-92 case.

    PubMed

    Bonaldi, Tiziana; Mihailovich, Marija

    2016-05-01

    The functional effect of a specific miRNA is tightly linked to the transcriptome, thus having the potential to elicit distinct outcomes in different cellular states. Our recent discovery of a dual role of the miR-17-92 cluster, which shifts from oncogene to tumor suppressor during lymphoma progression, exemplifies the spatiotemporal plasticity of miRNAs. PMID:27314099

  12. miRNA-126 Orchestrates an Oncogenic Program in B Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nucera, Silvia; Giustacchini, Alice; Boccalatte, Francesco; Calabria, Andrea; Fanciullo, Cristiana; Plati, Tiziana; Ranghetti, Anna; Garcia-Manteiga, Jose; Cittaro, Davide; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Lechman, Eric R; Dick, John E; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ciceri, Fabio; Montini, Eugenio; Gentner, Bernhard; Naldini, Luigi

    2016-06-13

    MicroRNA (miRNA)-126 is a known regulator of hematopoietic stem cell quiescence. We engineered murine hematopoiesis to express miRNA-126 across all differentiation stages. Thirty percent of mice developed monoclonal B cell leukemia, which was prevented or regressed when a tetracycline-repressible miRNA-126 cassette was switched off. Regression was accompanied by upregulation of cell-cycle regulators and B cell differentiation genes, and downregulation of oncogenic signaling pathways. Expression of dominant-negative p53 delayed blast clearance upon miRNA-126 switch-off, highlighting the relevance of p53 inhibition in miRNA-126 addiction. Forced miRNA-126 expression in mouse and human progenitors reduced p53 transcriptional activity through regulation of multiple p53-related targets. miRNA-126 is highly expressed in a subset of human B-ALL, and antagonizing miRNA-126 in ALL xenograft models triggered apoptosis and reduced disease burden. PMID:27300437

  13. Harnessing click detectors for the genuine characterization of light states

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, René; Sperling, Jan; Perez-Leija, Armando; Gräfe, Markus; Heinrich, Matthias; Nolte, Stefan; Vogel, Werner; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The key requirement for harnessing the quantum properties of light is the capability to detect and count individual photons. Of particular interest are photon-number-resolving detectors, which allow one to determine whether a state of light is classical or genuinely quantum. Existing schemes for addressing this challenge rely on a proportional conversion of photons to electrons. As such, they are capable of correctly characterizing small photon fluxes, yet are limited by uncertainties in the conversion rate. In this work, we employ a divide-and-conquer approach to infallibly discerning non-classicality of states of light. This is achieved by transforming the incident fields into uniform spatial distributions that readily lend themselves for characterization by standard on-off detectors. Since the exact statistics of the light stream in multiplexed on-off detectors are click statistics, our technique is freely scalable to accommodate–in principle–arbitrarily large photon fluxes. Our experiments pave the way towards genuine integrated photon-number-resolving detection for advanced on-chip photonic quantum networks. PMID:26771053

  14. Harnessing click detectors for the genuine characterization of light states.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, René; Sperling, Jan; Perez-Leija, Armando; Gräfe, Markus; Heinrich, Matthias; Nolte, Stefan; Vogel, Werner; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The key requirement for harnessing the quantum properties of light is the capability to detect and count individual photons. Of particular interest are photon-number-resolving detectors, which allow one to determine whether a state of light is classical or genuinely quantum. Existing schemes for addressing this challenge rely on a proportional conversion of photons to electrons. As such, they are capable of correctly characterizing small photon fluxes, yet are limited by uncertainties in the conversion rate. In this work, we employ a divide-and-conquer approach to infallibly discerning non-classicality of states of light. This is achieved by transforming the incident fields into uniform spatial distributions that readily lend themselves for characterization by standard on-off detectors. Since the exact statistics of the light stream in multiplexed on-off detectors are click statistics, our technique is freely scalable to accommodate-in principle-arbitrarily large photon fluxes. Our experiments pave the way towards genuine integrated photon-number-resolving detection for advanced on-chip photonic quantum networks. PMID:26771053

  15. Harnessing the protective potential of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S Abigail; Derdeyn, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Recent biological, structural, and technical advances are converging within the HIV-1 vaccine field to harness the power of antibodies for prevention and therapy. Numerous monoclonal antibodies with broad neutralizing activity against diverse HIV-1 isolates have now been identified, revealing at least five sites of vulnerability on the envelope (Env) glycoproteins. While there are practical and technological barriers blocking a clear path from broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb) to a protective vaccine, this is not a dead end. Scientists are revisiting old approaches with new technology, cutting new trails through unexplored territory, and paving new roads in the hopes of preventing HIV-1 infection. Other promising avenues to capitalize on the power of bNAbs are also being pursued, such as passive antibody immunotherapy and gene therapy approaches. Moreover, non-neutralizing antibodies have inhibitory activities that could have protective potential, alone or in combination with bNAbs. With a new generation of bNAbs, and a clinical trial that associated antibodies with reduced acquisition, the field is closer than ever to developing strategies to use antibodies against HIV-1. PMID:26918160

  16. Harnessing click detectors for the genuine characterization of light states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilmann, René; Sperling, Jan; Perez-Leija, Armando; Gräfe, Markus; Heinrich, Matthias; Nolte, Stefan; Vogel, Werner; Szameit, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The key requirement for harnessing the quantum properties of light is the capability to detect and count individual photons. Of particular interest are photon-number-resolving detectors, which allow one to determine whether a state of light is classical or genuinely quantum. Existing schemes for addressing this challenge rely on a proportional conversion of photons to electrons. As such, they are capable of correctly characterizing small photon fluxes, yet are limited by uncertainties in the conversion rate. In this work, we employ a divide-and-conquer approach to infallibly discerning non-classicality of states of light. This is achieved by transforming the incident fields into uniform spatial distributions that readily lend themselves for characterization by standard on-off detectors. Since the exact statistics of the light stream in multiplexed on-off detectors are click statistics, our technique is freely scalable to accommodate-in principle-arbitrarily large photon fluxes. Our experiments pave the way towards genuine integrated photon-number-resolving detection for advanced on-chip photonic quantum networks.

  17. Abasic pivot substitution harnesses target specificity of RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Sook; Seok, Heeyoung; Lee, Dong Ha; Ham, Juyoung; Lee, Wooje; Youm, Emilia Moonkyung; Yoo, Jin Seon; Lee, Yong-Seung; Jang, Eun-Sook; Chi, Sung Wook

    2015-01-01

    Gene silencing via RNA interference inadvertently represses hundreds of off-target transcripts. Because small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can function as microRNAs, avoiding miRNA-like off-target repression is a major challenge. Functional miRNA–target interactions are known to pre-require transitional nucleation, base pairs from position 2 to the pivot (position 6). Here, by substituting nucleotide in pivot with abasic spacers, which prevent base pairing and alleviate steric hindrance, we eliminate miRNA-like off-target repression while preserving on-target activity at ∼80–100%. Specifically, miR-124 containing dSpacer pivot substitution (6pi) loses seed-mediated transcriptome-wide target interactions, repression activity and biological function, whereas other conventional modifications are ineffective. Application of 6pi allows PCSK9 siRNA to efficiently lower plasma cholesterol concentration in vivo, and abolish potentially deleterious off-target phenotypes. The smallest spacer, C3, also shows the same improvement in target specificity. Abasic pivot substitution serves as a general means to harness the specificity of siRNA experiments and therapeutic applications. PMID:26679372

  18. Harnessing non-Markovian quantum memory by environmental coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Zhong-Xiao; Xia, Yun-Jie; Lo Franco, Rosario

    2015-07-01

    Controlling the non-Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems is essential in quantum information technology since it plays a crucial role in preserving quantum memory. Albeit in many realistic scenarios the quantum system can simultaneously interact with composite environments, this condition remains little understood, particularly regarding the effect of the coupling between environmental parts. We analyze the non-Markovian behavior of a qubit interacting at the same time with two coupled single-mode cavities which in turn dissipate into memoryless or memory-keeping reservoirs. We show that increasing the control parameter, that is the two-mode coupling, allows for triggering and enhancing a non-Markovian dynamics for the qubit starting from a Markovian one in the absence of coupling. Surprisingly, if the qubit dynamics is non-Markovian for the zero control parameter, increasing the latter enables multiple transitions from non-Markovian to Markovian regimes. These results hold independently on the nature of the reservoirs. This work highlights that suitably engineering the coupling between parts of a compound environment can efficiently harness the quantum memory, stored in a qubit, based on non-Markovianity.

  19. Harnessing and understanding feedback technology in applied settings.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Elissa; Farrow, Damian; Ball, Kevin; Helmer, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Research on the influence of augmented feedback effects on both skill learning and performance has been examined from two differing positions, generally reflective of two core movement science disciplines: motor learning and biomechanics. The motor learning approach has been to examine the content and timing of feedback under tightly controlled laboratory settings, with a focus on simple tasks and the influence of movement outcome feedback. At the other end of the spectrum are biomechanical approaches, which have been primarily devoted to demonstrating the capacity of measurement technology to quantify and report on movement pattern effectiveness. This review highlights the gap left by these two approaches and argues that advancement of our understanding of feedback application in practical settings requires a shift towards a multi-disciplinary focus. A particular focus of the review is on how researchers and practitioners need to harness our understanding and subsequent application of the emergent feedback technologies most prevalent in elite sport settings and clinical sports medicine. We highlight important considerations for future applied multidisciplinary research driven by relevant theory and methodological design to more comprehensively capture how feedback systems can be used to facilitate the development of skilled performance. PMID:23828029

  20. Harnessing the electromagnetic absorptions of metamaterials for positive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yuanjiang; Zou, Yanhong; Luo, Hailu; Dai, Xiaoyu; Wen, Shuangchun; Fan, Dianyuan

    2010-08-01

    Absorption or loss is inevitable for the metal-based metamaterials (MMs) due to the intrinsic loss of the metal, and constitutes a major hurdle to the practical realization of most applications such as a sub-wavelength lens. Thus, to reduce the losses becomes one of the major challenges in the MM field. However, the inevitable loss can also be harnessed to take a positive role in the applications of MMs such as stealth technology or other types of cloaking devices. In this presentation, after a brief review of the advances in MMs-based absorbers, we present several schemes to fulfill the desired electromagnetic absorption properties, both linear and nonlinear. For linear absorption, we have experimentally demonstrated that the absorption performance of an ordinary microwave absorbing material can be evidently improved by using the electric resonance resulting from an array of subwavelength metallic circuit elements. For nonlinear absorption, we show theoretically that the active linear magnetic permeability induces a nonlinear absorption, similar to the two-photon absorption (TPA), of electric field in a lossy MM with a Kerr-type nonlinear polarization.

  1. Harnessing high-dimensional hyperentanglement through a biphoton frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhenda; Zhong, Tian; Shrestha, Sajan; Xu, Xinan; Liang, Junlin; Gong, Yan-Xiao; Bienfang, Joshua C.; Restelli, Alessandro; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Wei Wong, Chee

    2015-08-01

    Quantum entanglement is a fundamental resource for secure information processing and communications, and hyperentanglement or high-dimensional entanglement has been separately proposed for its high data capacity and error resilience. The continuous-variable nature of the energy-time entanglement makes it an ideal candidate for efficient high-dimensional coding with minimal limitations. Here, we demonstrate the first simultaneous high-dimensional hyperentanglement using a biphoton frequency comb to harness the full potential in both the energy and time domain. Long-postulated Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum revival is exhibited, with up to 19 time-bins and 96.5% visibilities. We further witness the high-dimensional energy-time entanglement through Franson revivals, observed periodically at integer time-bins, with 97.8% visibility. This qudit state is observed to simultaneously violate the generalized Bell inequality by up to 10.95 standard deviations while observing recurrent Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt S-parameters up to 2.76. Our biphoton frequency comb provides a platform for photon-efficient quantum communications towards the ultimate channel capacity through energy-time-polarization high-dimensional encoding.

  2. Mic Flocks in the Cloud: Harnessing Mobile Ubiquitous Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, M. A.; Christe, A.

    2015-12-01

    Smartphones provide a commercial, off-the-shelf solution to capture, store, analyze, and distribute infrasound using on-board or external microphones (mics) as well as on-board barometers. Free iOS infrasound apps can be readily downloaded from the Apple App Store, and Android versions are in progress. Infrasound propagates for great distances, has low sample rates, and provides a tractable pilot study scenario for open distributed sensor networks at regional and global scales using one of the most ubiquitous sensors on Earth - microphones. Data collection is no longer limited to selected vendors at exclusive prices: anybody on Earth can record and stream infrasound, and the diversity of recording systems and environments is rapidly expanding. Global deployment may be fast and easy (www.redvox.io), but comes with the cost of increasing data volume, velocity, variety, and complexity. Flocking - the collective motion of mobile agents - is a natural human response to threats or events of interest. Anticipating, modeling and harnessing flocking sensor topologies will be necessary for adaptive array and network processing. The increasing data quantity and complexity will exceed the processing capacity of human analysts and most research servers. We anticipate practical real-time applications will require the on-demand adaptive scalability and resources of the Cloud. Cloud architectures for such heterogeneous sensor networks will consider eventual integration into the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS).

  3. Harnessing the Therapeutic Potential of Th17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bystrom, Jonas; Taher, Taher E.; Muhyaddin, M. Sherwan; Clanchy, Felix I.; Mangat, Pamela; Jawad, Ali S.; Williams, Richard O.; Mageed, Rizgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Th17 cells provide protective immunity to infections by fungi and extracellular bacteria as well as cancer but are also involved in chronic inflammation. The cells were first identified by their ability to produce interleukin 17A (IL-17A) and, subsequently, associated with chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Th17 cells have some gene profile similarity with stem cells and can remain dormant in mucosal tissues for long periods. Indeed, recent studies suggest that functionally distinct subsets of pro- and anti-inflammatory Th17 cells can interchange phenotype and functions. For development, Th17 cells require activation of the transcription factors STAT3 and RORγt while RUNX1, c-Maf, and Aiolos are involved in changes of phenotype/functions. Attempts to harness Th17 cells against pathogens and cancer using vaccination strategies are being explored. The cells gain protective abilities when induced to produce interferon γ (IFNγ). In addition, treatment with antibodies to IL-17 is effective in treating patients with psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and refectory rheumatoid arthritis. Moreover, since RORγt is a nuclear receptor, it is likely to be a potential future drug target for modulating Th17 functions. This review explores pathways through which Th17 subsets are induced, the molecular basis of their plasticity, and potential therapeutic strategies for their modulation in diseases. PMID:26101460

  4. Application of a modified harness design for attachment of radio transmitters to shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzenbacher, Peter; Haig, Susan M.; Oring, L.W.

    2000-01-01

    Radio transmitter attachment methodology is important to the design of radio telemetry studies. In 1998, we attached 5 transmitters to a captive population of Western Sandpipers(Calidris mauri) and 7 transmitters to wild Killdeer (Charadriusv ociferus) using a modified version of the Rappolea nd Tipton (1991) figure-8 leg-loop harness. Captive birds fitted with harnesses did not exhibit quantifiable differences in behavior relative to control birds. Based on initial success in using the leg-loop harnesses, we used harnesses to attach transmitters in the wild to 30 Killdeer and 49 Dunlin (Calidris alpina) during the winters of 1998-1999 and 1999-2000. This was part of a study on movements of wintering shorebirds in the Willamette Valley of Oregon,USA. Wild birds showed no adverse effects of the harnesses.Thus, the described harness is a practical method for attachment of transmitters to shorebirds. Advantages of this harness method include a reduction in handling time at capture, elimination of the need to clip feathers for attachment, and increased transmitter retention time.

  5. Lumbar spine disc heights and curvature: upright posture vs. supine compression harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Hargens, Alan R.; Fredericson, Michael; Lang, Philipp K.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spinal lengthening in microgravity is thought to cause back pain in astronauts. A spinal compression harness can compress the spine to eliminate lengthening but the loading condition with harness is different than physiologic conditions. Our purpose was to compare the effect of spine compression with a harness in supine position on disk height and spinal curvature in the lumbar spine to that of upright position as measured using a vertically open magnetic resonance imaging system. METHODS: Fifteen healthy subjects volunteered. On day 1, each subject lay supine for an hour and a baseline scan of the lumbar spine was performed. After applying a load of fifty percent of body weight with the harness for thirty minutes, the lumbar spine was scanned again. On day 2, after a baseline scan, a follow up scan was performed after kneeling for thirty minutes within the gap between two vertically oriented magnetic coils. Anterior and posterior disk heights, posterior disk bulging, and spinal curvature were measured from the baseline and follow up scans. RESULTS: Anterior disk heights increased and posterior disk heights decreased compared with baseline scans both after spinal compression with harness and upright posture. The spinal curvature increased by both loading conditions of the spine. DISCUSSION: The spinal compression with specially designed harness has the same effect as the physiologic loading of the spine in the kneeling upright position. The harness shows some promise as a tool to increase the diagnostic capabilities of a conventional MR system.

  6. The Sequence and Structure Determine the Function of Mature Human miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzyniak, Dariusz; Jeleniewicz, Jaroslaw; Barciszewska, Miroslawa Z.; Barciszewski, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) (19–25 nucleotides in length) belong to the group of non-coding RNAs are the most abundant group of posttranscriptional regulators in multicellular organisms. They affect a gene expression by binding of fully or partially complementary sequences to the 3’-UTR of target mRNA. Furthermore, miRNAs present a mechanism by which genes with diverse functions on multiple pathways can be simultaneously regulated at the post-transcriptional level. However, little is known about the specific pathways through which miRNAs with specific sequence or structural motifs regulate the cellular processes. In this paper we showed the broad and deep characteristics of mature miRNAs according to their sequence and structural motifs. We investigated a distinct group of miRNAs characterized by the presence of specific sequence motifs, such as UGUGU, GU-repeats and purine/pyrimidine contents. Using computational function and pathway analysis of their targeted genes, we were able to observe the relevance of sequence and the type of targeted mRNAs. As the consequence of the sequence analysis we finally provide the comprehensive description of pathways, biological processes and proteins associated with the distinct group of characterized miRNAs. Here, we found that the specific group of miRNAs with UGUGU can activate the targets associated to the interferon induction pathway or pathways prominently observed during carcinogenesis. GU-rich miRNAs are prone to regulate mostly processes in neurogenesis, whereas purine/pyrimidine rich miRNAs could be involved rather in transport and/or degradation of RNAs. Additionally, we have also analyzed the simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Their variation within mature miRNAs might be critical for normal miRNA regular activity. Expansion or contraction of SSRs in mature miRNA might directly affect its mRNA interaction or even change the function of that distinct miRNA. Our results prove that due to the specific sequence features, these

  7. Tobacco/Nicotine and Endogenous Brain Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yue; Domino, Edward F.

    2008-01-01

    Smoking is a major public health problem with devastating health consequences. Although many cigarette smokers are able to quit, equal numbers of others cannot! Standard medications to assist in smoking cessation, such as nicotine replacement therapies and bupropion, are ineffective in many remaining smokers. Recent developments in the neurobiology of nicotine dependence have identified several neurotransmitter systems that may contribute to the process of smoking maintenance and relapse. These include: especially dopamine, but also norepinephrine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, acetylcholine, endogenous opioids, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, and endocannabinoids. The present review examines the limited contribution of the endogenous opioid system to the complex effects of nicotine/tobacco smoking. PMID:18215788

  8. An endogenous model of the credit network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianmin; Sui, Xin; Li, Shouwei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an endogenous credit network model of firm-bank agents is constructed. The model describes the endogenous formation of firm-firm, firm-bank and bank-bank credit relationships. By means of simulations, the model is capable of showing some obvious similarities with empirical evidence found by other scholars: the upper-tail of firm size distribution can be well fitted with a power-law; the bank size distribution can be lognormally distributed with a power-law tail; the bank in-degrees of the interbank credit network as well as the firm-bank credit network fall into two-power-law distributions.

  9. Animal spirits, competitive markets, and endogenous growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Kenji

    2013-10-01

    This paper uses a simple model with an endogenous discount rate and linear technology to investigate whether a competitive equilibrium has a higher balanced growth path (BGP) than the social planning solution and whether the BGP is determinate or indeterminate. The implications are as follows. To start with, people with an instinct to compare themselves with others possess an endogenous discount rate. In turn, this instinct affects the economic growth rate in a competitive market economy. The competitive market economy also sometimes achieves higher economic growth than a social planning economy. However, the outcomes of market economy occasionally fluctuate because of the presence of the self-fulfilling prophecy or animal spirits.

  10. Impact of Harness Attachment Point on Kinetics and Kinematics During Sled Towing.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Ian; Atkins, Steve J; Edmundson, Christopher J; Metcalfe, John; Sinclair, Jonathan K

    2016-03-01

    Resisted sprint training is performed in a horizontal direction and involves similar muscles, velocities, and ranges of motion (ROM) to those of normal sprinting. Generally, sleds are attached to the athletes through a lead (3 m) and harness; the most common attachment points are the shoulder or waist. At present, it is not known how the different harness point's impact on the kinematics and kinetics associated with sled towing (ST). The aim of the current investigation was to examine the kinetics and kinematics of shoulder and waist harness attachment points in relation to the acceleration phase of ST. Fourteen trained men completed normal and ST trials, loaded at 10% reduction of sprint velocity. Sagittal plane kinematics from the trunk, hip, knee, and ankle were measured, together with stance phase kinetics (third footstrike). Kinetic and kinematic parameters were compared between harness attachments using one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. The results indicated that various kinetic differences were present between the normal and ST conditions. Significantly greater net horizontal mean force, net horizontal impulses, propulsive mean force, and propulsive impulses were measured (p < 0.05). Interestingly, the waist harness also led to greater net horizontal impulse when compared with the shoulder attachment (p < 0.001). In kinematic terms, ST conditions significantly increased peak flexion in hip, knee, and ankle joints compared with the normal trials (p < 0.05). Results highlighted that the shoulder harness had a greater impact on trunk and knee joint kinematics when compared with the waist harness (p < 0.05). In summary, waist harnesses seem to be the most suitable attachment point for the acceleration phase of sprinting. Sled towing with these attachments resulted in fewer kinematic alterations and greater net horizontal impulse when compared with the shoulder harness. Future research is necessary in order to explore the long-term adaptations of

  11. Implications of the Interaction Between miRNAs and Autophagy in Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Gengyang; Ren, Hui; Qiu, Ting; Liang, De; Xie, Bo; Zhang, Zhida; Yao, Zhensong; Yang, Zhidong; Jiang, Xiaobing

    2016-07-01

    Imbalances between bone formation and resorption are the primary cause of osteoporosis. However, currently, a detailed molecular mechanism of osteoporosis is not available. Autophagy is the conserved process characterized by degrading and recycling aggregated proteins, intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are novel regulatory factors that play important roles in numerous cellular processes, including autophagy, through the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Conversely, autophagy plays a role in the regulation of miRNA homeostasis. Recent advances have revealed that both autophagy and miRNAs are involved in the maintenance of bone homoeostasis, whereas the role of the interaction of miRNAs with autophagy in osteoporosis remains unclear. In this paper, we review previous reports on autophagy, miRNAs, and their interaction in osteoporosis. PMID:26922423

  12. Potential application of miRNAs as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang-Hao; Ji, Jun-Tao; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disease typified by end-stage fibrosis. This disease can also increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. The associated diagnosis, pain and other complications further add to the burden of disease management. In recent years, significant progress has been achieved in identifying miRNAs and their physiological functions, including mRNA repression and protein expression control. Given the extensive effort made on miRNA research, a close correlation has been discovered between certain types of miRNAs and disease progression, particularly for tissue fibrosis. Designing miRNA-related tools for disease diagnosis and therapeutic treatments presents a novel and potential research frontier. In the current review, we discuss various miRNAs closely interacting with CP, as well as the possible development of targeted miRNA therapies in managing this disease. PMID:26149296

  13. Loa loa and Onchocerca ochengi miRNAs detected in host circulation.

    PubMed

    Tritten, Lucienne; O'Neill, Maeghan; Nutting, Chuck; Wanji, Samuel; Njouendoui, Abdel; Fombad, Fanny; Kengne-Ouaffo, Jonas; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    A combination of deep-sequencing and bioinformatics analysis enabled identification of twenty-two microRNA candidates of potential nematode origin in plasma from Loa loa-infected baboons and a further ten from the plasma of an Onchocerca ochengi-infected cow. The obtained data were compared to results from previous work on miRNA candidates from Dirofilaria immitis and O. volvulus found in host circulating blood, to examine the species specificity of the released miRNA. None of the miRNA candidates was found to be present in all four host-parasite scenarios and most of them were specific to only one of them. Eight candidate miRNAs were found to be identical in the full sequence in at least two different infections, while nine candidate miRNAs were found to be similar but not identical in at least four filarial species. PMID:25461483

  14. A potential role for miRNAs in topical drug development.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Joshua W; Levis, William R

    2013-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding regulatory RNAs demonstrated to play a role in regulating diverse physiologic and pathologic processes in humans. The understanding of their role in dermatologic disorders has been rapidly expanding, and technological advances in the field of small RNA therapeutics have provided a window into the possibilities for using our understanding of miRNA activities as a stepping-stone to treating a variety of skin diseases. The topical immunomodulator diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) has been used for the treatment of skin cancers and alopecia areata and represents one of many drug targets with potential for manipulation of miRNA pathways to enhance clinical efficacy. By exploring the miRNA pathways involved in specific skin diseases and the miRNAs impacted by drug treatments, investigators will discover new ways to treat skin disease and improve preexisting therapies. PMID:23377385

  15. Tumor-Induced Osteoclast miRNA Changes as Regulators and Biomarkers of Osteolytic Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ell, Brian; Mercatali, Laura; Ibrahim, Toni; Campbell, Neil; Schwarzenbach, Heidi; Pantel, Klaus; Amadori, Dino; Kang, Yibin

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the mechanism by which tumor cells influence osteoclast differentiation is crucial for improving treatment of osteolytic metastasis. Here, we report broad microRNA (miRNA) expression changes in differentiating osteoclasts after exposure to tumor-conditioned media, in part through activation of NFκB signaling by soluble intracellular adhesion molecule (sICAM1) secreted from bone-metastatic cancer cells. Ectopic expression of multiple miRNAs down-regulated during osteoclastogenesis suppresses osteoclast differentiation by targeting important osteoclast genes. Intravenous delivery of these miRNAs in vivo inhibits osteoclast activity and reduces osteolytic bone metastasis. Importantly, serum levels of sICAM1 and two osteoclast miRNAs, miR-16 and miR-378, which are elevated in osteoclast differentiation, correlate with bone metastasis burden. These findings establish miRNAs as potential therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers of bone metastasis. PMID:24135284

  16. Efficient pro-survival/angiogenic miRNA delivery by an MRI-detectable nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Renata S M; das Neves, Ricardo Pires; Cochlin, Lowri; Lima, Ana; Carvalho, Rui; Korpisalo, Petra; Dragneva, Galina; Turunen, Mikko; Liimatainen, Timmo; Clarke, Kieran; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Carr, Carolyn; Ferreira, Lino

    2013-04-23

    Herein, we report the use of biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) containing perfluoro-1,5-crown ether (PFCE), a fluorine-based compound (NP170-PFCE) with the capacity to track cells in vivo by magnetic ressonance imaging (MRI) and efficiently release miRNA. NP170-PFCE complexed with miRNAs accumulate whitin the cell's endolysosomal compartment and interact with higher frequency with argonaute2 (Ago2) and GW182 proteins, which are involved in the biological action of miRNAs, than commercial complexes formed by commercial reagents and miRNA, which in turn accumulate in the cell cytoplasm. The release of miRNA132 (miR132) from the NPs increased 3-fold the survival of endothelial cells (ECs) transplanted in vivo and 3.5-fold the blood perfusion in ischemic limbs relatively to control. PMID:23451983

  17. STAT3-dependent transactivation of miRNA genes following Toxoplasma gondii infection in macrophage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii can infect and replicate in virtually any nucleated cell in many species of warm-blooded animals; T. gondii has elaborate mechanisms to counteract host-cell apoptosis in order to maintain survival and breed in the host cells. Methods Using microarray profiling and a combination of conventional molecular approaches, we investigated the levels of microRNAs (miRNAs ) in human macrophage during T. gondii infection. We used molecular tools to examine Toxoplasma-upregualted miRNAs to revealed potential signal transducers and activators of transcription 3(STAT3) binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We analysed the apoptosis of human macrophage with the functional inhibition of the STAT3-binding miRNAs by flow cytometry. Results Our results demonstrated differential alterations in the mature miRNA expression profile in human macrophage following T. gondii infection. Database analysis of Toxoplasma-upregulated miRNAs revealed potential STAT3 binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We demonstrated that miR-30c-1, miR-125b-2, miR-23b-27b-24-1 and miR-17 ~ 92 cluster genes were transactivated through promoter binding of the STAT3 following T. gondii infection. Importantly, functional inhibition of selected STAT3-binding miRNAs in human macropahges increased apoptosis of host cells. Conclusions A panel of miRNAs is regulated through promoter binding of the STAT3 in human macrophage and these miRNAs are involved in anti-apoptosis in response to T. gondii infection. PMID:24341525

  18. Alterations of miRNAs reveal a dysregulated molecular regulatory network in Parkinson's disease striatum.

    PubMed

    Nair, Venugopalan D; Ge, Yongchao

    2016-08-26

    Molecular adaptations in the striatum mediated by dopamine (DA) denervation and/or levodopa (L-dopa) treatments have been implicated in the motor deficits found in Parkinson's disease (PD). Alterations in inflammatory response mechanisms and glutamatergic neurotransmission are reported to play important roles in mediating these changes. However, the mechanisms mediating the molecular adaptations in the striatum are not well understood. Small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) influence numerous biological processes including the development and maintenance of striatal neurons by regulating gene expression post-transcriptionally. To investigate miRNA function in human PD striatum, we examined the global expression of miRNAs in postmortem putamen (putamen along with caudate forms the striatum) tissues obtained from PD patients and neurologically normal controls using Nanostring miRNA assays. We found that 6 miRNAs were significantly (p≤0.05) upregulated and 7 miRNAs were downregulated in PD putamen when compared with control. The differential expression (DE) of the 4 highest scoring miRNAs was further confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Ingenuity pathway analysis demonstrated that these miRNAs are enriched in the processes of inflammatory responses. We found that the expression of DE miRNAs in PD putamen negatively correlates with the expression of gene transcripts implicated in inflammatory response with p53 and NF-kB as central signaling molecules. Taken together, our results suggest that in PD striatum, the DE miRNAs are associated with the oxidative stress pathway. This mechanism may contribute to the molecular adaptations and related motor complications found in PD. PMID:27369327

  19. Longitudinal study on circulating miRNAs in patients after lung cancer resection.

    PubMed

    Leidinger, Petra; Galata, Valentina; Backes, Christina; Stähler, Cord; Rheinheimer, Stefanie; Huwer, Hanno; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2015-06-30

    There is an urgent need of comprehensive longitudinal analyses of circulating miRNA patterns to identify dynamic changes of miRNAs in cancer patients after surgery. Here we provide longitudinal analysis of 1,205 miRNAs in plasma samples of 26 patients after lung cancer resection at 8 time points over a period of 18 months and compare them to 12 control patients. First, we report longitudinal changes with respect to the number of detected miRNAs over time and identified a significantly increased number of miRNAs in patients developing metastases (p = 0.0096). A quantitative analysis with respect to the expression level of the detected miRNAs revealed more significant changes in the miRNA levels in samples from patients without metastases compared to the non-cancer control patients. This analysis provided further evidence of miRNA plasma levels that are changing over time after tumor resection and correlate to patient outcome. Especially hsa-miR-197 could be validated by qRT-PCR as prognostic marker. Also for this miRNA, patients developing metastases had levels close to that of controls while patients that did not develop metastases showed a significant up-regulation.In conclusion, our data indicate that the overall miRNome of a patient that later develops metastases is less affected by surgery than the miRNome of a patient who does not show metastases. The relationship between altered plasma levels of specific miRNAs with the development of metastases would partially have gone undetected by an analysis at a single time point only. PMID:26078336

  20. Analysis of miRNA expression profiles in breast cancer using biclustering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important key regulators in multiple cellular functions, due to their a crucial role in different physiological processes. MiRNAs are differentially expressed in specific tissues, during specific cell status, or in different diseases as tumours. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) is a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) method for the analysis of differential gene expression. Using machine learning algorithms, it is possible to improve the functional significance interpretation of miRNA in the analysis and interpretation of data from RNA-seq. Furthermore, we tried to identify some patterns of deregulated miRNA in human breast cancer (BC), in order to give a contribution in the understanding of this type of cancer at the molecular level. Results We adopted a biclustering approach, using the Iterative Signature Algorithm (ISA) algorithm, in order to evaluate miRNA deregulation in the context of miRNA abundance and tissue heterogeneity. These are important elements to identify miRNAs that would be useful as prognostic and diagnostic markers. Considering a real word breast cancer dataset, the evaluation of miRNA differential expressions in tumours versus healthy tissues evidenced 12 different miRNA clusters, associated to specific groups of patients. The identified miRNAs were deregulated in breast tumours compared to healthy controls. Our approach has shown the association between specific sub-class of tumour samples having the same immuno-histo-chemical and/or histological features. Biclusters have been validated by means of two online repositories, MetaMirClust database and UCSC Genome Browser, and using another biclustering algorithm. Conclusions The obtained results with biclustering algorithm aimed first of all to give a contribute in the differential expression analysis in a cohort of BC patients and secondly to support the potential role that these non-coding RNA molecules could play in the clinical practice, in terms of prognosis