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Sample records for harshaw tld-700h dosemeters

  1. Performance of Harshaw TLD-100H two-element Dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Luo, L Z; Rotunda, J E

    2006-01-01

    One of the advantages of LiF based thermoluminescent (TL) materials is its tissue-equivalent property. The Harshaw TLD-100H (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) material has demonstrated that it has a near-flat photon energy response and high sensitivity. With the optimized dosemeter filters built into the holder, the Harshaw TLD-100H two-element dosemeter can be used as a whole body personnel dosemeter for gamma, X ray and beta monitoring without the use of an algorithm or correction factor. This paper presents the dose performance of the Harshaw TLD-100H two-element dosemeter against the ANSI N13.11-2001 standard and the results of tests that are required in IEC 1066 International Standard. PMID:16644944

  2. The study of new calibration features in the Harshaw TLD system.

    PubMed

    Luo, L Z

    2007-01-01

    The Harshaw TLD system has three key calibration procedures: the Reader, the Dosemeter and the Algorithm. These functions must be properly calibrated for the system to achieve the optimum results. For the conventional reader and dosemeter calibration, Harshaw TLD recommends a pre-fade and a post-fade of 24-48 h when calibrating the system for LiF:Mg,Ti type dosemeter. It is also recommended that keeping the fade time consistent is important to maintain the quality of the system performance. In recent years, new calibration features have been introduced into the Harshaw TLD models 6600 and 8800 operating systems. These new features are Auto Calibration, Auto QC and Auto Blank, and they give the user the ability to set up the clear-expose-read process to be performed automatically in a sequence for each dosemeter. This saves processing time and keeps the fade time the same. However, since the fade time is near zero, will it affect the TLD system calibration factors? What should the user expect? This paper presents a study of the effect of Auto Calibration/Auto QC to the TLD operation. PMID:17223631

  3. Personal photon dosemeter trial--Devonport Royal Dockyard.

    PubMed

    Collison, Roger

    2005-03-01

    To establish an understanding of the operational responses of various personal dosemeters employed at Devonport and to assess new types of dosemeters, a photon dosemeter trial was conducted. Most day-to-day exposure is to relatively low dose rates. Therefore the suitability of each dosemeter for use within the relatively low Devonport dose rate environment has been assessed. The Panasonic TLD demonstrated a good representation of the dose within the medium to higher gamma energy ranges with an unexpected under-response at lower energies. The optically stimulated luminescent dosemeter showed a varied response within a degraded (60)Co environment. With consistent under-response, the NRPB TLD and film badge were found to generally be unsuitable for sites such as Devonport. The Harshaw TLD demonstrated a good representation of the dose. The RADOS RAD80 and QFD fail to meet current best industry standards. However, the QFD is the only direct reading dosemeter suitable for use where intrinsically safe equipment is required. The RADOS RAD52 and SAIC PD 2i show a reasonable representation of the dose received but should be adjusted to read within an operational (60)Co environment. Direct ion storage and Thermo [corrected] electronic personal dosemeters showed good representations of the dose. Inherent characteristics combined with the associated systems led to the conclusion that these dosemeters should be employed for preference. PMID:15798276

  4. Comparative performance testing of Harshaw 8800 and KDT-02M TLD systems.

    PubMed

    Chumak, V; Volosky, V; Chernyshov, G; Dmitrienko, A; Sukhoruchkin, A; Rozumny, V

    2002-01-01

    The Soviet-produced KDT-02M system, which is still widely used for dosimetric monitoring in countries of the former Soviet Union, was compared with the Harshaw 8800 system. The comparison consisted of two stages. In the first stage workplace radiation fields were simulated in the framework of the IAEA intercomparison. In the second stage the two systems were compared when used in parallel by the personnel of Chernobyl Object 'Shelter'. Although in the first stage the Harshaw 8800 demonstrated better performance for various irradiation conditions, an obsolete KDT-02M also proved compliance with the basic requirements to the accuracy of individual dosimetric monitoring. In the second stage, more than 1200 paired measurements were performed, revealing good (r = 0.95) correlation between readouts of both systems. Deviation of the slope of the regression line may be adjusted by proper calibration. Although the KDT-02M system demonstrated adequate results for measurement of deep dose equivalent, its inability to determine shallow dose equivalent calls for its replacement with modem thermoluminesence dosemeters possessing this feature. PMID:12382819

  5. Dosimetric properties of new cards with high-sensitivity MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) detectors for Harshaw automatic reader.

    PubMed

    Budzanowski, M; Bilski, P; Olko, P; Ryba, E; Perle, S; Majewski, M

    2007-01-01

    A new configuration for a thermoluminescent dosimetric card has been developed through collaboration between the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Kraków and several commercial dosimetric companies. The card is based on high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P circular pellets (MCP-N) welded inside synthetic foils. The basic configuration consists of two pellets of 3.6 mm diameter and thicknesses from 0.25 up to 0.38 mm. The cards can be processed in a standard 6600 or 8800 Harshaw automatic TLD reader. The dosemeters demonstrate very high sensitivity, low background and good stability. This article presents results of the performance tests of the new dosimetric cards in the automatic TLD readers and a comparison of their properties. PMID:17020912

  6. An adapter for the Harshaw model 2000D TL analyzer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Virendra P.; Cusimano, John P.; Parker, DeRay

    A potentially more versatile personnel radiation dosimetry badge, using TLD LiF-700 and LiF-600 chips, has been under development at the INEL. To read all four TLD chips from this badge without removing (or placing back after reading) one chip at a time, a unique adapter has been developed to provide the capability of reading chips in a Harshaw Model 2000D Automated TL Analyzer System. Only slight modification of the Harshaw Analyzer is required for using this adapter.

  7. Evaluation of Effective Sources in Uncertainty Measurements of Personal Dosimetry by a Harshaw TLD System

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini Pooya, SM; Orouji, T

    2014-01-01

    Background: The accurate results of the individual doses in personal dosimety which are reported by the service providers in personal dosimetry are very important. There are national / international criteria for acceptable dosimetry system performance. Objective: In this research, the sources of uncertainties are identified, measured and calculated in a personal dosimetry system by TLD. Method: These sources are included; inhomogeneity of TLDs sensitivity, variability of TLD readings due to limited sensitivity and background, energy dependence, directional dependence, non-linearity of the response, fading, dependent on ambient temperature / humidity and calibration errors, which may affect on the dose responses. Some parameters which influence on the above sources of uncertainty are studied for Harshaw TLD-100 cards dosimeters as well as the hot gas Harshaw 6600 TLD reader system. Results: The individual uncertainties of each sources was measured less than 6.7% in 68% confidence level. The total uncertainty was calculated 17.5% with 95% confidence level. Conclusion: The TLD-100 personal dosimeters as well as the Harshaw TLD-100 reader 6600 system show the total uncertainty value which is less than that of admissible value of 42% for personal dosimetry services. PMID:25505769

  8. Comparison on characteristics of radiophotoluminescent glass dosemeters and thermoluminescent dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Ming; Yeh, Shann-Horng; Lin, Meei-Shiow; Chen, Wei-Li

    2006-01-01

    The radiophotoluminescent glass dosemeter (RPLGD) system is applicable for measurement of radiation dose of X rays and gamma rays by using radiophotoluminescent glass (silver-activated phosphate glass). When the radiophotoluminescent glass is exposed to ionizing radiation, stable luminescent centres are created. During pulsed ultraviolet laser excitation (337.1 nm) in the reader, the centres emit a radiation induced orange fluorescent light (600-700 nm). This phenomenon is called radiophotoluminescence. This study compared the RPLGD system with lithium fluoride (LiF) thermoluminescence dosimetry system and the results of the study revealed that the RPLGD had not only good basic characteristics for reproducibility of readout value, dose linearity, energy dependence and fading, but also infinite repeatable measurements and could be one of the most important radiation dose measurement instruments. PMID:16709718

  9. SIMPLE SURFACE PLASMON RESONANCE-BASED DOSEMETER.

    PubMed

    Urbonavičius, Benas Gabrielis; Adlienė, Diana

    2016-06-01

    The interest to application of various surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based sensors for the investigation of chemical and biological processes in thin layers deposited on the grating's surface/media is developing. Characterisation of processes as well as specimen's features might be performed analysing variations in optical properties (refraction index) of these thin layers. SPR sensors by default are characterised by high resolution and small uncertainties, and measurements might be performed in situ High-resolution, low-cost, SPR-based dosemeter concept has been proposed and realised depositing dose-sensitive nPAG gel layer onto diffraction grating's surface. The experimental set-up and method for information read out from the sensor were developed and implemented. Obtained results show a potential application of SPR-based dosemeter for dose measurements/mapping in steep gradient fields and/or large area fields. PMID:26535002

  10. State of the Art in Electronic Dosemeters for Neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Luszik-Bhadra, Marlies

    2011-05-05

    The paper presents an overview of electronic personal dosemeters for neutrons in mixed neutron/photon fields. The energy response of commercially available electronic dosemeters in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields and their performance in working places is discussed. The response curves are extended to high-energy neutrons up to 100 MeV, new prototype dosemeters are described and discussed especially for use at high-energy accelerators and in space.

  11. State of the Art in Electronic Dosemeters for Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luszik-Bhadra, Marlies

    2011-05-01

    The paper presents an overview of electronic personal dosemeters for neutrons in mixed neutron/photon fields. The energy response of commercially available electronic dosemeters in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields and their performance in working places is discussed. The response curves are extended to high-energy neutrons up to 100 MeV, new prototype dosemeters are described and discussed especially for use at high-energy accelerators and in space.

  12. Operational experience of electronic active personal dosemeter and comparison with CaSo4:Dy TL dosemeter in Indian PHWR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishwanath P; Managanvi, S S; Bihari, R R; Bhat, H R

    2013-01-01

    Direct reading dosemeter has been used for day-to-day radiation exposure control and management for last four decades in Indian nuclear power plants (NPPs). Recently new real time, alarm and pre-alarm on equivalent dose/dose rate, storage of dose/dose rate and maximum dose rate, user-friendly electronic active personal dosemeter (APD) has been implemented into practice for the first time at Kaiga Atomic Power Station-3&4,  of Indian NPPs. The dosemeter showed tolerance level (L) 0.1085±0.0450 compared with 0.1869±0.0729 (average±SD) for CaSO4:Dy, TL dosemeter, having narrow range trumpet curve, nil electromagnetic interference. Records of >29 000 for APD and TL dosemeter were analysed for comparasion of the measurement of the individual dose. APD followed general acceptance rule of ±25 % for dose >1 mSv. Monthly Station collective dose by TL dosemeters and APD for normal reactor operation as well as outage are found in good agreement. Operational experiences and statistical analysis support that an APD dosemeter is reasonably equivalent to CaSO4:Dy TL dosemeter. The accuracy, reproducibility and repeatability of the measurement of radiation for (137)Cs are comparable with CaSO4:Dy, TL dosemeter. Operational experience of APD during the normal operation as well as outage showed as one of the best ALARA tool for occupational dose monitoring, control, management and future outage planning. PMID:23528326

  13. The possible effect on personnel dose by two copper filters covering Element 1 of the Harshaw 8814 TLD badge.

    PubMed

    Reciniello, R N; Sengupta, S; Thompson, R L

    2009-08-01

    Ongoing uncertainties have existed regarding possible effects at low photon energies of two copper filters covering Element 1 of the Harshaw Type-8814 thermoluminescent dosimeter badge casing. To address these, Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) Personnel Monitoring Group conducted a test in which Type-8814 badges with one copper filter covering Element 1 were irradiated at several low-energy levels side-by-side with the same number of badges with two copper filters covering Element 1. A review of exposures to personnel at Brookhaven Laboratory to possible low-energy photon flux was also conducted. From both the test and the review of exposures, it can be concluded that, for radiological work under the conditions at BNL, there is no apparent dosimetric difference if one or two copper filters cover Element 1 of the Type-8814 badge. PMID:19590267

  14. A new, passive dosemeter for gamma, beta and neutron radiations.

    PubMed

    Jones, L A; Stokes, R P

    2011-03-01

    The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) provides personal radiation dosimetry to the UK Ministry of Defence. Dstl has recently developed a dosemeter that is based on a combination of thermoluminescent and etched-track detectors. The Dstl Combined Dosemeter is capable of assessing doses due to photons, beta particles and neutrons. This paper presents the laboratory type testing results for the Combined Dosemeter, and also describes the procedure for calibrating the dosemeter for use in workplace neutron fields. The Combined Dosemeter meets the type test requirements that are relevant to its intended applications, and gives neutron doses that are within 50% of the true dose in the workplaces in which it is used, even when the wearer has the potential to be exposed to a variety of neutron spectra (e.g. on board nuclear-powered submarines). PMID:21346288

  15. Barium dithionate as an EPR dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Baran, M P; Bugay, O A; Kolesnik, S P; Maksimenko, V M; Teslenko, V V; Petrenko, T L; Desrosiers, M F

    2006-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) dosimetry is growing in popularity and this success has encouraged the search for other dosimetric materials. Previous studies of gamma-irradiated barium dithionate (BaS(2)O(6) x 2H(2)O) have shown promise for its use as a radiation dosemeter. This work studies in greater detail several essential attributes of the system. Special attention has been directed to the study of EPR response dependences on microwave power, irradiation temperature, minimum detectable dose and post-irradiation stability. PMID:16565205

  16. A neutron dosemeter for nuclear criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, F; Curzio, G; Ciolini, R; Del Gratta, A; Nath, R

    2004-01-01

    A neutron dosemeter which offers instant read-out has been developed for nuclear criticality accidents. The system is based on gels containing emulsions of superheated dichlorodifluoromethane droplets, which vaporise into bubbles upon neutron irradiation. The expansion of these bubbles displaces an equivalent volume of gel into a graduated pipette, providing an immediate measure of the dose. Instant read-out is achieved using an array of transmissive optical sensors which consist of coupled LED emitters and phototransistor receivers. When the gel displaced in the pipette crosses the sensing region of the photomicrosensors, it generates a signal collected on a computer through a dedicated acquisition board. The performance of the device was tested during the 2002 International Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison in Valduc, France. The dosemeter was able to follow the initial dose gradient of a simulated accident, providing accurate values of neutron kerma; however, the emulsion was rapidly depleted of all its drops. A model of the depletion effects was developed and it indicates that an adequate dynamic range of the dose response can be achieved by using emulsions of smaller droplets. PMID:15353696

  17. Calibration of Far West Technology (FWT-60) radiachromic dye dosemeters

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, B.J.; Zaidi, M.K.

    1992-08-01

    Radiachromic dye dosimetry was used to measure kilogray doses absorbed by various liquid samples during gamma-ray exposure in a spent nuclear fuel pool. The source of nuclear fuel was the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Calibrations were performed using a {sup 60}Co source and were run on bare dosemeters, as well as on dosemeters which mocked to simulate the samples. These dosemeters were prepared as a dye-impregnated nylon film and are commercially available. When exposed to gamma-ray doses of 0.5 to 200 kGy, a color change occurs which has an optical density proportional to absorbed dose. The difference in the calibration curves demonstrated the importance of irradiation of dosemeters under conditions as close to the actual samples as possible. Since these dosemeters could not be immersed directly in the organic solutions of interest, they were sandwiched between layers of lucite and stainless steel. This simulated the conditions inside an irradiated sample and provides a practical method of measuring absorbed doses. The reproducibility of measurements using the radiachromic dye dosemeters is also shown. 10 refs.

  18. Calibration of Far West Technology (FWT-60) radiachromic dye dosemeters

    SciTech Connect

    Mincher, B.J.; Zaidi, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Radiachromic dye dosimetry was used to measure kilogray doses absorbed by various liquid samples during gamma-ray exposure in a spent nuclear fuel pool. The source of nuclear fuel was the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Calibrations were performed using a {sup 60}Co source and were run on bare dosemeters, as well as on dosemeters which mocked to simulate the samples. These dosemeters were prepared as a dye-impregnated nylon film and are commercially available. When exposed to gamma-ray doses of 0.5 to 200 kGy, a color change occurs which has an optical density proportional to absorbed dose. The difference in the calibration curves demonstrated the importance of irradiation of dosemeters under conditions as close to the actual samples as possible. Since these dosemeters could not be immersed directly in the organic solutions of interest, they were sandwiched between layers of lucite and stainless steel. This simulated the conditions inside an irradiated sample and provides a practical method of measuring absorbed doses. The reproducibility of measurements using the radiachromic dye dosemeters is also shown. 10 refs.

  19. Results of the EURADOS extremity dosemeter intercomparison 2009.

    PubMed

    Stadtmann, H; Grimbergen, T W M; Figel, M; Romero, A M; McWhan, A F

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an intercomparison for extremity dosemeters organised by the European radiation dosimetry group in 2009. In total, 59 systems were tested during this exercise including ring, stall and wrist dosemeters. A total of 1652 dosemeters were irradiated in the selected fields of photons and beta radiation qualities on appropriate phantoms (ISO finger and pillar phantom) in the dose quantity H(p)(0.07). All irradiations were carried out in selected accredited reference dosemetry laboratories (Seibersdorf Laboratories, Austria and IRSN, France). The results show that, especially at low-energy beta radiations ((85)Kr) and for beta irradiations with large angles of incidence (60°), many tested systems show pronounced under responses. On the other hand, for photon irradiations down to energies of 16 keV most systems showed good results. A participants meeting was held at IM2010 with discussion on both general aspects of this intercomparison and specific problems. PMID:21196458

  20. A method for evaluating personal dosemeters in workplace with neutron fields.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Nascimento, Luana; Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip

    2012-04-01

    Passive detectors, as albedo or track-etch, still dominate the field of neutron personal dosimetry, mainly due to their low-cost, high-reliability and elevated throughput. However, the recent appearance in the market of electronic personal dosemeters for neutrons presents a new option for personal dosimetry. In addition to passive detectors, electronic personal dosemeters necessitate correction factors, concerning their energy and angular response dependencies. This paper reports on the results of a method to evaluate personal dosemeters for workplace where neutrons are present. The approach here uses few instruments and does not necessitate a large mathematical workload. Qualitative information on the neutron energy spectrum is acquired using a simple spectrometer (Nprobe), reference values for H*(10) are derived from measurements with ambient detectors (Studsvik, Berthold and Harwell) and angular information is measured using personal dosemeters (electronic and bubbles dosemeters) disposed in different orientations on a slab phantom. PMID:21565843

  1. Type testing of the Siemens Plessey electronic personal dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Hirning, C R; Yuen, P S

    1995-07-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory assessment of the performance of a new type of personal dosimeter, the Electronic Personal Dosemeter made by Siemens Plessey Controls Limited. Twenty pre-production dosimeters and a reader were purchased by Ontario Hydro for the assessment. Tests were performed on radiological performance, including reproducibility, accuracy, linearity, detection threshold, energy response, angular response, neutron response, and response time. There were also tests on the effects of a variety of environmental factors, such as temperature, humidity, pulsed magnetic and electric fields, low- and high-frequency electromagnetic fields, light exposure, drop impact, vibration, and splashing. Other characteristics that were tested were alarm volume, clip force, and battery life. The test results were compared with the relevant requirements of three standards: an Ontario Hydro standard for personal alarming dosimeters, an International Electrotechnical Commission draft standard for direct reading personal dose monitors, and an International Electrotechnical Commission standard for thermoluminescence dosimetry systems for personal monitoring. In general, the performance of the Electronic Personal Dosemeter was found to be quite acceptable: it met most of the relevant requirements of the three standards. However, the following deficiencies were found: slow response time; sensitivity to high-frequency electromagnetic fields; poor resistance to dropping; and an alarm that was not loud enough. In addition, the response of the electronic personal dosimeter to low-energy beta rays may be too low for some applications. Problems were experienced with the reliability of operation of the pre-production dosimeters used in these tests. PMID:7790213

  2. Calibration, performance and type testing of personal dosemeters used in ionising-radiation applications in Greece.

    PubMed

    Boziari, A; Hourdakis, C J

    2007-01-01

    Active Personal Dosemeters (APDs) are widely used in real-time personal dosimetry. Their performance, operational characteristics and limitations, as well as their calibration should be routinely checked to assure satisfactory operation and safe use. This study summarises the results of such type tests and calibrations performed in almost 4750 dosemeters at Ionising Radiation Calibration Laboratory (HIRCL) of Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC). About 13.8% of the pencil type and 4.3% of the electronic dosemeters were found to be out of limits of acceptable performance. For the pencil type dosemeters, the mean calibration factor (CF+/-SD) for high- and low-dose categories was found to be 1.014+/-0.102 (range 0.793-1.458) and 0.995+/-0.059 (range 0.794-1.311), respectively. Of these >85% of them had reproducibility better than 90%, while <1% showed remarkable non-linearity and approximately 10% of them failed to retain the dose reading within the limits after 24 h. For the electronic dosemeters, the mean CF was 1.034+/-0.046 (range 0.967-1.238). The majority of them showed good reproducibility and linearity results while, after irradiation, the dose readings were not shifted through time. The energy response varies with the dosemeter type, reaching in one dosemeter type down to 50%. Both electronic and pencil did not showed electronic equilibrium problems. PMID:17185312

  3. The use of active personal dosemeters as a personal monitoring device: comparison with TL dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Boziari, A; Koukorava, C; Carinou, E; Hourdakis, C J; Kamenopoulou, V

    2011-03-01

    The use of active personal dosemeters (APDs) not only as a warning device but also, in some cases, as an official and hence stand-alone dosemeter is rapidly increasing. A comparison in terms of dose, energy and angle dependence, among different types of APD and a routinely used whole-body thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) has been performed. Significant differences were found between the TLD readings and mainly some not commonly used APDs. The importance of choosing the best adapted APD according to the radiation field characteristics is pointed out. PMID:21196464

  4. Characterisation of an electronic radon gas personal dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Gründel, M; Postendörfer, J

    2003-01-01

    The monitoring of radon exposure at workplaces is of great importance. Up to now passive measurement systems have been used for the registration of radon gas. Recently an electronic radon gas personal dosemeter came onto the market as an active measurement system for the registration of radon exposure (DOSEman; Sarad GmbH, Dresden, Germany). In this personal monitor, the radon gas diffuses through a membrane into a measurement chamber. A silicon detector system records spectroscopically the alpha decays of the radon gas and of the short-lived progeny 218Po and 214Po gathered onto the detector by an electrical field. In this work the calibration was tested and a proficiency test of this equipment was made. The diffusion behaviour of the radon gas into the measurement chamber, susceptibility to thoron, efficiency, influence of humidity, accuracy and the detection limit were checked. PMID:14756187

  5. 1983 ORNL intercomparison of personnel neutron and gamma dosemeters

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Ninth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted during April 19-21, 1983, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dosemeters from 33 participating agencies were mounted on water-filled polyethylene elliptical phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (0.02-0.45 mSv gamma and 0.49-11.14 mSv neutron) which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor served as the radiation source for six separate exposures which used four different shield conditions: unshielded and shielded with steel, steel/concrete, and concrete. Results of the neutron measurements indicate that it is not unusual for dose equivalent estimates made under the same conditions by different agencies to differ by more than a factor of 2. Albedo systems, which were the most popular neutron monitors in this study, provided the most accurate results with CR-39 recoil track being least accurate. Track and film neutron systems exhibited problems providing measurable indication of neutron exposure at dose equivalents of about 0.50 mSv. Gamma measurements showed that TLD and film systems generally overestimated dose equivalents in the mixed radiation fields with film exhibiting significant problems providing measurable indication of gamma exposure at dose equivalents lower than about 0.15 mSv. Under the conditions of this study in which exposures were carefully controlled and participants had information concerning exposure conditions and incident spectra prior to dosemeter analysis, only slightly more than half of all neutron and gamma dose equivalent estimates met regulatory accuracy standards relative to reference values. These results indicate that continued improvement of mixed-field personnel dosimetry is required by many participating organizations. 15 references, 30 tables.

  6. An estimate of the propagated uncertainty for a dosemeter algorithm used for personnel monitoring.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G

    2015-03-01

    The Y-12 National Security Complex utilises thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) to monitor personnel for external radiation doses. The TLD consist of four elements positioned behind various filters, and dosemeters are processed on site and input into an algorithm to determine worker dose. When processing dosemeters and determining the dose equivalent to the worker, a number of steps are involved, including TLD reader calibration, TLD element calibration, corrections for fade and background, and inherent sensitivities of the dosemeter algorithm. In order to better understand the total uncertainty in calculated doses, a series of calculations were performed using certain assumptions and measurement data. Individual contributions to the uncertainty were propagated through the process, including final dose calculations for a number of representative source types. Although the uncertainty in a worker's calculated dose is not formally reported, these calculations can be used to verify the adequacy of a facility's dosimetry process. PMID:25009187

  7. The calibration of personal dosemeters used for evaluating exposure to solar UV in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Sisto, R; Lega, D; Militello, A

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of an epidemiological study regarding the correlation between solar UV radiation exposure and skin pathologies in a population of outdoor workers, the possibility of using polysulphone film personal dosemeters to quantify the Subjects UVB exposure has been evaluated. An original experimental set-up is presented. in a preliminary version, which ill be used both for solar irradiance spectroradiometric measurements and for the reading of personal dosemeters. The polysulphone absorption is similar to the CIE erythemal response curve. Due to UVB radiation exposure, the polysulphone film dosemeters photodegrade with a measrable absorbance change. The absorbance variation after the dosemeter exposure to UV radiation has been correlated to the UVB effective dose. The calibration curve obtained by this method may be particularly useful for the evaluation of small closes. The method will be used to quantify the personal exposure of workers whose exposure conditions are characterised by high variability. PMID:11878432

  8. Feasibility study of extremity dosemeter based on polyallyldiglycolcarbonate (CR-39) for neutron exposure.

    PubMed

    Chau, Q; Bruguier, P

    2007-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, some activities such as reprocessing, recycling and production of bare fuel rods expose the workers to mixed neutron-photon fields. For several workplaces, particularly in glove boxes, some workers expose their hands to mixed fields. The mastery of the photon extremity dosimetry is relatively good, whereas the neutron dosimetry still raises difficulties. In this context, the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has proposed a study on a passive neutron extremity dosemeter based on chemically etched CR-39 (PADC: polyallyldiglycolcarbonate), named PN-3, already used in routine practice for whole body dosimetry. This dosemeter is a chip of plastic sensitive to recoil protons. The chemical etching process amplifies the size of the impact. The reading system for tracks counting is composed of a microscope, a video camera and an image analyser. This system is combined with the dose evaluation algorithm. The performance of the dosemeter PN-3 has been largely studied and proved by several laboratories in terms of passive individual neutron dosemeter which is used in routine production by different companies. This study focuses on the sensitivity of the extremity dosemeter, as well as its performance in the function of the level of the neutron energy. The dosemeter was exposed to monoenergetic neutron fields in laboratory conditions and to mixed fields in glove boxes at workplaces. PMID:17502314

  9. Characterization of optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters to measure organ doses in diagnostic radiology

    PubMed Central

    Endo, A; Katoh, T; Kobayashi, I; Joshi, R; Sur, J; Okano, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of an optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter (OSLD) for use in diagnostic radiology and to apply the OSLD in measuring the organ doses by panoramic radiography. Methods The dose linearity, energy dependency and angular dependency of aluminium oxide-based OSLDs were examined using an X-ray generator to simulate various exposure settings in diagnostic radiology. The organ doses were then measured by inserting the dosemeters into an anthropomorphic phantom while using three panoramic machines. Results The dosemeters demonstrated consistent dose linearity (coefficient of variation<1.5%) and no significant energy dependency (coefficient of variation<1.5%) under the applied exposure conditions. They also exhibited negligible angular dependency (≤10%). The organ doses of the X-ray as a result of panoramic imaging by three machines were calculated using the dosemeters. Conclusion OSLDs can be utilized to measure the organ doses in diagnostic radiology. The availability of these dosemeters in strip form proves to be reliably advantageous. PMID:22116136

  10. Independent evaluation of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) 'dot' dosemeters for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Bindu; Gesell, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) 'dot' dosemeters (manufactured by Landauer®) are reported to have a high degree of environmental stability, high level of sensitivity and provide wide range of dose measuring capabilities from 0.05 mGy to 100 Gy. The optical read out method is fast and relatively simple and permits repeated read out, but few studies have been performed about its application in monitoring radiation in the environment. This study was initiated to independently test the performance of OSL dot dosemeters for the application of measuring doses of radiation in the outdoor environment. Testing was performed in the laboratory to evaluate reproducibility and stability and in the field to evaluate accuracy relative to calibrated high-pressure ionisation chambers. The results showed that OSL dot dosemeters had good reproducibility and stability in both laboratory and field tests and met the performance requirements of standards of the American National Standards Institute. PMID:20947590

  11. From films to thermoluminescence dosemeters: the Greek Atomic Energy Commission experience.

    PubMed

    Carinou, E; Drikos, G; Hourdakis, C; Hyvönen, H; Kamenopoulou, V

    2001-01-01

    The personnel dosimetry department of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) assures the individual monitoring of almost 8000 occupationally exposed workers. Thermoluminescence dosimetry systems will replace the existing photographic dosimetry system for the individual monitoring with the joint support of IAEA and GAEC. The thermoluminescence dosimetry system consists of two automated readers, one automated irradiator and about 20,000 dosemeters purchased from the Rados Co. The properties of two thermoluminescent materials have been compared: LiF has been chosen for the whole-body dosemeter configuration and Li2B4O7 for the extremities. The technical evaluation of the system has been performed according to the European and IEC standards. The overall uncertainty has been calculated. The existing database system, and the accounting and dispatching procedures have been adapted to the new demands. The system became operational on March 2000, and the official distribution of thermoluminescence dosemeters has begun. PMID:11586730

  12. Operational comparison of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors in fuel fabrication facilities.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, N; Takada, C; Yoshida, T; Momose, T

    2007-01-01

    The authors carried out an operational study that compared the use of TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detector in plutonium environments of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai Works. A selected group of workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX (Plutonium-Uranium mixed oxide) fuel wore both TLD albedo dosemeters and solid state nuclear tracks detectors. The TL readings were generally proportional to the counted etch-pits, and thus the dose equivalent results obtained from TLD albedo dosemeter agreed with those from solid state nuclear tracks detector within a factor of 1.5. This result indicates that, in the workplaces of the MOX fuel plants, the neutron spectrum remained almost constant in terms of time and space, and the appropriate range of field-specific correction with spectrum variations was small in albedo dosimetry. PMID:17337735

  13. A gamma/neutron-discriminating, Cooled, Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) dosemeter

    SciTech Connect

    Eschbach, P.A.; Miller, S.D.

    1992-07-01

    The Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) of CaF{sub 2}:Mn (grain sizes from 0.1 to 100 microns) powder embedded in a hydrogenous matrix is reported as a function of fast-neutron dose. When all the CaF{sub 2}:Mn grains are interrogated at once, the COSL plastic dosemeters have a minimum detectable limit of 1 cSv fast neutrons; the gamma component from the bare {sup 252}cf exposure was determined with a separate dosemeter. We report here on a proton-recoil-based dosemeter that generates pulse height spectra, much like the scintillator of Hornyak, (2) to provide information on both the neutron and gamma dose.

  14. Calibration of personal dosemeters in terms of the ICRU operational quantities

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C. ); Hertel, N.E. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) has defined several new operational quantities for radiation protection purposes. The quantities to be used for personal monitoring are defined at depths in the human body. Because these quantities are impossible to measure directly, the ICRU has recommended that personal dosemeters should be calibrated under simplified conditions on an appropriate phantom, such as the ICRU sphere. The US personal dosimetry accreditation programs make use of a 30 {times} 30 {times} 15 cm polymethymethacrylate (PMMA) phantom, therefore it is necessary to relate the response of dosemeters calibrated on this phantom to the ICRU operational quantities. Calculations of the conversion factors to compute dosemeter response in terms of the operational quantities have been performed using the code MCNP. These calculations have also been compared to experimental measurements using thermoluminescent (TLD) detectors.

  15. Validation of a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining the absorbed and effective radiation doses in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Manninen, A-L; Kotiaho, A; Nikkinen, J; Nieminen, M T

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to validate a MOSFET dosemeter system for determining absorbed and effective doses (EDs) in the dose and energy range used in diagnostic radiology. Energy dependence, dose linearity and repeatability of the dosemeter were examined. The absorbed doses (ADs) were compared at anterior-posterior projection and the EDs were determined at posterior-anterior, anterior-posterior and lateral projections of thoracic imaging using an anthropomorphic phantom. The radiation exposures were made using digital radiography systems. This study revealed that the MOSFET system with high sensitivity bias supply set-up is sufficiently accurate for AD and ED determination. The dosemeter is recommended to be calibrated for energies <60 and >80 kVp. The entrance skin dose level should be at least 5 mGy to minimise the deviation of the individual dosemeter dose. For ED determination, dosemeters should be implanted perpendicular to the surface of the phantom to prevent the angular dependence error. PMID:25213263

  16. Summary of personal neutron dosemeter results obtained within the EVIDOS project.

    PubMed

    Luszik-Bhadra, M; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T; Boschung, M; Coeck, M; Curzio, G; Derdau, D; d'Errico, F; Fiechtner, A; Kyllönen, J-E; Lacoste, V; Lievens, B; Lindborg, L; Lovefors Daun, A; Reginatto, M; Schuhmacher, H; Tanner, R; Vanhavere, F

    2007-01-01

    Within the EC project EVIDOS ('Evaluation of Individual Dosimetry in Mixed Neutron and Photon Radiation Fields'), different types of active neutron personal dosemeters (and some passive ones) were tested in workplace fields at nuclear installations in Europe. The results of the measurements which have been performed up to now are summarised and compared to our currently best estimates of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10). Under- and over-readings by more than a factor of two for the same dosemeter in different workplace fields indicate that in most cases the use of field-specific correction factors is required. PMID:17449908

  17. Qualification of the bubble detector as neutron dosemeter at the MOX plant of BELGONUCLEAIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockerols, P.; De Smet, F.; Vandergheynst, A.

    2000-07-01

    Due to the increasing contribution of the neutron dose to the total dose of the BELGONUCLEAIRE personnel and the introduction of the ICRP 60 recommendations,1 the use of a more reliable personal neutron dosemeter has become even more important. A Canadian2 dosimeter manufactured by Bubble Technology Industries seemed to be a very interesting alternative to the albedo dosimeter used in the past. An extensive investigation program was carried out at BELGONUCLEAIRE to determine the effectiveness of the new dosimeter in the fuel fabrication plant environment. A series of tests were conducted to get a better understanding of this type of dosemeter.

  18. Performance of a PADC personal neutron dosemeter at simulated and real workplace fields of the nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Fiechtner, A; Boschung, M; Wernli, C

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the EVIDOS (Evaluation of Individual Dosimetry in Mixed Neutron and Photon Radiation Fields) project, funded by the EC, measurements with PADC personal neutron dosemeters were carried out at several workplace fields of the nuclear industry and at simulated workplace fields. The measured personal neutron dose equivalents of the PADC personal neutron dosemeter are compared with values that were assessed within the EVIDOS project by other partners. The detection limits for different spectra types are given. In cases were the neutron dose was too low to be measured by the PADC personal neutron dosemeter, the response is estimated by convoluting the responses to monoenergetic neutrons with the dose energy distribution measured within EVIDOS. The advantages and limitations of the PADC personal neutron dosemeter are discussed. PMID:17578876

  19. Determination of the response function for two personal neutron dosemeter designs based on PADC.

    PubMed

    Mayer, S; Assenmacher, F; Boschung, M

    2014-10-01

    Since 1998 neutron dosimetry based on PADC (poly allyl diglycol carbonate) is done with a so-called original Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) design at PSI. The original design (i.e. holder) was later changed. Both designs are optimised for use in workplaces around high-energy accelerators, where the neutron energy spectra are dominated by fast neutrons ranging up to some 100 MeV. In addition to the change of the dosemeter design a new evaluation method based on a microscope scanning technique has been introduced and the etching conditions have been optimised. In the present work, the responses obtained with the original and the new dosemeter designs are compared for fields of radionuclide sources and monoenergetic reference fields using the new evaluation method. The response curves in terms of the personal dose equivalent for normally incident neutrons were built as functions of the incident neutron energy. PMID:24179145

  20. A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO PERFORM THE ISOTROPY TEST FOR EXTREMITY DOSEMETERS.

    PubMed

    Gultresa, J; Llansana, J; Roig, M; Ginjaume, M

    2016-09-01

    The requirements for determining extremity dosemeter performance have evolved over the past decade. In 2010, the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) adopted a national protocol with performance requirements based on ISO 12794. Because of the lack of symmetry of ISO 4037-3 calibration phantoms, the isotropy test set up in the sagittal plane presented several challenges both for individual monitoring services and for calibration labs. This article proposes and validates a practical approach to reduce the number of irradiations. Results show that wrist and ring dosemeters in this study meet the ISO 12794 requirements for the isotropy test. However, additional studies would be needed to verify the newer IEC 62387 Standard. PMID:26747847

  1. EURADOS IC2012N: FURTHER INFORMATION DERIVED FROM AN EURADOS INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON OF NEUTRON PERSONAL DOSEMETERS.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, M-A; Fantuzzi, E; Cruz-Suarez, R; Luszik-Bhadra, M; Mayer, S; Thomas, D J; Tanner, R; Vanhavere, F

    2016-09-01

    In 2012, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) performed an intercomparison for neutron dosemeters that are intended to measure personal dose equivalent, Hp(10). A total of 31 participants registered with 34 dosimetry systems. The irradiation tests were chosen to provide the participants with useful information on their dosimetry systems, i.e. linearity, reproducibility, responses for different energies and angles and to simulated workplace fields. This paper gives details of the extensive information derived from the exercise. PMID:26715777

  2. Response of dosemeters in the radiation field generated by a TW-class laser system.

    PubMed

    Olšovcová, V; Klír, D; Krása, J; Krůs, M; Velyhan, A; Zelenka, Z; Rus, B

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art laser systems are able to generate ionising radiation of significantly high energies by focusing ultra-short and intense pulses onto targets. Thus, measures ensuring the radiation protection of both working personnel and the general public are required. However, commercially available dosemeters are primarily designed for measurement in continuous fields. Therefore, it is important to explore their response to very short pulses. In this study, the responses of dosemeters in a radiation field generated by iodine high-power and Ti:Sapphire laser systems are examined in proton and electron acceleration experiments. Within these experiments, electron bunches of femtosecond pulse duration and 100-MeV energy and proton bunches with sub-nanosecond pulse duration and energy of several megaelectronvolts were generated in single-shot regimes. Responses of typical detectors (TLD, films and electronic personal dosemeter) were analysed and compared. Further, a first attempt was carried out to characterise the radiation field generated by TW-class laser systems. PMID:24563524

  3. Assessment of neutron dosemeters around standard sources and nuclear fissile objects.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, N; Tournier, B; Groetz, J E; Piot, J; Riebler, E; Crovisier, P; Chambaudet, A; Cabanné, N

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate the neutron doses around nuclear fissile objects, a comparative study has been made on several neutron dosemeters: bubble dosemeters, etched-track detectors (CR-39) and 3He-filled proportional counters used as dose-rate meters. The measurements were made on the ambient and the personal dose equivalents H*(10) and Hp(10). Results showed that several bubble dosemeters should have been used due to a low reproducibility in the measurements. A strong correlation with the neutron energy was also found, with about a 30% underestimation of Hp(10) for neutrons from the PuBe source, and about a 9% overestimation for neutrons from the 252Cf source. Measurements of the nuclear fissile objects were made using the CR-39 and the dose-rate meters. The CR-39 led to an underestimation of 30% with respect to the neutron dose-rate meter measurements. In addition, the MCNP calculation code was used in the different configurations. PMID:12382734

  4. Simulated and measured Hp(10) response of the personal dosemeter Seibersdorf.

    PubMed

    Hranitzky, C; Stadtmann, H

    2007-01-01

    The Hp(10) energy response of the personal dosemeter Seibersdorf and its two different filtered LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) thermoluminescence (TL) detectors are investigated. A close-to-reality simulation model of the personal dosemeter badge including the wrapped detector card was implemented with the MCNP Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The comparison of measured and computationally calculated response using a semi-empirical TL efficiency function is carried out to provide information about the quality of the results of both methods, experiment and simulation. Similar to the experimental calibration conditions, the irradiation of dosemeters centred on the front surface of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) water slab phantom is simulated using ISO-4037 reference photon radiation qualities with mean energies between 24 keV and 1.25 MeV and corresponding ISO conversion coefficients. The comparison of the simulated and measured relative Hp(10) energy responses resulted in good agreement within some percent except for the filtered TL element at lower photon energies. PMID:17846027

  5. Investigation of a BeO-based optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Sommer, M; Henniger, J

    2006-01-01

    The optical sensitivity of BeO-based luminophors has been well-known for many years. The optical stimulation of BeO with blue light is most effective. Then the dosemeters emit luminescent light in the ultraviolet-range around 325 nm. Matched on these facts a simple optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) treatment has been developed. Intense blue light-emitting diodes are used for cw-stimulation. A Hamamatsu solar blind photomultiplier detects the OSL-light. Good separation of both spectral ranges by optical filters is very important. The dosemeter has a linear dose response between approximately 20 muGy and >10 Gy. It was suggested, that a modification of stimulation conditions would allow measurements down to 1 muGy. Fading, photon energy dependence and reproducibility of OSL-signal correspond well with requirements to clinical and personal dosemeters. In addition, basic questions of the OSL-process in BeO have been investigated. A relevant point of interest was the dependency of the OSL-signal on stimulation power. PMID:16735572

  6. Development and characterization of real-time personal neutron dosemeter with two silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Nakamura, T.; Tsujimura, N.; Ueda, O.; Suzuki, T.

    1998-12-01

    We have developed a new real-time personal neutron dosemeter containing two neutron sensors, a fast and a slow neutron sensor. The former sensor is a p-type silicon semiconductor detector. The slow neutron sensor is also a p-type silicon semiconductor detector and natural boron is doped on the aluminum electrode to produce 10B(n,α) reactions. A thin polyethylene radiator is contacted on the front surface of each sensor to produce recoil protons. The neutron detection efficiencies of these sensors were measured in a thermal neutron field and monoenergetic neutron fields from 8 keV to 22 MeV. By taking the weighted sum of counts given by the two sensors, the detection efficiency could be made to approach to the fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factor given by ICRP 51. Field tests of the performance of this neutron dosemeter were performed in the radiation environments around several nuclear facilities, including reactor, accelerator, radioisotope and nuclear fuel handling facilities. Based on the results of these field tests, we conclude that our dosemeter is able to provide a reading of the neutron dose equivalent within a factor of 2 margin of accuracy.

  7. THE RESULTS OF THE EURADOS INTERCOMPARISON IC2014 FOR WHOLE-BODY DOSEMETERS IN PHOTON FIELDS.

    PubMed

    Stadtmann, H; Grimbergen, T W M; Figel, M; Romero, A M; McWhan, A F; Gärtner, C

    2016-09-01

    The European Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) first started performing international intercomparisons for whole-body dosemeters for individual monitoring services in 1998. Since 2008, these whole-body intercomparisons have been performed on a regular basis. In this latest intercomparison (IC2014), 96 monitoring services from 35 countries (mostly European) participated with 112 dosimetry systems. Unlike in the previous intercomparisons, the whole registration, communication and data exchange process was handled by a new on-line platform. All dosemeter irradiations were carried out in the Seibersdorf accredited dosimetry laboratory. The irradiation plan consisted of nine irradiation setups with five different photon radiation qualities (S-Cs, S-Co, RQR7, W-80 and W-150) and two different angles of radiation incidence (0° and 60°). The paper describes and analyses the individual results for the personal dose equivalent quantities Hp(10) and if requested, Hp(0.07), for all participating systems and compares these results with the ISO 14146 'trumpet curve' performance criteria. The results show that 100 systems (89 % of all systems) do fulfil the general ISO 14146 performance criteria. This paper gives an overview on the performance of the participating individual monitoring services and the influence of the dosemeter type on the observed response values. PMID:26763903

  8. FIRST EURADOS INTERCOMPARISON EXERCISE OF EYE LENS DOSEMETERS FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Clairand, I; Ginjaume, M; Vanhavere, F; Carinou, E; Daures, J; Denoziere, M; Silva, E H; Roig, M; Principi, S; Van Rycheghem, L

    2016-09-01

    In the context of the decrease in the eye lens dose limit for occupational exposure to 20 mSv per year stated by the recent revision of the European Basic Safety Standards Directive 2013/59/EURATOM, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has organised in 2014, for the first time, an intercomparison exercise for eye lens dosemeters. The main objective was to assess the capabilities of the passive eye lens dosemeters currently in use in Europe for occupational monitoring in medical fields. A total of 20 European individual monitoring services from 15 different countries have participated. The dosemeters provided by the participants were all composed of thermoluminescent detectors, of various types and designs. The irradiations were carried out with several photon fields chosen to cover the energy and angle ranges encountered in medical workplace. Participants were asked to report the doses in terms of Hp(3) using their routine protocol. The results provided by each participant were compared with the reference delivered doses. All the results were anonymously analysed. Results are globally satisfactory since, among the 20 participants, 17 were able to provide 90 % of their response in accordance with the ISO 14146 standard requirements. PMID:26163384

  9. A portable versatile x- and gamma-ray dosemeter with ditigal display for medical use.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, A; Gangadharan, P

    1980-05-01

    A multipurpose dosemeter based on analogue-to-digita (A-d) conversion has been developed using solid state devices, micropower integrated circuits and displays. The A-D converter combines the features of a MOSFET electrometer, a voltage-to-frequency converter, the automatic Townsend balance, LED(LCD) display for exposure, analogue output and has a voltage-measuring accuracy of +/- 0.1% FS +/- 1 digit. The dosemeter, which is designed to measure a wide range of x- and gamma-ray exposure rates (1 mR h-1 to 1000 R min-1) and exposures (1 mR to 1000 R) with a variety of air-equivalent ionisation chambers, is compact, rugged and battery or AC mains powered. It is designed to provide trouble-free performance, easy operation and maintenance and to be independent of climatic conditions. Combining the features of a survey meter, dosemeter and a radioisotope calibrator, it can be fabricated using the facilities locally available in hospitals or universities. PMID:7403264

  10. Eye lens monitoring for interventional radiology personnel: dosemeters, calibration and practical aspects of H p (3) monitoring. A 2015 review.

    PubMed

    Carinou, Eleftheria; Ferrari, Paolo; Bjelac, Olivera Ciraj; Gingaume, Merce; Merce, Marta Sans; O'Connor, Una

    2015-09-01

    A thorough literature review about the current situation on the implementation of eye lens monitoring has been performed in order to provide recommendations regarding dosemeter types, calibration procedures and practical aspects of eye lens monitoring for interventional radiology personnel. Most relevant data and recommendations from about 100 papers have been analysed and classified in the following topics: challenges of today in eye lens monitoring; conversion coefficients, phantoms and calibration procedures for eye lens dose evaluation; correction factors and dosemeters for eye lens dose measurements; dosemeter position and influence of protective devices. The major findings of the review can be summarised as follows: the recommended operational quantity for the eye lens monitoring is H p (3). At present, several dosemeters are available for eye lens monitoring and calibration procedures are being developed. However, in practice, very often, alternative methods are used to assess the dose to the eye lens. A summary of correction factors found in the literature for the assessment of the eye lens dose is provided. These factors can give an estimation of the eye lens dose when alternative methods, such as the use of a whole body dosemeter, are used. A wide range of values is found, thus indicating the large uncertainty associated with these simplified methods. Reduction factors from most common protective devices obtained experimentally and using Monte Carlo calculations are presented. The paper concludes that the use of a dosemeter placed at collar level outside the lead apron can provide a useful first estimate of the eye lens exposure. However, for workplaces with estimated annual equivalent dose to the eye lens close to the dose limit, specific eye lens monitoring should be performed. Finally, training of the involved medical staff on the risks of ionising radiation for the eye lens and on the correct use of protective systems is strongly recommended. PMID

  11. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons. PMID:21613268

  12. Dose evaluation in criticality accidents using response of Panasonic TL personal dosemeters (UD-809/UD-802).

    PubMed

    Zeyrek, C T; Gündüz, H

    2012-09-01

    This study gives the results of dosimetry measurements carried out in the Silène reactor at Valduc (France) with neutron and photon personal thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) in mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields, in the frame of the international accident dosimetry intercomparison programme in 2002. The intercomparison consisted of a series of three irradiation scenarios. The scenarios took place at the Valduc site (France) by using the Silène experimental reactor. For neutron and photon dosimetry, Panasonic model UD-809 and UD-802 personal TLDs were used together. PMID:22389154

  13. Photon energy dependence of three fortuitous dosemeters from personal electronic devices, measured by optically stimulated luminescence.

    PubMed

    Beerten, Koen; Vanhavere, Filip

    2010-08-01

    New data are presented with regard to the relative OSL sensitivity of three different emergency dosemeters irradiated to various photon energies approximately between 48 and 1250 keV using blue excitation light. Investigated components extracted from commonly worn objects include those from USB flash drives (alumina substrate), mobile phones (Ba-rich silicate) and credit cards (chip card module). Several basic properties have been investigated such as the overall radiation sensitivity, the shape of the decay curve and fading of the OSL signal. An increase of the sensitivity for low energies relative to (60)Co gamma rays can be observed for the three dosemeters, the increase being very pronounced for the Ba-rich component (factor of 10) and less pronounced for the chip card module (factor of 2). It is concluded that proper dose correction factors for photon energy have to be applied in order to accurately determine the absorbed dose to tissue. The OSL sensitivity to neutron irradiation was investigated as well, but this was found to be less than the gamma sensitivity. PMID:20304766

  14. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dosemeters used in high-energy neutron environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, K W; Sheu, R J

    2015-04-01

    High-energy neutrons (>10 MeV) contribute substantially to the dose fraction but result in only a small or negligible response in most conventional moderated-type neutron detectors. Neutron dosemeters used for radiation protection purpose are commonly calibrated with (252)Cf neutron sources and are used in various workplace. A workplace-specific correction factor is suggested. In this study, the effect of the neutron spectrum on the accuracy of dose measurements was investigated. A set of neutron spectra representing various neutron environments was selected to study the dose responses of a series of Bonner spheres, including standard and extended-range spheres. By comparing (252)Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values based on fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this paper presents recommendations for neutron field characterisation and appropriate correction factors for responses of conventional neutron dosemeters used in environments with high-energy neutrons. The correction depends on the estimated percentage of high-energy neutrons in the spectrum or the ratio between the measured responses of two Bonner spheres (the 4P6_8 extended-range sphere versus the 6″ standard sphere). PMID:25280480

  15. Efficiency of a radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeter for low-earth-orbit space radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuda, H.; Fujitaka, K.; Badhwar, G. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Chips of a radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeter (RPLG) were used for measurements of space radiation during a 9.8 d Shuttle-Mir mission (STS-91) at an altitude of 400 km and an inclination of 51.65 degrees. Two of RPLG chips were put into each of 59 positions in or on a life-size human phantom. The RPLG values equivalent to 137Cs gamma ray absorbed doses were found to be systematically lower than those of a Mg2SiO4:Tb thermoluminescence dosemeter (TDMS). In comparison with the organ or tissue absorbed dose and dose equivalent values that were estimated using a combination of TDMS and plastic nuclear track detectors, the efficiencies of the RPLG chips were about 80% for the water absorbed dose and about 40% for the dose equivalent. Whereas the percentage values will change during different missions, such additional information obtained from small RPLG chips is useful for improving the reliability of radiation dosimetry in space.

  16. Portable transfer digital dosemeter for beam output measurements with X and gamma rays, electrons and neutrons.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, A; Gokarn, R S; Gangadharan, P

    1981-04-01

    This instrument was developed in response to a requirement for an accurate, stable and portable transfer dosemeter for calibration, at therapy dose levels, of equipment used for generating X and gamma rays, electrons and neutrons. The detector is a 0.5 cm3 ionization chamber capable of fitting various wall materials reproducibly at the end of the chamber stem. The measuring system uniquely combines the features of a MOSFET electrometer and an automatic Townsend balance. When used for X, gamma and neutron radiations, the instrument measures the tissue kerma in free air on two ranges: 0.001 - 1.999 Gy (0.1 - 199.9 rad) and 0.01 - 19.99 Gy (1 - 1999 rad) or their exposure equivalents, with autoranging feature when the first range is exceeded. The polarizing voltage (180 V) can be reversed for electron and neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has a measuring accuracy of +/- 0.2% FS +/- 1 digit and operates on four 1.5 V torchlight cells or on AC mains (200-250 V, 50 - 60 Hz). It utilizes solid state devices, CMOS integrated circuits and displays, and is not affected by RF fields. The instrument is enclosed in a brief-case for portability and is easy to operate and maintain in a hospital. PMID:7225720

  17. Development of advanced-type multi-functional electronic personal dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Nunomiya, T; Abe, S; Aoyama, K; Nakamura, T

    2007-01-01

    An advanced-type small, light, multi-functional electronic personal dosemeter has been developed using silicon semiconductor radiation detectors for dose management of workers at nuclear power plants and accelerator facilities. This dosemeter is 62 x 82 x 27 mm(3) in size and approximately 130 g in weight, which is capable of measuring personal gamma ray and neutron dose equivalents, Hp(10), simultaneously. The neutron dose equivalent can be obtained using two types of silicon semiconductors: a slow-neutron sensor (<1 MeV) and a fast-neutron sensor (>1 MeV). The slow neutron sensor is a 10 x 10 mm(2) p-type silicon on which a natural boron layer is deposited around an aluminium electrode. The fast neutron sensor is also a 10 x 10 mm(2) p-type silicon crystal on which an amorphous silicon hydride is deposited. The neutron energy response corresponding to the fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficient given by ICRP Publication 74 has been evaluated using a monoenergetic neutron source from 250 keV to 15 MeV at the Fast Neutron Laboratory of Tohoku University. As the result, the Hp(10) response to neutrons in the energy range of 250 keV and 4.4 MeV within +/-50% difference has been obtained. PMID:17704353

  18. Directionality of extruded lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters in a cobalt-60 beam.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G S; Batey, S E; Mosleh-Shirazi, M A

    2000-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the directionality of commercially available extruded lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg,Ti) thermoluminescent dosemeters was carried out in a cobalt-60 beam at a water depth of 5 cm. One-half of a batch of 60 chips (3.1 x 3.1 x 0.9 mm3) was exposed face-on (faces perpendicular to the beam central axis), and the other half was exposed in an edge-on orientation (two edges perpendicular and faces parallel to the beam axis). Measurements show that an edge-on exposure results in a thermoluminescence reading approximately 0.9% lower than a face-on exposure. Although this is of minor importance in every day patient dosimetry, it is relevant in evaluating errors in in-phantom dosimetric measurements where greater accuracy is required. PMID:11064657

  19. Development of confocal laser microscope system for examination of microscopic characteristics of radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Maki, Daisuke; Ishii, Tetsuya; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2011-03-01

    A confocal laser microscope system was developed for the measurement of radiophotoluminescence (RPL) photons emitted from a minute alpha-ray-irradiated area in an RPL glass dosemeter. The system was composed mainly of an inverted-type microscope, an ultraviolet laser, an XY movable stage and photon-counting circuits. The photon-counting circuits were effective in the reduction of the background noise level in the measurement of RPL photons. The performance of this microscope system was examined by the observation of standard RPL glass samples irradiated using (241)Am alpha rays. The spatial resolution of this system was ∼ 3 μm, and with regard to the sensitivity of this system, a hit of more than four to five alpha rays in unit area produced enough amount of RPL photons to construct the image. PMID:21212081

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ACTIVE DOSEMETER ACCORDING TO IEC 61526:2010.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, J; Santos, J A M; Santos, L; Alves, J G; Oliveira, C

    2016-09-01

    The active personal dosemeter, RaySafe i2, allows the measurement and record of Hp(10) in real time, every second, via wireless technology for real-time display on a portable computer and/or a local network. The system seems particularly attractive for individual monitoring at clinical facilities where high intensity and varying radiation fields may occur, as it enables the user to acknowledge and optimize the dose and dose rate values in real time for each procedure. Prior to its use, the system was characterized at the Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation of IST-LPSR aiming at the metrological characterization of the system in accordance with IEC 61526:2010 for metrological control purposes and to verify the technical specifications stated by the manufacturer. PMID:27103641

  1. Automation of radiation dosimetry using PTW dosemeter and LabVIEW™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C.; Al-Frouh, K.; Anjak, O.

    2011-10-01

    Automation of UNIDOS "Dosemeter" using personal computer (PC) is discussed in this paper. In order to save time and eliminate human operation errors during the radiation dosimetry, suitable software, using LabVIEW™ graphical programming language, was written to automate and facilitate the processes of measurements, analysis and data storage. The software calculates the calibration factor of the ionization chamber in terms of air kerma or absorbed dose to water according to IAEA dosimetry protocols. It also has the ability to print a calibration certificate. The obtained results using this software are found to be more reliable and flexible than those obtained by manual methods previously employed. Using LabVIEW™ as a development tool is extremely convenient to make things easier when software modifications and improvements are needed.

  2. Evaluation of the calibration procedure of active personal dosemeters for interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Bordy, J-M; Daures, J; Clairand, I; Denozière, M; Donadille, L; d'Errico, F; Gouriou, J; Itié, C; Struelens, L

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the use of active personal dosemeters (APD) in interventional radiology is presented. It is based on the work done by the working package 7 of the CONRAD coordinated action supported by the EC within the frame of the 6th FP. This study was done in collaboration with the working package 4 of CONRAD to deal with the calculations required for studying the new calibration facility. The main requirements of the standard for the APD and the difficulties caused by the use of pulsed radiations are presented through the results of an intercomparison organised in a realistic calibration facility similar to the workplace situation in interventional radiology. The main characteristics of this facility are presented. PMID:18757898

  3. Two-dimensional differential calibration method for a neutron dosemeter using a thermal neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Harano, Hideki; Masuda, Akihiko; Nishiyama, Jun; Matsue, Hideaki; Uritani, Akira; Nunomiya, Tomoya

    2013-08-01

    A new thermal neutron calibration method to experimentally determine the energy response function of a neutron detector using a pulse parallel beam and the time-of-flight (TOF) technique is developed. The calibration method was experimentally demonstrated for a (3)He proportional counter and an electric personal dosemeter using a pulsed thermal neutron beam from the research reactor JRR-3M. The responses of the detectors were successfully obtained as a function of neutron energy. However, detailed information on the detector structure is required to obtain the spatial response distribution for the detector. The authors further propose an improved calibration method obtaining the spatial response distribution using a pulsed narrow beam, the TOF technique and a beam scanning technique. PMID:23509397

  4. Performance of the EPD-N2 dosemeter for monitoring aircrew doses.

    PubMed

    Scherpelz, R I; Cezeaux, J R

    2015-03-01

    United States Air Force (USAF) aircrew fly at altitudes and for durations where doses from cosmic radiation are significant enough to warrant monitoring. This study evaluated a candidate radiological monitoring system for USAF aircrew, the Thermo Scientific electronic personnel dosemeter (EPD-N2). The evaluation consisted of characterising the device in a well-characterised radiation field at a European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) accelerator, and aboard an USAF aircraft. The performance of the EPDs was evaluated by comparison with accepted values for dose at the CERN facility, comparison with the value calculated by flight dose software and comparison with the value estimated by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter aboard the aircraft. This study recommends that a correction factor of 1/CF = 1/3.9 be applied to EPD-N2 measurements aboard aircraft flights. The uncertainty in this correction factor is 11.8 %. PMID:25108394

  5. EURADOS INTERCOMPARISONS IN EXTERNAL RADIATION DOSIMETRY: SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES AMONG EXERCISES FOR WHOLE-BODY PHOTON, WHOLE-BODY NEUTRON, EXTREMITY, EYE-LENS AND PASSIVE AREA DOSEMETERS.

    PubMed

    Romero, Ana M; Grimbergen, Tom; McWhan, Andrew; Stadtmann, Hannes; Fantuzzi, Elena; Clairand, Isabelle; Neumaier, Stefan; Figel, Markus; Dombrowski, Harald

    2016-09-01

    The European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) has been organising dosimetry intercomparisons for many years in response to an identified requirement from individual monitoring services (IMS) for independent performance tests for dosimetry systems. The participation in intercomparisons gives IMS the opportunity to show compliance with their own quality management system, compare results with other participants and develop plans for improving their dosimetry systems. In response to growing demand, EURADOS has increased the number of intercomparisons for external radiation dosimetry. Most of these fit into the programme of self-financing intercomparisons for dosemeters routinely used by IMS. This programme is being coordinated by EURADOS working group 2 (WG2). Up to now, this programme has included four intercomparisons for whole-body dosemeters in photon fields, one for extremity dosemeters in photon and beta fields, and one for whole-body dosemeters in neutron fields. Other EURADOS working groups have organised additional intercomparisons including events in 2014 for eye-lens dosemeters and passive area dosemeters for environmental monitoring. In this paper, the organisation and achievements of these intercomparisons are compared in detail focusing on the similarities and differences in their execution. PMID:26759475

  6. Study of a selection of 10 historical types of dosemeter: variation of the response to Hp(10) with photon energy and geometry of exposure.

    PubMed

    Thierry-Chef, I; Pernicka, F; Marshall, M; Cardis, E; Andreo, P

    2002-01-01

    An international collaborative study of cancer risk among workers in the nuclear industry is tinder way to estimate direetly the cancer risk following protracted low-dose exposure to ionising radiation. An essential aspect of this study is the characterisation and quantification of errors in available dose estimates. One major source of errors is dosemeter response in workplace exposure conditions. Little information is available on energy and geometry response for most of the 124 different dosemeters used historically in participating facilities. Experiments were therefore set up to assess this. using 10 dosemeter types representative of those used over time. Results show that the largest errors were associated with the response of early dosemeters to low-energy photon radiation. Good response was found with modern dosemeters. even at low energy. These results are being used to estimate errors in the response for each dosemeter type, used in the participating facilities, so that these can be taken into account in the estimates of cancer risk. PMID:12408486

  7. Calibration of an eye lens dosemeter in terms of Hp(3) to be used in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, F. L. S.; Guimarães, M. C.; Da Silva, T. A.; Nogueira Tavares, M. S.

    2014-11-01

    Recently, the International Commission on Radiological Protection has reviewed epidemiological evidences suggesting that there were tissue reaction effects in the eye lens below the previously considered absorbed dose threshold. A new statement related to the eye lens was issued that changed the absorbed dose threshold and reduced the dose limits for occupationally exposed persons. As consequence, some planned exposures require eye lens dosimetry and a debate was raised on the adequacy of the dosimetric quantity and on its method of measurement. The aim of this work was to study the methodology for calibrating the EYE-DTM holder with a TLD-100H Harshaw chip detector and to determine its angular and energy dependences in terms of personal dose equivalent, Hp(3).

  8. The use of passive personal neutron dosemeters to determine the neutron dose equivalent component of radiation fields in spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, D T; Hager, L G; Tanner, R J

    2004-01-01

    For the altitude range and inclination of the International Space Station (ISS), secondary neutrons can be a major contributor to dose equivalent inside a spacecraft. The exact proportion is very dependent on the amount of shielding of the primary galactic cosmic radiation and trapped particles, but is likely to lie in the range of 10-50%. Personal neutron dosemeters of simple design, processed using simple techniques developed for personal dosimetry, may be used to estimate this neutron component. PMID:15353682

  9. Efficiency-corrected dose verification with thermoluminescence dosemeters in heavy-ion beams.

    PubMed

    Berger, Thomas; Hajek, Michael; Fugger, Mamfred; Vana, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    One of the most essential difficulties in heavy-ion dosimetry by means of thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs)--often seen as a serious disadvantage of TLD utilisation--regards the changing TL-efficiency with increasing linear energy transfer (LET) of the particle. This behaviour leads to a falsification of absorbed dose that can be significant for many applications, e.g. in space or radiotherapeutic dosimetry. The high-temperature TL emission of LiF:Mg,Ti TL detectors can be exploited to obtain information about the LET of the heavy-ion radiation field under study. The high-temperature ratio (HTR) is used as a parameter to determine average LET. To correct the absorbed dose according to the TL-efficiency, the detailed dependence of HTR- and TL-efficiency on LET was recorded. These investigations were accomplished at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan, with a variety of high-energy ion beams (helium, carbon, neon, silicon and iron) ranging in LET from 2.2 to 393 keV microm(-1). The obtained relationships HTR vs. LET and TL-efficiency vs. LET were combined into a TL efficieny vs. HTR relationship. This enables correction of the absorbed dose (HTR-B method). The methodology is demonstrated by means of TLD 700 ((7)LiF:Mg,Ti) measurements in carbon beams of 290 and 400 MeV n(-1) available from HIMAC. PMID:16709709

  10. On optically stimulated luminescence properties of household salt as a retrospective dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Timar-Gabor, Alida; Trandafir, Oana

    2013-08-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in the UV (270-370 nm) spectral region have been investigated for five types of table salt (NaCl) available in Romanian supermarkets with a view to applying them in retrospective dosimetry. The salt samples gave bright TL signals with two main peaks at ∼100°C and at 300 or 260°C, depending on the origin of the salt and bright OSL signals under continuous stimulation with blue light. The OSL signal (stimulated at 100°C after a pre-heat of 10 s at 150°C) was used for investigations in a standard multiple aliquot procedure. The dose-response was found to be linear in the dose range investigated (up to ∼100 mGy) and the lower limit of detection for the samples varied from ∼0.01 to 14 mGy. These characteristics, along with the widespread abundance and low cost of household salt, confirm its potential as a retrospective dosemeter. PMID:23443414

  11. Performance characteristics of neutron personnel dosemeters used in the Oak Ridge intercomparison studies

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    To provide an opportunity for dosimetrists to test and calibrate their neutron personnel monitoring systems, the staff of the Dosimetry Applications Research Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies (PDIS) periodically since 1974. During these studies, neutron dosemeters are mailed to ORNL, exposed to low-level (less than 15 mSv) dose equivalents in a variety of mixed-radiation fields produced using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR), and then returned to the participants for evaluation. Beginning with the Seventh PDIS in 1981, interest and participation in the Oak Ridge intercomparisons increased significantly and consistent and documented methods for determining reference neutron dose equivalents for the HPRR were introduced. This paper presents a summary and analysis of about 3450 neutron dose equivalent measurements reported for PDIS 7 through 12 (1981-1986) with particular emphasis on low dose equivalent sensitivity, accuracy and precision, and performance relative to accreditation standards for the basic types of personnel dosimetry systems. (16 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Energy and angular dependences of common types of personal dosemeters in the mirror of the First national intercomparison of individual dosimetric monitoring laboratories in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Chumak, V; Deniachenko, N; Volosky, V

    2015-12-01

    In depth analysis of the results of the First National Intercomparison of individual dosimetry laboratories in Ukraine has revealed energy and angular responses of the most common types of personal dosemeters and dosi metric systems. Participating laboratories use 9 different types of dosimetric systems - automatic, semi automat ic and manual. If was found that energy dependences of the most common dosemeter types in Ukraine generally correspond to the literature data on respective TLD materials (LiF:Mg,Cu,P, LiF:Mg,TiandAl2O3:С), however, due to peculiarities of holders (filters) and dose algorithms, for some dosimetry systems the energy dependences can be improved (compensated). Angular dependences proved to be more pronounced: only two systems revealed weak dependence of response on the incident angle, for other systems at large angles (α=60°) dosemeters overestimate true dose values. PMID:26695907

  13. Evaluation of a personal and environmental dosemeter based on CR-39 track detectors in quasi-monoenergetic neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Caresana, M; Ferrarini, M; Parravicini, A; Sashala Naik, A

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the evaluation of the dosimetric capability of a detector based on a CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector coupled to a 1 cm thickness of PMMA radiator was made with the aim of understanding the applicability of this technique to personal and environmental neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has been exposed to monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams at PTB in Braunschweig, Germany and at Ithemba Laboratories, in Faure, South Africa, with peak energies ranging from 0.565 to 100 MeV. The results showed a response that is almost independent of the neutron energy in the whole energy range. PMID:24324248

  14. Characterising Passive Dosemeters for Dosimetry of Biological Experiments in Space (dobies)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhavere, Filip; Spurny, Frantisek; Yukihara, Eduardo; Genicot, Jean-Louis

    Introduction: The DOBIES (Dosimetry of biological experi-ments in space) project focusses on the use of a stan-dard dosimetric method (as a combination of differ-ent passive techniques) to measure accurately the absorbed doses and equivalent doses in biological samples. Dose measurements on biological samples are of high interest in the fields of radiobiology and exobiology. Radiation doses absorbed by biological samples must be quantified to be able to determine the relationship between observed biological effects and the radiation dose. The radiation field in space is very complex, con-sisting of protons, neutrons, electrons and high-energy heavy charged particles. It is not straightfor-ward to measure doses in this radiation field, cer-tainly not with only small and light passive doseme-ters. The properties of the passive detectors must be tested in radiation fields that are representative of the space radiation. We will report on the characterisation of different type of passive detectors at high energy fields. The results from such characterisation measurements will be applied to recent exposures of detectors on the International Space Station. Material and methods: Following passive detectors are used: • thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) • optically stimulated luminescence detectors (OSLD) • track etch detectors (TED) The different groups have participated in the past to the ICCHIBAN series of irradiations. Here protons and other particles of high energy were used to de-termine the LET-dependency of the passive detec-tors. The last few months, new irradiations have been done at the iThemba labs (100-200 MeV protons), Dubna (145 MeV protons) and the JRC-IRMM (quasi mono energetic neutrons up to 19 MeV). All these detectors were also exposed to a simulated space radiation field at CERN (CERF-field). Discussion: The interpretation of the TLD and OSLD results is done using the measured LET spectrum (TED) and the LET-dependency curves of ths TLD and OSLDs

  15. Performance of the electronic personal dosemeter for neutron 'Saphydose-N' at different workplaces of nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, T; Chau, Q; Ménard, S; Lacoste, V; Muller, H; Luszik-Bhadra, M; Reginatto, M; Bruguier, P

    2006-01-01

    This paper mainly aims at presenting the measurements and the results obtained with the electronic personal neutron dosemeter Saphydose-N at different facilities. Three campaigns were led in the frame of the European contract EVIDOS ('Evaluation of Individual Dosimetry in Mixed Neutron and Photon Radiation Fields'). The first one consisted in the measurements at the IRSN French research laboratory in reference neutron fields generated by a thermal facility (SIGMA), radionuclide ISO sources ((241)AmBe; (252)Cf; (252)Cf(D(2)O)\\Cd) and a realistic spectrum (CANEL/T400). The second one was performed at the Krümmel Nuclear Power Plant (Germany) close to the boiling water reactor and to a spent fuel transport cask. The third one was realised at Mol (Belgium), at the VENUS Research Reactor and at Belgonucléaire, a fuel processing factory. PMID:16820401

  16. Performance characteristics of LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters employed in the National Personnel Radiation Dose Services in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ngaile, J E; Muhogora, W E

    2004-06-01

    Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) have been used to estimate the personal dose equivalent for external occupationally exposed workers in Tanzania. The reliability and precision of dose measurements and the accuracy of dose evaluation are important factors for the improvement and achievement of individual monitoring objectives. In this piece of work we describe a study of the major characteristics of TLDs (linearity of response, photon energy response, batch homogeneity and uniformity, calibration of TLDs and TLD systems in terms of operational quantities, fading, etc) in order to initiate a routine performance testing and quality assurance programme to be undertaken by central personal dosimetry services. The energy response of the dosemeters relative to that measured using 137Cs gamma rays was found to vary between 1.0 and 1.3 over the range of 33-1250 keV (60Co). The linearity of the response for the TL dose dependence in the dose range of 0.1-30 mGy for 48 keV and 137Cs (662 keV) radiation protection qualities varied from 15% to 7% respectively, for both energies. The minimum detectable dose, the batch homogeneity and uniformity, and the batch reproducibility were found to be 0.1 mGy, 16%, and 9% respectively while the fading characteristic of doped LiF after a received dose of 3 mGy was found to be 6.3% over a one-month period. These results are discussed in order to demonstrate the degree of accuracy achieved and the need for its improvement where necessary. PMID:15296259

  17. Measurements of non-target organ doses using MOSFET dosemeters for selected IMRT and 3D CRT radiation treatment procedures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Brian; Xu, X George

    2008-01-01

    Many expressed concerns about the potential increase in second cancer risk from the widespread shift to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques from traditional 3-D conformal radiation treatment (3D CRT). This paper describes the study on in-phantom measurements of radiation doses in organ sites away from the primary tumour target. The measurements involved a RANDO((R)) phantom and Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor dosemeters for selected 3D CRT and IMRT treatment plans. Three different treatment plans, 4-field 3D CRT, 6-field 3D CRT and 7-field IMRT for the prostate, were considered in this study. Steps to reconstruct organ doses from directly measured data were also presented. The dosemeter readings showed that the doses decrease as the distances increase for all treatment plans. At 40 cm from the prostate target, doses were <1% of the therapeutic dose. At this location, however, the IMRT plan resulted in an absorbed dose from photons, that is a factor of 3-5 higher than the 3D CRT treatment plans. This increase on absorbed dose is due to the increased exposure time for delivering the IMRT plan. The total monitor unit (MU) was 2850 for the IMRT case, while the MU was 1308 and 1260 for 6-field and 4-field 3D CRT cases, respectively. Findings from this case study involving the prostate treatments agree with those from previous studies that IMRT indeed delivers higher photon doses to locations that are away from the primary target. PMID:17627959

  18. Effective dose assessment in the maxillofacial region using thermoluminescent (TLD) and metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosemeters: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, D; Wolff, J; Rottke, D

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare the performance of metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) technology dosemeters with thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) (TLD 100; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) in the maxillofacial area. Methods: Organ and effective dose measurements were performed using 40 TLD and 20 MOSFET dosemeters that were alternately placed in 20 different locations in 1 anthropomorphic RANDO® head phantom (the Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY). The phantom was exposed to four different CBCT default maxillofacial protocols using small (4 × 5 cm) to full face (20 × 17 cm) fields of view (FOVs). Results: The TLD effective doses ranged between 7.0 and 158.0 µSv and the MOSFET doses between 6.1 and 175.0 µSv. The MOSFET and TLD effective doses acquired using four different (FOV) protocols were as follows: face maxillofacial (FOV 20 × 17 cm) (MOSFET, 83.4 µSv; TLD, 87.6 µSv; −5%); teeth, upper jaw (FOV, 8.5 × 5.0 cm) (MOSFET, 6.1 µSv; TLD, 7.0 µSv; −14%); tooth, mandible and left molar (FOV, 4 × 5 cm) (MOSFET, 10.3 µSv; TLD, 12.3 µSv; −16%) and teeth, both jaws (FOV, 10 × 10 cm) (MOSFET, 175 µSv; TLD, 158 µSv; +11%). The largest variation in organ and effective dose was recorded in the small FOV protocols. Conclusions: Taking into account the uncertainties of both measurement methods and the results of the statistical analysis, the effective doses acquired using MOSFET dosemeters were found to be in good agreement with those obtained using TLD dosemeters. The MOSFET dosemeters constitute a feasible alternative for TLDs for the effective dose assessment of CBCT devices in the maxillofacial region. PMID:25143020

  19. Photon energy response of luminescence dosemeters and its impact on assessment of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) in mixed fields of varying energies of photons and beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, A S

    2002-01-01

    X and gamma rays continue to remain the main contributors to the dose to humans. As these photons of varying energies are encountered in various applications, the study of photon energy response of a dosemeter is an important aspect to ensure the accuracy in dose measurement. Responses of dosemeters have to be experimentally established because for luminescence dosemeters, they depend not only on the effective atomic number (ratio of mass energy absorption coefficients of dosemeter and tissue) of the detector, but also considerably on the luminescence efficiency and the material surrounding the dosemeters. Metal filters are generally used for the compensation of energy dependence below 200 keV and/or to provide photon energy discrimination. It is noted that the contribution to Hp(0.07) could be measured more accurately than Hp(10). For the dosemeters exhibiting high photon energy-dependent response, estimation of the beta component of Hp(0.07) becomes very difficult in the mixed field of beta radiation and photons of energy less than 100 keV. Recent studies have shown that the thickness and the atomic number of metal filters not only affect the response below 200 keV but also cause a significant over-response for high energy (>6 MeV) photons often encountered in the environments of pressurised heavy water reactors and accelerators. PMID:12382729

  20. Fundamental study on the characteristics of a radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeter with no energy compensation filter for measuring patient entrance doses in cardiac interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    Kato, Mamoru; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tadaya; Oosaka, Hajime; Tosa, Tetsuo; Kadowaki, Ken

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac interventional procedures have been increasing year by year. However, radiation skin injuries have been still reported. There is a necessity to measure the patient entrance skin dose (ESD), but an accurate dose measurement method has not been established. To measure the ESD, a lot of radiophotoluminescence dosemeters (RPLDs) provide an accurate measurement of the direct actual ESD at the points they are arrayed. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of RPLD to measure the ESD. As a result, X-ray permeable RPLD (with no tin filter) did not interfere with the percutaneous coronary intervention procedure. The RPLD also had good fundamental performance characteristics. Although the RPLD had a little energy dependence, it showed excellent dose and dose-rate linearity, and good angular dependence. In conclusion, by calibrating the energy dependence, RPLDs are useful dosemeter to measure the ESD in cardiac intervention. PMID:24277872

  1. Extremity and whole-body dosemeters for beta and beta gamma fields based on LiF:Mg,Cu,P thin detectors.

    PubMed

    Pérez, S; Ginjaume, M; Ortega, X; Duch, M A; Roig, M

    2002-01-01

    This study aims at proposing two TL dosemeters: one for the whole body and another for the extremities, for beta and gamma fields. Selected sensible material consists of 5 mg x cm(-2) LiF:Mg,Cu,P film (GR-200F) manufactured in China. Calibration was carried out according to ISO 4037-3, in terms of Hp(0.07), and dosimetric performance was analysed on the basis of IEC-1066 and ISO-12794 Standards. Experiments showed a satisfactory sensitivity of the proposed dosemeters for detecting beta radiation at protection levels and a very good energy response; thus, highly recommending their use for weakly penetrating radiation measurements. However, the homogeneity and the reproducibility of GR-200F are not found to be as reliable as in standard materials. PMID:12382748

  2. Energy response of GR-200A thermoluminescence dosemeters to 60Co and to monoenergetic synchrotron radiation in the energy range 28-40 keV.

    PubMed

    Emiro, F; Di Lillo, F; Mettivier, G; Fedon, C; Longo, R; Tromba, G; Russo, P

    2016-01-01

    The response of LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescence dosemeters (type GR-200A) to monoenergetic radiation of energy 28, 35, 38 and 40 keV was evaluated with respect to irradiation with a calibrated (60)Co gamma-ray source. High-precision measurements of the relative air kerma response performed at the SYRMEP beamline of the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility (Trieste, Italy) showed a significant deviation of the average response to low-energy X-rays from that to (60)Co, with an over-response from 6 % (at 28 keV) to 22 % (at 40 keV). These data are not consistent with literature data for these dosemeters, where model predictions gave deviation from unity of the relative air kerma response of about 10 %. The authors conclude for the need of additional determinations of the low-energy relative response of GR-200A dosemeters, covering a wider range of monoenergetic energies sampled at a fine energy step, as planned in future experiments by their group at the ELETTRA facility. PMID:25737582

  3. Development of a fibre-optic dosemeter to measure the skin dose and percentage depth dose in the build-up region of therapeutic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Kim, K-A; Yoo, W J; Jang, K W; Moon, J; Han, K-T; Jeon, D; Park, J-Y; Cha, E-J; Lee, B

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a fibre-optic dosemeter (FOD) using an organic scintillator with a diameter of 0.5 mm for photon-beam therapy dosimetry was fabricated. The fabricated dosemeter has many advantages, including water equivalence, high spatial resolution, remote sensing and real-time measurement. The scintillating light generated from an organic-dosemeter probe embedded in a solid-water stack phantom is guided to a photomultiplier tube and an electrometer via 20 m of plastic optical fibre. Using this FOD, the skin dose and the percentage depth dose in the build-up region according to the depths of a solid-water stack phantom are measured with 6- and 15-MV photon-beam energies with field sizes of 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm(2), respectively. The results are compared with those measured using conventional dosimetry films. It is expected that the proposed FOD can be effectively used in radiotherapy dosimetry for accurate measurement of the skin dose and the depth dose distribution in the build-up region due to its high spatial resolution. PMID:22764176

  4. Effect of short-term sensitivity loss in LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosemeter and its implications on personnel dosimetry operations.

    PubMed

    Romanyukha, Alexander; Delzer, Jeffrey A; Grypp, Matthew D; Williams, Anthony S

    2016-02-01

    A short-term sensitivity loss in LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was observed and is described. Its observation occurred during a pre-irradiation anneal with a slightly elevated maximum temperature (5-15°C), which causes notable under-response (5-10 %) of the subsequent read at the recommended time-temperature profile (TTP), which has a peak temperature of 260°C. A subsequent irradiation and reading using the recommended TTP showed partial or complete recovery of the TLD's sensitivity. To the best of our knowledge, there were no publications on possible implications of a one-time 5-15°C overheat of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs during anneal. This is not unusual when several readers with some variations in their heating cycles are used to calibrate and process the same population of dosemeters. A special test to identify if a small uncontrolled overheating of a dosemeter element has occurred was developed and tested. Two practical implications of the effect of a short-term sensitivity loss in LiF:Mg,Cu,P, e.g. inconsistency in results of metrological traceability verification and reporting of false neutron doses, are described in detail. Simple indicators of a small uncontrolled overheating are provided. PMID:25767182

  5. Relative HCP-to-gamma Thermoluminescent Efficiencies for TLD-100 Dosemeters Exposed to Low-energy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, O.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Buenfil, A. E.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Concha, K.; Brandan, M. E.; Aviles, P.; Gamboa de Buen, I.

    2006-09-08

    This work presents data and calculations of (HCP)-to-gamma TLD-100 thermoluminescent efficiencies. Dosemeters were irradiated with low energy hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen ions. For nitrogen and oxygen two energies, corresponding to ''mirror'' values below and above the Bragg peak energy, were used to measure TL efficiencies for the same linear energy transfer (LET) entrance value. Efficiency results, both as a function of LET and energy, show distinct curves for each ion species. For energies above the Bragg peak energy, measurements show the well known tendency, efficiency values decrease with increasing LET. Data for energies lower than the Bragg peak display the opposite, efficiency increases with increasing LET. Results presented as a function of incident energy show that efficiency decreases with decreasing energy. For nitrogen and oxygen ions, the ''mirror'' measurements at higher energy (above the Bragg peak) are found to be 1.45 times greater than their low energy counterparts. Theoretical predictions based on Modified Track Structure Theory (MTST) show agreement with data within 40 % and predict the observed behavior, higher efficiency for higher ion energy.

  6. On the use of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters in space--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y S; Satinger, D; Fuks, E; Oster, L; Podpalov, L

    2003-01-01

    The use of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) in space radiation fields is reviewed. It is demonstrated in the context of modified track structure theory and microdosimetric track structure theory that there is no unique correlation between the relative thermoluminescence (TL) efficiency of heavy charged particles, neutrons of all energies and linear energy transfer (LET). Many experimental measurements dating back more than two decades also demonstrate the multivalued, non-universal, relationship between relative TL efficiency and LET. It is further demonstrated that the relative intensities of the dosimetric peaks and especially the high-temperature structure are dependent on a large number of variables, some controllable, some not. It is concluded that TL techniques employing the concept of LET (e.g. measurement of total dose, the high-temperature ratio (HTR) methods and other combinations of the relative TL efficiency of the various peaks used to estimate average Q or simulate Q-LET relationships) should be regarded as lacking a sound theoretical basis, highly prone to error and, as well, lack of reproducibility/universality due to the absence of a standardised experimental protocol essential to reliable experimental methodology. PMID:14653322

  7. Assessment of effective radiation dose of an extremity CBCT, MSCT and conventional X ray for knee area using MOSFET dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the organ and effective doses in the knee area resulting from different commercially available multislice computed tomography devices (MSCT), one cone beam computed tomography device (CBCT) and one conventional X-ray radiography device using MOSFET dosemeters and an anthropomorphic RANDO knee phantom. Measurements of the MSCT devices resulted in effective doses ranging between 27 and 48 µSv. The CBCT measurements resulted in an effective dose of 12.6 µSv. The effective doses attained using the conventional radiography device were 1.8 µSv for lateral and 1.2 µSv for anterior-posterior projections. The effective dose resulting from conventional radiography was considerably lower than those recorded for the CBCT and MSCT devices. The MSCT effective dose results were two to four times higher than those measured on the CBCT device. This study demonstrates that CBCT can be regarded as a potential low-dose 3D imaging technique for knee examinations. PMID:23825221

  8. Analysis of neutron and photon response of a TLD-ALBEDO personal dosemeter on an ISO slab phantom using TRIPOLI-4.3 Monte Carlo code.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y K

    2005-01-01

    TRIPOLI-4.3 Monte Carlo transport code has been used to evaluate the QUADOS (Quality Assurance of Computational Tools for Dosimetry) problem P4, neutron and photon response of an albedo-type thermoluminescence personal dosemeter (TLD) located on an ISO slab phantom. Two enriched 6LiF and two 7LiF TLD chips were used and they were protected, in front or behind, with a boron-loaded dosemeter-holder. Neutron response of the four chips was determined by counting 6Li(n,t)4He events using ENDF/B-VI.4 library and photon response by estimating absorbed dose (MeV g(-1)). Ten neutron energies from thermal to 20 MeV and six photon energies from 33 keV to 1.25 MeV were used to study the energy dependence. The fraction of the neutron and photon response owing to phantom backscatter has also been investigated. Detailed TRIPOLI-4.3 solutions are presented and compared with MCNP-4C calculations. PMID:16381740

  9. Current challenges in personal dosimetry at the US DOE Hanford site.

    PubMed

    Rathbone, B A; McDonald, J C; Traub, R J

    2002-01-01

    An overview is presented of the dosimetry system, dose equivalent calculation methodology, and QA/QC practices used at the US Department of Energy Hanford site. It describes some of the problems encountered in accurately measuring dose equivalent quantities under a broad range of field conditions that do not necessarily correlate with laboratory calibration conditions and the approach taken to solve these problems. Personnel at Hanford are monitored with a combination of Harshaw model 8825 and 8816 thermoluminescence dosemeters and CR-39 etched track dosemeters. Extremities are monitored using the ICN MeasuRing loaded with a Harshaw XD740 chipstrate TLD. All dosemeters employ LiF:Mg,Ti elements that are read on-site with Harshaw model 8800 and 6600 TLD readers. CR-39 dosemeters are electrochemically etched in non-commercial etch chambers and counted with an automated track counting system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Problems with over response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(0.07), under-response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(3), and over response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(10) in Hanford's 90Sr/90Y beta radiation fields are discussed. Approaches to measurement of the operational quantities for field conditions and algorithm solutions to the above problems are described. Methods used to calibrate the ring dosemeter for Hanford field conditions together with limitations of the ring dosemeter in measuring Hp(0.07) for extremities, particularly when covered with protective clothing, are also discussed. PMID:12382727

  10. Multichannel dosemeter and Al2O3:C optically stimulated luminescence fibre sensors for use in radiation therapy: evaluation with electron beams.

    PubMed

    Magne, S; Auger, L; Bordy, J M; de Carlan, L; Isambert, A; Bridier, A; Ferdinand, P; Barthe, J

    2008-01-01

    This article proposes an innovative multichannel optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosemeter for on-line in vivo dose verification in radiation therapy. OSL fibre sensors incorporating small Al(2)O(3):C fibre crystals (TLD(500)) have been tested with an X-ray generator. A reproducible readout procedure should reduce the fading-induced uncertainty ( approximately - 1% per decade). OSL readouts are temperature-dependent [ approximately 0.3% K(-1) when OSL stimulation is performed at the same temperature as irradiation; approximately 0.16% K(-1) after thermalisation (20 degrees C)]. Sensor calibration and depth-dose measurements with electron beams have been performed with a Saturne 43 linear accelerator in reference conditions at CEA-LNHB (ionising radiation reference laboratory in France). Predosed OSL sensors show a good repeatability in multichannel operation and independence versus electron energy in the range (9, 18 MeV). The difference between absorbed doses measured by OSL and an ionisation chamber were within +/-0.9% (for a dose of about 1 Gy) despite a sublinear calibration curve. PMID:18757901

  11. Characteristics of a 85Kr beta-particle source applied in Series 1 reference irradiations of DIS-1 direct ion storage dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Hakanen, A T; Sipilä, P M; Sahla, T T

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics necessary to specify an ISO 6980 Series 1 reference radiation field were determined for a commercially available 85Kr beta-particle source, using a BEAM EGS4 Monte Carlo code. The characteristics include residual maximum beta energy, E(res), and the uniformity of the dose rate over the calibration area. The E(res) and the uniformity were also determined experimentally, using an extrapolation ionization chamber (EC) and a 0.2 cm3 parallel plate ionization chamber, respectively. The depth-dose curve measured with the EC gave a value 0.62 MeV for the E(res). Series 2 90Sr + 90Y and Series 1(85) Kr beta-particle sources calibrated for H(p)(0.07) at the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL) of STUK were used to determine the energy and angular responses of DIS-1 direct ion storage dosemeters. The averaged zero angle H(p)(0.07) responses to the 90Sr + 90Y and 85Kr reference radiations were 135 and 80%, respectively. The responses were normalized to 100%, H(p)(0.07) response to 137Cs photon radiation. PMID:17548464

  12. The effect of beam tube potential variation on gonad dose to patients during chest radiography investigated using high sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Fung, K K; Gilboy, W B

    2001-04-01

    Optimization of X-ray beam tube potential (kVp) in radiological examinations can minimize patient dose. This research aims to investigate the effect of tube potential variation on gonad doses to patients during posteroanterior (PA) chest radiography examinations. This study was carried out using a Toshiba general purpose X-ray unit and a Rando phantom. Dose measuring equipment included an ion chamber system, a dose-area product (DAP) meter and a thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) reader system with high sensitivity TLD pellets of LiF:Mg,Cu,P for low level gonad dose measurement. PA chest exposures of the phantom to produce a constant exit dose were made using a standard low tube potential (range 60-100 kVp) non-grid technique and a high tube potential (range 95-150 kVp) grid technique. Entrance surface doses (ESDs) and DAPs were also included in the measurements. Effective doses (EDs) were computed from ESD and DAP measurements using NRPB-SR262 and Xdose software. Results show that with the low tube potential technique both ovary dose and testes dose increase with increasing tube potential; statistically significant correlations of r = 0.994 (p = 0.0006) and r = 0.998 (p = 0.001), respectively, were found. For both organs, doses increase at a rate of approximately 2% per kVp. With the high tube potential technique there is insignificant correlation between gonad doses and tube potential. When comparing patient doses from typical exposures made at 70 kVp (low tube potential non-grid technique) with doses from exposures made at 120 kVp (high tube potential grid technique), the high tube potential technique delivers significantly higher values for ESD, and ovary, testes and effective doses by factors of 1.7, 5.2, 5.5 and 2.7, respectively. PMID:11387155

  13. Energy response of different types of RADOS personal dosemeters with MTS-N (LiF:Mg,Ti) and MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) TL detectors.

    PubMed

    Obryk, B; Hranitzky, C; Stadtmann, H; Budzanowski, M; Olko, P

    2011-03-01

    The photon energy response of different RADOS (Mirion Technologies) personal dosemeters with MTS-N (LiF:Mg,Ti) and MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) thermoluminescence (TL) detectors was investigated. Three types of badges were applied. The irradiation with reference photon radiation qualities N (the narrow spectrum series), and S-Cs and S-Co nuclide radiation qualities, specified in ISO 4037 [International Organization for Standardization (ISO). X and gamma reference radiations for calibrating dosemeters and doserate meters and for determining their response as a function of photon energy. ISO 4037. Part 1-4 (1999)], in the energy range of 16-1250 keV, were performed at the Dosimetry Laboratory Seibersdorf. The results demonstrated that a readout of a single MTS-N or MCP-N detector under the Al filter can be used to determine Hp(10) according to requirements of IEC 61066 [International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Thermoluminescence dosimetry systems for personal and environmental monitoring. International Standard IEC 61066 (2006)] for TL systems for personal dosimetry. The new RADOS badge with the experimental type of a holder (i.e. Cu/Al filters) is a very good tool for identifying the radiation quality (photon energy). PMID:21227957

  14. Intercomparison exercise within a distributed-dosimetry network.

    PubMed

    Romanyukha, A; Voss, S P; Benevides, L A

    2011-03-01

    The results of an intercomparison exercise within the US Navy dosimetric network (USN-DN) are presented and discussed. The USN-DN uses a commercially available LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) model Harshaw 8840/8841 and TLD reader model Harshaw 8800 manufactured by Thermo Fisher Scientific. The USN-DN consists of a single calibration facility and 16 satellite dosimetry reading facilities throughout the world with ∼ 40 model 8800 TLD readers and in excess of 350 000 TLD cards in circulation. The Naval Dosimetry Center (NDC) is the primary calibration site responsible for the distribution and calibration of all TLD cards and their associated holders. In turn, each satellite facility is assigned a subpopulation of cards, which are utilised for servicing their local customers. Consistency of the NDC calibration of 150 dosemeters (calibrated at NDC) and 27 locally calibrated remote readers was evaluated in the framework of this intercomparison. Accuracy of TLDs' calibration, performed at the NDC, was found to be <3 % throughout the entire network. Accuracy of the readers' calibration, performed with the NDC issued calibration dosemeters at remote sites, was found to be better than 4 % for most readers. The worst performance was found for reader Channel 3, which is calibrated using the thinnest chip of the Harshaw 8840/8841 dosemeter. The loss of sensitivity of this chip may be caused by time-temperature profile that has been designed for all four chips without consideration of chip thickness. PMID:21088021

  15. A new paradigm in personal dosimetry using LiF:Mg,Cu,P.

    PubMed

    Cassata, J R; Moscovitch, M; Rotunda, J E; Velbeck, K J

    2002-01-01

    The United States Navy has been monitoring personnel for occupational exposure to ionising radiation since 1947. Film was exclusively used until 1973 when thermoluminescence dosemeters were introduced and used to the present time. In 1994, a joint research project between the Naval Dosimetry Center, Georgetown University, and Saint Gobain Crystals and Detectors (formerly Bicron RMP formerly Harshaw TLD) began to develop a state of the art thermoluminescent dosimetry system. The study was conducted from a large-scale dosimetry processor point of view with emphasis on a systems approach. Significant improvements were achieved by replacing the LiF:Mg,Ti with LiF:Mg,Cu,P TL elements due to the significant sensitivity increase, linearity, and negligible hiding. Dosemeter filters were optimised for gamma and X ray energy discrimination using Monte Carlo modelling (MCNP) resulting in significant improvement in accuracy and precision. Further improvements were achieved through the use of neural-network based dose calculation algorithms. Both back propagation and functional link methods were implemented and the data compared with essentially the same results. Several operational aspects of the system are discussed, including (1) background subtraction using control dosemeters, (2) selection criteria for control dosemeters, (3) optimisation of the TLD readers, (4) calibration methodology, and (5) the optimisation of the heating profile. PMID:12382701

  16. Chapter I: Geology of a Middle Tertiary Clay Deposit in thePatagonia Mountains near Harshaw, Santa Cruz County, Southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, Brenda B.

    2005-01-01

    A middle Tertiary rhyolite tuff on the northeast side of the Patagonia Mountains in Santa Cruz County, southeastern Arizona contains lenses of calcareous low-swelling montmorillonite clay, as much as 10 to 15 m thick. The presence of the tuff has been known for years, but the clay has not been described previously. The clay lenses, which are virtually silt- and sand-free, were probably formed by diagenetic alteration of fairly clean ash-fall-tuff beds. In preliminary tests, the clay exhibited only about 9 percent shrinkage on drying and about 1 percent shrinkage on firing. Cracking and distortion were minimal in both drying and firing. Further testing needs to be done on the clay to determine its suitability as a specialty clay or as an additive to other clays.

  17. Measurements of occupational exposure for a technologist performing 18F FDG PET scans.

    PubMed

    Biran, Talma; Weininger, Jolie; Malchi, Shalom; Marciano, Rami; Chisin, Roland

    2004-11-01

    Radiation doses to one PET technologist performing 100 18F FDG (18F fluorodeoxyglucose) imaging procedures were measured in a clinical setting using two types of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges, one finger-ring TLD and one electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). 18F FDG was handled either with unshielded or with viewing window tungsten shielded syringes. The resulting doses using unshielded syringes were 13.8 +/- 0.8 microSv/370 MBq and 14.3 +/- 0.4 microSv/370 MBq, measured with TLD 100 and with TLD 700H/600H, respectively. For the same series of measurements, the doses obtained using shielded syringes were 10.7 +/- 0.4 microSv/370 MBq and 7.2 +/- 2.1 microSv/370 MBq with TLD700H/600H and with EPD, respectively. The dose to the right hand from shielded syringes was 69.3 +/- 5.5 microSv/370 MBq. All these values are within the ICRP recommended dose limits. Extrapolated to 725 examinations per year, the resulting effective dose measured with TLD would be 10 mSv with unshielded and 7.5 mSv with shielded syringes, respectively (25% dose reduction). The doses measured by TLD were consistently higher than those measured by EPD, suggesting that EPD measurements might underestimate occupational doses. PMID:15551792

  18. Ten years of monitoring the occupational radiation exposure in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Basić, B; Beganović, A; Samek, D; Skopljak-Beganović, A; Gazdić-Santić, M

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of occupationally exposed persons in Bosnia and Herzegovina started in 1960s and it was interrupted in 1992. Dosimetry service resumed in 1999 when the International Atomic Energy Agency provided Harshaw 4500 TLD-reader and the first set of TLDs for the Radiation Protection Centre (RPC) of the Institute of Public Health of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. In January 2009, the RPC covered 1279 professionals with personal dosimetry, which is more than 70 % of all radiation workers in the country. Most of the TLD users work in medical institutions. In period 1999-2003 RPC provided 984 workers with dosemeters. In the next 5 y period (2004-2008), the number of persons covered by dosimetry increased by an average of 51 %. The mean and collective effective dose in the period 1999-2003 were 1.55 mSv and 1.54 personSv, respectively. In the period 2004-2008, the mean doses changed by 1 % on average, but the collective effective dose increased by 53 % for all practices. Mean and collective effective dose were 1.57 mSv and 2.34 personSv, respectively. The highest personal doses are associated with industrial radiography, than exposures in nuclear medicine. Radiology plays a significant role in collective dose only, whereas other exposures are low. Results correspond to results found in the literature. New practices in industry and medicine emphasise the need for more personal dosemeters, as well as specialised dosemeters for extremities monitoring, etc. PMID:20150230

  19. Application Of The Thermoluminescent Dosemeters For The Measurement Of Low Level Background

    SciTech Connect

    Stochioiu, Ana I.; Sahagia, Maria C.; Mihai, Felicia S.; Tudor, Ion L.; Lupescu, Henrieta I.

    2007-04-23

    The results obtained in the measurement of the low level radiation background by using a thermoluminescent (TL) system, in a former salt mine, designed to be used as an underground laboratory , are presented.

  20. Thermoluminescence solid-state nanodosimetry—the peak 5A/5 dosemeter

    PubMed Central

    Fuks, E.; Horowitz, Y. S.; Horowitz, A.; Oster, L.; Marino, S.; Rainer, M.; Rosenfeld, A.; Datz, H.

    2011-01-01

    The shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) following 90Sr/90Y beta irradiation, previously demonstrated to be dependent on the cooling rate used in the 400°C pre-irradiation anneal, is shown to be dependent on ionisation density in both naturally cooled and slow-cooled samples. Following heavy-charged particle high-ionisation density (HID) irradiation, the temperature of composite peak 5 decreases by ∼5°C and the peak becomes broader. This behaviour is attributed to an increase in the relative intensity of peak 5a (a low-temperature satellite of peak 5). The relative intensity of peak 5a is estimated using a computerised glow curve deconvolution code based on first-order kinetics. The analysis uses kinetic parameters for peaks 4 and 5 determined from ancillary measurements resulting in nearly ‘single-glow peak’ curves for both the peaks. In the slow-cooled samples, owing to the increased relative intensity of peak 5a compared with the naturally cooled samples, the precision of the measurement of the 5a/5 intensity ratio is found to be ∼15 % (1 SD) compared with ∼25 % for the naturally cooled samples. The ratio of peak 5a/5 in the slow-cooled samples is found to increase systematically and gradually through a variety of radiation fields from a minimum value of 0.13±0.02 for 90Sr/90Y low-ionisation density irradiations to a maximum value of ∼0.8 for 20 MeV Cu and I ion HID irradiations. Irradiation by low-energy electrons of energy 0.1–1.5 keV results in values between 1.27 and 0.95, respectively. The increasing values of the ratio of peak 5a/5 with increasing ionisation density demonstrate the viability of the concept of the peak 5a/5 nanodosemeter and its potential in the measurement of average ionisation density in a ‘nanoscopic’ mass containing the trapping centre/luminescent centre spatially correlated molecule giving rise to composite peak 5. PMID:21149323

  1. Thermoluminescence solid-state nanodosimetry--the peak 5A/5 dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Fuks, E; Horowitz, Y S; Horowitz, A; Oster, L; Marino, S; Rainer, M; Rosenfeld, A; Datz, H

    2011-02-01

    The shape of composite peak 5 in the glow curve of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) following (90)Sr/(90)Y beta irradiation, previously demonstrated to be dependent on the cooling rate used in the 400°C pre-irradiation anneal, is shown to be dependent on ionisation density in both naturally cooled and slow-cooled samples. Following heavy-charged particle high-ionisation density (HID) irradiation, the temperature of composite peak 5 decreases by ∼5°C and the peak becomes broader. This behaviour is attributed to an increase in the relative intensity of peak 5a (a low-temperature satellite of peak 5). The relative intensity of peak 5a is estimated using a computerised glow curve deconvolution code based on first-order kinetics. The analysis uses kinetic parameters for peaks 4 and 5 determined from ancillary measurements resulting in nearly 'single-glow peak' curves for both the peaks. In the slow-cooled samples, owing to the increased relative intensity of peak 5a compared with the naturally cooled samples, the precision of the measurement of the 5a/5 intensity ratio is found to be ∼15% (1 SD) compared with ∼25% for the naturally cooled samples. The ratio of peak 5a/5 in the slow-cooled samples is found to increase systematically and gradually through a variety of radiation fields from a minimum value of 0.13±0.02 for (90)Sr/(90)Y low-ionisation density irradiations to a maximum value of ∼0.8 for 20 MeV Cu and I ion HID irradiations. Irradiation by low-energy electrons of energy 0.1-1.5 keV results in values between 1.27 and 0.95, respectively. The increasing values of the ratio of peak 5a/5 with increasing ionisation density demonstrate the viability of the concept of the peak 5a/5 nanodosemeter and its potential in the measurement of average ionisation density in a 'nanoscopic' mass containing the trapping centre/luminescent centre spatially correlated molecule giving rise to composite peak 5. PMID:21149323

  2. Alarm inhalation dosemeter for long living radioactive dust due to an uncontrolled release

    SciTech Connect

    Streil, T.; Oeser, V.; Rambousky, R.; Buchholz, F. W.

    2008-08-07

    MyRIAM is the acronym for My Radioactivity In Air Monitor and points out that the device was designed for personal use to detect any radioactivity in the air at the place and at the moment of danger. The active air sampling process enables a detection limit several orders of magnitude below that of Gamma detectors. Therefore, it is the unique way to detect dangerous exposures in time.Individual protection against inhalation of long living radioactive dust (LLRD) saves human life and health. LLRD may occur in natural environment as well as in case of nuclear accidence or military and terrorist attacks. But in any case, the immediate warning of the population is of great importance. Keep in mind: it is very easy to avoid LLRD inhalation--but you have to recognize the imminent danger. The second requirement of gap-less documentation and reliable assessment of any derived LLRD exposure is building the link to Dosimetry applications.The paper demonstrates the possibility to design small and low cost air samplers, which can be used as personal alarm dosimeters and fulfil the requirements mentioned above.Several test measurements taken by a mobile phone sized MyRIAM, shall be used to demonstrate the correctness of this statement.

  3. Elimination of redundant thermoluminescent dosemeter monitoring at Oyster Creek nuclear generating station

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Oyster Creek direct radiation monitoring network has long been operating using several time-scale measurements. This network is used to assess the radiation levels during normal plant operations as well as to set the background radiation levels used to determine the radiological impact of a nonroutine release of radioactivity from the plant. Through analysis of the behavior of the monthly and quarterly activity of several types of direct radiation monitoring, the successful elimination of redundant and artificially high measurement techniques has been done in concert with providing the community with most efficient direct radiation monitoring methods. Dose rates from external radiation sources are measured around licensed U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) facilities using passive detectors known as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). These detectors provide a quantitative measurement of the radiation levels in the are in which they are placed. The detected radiation could be the result of cosmic or naturally occurring origin in the air and on the ground, prior nuclear weapons testing, and activity from a nuclear facility. This paper describes the TLD network placed around the Oyster Creek nuclear generating station (OCNGS) and the comparisons between TLDs of different manufacturers and of different resident times and the successful elimination of the less accurate monthly TLD for the purpose of cost containment.

  4. A comparison of personal dose equivalent measurements made by personal dosemeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cechak, T.; Davidkova, J.; Kodl, O.; Novacek, P.; Papirnik, P.; Petrova, K.; Prasek, P.; Martincik, J.; Sochor, V.

    2014-11-01

    Individual monitoring services for external radiation were tested in the Czech Republic. The results of the tests show that they are dosimetry systems authorized and regularly tested in the Czech Republic having outliers for low energy region and angle of 50 degree and greater. With the highest probability, it can be stated that the processing equipment does not determine the angle of exposure reliably. These cases may have caused overestimations of Hp(10) in the special conditions occurring e.g. in interventional radiology and cardiology procedures.

  5. Alarm inhalation dosemeter for long living radioactive dust due to an uncontrolled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streil, T.; Oeser, V.; Rambousky, R.; Buchholz, F. W.

    2008-08-01

    MyRIAM is the acronym for My Radioactivity In Air Monitor and points out that the device was designed for personal use to detect any radioactivity in the air at the place and at the moment of danger. The active air sampling process enables a detection limit several orders of magnitude below that of Gamma detectors. Therefore, it is the unique way to detect dangerous exposures in time. Individual protection against inhalation of long living radioactive dust (LLRD) saves human life and health. LLRD may occur in natural environment as well as in case of nuclear accidence or military and terrorist attacks. But in any case, the immediate warning of the population is of great importance. Keep in mind: it is very easy to avoid LLRD inhalation—but you have to recognize the imminent danger. The second requirement of gap-less documentation and reliable assessment of any derived LLRD exposure is building the link to Dosimetry applications. The paper demonstrates the possibility to design small and low cost air samplers, which can be used as personal alarm dosimeters and fulfil the requirements mentioned above. Several test measurements taken by a mobile phone sized MyRIAM, shall be used to demonstrate the correctness of this statement.

  6. CW-OSL measurement protocols using optical fibre Al2O3:C dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Edmund, J M; Andersen, C E; Marckmann, C J; Aznar, M C; Akselrod, M S; Bøtter-Jensen, L

    2006-01-01

    A new system for in vivo dosimetry during radiotherapy has been introduced. Luminescence signals from a small crystal of carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) are transmitted through an optical fibre cable to an instrument that contains optical filters, a photomultiplier tube and a green (532 nm) laser. The prime output is continuous wave optically stimulated luminescence (CW-OSL) used for the measurement of the integrated dose. We demonstrate a measurement protocol with high reproducibility and improved linearity, which is suitable for clinical dosimetry. A crystal-specific minimum pre-dose is necessary for signal stabilisation. Simple background subtraction only partially removes the residual signal present at long integration times. Instead, the measurement protocol separates the decay curve into three individual components and only the fast and medium components were used. PMID:16990348

  7. Dichromate solution as a reference dosemeter for use in industrial irradiation plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, P. H. G.; Barrett, J. H.; Berkley, A. M.

    1982-10-01

    The radiolytic reduction of dichromate ion in aqueous solution was investigated as a dosimetry system for reference purposes in the 10 to 40 kGy range. Preliminary work showed 0.4 M sulphuric acid to be unsuitable as a solvent for dichromate and all work reported here has been carried out in 0.1 M perchloric acid solution. An initial concentration of dichromate ions of 2.5 mM was judged optimal for this dose range and measurement wavelength of 440 nm is suggested. Deviations from the Beer-Lambert law at this wavelength were investigated and extinction coefficients are reported for both dichromate ion and chromic (Cr(III)) ion. Solutions were found to be stable after irradiation, even when stored at elevated temperatures. The difference in reduction yield between batches of solution was shown to be less than + or - 0.5%. The effect of irradiation temperature on reduction yield was determined to be -0.2% per deg C over the range 20 to 50 C.

  8. The influence of neutron contamination on dosimetry in external photon beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, Felix Czarnecki, Damian; Zink, Klemens

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Photon fields with energies above ∼7 MeV are contaminated by neutrons due to photonuclear reactions. Their influence on dosimetry—although considered to be very low—is widely unexplored. Methods: In this work, Monte Carlo based investigations into this issue performed with FLUKA and EGSNRC are presented. A typical Linac head in 18 MV-X mode was modeled equivalently within both codes. EGSNRC was used for the photon and FLUKA for the neutron production and transport simulation. Water depth dose profiles and the response of different detectors (Farmer chamber, TLD-100, TLD-600H, and TLD-700H chip) in five representative depths were simulated and the neutrons’ impact (neutron absorbed dose relative to photon absorbed dose) was calculated. To take account of the neutrons’ influence, a theoretically required correction factor was defined and calculated for five representative water depths. Results: The neutrons’ impact on the absorbed dose to water was found to be below 0.1% for all depths and their impact on the response of the Farmer chamber and the TLD-700H chip was found to be even less. For the TLD-100 and the TLD-600H chip it was found to be up to 0.3% and 0.7%, respectively. The theoretical correction factors to be applied to absorbed dose to water values measured with these four detectors in a depth different from the reference/calibration depth were calculated and found to be below 0.05% for the Farmer chamber and the TLD-700H chip, but up to 0.15% and 0.35% for the TLD-100 and TLD-600H chips, respectively. In thermoluminescence dosimetry the neutrons’ influence (and therefore the additional inaccuracy in measurement) was found to be higher for TLD materials whose {sup 6}Li fraction is high, such as TLD-100 and TLD-600H, resulting from the thermal neutron capture reaction on {sup 6}Li. Conclusions: The impact of photoneutrons on the absorbed dose to water and on the response of a typical ionization chamber as well as three different types

  9. Occupational exposure doses in interventional procedures in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    PubMed

    Bašić, B; Beganović, A; Skopljak-Beganović, A; Samek, D

    2011-03-01

    Monitoring of occupationally exposed workers in Bosnia and Herzegovina started in 1960s and it was interrupted in 1992. Dosimetry service resumed in 1999 when the International Atomic Energy Agency provided Radiation Protection Centre with Harshaw 4500 Thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD)-reader and the first set of TLDs. The highest doses are received by professionals working in interventional procedures (radiology, cardiology, gastroenterohepatology etc.). Number of these procedures is increasing each year (just in cardiology this increase is 24 % per year). Results from two TLDs are used to estimate effective dose. One is worn under the apron (chest level), and the other above (neck level). Calculation is performed using Niklason's methodology. Total number of occupationally exposed persons in interventional radiology is 90. The collective dose they receive is 67 person mSv, while the mean dose is 0.77 mSv (based on 12-month period). Highest doses are received by physicians (3.7 mSv), while radiographers and nurses receive 2.1 and 1.9 mSv respectively. This occurs due to the fact that physicians stand closer to the source (patient). The lead apron is proven to be the most efficient radiation protection equipment, but, also, lead thyroid shield and glasses can significantly lower doses received by professionals. The use of this equipment is highly recommended. PMID:21138927

  10. Discrimination of photon from proton irradiation using glow curve feature extraction and vector analysis.

    PubMed

    Skopec, M; Loew, M; Price, J L; Guardala, N; Moscovitch, M

    2006-01-01

    Two types of thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs), the Harshaw LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) and CaF(2):Tm (TLD-300) were investigated for their glow curve response to separate photon and proton irradiations. The TLDs were exposed to gamma irradiation from a (137)Cs source and proton irradiation using a positive ion accelerator. The glow curve peak structure for each individual TLD exposure was deconvolved to obtain peak height, width, and position. Simulated mixed-field glow curves were obtained by superposition of the experimentally obtained single field exposures. Feature vectors were composed of two kinds of features: those from deconvolution and those taken in the neighbourhood of several glow curve peaks. The inner product of the feature vectors was used to discriminate among the pure photon, pure proton and simulated mixed-field irradiations. In the pure cases, identification of radiation types is both straightforward and effective. Mixed-field discrimination did not succeed using deconvolution features, but the peak-neighbourhood features proved to discriminate reliably. PMID:16614091

  11. Operational specifications of the L.I.T.E.S. (Laser Illuminated Track Etch Scattering) dosemeter reader.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M. E.; Devine, R. T.; Gepford, H. J.; McKeever, R. J.; Hoffman, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Personnel Dosimetry Operations Team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has accepted the LITES dosimeter reader into its suite of radiation dose measurement instruments. The LITES instrument transmits coherent light from a HeNe laser through the pertinent track etch foil and a photodiode measures the amount of light scattered by the etched tracks. A small beam stop blocks the main laser light, while a lens refocuses the scattered light into the photodiode. Three stepper motors in the current LITES system are used to position a carousel that holds 36 track etch dosimeters. Preliminary work with the LITES system demonstrated the device had a linear response in counting foils subjected to exposures up to 50 mSv (5.0 rem). The United States Department of Energy requires that annual general employee dose not exceed 50 mSv (5.0 rem). On a regular basis, LANL uses the Autoscan 60 reader system (Thermo Electron Corp.) for counting track etch dosimeters. However, LANL uses a 15 hour etch process for CR39 dosimeters, and this produces more and larger track etch pits than the 6 hour etch used by many institutions. Therefore, LANL only uses the Autoscan 60 for measuring neutron dose equivalent up to exposure levels of about 3 mSv (300 mrem). The LITES system has a measured lower limit of detection (LLD) of about 0.6 mSv (60 mrem), and it has a correlation coefficient of R{sup 2} = 0.99 over an exposure range up to 500 mSv (50.0 rem). A series of blind studies were done using three methods: the Autoscan 60 system, manual counting by optical microscope, and the LITES instrument. A collection of track etch dosimeters of unknown NDE (neutron dose equivalent) were analyzed using the three methods, and the (PC) performance coefficient was calculated when the NDE became known. The Autoscan 60 and optical microscope methods had a combined PC = 0.171, and the LITES instrument had a PC = 0.194, where a PC less than or equal to 0.300 is considered satisfactory.

  12. Evaluation of dose equivalent by the electronic personal dosemeter for neutron 'Saphydose-N' at different workplaces of nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Chau, Q; Lahaye, T

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements made with the electronic personal neutron Saphydose-N during the four campaigns of the European contract EVIDOS (EValuation of Individual DOSimetry in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields). These measurements were performed at Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in France (C0), at the Krümmel Nuclear Power Plant in Germany (C1), at the VENUS Research Reactor and the Belgonucléaire fuel processing plant in Belgium (C2) and at the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant in Sweden (C3). The results for Saphydose-N are compared with reference values for dose equivalent. PMID:17110389

  13. Pre- and post-irradiation fading effect for LiF:Mg,Ti and LiF:Mg,Cu,P materials used in routine monitoring.

    PubMed

    Carinou, E; Askounis, P; Dimitropoulou, F; Kiranos, G; Kyrgiakou, H; Nirgianaki, E; Papadomarkaki, E; Kamenopoulou, V

    2011-03-01

    LiF is a well-known thermoluminescent (TL) material used in individual monitoring, and its fading characteristics have been studied for years. In the present study, the fading characteristics (for a period of 150 d) of various commercial LiF materials with different dopants have been evaluated. The materials used in the study are those used in routine procedures by the Personal Dosimetry Department of Greek Atomic Energy Commission and in particular, LiF:Mg,Ti (MTS-N, TL Poland), LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N, TL Poland), LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-Ns, thin active layer detector, TL Poland) and LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H, Harshaw). The study showed that there is a sensitivity loss in signal of up to 20 % for the MTS-N material for a 150-d period in the pre-irradiation fading phase. The MCP-N has a stable behaviour in the pre-irradiation fading phase, but this also depends on the readout system. As far as the post-irradiation fading effect is concerned, a decrease of up to 20 % for the MTS-N material is observed for the same time period. On the other hand, the LiF:Mg,Cu,P material presents a stable behaviour within ± 5 %. These results show that the fading effect is different for each material and should be taken into account when estimating doses from dosemeters that are in use for >2 months. PMID:21199822

  14. Memorandum from the British Committee on Radiation Units and Measurements. Quantities for reporting the calibration of therapy-level dosemeters in photon beams.

    PubMed

    1980-09-01

    It is proposed that existing primary standards of exposure continue to be operated as at present; in-air comparison of secondary standards will be used to determine an exposure calibration, quoted in the SI unit C kg-1. A derived calibration factor for absorbed dose will be supplied for use with the secondary-standard chamber in a water phantom under specified conditions. Secondary-standardizing laboratories will be able to calibrate field instruments, scaled in grays, in terms of absorbed dose to water under reference conditions appropriate to the particular radiation quality. PMID:6777014

  15. Comparison of environmental TLD (thermoluminescent dosimeter) results obtained using glow curve deconvolution and region of interest analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    We tested a Harshaw Model 4000 TLD Reader in the Sandia Environmental TLD Program. An extra set of LiF TLD-700 chips were prepared for each field location and calibration level. At the end of quarter one, half of the TLDs were read on the Model 4000 and the other half were read on our standard Harshaw Model 2000. This presentation compares the results of the two systems. The Model 4000 results are reported for two regions of interest and for background subtraction using Harshaw Glow Curve Deconvolution Software.

  16. Response of TL materials to diagnostic radiology X radiation beams.

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana F; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to carry out a direct performance comparison among some known types of TLDs-three types of CaSO(4):Dy pellets, sintered Al(2)O(3) pellets, LiF:Mg,Ti (Harshaw TLD-100), CaF(2):Dy (Harshaw TLD-200) and CaF(2):Mn (Harshaw TLD-400)-in the energy and dose ranges of diagnostic radiology beams. Several dosimetric characteristics were evaluated, such as reproducibility, sensitivity, calibration curves, lower dose limits and energy dependence. PMID:20097569

  17. Thermal expansion data for eight optical materials from 60 K to 300 K.

    PubMed

    Browder, J S; Ballard, S S

    1977-12-01

    Coefficients of linear thermal expansion are reported, in the range 60 K to room temperature, for eight optical materials: Polytran potassium chloride and Polytran calcium fluoride-Harshaw; chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) zinc sulfide and zinc selenide-Raytheon; germanium (single-crystal and polycrystal); crystalline magnesium fluoride, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), and lithium niobate-Harshaw. The last three are anisotropic crystals; thermal expansion was measured both parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. PMID:20174331

  18. An on-board TLD system for dose monitoring on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Apathy, I; Deme, S; Bodnar, L; Csoke, A; Hejja, I

    1999-01-01

    This institute has developed and manufactured a series of thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) systems for spacecraft, consisting of a set of bulb dosemeters and a small, compact, TLD reader suitable for on-board evaluation of the dosemeters. By means of such a system highly accurate measurements were carried out on board the Salyut-6, -7 and Mir Space Stations as well as on the Space Shuttle. A new implementation of the system will be placed on several segments of the ISS as the contribution of Hungary to this intemational enterprise. The well proven CaSO4:Dy dosemeters will be used for routine dosimetry of the astronauts and in biological experiments. The mean LET value will be measured by LiF dosemeters while doses caused by neutrons are planned to be determined by 6LiF/7LiF dosemeter pairs and moderators. A detailed description of the system is given. PMID:11542233

  19. CaSO4:DY,Mn: A new and highly sensitive thermoluminescence phosphor for versatile dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahl, Shaila; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Pratik

    2016-02-01

    With the advent of newer techniques for dose reduction coupled with the development of more sensitive detectors, the radiation doses in radiological medical investigation are decreasing. Nevertheless, keeping the tenet in mind that all radiation doses could entail risk, there is a need to develop more sensitive dosimeters capable of measuring low doses. This paper gives the account of the development of a new and sensitive phosphor CaSO4:Dy,Mn and its characterization. The standard production procedure based on the recrystallization method was used to prepare CaSO4:Dy,Mn. The Thermoluminescence (TL) studies were carried out by exposing it with gamma radiation (Cs-137) from 10 μGy to 100 Gy. The theoretical studies to determine the number of peaks and kinetic parameters related to the TL glow peaks in CaSO4:Dy,Mn was performed using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) method. Experiments were performed to determine optimum concentration of the dopants Dysprosium (Dy) and Mangnese (Mn) in the host CaSO4 so that maximum sensitivity of the phosphor may be achieved. The optimum dopant concentration turned out to be 0.1 mol%. As there were two dopants Dy and Mn their relative ratio were varied in steps of 0.025 keeping the concentration of total dopant (Dy and Mn) 0.1 mol% always. The maximum TL intensity was seen in the CaSO4:Dy(0.025),Mn(0.075) combination. The TL sensitivity of this phosphor was found to be about 2 and 1.8 times higher than that of popular phosphor CaSO4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD-700H) respectively. This new phosphor CaSO4:Dy,Mn showed fading of 11% which is similar to that of the standard phosphor CaSO4:Dy. The paper concludes that the new, highly sensitive TL phosphor CaSO4:Dy,Mn has shown higher sensitivity and hence the potential to replace commonly used CaSO4:Dy.

  20. Measurements of the thermal expansion of six optical materials, from room temperature to 250 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Ballard, S S; Brown, S E; Browder, J S

    1978-04-01

    Coefficients of linear thermal expansion are reported in the range from room temperature to 250 degrees C for six optical materials: Polytran potassium chloride and Polytran calcium fluoride-Harshaw; chemical-vapordeposited (CVD) zinc selenide and zinc sulfide-Raytheon; single-crystal germanium-Eagle-Picher; and lithium niobate-Harshaw. For the last named, an anisotropic crystal, thermal expansion was measured both parallel and perpendicular to the c axis. Curves are given to illustrate the expansion behavior of the materials over the 60-500-K range. PMID:20197949

  1. Beta and low-energy photon irradiation of several commercial phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, J. J.; Holbrook, K. L.; Soldat, K. L.

    1983-02-01

    Several commercially available thermoluminescent phosphors were evaluated with respect to their observed response to selected beta sources and K-fluorescent X rays. Phosphor responses were determined for in-air and on-phantom irradiations. Similar irradiations were done using a 137Cs source. Phosphor glow curves were recorded using a Harshaw Model 2080 TL Picoprocessor.

  2. Testing of Willow Clones for Biomass Production in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiske, Marke E.

    2005-01-01

    A core experiment with 31 willow clones and 8 standard poplar clones was established at the Harshaw Experimental Farm, Rhinelander, WI in 1997. Data analysis is continuing for survival, growth, and biomass data for all willow test sites in this project.

  3. Comparison between thermoluminescence and electronic dosimetry results at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre.

    PubMed

    Vanhavere, F; Coeck, M

    2001-01-01

    At the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK.CEN, the official dose of record is measured by thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs), read out on a monthly basis. The workers who frequently enter controlled areas also wear an electronic dosemeter (ED), in addition, as an ALARA tool. In this paper the dose values registered by both dosimetry systems during 1 year are compared. Special attention was given to the determination of the background radiation. The general agreement was good, although the TLD gave slightly higher values. An exercise like this yielded useful information on the storage and use of dosemeters by personnel and on the lowest limit of detection obtained with both systems. PMID:11586711

  4. An investigation of false positive dosimetry results

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, M.A.; Davis, S.A.; Goff, T.E.; Wu, C.F.

    1996-12-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility designed for the demonstration of the safe disposal of transuranic waste. Currently, the radiation source term is confined to sealed calibration and check sources since WIPP has not received waste for disposal. For several years the WIPP Dosimetry Group has operated a Harshaw Model 8800C reader to analyze Harshaw 8801-7776 thermoluminescent cards (3 TLD-700 and 1 TLD-600) with 8805 holder. The frequency of false positive results for quarterly dosimeter exchanges is higher than desired by the Dosimetry Group management. Initial observations suggested that exposure to intense ambient sunlight may be responsible for the majority of the false positive readings for element 3. A study was designed to investigate the possibility of light leaking through the holder and inducing a signal in element 3. This paper discusses the methods and results obtained, with special emphasis placed on recommendations to reduce the frequency of light-induced false positive readings.

  5. Personal neutron dosimetry at a research reactor facility.

    PubMed

    Kamenopoulou, V; Carinou, E; Stamatelatos, I E

    2001-01-01

    Individual neutron monitoring presents several difficulties due to the differences in energy response of the dosemeters. In the present study, an individual dosemeter (TLD) calibration approach is attempted for the personnel of a research reactor facility. The neutron energy response function of the dosemeter was derived using the MCNP code. The results were verified by measurements to three different neutron spectra and were found to be in good agreement. Three different calibration curves were defined for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons. At the different working positions around the reactor, neutron spectra were defined using the Monte Carlo technique and ambient dose rate measurements were performed. An estimation of the neutrons energy is provided by the ratio of the different TLD pellets of each dosemeter in combination with the information concerning the worker's position; then the dose equivalent is deduced according to the appropriate calibration curve. PMID:11586728

  6. Personnel neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.

    1982-04-01

    This edited transcript of a presentation on personnel neutron discusses the accuracy of present dosimetry practices, requirements, calibration, dosemeter types, quality factors, operational problems, and dosimetry for a criticality accident. 32 figs. (ACR)

  7. Current Challenges in Personal Dosimetry at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, Bruce A. ); McDonald, Joseph C. ); Traub, Richard J. )

    2002-10-01

    Abstract - This paper presents an overview of the dosimetry system, dose equivalent calculation methodology, and QA/QC practices used at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site. It describes some of the problems encountered in accurately measuring dose equivalent quantities under a broad range of field conditions that do not necessarily correlate with laboratory calibration conditions and the approach taken to solve these problems. Personnel at Hanford are monitored with a combination of Harshaw model 8825 and 8816 thermoluminescent dosimeters and CR-39? track etch dosimeters. Extremities are monitored using the ICN MeasuRing loaded with a Harshaw XD740 chipstrate TLD. All dosimeters employ LiF:Mg,Ti elements that are read onsite with Harshaw model 8800 and 6600 TLD readers. CR-39? dosimeters are electrochemically etched in non-commercial etch chambers and counted with an automated track counting system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Problems with over response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(0.07), under response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(3), and over response of the 8825 with respect to Hp(10) in Hanford's 90Sr/90Y beta radiation fields are discussed. Approaches to measurement of the operational quantities for field conditions and algorithm solutions to the above problems are described. Methods used to calibrate the ring dosimeter for Hanford field conditions together with limitations of the ring dosimeter in measuring Hp(0.07) for extremities, particularly when covered with protective clothing, are also discussed.

  8. Optimization of the photon response for a LiF thermoluminescent dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Carnell, R.C.

    1998-12-31

    A Harshaw LiF TLD card holder was optimized for maximum discrimination between different energies of irradiating photons in order to improve the dosimetric response. Since dose is proportional energy deposited, a theoretical model was created to estimate the TLD response by calculating the energy deposition. These results correlated with experimental data from NIST to within 20%. In order to increase the accuracy of the model, energy deposition calculations were made using the MCNP particle transport program. MCNP improved the correlation of the modeled data with the experimental data. Next, Harshaw`s 8825 card holder was optimized for photon energy determination by analyzing the card holder`s response with different filter materials and thickness. This analysis showed that increasing the copper filter thickness by 20 times and doubling the tin filter thickness compared to the original 8825 design improved the TLD`s photon energy determination response. The improved 8825 card holder was constructed and experiments were conducted at Armstrong Laboratories. The MCNP model predicted the experimental response of the card holder to within two standard deviations for all beams except M60. Finally, recommendations for a new card holder were made by Naval Dosimetry Center which included a modified filter for improved dose determination.

  9. Development of an algorithm for TLD badge system for dosimetry in the field of X and gamma radiation in terms of Hp(10).

    PubMed

    Bakshi, A K; Srivastava, K; Varadharajan, G; Pradhan, A S; Kher, R K

    2007-01-01

    In view of the introduction of International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements operational quantities Hp(10) and Hp(0.07), defined for individual monitoring, it became necessary to develop an algorithm that gives direct response of the dosemeter in terms of the operational quantities. Hence, for this purpose and also to improve the accuracy in dose estimation especially in the mixed fields of X ray and gamma, an algorithm was developed based on higher-order polynomial fit of the data points generated from the dose-response of discs under different filter regions of the present TL dosemeter system for known delivered doses. Study on the response of the BARC TL dosemeter system based on CaSO(4):Dy Teflon thermoluminescence dosemeter discs in the mixed fields of X and gamma radiation was carried out to ensure that the accuracies are within the prescribed limits recommended by the international organisations. The prevalent algorithm, based on the ratios of the disc response under various filters regions of the dosemeter to pure photons, was tested for different proportion of two radiations in case of mixed field dosimetry. It was found that the accuracy for few fields is beyond the acceptable limit in case of prevalent algorithm. The new proposed algorithm was also tested in mixed fields of photon fields and to pure photon fields of varied angles. It was found that the response of the dosemeter in mixed fields of photons and its angular response are satisfactory. The new algorithm can be used to record and report the personal dose in terms of Hp(10) as per the international recommendation for the present TL dosemeter. PMID:16984896

  10. The use of passive environmental TLDs in the operation of the Spanish early warning network 'REVIRA'.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Vergara, J C; Romero, A M; Vila Pena, M; Rodriguez, R; Muñiz, J L

    2002-01-01

    As required by different international agreements, the regulatory body in Spain (Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear) implemented in 1992 a national automatic network (REVIRA) that continuously monitors radiation levels in order to give early warning of incidents having potential transboundary implications. The detector for environmental gamma-radiation dose rate is an active instrument based on a Geiger-Müller counter. However, the use of passive environmental dosemeters provides an additional low-cost dose estimate with an independent centralised calibration and even better basic features than active instruments. Since 1999, all 25 REVIRA stations have been monitored with passive TL environmental dosemeters based on LiF:Mg,Cu,P and operated according to the procedures established at Ciemat. This paper presents the obtained results and the further analysis considering differences in aspects such as photon energy response, inherent background or response to cosmic rays. The benefits of the use of passive environmental dosemeters in early warning networks are discussed. PMID:12382745

  11. Measurements of eye lens doses in interventional cardiology using OSL and electronic dosemeters†.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, R M; Vano, E; Fernandez, J M; Ginjaume, M; Duch, M A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to test the appropriateness of OSL and electronic dosemeters to estimate eye lens doses at interventional cardiology environment. Using TLD as reference detectors, personal dose equivalent was measured in phantoms and during clinical procedures. For phantom measurements, OSL dose values resulted in an average difference of -15 % vs. TLD. Tests carried out with other electronic dosemeters revealed differences up to ±20 % versus TLD. With dosemeters positioned outside the goggles and when TLD doses were >20 μSv, the average difference OSL vs. TLD was -9 %. Eye lens doses of almost 700 μSv per procedure were measured in two cases out of a sample of 33 measurements in individual clinical procedures, thus showing the risk of high exposure to the lenses of the eye when protection rules are not followed. The differences found between OSL and TLD are acceptable for the purpose and range of doses measured in the survey. PMID:24464819

  12. Study of minimum detection limit of TLD personnel monitoring system in India.

    PubMed

    Sneha, C; Pradhan, S M; Adtani, M M

    2010-09-01

    Personnel monitoring of radiation workers in India is carried out using a thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) system based on CaSO(4):Dy Teflon TLD disc. The dose due to occupational exposure for a majority of radiation workers is very small and hence is reported as zero. In view of this the detection of low levels of occupational dose over and above a variable background assumes great importance. The present values of reporting levels are based on the standard deviations of annealed dosemeters and therefore are fixed irrespective of period of use and background radiation levels. The validity of these levels is investigated under laboratory conditions. The laboratory values of standard deviations cannot be used as an indication of the imprecision that occurs during service. Therefore, the validity of the reporting levels is also investigated for control dosemeters used in routine service. PMID:20511403

  13. Microprocessor controlled portable TLD system.

    PubMed

    Apathy, I; Deme, S; Feher, I

    1996-01-01

    An up-to-date microprocessor controlled thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) system for environmental and space dose measurements has been developed. The earlier version of the portable TLD system, Pille, was successfully used on Soviet orbital stations as well as on the US Space Shuttle, and for environmental monitoring. The new portable TLD system, Pille'95, consists of a reader and TL bulb dosemeters, and each dosemeter is provided with an EEPROM chip for automatic identification. The glow curve data are digitised and analysed by the program of the reader. The measured data and the identification number appear on the LED display of the reader. Up to several thousand measured data together with the glow curves can be stored on a removable flash memory card. The whole system is supplied either from built-in rechargeable batteries or from the mains of the space station. PMID:11540052

  14. Dose response of commercially available optically stimulated luminescent detector, Al2O3:C for megavoltage photons and electrons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Wook; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Dong Oh; Yoon, Myonggeun; Hwang, Ui-Jung; Rah, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Sang Yeob; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the dose response of an optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter (OSLD) to megavoltage photon and electron beams. A nanoDot™ dosemeter was used to measure the dose response of the OSLD. Photons of 6-15 MV and electrons of 9-20 MeV were delivered by a Varian 21iX machine (Varian Medical System, Inc. Milpitas, CA, USA). The energy dependency was <1 %. For the 6-MV photons, the dose was linear until 200 cGy. The superficial dose measurements revealed photon irradiation to have an angular dependency. The nanoDot™ dosemeter has potential use as an in vivo dosimetric tool that is independent of the energy, has dose linearity and a rapid response compared with normal in vivo dosimetric tools, such as thermoluminescence detectors. However, the OSLD must be treated very carefully due to the high angular dependency of the photon beam. PMID:21636557

  15. Assessment of eye lens doses for workers during interventional radiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Urboniene, A; Sadzeviciene, E; Ziliukas, J

    2015-07-01

    The assessment of eye lens doses for workers during interventional radiology (IR) procedures was performed using a new eye lens dosemeter. In parallel, the results of routine individual monitoring were analysed and compared with the results obtained from measurements with a new eye lens dosemeter. The eye lens doses were assessed using Hp(3) measured at the level of the eyes and were compared with Hp(10) measured with the whole-body dosemeter above the lead collar. The information about use of protective measures, the number of performed interventional procedures per month and their fluoroscopy time was also collected. The assessment of doses to the lens of the eye was done for 50 IR workers at 9 Lithuanian hospitals for the period of 2012-2013. If the use of lead glasses is not taken into account, the estimated maximum annual dose equivalent to the lens of the eye was 82 mSv. PMID:25877533

  16. Individual neutron monitoring in workplaces with mixed neutron/photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Bolognese-Milsztajn, T; Bartlett, D; Boschung, M; Coeck, M; Curzio, G; d'Errico, F; Fiechtner, A; Giusti, V; Gressier, V; Kyllönen, J; Lacoste, V; Lindborg, L; Luszik-Bhadra, M; Molinos, C; Pelcot, G; Reginatto, M; Schuhmacher, H; Tanner, R; Vanhavere, F; Derdau, D

    2004-01-01

    EVIDOS ('evaluation of individual dosimetry in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields') is an European Commission (EC)-sponsored project that aims at a significant improvement of radiation protection dosimetry in mixed neutron/photon fields via spectrometric and dosimetric investigations in representative workplaces of the nuclear industry. In particular, new spectrometry methods are developed that provide the energy and direction distribution of the neutron fluence from which the reference dosimetric quantities are derived and compared to the readings of dosemeters. The final results of the project will be a comprehensive set of spectrometric and dosimetric data for the workplaces and an analysis of the performance of dosemeters, including novel electronic dosemeters. This paper gives an overview of the project and focuses on the results from measurements performed in calibration fields with broad energy distributions (simulated workplace fields) and on the first results from workplaces in the nuclear industry, inside a boiling water reactor and around a spent fuel transport cask. PMID:15353743

  17. Microprocessor controlled portable TLD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apathy, I.; Deme, S.; Feher, I.

    1996-01-01

    An up-to-date microprocessor controlled thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) system for environmental and space dose measurements has been developed. The earlier version of the portable TLD system, Pille, was successfully used on Soviet orbital stations as well as on the US Space Shuttle, and for environmental monitoring. The new portable TLD system, Pille'95, consists of a reader and TL bulb dosemeters, and each dosemeter is provided with an EEPROM chip for automatic identification. The glow curve data are digitised and analysed by the program of the reader. The measured data and the identification number appear on the LED display of the reader. Up to several thousand measured data together with the glow curves can be stored on a removable flash memory card. The whole system is supplied either from built-in rechargeable batteries or from the mains of the space station.

  18. Gamma dose measurement in a water phantom irradiated with the BNCT facility at THOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Hsu, P C; Liaw, T F

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that a LiF thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) is used as a gamma dosemeter in a water phantom irradiated with the BNCT facility at THOR. Based on the TLD neutron sensitivity and neutron fluxes in the water phantom, which were simulated by the MCNP code, TLD-700 was chosen as a gamma dosemeter in this report. For the correction of the neutron influence on TLD-700, the thermal neutron sensitivity to TLD-700 was investigated with MCNP simulation and the thermal neutron flux was measured with gold foils using the cadmium difference technique. The correction to the neutron influence on the TLD was established on the TLD thermal neutron sensitivity. the thermal neutron flux, and the conversion factor from energy deposition in the TLD to the TLD response. By comparing the experimental data with the thermal neutron influence correction, these data are in very good agreement with the MCNP predictions. PMID:11707034

  19. Quality control for exposure assessment in epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Bornkessel, C; Blettner, M; Breckenkamp, J; Berg-Beckhoff, G

    2010-08-01

    In the framework of an epidemiological study, dosemeters were used for the assessment of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure. To check the correct dosemeter's performance in terms of consistency of recorded field values over the entire study period, a quality control strategy was developed. In this paper, the concept of quality control and its results is described. From the 20 dosemeters used, 19 were very stable and reproducible, with deviations of a maximum of +/-1 dB compared with their initial state. One device was found to be faulty and its measurement data had to be excluded from the analysis. As a result of continuous quality control procedures, the confidence in the measurements obtained during the field work was strengthened significantly. PMID:20308051

  20. Czech results at criticality dosimetry intercomparison 2002.

    PubMed

    Frantisek, Spurný; Jaroslav, Trousil

    2004-01-01

    Two criticality dosimetry systems were tested by Czech participants during the intercomparison held in Valduc, France, June 2002. The first consisted of the thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) (Al-P glasses) and Si-diodes as passive neutron dosemeters. Second, it was studied to what extent the individual dosemeters used in the Czech routine personal dosimetry service can give a reliable estimation of criticality accident exposure. It was found that the first system furnishes quite reliable estimation of accidental doses. For routine individual dosimetry system, no important problems were encountered in the case of photon dosemeters (TLDs, film badge). For etched track detectors in contact with the 232Th or 235U-Al alloy, the track density saturation for the spark counting method limits the upper dose at approximately 1 Gy for neutrons with the energy >1 MeV. PMID:15353690

  1. Reference dosimetry measurements for the international intercomparison of criticality accident dosimetry SILENE 9-21 June 2002.

    PubMed

    Asselineau, B; Trompier, F; Texier, C; Itié, C; Médioni, R; Tikunov, D; Muller, H; Pelcot, G

    2004-01-01

    An international intercomparison of criticality accident dosimetry systems took place in the SILENE reactor, in June 2002. Participants from 60 laboratories irradiated their dosemeters (physical and biological) using two different configurations of the reactor. In preparation for this intercomparison, the leakage radiation fields were characterised by spectrometry and dosimetry measurements using the ROSPEC spectrometer associated with a NE-213 scintillator, ionisation chambers, GM counters, diodes and thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs). For this intercomparison, a large area was required to irradiate the dosemeters both in free air and on phantoms. Therefore, measurements of the uniformity of the field were performed with activation detectors and TLDs for neutron and gammas, respectively. This paper describes the procedures used and the results obtained. PMID:15353691

  2. Hand exposure to ionising radiation of nuclear medicine workers.

    PubMed

    Wrzesień, M; Olszewski, J; Jankowski, J

    2008-01-01

    The specific nature of work in nuclear medicine departments involves the use of isotopes and handling procedures, which contribute to the considerable value of an equivalent dose received, in particular, by the fingertips. Standard nuclear medicine department uses ring dosemeters placed usually at the base of the middle finger. The main aim of the study was to find out whether a relationship exists between the doses recorded by thermoluminescent detectors placed at various locations on the radiopharmacists' hands and the doses recorded by the ring detectors, and to determine the character of that relationship. The correction factor represents a correction value to be used to calculate the doses which might be received by locations on the hand from the dose recorded by the ring dosemeter. The dose recorded by the ring dosemeter is on the average five times lower than that received by the fingertips of thumb, index and middle fingers. PMID:18310609

  3. Dosimetry quality assurance in Martin Marietta Energy Systems` centralized external dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Souleyrette, M.L.

    1992-10-23

    External dosimetry needs at the four Martin Marietta Energy Systems facilities are served by Energy Systems Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a four plant program with four dosimeter distribution centers and two dosimeter processing centers. Each plant has its own distribution center, while processing centers are located at ORNL and the Y-12 Plant. The program has been granted accreditation by the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). The CEDS is a TLD based system which is responsible for whole-body beta-gamma, neutron, and extremity monitoring. Beta-gamma monitoring is performed using the Harshaw/Solon Technologies model 8805 dosimeter. Effective October 1, 1992 the standard silver mylar has been replaced with an Avery mylar foil blackened on the underside with ink. This was done in an effort to reduce the number of light induced suspect readings. At this time we have little operational experience with the new blackened mylars-The CEDS neutron dosimeter is the Harshaw model 8806B. This card/holder configuration contains two TLD-600/TLD-700 chip pairs; one pair is located beneath a cadmium filter and one pair is located beneath a plastic filter. In routine personnel monitoring the CEDS neutron dosimeter is always paired with a CEDS beta-gamma dosimeter.The CEDS extremity dosimeter is composed of a Harshaw thin TLD-700 dosiclip placed inside a Teledyne RB-4 finger sachet. The finger sachet provides approximately 7 mg/cm{sup 2} filtration over the chip. A teflon ring surrounds the dosiclip to help prevent tearing of the vinyl sachet.

  4. Dosimetry quality assurance in Martin Marietta Energy Systems' centralized external dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Souleyrette, M.L.

    1992-10-23

    External dosimetry needs at the four Martin Marietta Energy Systems facilities are served by Energy Systems Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a four plant program with four dosimeter distribution centers and two dosimeter processing centers. Each plant has its own distribution center, while processing centers are located at ORNL and the Y-12 Plant. The program has been granted accreditation by the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). The CEDS is a TLD based system which is responsible for whole-body beta-gamma, neutron, and extremity monitoring. Beta-gamma monitoring is performed using the Harshaw/Solon Technologies model 8805 dosimeter. Effective October 1, 1992 the standard silver mylar has been replaced with an Avery mylar foil blackened on the underside with ink. This was done in an effort to reduce the number of light induced suspect readings. At this time we have little operational experience with the new blackened mylars-The CEDS neutron dosimeter is the Harshaw model 8806B. This card/holder configuration contains two TLD-600/TLD-700 chip pairs; one pair is located beneath a cadmium filter and one pair is located beneath a plastic filter. In routine personnel monitoring the CEDS neutron dosimeter is always paired with a CEDS beta-gamma dosimeter.The CEDS extremity dosimeter is composed of a Harshaw thin TLD-700 dosiclip placed inside a Teledyne RB-4 finger sachet. The finger sachet provides approximately 7 mg/cm[sup 2] filtration over the chip. A teflon ring surrounds the dosiclip to help prevent tearing of the vinyl sachet.

  5. Liquefaction of bituminous coals using disposable ore catalysts and hydrogen. Final report, February 7, 1982-July 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, V.K.

    1982-09-01

    There are a number of problems associated with the production of liquid fuels from coal. The most complex is the use of commercial catalysts which are expensive, with short life, and cannot be recovered or regenerated. The objective of this study was to conduct experiments on coal hydrogenation using low cost mineral ores as disposable catalysts. Coal samples from Blacksville Mine, Pittsburgh Bed were hydrogenated using a number of ores, ore concentrates and industrial waste products as catalysts. Experiments were also conducted using a commercial catalyst (Harshaw Chemicals, 0402T) and no catalyst at all to compare the results. Since iron pyrite has been reported to be a good disposable catalyst, experiments were also conducted using pyrite individually as well as in admixture with other ores or concentrates. The liquefaction was conducted at 425/sup 0/C under 2000 psig (13,790 kPa) hydrogen pressure for a reaction time of 30 minutes using SRC-II heavy distillate as a vehicle oil. The conclusions of this study are as follows: (a) Results of liquefaction using two cycle technique showed that the catalytic activity of iron pyrite could be enhanced by adding materials like limonite, laterite or red mud. Iron pyrite in admixture with limonite ore or molybdenum oxide concentrate gave the best results among all the binary mixtures studied. (b) Iron pyrite with molybdenum oxide concentrate and cobaltic hydroxide cake (metal loading in each case the same as in Harshaw catalyst) gave results which compared favorably with those obtained using the Harshaw catalyst. It is recommended that work on this project should be continued exploring other ores and their mixtures for their catalytic activity for coal liquefaction.

  6. Thermal neutron equivalent dose assessment around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using NTDs. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.

    PubMed

    Abu-Jarad, F; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Haddad, M N; Al-jarallah, M I

    2002-01-01

    Area passive neutron dosemeters based on nuclear track detectors (NTDs) have been used for 13 days to assess accumulated low doses of thermal neutrons around neutron source storage area of the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Moreover, the aim of this study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the storage area. NTDs were mounted with the boron converter on their surface as one compressed unit. The converter is a lithium tetraborate (Li2B4O7) layer for thermal neutron detection via 10B(n,alpha)7Li and 6Li(n,alpha)3H nuclear reactions. The area passive dosemeters were installed on 26 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. The calibration factor for NTD-based area passive neutron dosemeters was found to be 8.3 alpha tracks x cm(-2) x microSv(-1) using active snoopy neutron dosemeters in the KFUPM neutron irradiation facility. The results show the variation of accumulated dose with locations around the storage area. The range of dose rates varied from as low as 40 nSvx h(-1) up to 11 microSv x h(-1). The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosemeter was able to detect accumulated doses as low as 40 nSv x h(-1), which could not be detected with the available active neutron dosemeters. The results of the study also indicate that an additional shielding is required to bring the dose rates down to background level. The present investigation suggests extending this study to find the contribution of doses from fast neutrons around the neutron source storage area using NTDs through proton recoil. The significance of this passive technique is that it is highly sensitive and does not require any electronics or power supplies, as is the case in active systems. PMID:12474945

  7. A robotic manipulator for handling TLD badges.

    PubMed

    Levinson, S; Weinstein, M; Abraham, A; German, U; Gorelik, V; Rozenfeld, R; Hillel, S; Rodnay, G

    2008-11-01

    A prototype system for automatic handling of Harshaw/Bicron (now ThermoFisher Scientific) thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) badges, which is based on a robotic arm, was designed and built. The robot performs the loading and unloading of the TLD cards in the badges and transports them between the loading/unloading station and magazine stations. For quality assurance, a sticker containing the worker's details printed in barcode format was added to the badge. Automatic on-line identification is performed for checking the correlation between the badge and the TLD card number. PMID:18849713

  8. Evaluation of the dosimetric response for CaSO4:Dy at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Ramos-Bernal, S; Negrón-Mendoza, A; Azoŕin, J

    2002-01-01

    Homemade solid state CaSO4:Dy detectors were tested to evaluate their response to gamma radiation at liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The dosemeters were irradiated with doses between 12 and 1071 Gy. For this study these dosemeters were exposed to gamma rays with a dose rate of 1.19 Gy.min(-1). The analysis for these crystals was made by thermoluminiscence. The dose response at liquid nitrogen temperature was linear in the dose range studied and it is about 20% lower with respect to the response at room temperature. The response is reproducible with the same geometric set-up. PMID:12382918

  9. A thermoluminescence dosimetry system for personal monitoring in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Currivan, L; Spain, D; Donnelly, H; Colgan, P A

    2001-01-01

    In 1993 the decision was taken to replace film badges with thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) as the main form of dosemeter for both whole-body and extremity monitoring at the Dosimetry Service of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) in Dublin. A review of commercially available automatic TLD systems was carried out to identify the system which best met the RPII's requirements. This paper describes the dosimetry system used, and, in addition, discusses the problems encountered and how these were addressed. PMID:11586731

  10. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} x 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover, the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining 6 cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  11. Fire testing of bare uranium hexafluoride cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    In 1965, the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), now the K-25 Site, conducted a series of tests in which bare cylinders of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) were exposed to engulfing oil fires for the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), now the US Department of Energy (DOE). The tests are described and the results, conclusions, and observations are presented. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5-in.-diam {times} 7.5-in.-long cylinders of Monel (Harshaw), 5.0-in.-diam {times} 30-in.-long cylinders of Monel, and 8-in.-diam {times} 48-in.-long cylinders of nickel. The cylinders were filled approximately to the standard UF{sub 6} fill limits of 5, 55, and 250 lb, respectively, with a U-235 content of 0.22%. The 5-in.- and 8-in.-diam cylinders were tested individually with and without their metal valve covers. For the 3.5-in.-diam Harshaw cylinders and the 5.0-in.-diam cylinder without a valve cover the valves failed and UF{sub 6} was released. The remaining cylinders ruptured explosively in time intervals ranging from about 8.5 to 11 min.

  12. The high dose response and functional capability of the DT-702/Pd lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Tyler M; Talmadge, Molly D; Murray, Mark M; Nelson, Martin E; Mueller, Andrew C; Romanyukha, Alexander A; Fairchild, Gregory R; Grypp, Matthew D; Williams, Anthony S

    2015-05-01

    The United States Navy monitors the dose its radiation workers receive using the DT-702/PD thermoluminescent dosimeter, which consists of the Harshaw 8840 holder and the four-element Harshaw 8841 card. There were two main objectives of this research. In the first objective, the dosimeters were exposed to 100 Gy using electron and x-ray beams and found to respond approximately 30-40% lower than the delivered dose. No significant effect on the under-response was found when dose rate, radiation type, dosimeter position on the phantom, and dosimeter material were varied or when the card was irradiated while enclosed in its holder. Since the current naval policy is to remove from occupational use any thermoluminescent dosimeter with an accumulated deep dose equivalent of 0.05 Sv or greater, the functionality of the dosimeter was also investigated at deep dose equivalents of 0.05, 0.15, and 0.25 Sv using 60Co and 137Cs sources as the second main objective. All dosimeters were annealed following exposure and then exposed to 5.0 mSv from a 90Sr source. In all cases, the dosimeters responded within 3% of the delivered dose, indicating that the dosimeters remained functional as defined by naval dosimetry requirements. However, the anneal time required to clear the thermoluminescent dosimeter's reading was found to increase approximately as the cube root with the delivered dose. PMID:25811149

  13. Study of the improvement of TLD cards for personal neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabie, N.; Hassan, G. M.; El-Sersy, A. R.; Ezzat, M.

    2010-04-01

    In this work, personal thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) cards type of GN-6770 (holder type 8806) from Harshaw were used for personal neutron dosimetry. The response of the dosimeters has been determined in terms of the personal absorbed dose and personal dose equivalent for different neutron energy components, based on the recommendations of ICRP-60 and ICRU-49. Neutron irradiation was performed using a 5 mCi Am-Be neutron source. The TLD reader, type Harshaw 6600, was installed and calibrated for accurate neutron doses equivalent to gamma-ray doses. It was found that fast neutron doses measured by TLD (badges or cards) are in agreement with those measured by neutron TE (tissue equivalent gas) ionization chambers and neutron monitors. Thermal neutron doses measured by TLD cards were overestimated when compared with those measured by neutron monitors. Additional Cd was used to reduce thermal neutron doses to be in agreement with actual thermal doses. Other configurations for TLD crystals are also suggested for accurate thermal neutron dose measurements.

  14. Dose measurements in space by the Hungarian Pille TLD system.

    PubMed

    Apathy, I; Deme, S; Feher, I; Akatov, Y A; Reitz, G; Arkhanguelski, V V

    2002-10-01

    Exposure of crew, equipment, and experiments to the ambient space radiation environment in low Earth orbit poses one of the most significant problems to long-term space habitation. Accurate dose measurement has become increasingly important during the assembly (extravehicular activity (EVA)) and operation of space stations such as on Space Station Mir. Passive integrating detector systems such as thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) are commonly used for dosimetry mapping and personal dosimetry on space vehicles. The well-known advantages of passive detector systems are their independence of power supply, small dimensions, high sensitivity, good stability, wide measuring range, resistance to environmental effects, and relatively low cost. Nevertheless, they have the general disadvantage that for evaluation purposes they need a laboratory or large--in mass and power consumption--terrestrial equipment, and consequently they cannot provide time-resolved dose data during long-term space flights. KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (KFKI AEKI) has developed and manufactured a series of thermoluminescent dosemeter systems for measuring cosmic radiation doses in the 10 microGy to 10 Gy range, consisting of a set of bulb dosemeters and a compact, self-contained, TLD reader suitable for on-board evaluation of the dosemeters. By means of such a system, highly accurate measurements were carried out on board the Salyut-6, -7 and Mir Space Stations as well as on the Space Shuttle. A detailed description of the system is given and the comprehensive results of these measurements are summarised. PMID:12440428

  15. High-sensitivity thermoluminescence applied to environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velbeck, K. J.; Zhang, L.; Rotunda, Joe E.; Moscovitch, Marko

    1999-02-01

    We describe the development of a new environmental TLD Dosemeter Badge and dose computation algorithm based on the new LiF:Mg,Cu,P material. LiF:Mg,Cu,P, with its high sensitivity, tissue equivalence, energy independence, and low fading characteristics, is a natural choice for environmental dosimetry. The badge consists of a card and a plastic holder. The card contains four LiF:Mg,Cu,P elements, each 3.2 mm square and 0.4 mm thick, encapsulated in TeflonR. The badge is symmetrical and uses four filters to discriminate low and high energy photons and to determine Directional Dose Equivalent, H'(0.07,(alpha) ), and Ambient Dose Equivalent, H*(10). Extensive data was taken based on irradiations of 920 dosemeters to both single and mixed fields of photons and betas. In addition, angular incidence data of various fields was taken. The approach to the algorithm is empirical and is based on this data. While most algorithms are based solely on perpendicular incidence exposure, this algorithm is being developed to account for the angular response of the dosemeter. This paper will present the algorithm for perpendicular irradiation; the angular response portion is in development. The dosemeter is designed to meet the criteria of the new draft standard ANSI N13.29, 'Environmental Dosimetry Performance -- Criteria for Testing.'

  16. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Vano, E; Sanchez, R M; Fernandez, J M

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 µSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm(2), respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators (protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 µSv Gy(-1) cm(-2), respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y(-1) and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties. PMID:25848117

  17. Direct reading measurement of absorbed dose with plastic scintillators--the general concept and applications to ophthalmic plaque dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Flühs, D; Heintz, M; Indenkämpen, F; Wieczorek, C

    1996-03-01

    We have developed dosemeters based on plastic scintillators for a variety of applications in radiation therapy. The dosemeters consist basically of a tissue-substituting scintillator probe, an optical fiber light guide, and a photomultiplier tube. The background light generated in the light guide can be compensated by a simultaneous measurement of the light from a blind fiber. Plastic scintillator dosemeters combine several advantageous properties which render them superior to other dosemeter types for many applications: minimal disturbance of the radiation field because of the homogeneous detector volume and the approximate water equivalence; no dependence on temperature and pressure (under standard clinical conditions) and angle of radiation incidence; no high voltage in the probe; high spatial resolution due to small detector volumes; direct reading of absorbed doses; and a large dynamical range. The high spatial resolution together with direct reading make these detectors suitable for real-time 3-D dosimetry using multi-channel detector systems. Such a system has been developed for eye plaque dosimetry and successfully employed for dosimetric treatment optimization. The plaque optimization can be performed by dosimetric measurements for the individual patient ("dosimetric treatment planning"). The time consumption for this procedure is less than for a physically correct computer-based therapy planning, e.g., by means of a Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:8815386

  18. Correction factors for the ISO rod phantom, a cylinder phantom, and the ICRU sphere for reference beta radiation fields of the BSS 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, R.

    2015-03-01

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) requires in its standard ISO 6980 that beta reference radiation fields for radiation protection be calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to tissue at a depth of 0.07 mm in a slab phantom (30 cm x 30 cm x 15 cm). However, many beta dosemeters are ring dosemeters and are, therefore, irradiated on a rod phantom (1.9 cm in diameter and 30 cm long), or they are eye dosemeters possibly irradiated on a cylinder phantom (20 cm in diameter and 20 cm high), or area dosemeters irradiated free in air with the conventional quantity value (true value) being defined in a sphere (30 cm in diameter, made of ICRU tissue (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements)). Therefore, the correction factors for the conventional quantity value in the rod, the cylinder, and the sphere instead of the slab (all made of ICRU tissue) were calculated for the radiation fields of 147Pm, 85Kr, 90Sr/90Y, and, 106Ru/106Rh sources of the beta secondary standard BSS 2 developed at PTB. All correction factors were calculated for 0° up to 75° (in steps of 15°) radiation incidence. The results are ready for implementation in ISO 6980-3 and have recently been (partly) implemented in the software of the BSS 2.

  19. Personal dose equivalent angular response factors for photons with energies up to 1 GeV.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G

    2013-04-01

    When performing personal dosemeter calibrations, the dosemeters are typically irradiated while mounted on slab-type phantoms and oriented facing the source. Performance testing standards or intercomparison studies may also specify various rotational angles to test the response of the dosemeter and associated algorithm as this rotation introduces changes in the quantity of delivered dose. Correction factors for rotational effects are available, but many have not been updated in recent years and were typically calculated using the kerma approximation. The personal dose equivalent, Hp(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body, but typically the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm × 30 cm × 15 cm slab-type phantom. In this work personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for photons with energies up to 1 GeV have been calculated for depths of 0.007, 0.3 and 1.0 cm in the slab phantom for rotational angles ranging from 15° to 75°. Angular response factors have been determined by comparing the conversion coefficients for each angle and energy to those reported in an earlier work for a non-rotational (e.g. perpendicular to the phantom face) geometry. The angular response factors were determined for discrete angles, but fits of the factors are provided. PMID:22914333

  20. Tenth ORNL Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Chou, T.L.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1985-03-01

    The Tenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during April 9-11, 1984. Dosemeter badges from 31 participating organizations were mounted on 40cm Lucite phantoms and exposed to a range of dose equivalents which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor served as the only source of radiation for eight of the ten irradiations which included a low (approx. 0.50 mSv) and high (approx. 10.00 mSv) neutron dose equivalent run for each of four shield conditions. Two irradiations were also conducted for which concrete- and Lucite-shield reactor irradiations were gamma-enhanced using a /sup 137/Cs source. Results indicated that some participants had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron and gamma exposures at dose equivalents less than about 0.50 mSv and 0.20 mSv, respectively. Albedo dosemeters provided the best overall accuracy and precision for the neutron measurements. Direct interaction TLD systems showed significant variation in accuracy with incident spectrum, and threshold neutron dosemeters (film and recoil track) underestimated reference values by more than 50%. Gamma dose equivalents estimated in the mixed fields were higher than reference values with TL gamma dosemeters generally yielding more accurate results than film. Under the conditions of this study in which participants had information concerning exposure conditions and radiation field characteristics prior to dosemeter evaluation, only slightly more than half of all reported results met regulatory standards for neutron and gamma accuracy. 19 refs., 2 figs., 29 tabs.

  1. Analysis of read-out heating rate effects on the glow peaks of TLD-100 using WinGCF software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauk, Sabar; Hussin, Siti Fatimah; Alam, Md. Shah

    2016-01-01

    This study was done to analyze the effects of the read-out heating rate on the LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) glow peaks using WinGCF computer software. The TLDs were exposed to X-ray photons with a potential difference of 72 kVp and 200 mAs in air and were read-out using a Harshaw 3500 TLD reader. The TLDs were read-out using four read-out heating rates at 10, 7, 4 and 1 °C s-1. It was observed that lowering the heating rate could separate more glow peaks. The activation energy for peak 5 was found to be lower than that for peak 4. The peak maximum temperature and the integral value of the main peak decreased as the heating rate decreases.

  2. Evaluation of new and conventional thermoluminescent phosphors for environmental monitoring using automated thermoluminescent dosimeter readers

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, B.A.; Endres, A.W.; Antonio, E.J.

    1994-10-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in a new generation of super-sensitive thermoluminescent (TL) phosphors for potential use in routine personnel and environmental monitoring. Two of these phosphors, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and LiF:Mg,Cu,P, are evaluated in this paper for selected characteristics relevant to environmental monitoring, along with two conventional phosphors widely used in environmental monitoring, LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF{sub 2}:Dy. The characteristics evaluated are light-induced fading, light-induced background, linearity and variability at low dose, and the minimum measurable dose. These characteristics were determined using an automated commercial dosimetry system (Harshaw System 8800) and routine processing protocols. Annealing and readout protocols for each phosphor were optimized for use in a large-scale environmental monitoring program.

  3. Preirradiation sensitivity loss of reader-annealed LiF TLDs

    SciTech Connect

    Poeton, R.W.; Stanford, N.; Scannel, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) maintains a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) dosimetry service using a Harshaw TLD badge system consisting of two TLD cards in a plastic case and automatic 2271 readers. Beginning in 1986, a standardized on-site quality assurance testing program was instituted for the facilities provided with YAEC personnel dosimetry. Results obtained during the first half of 1986 indicated a low bias in test TLD results on the order of 10 to 15%. A subsequent investigation attributed this bias to a previously unidentified loss in the sensitivity of reader-annealed LiF TLDs with storage time prior to irradiation. The discovery of this effect, based on in-plant quality assurance testing, demonstrates the usefulness of even relatively simple quality assurance tests by users themselves, regardless of the apparent thoroughness of other testing.

  4. Optimum parameters of TLD100 powder used for radiotherapy beams calibration check

    SciTech Connect

    Arib, M. . E-mail: mehenna.arib@comena-dz.org; Yaich, A.; Messadi, A.; Dari, F.

    2006-10-01

    External audit of the absorbed dose determination from radiotherapy machines is performed using Lithium fluoride (LiF) TLD-100. Optimal parameters needed to obtain highly accurate dosage from LiF powder was investigated, including the setup of the Harshaw 4000 reader. A linear correspondence between the thermoluminescent signal and the mass of the powder was observed, demonstrating that the dose can be evaluated with small samples of powder. The reproducibility of the thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) readings obtained with up to 10 samples from 1 capsule containing 160 mg of powder was around 1.5% (1 standard deviation [SD]). The time required for the manual evaluation of TLDs can be improved by 3 readings without loss of accuracy. Better reproducibility is achieved if the capsules are evaluated 7 days after irradiation using a nitrogen flow of 300 cc/min.

  5. Stereotactic radiosurgery dosimetry using thermoluminescent dosimeters and radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila-Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes; Perches, Rodolfo Díaz

    2000-10-01

    In this work we present a protocol to measure absorbed dose distributions in stereotactic radiosurgery treatments with a linear accelerator (Linac) using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and radiochromic dye films. A Linac Philips SL-15 (6 MV X-rays), a ZD2 stereoactic system for localizing the target via computed tomography (CT), and Leibinger radiosurgery accessories will be used. A versatile spherical acrylic phantom of 16 cm diameter to measure the dose distributions has been designed. The phantom is composed of two hemispheres. On one flat side of the hemispheres an array of Harshaw/Bicron TLD-100 or a sheet of GafChromic MD-55 film will be placed. The phantom will be irradiated in three different orientations to obtain spatial dose distributions in the coronal, sagital and transverse planes. The experimental measurement will be compared with the results provided by a commercial treatment-planning system.

  6. Development of an algorithm for evaluating personal doses due to photon fields in terms of operational quantities for TLD badge system in India.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S M; Sneha, C; Chourasiya, G; Adtani, M M; Tripathi, S M; Singh, S K

    2009-09-01

    In order to evaluate and report the personal doses in terms of personal dose equivalent, the performance of the CaSO(4):Dy based thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) badge used for countrywide personnel monitoring in India is investigated using monoenergetic and narrow spectrum radiation qualities equivalent to those given in ISO standards. Algorithms suitable for evaluating H(p)(10) and H(p)(0.07) within +/- 30 % are developed from the responses of dosemeter elements/discs under different filters for normal as well as angular irradiation conditions using these beams. The algorithm is tested for TLD badges irradiated to mixtures of low- and high-energy ((137)Cs) beams in various proportions. The paper concludes with the results of test of algorithm by evaluation of badges used in the IAEA/RCA intercomparison studies and discussion on inherent limitations. PMID:19755432

  7. Improvements in extremity dose assessment for ionising radiation medical applications.

    PubMed

    Ginjaume, M; Pérez, S; Ortega, X

    2007-01-01

    This study aims at testing the INTE ring dosemeter based on MCP-Ns and TLD-100 detectors on users from the field of medical applications, namely radiopharmacists, personnel at a cyclotron facility with corresponding FDG synthesis cells, interventional radiology technologists and radiologists. These users were chosen due to the fact that they have a significantly high risk of exposure to their hands. Following previous results, MCP-Ns TL thin material was used for radiology measurements, whereas TLD-100 was preferred for other applications. The dosemeters were tested to make sure that they were waterproof and that they could be sterilised properly prior to use. Results confirm the need to implement finger dosimetry, mainly for interventional radiologists as finger dose can be >50 times higher than whole-body dose and 3 times higher than wrist dose. PMID:17277325

  8. A practical method to evaluate radiofrequency exposure of mast workers.

    PubMed

    Alanko, Tommi; Hietanen, Maila

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of occupational exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields in telecommunication transmitter masts is a challenging task. For conventional field strength measurements using manually operated instruments, it is difficult to document the locations of measurements while climbing up a mast. Logging RF dosemeters worn by the workers, on the other hand, do not give any information about the location of the exposure. In this study, a practical method was developed and applied to assess mast workers' exposure to RF fields and the corresponding location. This method uses a logging dosemeter for personal RF exposure evaluation and two logging barometers to determine the corresponding height of the worker's position on the mast. The procedure is not intended to be used for compliance assessments, but to indicate locations where stricter assessments are needed. The applicability of the method is demonstrated by making measurements in a TV and radio transmitting mast. PMID:19054796

  9. A method to characterise site, urban and regional ambient background radiation.

    PubMed

    Passmore, C; Kirr, M

    2011-03-01

    Control dosemeters are routinely provided to customers to monitor the background radiation so that it can be subtracted from the gross response of the dosemeter to arrive at the occupational dose. Landauer, the largest dosimetry processor in the world with subsidiaries in Australia, Brazil, China, France, Japan, Mexico and the UK, has clients in approximately 130 countries. The Glenwood facility processes over 1.1 million controls per year. This network of clients around the world provides a unique ability to monitor the world's ambient background radiation. Control data can be mined to provide useful historical information regarding ambient background rates and provide a historical baseline for geographical areas. Historical baseline can be used to provide site or region-specific background subtraction values, document the variation in ambient background radiation around a client's site or provide a baseline for measuring the efficiency of clean-up efforts in urban areas after a dirty bomb detonation. PMID:20959341

  10. EYE LENS DOSIMETRY FOR FLUOROSCOPICALLY GUIDED CLINICAL PROCEDURES: PRACTICAL APPROACHES TO PROTECTION AND DOSE MONITORING.

    PubMed

    Martin, Colin J

    2016-06-01

    Doses to the eye lenses of clinicians undertaking fluoroscopically guided procedures can exceed the dose annual limit of 20 mSv, so optimisation of radiation protection is essential. Ceiling-suspended shields and disposable radiation absorbing pads can reduce eye dose by factors of 2-7. Lead glasses that shield against exposures from the side can lower doses by 2.5-4.5 times. Training in effective use of protective devices is an essential element in achieving good protection and acceptable eye doses. Effective methods for dose monitoring are required to identify protection issues. Dosemeters worn adjacent to the eye provide the better option for interventional clinicians, but an unprotected dosemeter worn at the neck will give an indication of eye dose that is adequate for most interventional staff. Potential requirements for protective devices and dose monitoring can be determined from risk assessments using generic values for dose linked to examination workload. PMID:26454269

  11. Quality assurance and quality control programme in the Personal Dosimetry Department of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission.

    PubMed

    Kamenopoulou, V; Drikos, G; Carinou, E; Papadomarkaki, E; Askounis, P; Kyrgiakou, H; Kefalonitis, N

    2002-01-01

    A quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) programme was applied to the personal monitoring department (TLD based) of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC). This programme was designed according to the recommendations of international bodies such as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Commission (CEC). This paper deals with the presentation of the QA/QC programme which includes administrative data and information, technical checking of the equipment, acceptance tests of new equipment and dosemeters, issuing and processing of the dosemeters, dose evaluation, record keeping and reporting, traceability and reproducibility, handling of complaints, internal reviews and external audits. PMID:12382742

  12. Characterisation of the TAPIRO BNCT epithermal facility.

    PubMed

    Burn, K W; Colli, V; Curzio, G; d'Errico, F; Gambarini, G; Rosi, G; Scolari, L

    2004-01-01

    A collimated epithermal beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) research has been designed and built at the TAPIRO fast research reactor. A complete experimental characterisation of the radiation field in the irradiation chamber has been performed, to verify agreement with IAEA requirements. Slow neutron fluxes have been measured by means of an activation technique and with thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs). The fast neutron dose has been determined with gel dosemeters, while the fast neutron spectrum has been acquired by means of a neutron spectrometer based on superheated drop detectors. The gamma-dose has been measured with gel dosemeters and TLDs. For an independent verification of the experimental results, fluxes, doses and neutron spectra have been calculated with Monte Carlo simulations using the codes MCNP4B and MCNPX_2.1.5 with the direct statistical approach (DSA). The results obtained confirm that the epithermal beams achievable at TAPIRO are of suitable quality for BNCT purposes. PMID:15353724

  13. A whole-body dosimetry system for personal monitoring based on hot-pressed thin layer TLD.

    PubMed

    Busch, F; Engelhardt, J; Martini, E; Lesz, J

    2011-03-01

    We are introducing a new high-capacity thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) system to measure the whole body values of H(p)(10) and H(p)(0.07) from photons for use in individual monitoring services. Small and light-weight badges allow a convenient application in a wide variety of workplaces with photon radiation from 20 keV to at least 7 MeV. The main advantage of this system will be the large capacity of ∼ 100,000 dosemeters per month at costs equivalent to the current film monitoring. The hot-pressed thin-layer TL detector (LiF:Mg,Ti) is welded onto an aluminium substrate and provided with a data matrix code for automatic processing. The detector holder has been optimised, that no additional filter is necessary. The new designed TLD reader with readout times <10 s will allow a large throughput and a considerable degree of automation. PMID:21227958

  14. A multi-detector neutron spectrometer with nearly isotropic response for environmental and workplace monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Bedogni, R.; Moraleda, M.; Delgado, A.; Romero, A.; Esposito, A.

    2010-01-01

    This communication describes an improved design for a neutron spectrometer consisting of 6Li thermoluminescent dosemeters located at selected positions within a single moderating polyethylene sphere. The spatial arrangement of the dosemeters has been designed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the response matrix for 56 log-equidistant energies from 10 -9 to 100 MeV, looking for a configuration that permits to obtain a nearly isotropic response for neutrons in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. The feasibility of the proposed spectrometer and the isotropy of its response have been evaluated by simulating exposures to different reference and workplace neutron fields. The FRUIT code has been used for unfolding purposes. The results of the simulations as well as the experimental tests confirm the suitability of the prototype for environmental and workplace monitoring applications.

  15. A A field test for extremity dose assessment during outages at Korean nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young

    2013-05-01

    During maintenance on the water chamber of a steam generator, the pressuriser heater and the pressure tube feeder in nuclear power plants, workers are likely to receive high radiation doses due to the severe workplace conditions. In particular, it is expected that workers' hands would receive the highest radiation doses because of their contact with the radioactive materials. In this study, field tests for extremity dose assessments in radiation workers undertaking contact tasks with high radiation doses were conducted during outages at pressurised water reactors and pressurised heavy water reactors in Korea. In the test, the radiation workers were required to wear additional thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) on their backs and wrists and an extremity dosemeter on the finger, as well as a main TLD on the chest while performing the maintenance tasks. PMID:23091221

  16. Radiation exposure of an anaesthesiologist in catheterisation and electrophysiological cardiac procedures.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Stefano; Moretti, Renzo; Lorini, Ferdinando Luca; Lagrotta, Mariavittoria

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, cardiac catheterisation and electrophysiological procedures, diagnostic and interventional, require an anaesthesiological support. The anaesthesiologist receives radiation doses depending on various factors, such as type of procedure and exposure modality, anaesthesiological technique, individual protective devices and operator experience. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose per procedure, the exposure inhomogeneity and the effective dose, E, of a senior anaesthesiologist in the haemodynamic laboratory of Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo. The dose monitoring was routinely performed with sets of several thermoluminescent dosemeters and an electronic personal dosemeter. The study covered 300 consecutive procedures over 1 y. The anaesthesiologist wore a protective apron, a thyroid collar and glasses (0.5 mm lead-equivalent). PMID:25752757

  17. The patient as a radioactive source: an intercomparison of survey meters for measurements in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Uhrhan, K; Drzezga, A; Sudbrock, F

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the radiation exposure in nuclear medicine is evaluated by measuring dose rates in the proximity of patients and those in close contact to sources like capsules and syringes. A huge number of different survey meters (SMs) are offered commercially. This topic has recently gained interest since dosemeters and active personal dosemeters (APD) for the new dose quantities (ambient and directional dose equivalent) have become available. One main concern is the practical use of SMs and APD in daily clinical routines. Therefore, the radiation field of four common radiopharmaceuticals containing (18)F, (90)Y, (99m)Tc and (131)I in radioactive sources or after application to the patient was determined. Measurements were carried out with different SMs and for several distances. Dose rates decline significantly with the distance to the patient, and with some restrictions, APD can be used as SMs. PMID:25071244

  18. International project on individual monitoring and radiation exposure levels in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Padovani, R; Le Heron, J; Cruz-Suarez, R; Duran, A; Lefaure, C; Miller, D L; Sim, H K; Vano, E; Rehani, M; Czarwinski, R

    2011-03-01

    Within the Information System on Occupational Exposure in Medicine, Industry and Research (ISEMIR), a new International Atomic Energy Agency initiative, a Working Group on interventional cardiology, aims to assess staff radiation protection (RP) levels and to propose an international database of occupational exposures. A survey of regulatory bodies (RBs) has provided information at the country level on RP practice in interventional cardiology (IC). Concerning requirements for wearing personal dosemeters, only 57 % of the RB specifies the number and position of dosemeters for staff monitoring. Less than 40 % of the RBs could provide occupational doses. Reported annual median effective dose values (often <0.5 mSv) were lower than expected considering validated data from facility-specific studies, indicating that compliance with continuous individual monitoring is often not achieved in IC. A true assessment of annual personnel doses in IC will never be realised unless a knowledge of monitoring compliance is incorporated into the analysis. PMID:21051431

  19. A comparison of different neutron spectroscopy systems at the reactor facility VENUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhavere, F.; Vermeersch, F.; Chartier, J. L.; Itié, C.; Rosenstock, W.; Köble, T.; d'Errico, F.

    2002-01-01

    The VENUS facility is a zero-power research reactor mainly devoted to studies on LWR fuels. Localised high-neutron rates were found around the reactor, with a neutron/gamma dose equivalent rate ratio as high as three. Therefore, a study of the neutron dosimetry around the reactor was started some years ago. During this study, several methods of neutron spectroscopy were employed and a study of individual and ambient dosemeters was performed. A first spectrometric measurement was done with the IPSN multisphere spectrometer in three positions around the reactor. Secondly, the ROSPEC spectrometer from the Fraunhofer Institut was used. The spectra were also measured with the bubble interactive neutron spectrometer. These measurements were compared with a numerical simulation of the neutron field made with the code TRIPOLI-3. Dosimetric measurements were made with three types of personal neutron dosemeters: an albedo type, a track etch detector and a bubble detector.

  20. Evaluation of spurious readings in Los Alamos personnel TL dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Eisen, Y.; Littlejohn, G.J.; Cortez, J.R.

    1984-08-01

    This study investigates the possibility of tritium build-up in TLD-600 chips irradiated with neutrons and the causes of spurious readings in the Harshaw TLD cards used for personnel dosimetry. Experiments indicated that spurious readings in TLD-600 chips, previously irradiated with neutrons, might occur in cases where the cards had been accidentally read at temperatures lower than 300/sup 0/C as a result of bad contact between the hot finger in the reading system and the chips. Because a TLD card contains glue and paper bar-code labels, the postannealing is performed at 80/sup 0/C for 17 hours. This annealing procedure alone does not effectively deplete the high-energy traps, such as those near 260/sup 0/C, populated by high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) particles. TLD-600 chips, irradiated on a phantom by 400 mrem of moderated fission neutrons, read at 240/sup 0/C, annealed at 80/sup 0/C for 17 hours, and then reread at 280/sup 0/C, showed residual doses as large as 200 mrem (equivalent photons). Calculations and experiments show that for neutron exposures around 1 rem of moderated fission neutrons with an average energy of 500 keV, the maximum build-up of dose as a result of tritium formation is less than 1 mrem. The dose build-up in properly annealed TLD-600 and TLD-700 chips, is nearly the same, even though the TLD-600 chips were previously irradiated by neutrons. Both kinds of chips show natural background accumulation. A mechanism for annealing the Harshaw cards at high temperatures, without destroying the label or the adhesive material, was developed and found to be useful. 7 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Combined shift and methanation in a fluidized-bed reactor. Quarterly progress report, 1 April-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, R C

    1980-07-01

    Only one bench-scale reactor test was completed. The Harshaw Ni/Cu/Mo and UCI (composition undisclosed) catalysts were evaluated over a 12-day period at 800 F and a feed gas H/sub 2//CO ratio of 2/1. Initial conversions with both catalysts were about 33 percent; and the activities of both samples declined steadily during the test, with final conversion values in the 15 to 20 percent range. During this test, problems were experienced with water carryover into the Drierite traps, necessitating some major design changes in the water letdown system. Two subsequent attempts to initiate a second test at 950 F with these catalysts were unsuccessful for the reasons given. A 5-day PEDU test (Test SM-2) was conducted using the spent Harshaw Ni/Cu/Mo catalyst from Test SM-1 in February. The purpose was to continue the data period at H/sub 2//CO = 1/1 that was terminated prematurely during the earlier PEDU test. After a brief baseline period (H/sub 2//CO = 3/1), during which catalyst activity appeared to be normal, the feed gas was changed to approximately 31 percent H/sub 2/, 31 percent CO, 22 percent CO/sub 2/, and 16 percent CH/sub 4/; and steam was added to the feed. Some difficulty was experienced in maintaining high bed temperatures, with the result that the steam flow had to be gradually decreased. This may have enhanced catalyst coking, since the catalyst activity generally declined slowly throughout the test, and the final carbon content of the catalyst was 3.6 percent (vs. 2.0 percent at the beginning of the test). A second 5-day PEDU test (Test SM-3) was conducted using the Climax Ni/Mo catalyst. The results are described.

  2. Eye dose monitoring of PET/CT workers

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, U; O'Reilly, G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to measure eye dose [Hp(3)] to workers in a busy positron emission tomography (PET)/CT centre. Doses were compared with the proposed new annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Methods: We used a newly designed dosemeter to measure eye dose [Hp(3)]. Eye dosemeters were worn with an adjustable headband, with the dosemeter positioned adjacent to the left eye. The whole-body dose was also recorded using electronic personal dosemeter (EPD® Mk2; Thermo Electron Corporation, Waltham, MA). Exposed staff included radiographers, nurses and healthcare assistants. Results: The radiographers received the highest exposure of the staff groups studied, with one radiographer receiving an exposure of 0.5 mSv over the 3-month survey period. The estimated maximum eye dose for 1 year is approximately 2 mSv. The numeric value for eye dose was compared with the numeric value for personal dose equivalent to see if one could be used as an indicator for the other. From our data, a conservative estimate of eye dose Hp(3) (mSv) can be made as being up to approximately twice the numeric value for whole-body dose [Hp(10)] (mSv). Conclusion: Eye dose was found to be well within the new proposed annual limit at our PET/CT centre. Routine whole-body dose measurements may be a useful starting point for assessing whether eye dose monitoring should be prioritized in a PET facility. Advances in knowledge: Following the proposal of a reduced eye dose limit, this article provides new measurement data on staff eye doses for PET/CT workers. PMID:25109711

  3. IEC STANDARDS FOR INDIVIDUAL MONITORING OF IONISING RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Voytchev, Miroslav; Ambrosi, P.; Behrens, R.; Chiaro Jr, Peter John

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents IEC/SC 45B Radiation protection instrumentation and its standards for individual monitoring of ionising radiation: IEC 61526 Ed. 3 for active personal dosemeters and IEC 62387-1 for passive integrating dosimetry systems. The transposition of these standards as CENELEC (European) standards is also discussed together with the collaboration between IEC/SC 45B and ISO/TC 85/SC 2.

  4. HSE performance tests for dosimetry services.

    PubMed

    Birch, R; Simpson, J A; Hedley, R P; Wardle, J

    2000-12-01

    In the United Kingdom a dosimetry service that measures and assesses whole-body or part-body doses arising from external radiation must successfully complete a performance test. Results of the performance tests for routine whole-body, routine extremity/skin and special accident dosimetry, carried out over the past six years by the AEA Technology Calibration Service at Winfrith, and DRaStaC, the AWE Calibration Service at Aldermaston, are presented. The test involves irradiating groups of dosemeters to known doses of gamma radiation and determining the bias and relative standard deviations for each dose group. The results are compared with the pass criteria specified by the UK Health and Safety Executive. For routine whole-body dosimetry, both the film badge and thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) perform adequately for irradiations between 0.6 and 30 mSv. For higher doses up to 250 mSv, where the slow emulsion of the film is used, the film badge shows poorer performance with a tendency to overestimate the dose. For routine extremity/skin dosimetry there is a wider spread of relative standard deviation results than is seen for routine whole-body dosimetry. This is to be expected since the results will include dosemeters that are based on 'disposable' TLDs and ones based on lithium fluoride powder in sachets. For special accident dosimetry the dosemeters are tested between 0.26 and 6 Gy. For the highest dose group the film badge invariably underestimates the true dose, whereas the TLD has a tendency to overestimate it. PMID:11140715

  5. A method to minimise the fading effects of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-600 and TLD-700) using a pre-heat technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, YoungJu; Won, Yuho; Kang, Kidoo

    2015-04-01

    Passive integrating dosemeters [thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL)] are the only legally permitted individual dosemeters for occupational external radiation exposure monitoring in Korea. Also its maximum issuing cycle does not exceed 3 months, and the Korean regulations require personal dosemeters for official assessment of external radiation exposure to be issued by an approved or rather an accredited dosimetry service according to ISO/IEC 17025. KHNP (Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power, LTD), a unique operating company of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Korea, currently has a plan to extend a TLD issuing cycle from 1 to 3 months under the authors' fading error criteria, ±10%. The authors have performed a feasibility study that minimises post-irradiation fading effects within their maximum reading cycle employing pre-heating technique. They repeatedly performed irradiation/reading a bare TLD chip to determine optimum pre-heating conditions by analysing each glow curve. The optimum reading conditions within the maximum reading cycle of 3 months were decided: a pre-heating temperature of 165°C, a pre-heating time of 9 s, a heating rate of 25°C s(-1), a reading temperature of 300°C and an acquisition time of 10 s. The fading result of TLD-600 and TLD-700 carried by newly developed time temperature profile (TTP) showed a much smaller fading effect than that of current TTP. The result showed that the fading error due to a developed TTP resulted in a ∼5% signal loss, whereas a current TTP caused a ∼15% loss. The authors also carried out a legal performance test on newly developed TTP to confirm its possibility as an official dosemeter. The legal performance tests that applied the developed TTP satisfied the criteria for all the test categories. PMID:25301971

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy, Safety, and Environment. Part 5. Overview and assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Research conducted in 1984 is briefly described. Research areas include: (1) uncertainties in modeling source/receptor relations for acidic deposition; (2) health physics support and assistance to the DOE; (3) technical guidelines for radiological calibrations; (4) personnel neutron dosemeter evaluation and upgrade program; (5) beta measurement evaluation and upgrade; (6) accreditation program for occupational exposure measurements; (7) assurance program for Remedial Action; (8) environmental protection support and assistance; (9) hazardus waste risk assessment; and (10) radiation policy studies. (ACR)

  7. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deme, S.; Apathy, I.; Hejja, I.; Lang, E.; Feher, I.

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET.

  8. Extra dose due to extravehicular activity during the NASA4 mission measured by an on-board TLD system.

    PubMed

    Deme, S; Apathy, I; Hejja, I; Lang, E; Feher, I

    1999-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled on-board TLD system, 'Pille'96', was used during the NASA4 (1997) mission to monitor the cosmic radiation dose inside the Mir Space Station and to measure the extra dose to two astronauts in the course of their extravehicular activity (EVA). For the EVA dose measurements, CaSO4:Dy bulb dosemeters were located in specially designed pockets of the ORLAN spacesuits. During an EVA lasting 6 h, the dose ratio inside and outside Mir was measured. During the EVA, Mir crossed the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) three times. Taking into account the influence of these three crossings the mean EVA/internal dose rate ratio was 3.2. Internal dose mapping using CaSO4:Dy dosemeters gave mean dose rates ranging from 9.3 to 18.3 microGy h-1 at locations where the shielding effect was not the same. Evaluation results of the high temperature region of LiF dosemeters are given to estimate the mean LET. PMID:11542227

  9. Low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies (7 to 17.5 keV) with synchroton radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ipe, N.E.; Bellamy, H.; Flood, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    Unique properties of synchrotron radiation (SR), such as its high intensity, brightness, polarization, and broad spectral distribution (extending from x-ray to infra-red wavelengths) make it an attractive light source for numerous experiments. As SR facilities are rapidly being built all over the world, they introduce the need for low-energy x-ray dosemeters because of the potential radiation exposure to experimenters. However, they also provide a unique opportunity for low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies because of the availability of monochromatic x-ray beams. Results of such studies performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory are described. Lithium fluoride TLDs (TLD-100) of varying thicknesses (0.015 to 0.08 cm) were exposed free in air to monochromatic x-rays (7 to 17.5 keV). These exposures were monitored with ionization chambers. The response (nC/Gy) was found to increase with increasing TLD thickness and with increasing beam energy. A steeper increase in response with increasing energy was observed with the thicker TLDs. The responses at 7 and 17.5 keV were within a factor of 2.3 and 5.2 for the 0.015 and 0.08 cm-thick TLDs, respectively. The effects of narrow (beam size smaller than the dosemeter) and broad (beam size larger than the dosemeter) beams on the response of the TLDs are also reported.

  10. Assessment of effective dose and dose to the lens of the eye for the interventional cardiologist.

    PubMed

    Lie, Øydis Østbye; Paulsen, Gudrun Uthaug; Wøhni, Tor

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between personal dosemeter (PD) reading, effective dose and dose to the lens of the eye for interventional cardiologists in Norway. Doses were recorded with thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD-100) for 14 cardiologists, and the effective doses were estimated using the Niklason algorithm. The procedures performed were coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention, and all the hospitals (eight) in Norway, which are performing these procedures, were included in the study. Effective dose per unit dose-area product varied by a factor of 5, and effective dose relative to PD reading varied between 4 and 39%. Eye lens doses ranged from 39 to 138% of the dosemeter reading. On the basis of an estimated annual workload of 900 procedures, the annual effective doses ranged from 1 to 11 mSv. The estimated annual doses to the unprotected eye ranged from 9 to 210 mSv. According to the ICRP dose limits, the results indicate that the eye could be the limiting organ. PMID:19056809

  11. Chemical dosimetry system for criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Saveta; Ilijas, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI) criticality dosimetry system consists of a chemical dosimetry system for measuring the total (neutron + gamma) dose, and a thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry system for a separate determination of the gamma ray component. The use of the chemical dosemeter solution chlorobenzene-ethanol-trimethylpentane (CET) is based on the radiolytic formation of hydrochloric acid, which protonates a pH indicator, thymolsulphonphthalein. The high molar absorptivity of its red form at 552 nm is responsible for a high sensitivity of the system: doses in the range 0.2-15 Gy can be measured. The dosemeter has been designed as a glass ampoule filled with the CET solution and inserted into a pen-shaped plastic holder. For dose determinations, a newly constructed optoelectronic reader has been used. The RBI team took part in the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002, with the CET dosimetry system. For gamma ray dose determination TLD-700 TL detectors were used. The results obtained with CET dosemeter show very good agreement with the reference values. PMID:15353694

  12. ESR/alanine dosimetry applied to radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, D. C.

    The radiation processing of food products is specified in terms of absorbed dose, and processing quality is assessed on the basis of absorbed dose measurements. The validity of process quality control is highly dependent on the quality of the measurements and associated instrumentation; in this respect, dosimetry calibration by an Organization with official status provides an essential guarantee of validity to the quality control steps taken. The Laboratoire de Métrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants (L.M.R.I.) is the primary standards and evaluation laboratory approved by the Bureau National de Métrologie (B.N.M.), which is the French National Bureau of Standards. The LMRI implements correlation procedures in response to the various requirements which arise in connection with high doses and doserates. Such procedures are mainly based on ESR/alanine spectrometry, a dosimetry technique ideally suited to that purpose. Dosemeter geometry and design are tailored to operating conditions. "Photon" dosemeters consist of a detector material in powder or compacted form, and a wall with thickness and chemical composition consistent with the application. "Electron" dosemeters have a detector core of compacted alanine with thickness down to a few tenths of a millimeter. The ESR/alanine dosimetry technique, developed at LMRI is a flexible, reliable and accurate tool which effectively meets the various requirements arising in the field of reference dosimetry, where high doses and doserates are involved.

  13. Characterisation of OSL and OSLN droplets for dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, L F; D'Agostino, E; Vaniqui, A C S; Saldarriaga, C; Vanhavere, F; De Deene, Y

    2014-10-01

    In spite of considerable progress in neutron dosimetry, there is no dosemeter that is capable of measuring neutron doses independently of the neutron spectrum with good accuracy. Carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) is a sensitive material for ionising radiation (beta-ray, X ray and electron) and has been used for applications in personal and medical dosimetry as an optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosemeter. Al2O3:C has a low sensitivity to neutron radiation; this prevents its application to neutron fields, representing a disadvantage of Al2O3:C-OSL when compared with LiF, which is used as a thermoluminescent detector. Recently an improvement for neutron dosimetry (Passmore and Kirr. Neutron response characterisation of an OSL neutron dosemeter. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 2011; 144: 155-60) uses Al2O3:C coated with (6)Li2CO3 (OSLN),which gives the high-sensitive response as known for Al2O3:C with the advantage of being also sensitive to thermal neutrons. In this article, the authors compare small-size detectors (droplets) of Al2O3:C (OSL) and of Al2O3:C+(6)Li2CO3 (OSLN) and discuss the advantages and drawbacks of both materials, regarding size vs. response. PMID:24381203

  14. Characterisation of neutron fields: challenges in assessing the directional distribution.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Reginatto, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    The SCK·CEN has carried out neutron field characterisation campaigns at several nuclear reactors. The main goal of these measurement campaigns was to evaluate the performance of different neutron personal dosemeters. To be able to evaluate the performance of neutron personal dosemeters in terms of Hp(10), knowledge of the directional distribution is indispensable. This distribution was estimated by placing several personal dosemeters on all six sides of a slab phantom. The interpretation and conversion of this information into a reliable value for Hp(10) requires great care. The data were analysed using three methods. In the first approach, a linear interpolation was performed on three perpendicular axes. In the other two approaches, an icosahedron was used to model the angle of incidence of the neutrons and a linear interpolation or a Bayesian analysis was performed. This study describes the limitations and advantages of each of these methods and provides recommendations for their use to estimate the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) for neutron dosimetry. PMID:24966340

  15. Inhalation and external doses in coastal villages of high background radiation area in Kollam, India.

    PubMed

    Ben Byju, S; Koya, P K M; Sahoo, B K; Jojo, P J; Chougaonkar, M P; Mayya, Y S

    2012-11-01

    The observational evidence for radiation-induced health effects in humans comes largely from the exposures to high doses received over short periods of time. The rate of induction of any health risk at low doses and dose rates is estimated by extrapolation from observations at high doses. Effects of low dose/low dose rate could be done by the study of populations that have been exposed to slightly above-average natural radiation doses. Southwest coastal line of the Kerala state in India is one such region known to have elevated levels of background radioactivity mainly due to the mineral-rich sand available with high abundance of thorium. In the present work, a study was conducted to investigate the inhalation and external radiation doses to human beings in the high background radiation area along the southwest coast of Kerala. Five hundred dwellings were selected for the study. All the selected houses were at least 10 y old with similar construction. Long-term integrated indoor measurements of the external gamma dose using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) and the inhalation dose with the SSNTD-based twin-cup dosemeters were carried out in the dwellings simultaneously. Ambient gamma dose measurements were also made with a GM tube-based survey meter while deploying and retrieving the dosemeters. The data show a high degree of heterogeneity. The inhalation dose was found to vary from 0.1 to 3.53 mSv y(-1) and the external dose rates had a range of 383-11419 µGy y(-1). The external doses measured by the survey meter and TLDs showed an excellent correlation. PMID:22961502

  16. Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, O.; Sanchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodriguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E.

    2012-10-23

    Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia' (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In and {sup 11}C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of 'Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares' (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the {sup R}eglamento General de Seguridad Radiologica{sup ,} Mexico (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the 'International Commission on Radiation Protection' (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

  17. Occupational radiation dose to eyes from endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures in light of the revised eye lens dose limit from the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, A; Malone, L; O’Reilly, G

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a common procedure that combines the use of X-ray fluoroscopy and endoscopy for examination of the bile duct. Published data on ERCP doses are limited, including staff eye dose from ERCP. Occupational eye doses are of particular interest now as the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has recommended a reduction in the dose limit to the lens of the eye. The aim of this study was to measure occupational eye doses obtained from ERCP procedures. Methods: A new eye lens dosemeter (EYE-D™, Radcard, Krakow, Poland) was used to measure the ERCP eye dose, Hp(3), at two endoscopy departments in Ireland. A review of radiation protection practice at the two facilities was also carried out. Results: The mean equivalent dose to the lens of the eye of a gastroenterologist is 0.01 mSv per ERCP procedure with an undercouch X-ray tube and 0.09 mSv per ERCP procedure with an overcouch X-ray tube. Staff eye dose normalised to patient kerma area product is also presented. Conclusion: Staff eye doses in ERCP have the potential to exceed the revised ICRP limit of 20 mSv per annum when an overcouch X-ray tube is used. The EYE-D dosemeter was found to be a convenient method for measuring lens dose. Eye doses in areas outside of radiology departments should be kept under review, particularly in light of the new ICRP eye dose limit. Advances in knowledge: Occupational eye lens doses from ERCP procedures have been established using a new commercially available dedicated Hp(3) dosemeter. PMID:23385992

  18. Ambient Dose Equivalent measured at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología Department of Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila, O.; Torres-Ulloa, C. L.; Medina, L. A.; Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.; de Buen, I. Gamboa; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient dose equivalent values were determined in several sites at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, using TLD-100 and TLD-900 thermoluminescent dosemeters. Additionally, ambient dose equivalent was measured at a corridor outside the hospitalization room for patients treated with 137Cs brachytherapy. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Laboratorio de Metrología, to known 137Cs gamma radiation air kerma. Radionuclides considered for this study are 131I, 18F, 67Ga, 99mTc, 111In, 201Tl and 137Cs, with main gamma energies between 93 and 662 keV. Dosemeters were placed during a five month period in the nuclear medicine rooms (containing gamma-cameras), injection corridor, patient waiting areas, PET/CT study room, hot lab, waste storage room and corridors next to the hospitalization rooms for patients treated with 131I and 137Cs. High dose values were found at the waste storage room, outside corridor of 137Cs brachytherapy patients and PET/CT area. Ambient dose equivalent rate obtained for the 137Cs brachytherapy corridor is equal to (18.51±0.02)×10-3 mSv/h. Sites with minimum doses are the gamma camera rooms, having ambient dose equivalent rates equal to (0.05±0.03)×10-3 mSv/h. Recommendations have been given to the Department authorities so that further actions are taken to reduce doses at high dose sites in order to comply with the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable).

  19. Ambient Dose Equivalent measured at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia Department of Nuclear Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, O.; Torres-Ulloa, C. L.; Medina, L. A.; Trujillo-Zamudio, F. E.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E.

    2010-12-07

    Ambient dose equivalent values were determined in several sites at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Departmento de Medicina Nuclear, using TLD-100 and TLD-900 thermoluminescent dosemeters. Additionally, ambient dose equivalent was measured at a corridor outside the hospitalization room for patients treated with {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Laboratorio de Metrologia, to known {sup 137}Cs gamma radiation air kerma. Radionuclides considered for this study are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 67}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 201}Tl and {sup 137}Cs, with main gamma energies between 93 and 662 keV. Dosemeters were placed during a five month period in the nuclear medicine rooms (containing gamma-cameras), injection corridor, patient waiting areas, PET/CT study room, hot lab, waste storage room and corridors next to the hospitalization rooms for patients treated with {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs. High dose values were found at the waste storage room, outside corridor of {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy patients and PET/CT area. Ambient dose equivalent rate obtained for the {sup 137}Cs brachytherapy corridor is equal to (18.51{+-}0.02)x10{sup -3} mSv/h. Sites with minimum doses are the gamma camera rooms, having ambient dose equivalent rates equal to (0.05{+-}0.03)x10{sup -3} mSv/h. Recommendations have been given to the Department authorities so that further actions are taken to reduce doses at high dose sites in order to comply with the ALARA principle (as low as reasonably achievable).

  20. Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila, O.; Sánchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodríguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E.

    2012-10-01

    Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of "Instituto Nacional de Cancerología" (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are 131I, 18F, 68Ga, 99mTc, 111In and 11C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of "Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares" (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the "Reglamento General de Seguridad Radiológica", México (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the "International Commission on Radiation Protection" (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

  1. Natural gamma radioactivity in the villages of Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Padua, Jeni Chandar; Basil Rose, M R

    2013-01-01

    In situ radiometric survey carried out in 81 revenue villages of Kanyakumari District, Tamil Nadu, India, using a portable radiation dosemeter/detector, revealed the existence of radiation hotspots along the coastal belt. A close observation of the coastal villages specifically revealed high background radioactivity in 14 coastal villages. A very high intrinsic anomalous radioactivity of 41.03 μSv h(-1) was observed, in a famous tourist spot in the coastal belt of Kanyakumari District. This is the highest level of radiation registered in South India, which is extremely higher than the permissible world average and is suggestive of causing severe clinical problems on continuous and prolonged exposure. PMID:23516264

  2. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) response of Al2O3:C, BaFCl:Eu and K2Ca2(SO4)3:Eu phosphors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pratik; Bahl, Shaila; Sahare, P D; Kumar, Surender; Singh, Manveer

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) response of BaFCl:Eu and K2Ca2(SO4)3:Eu phosphors for different doses and bleaching durations. The results have also been compared with the commercially available Landauer Al2O3:C (Luxel®) dosemeter. Nanocrystalline K2Ca2(SO4)3:Eu is known to be a sensitive thermoluminescent phosphor, but its OSL response is hardly reported. At first, pellets of nanocrystalline K2Ca2(SO4)3:Eu powder were prepared by adding Teflon as a binder. Their OSL signal was compared with that of the material in pure form, i.e. without adding the binder (in 100:1 ratio). It was observed that adding the binder does not appreciably affect the OSL intensity. On comparison with the commercially available Al2O3:C from Landauer, it was found that K2Ca2(SO4)3:Eu is around 15 times less sensitive than Al2O3:C. 'Homemade' BaFCl:Eu phosphor has also been studied. The intensity of BaFCl:Eu was ∼20 times more than the standard Al2O3:C dosemeter and ∼200 times more sensitive than K2Ca2(SO4)3:Eu in the dose range of 13-200 cGy. OSL dosemeters are believed to give luminescence signal even if they are read before, i.e. multiple reading may be possible under suitable conditions after single exposure. This was also checked for all the prepared dosemeters and it was found that Al2O3:C showed the least decrease of <2 %, followed by BaFCl:Eu of 15 % and K2Ca2(SO4)3:Eu with 20 %. Finally, Al2O3:C and BaFCl:Eu phosphors were also studied for their optical bleaching durations to which the respective signals get completely removed so that the phosphor can be re-used. It was observed that BaFCl:Eu is bleached faster and more easily than Al2O3:C. PMID:25646524

  3. Dose distribution outside the target volume for 170-MeV proton beam.

    PubMed

    Pachnerová Brabcová, K; Ambrožová, I; Kubančák, J; Puchalska, M; Vondráček, V; Molokanov, A G; Sihver, L; Davídková, M

    2014-10-01

    Dose delivered outside the proton field during radiotherapy can potentially lead to secondary cancer development. Measurements with a 170-MeV proton beam were performed with passive detectors (track etched detectors and thermoluminescence dosemeters) in three different depths along the Bragg curve. The measurement showed an uneven decrease of the dose outside of the beam field with local enhancements. The major contribution to the delivered dose is due to high-energy protons with linear energy transfer (LET) up to 10 keV µm(-1). However, both measurement and preliminary Monte Carlo calculation also confirmed the presence of particles with higher LET. PMID:24759915

  4. A review of exposures to radon, long-lived radionuclides and external gamma at the Czech uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Marušiaková, M; Gregor, Z; Tomášek, L

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents the results of the personal exposure monitoring conducted in the RoŽná uranium mine in the Czech Republic. In this mine, which has been operated since the late 1950s, personal ALGADE dosemeters have been used since 1998. A group of 600 miners employed during the period 2000-09 has been analysed. Annual exposures to radon decay products, long-lived alpha emitters and external gamma radiation are described. These components play an essential role in the estimation of the total effective dose. The dependence of the exposures on the type of mining job is also assessed. PMID:21471123

  5. Dosimetry at an interim storage for spent nuclear fuel.

    PubMed

    Králík, M; Kulich, V; Studeny, J; Pokorny, P

    2007-01-01

    The Czech nuclear power plant Dukovany started its operation in 1985. All fuel spent from 1985 up to the end of 2005 is stored at a dry interim storage, which was designed for 60 CASTOR-440/84 casks. Each of these casks can accommodate 84 fuel assemblies from VVER 440 reactors. Neutron-photon mixed fields around the casks were characterized in terms of ambient dose equivalent measured by standard area dosemeters. Except this, neutron spectra were measured by means of a Bonner sphere spectrometer, and the measured spectra were used to derive the corresponding ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons. PMID:17526479

  6. Assessment of the radiological safety of a Genoray portable dental X-ray unit

    PubMed Central

    Hafezi, L; Manafi, F; Talaeipour, A R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The portable dental radiographic systems are generally used in emergency situations (e.g. during natural disasters) for disabled/aged patients and in patient rooms. This study assesses the output exposure of a portable dental radiographic system measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Methods: Occupational exposure of the operator was determined when the portable dental unit was used for mandibular and maxillary teeth exposure. Results: The doses of some critical organs of an operator were measured using TLDs implanted within the Rando phantom. Conclusions: Considering the annual organ dose limits, the eye lens dose limit is the main factor determining the frequency of system application. PMID:25343709

  7. An analysis of the radiation field characteristics for extremity dose assessment during maintenance periods at nuclear power plants in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young

    2012-12-01

    Workers who maintain the water chambers of steam generators during maintenance periods in nuclear power plants (NPPs) have a higher likelihood of high radiation exposure, even if they are exposed for a short period of time. In particular, it is expected that the hands of workers would receive the highest radiation exposure as a consequence of hand contact with radioactive materials. In this study, a characteristic analysis of inhomogeneous radiation fields for contact operations was conducted using thermoluminescent dosemeters for the whole body and extremities during maintenance periods at Korean NPPs. It was observed that inhomogeneous radiation fields for contact operations at NPPs were dominated by high-energy photons. PMID:22628525

  8. A new fully integrated X-ray irradiator system for dosimetric research.

    PubMed

    Richter, D; Mittelstraß, D; Kreutzer, S; Pintaske, R; Dornich, K; Fuchs, M

    2016-06-01

    A fully housed X-ray irradiator was developed for use within lexsyg or Magnettech desktop equipment. The importance of hardening of the low energy photon radiation is discussed, its performance and feasibility is empirically shown and sustained by basic numerical simulations. Results of the latter for various materials are given for different X-ray source settings in order to provide estimates on the required setup for the irradiation of different geometries and materials. A Si-photodiode provides real-time monitoring of the X-ray-irradiator designed for use in dosimetric dating and other dosimetric application where irradiation of small samples or dosemeters is required. PMID:27041090

  9. Neutron microdosimetric response of a gas electron multiplier.

    PubMed

    Dubeau, J; Waker, A J

    2008-01-01

    A new high-sensitivity tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) on the basis of the gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector used in high-energy physics experiments has been designed, constructed and tested in a variety of neutron fields. The GEM-TEPC makes use of a lithographically produced strip readout system to achieve the equivalent of a large number of miniature TEPC detector elements. This new device could be used as the basis of an electronic personal dosemeter for gamma and neutron mixed radiation fields. PMID:17951607

  10. Neutron field characterisation at mixed oxide fuel plant.

    PubMed

    Passmore, C; Million, M; Kirr, M; Bartz, J; Akselrod, M S; Devita, A; Berard, J

    2012-06-01

    A neutron field characterisation was conducted at the AREVA Melox Plant to determine the response of passive and active neutron dosemeters for several stages in the mixed oxide fuel manufacturing process. Landauer Europe provides radiation dosimetry to many contractors working at the Melox site. The studies were conducted to assist in determining the neutron radiation fields the workers are exposed to routinely, evaluate the need for specific neutron correction factors and to ensure that the most accurate neutron dose is reported for the Melox Plant workers. PMID:22028415

  11. Measurement by room-temperature phosphorescence of polynuclear aromatics containing hydrocarbon fuels that permeate glove materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; White, D.A.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1986-01-01

    Permeations of commonly used glove materials by polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds in hydrocarbon fuels were measured with solid-state dosemeters composed of filter paper. The permeated PNA were sorbed by the filter paper and analyzed in situ using room-temperature phosphorescence spectroscopy. This technique provided a simple, cost-effective, and very sensitive means for measuring breakthrough times and permeation rates of the class of potentially carcinogenic PNA in liquid fuels derived from crude petroleum, oil shale, and coal. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium borate glass subjected to Co-60 gamma ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, R. S.; Wagiran, H.; Saeed, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetric properties of dysprosium doped calcium magnesium borate (CMB:Dy) glass are presented. This study is deemed to understand the application of calcium as the modifier in magnesium borate glass with the presence of dysprosium as the activator to be performed as TL dosimeter (TLD). The study provides fundamental knowledge of a glass system that may lead to perform new TL glass dosimetry application in future research. Calcium magnesium borate glass systems of (70-y) B2O3 - 20 CaO - 10 MgO-(y) Dy2O3 with 0.05 mol % ≤ y ≤ 0.7 mol % of dyprosium were prepared by melt-quenching technique. The amorphous structure and TL properties of the prepared samples were determined using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TL reader; model Harshaw 4500 respectively. The samples were irradiated to Co-60 gamma source at a dose of 50 Gy. Dosimetric properties such as annealing procedure, time temperature profile (TTP) setting, optimization of Dy2O3 concentration of 0.5 mol % were determined for thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) reader used.

  13. Thermoluminescence characteristics of flat optical fiber in radiation dosimetry under different electron irradiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawiah, A.; Intan, A. M.; Bauk, S.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Yusoff, Z.; Mokhtar, M. R.; Wan Abdullah, W. S.; Mat Sharif, K. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mahamd Adikan, F. R.; Tamchek, N.; Noor, N. M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2013-05-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) flat optical fibers (FF) have been proposed as radiation sensor in medical dosimetry for both diagnostic and radiotherapy applications. A flat optical fiber with nominal dimensions of (3.226 × 3.417 × 0.980) mm3 contains pure silica SiO2 was selected for this research. The FF was annealed at 400°C for 1 h before irradiated. Kinetic parameters and dosimetric glow curve of TL response were studied in FF with respect to electron irradiation of 6 MeV, 15 MeV and 21 MeV using linear accelerator (LINAC) in the dose range of 2.0-10.0 Gy. The TL response was read using a TLD reader Harshaw Model 3500. The Time-Temperature-Profile (TTP) of the reader used includes; initial preheat temperature of 80°C, maximum readout temperature is 400°C and the heating rate of 30°Cs-1. The proposed FF shows excellent linear radiation response behavior within the clinical relevant dose range for all of these energies, good reproducibility, independence of radiation energy, independence of dose rate and exhibits a very low thermal fading. From these results, the proposed FF can be used as radiation dosimeter and favorably compares with the widely used of LiF:MgTi dosimeter in medical radiotherapy application.

  14. The Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Flat Fibers to Gamma Radiation.

    PubMed

    Nawi, Siti Nurasiah Binti Mat; Wahib, Nor Fadira Binti; Zulkepely, Nurul Najua Binti; Amin, Yusoff Bin Mohd; Min, Ung Ngie; Bradley, David Andrew; Nor, Roslan Bin Md; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Study has been undertaken of the thermoluminescence (TL) yield of various tailor-made flat cross-section 6 mol% Ge-doped silica fibers, differing only in respect of external dimensions. Key TL dosimetric characteristics have been investigated, including glow curves, dose response, sensitivity, fading and reproducibility. Using a (60)Co source, the samples were irradiated to doses within the range 1 to 10 Gy. Prior to irradiation, the flat fibers were sectioned into 6 mm lengths, weighed, and annealed at 400 °C for 1 h. TL readout was by means of a Harshaw Model 3500 TLD reader, with TLD-100 chips (LiF:Mg, Ti) used as a reference dosimeter to allow the relative response of the fibers to be evaluated. The fibers have been found to provide highly linear dose response and excellent reproducibility over the range of doses investigated, demonstrating high potential as TL-mode detectors in radiation medicine applications. Mass for mass, the results show the greatest TL yield to be provided by fibers of the smallest cross-section, analysis indicating this to be due to minimal light loss in transport of the TL through the bulk of the silica medium. PMID:26307987

  15. A TLD dose algorithm using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Moscovitch, M.; Rotunda, J.E.; Tawil, R.A.; Rathbone, B.A.

    1995-12-31

    An artificial neural network was designed and used to develop a dose algorithm for a multi-element thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD). The neural network architecture is based on the concept of functional links network (FLN). Neural network is an information processing method inspired by the biological nervous system. A dose algorithm based on neural networks is fundamentally different as compared to conventional algorithms, as it has the capability to learn from its own experience. The neural network algorithm is shown the expected dose values (output) associated with given responses of a multi-element dosimeter (input) many times. The algorithm, being trained that way, eventually is capable to produce its own unique solution to similar (but not exactly the same) dose calculation problems. For personal dosimetry, the output consists of the desired dose components: deep dose, shallow dose and eye dose. The input consists of the TL data obtained from the readout of a multi-element dosimeter. The neural network approach was applied to the Harshaw Type 8825 TLD, and was shown to significantly improve the performance of this dosimeter, well within the U.S. accreditation requirements for personnel dosimeters.

  16. An example of abnormal glow curves identification in personnel thermoluminescent dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Osorio Piniella, V; Stadtmann, H; Lankmayr, E

    2002-01-01

    The personal Dosimetry Service Seibersdorf analyses monthly a large number of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The dosimeters consist of LiF chips, and the readout is carried out with an automated Harshaw 8800 reader system. In some cases, the luminescent glow curves of the routine analysis do not have the expected form as a result of external chemical contamination, hardware problems, poor heat transfer, etc. It is therefore necessary to investigate the reasons for the irregularity of these curves. An algorithm for the investigation of the routine curves was developed. It is based on the fact that the shape of an abnormal glow curve differs from the shape of a normal one. An interesting type of abnormal glow curves in the routine service was found. Some dosimeters of a certain client, a steel industry, exhibit glow curves with an atypical shape and very high signals. In those dosimeters, a possible chemical contamination in the form of a powder was discovered, which interferes with the dosimetric signal. A quantitative analysis of that powder was made by means of inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) after microwave dissolution. Elements like aluminium, barium, calcium and others were found. Such elements are used in different combinations as thermoluminescent materials. PMID:12406593

  17. The development, characterization, and performance evaluation of a new combination type personnel neutron dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Sims, C.S.; Poston, J.W.; Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1989-10-01

    A new combination type personnel neutron dosimeter has been designed and developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The combination personnel neutron dosimeter (CPND) consists of a Harshaw albedo neutron thermoluminescent dosimeter (two pairs of TLD-600/TLD- 700) and two bubble detectors (one BD-100R and one BDS-1500 from Bubble Technology Industries, Canada). The CPND was developed with the aim of having crude neutron spectrometric capability, universal applicability, better angular response, and an improved lower limit of detection (LLD). The CPND has been well characterized in the following areas: reusability, linearity, lower limit of detection (LLD), detection capability in mixed neutron-gamma fields, angular dependence, and neutron energy dependence. the characterization was accomplished with irradiations using a {sup 238}Pu-Be source, a {sup 252}Cf(D{sub 2}O) source, a {sup 252}Cf source, a {sup 252}Cf(PE) source, monoenergetic neutrons from accelerator and reactor filtered beams, {sup 137}Cs, and X-rays. Optimum signal readout procedures, signal processing techniques, routine operational usage, and neutron dose equivalent evaluation algorithms for the CPND were developed with the goals of having the best precision and accuracy as well as being convenient to use. 97 refs., 43 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Dosimetry verification on VMAT and IMRT radiotherapy techniques: In the case of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, A.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatment depends on the accuracy of the dose delivery to patients, the purpose of the study is to verify the dose in IMRT and VMAT technique in prostate cancer cases correspond to TPS dose using phantom base on ICRU No.50. The dose verification of the target and OAR was performed by placing the TLD Rod LiF100 and EBT2 Gafchromic film at slab hole of pelvic part of the Alderson RANDO phantom for prostate cancer simulation. The Exposed TLDs was evaluated using the TLD Reader Harshaw while EBT2 film was scanned using Epson scanner. The point dose measurements were compared between planned dose and measured dose at target volume and OAR. The result is the dose difference at target volume, bladder and rectum for IMRT and VMAT are less than 5%. On the other hand, the dose difference at the Femoral head is more than 5% for both techniques because the location of OAR already in low gradient dose. Furthermore, the difference dose of the target volume for IMRT technique tends to be smaller than VMAT either for TLD and EBT2 film detectors. From the measurement showed that the delivered dose on the phantom simulation match with ICRU No.50 criteria.

  19. Response of thermoluminescent dosimeters to photons simulated with the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moralles, M.; Guimarães, C. C.; Okuno, E.

    2005-06-01

    Personal monitors composed of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) made of natural fluorite (CaF 2:NaCl) and lithium fluoride (Harshaw TLD-100) were exposed to gamma and X rays of different qualities. The GEANT4 radiation transport Monte Carlo toolkit was employed to calculate the energy depth deposition profile in the TLDs. X-ray spectra of the ISO/4037-1 narrow-spectrum series, with peak voltage (kVp) values in the range 20-300 kV, were obtained by simulating a X-ray Philips MG-450 tube associated with the recommended filters. A realistic photon distribution of a 60Co radiotherapy source was taken from results of Monte Carlo simulations found in the literature. Comparison between simulated and experimental results revealed that the attenuation of emitted light in the readout process of the fluorite dosimeter must be taken into account, while this effect is negligible for lithium fluoride. Differences between results obtained by heating the dosimeter from the irradiated side and from the opposite side allowed the determination of the light attenuation coefficient for CaF 2:NaCl (mass proportion 60:40) as 2.2 mm -1.

  20. Final Harvest of Above-Ground Biomass and Allometric Analysis of the Aspen FACE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-04-15

    The Aspen FACE experiment, located at the US Forest Service Harshaw Research Facility in Oneida County, Wisconsin, exposes the intact canopies of model trembling aspen forests to increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and O3. The first full year of treatments was 1998 and final year of elevated CO2 and O3 treatments is scheduled for 2009. This proposal is to conduct an intensive, analytical harvest of the above-ground parts of 24 trees from each of the 12, 30 m diameter treatment plots (total of 288 trees) during June, July & August 2009. This above-ground harvest will be carefully coordinated with the below-ground harvest proposed by D.F. Karnosky et al. (2008 proposal to DOE). We propose to dissect harvested trees according to annual height growth increment and organ (main stem, branch orders, and leaves) for calculation of above-ground biomass production and allometric comparisons among aspen clones, species, and treatments. Additionally, we will collect fine root samples for DNA fingerprinting to quantify biomass production of individual aspen clones. This work will produce a thorough characterization of above-ground tree and stand growth and allocation above ground, and, in conjunction with the below ground harvest, total tree and stand biomass production, allocation, and allometry.

  1. The Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Flat Fibers to Gamma Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mat Nawi, Siti Nurasiah Binti; Wahib, Nor Fadira Binti; Zulkepely, Nurul Najua Binti; Amin, Yusoff Bin Mohd; Min, Ung Ngie; Bradley, David Andrew; Md Nor, Roslan Bin; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Study has been undertaken of the thermoluminescence (TL) yield of various tailor-made flat cross-section 6 mol% Ge-doped silica fibers, differing only in respect of external dimensions. Key TL dosimetric characteristics have been investigated, including glow curves, dose response, sensitivity, fading and reproducibility. Using a 60Co source, the samples were irradiated to doses within the range 1 to 10 Gy. Prior to irradiation, the flat fibers were sectioned into 6 mm lengths, weighed, and annealed at 400 °C for 1 h. TL readout was by means of a Harshaw Model 3500 TLD reader, with TLD-100 chips (LiF:Mg, Ti) used as a reference dosimeter to allow the relative response of the fibers to be evaluated. The fibers have been found to provide highly linear dose response and excellent reproducibility over the range of doses investigated, demonstrating high potential as TL-mode detectors in radiation medicine applications. Mass for mass, the results show the greatest TL yield to be provided by fibers of the smallest cross-section, analysis indicating this to be due to minimal light loss in transport of the TL through the bulk of the silica medium. PMID:26307987

  2. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of rare earth-doped NaMgBO3 phosphor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z S; Ingale, N B; Omanwar, S K

    2016-05-01

    Rare earth (Dy(3+) and Sm(3+))-doped sodium magnesium borate (NaMgBO3) is synthesized by solution combustion synthesis method keeping their thermoluminescence properties in mind. The reaction produced very stable crystalline NaMgBO3:RE (RE = Dy(3+), Sm(3+)) phosphors. The phosphors are exposed to (60)Co gamma-ray radiations dose of varying rate from 5 to 25 Gy, and their TL characteristics with kinetic parameters are studied. NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) phosphor shows two peaks for lower doping concentration of Dy(3+) while it reduced to single peak for the higher concentrations of activator Dy(3+). NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) shows the major glow peak around 200 °C while NaMgBO3:Sm(3+) phosphors show two well-separated glow peaks at 200 and 332 °C respectively. The thermoluminescence intensity of these phosphors was compare with the commercially available TLD-100 (Harshaw) phosphor. The TL responses for gamma-ray radiations dose were found to be linear from 5 to 25 Gy for both phosphors while the fading in each case is calculated for the tenure of 45 days. PMID:26178829

  3. Dosimetric properties of the newly developed KLT-300 (LiF:Mg,Cu,Na,Si) TL detector.

    PubMed

    Lee, J I; Kim, J L; Chang, S Y; Chung, K S; Choe, H S

    2004-01-01

    The dosimetric properties of the newly developed KLT-300 (KAERI LiF:Mg,Cu,Na,Si TL detector) in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) were investigated. The sensitivity of the TL detector was about 30 times higher than that of the TLD-100 by light integration. In the study of the dose linearity of the detector, the dose response was very linear up to 10 Gy and a sublinear response was observed at higher doses. The energy response of the detector was studied for photon energies from 20 to 662 keV. The results show that a maximum response of 1.004 at 53 keV and a minimum response of 0.825 at 20 keV were observed. The reproducibility study for the TL detector was also carried out. The coefficients of variation for each detector separately did not exceed 0.016, and for all the 10 detectors collectively it was 0.0054. IEC Standard requires that the coefficient of variation shall not exceed 0.075. So, the reproducibility of this new TL detector sufficiently satisfied the IEC requirements. A detection threshold of the detector was investigated and found to be 70 nGy by Harshaw 4500 TLD Reader. PMID:15856584

  4. Pore structure characterization of catalyst supports via low field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Glaves, C.L.; Gallegos, D.P. )

    1988-09-01

    The pore structures of two types of catalyst support material were studied: {gamma}-alumina and silica aerogel. The alumina samples were commercial catalyst supports made in 1/8 inch diameter pellet form by Harshaw Chemical. Aerogels were prepared by forming a gel in a two-step, base-catalyzed process using TEOS, followed by supercritical drying to form the aerogel. Two different aerogels were made, one undergoing the drying process immediately after gel formation (non-aged), and the other being aged in the gel state for two weeks in a basic solution of 0.1 molar NH{sub 4}OH at 323 K before being supercritically dried (aged). The aging process is believed to alter the aerogel pore structure. The pore size distribution of the alumina material was determined via NMR and compared to results obtained by mercury intrusion and nitrogen adsorption/condensation techniques. The pore size distributions of the two aerogel samples were measured via NMR and nitrogen adsorption/condensation; the material was too compressible for porosimetry.

  5. In vivo evaluating skin doses for lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Pan, Lung-Kang; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Liu, Wen-Shan; Hsu, Chang-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study is the first to use 10- to 90-kg tissue-equivalent phantoms as patient surrogates to measure peripheral skin doses (Dskin) in lung cancer treatment through Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of the Axesse linac. Five tissue-equivalent and Rando phantoms were used to simulate lung cancer patients using the thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD-100H) approach. TLD-100H was calibrated using 6 MV photons coming from the Axesse linac. Then it was inserted into phantom positions that closely corresponded with the position of the represented organs and tissues. TLDs were measured using the Harshaw 3500 TLD reader. The ICRP 60 evaluated the mean Dskin to the lung cancer for 1 fraction (7 Gy) undergoing VMAT. The Dskin of these phantoms ranged from 0.51±0.08 (10-kg) to 0.22±0.03 (90-kg) mSv/Gy. Each experiment examined the relationship between the Dskin and the distance from the treatment field. These revealed strong variations in positions close to the tumor center. The correlation between Dskin and body weight was Dskin (mSv) = -0.0034x + 0.5296, where x was phantom's weight in kg. R2 is equal to 0.9788. This equation can be used to derive an equation for lung cancer in males. Finally, the results are compared to other published research. These findings are pertinent to patients, physicians, radiologists, and the public. PMID:26405934

  6. Interim status report of the TMI personnel-dosimetry project

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, B.L.; Alvarez, J.L.; Adams, S.R.

    1981-06-01

    The current 2-chip TLD personnel dosimeter in use at Three Mile Island (TMI) has been shown inadequate for the anticipated high beta/gamma fields during TMI recovery operations in some areas. This project surveyed the available dosimeter systems, set up an Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) prototype system, and compared this system with those commercial systems that could be made immediately available for comparison. Of the systems tested, the new INEL personnel dosimeter was found to produce the most accurate results for use in recovery operations at TMI-2. The other multiple-chip or multiple-filter systems were found less desirable at present. The most prominent deficiencies in the INEL dosimeter stem from the fact that it lacks a completely automated reader and its x-ray and thermal neutron responses require additional development. A automated prototype reader system may be in operation by the end of CY-1981. Three alternatives for operational dosimetry are discussed. A combination of a modified version of the presently used Harshaw 2-chip dosimeter and the INEL dosimeter is recommended.

  7. Investigation of neutron converters for production of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) neutron dosimeters using Al 2O 3:C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittani, J. C. R.; da Silva, A. A. R.; Vanhavere, F.; Akselrod, M. S.; Yukihara, E. G.

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) properties of neutron dosimeters in powder and in the form of pellets prepared with a mixture of Al 2O 3:C and neutron converters. The neutron converters investigated were high density polyethylene (HDPE), lithium fluoride (LiF), lithium fluoride 95% enriched with 6Li ( 6LiF), lithium carbonate 95% enriched with 6Li ( 6Li 2CO 3), boric acid enriched with 99% of 10B (H310BO) and gadolinium oxide (Gd 2O 3). The proportion of Al 2O 3:C and neutron converter in the mixture was varied to optimize the total OSL signal and neutron sensitivity. The neutron sensitivity and dose-response were determined for the OSL dosimeters using a bare 252Cf source and compared to the response of Harshaw TLD-600 and TLD-700 dosimeters ( 6LiF:Mg,Ti and 7LiF:Mg,Ti). The results demonstrate the possibility of developing an OSL dosimeter made of Al 2O 3:C powder and neutron converter with a neutron sensitivity (defined as the ratio between the 60Co equivalent gamma dose and the reference neutron absorbed dose) and neutron-gamma discrimination comparable to the TLD-600/TLD-700 combination. It was shown that the shape of the OSL decay curves varied with the type of the neutron converter, demonstrating the influence of the energy deposition mechanism and ionization density on the OSL process in Al 2O 3:C.

  8. Position-sensitive detectors of the detector group at Jülich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, R.; Clemens, U.; Kemmerling, G.; Nöldgen, H.; Schelten, J.

    2009-06-01

    The detector group of the Central Institute of Electronics at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH was founded in 1968. First developments aimed at a detector system with a position-sensitive BF 3 proportional counter for small-angle neutron scattering, which was later used at a beamline of the research reactor FRJ2. At the end of the 1970s first measurements were carried out with photomultiplier (PM)-based detector systems linked with a LiI crystal from Harshaw. Based on this experience we started with the spectrum of position-sensitive neutron scintillation detectors, which have been developed and designed in our institute during the last three decades comprising several high-resolution linear and two-dimensional detectors. The general design of those detectors is based on a modified Anger principle using an array of PMs and a 1 mm 6Li glass scintillator. The sensitive detector area varies on the type of the PMs used and is related to the spatial resolution of the detector type. The neutron sensitivity at 1 Å is about 65% and the remaining gamma sensitivity is less than 10 -4 with a maximum count rate up to 500 kHz depending on the used detector system.

  9. Characterization of neutron reference fields at US Department of Energy calibration fields.

    PubMed

    Olsher, R H; McLean, T D; Mallett, M W; Seagraves, D T; Gadd, M S; Markham, Robin L; Murphy, R O; Devine, R T

    2007-01-01

    The Health Physics Measurements Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has initiated a study of neutron reference fields at selected US Department of Energy (DOE) calibration facilities. To date, field characterisation has been completed at five facilities. These fields are traceable to the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) through either a primary calibration of the source emission rate or through the use of a secondary standard. However, neutron spectral variation is caused by factors such as room return, scatter from positioning tables and fixtures, source anisotropy and spectral degradation due to source rabbits and guide tubes. Perturbations from the ideal isotropic point source field may impact the accuracy of instrument calibrations. In particular, the thermal neutron component of the spectrum, while contributing only a small fraction of the conventionally true dose, can contribute a significant fraction of a dosemeter's response with the result that the calibration becomes facility-specific. A protocol has been developed to characterise neutron fields that relies primarily on spectral measurements with the Bubble Technology Industries (BTI) rotating neutron spectrometer (ROSPEC) and the LANL Bonner sphere spectrometer. The ROSPEC measurements were supplemented at several sites by the BTI Simple Scintillation Spectrometer probe, which is designed to extend the ROSPEC upper energy range from 5 to 15 MeV. In addition, measurements were performed with several rem meters and neutron dosemeters. Detailed simulations were performed using the LANL MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the magnitude of source anisotropy and scatter factors. PMID:17496290

  10. Development of a technique for improving coefficient of variation of CaSO4:Dy teflon-based TLD personnel monitoring system in low-dose region.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S M; Sneha, C; Sahai, M K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2015-12-01

    In view of the importance of zero-dose background (null signal) in influencing the coefficient of variation in low-dose region, a technique for the estimation of the same from composite (gross) signal is developed for CaSO4:Dy-based personnel monitoring system being used in India. The technique is based on simple analysis of glow curves (GCs) of unexposed and exposed dosemeters, evolution of trend/model for the zero-dose curves, generation of simulation protocol for individual zero-dose curves, establishment of characteristics of GCs of exposed dosemeters and finally preparation of an algorithm to segregate the components from composite signal. The technique offers the separation of real-time background and gives superior results over other method of approximation of the background. The results also prove efficiency of the empirical trending and simulation protocol of background GCs. The proposed technique can be implemented in routine monitoring without any extra man hours and reader time. PMID:25527179

  11. Space radiation measurements on-board ISS--the DOSMAP experiment.

    PubMed

    Reitz, G; Beaujean, R; Benton, E; Burmeister, S; Dachev, Ts; Deme, S; Luszik-Bhadra, M; Olko, P

    2005-01-01

    The experiment 'Dosimetric Mapping' conducted as part of the science program of NASA's Human Research Facility (HRF) between March and August 2001 was designed to measure integrated total absorbed doses (ionising radiation and neutrons), heavy ion fluxes and its energy, mass and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra, time-dependent count rates of charged particles and their corresponding dose rates at different locations inside the US Lab at the International Space Station. Owing to the variety of particles and energies, a dosimetry package consisting of thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) chips and nuclear track detectors with and without converters (NTDPs), a silicon dosimetry telescope (DOSTEL), four mobile silicon detector units (MDUs) and a TLD reader unit (PILLE) with 12 TLD bulbs as dosemeters was used. Dose rates of the ionising part of the radiation field measured with TLD bulbs applying the PILLE readout system at different locations varied between 153 and 231 microGy d(-1). The dose rate received by the active devices fits excellent to the TLD measurements and is significantly lower compared with measurements for the Shuttle (STS) to MIR missions. The comparison of the absorbed doses from passive and active devices showed an agreement within +/- 10%. The DOSTEL measurements in the HRF location yielded a mean dose equivalent rate of 535 microSv d(-1). DOSTEL measurements were also obtained during the Solar Particle Event on 15 April 2001. PMID:16604663

  12. Personal dosimetry for interventional operators: when and how should monitoring be done?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C J

    2011-01-01

    Objective Assessment of the potential doses to the hands and eyes for interventional radiologists and cardiologists can be difficult. A review of studies of doses to interventional operators reported in the literature has been undertaken. Methods Distributions for staff dose to relevant parts of the body per unit dose–area product and for doses per procedure in cardiology have been analysed and mean, median and quartile values derived. The possibility of using these data to provide guidance for estimation of likely dose levels is considered. Results Dose indicator values that could be used to predict orders of magnitude of doses to the eye, thyroid and hands from interventional operator workloads have been derived, based on the third quartile values, from the distributions of dose results analysed. Conclusion Dose estimates made in this way could be employed in risk assessments when reviewing protection and monitoring requirements. Data on the protection provided by different shielding and technique factors have also been reviewed to provide information for risk assessments. Recommendations on the positions in which dosemeters are worn should also be included in risk assessments, as dose measurements from suboptimal dosemeter use can be misleading. PMID:21159809

  13. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, J.E.; Piper, R.K.; Leonowich, J.A.; Faust, L.G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well-chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2-in. (1.27-cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D{sub 2}O-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresana, M.; Denker, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Golnik, N.; Hohmann, E.; Leuschner, A.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Manessi, G.; Mayer, S.; Ott, K.; Röhrich, J.; Silari, M.; Trompier, F.; Volnhals, M.; Wielunski, M.

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instruments were placed in a reference position and irradiated with neutrons delivered in bursts of different intensity. The analysis of the instrument response as a function of the burst charge (the total electric charge of the protons in the burst shot onto the tungsten target) permitted to assess for each device the dose underestimation due to the time structure of the radiation field. The personal neutron dosemeters were exposed on a standard PMMA slab phantom and the response linearity was evaluated.

  15. Development of age-specific Japanese head phantoms for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Fujii, K; Akahane, K; Yamauchi, M; Narai, K; Aoyama, T; Katsu, T; Obara, S; Imai, K; Ikeda, M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the authors developed age-specific physical head phantoms simulating the physique of Japanese children for dose evaluation in paediatric head computed tomography (CT) examinations. Anatomical structures at 99 places in 0-, 0.5-, 1- and 3-y-old Japanese patients were measured using DICOM viewer software from CT images, and the head phantom of each age was designed. For trial manufacture, a 3-y-old head phantom consisting of acrylic resin and gypsum was produced by machine processing. Radiation doses for the head phantom were measured with radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters and Si-pin photodiode dosemeters. To investigate whether the phantom shape was suitable for dose evaluation, organ doses in the same scan protocol were compared between the 3-y-old head and commercially available anthropomorphic phantoms having approximately the same head size. The doses of organs in both phantoms were equivalent. The authors' designed paediatric head phantom will be useful for dose evaluation in paediatric head CT examinations. PMID:24821932

  16. OCCUPATIONAL DOSE ASSESSMENT IN INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY IN SERBIA.

    PubMed

    Kaljevic, J; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Stankovic, J; Arandjic, D; Bozovic, P; Antic, V

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the occupational dose in interventional cardiology in a large hospital in Belgrade, Serbia. A double-dosimetry method was applied for the estimation of whole-body dose, using thermoluminescent dosemeters, calibrated in terms of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10). Besides the double-dosimetry method, eye dose was also estimated by means of measuring ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), and doses per procedure were reported. Doses were assessed for 13 physicians, 6 nurses and 10 radiographers, for 2 consequent years. The maximum annual effective dose assessed was 4.3, 2.1 and 1.3 mSv for physicians, nurses and radiographers, respectively. The maximum doses recorded by the dosemeter worn at the collar level (over the apron) were 16.8, 11.9 and 4.5 mSv, respectively. This value was used for the eye lens dose assessment. Estimated doses are in accordance with or higher than annual dose limits for the occupational exposure. PMID:26464526

  17. External radiation exposure of personnel in nuclear medicine from 18F, 99mTC and 131I with special reference to fingers, eyes and thyroid.

    PubMed

    Leide-Svegborn, S

    2012-04-01

    The radiation exposure of fingers, thyroid and eyes of workers handling radiopharmaceuticals during various nuclear medicine procedures was measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters. Dosemeters were placed on the finger tips of 19 workers on several different occasions for various procedures. Additionally, the routinely determined whole-body doses to various groups of workers were analysed. The finger dose measurements demonstrated clear differences between the various tasks, from 0.0012 µGy MBq(-1) (unpacking and installing (99)Mo/(99m)Tc-generator) to 3.0 µGy MBq(-1) (syringe withdrawal, injection and waste handling of (18)F-FDG). As long as the worker was handling (99m)Tc, the dose to the fingers was well below the ICRP dose limits, even when the activity was high. Special concern should, however, be devoted to the handling of (18)F, since the dose to the fingers could easily reach the dose limits. The estimated dose to eyes and thyroid was well below the dose limits. Since the introduction of the positron emission tomography/computed tomography facility, the annual whole-body dose has increased for those directly involved in the handling of (18)F. The annual whole-body dose of 0.2-2.5 mGy was, however, well below the dose limits. PMID:21571739

  18. Doses to operators during interventional radiology procedures: focus on eye lens and extremity dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Koukorava, C; Carinou, E; Simantirakis, G; Vrachliotis, T G; Archontakis, E; Tierris, C; Dimitriou, P

    2011-03-01

    The present study is focused on the personnel doses during several types of interventional radiology procedures. Apart from the use of the official whole body dosemeters (thermoluminescence dosemeter type), measurements were performed to the extremities and the eyes using thermoluminescent loose pellets. The mean doses per kerma area product were calculated for the monitored anatomic regions and for the most frequent types of procedures. Higher dose values were measured during therapeutic procedures, especially embolisations. The maximum recorded doses during a single procedure were 1.8 mSv to the finger (nephrostomy), 2.1 mSv to the wrist (liver chemoembolisation), 0.6 mSv to the leg (brain embolisation) and 2.4 mSv to the eye (brain embolisation). The annual doses estimated for the operator with the highest workload according to the measurements and the system's log book were 90.4 mSv to the finger, 107.9 mSv to the wrist, 21.6 mSv to the leg and 49.3 mSv to the eye. Finally, the effect of the beam angulation (i.e. projection) and shielding equipment on the personnel doses was evaluated. The measurements were performed within the framework of the ORAMED (Optimization of RAdiation Protection for MEDical staff) project. PMID:21044993

  19. Monte Carlo-derived TLD cross-calibration factors for treatment verification and measurement of skin dose in accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2009-03-21

    Monte Carlo simulation was employed to calculate the response of TLD-100 chips under irradiation conditions such as those found during accelerated partial breast irradiation with the MammoSite radiation therapy system. The absorbed dose versus radius in the last 0.5 cm of the treated volume was also calculated, employing a resolution of 20 microm, and a function that fits the observed data was determined. Several clinically relevant irradiation conditions were simulated for different combinations of balloon size, balloon-to-surface distance and contents of the contrast solution used to fill the balloon. The thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) cross-calibration factors were derived assuming that the calibration of the dosemeters was carried out using a Cobalt 60 beam, and in such a way that they provide a set of parameters that reproduce the function that describes the behavior of the absorbed dose versus radius curve. Such factors may also prove to be useful for those standardized laboratories that provide postal dosimetry services. PMID:19229101

  20. Neutron measurements in the Vandellòs II nuclear power plant with a Bonner sphere system.

    PubMed

    Fernández, F; Bakali, M; Tomás, M; Muller, H; Pochat, J L

    2004-01-01

    In some Spanish nuclear power plants of pressurised water reactor (PWR) type, albedo thermoluminescence dosemeters are used for personal dosimetry while survey meters, based on a thermal-neutron detector inside a cylindrical or spherical moderator, are used for dose rate assessment in routine monitoring. The response of both systems is highly dependent on the energy of the existing neutron fields. They are usually calibrated by means of ISO neutron sources with energy distributions quite different from those encountered at these installations. Spectrometric measurements with a Bonner sphere system (BSS) allow us to determine the reference dosimetric values. The UAB group, under request from the National Coordinated Research Action, was in charge of characterising the neutron fields and evaluating the response of personal dosemeters at several measurement points inside the containment building of the Catalan Nuclear Power Plant Vandellòs II. The neutron fields were characterised at five places using the UAB-BSS and a home made unfolding code called MITOM. The results obtained confirm the presence of low-energy components in the neutron field in most of the selected points. Moreover, we have found no influence of the nuclear fuel burning on the shape of the spectrum. PMID:15353701

  1. The new EC technical recommendations for monitoring individuals occupationally exposed to external radiation.

    PubMed

    Alves, J G; Ambrosi, P; Bartlett, D T; Currivan, L; van Dijk, J W E; Fantuzzi, E; Kamenopoulou, V

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the European Commission technical recommendations (TR) for monitoring individuals occupationally exposed to external radiation is to provide guidance on those aspects of the implementation of the European Union Parliament and Council Directives directly related to individual monitoring of external radiation, and to encourage harmonisation thereof. They are mainly aimed at the management and staff of IM services but also at manufacturers, laboratories supplying type-testing services, national authorities trying to harmonise approval procedures, and government bodies to harmonise regulations and guidance. The TR main topics are: objectives and aims of IM for external radiation; dosimetry concepts; accuracy requirements; calibration, type testing and performance testing; approval procedures; quality assurance and quality control; and dose record keeping. Attention is paid to particular aspects, such as wide energy ranges for the use of personal dosemeters, pulsed fields and non-charged particle equilibrium; and use of active personal dosemeters. The TR give proposals towards achieving harmonisation in IM and the eventual mutual recognition of services and of dose results. PMID:20959338

  2. A review of recent advances in optical fibre sensors for in vivo dosimetry during radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, S; McCarthy, D; Woulfe, P; Grattan, M W D; Hounsell, A R; Sporea, D; Mihai, L; Vata, I; Leen, G

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the recent developments and requirements in radiotherapy dosimetry, with particular emphasis on the development of optical fibre dosemeters for radiotherapy applications, focusing particularly on in vivo applications. Optical fibres offer considerable advantages over conventional techniques for radiotherapy dosimetry, owing to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences, and suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based dosemeters, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive and thus particularly suited to in vivo dosimetry. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, for example, for brachytherapy treatments, the optical fibres could be placed in the tumour itself or into nearby critical tissues requiring monitoring, via the same applicators or needles used for the treatment delivery thereby providing real-time dosimetric information. The article outlines the principal sensor design systems along with some of the main strengths and weaknesses associated with the development of these techniques. The successful demonstration of these sensors in a range of different clinical environments is also presented. PMID:25761212

  3. Effect of background and transport dose on the results of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) measurements in photon fields obtained during the intercomparison 2013 of the African region.

    PubMed

    Arib, M; Herrati, A; Dari, F; Lounis-Mokrani, Z

    2015-12-01

    As part of the intercomparison on the measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10), jointly organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Algerian Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory, for the African region, up to 12 dosemeters were added to the packages of the 28 participants to evaluate the background and transport dose (BGTD), received by the dosemeters before and after their irradiation at the SSDL (environmental irradiations, scanning process at the airports, etc.). Out of the 28 participants, only 17 reported the corresponding BGTD measured values, which lied between 0.03 and 0.8 mSv. The mean measured value of BG was (0.25±0.14) mSv, which is significantly high compared with the lowest dose value used in the intercomparison exercise. The BGTD correction shifted the overall results of the intercomparison from an overestimation of dose (∼8 % before applying BGT dose correction) to an underestimation of dose (-9 % after correction). The measurement protocol and the detailed analysis of the results and applied corrections are discussed in this paper. PMID:25433048

  4. Quality control and reliability of reported doses.

    PubMed

    Stadtmann, H; Figel, Markus; Kamenopoulou, V; Kluszczynski, D; Roed, H; Van Dijk, J

    2004-01-01

    Results of performance tests verifying the dosimetric properties of dosimetric systems are published in various reports (e.g. IAEA and EURADOS). However, there is hardly any information in the open literature relating to the uncertainty in a dose measurement or in the annual dose, which is increased by failure of the evaluation or data management system, damage of the dosemeter itself or by the loss of dosemeter. In this article, an attempt is made to estimate the importance of the above-mentioned conditions. This is achieved by sending questionnaires to about 200 approved dosimetric services in Europe. In total 88 questionnaires were returned and analysed. In the questionnaires, the frequency of occurrence of the various error conditions were investigated. Participants were also asked to evaluate the impact of the error condition from a dosimetric point of view and what countermeasures are taken. The article summarises all responses and compares different sources of errors according to their impact on the uncertainty of the resulting dose and gives a comprehensive overview on quality control actions and reliability on reported doses from European dosimetric services. PMID:15574990

  5. In vivo dose evaluation during gynaecological radiotherapy using L-alanine/ESR dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Rech, Amanda Burg; Barbi, Gustavo Lazzaro; Ventura, Luiz Henrique Almeida; Guimarães, Flavio Silva; Oliveira, Harley Francisco; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2014-06-01

    The dose delivered by in vivo 3-D external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) was verified with L-alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry for patients diagnosed with gynaecological cancer. Measurements were performed with an X-band ESR spectrometer. Dosemeters were positioned inside the vaginal cavity with the assistance of an apparatus specially designed for this study. Previous phantom studies were performed using the same conditions as in the in vivo treatment. Four patients participated in this study during 20-irradiation sessions, giving 220 dosemeters to be analysed. The doses were determined with the treatment planning system, providing dose confirmation. The phantom study resulted in a deviation between -2.5 and 2.1 %, and for the in vivo study a deviation between -9.2 and 14.2 % was observed. In all cases, the use of alanine with ESR was effective for dose assessment, yielding results consistent with the values set forth in the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) reports. PMID:24751984

  6. Verification of an effective dose equivalent model for neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, J. E.; Piper, R. K.; Leonowich, J. A.; Faust, L. G.

    1991-10-01

    Since the effective dose equivalent, based on the weighted sum of organ dose equivalents, is not a directly measurable quantity, it must be estimated with the assistance of computer modeling techniques and a knowledge of the radiation field. Although extreme accuracy is not necessary for radiation protection purposes, a few well chosen measurements are required to confirm the theoretical models. Neutron measurements were performed in a RANDO phantom using thermoluminescent dosemeters, track etch dosemeters, and a 1/2 in. (1.27 cm) tissue equivalent proportional counter in order to estimate neutron doses and dose equivalents within the phantom at specific locations. The phantom was exposed to bare and D2O-moderated Cf-252 neutrons at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Low Scatter Facility. The Monte Carlo code MCNP with the MIRD-V mathematical phantom was used to model the human body and calculate organ doses and dose equivalents. The experimental methods are described and the results of the measurements are compared to the calculations.

  7. Field parameters and dosimetric characteristics of a fast neutron calibration facility: experimental and Monte Carlo evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Gualdrini, G.; Monteventi, F.

    2002-01-01

    At the ENEA Institute for Radiation Protection (IRP) the fast neutron calibration facility consists of a remote control device which allows locating different sources (Am-Be, Pu-Li, bare and D 2O moderated 252Cf) at the reference position, at the desired height from the floor, inside a 10×10×3 m 3 irradiation room. Either the ISO reference sources or the Pu-Li source have been characterised in terms of uncollided H*(10) and neutron fluence according to the ISO calibration procedures. A spectral fluence mapping, carried out with the Monte Carlo Code MCNP TM, allowed characterising the calibration point, in scattered field conditions, according to the most recent international recommendations. Moreover, the irradiation of personal dosemeters on the ISO water filled slab phantom was simulated to determine the field homogeneity of the calibration area and the variability of the neutron field (including the backscattered component) along the phantom surface. At the ENEA Institute for Radiation Protection the calibration of neutron area monitors as well as personal dosemeters can now be performed according to the international standards, at the same time guaranteeing suitable conditions for research and qualification purposes in the field of neutron dosimetry.

  8. A SOLUTION FOR NEUTRON PERSONAL DOSIMETRY IN THE ABSENCE OF WORKPLACE SPECTROMETRY.

    PubMed

    Hajek, M; Cruz Suárez, R

    2016-09-01

    In view of the widely varying energy spectra encountered in practical situations, accuracy of neutron dose assessment requires detailed knowledge of detector responses and workplace conditions to achieve an adequate level of protection. If the neutron spectrum should be a priori unknown and no measurement of the workplace spectrum is available, the 'Compendium of Neutron Spectra and Detector Responses for Radiation Protection Purposes' published in the International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Report Series offers a broad range of reference spectra that may be appropriate for many applications. The proposed approach applies a correction factor based on the ratio of 'personal dose equivalent indices' for a particular workplace spectrum and a reference field used for calibration of the dosemeter response. Amendments in the definition of operational quantities as well as introduction of new modalities that, for example, may be expected to give increased importance to high-energy neutrons necessitate frequent revision of the Compendium. Results from the European Radiation Dosimetry Group Intercomparison 2012 for neutron personal dosemeters provide evidence that workplace fields are insufficiently reflected. This is proposed to be considered as an improvement opportunity. PMID:26396264

  9. Book Review:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Publications of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) enjoy a justifiably high reputation for their relevance and accuracy. This is no exception. As the report is assumed to be the joint responsibility of all members of the Commission, no authors' names are given. Nevertheless, the various chapters clearly correspond to the interests of the four members of the "report committee", all of whom are well known in their respective fields of work. The subject of the report is the measurement of absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate in materials exposed to pulsed ionizing radiation, particularly X-ray and electron beams. Only thirty five pages of text may seem at first sight to be insufficient to provide anything but a superficial view of the subject, but the authors have adopted a very compact style which covers a lot of ground. It should be regarded as a practical guide, not as a textbook or scientific monograph; rules are sometimes given without justification, but with a reference to where more information can be found. Four types of radiation detectors are dealt with in separate chapters—ionization chambers, chemical dosemeters, calorimeters and solid-state detectors. For irradiation conditions typical of those encountered in radiotherapy, i.e. from about 0.05 mGy to 1 mGy per pulse, commercial cable-connected ionization chambers are recommended, and this chapter is largely a summary of the many papers by Boag on corrections for non-saturation. Suggestions are also made for the design of chambers for use with higher dose rates up to 100 mGy per pulse. For still higher dose rates, such as those met with in radiobiological and radiochemical research, the Fricke dosemeter can be used up to 10 Gy per pulse. The chapter on chemical dosemeters deals also with extensions upwards in dose rate to about 100 Gy per pulse using "super-Fricke" solution or a thiocyanate dosemeter. Calorimeters are less influenced by a change from continuous to

  10. Linear vs. function-based dose algorithm designs.

    PubMed

    Stanford, N

    2011-03-01

    The performance requirements prescribed in IEC 62387-1, 2007 recommend linear, additive algorithms for external dosimetry [IEC. Radiation protection instrumentation--passive integrating dosimetry systems for environmental and personal monitoring--Part 1: General characteristics and performance requirements. IEC 62387-1 (2007)]. Neither of the two current standards for performance of external dosimetry in the USA address the additivity of dose results [American National Standards Institute, Inc. American National Standard for dosimetry personnel dosimetry performance criteria for testing. ANSI/HPS N13.11 (2009); Department of Energy. Department of Energy Standard for the performance testing of personnel dosimetry systems. DOE/EH-0027 (1986)]. While there are significant merits to adopting a purely linear solution to estimating doses from multi-element external dosemeters, differences in the standards result in technical as well as perception challenges in designing a single algorithm approach that will satisfy both IEC and USA external dosimetry performance requirements. The dosimetry performance testing standards in the USA do not incorporate type testing, but rely on biennial performance tests to demonstrate proficiency in a wide range of pure and mixed fields. The test results are used exclusively to judge the system proficiency, with no specific requirements on the algorithm design. Technical challenges include mixed beta/photon fields with a beta dose as low as 0.30 mSv mixed with 0.05 mSv of low-energy photons. Perception-based challenges, resulting from over 20 y of experience with this type of performance testing in the USA, include the common belief that the overall quality of the dosemeter performance can be judged from performance to pure fields. This paper presents synthetic testing results from currently accredited function-based algorithms and new developed purely linear algorithms. A comparison of the performance data highlights the benefits of each

  11. Determination of environmental radioactivity (238U, 232Th and 40K) and indoor natural background radiation level in Chennai city (Tamilnadu State), India.

    PubMed

    Babai, K S; Poongothai, S; Punniyakotti, J

    2013-01-01

    An extensive study on the determination of the natural radioactivity ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) levels in soil samples of Chennai city, India has been undertaken and the results of the same are compared with the levels reported in other Indian cities as well as other parts of the world. The radioactivity content in the soil samples, the absorbed dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent, radium equivalent activity, internal and external hazard indices were calculated and compared with UNSCEAR 2000 recommended values. In addition to the above, mapping of indoor natural background gamma radiation levels has been made using thermo luminescent dosemeters throughout Chennai city and the same are reported. PMID:22847868

  12. Reduction of occupational radiation dose in staff at the cardiac catheterisation laboratory by protective material placed on the patient.

    PubMed

    Ordiales, J M; Nogales, J M; Sánchez-Casanueva, R; Vano, E; Fernández, J M; Álvarez, F J; Ramos, J; Martínez, G; López-Mínguez, J R

    2015-07-01

    Reducing occupational radiation dose in cardiac catheterisation laboratories is one of the objectives of the radiation protection system because the procedures performed involve high levels of radiation compared with others in health care. Recommendations on protection methods used are referred to different structural types and personal protection tools. In this work, the effectiveness of a shielding drape above the patient in different geometric shapes for a standard procedure in interventional cardiology was evaluated. Values of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) obtained simultaneously with three active electronic semiconductor dosemeters located at the usual position of staff and at the C-arm have been used to show the usefulness of the shielding drape. PMID:25848096

  13. National and international standards and calibration of thermoluminescence dosimetry systems.

    PubMed

    Soares, C G

    2002-01-01

    Radiation protection for radiation workers, the public, and the environment is of international concern. The use of thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) is an acceptable method for dose recording in most countries. For reasons of consistency and data gathering (research) it is important that a Sievert (Sv) in one part of the world equals an Sv on the other side of the globe. To this end, much work has gone into the development of standards and calibration practices for TLD systems so that they compare not only with similar systems, but also with other forms of radiation measurement. While most national laboratories provide calibration services for these systems some, as in the United States, depend on services of secondary calibration laboratories that are traceable to the national laboratories through accreditation programmes. The purpose of this paper is to explain how TLD measurements are traceable to their respective national standards for both personnel and environmental dosimetry. PMID:12382728

  14. Personnel neutron dosimetry improvements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.F.; Hoffman, J.M.; Brake, R.J.; Bliss, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    We are investigating methods to improve neutron dosimetry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) using the track etch dosemeter CR-39. Specifically, use of CR-39 for dynamic environments, typically encountered at the LANL Plutonium Facility, is shown to be a superior method for personnel neutron dosimetry when compared to the currently used TLD system. The results of glovebox experiments simulating hydrogenous shielding used at LANL, temporal variations of neutron correction factors used at the Plutonium Facility, trial implementation at this facility and preliminary neutron spectroscopy measurements are presented and compared to reference dosimetry measurements. Our results confirm that use of a TLD system in a facility implementing hydrogenous shielding requires frequent field re-calibration. When such correction factors are not re-evaluated frequently, or are maintained at pre-shielding levels, significant (i.e., 2- to 3-fold) overestimation of the neutron dose equivalent can occur.

  15. Personnel neutron dosimetry improvements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.F.; Hoffman, J.M.; Brake, R.J. ); Bliss, J.L. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating methods to improve neutron dosimetry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) using the track etch dosemeter CR-39. Specifically, use of CR-39 for dynamic environments, typically encountered at the LANL Plutonium Facility, is shown to be a superior method for personnel neutron dosimetry when compared to the currently used TLD system. The results of glovebox experiments simulating hydrogenous shielding used at LANL, temporal variations of neutron correction factors used at the Plutonium Facility, trial implementation at this facility and preliminary neutron spectroscopy measurements are presented and compared to reference dosimetry measurements. Our results confirm that use of a TLD system in a facility implementing hydrogenous shielding requires frequent field re-calibration. When such correction factors are not re-evaluated frequently, or are maintained at pre-shielding levels, significant (i.e., 2- to 3-fold) overestimation of the neutron dose equivalent can occur.

  16. Dosimetry experiences and lessons learned for radiation dose assessment in Korean nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young; Son, Jung Kwon

    2013-07-01

    Since the first Korean nuclear power plant (NPP), Kori 1, commenced operation in 1978, a total of 21 NPPs had been put into operation in Korea by the end of 2011. Radiation doses of NPP workers have been periodically evaluated and controlled within the prescribed dose limit. Radiation dose assessment is carried out monthly by reading personal dosemeters for external radiation exposure, which have traceability in compliance with strict technical guidelines. In the case of the internal radiation exposure, workers who have access to the possible area of polluted air are also evaluated for their internal dose after maintenance task. In this article, the overall situation and experience for the assessment and distribution of radiation doses in Korean NPPs is described. PMID:23204558

  17. Evaluation of organ doses in adult and paediatric CT examinations based on Monte Carlo simulations and in-phantom dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K; Nomura, K; Muramatsu, Y; Takahashi, K; Obara, S; Akahane, K; Satake, M

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) and organ doses evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations through comparisons with doses evaluated by in-phantom dosimetry. Organ doses were measured with radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeter (RGD) set at various organ positions within adult and 1-y-old anthropomorphic phantoms. For the dose simulations, the X-ray spectrum and bow-tie filter shape of a CT scanner were estimated and 3D voxelised data of the CTDI and anthropomorphic phantoms from the acquired CT images were derived. Organ dose simulations and measurements were performed with chest and abdomen-pelvis CT examination scan parameters. Relative differences between the simulated and measured doses were within 5 % for the volume CTDI and 13 % for organ doses for organs within the scan range in adult and paediatric CT examinations. The simulation results were considered to be in good agreement with the measured doses. PMID:25848103

  18. Simulated workplace neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, V.; Taylor, G.; Röttger, S.

    2011-12-01

    The use of simulated workplace neutron fields, which aim at replicating radiation fields at practical workplaces, is an alternative solution for the calibration of neutron dosemeters. They offer more appropriate calibration coefficients when the mean fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients of the simulated and practical fields are comparable. Intensive Monte Carlo modelling work has become quite indispensable for the design and/or the characterization of the produced mixed neutron/photon fields, and the use of Bonner sphere systems and proton recoil spectrometers is also mandatory for a reliable experimental determination of the neutron fluence energy distribution over the whole energy range. The establishment of a calibration capability with a simulated workplace neutron field is not an easy task; to date only few facilities are available as standard calibration fields.

  19. DOSE TO RADIOLOGICAL TECHNOLOGISTS FROM INDUCED RADIONUCLIDES IN CARBON ION RADIOTHERAPY.

    PubMed

    Yonai, S; Spano, V

    2016-09-01

    Radioactive nuclides are induced in irradiation devices and patients during high-energy photon and ion beam radiotherapies. These nuclides potentially become sources of exposure to radiation workers. Radiological technologists (RTs) are often required to enter an irradiation room and approach activated devices and patients. In this study, annual doses to RTs working in a carbon ion radiotherapy facility were estimated based on measurements with the Si-semiconductor personal dosemeter. In addition, the time decay of dose around a patient couch after irradiation was obtained by phantom experiments. The annual Hp(10) values for passive and scanned beams were estimated to be 61 and 2 μSv, respectively, when assuming the number of treatments in 2013. These are much lower than the ICRP recommended dose limit for radiation workers. The time-series data of dose to RTs during their work and the time decay of the dose should be helpful for reducing their dose further. PMID:27179122

  20. Combined TL and 10B-alanine ESR dosimetry for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Bartolotta, A; D'Oca, M C; Lo Giudice, B; Brai, M; Borio, R; Forini, N; Salvadori, P; Manera, S

    2004-01-01

    The dosimetric technique described in this paper is based on electron spin resonance (ESR) detectors using an alanine-boric compound acid enriched with (10)B, and beryllium oxide thermoluminescent (TL) detectors; with this combined dosimetry, it is possible to discriminate the doses due to thermal neutrons and gamma radiation in a mixed field. Irradiations were carried out inside the thermal column of a TRIGA MARK II water-pool-type research nuclear reactor, also used for Boron Neutron Capture therapy (BNCT) applications, with thermal neutron fluence from 10(9) to 10(14) nth cm(-2). The ESR dosemeters using the alanine-boron compound indicated ESR signals about 30-fold stronger than those using only alanine. Moreover, a negligible correction for the gamma contribution, measured with TL detectors, almost insensitive to thermal neutrons, was necessary. Therefore, a simultaneous analysis of our TL and ESR detectors allows discrimination between thermal neutron and gamma doses, as required in BNCT. PMID:15353720

  1. Monoenergetic fast neutron reference fields: II. Field characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, Ralf; Thomas, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Monoenergetic neutron reference fields are required for the calibration of neutron detectors and dosemeters for various applications ranging from nuclear physics and nuclear data measurements to radiation protection. In a series of two separate publications the metrological aspects of the production and measurement of fast neutrons are reviewed. In the first part, requirements for the nuclear reactions used to produce neutron fields as well as methods for target characterization and the general layout of reference facilities were discussed. This second part focuses on the most important techniques for field characterization and includes the determination of the neutron fluence as well as the spectral neutron distribution and the determination of the fluence of contaminating photons. The measurements are usually carried out relative to reference cross sections which are reviewed in a separate contribution, but for certain conditions 'absolute' methods for neutron measurements can be used which are directly traceable to the international system of units (SI).

  2. Design and fabrication of a multipurpose thyroid phantom for medical dosimetry and calibration.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh Naderi, Simin; Sina, Sedigheh; Karimipoorfard, Mehrnoosh; Lotfalizadeh, Fatemeh; Entezarmahdi, Mohammad; Moradi, Hamed; Faghihi, Reza

    2016-03-01

    A multipurpose anthropomorphic neck phantom was designed and fabricated for use in medical applications. The designed neck phantom is composed of seven elliptic cylindrical slices with a semi-major axis of 14 cm and a semi-minor axis of 12.5 cm, each having the thickness of 2 cm. The thyroid gland, bony part of the neck, and the windpipe were also built inside the neck phantom. For the purpose of medical dosimetry, some holes were drilled inside the phantom to accommodate the thermoluminescence dosemeters with different shapes and dimensions. For testing the quality of images in nuclear medicine, the thyroid gland was built separately to accommodate the radioactive iodine. Finally, the nuclear medicine images were obtained by inserting (131)I in both male and female thyroid parts. PMID:26124260

  3. Influence of thermal quenching on the thermostimulated processes in alpha-Al2O3. Role of F and F+ centres.

    PubMed

    Vincellér, S; Molnár, G; Berkane-Krachai, A; Iacconi, P

    2002-01-01

    Anion deficient alpha-Al2O3 is highly sensitive to ionising radiations and is widely used as a thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter in environmental monitoring. Two types of alpha alumina were studied and it was observed that both were affected by thermal quenching of luminescence. This effect, which manifests itself by the decay of the TL response when the heating rate increases, can be described by the Mott-Seitz theory. It was observed that thermostimulated exoemission response increased when the heating rate increased, whereas thermostimulated conductivity remained constant. However, none of the available theories could explain the dependence of the F- centre emission on the heating rate. A model is proposed to describe simultaneously the various thermally stimulated processes. PMID:12382832

  4. Spectra and Neutron Dosimetry Inside a PET Cyclotron Vault Room

    SciTech Connect

    Vega-Carrillo, Hector Rene; Mendez, Roberto; Iniguez, Maria Pilar; Marti-Climent, Joseph; Penuelas, Ivan; Barquero, Raquel

    2006-09-08

    The neutron field around a PET cyclotron was investigated during 18F radioisotope production with an 18 MeV proton beam. Pairs of thermoluminescent dosemeters, TLD600 and TLD700, were used as thermal neutron detector inside a Bonner Spheres Spectrometer to measure the neutron spectra at three different positions inside the cyclotron's vault room. Neutron spectra were also determined by Monte Carlo calculations. The hardest spectrum was observed in front of cyclotron target and the softest was noticed at the antipode of target. Neutron doses derived from the measured spectra vary between 11 and 377 mSv/{mu}A-h of proton integrated current, Doses were also measured with a single-moderator remmeter, with an active thermal neutron detector, whose response in affected by the radiation field in the vault room.

  5. The utilization of bubble detector technology in the development of a Combination Area Neutron Spectrometer (CANS)

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.; Sims, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The compact and relatively inexpensive Combination Area Neutron Spectrometer (CANS) should provide neutron spectral capabilities heretofore available only via complex set-ups and time-consuming, painstaking calculations. Some of its strong points include the measurement of neutron fluence and the need for only a single algorithm, with a single solution, regardless of the spectra. Because fluence, a real quantity, is the foundation of dose equivalent determination, the results of CANS should endure the winds of change accompanying the definition of dose equivalent and its consorted conversion conventions. It is also hoped that personnel applications may be realized in miniature version of CANS, the Personal Neutron Dosemeter/Spectrometer (PENDOSE). 6 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Estimation of annual occupational effective doses from external ionizing radiation at medical institutions in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korir, Geoffrey; Wambani, Jeska; Korir, Ian

    2011-04-01

    This study details the distribution and trends of doses due to occupational radiation exposure among radiation workers from participating medical institutions in Kenya, where monthly dose measurements were collected for a period of one year ranging from January to December in 2007. A total of 367 medical radiation workers were monitored using thermoluminescent dosemeters. They included radiologists (27%), oncologists (2%), dentists (4%), Physicists (5%), technologists (45%), nurses (4%), film processor technicians (3%), auxiliary staff (4%), and radiology office staff (5%). The average annual effective dose of all categories of staff was found to range from 1.19 to 2.52 mSv. This study formed the initiation stage of wider, comprehensive and more frequent monitoring of occupational radiation exposures and long-term investigations into its accumulation patterns in our country.

  7. Calibration system for albedo neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Rothermich, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    Albedo neutron dosimeters have proven to be effective as a method of measuring the dose from neutron exposures that other types of neutron detectors cannot measure. Results of research conducted to calibrate an albedo neutron dosemeter are presented. The calibration procedure consisted of exposing the TLD chips to a 46 curie /sup 238/PuBe source at known distances, dose rates and exposure periods. The response of the TLD's is related to the dose rate measured with a dose rate meter to obtain the calibration factor. This calibration factor is then related to the ratio of the counting rates determined by 9-inch and 3-inch Bonner spheres (also called remmeters) and a calibration curve was determined. 17 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Status of eye lens radiation dose monitoring in European hospitals.

    PubMed

    Carinou, Eleftheria; Ginjaume, Merce; O'Connor, Una; Kopec, Renata; Sans Merce, Marta

    2014-12-01

    A questionnaire was developed by the members of WG12 of EURADOS in order to establish an overview of the current status of eye lens radiation dose monitoring in hospitals. The questionnaire was sent to medical physicists and radiation protection officers in hospitals across Europe. Specific topics were addressed in the questionnaire such as: knowledge of the proposed eye lens dose limit; monitoring and dosimetry issues; training and radiation protection measures. The results of the survey highlighted that the new eye lens dose limit can be exceeded in interventional radiology procedures and that eye lens protection is crucial. Personnel should be properly trained in how to use protective equipment in order to keep eye lens doses as low as reasonably achievable. Finally, the results also highlighted the need to improve the design of eye dosemeters in order to ensure satisfactory use by workers. PMID:25222935

  9. Aspects of harmonisation of individual monitoring for external radiation in Europe: conclusions of a EURADOS action.

    PubMed

    Kamenopoulou, V; van Dijk, J W E; Ambrosi, P; Bolognese-Milsztajn, T; Castellani, C M; Currivan, L; Falk, R; Fantuzzi, E; Figel, M; Alves, J Garcia; Ginjaume, M; Janzekovic, H; Kluszczynski, D; Lopez, M A; Luszik-Bhadra, M; Olko, P; Roed, H; Stadtmann, H; Vanhavere, F; Vartiainen, E; Wahl, W; Weeks, A; Wernli, C

    2006-01-01

    Following the publication of the EU Council Directive 96/29, EURADOS coordinated two working groups (WGs) for promoting the process of harmonisation on individual monitoring of occupationally exposed persons in Europe. An overview of the major findings of the second WG is presented. Information on the technical and quality standards and on the accreditation and approval procedures has been compiled. The catalogue of dosimetric services has been updated and extended. An overview of national regulations and standards for protection from radon and other natural sources in workplaces has been made, attempting to combine the results from individual monitoring for external, internal and workplace monitoring. A first status description of the active personal dosemeters, including legislative and technical information, and their implementation has been made. The importance of practical factors on the uncertainty in the dose measurement has been estimated. Even if a big progress has been made towards harmonisation, there is still work to be done. PMID:16581923

  10. Indoor gamma radiation and radon concentrations in a Norwegian carbonatite area.

    PubMed

    Sundal, A V; Strand, T

    2004-01-01

    Results of indoor gamma radiation and radon measurements in 95 wooden dwellings located in a Norwegian thorium-rich carbonatite area using thermoluminescent dosemeters and CR-39 alpha track detectors, respectively, are reported together with a thorough analysis of the indoor data with regard to geological factors. Slightly enhanced radium levels and thorium concentrations of several thousands Bq kg(-1) in the carbonatites were found to cause elevated indoor radon-222 levels and the highest indoor gamma dose rates ever reported from wooden houses in Norway. An arithmetic mean indoor gamma dose rate of 200 nGy h(-1) and a maximum of 620 nGy h(-1) were obtained for the group of dwellings located directly on the most thorium-rich bedrock. PMID:15312702

  11. Evaluation of an automated FDG dose infuser to PET-CT patients.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Roberto M; Vano, Eliseo; Fernández, Jose M; Ginjaume, Mercè; Carreras, José L

    2015-07-01

    An experience with an automated infuser device at a university hospital is presented in this paper. Occupational doses at operators' fingertips were measured using optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters for two different scenarios: (i) using a semi-automatic system to prepare the fluorodesoxiglucose (FDG) injections that were delivered to the patient manually and (ii) using an automated infusion device that prepares and delivers the FDG dose. The accuracy of the activity prepared by the automatic system was also verified. Reductions in fingertip doses of 60 % using the fully automatic system have been measured. The difference between the programmed and the delivered activity was 2 %. The use of the automatic infuser in the authors' institution has led to a substantial reduction in hand radiation doses. But contamination risks, even though reduced, still exist; therefore, radioisotope manipulation should follow strict radiation protection rules to avoid incidents. Improved accuracy in dose delivery reduces chances of dose misadministration. PMID:25821215

  12. Nuclear medicine annual external occupational dose distribution: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, year 2005.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Claudia L P; Lima, Ana L S; da Silva, Herica L R; Souza-Santos, Denison; Silva, Claudio R

    2011-03-01

    Brazil has about 300 nuclear medicine services (NMS), 44 of them located in the state of Rio de Janeiro (RJ). Most nuclear medicine staff are routinely monitored for external dose. This paper makes a statistical analysis of all the RJ NMS annual external occupational doses in year 2005. Around 100 professionals of RJ NMS received annual doses >4.0 mSv, considering only external doses, but no one receives doses higher than the mean annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Extremities dosemeters are used by about 10 % of the staff. In some cases, these doses are more than 10 times higher than the dose in thorax. The maximum ratio of extremity dose/thorax dose, in 2005, was 72. This study shows the importance to improve radiation protection procedures in nuclear medicine, mainly because the number of occupational individuals in nuclear medicine and their external doses are increasing. PMID:21051433

  13. Dose evaluation in criticality accident conditions using transient critical facilities fueled with a fissile solution.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Tonoike, K; Miyoshi, Y

    2004-01-01

    Neutron dose measurement and evaluation techniques in criticality accident conditions using a thermo luminescence dosemeter (TLD) was studied at the Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In the present approach, the absorbed dose is derived from the ambient dose equivalent measured with a TLD, using the appropriate conversion factor given by computation. Using this technique, the neutron dose around the SILENE reactor of the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) of France was measured in the Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise (June 10-21, 2002) organized by OECD/NEA and IRSN. In this exercise, the gamma dose was also measured with a TLD. In this report, measurements and evaluation results at TRACY and SILENE are presented. PMID:15353695

  14. Comparison of radiation dose to operator between transradial and transfemoral coronary angiography with optimised radiation protection: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiliang; Jin, Zhigeng; Jing, Limin

    2014-03-01

    A growing concern in applying radial access in cardiac catheterisation is the increased operator radiation exposure. This study used an anthropomorphic phantom to simulate transradial and transfemoral coronary angiography with optimised radiation protection conditions. Operator radiation exposure was measured with thermoluminescent dosemeters at predefined locations. Compared with the femoral route, the radial route was associated with a dose decrease of 15 % at the operator's chest level with optimised radiation shielding. However, radiation exposure to the operator's hand remained significantly higher when applying radial access even with collective protective equipment used (by a factor of 2). Furthermore, the efficiency of operator radiation protection was found to be dependent on the tube incidence. Awareness should be raised about the significant increase of radiation exposure to operators' hands in transradial coronary angiography. Protection to reduce the dose level to the hands is necessary and should be further improved. PMID:24162374

  15. EPR/alanine pellets with low Gd content for neutron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Marrale, M; Brai, M; Longo, A; Panzeca, S; Carlino, A; Tranchina, L; Tomarchio, E; Parlato, A; Buttafava, A; Dondi, D; Zeffiro, A

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports on results obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation on a blend of alanine added with low content of gadolinium oxide (5 % by weight) to improve the sensitivity to thermal neutron without excessively affecting tissue equivalence. The sensitivity is enhanced by this doping procedure of more an order of magnitude. The results are compared with those obtained with the addition of boric acid (50 % by weight) where boron is in its natural isotopic composition in order to produce low-cost EPR dosemeters. The gadolinium addition influences neutron sensitivity more than the boron addition. The presence of additives does not substantially change the fading of the EPR signal induced by neutrons. The MC simulations agree the experimental results in case of gadolinium addition. PMID:24262924

  16. Measurements of gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in phantoms exposed to a BNCT epithermal beam with TLD-700.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Magni, D; Regazzoni, V; Borroni, M; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Burian, J; Marek, M; Klupak, V; Viererbl, L

    2014-10-01

    Gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in a phantom exposed to an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be measured by means of a single thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD-700). The method exploits the shape of the glow curve (GC) and requires the gamma-calibration GC (to obtain gamma dose) and the thermal-neutron-calibration GC (to obtain neutron fluence). The method is applicable for BNCT dosimetry in case of epithermal neutron beams from a reactor because, in most irradiation configurations, thermal neutrons give a not negligible contribution to the TLD-700 GC. The thermal neutron calibration is not simple, because of the impossibility of having thermal neutron fields without gamma contamination, but a calibration method is here proposed, strictly bound to the method itself of dose separation. PMID:24435913

  17. Possibility of retrospective dosimetry for persons accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation using electron spin resonance of sugar and mother-of-pearl.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T

    1989-02-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) dosemeter was used to measure ESR absorption spectra of sugar and shell buttons made of mother-of-pearl, for the purpose of evaluating the external dose to exposed inhibitants in the vicinity of a radiation accident. The ESR absorption intensity of sugar was proportional to dose in the range from about 30 mGy to 6 x 10(4) Gy. The lifetime of the free radical created in both sugar and shell buttons by radiation was stable for at least 6 months after irradiation. If sugar and shell goods left in or around houses since the occurrence of the Chernobyl reactor and the Brazilian accidents were obtained, it would be possible to estimate from them the integrated external dose to exposed people. PMID:2538196

  18. Characterisation of neutron fields at Cernavoda NPP.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, Vanessa; Vanhavere, Filip; Dumitrescu, Dorin; Chirosca, Alecsandru; Hager, Luke; Million, Marc; Bartz, James

    2013-04-01

    Near a nuclear reactor or a fuel container, mixed neutron/gamma fields are very common, necessitating routine neutron dosimetry. Accurate neutron dosimetry is complicated by the fact that the neutron effective dose is strongly dependent on the neutron energy and the direction distribution of the neutron fluence. Neutron field characterisation is indispensable if one wants to obtain a reliable estimate for the neutron dose. A measurement campaign at CANDU nuclear power plant located in Cernavoda, Romania, was set up to characterise the neutron fields in four different locations and to investigate the behaviour of different neutron personal dosemeters. This investigation intends to assist in choosing a suitable neutron dosimetry system at this nuclear power plant. PMID:22874895

  19. Simulation of response functions of fast neutron sensors and development of thin neutron silicon sensor.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Mikihiko; Nunomiya, Tomoya

    2014-10-01

    On radiation detection using silicon sensor, signals are produced from collected charges in a depletion layer; however, for high-energy particles, this depletion layer is extended due to funnelling phenomenon. The lengths of charge collection were experimentally obtained from proton peak energies in measured pulse-heights. The length is extended with increasing proton energy of up to 6 MeV, and then, is constant over 6 MeV. The response functions of fast neutron sensors were simulated for 5- and 15-MeV monoenergetic and (252)Cf neutron sources using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code. The simulation results agree well with the experimental ones, including the effect of funnelling phenomenon. In addition, a thin silicon sensor was developed for a new real-time personal neutron dosemeter. Photon sensitivity is vanishingly smaller than neutron one by a factor of 5×10(-4). PMID:24516186

  20. A new electronic neutron dosimeter (END) for reliable personal dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, H.; Cousins, T.; Andrews, H. R.; Machrafi, R.; Voevodskiy, A.; Kovaltchouk, V.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Robins, M.; Larsson, C.; Hugron, R.; Brown, J.

    2008-04-01

    Tests of existing electronic neutron dosimeters by military and civilian groups have revealed significant performance limitations. To meet the operational requirements of emergency response personnel to a radiological/nuclear incident as well as those in the nuclear industry, a new END has been developed. It is patterned after a unique commercial neutron spectral dosemeter known as the N-probe. It uses a pair of small special scintillators on tiny photomultiplier tubes. Special electronics were designed to minimize power consumption to allow for weeks of operation on a single charge. The size, performance, and data analysis for the END have been designed to meet/exceed international standards for electronic neutron dosimeters. Results obtained with the END prototype are presented.

  1. A radioluminescence study of spectral and dose characteristics of common luminophors.

    PubMed

    Erfurt, G; Krbetschek, M R

    2002-01-01

    Many synthetic materials are used as thermoluminescence dosemeters for the measurement of the absorbed dose from ionising radiation sources. A part of the absorbed energy leads to a prompt luminescence (radioluminescence, abbreviated RL) which dose behaviour mainly corresponds with the densitity of charge carriers in the respective traps or recombination sites. The RL reported in this study was stimulated using two 137Cs sources with activities of 3.7 MBq (spectral measurements) or 5 MBq (dosimetry studies), respectively, and was recorded steadily during stimulation. This presentation gives a comprehensive survey of the spectral and dose dependent RL properties of a number of luminescent materials like LiF:Mg,Ti, Al2O3:C, CaSO4:Dy, CaF2:Mn, Li2B4O7:Mn, BeO and ZnS:Ag. The spectral and dose dependent results were compared with thermoluminescence as well as other RL studies. PMID:12382908

  2. Comparing Geant4 hadronic models for the WENDI-II rem meter response function.

    PubMed

    Vanaudenhove, T; Dubus, A; Pauly, N

    2013-01-01

    The WENDI-II rem meter is one of the most popular neutron dosemeters used to assess a useful quantity of radiation protection, namely the ambient dose equivalent. This is due to its high sensitivity and its energy response that approximately follows the conversion function between neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent in the range of thermal to 5 GeV. The simulation of the WENDI-II response function with the Geant4 toolkit is then perfectly suited to compare low- and high-energy hadronic models provided by this Monte Carlo code. The results showed that the thermal treatment of hydrogen in polyethylene for neutron <4 eV has a great influence over the whole detector range. Above 19 MeV, both Bertini Cascade and Binary Cascade models show a good correlation with the results found in the literature, while low-energy parameterised models are not suitable for this application. PMID:22972796

  3. [Demonstration of ultra-hard X-radiation by means of silicon photo-elements (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Löffler, E; Seeger, W

    1980-12-01

    Commercial silicon photo-elements were irradiated with 8 MV X-rays and 10 MeV electrons in the linear accelerator SL 75/10, and their usability as monitors and dosemeters was examined. The short circuit current of the photo-elements, which is linear to the transmitted dose rate, was measured with an expressly developed impulse amplifier which is sensitive to electricity. Further examinations as to the energy dependence proved a nearly constant sensitivity within the scope of 1 to 10 MeV. However, there are irradiation damages within this scope, which lead to a decrease of the sensitivity to photo-electricity producing a degeneration rate of 100 to 9 MGy-1. The examination showed on the other hand that, because of their simple measuring principle, the easily reproducible results, and the high sensitivity, the photo-elements can find various applications as monitors with direct display for relative measurements. PMID:7456090

  4. Thermal neutron calibration channel at LNMRI/IRD.

    PubMed

    Astuto, A; Salgado, A P; Leite, S P; Patrão, K C S; Fonseca, E S; Pereira, W W; Lopes, R T

    2014-10-01

    The Brazilian Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations (LNMRI) standard thermal neutron flux facility was designed to provide uniform neutron fluence for calibration of small neutron detectors and individual dosemeters. This fluence is obtained by neutron moderation from four (241)Am-Be sources, each with 596 GBq, in a facility built with blocks of graphite/paraffin compound and high-purity carbon graphite. This study was carried out in two steps. In the first step, simulations using the MCNPX code on different geometric arrangements of moderator materials and neutron sources were performed. The quality of the resulting neutron fluence in terms of spectrum, cadmium ratio and gamma-neutron ratio was evaluated. In the second step, the system was assembled based on the results obtained on the simulations, and new measurements are being made. These measurements will validate the system, and other intercomparisons will ensure traceability to the International System of Units. PMID:24625545

  5. Vertical distribution of radiation dose rates in the water of a brackish lake in Aomori Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Iyogi, Takashi; Ueda, Shinji; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2015-11-01

    Seasonal radiation dose rates were measured with glass dosemeters housed in watertight cases at various depths in the water of Lake Obuchi, a brackish lake in Aomori Prefecture, Japan, during fiscal years 2011-2013 to assess the background external radiation dose to aquatic biota in the lake. The mean radiation dose in the surface water of the lake was found to be 27 nGy h(-1), which is almost the same as the absorption dose rate due to cosmic ray reported in the literature. Radiation dose rates decreased exponentially with water depth down to a depth of 1 m above the bottom sediment. In the water near the sediment, the dose rate increased with depth owing to the emission of γ-rays from natural radionuclides in the sediment. PMID:25944958

  6. Dosimetric investigations on Mars-96 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkova, J.; Dachev, Ts.; Matviichuk, Yu.; Koleva, R.; Tomov, B.; Baynov, P.; Petrov, V.; Nguyen, V.; Siegrist, M.; Chene, J.

    1994-10-01

    The dosimetric experiments Dose-M and Liulin as part of the more complex French-German-Bulgarian-Russian experiments for the investigation of the radiation environment for Mars-96 mission are described. The experiments will be realized with dosemeter-radiometer instruments, measuring absorbed dose in semiconductor detectors and the particle flux. Two detectors will be mounted on board the Mars-96 orbiter. Another detector will be on the guiderope of the Mars-96 Aerostate station. The scientific aims of Dose-M and Liulin experiments are: Analysis of the absorbed dose and the flux on the path and around Mars behind different shielding. Study of the shielding characteristics of the Martian atmosphere from galactic and solar cosmic rays including solar proton events. Together with the French gamma-spectrometer and the German neutron detectors the investigation of the radiation environment on the surface of Mars and in the atmosphere up to 4000 m altitude will be conducted.

  7. A phantom-based evaluation of three commercially available patient organ shields for computed tomography X-ray examinations in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Huggett, Jamie; Mukonoweshuro, William; Loader, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Three commercially available in-plane patient organ shields (barium eye, bismuth eye and bismuth breast) for computed tomography (CT) examinations were evaluated to determine their effectiveness for dose reduction. Absorbed doses were measured using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor dosemeters fastened to a Kyoto CT Torso phantom. Resultant images were visually compared with those minus shielding by an experienced radiologist. Approximate dose reductions of 21, 38 and 50 % were achieved by the barium eye, bismuth eye and bismuth breast shields, respectively, at a cost of increased image noise and streak artefacts. Shielded images produced varied levels of image artefact, particularly those resulting from the eye shields. Measured dose reductions were not consistent with the potential dose savings stated by the manufacturers of the shields. When evaluating the breast shield, similar dose reduction was achieved without shield-induced artefact by simply reducing the X-ray tube current. PMID:23222552

  8. Mixed field peronnel dosimetry: Part 1, High temperature peak characteristics of the reader-annealed TLD-600

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C. ); Sims, C.S. )

    1991-02-01

    The high temperature peaks (TL peaks 6--7) of TLD-600 are known to have higher responses to high LET radiation than to low LET radiation. These high temperature peak characteristics were studied for the automatic reader-annealed Harshaw albedo neutron TLD. The high temperature peaks response is linear for neutrons over the dose equivalent range tested (0.05--3 mSv of a {sup 252}Cf source moderated by a 15 cm radius polyethylene sphere), but is supralinear above 20 mSv of {sup 137}Cs photons. The peaks ratio (peaks 6--7/peaks 3--5) of TLD-600 is 0.15 for neutrons of any incident energy, 0.01 for {sup 137}Cs gammas, and 0.02 for M-150 x-rays. Based on the high temperature peak characteristics, a mixed field neutron-photon personnel dosimetry methodology using a single TLD-600 element was developed. The dosimetric method was evaluated in mixed {sup 238}PuBe + {sup 137}Cs fields with four neutron-gamma dose equivalent ratios, and the neutron, photon and total dose equivalent estimations are better than 20% except in one case. However, it was found that the neutron and photon dose equivalent estimations are sensitive to the neutron and photon peaks ratios, depending on the neutron-photon dose equivalent ratio and the neutron source in the mixed field. Therefore, a successful use of this method requires knowledge of the photon and neutron energies in the mixed field. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Detection of Thermoluminescence in Post-Gamma Shelf-Aged Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jonathan; Shah Jahan, M.

    2004-11-01

    Polyethylene (PE) of molecular weight 3-6 million mol/gm, commonly known as ultra-high molecular weight PE (UHMWPE) and used in orthopedic joint replacements, was irradiated with gamma rays at sterilization dose ( ˜ 3 MRad of ^60Co) at room temperature (RT) in air and subsequently aged for 5-15 years in the same environment. When heated from RT to 280^oC at 1^oC/s using a commercial thermoluminescence (TL) detector (Harshaw 3500), the aged UHMWPE samples were found to produce luminescence with (glow) peaks near 112^oC, 208^oC and 255^oC. While the 112^oC TL glow peak is attributed to the long-lived oxygen-induced free radicals, the 208^oC and 255^oC glow peaks are assigned to molecular breakdown processes caused by melting of the long-chain molecules. To confirm the correlation between TL and the free radicals, measurements were made on the same samples before and after recording TL using an X-band (9.5 GHz microwave frequency and 100 kHz modulation and detection frequency) electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer (Varian E-4). Before TL, ESR produced a broad resonance line centered at g-value 2.013 and peak-to-peak separation of 5.26 G. After TL, a very weak broad ESR signal was detected which may be produced by molecular breakdown or free radicals still present in the sample.

  10. [Quality assurance in diagnostic radiology using an automated system. Experience and results].

    PubMed

    Princivalli, M; Stea, L; Ordóñez, P L; Bussoli, L; Marchetti, C

    1995-05-01

    The authors report their personal experience with the use of an integrated quality control system in the radiology department. The system we used was the RTI DIGI-X Plus, a Swedish-made product, allowing a wide range of parameters to be measured on diagnostic X-ray units for general radiography, mammography and fluoroscopy. Data can be retrieved with a minimum number of measurements. The "oRTIgo" software improves the quality assurance system and ensures document compliance with international recommendations. The equipment consists of a detector unit, a processor and a display unit. The detector consists of a rotating holder with 12 combinations of metal filters of various thickness mounted in front of two photo-diodes covered with identical X-ray intensifying gadoliniumoxysulfide screens. This unit is connected to a data acquisition system controlled by a microcomputer. Peak tube voltage and total tube filtration are derived from the ratio of detector signals. The relationship between this ratio and the measured quantity is determined by a calibration procedure. Furthermore, exposure time "mAs" value, "mAs" linearity and exposure (or kerma in air) can be measured. Digital storage can be performed and input signals displayed. A serial interface is used to communicate with a PC for QC management purposes. An error propagation model is used to determine the inaccuracy of peak tube voltage measurements. With the DIGI-X Plus system, measurements can be carried out in a shorter time and the stored data reprocessed later on. After QA testing on 20 X-ray units in the radiology department, in vivo doses were measured using a TLD Harshaw 100 on 46 randomly selected patients undergoing chest examinations. The results are reported and analyzed following the NRPB protocol and show high agreement with the recommended values. PMID:7617909

  11. Improving neutron dosimetry using bubble detector technology

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.A.

    1993-02-01

    Providing accurate neutron dosimetry for a variety of neutron energy spectra is a formidable task for any dosimetry system. Unless something is known about the neutron spectrum prior to processing the dosimeter, the calculated dose may vary greatly from that actually encountered; that is until now. The entrance of bubble detector technology into the field of neutron dosimetry has eliminated the necessity of having an a priori knowledge of the neutron energy spectra. Recently, a new approach in measuring personnel neutron dose equivalent was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By using bubble detectors in combination with current thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a Combination Personnel Neutron Dosimeter (CPND), not only is it possible to provide accurate dose equivalent results, but a simple four-interval neutron energy spectrum is obtained as well. The components of the CPND are a Harshaw albedo TLD and two bubble detectors with theoretical energy thresholds of 100 key and 1500 keV. Presented are (1) a synoptic history surrounding emergence of bubble detector technology, (2) a brief overview of the current theory on mechanisms of interaction, (3) the data and analysis process involved in refining the response functions, (4) performance evaluation of the original CPND and a reevaluation of the same data under the modified method, (5) the procedure used to determine the reference values of component fluence and dose equivalent for field assessment, (6) analysis of the after-modification results, (7) a critique of some currently held assumptions, offering some alternative explanations, and (8) thoughts concerning potential applications and directions for future research.

  12. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Aspen FACE Experiment (FACTS II)

    DOE Data Explorer

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at DOE’s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. FACTS II, the Aspen FACE Experiment is a multidisciplinary study to assess the effects of increasing tropospheric ozone and carbon dioxide levels on the structure and function of northern forest ecosystems. The Aspen FACE facility is located at the Harshaw Experimental Forest near Rhinelander, Wisconsin. It consists of twelve 30m rings in which the concentrations of carbon dioxide and tropospheric ozone can be controlled. The design provides the ability to assess the effects of these gasses alone, and in combination, on many ecosystem attributes, including growth, leaf development, root characteristics, and soil carbon. Each ring consists of a series of vertical ventpipes which disperse carbon dioxide, ozone or normal air into the center of the ring. This computer controlled system uses signal feedback technology to adjust gas release each second in order to maintain a stable, elevated concentration of carbon dioxide and/or ozone throughout the experimental plot. Because there is no confinement, there is no significant change in the natural, ambient environment other than elevating these trace gas concentrations. [copied from http://aspenface.mtu.edu/index.html] Ring maps, lists of publications, data from the experiments, newsletters, protocol and performance

  13. SU-E-T-308: Systematic Characterization of the Energy Response of Different LiF TLD Crystals for Dosimetry Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, E; Caprile, P; Sanchez-Nieto, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The thermoluminiscense dosimeters (TLDs) are widely used in personal and clinical dosimetry due to its small size, good sensitivity and tissue equivalence, among other advantages. This study presents the characterization of Lithium Fluoride based TLDs, in terms of their absorbed dose response to successive irradiation cycles in a broad range of beam energies, measured under reference conditions. Methods: Four types of Harshaw TLD chips were used: TLD-100, TLD-600 TLD-700 and 100-H. They were irradiated with 10 photon beams of different energy spectrums, from 28 kVp to 18MV (in 30 consecutive cycles for 6 and 18 MV). Results: It was found that the response of the dosimetric system was stabilized (less than ±3%) after 10 cycles for TLD-600 and TLD-700. In the case of TLD-100 and TLD-100H this dependence was not observed. A decreased response to increasing beam energy in terms of absorbed dose to water was observed, as expected, except for TLD-100H which showed the opposite behavior. The less energy dependent detector was the TLD-100H exhibiting a maximum deviation of 12%. The highest variation observed was 33% for TLD-100. The study allowed the determination of calibration factors in absorbed dose for a wide range of energies and materials for different dosimetric applications, such as in-vivo dosimetry during imaging and radiotherapy. Conclusion: The study allowed the determination of calibration factors in absorbed dose for a wide range of energies and materials for different dosimetric applications, such as in-vivo dosimetry during imaging and radiotherapy.

  14. SU-E-J-69: Evaluation of the Lens Dose On the Cone Beam IGRT Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo-Llinares, R; Gimeno-Olmos, J; Carmona Meseguer, V; Lliso-Valverde, F; Candela-Juan, C; Perez-Calatayud, J; Pujades, M; Ballester, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: With the establishment of the IGRT as a standard technique, the extra dose that is given to the patients should be taken into account. Furthermore, it has been a recent decrease of the dose threshold in the lens, reduced to 0.5 Gy (ICRP ref 4825-3093-1464 on 21st April, 2011).The purpose of this work was to evaluate the extra dose that the lens is receive due to the Cone-Beam (CBCT) location systems in Head-and-Neck treatments. Methods: The On-Board Imaging (OBI) v 1.5 of the two Varian accelerators, one Clinac iX and one True Beam, were used to obtain the dose that this OBI version give to the lens in the Head-and-Neck location treatments. All CBCT scans were acquired with the Standard Dose Head protocol (100 kVp, 80 mA, 8 ms and 200 degree of rotation).The measurements were taken with thermoluminescence (TLD) EXTRAD (Harshaw) dosimeters placed in an anthropomorphic phantom over the eye and under 3 mm of bolus material to mimic the lens position. The center of the head was placed at the isocenter. To reduce TLD energy dependence, they were calibrated at the used beam quality. Results: The average lens dose at the lens in the OBI v 1.5 systems of the Clinac iX and the True Beam is 0.071 and 0.076 cGy/CBCT, respectively. Conclusions: The extra absorbed doses that receive the eye lenses due to one CBCT acquisition with the studied protocol is far below the new ICRP recommended threshold for the lens. However, the addition effect of several CBCT acquisition during the whole treatment should be taken into account.

  15. Theoretical and practical implications of the effects of temperature during irradiation and during pre- and post-irradiation storage on the response of thermoluminescence dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Gail de Planque, E.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to determine the applicability of the Randall-Wilkins theory for describing the behavior of CaF/sub 2/:Mn thermoluminescence dosimeters (Harshaw TLD-400 chips). Results were obtained for four different conditions: irradiation followed by storage, irradiation after storage, irradiation both preceded and followed by storage, and continuous simultaneous irradiation and storage. The experiments were performed for storage intervals of approximately 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 7 days at five different storage temperatures: -25, +20, +65, +150 and +175/sup 0/C. The results indicate fading that is described not by the Randall-Wilkins theory but rather as a linear function of the logarithm of the storage time. While the results suggest that the trapping efficiency is independent of temperature, they do demonstrate a small decrease in TL response with storage time prior to irradiation which is independent of temperature and time (>17 hours) and hence probably not dosimetric in origin but perhaps optically related. Glow curve analyses support the concept of a band of traps rather than a single trap. The overall results are compared to other data available in the literature most of which is for room-temperature storage. These data, for storage periods ranging from minutes to one year, can also be described as a linear function of the logarithm of the storage time and are remarkably consistent when uniformly normalized. Although peripheral experiments revealed problems associated with self-irradiation as well as a decline in sensitivity with use, the stability experiment results verify the highly favorable stability properties of CaF/sub 2/:Mn for widespread application.

  16. Occupational radiation dose to eyes from interventional radiology procedures in light of the new eye lens dose limit from the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, C; Gallagher, A; Dowling, A; Guiney, M; Ryan, J M; McEniff, N; O'Reilly, G

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended a substantial reduction in the equivalent dose limit for the lens of the eye, in line with a reduced threshold of absorbed dose for radiation-induced cataracts. This is of particular relevance in interventional radiology (IR) where it is well established that staff doses can be significant, however, there is a lack of data on IR eye doses in terms of Hp(3). Hp(3) is the personal dose equivalent at a depth of 3 mm in soft tissue and is used for measuring lens dose. We aimed to obtain a reliable estimate of eye dose to IR operators. Methods: Lens doses were measured for four interventional radiologists over a 3-month period using dosemeters specifically designed to measure Hp(3). Results: Based on their typical workloads, two of the four interventional radiologists would exceed the new ICRP dose limit with annual estimated doses of 31 and 45 mSv to their left eye. These results are for an “unprotected” eye, and for IR staff who routinely wear lead glasses, the dose beneath the glasses is likely to be significantly lower. Staff eye dose normalized to patient kerma–area product and eye dose per procedure have been included in the analysis. Conclusion: Eye doses to IR operators have been established using a dedicated Hp(3) dosemeter. Estimated annual doses have the potential to exceed the new ICRP limit. Advances in knowledge: We have estimated lens dose to interventional radiologists in terms of Hp(3) for the first time in an Irish hospital setting. PMID:25761211

  17. Long-term fade study of the DT-702 LiF: Mg,Cu,P TLD.

    PubMed

    Delzer, J A; Hawley, J R; Romanyukha, A; Nemmers, S; Selwyn, R; Benevides, L A

    2008-01-01

    LiF thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) are used by the US Navy to record radiation exposure of personnel. The Model DT-648 LiF:Mg,Ti TLD has been replaced by a new Model DT-702 LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLD. The DT-648 was used for many years and has undergone extensive testing to identify its pre- and post-irradiation fade operating characteristics. Studies have shown that the addition of copper increases the thermoluminesence sensitivity of the TLD for improved low-level radiation monitoring. This study evaluates various fading characteristics of the new copper-doped dosemeter using current equipment for processing of TLDs and calibrating to a National Institute of Standards and Technology standard source. The 57-week study took place at the Naval Dosimetry Center, Bethesda, MD, USA. TLDs were stored for various lengths of time before and after being exposed to a National Institute of Standards and Technology calibrated radiation sources. TLDs were then processed using current US Navy instructions and the resulting dose compared with the calibrated exposure. Both loss of signal and loss of sensitivity were evaluated. The results of this study have shown that the DT-702 TLD has no statistically significant change in sensitivity or change in signal with up to 57 weeks of pre- or post-irradiation time. The results of this study will increase the accuracy of exposure record keeping for the Navy and will allow longer issue periods. This will increase flexibility with international and domestic shipping procedures, as well as reduce workload requirements for dosimetry processing. PMID:18621919

  18. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (<7 mm wide) silicon photodiode dosemeters (34 in total), which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within adult and 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantoms. Output signals from photodiode dosemeters were read on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. For the adult phantom, organ doses (for organs within the scan range) and effective doses were 8–35 mGy and 7–18 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 12–33 mGy and 10–21 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. For the paediatric phantom, organ and effective doses were 4–17 mGy and 3–7 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 5–14 mGy and 3–9 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. Doses to organs at the boundaries of the scan length were higher for 64-slice CT scanners using large beam widths and/or a large pitch because of the larger extent of over-ranging. The CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose–length product (DLP) and the effective dose values using 64-slice CT for the adult and paediatric phantoms were the same as those obtained using 4-, 8- and 16-slice CT. Conversion factors of DLP to the effective dose by International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 were 0.024 mSv⋅mGy−1⋅cm−1 and 0.019 mSv⋅mGy−1⋅cm−1 for adult chest and abdominopelvic CT scans, respectively. PMID:19934069

  19. Dose measurements in pulsed radiation fields with commercially available measuring components.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Sabrina; Hupe, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    Dose measurements in pulsed radiation fields with dosemeters using the counting technique are known to be inappropriate. Therefore, there is a demand for a portable device able to measure the dose in pulsed radiation fields. As a detector, ionisation chambers seem to be a good alternative. In particular, using a secondary standard ionisation chamber in combination with a reliable charge-measuring system would be a good solution. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) uses secondary standard ionisation chambers in combination with PTB-made measuring electronics for dose measurements at its reference fields. However, for general use, this equipment is too complex. For measurements on-site, a mobile special electronic system [Hupe, O. and Ankerhold, U. Determination of ambient and personal dose equivalent for personnel and cargo security screening. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 121: (4), 429-437 (2006)] has been used successfully. Still, for general use, there is a need for a much simpler but a just as good solution. A measuring instrument with very good energy dependence for H*(10) is the secondary standard ionisation chamber HS01. An easy-to-use and commercially available electrometer for measuring the generated charges is the UNIDOS by PTW Freiburg. Depending on the expected dose values, the ionisation chamber used can be selected. In addition, measurements have been performed by using commercially available area dosemeters, e.g. the Mini SmartION 2120S by Thermo Scientific, using an ionisation chamber and the Szintomat 6134 A/H by Automess, using a scintillation detector. PMID:26056377

  20. Radiation dose evaluation in 64-slice CT examinations with adult and paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Koyama, S; Yamauchi, M; Ko, S; Akahane, K; Nishizawa, K

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing routine adult and paediatric CT examinations with 64-slice CT scanners and to compare the doses with those from 4-, 8- and 16-multislice CT scanners. Patient doses were measured with small (<7 mm wide) silicon photodiode dosemeters (34 in total), which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within adult and 6-year-old child anthropomorphic phantoms. Output signals from photodiode dosemeters were read on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed. For the adult phantom, organ doses (for organs within the scan range) and effective doses were 8-35 mGy and 7-18 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 12-33 mGy and 10-21 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. For the paediatric phantom, organ and effective doses were 4-17 mGy and 3-7 mSv, respectively, for chest CT, and 5-14 mGy and 3-9 mSv, respectively, for abdominopelvic CT. Doses to organs at the boundaries of the scan length were higher for 64-slice CT scanners using large beam widths and/or a large pitch because of the larger extent of over-ranging. The CT dose index (CTDI(vol)), dose-length product (DLP) and the effective dose values using 64-slice CT for the adult and paediatric phantoms were the same as those obtained using 4-, 8- and 16-slice CT. Conversion factors of DLP to the effective dose by International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 were 0.024 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) and 0.019 mSvmGy(-1)cm(-1) for adult chest and abdominopelvic CT scans, respectively. PMID:19934069

  1. Eye lens dose in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Principi, S; Delgado Soler, C; Ginjaume, M; Beltran Vilagrasa, M; Rovira Escutia, J J; Duch, M A

    2015-07-01

    The ICRP has recently recommended reducing the occupational exposure dose limit for the lens of the eye to 20 mSv y(-1), averaged over a period of 5 y, with no year exceeding 50 mSv, instead of the current 150 mSv y(-1). This reduction will have important implications for interventional cardiology and radiology (IC/IR) personnel. In this work, lens dose received by a staff working in IC is studied in order to determine whether eye lens dose monitoring or/and additional radiological protection measures are required. Eye lens dose exposure was monitored in 10 physicians and 6 nurses. The major IC procedures performed were coronary angiography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. The personnel were provided with two thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs): one calibrated in terms of Hp(3) located close to the left ear of the operator and a whole-body dosemeter calibrated in terms of Hp(10) and Hp(0.07) positioned on the lead apron. The estimated annual eye lens dose for physicians ranged between 8 and 60 mSv, for a workload of 200 procedures y(-1). Lower doses were collected for nurses, with estimated annual Hp(3) between 2 and 4 mSv y(-1). It was observed that for nurses the Hp(0.07) measurement on the lead apron is a good estimate of eye lens dose. This is not the case for physicians, where the influence of both the position and use of protective devices such as the ceiling shield is very important and produces large differences among doses both at the eyes and on the thorax. For physicians, a good correlation between Hp(3) and dose area product is shown. PMID:25809107

  2. Implementation of standards for individual monitoring in Europe.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, E; Alves, J G; Ambrosi, P; Janzekovic, H; Vartiainen, E

    2004-01-01

    A large number of standards are available for radiation protection and individual monitoring purposes. They are published by various organisations, international and national. Moreover, the increasing policy of "Quality" applied to individual monitoring requires the implementation of standards on Quality Assurance (QA) both in technical and management aspects of a dosimetric service. Implementation of standards is not mandatory; therefore, varying degrees of implementation can be found in different European countries. However, for a number of good reasons, a degree of harmonisation within the European Union (EU) of the requirements and procedures for individual monitoring would be desirable. Harmonisation as applied to dosimetric services does not mean that they should all follow exactly the same procedures, but that they should aim to meet the same general requirements, and their results should be comparable. This article aims to compile information on the use of all standards applied within individual monitoring practices, be it on the calibration of dosemeters or on the QA procedures to be applied to the overall dose evaluation process. Both "technical standards" and "quality standards" will be discussed. A list of documents of relevance to subjects such as recommendations and requirements in the field of individual monitoring, whose application could help in the harmonisation of procedures, will also be given. As it is agreed that implementation of quality standards is a relevant framework within which harmonisation can be achieved, guidance on the implementation of quality standards in a dosimetric service is given. Accreditation and approval of dosimetric services will be of relevance in the process of harmonisation of individual monitoring within the EU. In this article, a discussion of various procedures and the meaning of both forms of recognition is also provided. Although most of the text applies to the monitoring of internal and external exposure to

  3. Comparison of doses to the rectum derived from treatment planning system with in-vivo dose values in vaginal vault brachytherapy using cylinder applicators

    PubMed Central

    Obed, Rachel Ibhade; Akinlade, Bidemi Idayat; Ntekim, Atara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In-vivo measurements to determine doses to organs-at-risk can be an essential part of brachytherapy quality assurance (QA). This study compares calculated doses to the rectum with measured dose values as a means of QA in vaginal vault brachytherapy using cylinder applicators. Material and methods At the Department of Radiotherapy, University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria, intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) was delivered by a GyneSource high-dose-rate (HDR) unit with 60Co. Standard 2D treatment plans were created with HDR basic 2.6 software for prescription doses 5-7 Gy at points 5 mm away from the posterior surface of vaginal cylinder applicators (20, 25, and 30 mm diameters). The LiF:Mg, Ti thermoluminescent dosimeter rods (1 x 6 mm) were irradiated to a dose of 7 Gy on Theratron 60Co machine for calibration purpose prior to clinical use. Measurements in each of 34 insertions involving fourteen patients were performed with 5 TLD-100 rods placed along a re-usable rectal marker positioned in the rectum. The dosimeters were read in Harshaw 3500 TLD reader and compared with doses derived from the treatment planning system (TPS) at 1 cm away from the dose prescription points. Results The mean calculated and measured doses ranged from 2.1-3.8 Gy and 1.2-5.6 Gy with averages of 3.0 ± 0.5 Gy and 3.1 ± 1.1 Gy, respectively, for treatment lengths 2-8 cm along the cylinder-applicators. The mean values correspond to 48.9% and 50.8% of the prescribed doses, respectively. The deviations of the mean in-vivo doses from the TPS values ranged from –1.9 to 2.1 Gy with a p-value of 0.427. Conclusions This study was part of efforts to verify rectal dose obtained from the TPS during vaginal vault brachytherapy. There was no significant difference in the dose to the rectum from the two methods of measurements. PMID:26816506

  4. The Development, Characterization, and Performance Evaluation of a New Combination Type Personnel Neutron Dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chwei-Jeng

    A new combination type personnel neutron dosimeter has been designed and developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The combination personnel neutron dosimeter (CPND) consists of a Harshaw albedo neutron thermoluminescent dosimeter (two pairs of TLD-600/TLD-700) and two bubble detectors (one BD-100R and one BDS-1500 from Bubble Technology Industries, Canada). The CPND was developed with the aim of having crude neutron spectrometric capability, universal applicability, better angular response, and an improved lower limit of detection (LLD). The CPND has been well characterized in the following areas: reusability, linearity, lower limit of detection (LLD), detection capability in mixed neutron-gamma fields, angular dependence, and neutron energy dependence. The characterization was accomplished with irradiations using a ^{238} Pu-Be source, a ^{252} Cf(D_2O) source, a ^{252}Cf source, a ^ {252}Cf(PE) source, monoenergetic neutrons from accelerator and reactor filtered beams, ^ {137}Cs, and X-rays. Optimum signal readout procedures, signal processing techniques, routine operational usage, and neutron dose equivalent evaluation algorithms for the CPND were developed with the goals of having the best precision and accuracy as well as being convenient to use. Various reference spectra were developed to evaluate the performance (mainly the spectrometric and the dose equivalent measurement capabilities) of the CPND. The performance of the CPND was evaluated by in-situ tests in radiation fields existing in the working environment at ORNL. The spectra in these areas were measured previously with a calibrated Bonner multisphere spectrometer. The CPND also was tested with laboratory radioisotopic sources in single-source and multi-source exposure situations. Finally, the CPND was tested by participating in the fourteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study. The results of the tests mentioned above demonstrated that the CPND meets the ambitious design purposes

  5. SU-E-T-101: Determination and Comparison of Correction Factors Obtained for TLDs in Small Field Lung Heterogenous Phantom Using Acuros XB and EGSnrc

    SciTech Connect

    Soh, R; Lee, J; Harianto, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine and compare the correction factors obtained for TLDs in 2 × 2cm{sup 2} small field in lung heterogenous phantom using Acuros XB (AXB) and EGSnrc. Methods: This study will simulate the correction factors due to the perturbation of TLD-100 chips (Harshaw/Thermoscientific, 3 × 3 × 0.9mm{sup 3}, 2.64g/cm{sup 3}) in small field lung medium for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). A physical lung phantom was simulated by a 14cm thick composite cork phantom (0.27g/cm{sup 3}, HU:-743 ± 11) sandwiched between 4cm thick Plastic Water (CIRS,Norfolk). Composite cork has been shown to be a good lung substitute material for dosimetric studies. 6MV photon beam from Varian Clinac iX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with field size 2 × 2cm{sup 2} was simulated. Depth dose profiles were obtained from the Eclipse treatment planning system Acuros XB (AXB) and independently from DOSxyznrc, EGSnrc. Correction factors was calculated by the ratio of unperturbed to perturbed dose. Since AXB has limitations in simulating actual material compositions, EGSnrc will also simulate the AXB-based material composition for comparison to the actual lung phantom. Results: TLD-100, with its finite size and relatively high density, causes significant perturbation in 2 × 2cm{sup 2} small field in a low lung density phantom. Correction factors calculated by both EGSnrc and AXB was found to be as low as 0.9. It is expected that the correction factor obtained by EGSnrc wlll be more accurate as it is able to simulate the actual phantom material compositions. AXB have a limited material library, therefore it only approximates the composition of TLD, Composite cork and Plastic water, contributing to uncertainties in TLD correction factors. Conclusion: It is expected that the correction factors obtained by EGSnrc will be more accurate. Studies will be done to investigate the correction factors for higher energies where perturbation may be more pronounced.

  6. Personal Dose Equivalent Conversion Coefficients For Photons To 1 GEV

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.; Hertel, N. E.

    2010-09-27

    The personal dose equivalent, H{sub p}(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity Effective Dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk where personal dosemeters are usually worn and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 cm X 30 cm X 15 cm slab-type phantom. For this condition the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H{sub p,slab}(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several MeV, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H{sub p,slab}(10) and H{sub p,slab}(3) using both the kerma approximation and by tracking secondary charged particles. For H{sub p}(0.07) the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H{sub p,slab}(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared to the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on

  7. WE-D-17A-05: Measurement of Stray Radiation Within An Active Scanning Proton Therapy Facility: EURADOS WG9 Intercomparison Exercise of Active Dosimetry Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, J; Trompier, F; Stolarczyk, L; Klodowska, M; Liszka, M; Olko, P; Algranati, C; Fellin, F; Schwarz, M; Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M; Dufek, V; Frojdh, E; George, S; Harrison, R; Kubancak, J; Ploc, O; Knezevic, Z; Majer, M; Miljanic, S; and others

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intercomparison of active dosemeters in the measurement of stray radiation at the Trento active-scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: EURADOS WG9 carried out a large intercomparison exercise to test different dosemeters while measuring secondary neutrons within a 230 MeV scanned proton therapy facility. Detectors included two Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS), three tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCHawk) and six rem-counters (Wendi II, Berthold, RadEye, a regular and an extended-range Anderson and Braun NM2B counters). Measurements of neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), were done at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room while irradiating a water tank phantom with a 10 × 10 × 10 cc field. Results: A generally good agreement on H*(10) values was observed for the tested detectors. At distance of 2.25 m and angles 45°, 90° and 180° with respect to the beam axis, BSS and proportional counters agreed within 30%. Higher differences (up to 60%) were observed at the closest and farthest distances, i.e. at positions where detectors sensitivity, energy, fluence and angular response are highly dependent on neutron spectra (flux and energy). The highest neutron H*(10) value, ∼60 microSv/Gy, was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H*(10) decreased significantly with the distance from the isocenter dropping to 1.1 microSv/Gy at 4.25 m and 90° from beam axis, ∼2 nanoSv/Gy at the entrance of the maze, 0.2 nanoSv/Gy at the door outside the room and below detection limit in the gantry control room and at an adjacent room. These values remain considerately lower than those of passively scattered proton beams. BSS and Hawk unfolded spectra provide valuable inputs when studying the response of each detector. Conclusion: TEPCs and BSS enable accurate measurements of stray neutrons while other rem-meters also give satisfactory results but require further improvements to reduce uncertainties.

  8. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for photons to 1 GeV.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2011-04-01

    The personal dose equivalent, H(p)(d), is the quantity recommended by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) to be used as an approximation of the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations. The personal dose equivalent can be defined for any location and depth within the body. Typically, the location of interest is the trunk, where personal dosemeters are usually worn, and in this instance a suitable approximation is a 30 × 30 × 15 cm(3) slab-type phantom. For this condition, the personal dose equivalent is denoted as H(p,slab)(d) and the depths, d, are taken to be 0.007 cm for non-penetrating and 1 cm for penetrating radiation. In operational radiation protection a third depth, 0.3 cm, is used to approximate the dose to the lens of the eye. A number of conversion coefficients for photons are available for incident energies up to several megaelectronvolts, however, data to higher energies are limited. In this work, conversion coefficients up to 1 GeV have been calculated for H(p,slab)(10) and H(p,slab)(3) both by using the kerma approximation and tracking secondary charged particles. For H(p)(0.07), the conversion coefficients were calculated, but only to 10 MeV due to computational limitations. Additionally, conversions from air kerma to H(p,slab)(d) have been determined and are reported. The conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, but analytical fits of the coefficients over the energy range are provided. Since the inclusion of air can influence the production of secondary charged particles incident on the face of the phantom, conversion coefficients have been determined both in vacuo and with the source and slab immersed within a sphere in air. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared with the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological

  9. Past and future application of solid-state detectors in manned spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Reitz, Guenther

    2006-01-01

    The radiation exposure in space missions can be reduced by careful mission planning and appropriate measures, such as provision of a radiation shelter, but it cannot be eliminated. The reason for that is the high penetration capability of the radiation components owing to their high energies. Radiation is therefore an acknowledged primary concern for manned spaceflight and is a potentially limiting factor for long-term orbital and interplanetary missions. The radiation environment is a complex mixture of charged particles of solar and galactic origin and of the radiation belts, as well as of secondary particles produced in interactions of the galactic cosmic particles with the nuclei of atmosphere of the earth. The complexity even increases by placing a spacecraft into this environment owing to the interaction of the radiation components with the shielding material. Therefore it is a challenge to provide for appropriate measurements in this radiation field, coping with the limited resources on experiment power and mass. Solid-state dosemeters were already chosen for measurements in the first manned flights. Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) and plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD) especially found a preferred application because they are light-weighted, need no power supply and they are tissue-equivalent. Most of the data available until 1996 were gathered by using these passive detectors; this especially holds for heavy ion particle spectra. The systems, supplemented by converter foils or fission detectors and bubble detectors, provide information on dose, particle flux-, energy- and linear energy transfer spectra of the ionising radiation and neutron fluxes and doses. From 1989, silicon detectors were used for dose and flux measurements and later on for particle spectrometry. Silicon detectors were demonstrated as a powerful tool for the description of space radiation environment. Optical simulated luminescence (OSL) detectors have now been introduced as a

  10. Experimental qualification of a code for optimizing gamma irradiation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosse, D. C.; Leizier, J. J. M.; Keraron, Y.; Lallemant, T. F.; Perdriau, P. D. M.

    Dose computation codes are a prerequisite for the design of gamma irradiation facilities. Code quality is a basic factor in the achievement of sound economic and technical performance by the facility. This paper covers the validation of a code by reference dosimetry experiments. Developed by the "Société Générale pour les Techniques Nouvelles" (SGN), a supplier of irradiation facilities and member of the CEA Group, the code is currently used by that company. (ERHART, KERARON, 1986) Experimental data were obtained under conditions representative of those prevailing in the gamma irradiation of foodstuffs. Irradiation was performed in POSEIDON, a Cobalt 60 cell of ORIS-I. Several Cobalt 60 rods of known activity are arranged in a planar array typical of industrial irradiation facilities. Pallet density is uniform, ranging from 0 (air) to 0.6. Reference dosimetry measurements were performed by the "Laboratoire de Métrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants" (LMRI) of the "Bureau National de Métrologie" (BNM). The procedure is based on the positioning of more than 300 ESR/alanine dosemeters throughout the various target volumes used. The reference quantity was the absorbed dose in water. The code was validated by a comparison of experimental and computed data. It has proved to be an effective tool for the design of facilities meeting the specific requirements applicable to foodstuff irradiation, which are frequently found difficult to meet.

  11. Quality assurance of environmental gamma radiation monitoring in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Stuhec, M; Zorko, B; Mitić, D; Miljanić, S; Ranogajec-Komor, M

    2006-01-01

    Environmental gamma radiation monitoring established in Slovenia consists of a network of multifunctional gamma monitors (MFMs) based on pairs of Geiger-Müller counters and a network of measuring sites with high-sensitive thermoluminiscence dosemeters. The measuring points are evenly spread across Slovenia, located at the meteorological stations and more densely on additional locations around the Krsko NPP. The MFM network has a 2-fold function with one sensor used for the purpose of early warning system in near surroundings of the NPP and the other, more sensitive, for natural radiation monitoring. The paper summarises activities to establish quality assurance of the environmental gamma radiation measurements in Slovenia, with a critical view of the results in comparison with the international standards and recommendations. While the results of linearity and energy dependence tests were satisfying, on-field intercomparison showed that the inherent signal of one of the monitors (MFM) has to be taken into account in the range of environmental background radiation. PMID:16410289

  12. Estimation of patient doses for common diagnostic X-ray examinations in Latvian hospitals, analysis of radiographic techniques and comparison with European guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bogucarskis, K; Salmins, A; Gfirtner, H; Anatschkowa, E

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the estimation of doses received by patients undergoing radiological examinations in order to establish dose reference levels (DRLs) in Latvia. Several large hospitals, small hospitals and private practices were selected for patient dose measurements. The measurements were carried out using calibrated thermoluminiscence dosemeters attached to the patient's skin. Exposure parameters and patient's data were recorded. The entrance surface doses (ESDs) to patients undergoing several common X-ray examinations (chest AP/PA, chest LAT, lumbar spine AP/PA, lumbar spine LAT and pelvis) were measured. Data concerning the kV(p) settings, used type of films, focus-film distance and the ESD values were analysed and compared with those recommended by the European Community (EC). Among the different hospitals and private practices, discrepancies in the patient doses and techniques used for the examination were found, where the doses exceeded the EC recommended values owing to a very low kV(p) and a very low sensitivity of the screen film combinations used. PMID:15933103

  13. Prostatic artery embolization: radiation exposure to patients and staff.

    PubMed

    Garzón, W J; Andrade, G; Dubourcq, F; Abud, D G; Bredow, M; Khoury, H J; Kramer, R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation doses to patients and staff received from the first cases of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) conducted in a public hospital in Recife, Brazil. Five PAE procedures for 5 men diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia were investigated. In order to characterize patient exposure, dosimetric quantities, such as the air kerma-area product (P KA), the cumulative air kerma at the interventional reference point (Ka,r), the number of images, etc, were registered. To evaluate the possibility for deterministic effects, the peak skin dose (PSD) was measured using radiochromic films. For evaluation of personal dose equivalent and effective dose to the medical staff, thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD-100) were used. The effective dose was estimated using the double dosimetry alghoritm of von Boetticher. The results showed that the mean patient's PSD per procedure was 2674.2 mGy. With regard to the medical staff, the mean, minimum and maximum effective doses estimated per procedure were: 18 μSv, 12 μSv and 21 μSv respectively. High personal equivalent doses were found for the feet, hands and lens of the eye, due to the use of multiple left anterior oblique projections and the improper use of the suspended lead screen and the lead curtain during procedures. PMID:27025551

  14. Evaluation of staff, patient and foetal radiation doses due to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures in a pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Huda, A; Garzón, W J; Filho, G C L; Vieira, B; Kramer, R; Xu, X G; Gao, Y; Khoury, H J

    2016-03-01

    The use of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in pregnant patients is not rare. Most studies on the safety and efficacy of these procedures report short- and long-term pregnancy outcomes and but not foetal absorbed doses. This investigation reports on an ERCP procedure for a 40-y-old woman who was 32-34 weeks pregnant. Thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD 100) were used to measure doses received by the patient and the staff. Additionally, Monte Carlo calculations were performed using a 3D computational phantom representing a 9-month pregnant patient to estimate the foetal absorbed dose. The results show that the spleen of the mother received the largest absorbed dose of 12.18 mGy since it was closer to the source than other internal organs. For the foetus and uterus, the lowest absorbed dose was found to be 0.01 mGy to the foetal brain, while the largest absorbed dose was estimated to be 0.13 mGy to the placenta. PMID:26084305

  15. Dosimetric monitoring in Ukraine--present status and path to the future.

    PubMed

    Chumak, V; Boguslavskaya, A

    2007-01-01

    Despite wide use of nuclear energy and radiation sources in industry and medicine, there is no centralised dose accounting system in Ukraine; existing dosimetry services operate obsolete manual thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) readers and do not meet modern proficiency standards. Currently, dosimetric monitoring is required for approximately 42,000 occupationally exposed workers, including 9100 in medicine, 17,000 employees of nuclear power plants and approximately 16,000 workers dealing with other sources of occupational exposure. This article presents the plan of elaboration of the United System for monitoring and registration of individual doses which has the aim of harmonisation of individual monitoring in Ukraine through securing methodical unity; scientific and methodological guidance of individual dosimetric control; procurement of common technical policy regarding nomenclature and operation of instrumentation; implementation of quality assurance programmes; development and support of information infrastructure, in particular operation of the national registry of individual doses; training and certification of personnel engaged in the system of individual dosimetric monitoring. PMID:16987910

  16. Paediatric personnel extremity dose study.

    PubMed

    Gallet, J M C; Reed, M H

    2002-03-01

    Concern has been expressed in paediatric radiology regarding the magnitude of the extremity dose received by attending personnel during routine fluoroscopic procedures and CT. Common procedures that may be of short duration in adults can be quite the opposite in paediatric patients. The extremities of attending personnel are more likely to be exposed to the primary beam and for a longer period of time owing to a variety of reasons such as assisting in the procedure or physically restraining the patient during the examination. During the period mid 1998 to mid 2000, two paediatric radiologists, four senior radiographers and two paediatric nurses were monitored using ring thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Each participant wore the ring TLD on either the left or right ring finger, depending on which hand the individual favoured. Left/right asymmetrical studies were not conducted, nor were records kept of whether an examination used a grid or gridless technique. Initial apprehension about higher paediatric fluoroscopic and CT extremity doses was dispelled as a result of this quantitative dosimetric study. PMID:11932219

  17. Personnel doses in haemodynamic units in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kottou, S; Neofotistou, V; Tsapaki, V; Lobotessi, H; Manetou, A; Molfetas, M G

    2001-01-01

    Personnel of haemodynamic and interventional radiology units receive continuously increasing radiation doses due to extended fluoroscopy. Moreover, there is not a parallel increase in the number of cardiology specialists involved. Doses received by 15 cardiologists and 5 nurses, in 5 Athenian hospitals were measured using thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) and film badges. The workload and examination protocol of each cardiologist, the technical characteristics of the X ray unit, as well as availability and use of protective equipment were recorded. Results show that doses measured by TLD and film badges differ due mainly to the irregular wear of the latter. Although X ray units performed comparably with each other, dose per procedure received by each cardiologist varied widely, due to differences in examination protocol and beam collimation used. In all cases, nurses' dose was approximately one fourth of cardiologists' dose. In half of the cases assessed, the protective equipment available was not in full use. Estimation of dose per procedure, taking into account personnel's workload assesses annual personnel doses. Evaluation of risk level and check of compliance with regulatory dose limits should be part of continuing radiation protection education. PMID:11487818

  18. Studies on automatic hot gas reader used in the countrywide personnel monitoring programme.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munish; Alagu Raja, E; Prasad, L C; Popli, K L; Kher, R K; Bhatt, B C

    2005-01-01

    In India, approximately 58,000 radiation workers are monitored using locally made CaSO4:Dy teflon embedded thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD) badge system. The automatic hot gas readers developed locally are also used in TL measurements. The hot gas reader system has many advantages over the manual readers used previously and has completely replaced the manual reader system in all TLD personnel monitoring units in India. In the present study, the new reader system is studied and a theoretical attempt has been made to interpret the experimentally obtained results. The glow curves are generated theoretically and are also plotted experimentally. It has been found that the heat capacity of the heating gas, which is responsible for the transfer of heat, has a role in deciding the position of peak and is verified experimentally using different gas flow rates of nitrogen and argon as heating gases in the reader. The theoretical study may also be helpful in fitting the experimentally obtained glow curves and, therefore, the elimination of unwanted non-radiation-induced contributions, such as dark current, electronic spikes, light leakage and triboluminescence that generally distort the glow curve shape, can be achieved. PMID:15843392

  19. Effectiveness of thyroid gland shielding in dental CBCT using a paediatric anthropomorphic phantom

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J; Horner, K; Theodorakou, C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of thyroid shielding in dental CBCT examinations using a paediatric anthropomorphic phantom. Methods: An ATOM® 706-C anthropomorphic phantom (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems Inc., Norfolk, VA) representing a 10-year-old child was loaded with six thermoluminescent dosemeters positioned at the level of the thyroid gland. Absorbed doses to the thyroid were measured for five commercially available thyroid shields using a large field of view (FOV). Results: A statistically significant thyroid gland dose reduction was found using thyroid shielding for paediatric CBCT examinations for a large FOV. In addition, a statistically significant difference in thyroid gland doses was found depending on the position of the thyroid gland. There was little difference in the effectiveness of thyroid shielding when using a lead vs a lead-equivalent thyroid shield. Similar dose reduction was found using 0.25- and 0.50-mm lead-equivalent thyroid shields. Conclusions: Thyroid shields are to be recommended when undertaking large FOV CBCT examinations on young patients. PMID:25411710

  20. Dose reduction in orthodontic lateral cephalography: dosimetric evaluation of a novel cephalographic thyroid protector (CTP) and anatomical cranial collimation (ACC)

    PubMed Central

    Rottke, D; van der Stelt, P F; Berkhout, W E R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To test the dose-reducing capabilities of a novel thyroid protection device and a recently introduced cranial collimator to be used in orthodontic lateral cephalography. Methods: Cephalographic thyroid protector (CTP) was designed to shield the thyroid while leaving the cervical vertebrae depicted. Using a RANDO® head phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) equipped with dosemeters and a Proline XC (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) cephalograph, lateral cephalograms were taken, and the effective dose (ED) was calculated for four protocols: (1) without shielding; (2) with CTP; (3) with CTP and anatomical cranial collimator (ACC); and (4) with a thyroid collar (TC). Results: The ED for the respective protocols was (1) 8.51; (2) 5.39; (3) 3.50; and (4) 4.97 µSv. The organ dose for the thyroid was reduced from 30.17 to 4.50 µSv in Protocols 2 and 3 and to 3.33 µSv in Protocol 4. Conclusions: The use of just the CTP (Protocol 2) resulted in a 36.8% reduction of the ED of a lateral cephalogram. This was comparable to the classical TC (Protocol 4). A 58.8% reduction of the ED was obtained when combining CTP and ACC (Protocol 3). The dose to the radiosensitive thyroid gland was reduced by 85% in Protocols 2 and 3 and by 89% in Protocol 4. PMID:25564885

  1. The effective dose of different scanning protocols using the Sirona GALILEOS® comfort CBCT scanner

    PubMed Central

    Bohay, R; Kaci, L; Barnett, R; Battista, J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effective dose and CT dose index (CTDI) for a range of imaging protocols using the Sirona GALILEOS® Comfort CBCT scanner (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Bensheim, Germany). Methods: Calibrated optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters were placed at 26 sites in the head and neck of a modified RANDO® phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Greenwich, NY). Effective dose was calculated for 12 different scanning protocols. CTDI measurements were also performed to determine the dose–length product (DLP) and the ratio of effective dose to DLP for each scanning protocol. Results: The effective dose for a full maxillomandibular scan at 42 mAs was 102 ± 1 μSv and remained unchanged with varying contrast and resolution settings. This compares with 71 μSv for a maxillary scan and 76 μSv for a mandibular scan with identical milliampere-seconds (mAs) at high contrast and resolution settings. Conclusions: Changes to mAs and beam collimation have a significant influence on effective dose. Effective dose and DLP vary linearly with mAs. A collimated maxillary or mandibular scan decreases effective dose by approximately 29% and 24%, respectively, as compared with a full maxillomandibular scan. Changes to contrast and resolution settings have little influence on effective dose. This study provides data for setting individualized patient exposure protocols to minimize patient dose from ionizing radiation used for diagnostic or treatment planning tasks in dentistry. PMID:25358865

  2. Radiation protection in fixed PET/CT facilities--design and operation.

    PubMed

    Peet, D J; Morton, R; Hussein, M; Alsafi, K; Spyrou, N

    2012-05-01

    We describe the design of a fixed positron emission tomography (PET)/CT facility and the use of a simulated instantaneous dose-rate plot to visually highlight areas of potentially high radiation exposure. We also illustrate the practical implementation of basic radiation protection principles based on the use of distance and shielding and the minimisation of time spent in hot areas. Staff whole body doses for 4 years are presented with results of an optimisation study analysing the dose arising from the different phases within each study using direct reading dosemeters. The total whole body dose for all staff for each patient fell from 9.5 μSv in the first full year of operation to 4.8 µSv in 2008. The maximum dose to an individual member of staff per patient decreased over the same period from 3.2 to 0.9 µSv. The optimisation study showed that the highest dose was recorded during the injection phase. PMID:21976626

  3. IMPLICATIONS OF PATIENT CENTRING ON ORGAN DOSE IN COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Bharti; Sandborg, Michael; Althén, Jonas Nilsson

    2016-06-01

    Automatic exposure control (AEC) in computed tomography (CT) facilitates optimisation of dose absorbed by the patient. The use of AEC requires appropriate 'patient centring' within the gantry, since positioning the patient off-centre may affect both image quality and absorbed dose. The aim of this experimental study was to measure the variation in organ and abdominal surface dose during CT examinations of the head, neck/thorax and abdomen. The dose was compared at the isocenter with two off-centre positions-ventral and dorsal to the isocenter. Measurements were made with an anthropomorphic adult phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters. Organs and surfaces for ventral regions received lesser dose (5.6-39.0 %) than the isocenter when the phantom was positioned +3 cm off-centre. Similarly, organ and surface doses for dorsal regions were reduced by 5.0-21.0 % at -5 cm off-centre. Therefore, correct vertical positioning of the patient at the gantry isocenter is important to maintain optimal imaging conditions. PMID:26743256

  4. Visual and numerical methods to measure patient skin doses in interventional procedures using radiochromic XR-RV2 films.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, R; Vano, E; Fernández, J M; Machado, A; Roas, N

    2011-09-01

    Radiochromic XR-RV2 films are considered as one of the best dosemeters to measure patient skin doses in fluoroscopy-guided interventional procedures. To fulfil this purpose, they need to be calibrated with diagnostic energies and doses beyond several Gray. The vendor provides a visual calibration strip to estimate the absorbed dose. Differences between visual dose estimation versus film digitisation were investigated. The influence of backscatter radiation on film sensitivity was also investigated and the sources of uncertainty were analysed when skin doses were measured with these films. When based on the visual comparison with the strip, the estimation of the dose resulted in an error of 50 % (2 Gy in the region around 4 Gy). However, when using numerical methods after film digitisation, the uncertainty in dose measurement fell to 7-14 % in the dose range of interest. Calibration under backscatter conditions demonstrates that the  'in air' calibration underestimates the doses by 7 %. When the dose was measured with a calibration method based on 16 bits grey digitisation, uncertainty was twice higher than when the red channel from red, green, blue digitised images was used. PMID:21757442

  5. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for electrons to 1 Ge V.

    PubMed

    Veinot, K G; Hertel, N E

    2012-04-01

    In a previous paper, conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent, H(p)(d), for photons were reported. This note reports values for electrons calculated using similar techniques. The personal dose equivalent is the quantity used to approximate the protection quantity effective dose when performing personal dosemeter calibrations and in practice the personal dose equivalent is determined using a 30×30×15 cm slab-type phantom. Conversion coefficients to 1 GeV have been calculated for H(p)(10), H(p)(3) and H(p)(0.07) in the recommended slab phantom. Although the conversion coefficients were determined for discrete incident energies, analytical fits of the conversion coefficients over the energy range are provided using a similar formulation as in the photon results previously reported. The conversion coefficients for the personal dose equivalent are compared with the appropriate protection quantity, calculated according to the recommendations of the latest International Commission on Radiological Protection guidance. Effects of eyewear on H(p)(3) are also discussed. PMID:21715410

  6. Lyoluminescence dosimetry in photon and fast neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Puite, K J; Crebolder, D L

    1977-11-01

    The lyoluminescence (LL) technique using mannose, a monosaccharide, is described. Dose-response curves for 60Co-gamma-rays (5 rad to 120 krad), fission neutrons, 5.3 MeV and 15 MeV neutrons (100 rad to 20 krad) have been measured. The close tissue-equivalence of mannose makes this material well suited for dosimetric use in low energy X-ray fields for radiotherapy and radiobiology. It also provides a cheap, simple and reproducible dosemeter in industrial applications of radiation (sprouting inhibition of onions and potatoes; control of insect infestation). After correction for the gamma contamination of the neutron beam the LL signal per rad in ICRU muscle tissue from the neutron irradiations has been derived and the relative effectiveness of the LL signal for fast neutrons in mannose has been calculated as 0.34 +/- 0.03 (fission neutrons), 0.63 +/- 0.07 (5.3 MeV neutrons) and 0.74 +/- 0.05 (15 MeV neutrons). These results are compared with data from other systems. It is concluded that mannose can be used as a transfer system in neutron dosimetry, if its variation in sensitivity with neutron energy is taken into account. PMID:594143

  7. Low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies (6 to 16 keV) at SSRL beamline 1-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipe, N. E.; Chatterji, S.; Fassò, A.; Kase, K. R.; Seefred, R.; Olko, P.; Bilski, P.; Soares, C.

    1997-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation facilities provide a unique opportunity for low-energy x-ray dosimetry studies because of the availability of monochromatic x-ray beams. Results of such studies performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) are described. Polish lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs), MTS-N(LiF:Mg, Ti- 0.4 mm thick), MCP-N (LiF:Mg, Cu, P - 0.4 mm thick) were exposed free in air to monochromatic x-rays (6-16 keV). These exposures were monitored with an SSRL ionization chamber. The responses (counts/Gy) of MTS-N and MCP-N were generally found to increase with increasing energy. The response at 16 keV is about 3 and 4 times higher than the response at 6 keV for MTS-N and MCP-N, respectively. Irradiation at 6 keV indicates a fairly linear dose response for both type of TLDs over a dose range of 0.01 to 0.4 Gy. In addition there appears to be no significant difference in responses between irradiating the TLDs from the front and the back sides. The energy response of the PTW ionization chamber type 23342 relative to the SSRL ionization chamber is within ±4.5% between 6 and 16 keV. Both the TLDs and the PTW ionization chamber can also be used for beam dosimetry.

  8. Strict X-ray beam collimation for facial bones examination can increase lens exposure

    PubMed Central

    Powys, R; Robinson, J; Kench, P L; Ryan, J; Brennan, P C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It is well accepted that collimation is a cost-effective dose-reducing tool for X-ray examinations. This phantom-based study investigated the impact of X-ray beam collimation on radiation dose to the lenses of the eyes and thyroid along with the effect on image quality in facial bone radiography. Methods A three-view series (occipitomental, occipitomental 30 and lateral) was investigated, and radiation doses to the lenses and thyroid were measured using an Unfors dosemeter. Images were assessed by six experienced observers using a visual grading analysis and a total of 5400 observations were made. Results Strict collimation significantly (p<0.0001) reduced the radiation dose to the lenses of the eyes and thyroid when using a fixed projection-specific exposure. With a variable exposure technique (fixed exit dose, to simulate the behaviour of an automatic exposure control), while strict collimation was again shown to reduce thyroid dose, higher lens doses were demonstrated when compared with larger fields of exposure. Image quality was found to significantly improve using strict collimation, with observer preference being demonstrated using visual grading characteristic curves. Conclusion The complexities of optimising radiographic techniques have been shown and the data presented emphasise the importance of examining dose-reducing strategies in a comprehensive way. PMID:22374279

  9. Characterization of the scattered radiation field around an x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struelens, Lara; Kauwenberghs, Kim; Vanhavere, Filip

    2011-05-01

    To determine patient doses or doses to the medical staff, Monte Carlo calculations are frequently applied. In these kinds of calculations the x-ray tube is often simplified to make the calculations faster. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of simplifications in the Monte Carlo set-up of the x-ray tube on the observed differences between measurements and calculations in the scattered field. At a distance of 50 and 100 cm from the focal spot, air kerma calculations are done for different angles from -90° to 90° from the central beam axis in steps of 15° with the Monte Carlo software code MCNP-X. Different calculations were performed where each time a component of the simulated x-ray tube (collimator, filters, etc) or the environment (walls) is included. Scattered doses are also measured with thermoluminescent dosemeters. For the most simplified geometry of the x-ray tube, measurements are on average 70% larger than the calculated results. A much better agreement with the measurements is observed for more realistic calculations. The current work applies to a particular source in the SCK•CEN calibration laboratory; therefore the obtained results are representative and relevant for studies in calibration laboratories. As clinical sources have more shielding material and as in real imaging situations the scatter generated at the patient is much larger than the scatter leaking from the source, the results of this study have a limited impact on the wider field of clinical dosimetry.

  10. Photoneutron contamination from an 18 MV Saturne medical linear accelerator in the treatment room.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Mostafa; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Jabbari, Keyvan; Nasri-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad; Siavashpour, Zahra; Gheisari, Ruhollah; Amiri, Behnam

    2013-09-01

    Dose escalation with high-energy X rays of medical linear accelerators (linacs) in radiotherapy offers several distinct advantages over the lower energy photons. However, owing to photoneutron reactions, interaction of high-energy photons (>8 MV) with various high-Z nuclei of the materials in the linac head components produces unavoidable neutrons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the photoneutron dose equivalent per unit therapeutic X-ray dose of 18 MV, GE Saturne 20 linac in the treatment room using Monte Carlo (MC) MCNP linac head full simulation as well as thermoluminescence dosemeter measurements. This machine is one of the old linac models manufactured by General Electric Company; however, it is widely used in the developing countries because of low cost and simple maintenance for radiotherapy applications. The results showed a significant photoneutron dose from Saturne 20 linac head components especially at distances near the linac head (<150 cm). Results of this work could be used in several applications, especially designing bunker and entrance door shielding against neutrons produced by photoneutron reactions in GE Saturne 20. However, a detailed cost optimisation for a specific room would require a dedicated calculation. PMID:23538892

  11. Comparison of measured and calculated spatial dose distributions for a bench-mark 106Ru/106Rh hot particle source.

    PubMed

    Aydarous, A Sh; Charles, M W; Darley, P J

    2008-01-01

    This study is a part of a programme of research to provide validated dose measurement and calculation techniques for beta emitting hot particles by the construction of well-defined model hot particle sources. This enables parallel measurements and calculations to be critically compared. This particular study concentrates on the high-energy beta emitter, (106)Ru/(106)Rh (Emax = 3.54 MeV). This source is a common constituent of failed nuclear fuel, particularly in accident situations. The depth dose distributions were measured using radiochromic dye film (RDF); an imaging photon detector coupled to an LiF thermoluminescent dosemeter (LiF-IPD) and an extrapolation ionisation chamber (ECH). Dose calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP4C. Doses were measured and calculated as average values over various areas and depths. Of particular interest are the doses at depths of 7 and 30-50 mg cm(-2), and averaged over an area of 1 cm2, as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for use in routine and accidental over-exposures of the skin. In this case, the average ratios (MCNP/measurement) for RDF, ECH and LiF-IPD were 1.07 +/- 0.02, 1.02 +/- 0.01 and 0.83 +/- 0.16, respectively. There are significantly greater discrepancies between the ECH and LiF-IPD measurement techniques and calculations-particularly for shallow depths and small averaging areas. PMID:18083995

  12. On-board TLD measurements on MIR and ISS.

    PubMed

    Deme, S; Apáthy, I; Pázmándi, T; Benton, E R; Reitz, G; Akatov, Y

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents results from dosimetric measurements made aboard the Mir space station and the International Space Station (ISS) using the Pille portable thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) system. This paper includes the dosimetry mapping and automatic readout (trapped and untrapped components) results from Mir and ISS. The mean dose rate in 2001-2003 was 7 microGy h(-1). Using the hourly measuring period in automatic mode, doses from both galactic (independent of South Atlantic Anomaly--SAA) and SAA components were determined during Euromir'95 experiment. The mean total dose rate was 12.5 microGy h(-1), while the SAA contribution was 6.2 microGy h(-1). A similar measurement was performed on ISS in 2001 and in 2003. Both the manual and automatic measurements show a significant decrease in dose rate in 2001 in comparison to 1995-1997 due to the change in solar activity. For determination of the high linear energy transfer contribution from the radiation field during the ISS mapping experiment, three CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) were co-located with each TL detector. Analysis of the combined TLD and PNTD measurements showed a typical mean TLD efficiency of 84%, a dose contribution <10 keV microm(-1) of 17%, and an average quality factor of 1.95. PMID:16709717

  13. Maintaining the accuracy of the (60)Co calibration service at the ARPANSA post source replacement in 2010.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Chris; Butler, Duncan; Webb, David; Wright, Tracy; Lye, Jessica; Ramanathan, Ganesan; Harty, Peter; Takau, Viliami

    2015-06-01

    The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) maintains a (60)Co teletherapy source primarily for the calibration of therapy dosemeters. The source and encapsulating head were replaced in early 2010 with an Eldorado 78 head and new (60)Co source. In this article we present the results of ongoing accuracy and stability measurements since the replacement. A number of formal and informal indirect comparisons have been carried out with laboratories holding primary and secondary standards for (60)Co. ARPANSA chambers have also been calibrated at international primary standard laboratories allowing comparison of calibration coefficients and thus (60)Co absorbed dose standards. (60)Co calibration coefficients supplied by manufacturers of chambers were compared to those measured at the ARPANSA when this calibration was traceable to a primary standard. ARPANSA also participates in an annual international mailed dosimetry audit conducted by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The results thus far demonstrate that the absorbed doses to water delivered by the new ARPANSA (60)Co source are consistent with international doses within the stated uncertainties. PMID:25749989

  14. Evaluation of radiation doses in patient and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures.

    PubMed

    Seo, Deoknam; Kim, Kie Hwan; Kim, Jung-Su; Han, Seonggyu; Park, Kyung; Kim, Jungmin

    2016-03-01

    The radiation exposure dose must be optimised because the hazard resulting from an interventional radiology procedure is long term depending on the patient. The aim of this study was to measure the radiation doses received by the patients and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. Data were collected during 126 ERCP procedures, including the dose-area product (DAP), entrance dose (ED), effective dose (E), fluoroscopy time (T) and number of digital radiographs (F). The medical staff members each wore a personal thermoluminescence dosemeter to monitor exposure during ERCP procedures. The mean DAP, ED, E and T were 47.06 Gy cm(2), 196.06 mGy, 8.93 mSv, 7.65 min and 9.21 images, respectively. The mean dose to the staff was 0.175 mSv and that to the assistant was 0.069 mSv. The dose to the medical staff was minimal when appropriate protective measures were used. The large variation in the patient doses must be further investigated. PMID:26269518

  15. Thermoluminescence in CVD diamond films: application to actinometric dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Barboza-Flores, M; Meléndrez, R; Chernov, V; Castañeda, B; Pedroza-Montero, M; Gan, B; Ahn, J; Zhang, Q; Yoon, S F

    2002-01-01

    Diamond is considered a tissue-equivalent material since its atomic number (Z =6) is close to the effective atomic number of biological tissue (Z =7.42). Such a situation makes it suitable for radiation detection purposes in medical applications. In the present work the analysis is reported of the thermoluminescence (TL) and dosimetric features of chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond film samples subjected to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in the actinometric region. The TL glow curve shows peaks at 120, 220), 320 and 370 degrees C. The 120 and 370 degrees C peaks are too weak and the first one fades away in a few seconds after exposure. The overall room temperature fading shows a 50% TL decay 30 min after exposure. The 320 degrees C glow peak is considered to be the most adequate for dosimetric applications due to its low fading and linear TL behaviour as a function of UV dose in the 180-260 nm range. The TL excitation spectrum presents a broad band with at least two overlapped components around 205 and 220 nm. The results indicate that the TL behaviour of CVD diamond film can be a good alternative to the currently available dosemeter and detector in the actinometric region as well as in clinical and medical applications. PMID:12382917

  16. Radiation exposure in interventional radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, N. G. V.; Braz, D.; Vallim, M. A.; Filho, L. G. P.; Azevedo, F. S.; Barroso, R. C.; Lopes, R. T.

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate dose values in patients and staff involved in some interventional radiology procedures. Doses have been measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters for single procedures (such as renal and cerebral arteriography, transjungular intrahepatic portasystemic shunt (TIPS) and chemoembolization). The magnitude of doses through the hands of interventional radiologists has been studied. Dose levels were evaluated in three points for patients (eye, thyroid and gonads). The dose-area product (DAP) was also investigated using a Diamentor (PTW-M2). The dose in extremities was estimated for a professional who generally performed one TIPS, two chemoembolizations, two cerebral arteriographies and two renal arteriographies in a week. The estimated annual radiation dose was converted to effective dose as suggested by the 453-MS/Brazil norm The annual dose values were 137.25 mSv for doctors, 40.27 mSv for nurses and 51.95 mSv for auxiliary doctors, and all these annual dose values are below the limit established. The maximum values of the dose obtained for patients were 6.91, 10.92 and 15.34 mGy close to eye, thyroid and gonads, respectively. The DAP values were evaluated for patients in the same interventional radiology procedures. The dose and DAP values obtained are in agreement with values encountered in the literature.

  17. Synthesis and characterisation of BaSo4:Eu thermoluminescence phosphor.

    PubMed

    Annalakshmi, O; Jose, M T; Madhusoodanan, U

    2012-06-01

    Polycrystalline powder samples of BaSO(4) doped with Eu(2+) were prepared by solid-state reaction in different reducing atmospheres. Photoluminescence (PL), thermoluminescence (TL), TL kinetic and dosimetric studies have been carried out in this phosphor. The TL glow curve of BaSO(4):Eu(2+) showed only a single peak at 513 K unlike other phosphors and the TL intensity is about three to four times higher than that of CaSO(4):Dy, which is currently used as the radiation dosemeter for personnel monitoring in India. The TL dose response of the phosphor was found to be linear up to the dose range of 10(3) Gy beyond which saturation sets in. PL and TL spectra showed the characteristic emission of Eu(2+) ion. The TL parameters such as trap depth (E) or the energy required to release the electron or hole from the trap, frequency factor (s) and the order of kinetics (b) are determined by different methods such as isothermal decay, initial rise and variable heating rate. PMID:22223718

  18. Evaluation of organ doses in CT examinations with an infant anthropomorphic phantom.

    PubMed

    Fujii, K; Akahane, K; Miyazaki, O; Horiuchi, T; Shimada, A; Nagmatsu, H; Yamauchi, M; Yamauchi-Kawaura, C; Kawasaki, T

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate organ doses in infant CT examinations with multi-detector row CT scanners. Radiation doses were measured with radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters set in various organ positions within a 1-y-old child anthropomorphic phantom and organ doses were evaluated from the measurement values. Doses for tissues or organs within the scan range were 28-36 mGy in an infant head CT, 3-11 mGy in a chest CT, 5-11 mGy in an abdominal-pelvic CT and 2-14 mGy in a cardiac CT. The doses varied by the differences in the types of CT scanners and scan parameters used at each medical facility. Compared with those for children of various ages, the doses in an infant CT protocol were found to be similar to or slightly smaller than those in a paediatric CT for 5- or 6-y-old children. PMID:21743079

  19. Integration of external and internal dosimetry in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Frei, D; Wernli, C; Baechler, S; Fischer, G; Jossen, H; Leupin, A; Lörtscher, Y; Mini, R; Otto, T; Schuh, R; Weidmann, U

    2007-01-01

    Individual monitoring regulations in Switzerland are based on the ICRP60 recommendations. The annual limit of 20 mSv for the effective dose applies to the sum of external and internal radiation. External radiation is monitored monthly or quarterly with TLD, DIS or CR-39 dosemeters by 10 approved external dosimetry services and reported as Hp(10) and Hp(0.07). Internal monitoring is done in two steps. At the workplace, simple screening measurements are done frequently in order to recognise a possible incorporation. If a nuclide dependent activity threshold is exceeded then one of the seven approved dosimetry services for internal radiation does an incorporation measurement to assess the committed effective dose E50. The dosimetry services report all the measured or assessed dose values to the employer and to the National Dose Registry. The employer records the annually accumulated dose values into the individual dose certificate of the occupationally exposed person, both the external dose Hp(10) and the internal dose E50 as well as the total effective dose E=Hp(10)+E50. Based on the national dose registry an annual report on the dosimetry in Switzerland is published which contains the statistics for the total effective dose, as well as separate statistics for external and internal exposure. PMID:17287205

  20. Comparison between direct measurements and modeled estimates of external radiation exposure among school children 18 to 30 months after the Fukushima nuclear accident in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Shuhei; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Hayano, Ryugo; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Yoneoka, Daisuke; Kami, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Yukio; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2015-01-20

    After a major radioactive incident, accurate dose reconstruction is important for evaluating health risks and appropriate radiation protection policies. After the 2011 Japan Fukushima nuclear incident, we assessed the level of agreement between the modeled and directly measured dose and estimated the uncertainties. The study population comprised 520 school children from Minamisoma city, located 20 km north of the nuclear plant. The annual dose 18–30 months after the incident was assessed using two approaches: estimation using the model proposed by the Japanese government and direct measurement by radiation dosemeters. The ratio of the average of modeled and measured doses was 3.0 (standard deviation (SD): 2.0). The reduction coefficient, an index for radiation attenuation properties, was 0.3 (SD: 0.1) on average, whereas the value used in the government model was 0.6. After adjusting for covariates, the coefficient had a significant negative correlation with the air dose rate in the dwelling location (p < 0.001), indicating that stronger building shielding effects are valuable in areas with higher air contamination levels. The present study demonstrated that some overestimation may have been related to uncertainties in radiation reduction effects, and that the air contamination level might provide a more important indicator of these effects. PMID:25514624

  1. Optimisation of X-ray examinations in Lithuania: start of implementation in mammography.

    PubMed

    Adliene, Diana; Adlys, Gediminas; Cerapaite, Reda; Jonaitiene, Egle; Cibulskaite, Inga

    2005-01-01

    Optimisation of medical X-ray examinations is very important for the enhancement of the reliability of the examination and for the reduction of the radiation dose to patients. Results of investigations of doses to patients during mammography using thermoluminescence dosemeters at different hospitals are presented together with a brief overview of the situation for mammography in Lithuania. It is shown that the entrance surface air kerma varies in a broad range and differed from hospital to hospital. Nevertheless the calculated values of average glandular dose (AGD) for a 'standard' breast being relatively high were comparable with those (3.2 mGy per exposure at net optical density 1.4) currently accepted by international authorities. Differences in AGD values evaluated at different hospitals demonstrate the existing potential for optimisation of the mammography screening procedures. The results of this investigation will be included in a database for patient doses in Lithuania and used for establishing a national reference dose level for mammography. Currently, reference levels recommended by international authorities are used in Lithuania. PMID:15933145

  2. Evaluation of dose from external irradiation for individuals living in areas affected by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Naito, Wataru; Uesaka, Motoki; Yamada, Chie; Ishii, Hideki

    2015-02-01

    In order to effectively and appropriately manage external radiation doses in the affected areas of Fukushima, it is important to identify when, where and how much exposure occurred. It is also necessary to quantitatively measure external exposure and air dose rates for different activity patterns in individuals living and working in Japanese-style buildings. The authors used a new personal dosemeter (D-shuttle) along with a global positioning system and geographical information system to relate personal dose rate with activity patterns and air dose rate. Hourly individual doses obtained by D-shuttle can provide an effective communication tool for those who want to identify when and how much exposure occurs. Personal monitoring of 26 volunteers showed that personal doses obtained from D-shuttle were ∼30% of cumulative air dose estimated by data from the airborne monitoring survey. This analysis showed that, for most study volunteers, the exposure from staying at home represented about half of the total cumulative dose. This suggests that even though the peak exposure doses may be observed outside of working hours, to develop appropriate countermeasures for external dose reduction, it is thus important to identify the contributions of individuals' time-activities. This study provides a valuable basis for developing a realistic and pragmatic method to estimate external doses of individuals in Fukushima. PMID:24982262

  3. Risk of radiation exposure to medical staff involved in interventional endourology.

    PubMed

    Hristova-Popova, J; Zagorska, A; Saltirov, I; Petkova, K; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim is to estimate the possibility the new annual dose limit for eye lens to be exceeded and to study the impact of protective shield. Radiation exposure to medical personnel was evaluated with EDD-30 dosemeter in positions of operating surgeon, assisting doctor and nurse. At the operator's typical position for diagnosis and treatment of the urinary tract, the lens dose rates were 0.9 mSv h(-1) and 0.06 mSv h(-1) without and with lead shield. At the operator's position typical for percutaneous intervention dose rates were 1.9 and 0.02 mSv h(-1), respectively. At typical workload, the annual eye lens dose to the main operator without protective screen was estimated to be 29 mSv. With lead screen, operator lens dose can be reduced by a factor of 15-95 according to the procedure. Installation and use of lead screen and use of lead glasses were recommended to the endourology medical team. PMID:25855076

  4. Estimation of doses received by patients undergoing radiological examinations in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, E; Vardalaki, E; Hourdakis, C J; Dimitriou, P

    2001-01-01

    This study deals with the estimation of doses received by patients undergoing radiological examinations in order to establish diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) within the process of optimisation of patients' exposure in Greece. Six large hospitals in Athens were selected and 385 patients made up the sample. The entrance surface doses (ESDs) to patients undertaking five common X ray examinations (chest, cervical spine, lumbar spine AP and LAT, pelvis) were estimated using both thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) attached to the patient's skin and an ionisation chamber for air kerma measurements. Exposure settings and patient's data were recorded. Results concerning the kilovoltage and focus-to-film-distance (FFD) settings and the ESD values were analysed and compared to those recommended by the EU. Discrepancies in the patient doses and techniques used for the examinations studied were found among the different hospitals denoting the importance of establishing a national quality assurance programme and examination protocols to ensure patient doses are kept as low as possible. All the examinations studied fulfilled the EU recommendations except that for the chest where the doses were considerably higher due to the use of low kVP settings. PMID:11548324

  5. 1983 international intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimetry systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Greene, R.T.; Sims, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    An international intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimetry systems was conducted during September 12-16, 1983, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the Health Physics Research Reactor operated in the pulse mode to simulate criticality accidents. This study marked the twentieth in a series of annual accident dosimetry intercomparisons conducted at ORNL. Participants from ten organizations attended this intercomparison and measured neutron and gamma doses at area monitoring stations and on phantoms for three different shield conditions. Results of this study indicate that foil activation techniques are the most popular and accurate method of determining accident-level neutron doses at area monitoring stations. For personnel monitoring, foil activation, blood sodium activation, and thermoluminescent (TL) methods are all capable of providing accurate dose estimates in a variety of radiation fields. All participants in this study used TLD's to determine gamma doses with very good results on the average. Chemical dosemeters were also shown to be capable of yielding accurate estimates of total neutron plus gamma doses in a variety of radiation fields. While 83% of all neutron measurements satisfied regulatory standards relative to reference values, only 39% of all gamma results satisfied corresponding guidelines for gamma measurements. These results indicate that continued improvement in accident dosimetry evaluation and measurement techniques is needed.

  6. Samarium-153 therapy for prostate cancer: the evaluation of urine activity, staff exposure and dose rate from patients.

    PubMed

    Parlak, Yasemin; Gumuser, Gul; Sayit, Elvan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the excretion of Samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylphosphonic acid ((153)Sm-EDTMP) in urine and to calculate the dose rate of its retention in the body as a function of time and the dose received by the skin of laboratory staff's finger. Urine samples were collected from 11 patients after intravenous injection of (153)Sm-EDTMP. The measurements of dose rate were performed. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were used for absorbed dose measurements. Effective half-lives that were calculated from urine sample measurements were found as 7.1±3 h within the first 24 h. Whole body dose rates before collecting urine of patients were 60.0 ± 15.7 µSv h(-1) for within 1 h following (153)Sm-EDTMP administration. The highest finger radiation dose is to the right-hand thumb (3.8 ± 2 mGy). The results of the study imply that patients who recieved (153)Sm-EDTMP therapy should be kept a minumum of 8 h in an isolated room at hospital and that one staff should give therapy at most two patients per week. PMID:25063786

  7. Radiation Exposure to Patient and Staff in Hepatic Chemoembolization: Risk Estimation of Cancer and Deterministic Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hidajat, Nico Wust, Peter; Felix, Roland; Schroeder, Ralf Juergen

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine the risks of radiation-induced cancer and deterministic effects for the patient and staff in transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sixty-five patients with HCC underwent the first cycle of TACE. Thermoluminescence dosemeters and conversion factors were used to measure surface doses and to calculate organ doses and effective dose. For the patient, the risk of fatal cancer and severe genetic defect was in the magnitude of 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -5}, respectively. Five patients showed surface doses over the first lumbar vertebra exceeding 2000 mSv and 45 patients showed doses over the spine or the liver region above 500 mSv. The risk of fatal cancer and severe genetic defect for the radiologist and assistant was in the magnitude of 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -8}. They could exceed the threshold for lens opacity in the case of more than 490 and 1613 TACE yearly for a period of many years, respectively. Radiation dose could lead to local transient erythema and/or local depression of hematopoiesis in many patients after TACE. For the radiologist and assistant, risk of fatal cancer and genetic defect and lens opacity might arise when they perform interventions such as TACE intensively.

  8. Preparation and characterisation of a sol-gel process α-Al₂O₃ polycrystalline detector.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, H R; Santos, A

    2015-02-01

    This article presents the dosimetric characteristics of α-Al2O3 detectors prepared through the sol-gel process, disc pressing and sintering in a highly reducing atmosphere. Comparative tests between the sol-gel process α-Al2O3 polycrystalline and anion-defective α-Al2O3:C single-crystal detectors indicate that the ones prepared through this approach present good dosimetric characteristics similar to those found in single-crystal detectors, such as a simple glow curve with the main peak at ∼198 °C (2 °C s(-1)), high sensitivity, a detection threshold of 1.7 µGy, linearity of response, low fading, relatively low photon energy dependence, reusability without annealing and good reproducibility. However, the undesirable feature of heating rate dependence of the thermoluminescence (TL) output in α-Al2O3:C single crystal is practically non-existent in the sol-gel process α-Al2O3 polycrystalline detector. This characteristic renders it useful for the routine processing of large numbers of personal and environmental dosemeters at higher heating rates and also when it comes to the proposal for new approaches to thermal quenching investigation. PMID:24795396

  9. Criticality accident dosimetry systems: an international intercomparison at the SILENE reactor in 2002.

    PubMed

    Médioni, R; Asselineau, B; Verrey, B; Trompier, F; Itié, C; Texier, C; Muller, H; Pelcot, G; Clairand, I; Jacquet, X; Pochat, J L

    2004-01-01

    In criticality accident dosimetry and more generally for high dose measurements, special techniques are used to measure separately the gamma ray and neutron components of the dose. To improve these techniques and to check their dosimetry systems (physical and/or biological), a total of 60 laboratories from 29 countries (America, Europe, Asia) participated in an international intercomparaison, which took place in France from 9 to 21 June 2002, at the SILENE reactor in Valduc and at a pure gamma source in Fontenay-aux-Roses. This intercomparison was jointly organised by the IRSN and the CEA with the help of the NEA/OCDE and was partly supported by the European Communities. This paper describes the aim of this intercomparison, the techniques used by the participants and the two radiation sources and their characteristics. The experimental arrangements of the dosemeters for the irradiations in free air or on phantoms are given. Then the dosimetric quantities measured and reported by the participants are summarised, analysed and compared with the reference values. The present paper concerns only the physical dosimetry and essentially experiments performed on the SILENE facility. The results obtained with the biological dosimetry are published in two other papers of this issue. PMID:15353686

  10. Computation of cross sections and dose conversion factors for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Devine, R T

    2004-01-01

    In the application of criticality accident dosemeters the cross sections and fluence-to-dose conversion factors have to be computed. The cross section and fluence-to-dose conversion factor for the thermal and epi-thermal contributions to neutron dose are well documented; for higher energy regions (>100 keV) these depend on the spectrum assumed. Fluence is determined using threshold detectors. The cross sections require the folding of an expected spectrum with the reaction cross sections. The fluence-to-dose conversion factors also require a similar computation. The true and effective thresholds are used to include the information on the expected spectrum. The spectra can either be taken from compendia or measured at the facility at which the exposures are to be expected. The cross sections can be taken from data computations or analytic representations and the fluence-to-dose conversion factors are determined by various standards making bodies. The problem remaining is the method of computation. The purpose of this paper is to compare two methods for computing these factors: analytic and Monte Carlo. PMID:15353697

  11. The investigation of fetal doses in mantle field irradiation.

    PubMed

    Karaçam, Songül Cavdar; Güralp, Onur Sahin; Oksüz, Didem Colpan; Koca, Ayse; Cepni, Ismail; Cepni, Kimia; Bese, Nuran

    2009-02-01

    To determine clinically the fetal dose from irradiation of Hodgkin's disease during pregnancy and to quantify the components of fetal dose using phantom measurements. The fetal dose was measured with phantom measurements using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Phantom measurements were performed by simulating the treatment conditions on an anthropomorphic phantom. TLDs were placed on the phantom 41, 44, 46.5 and 49.5 cm from the centre of the treatment field. Two TLDs were placed on the surface of the phantom. The estimated total dose to all the TLDs ranged from 8.8 to 13.2 cGy for treatment with (60)Co and from 8.2 to 11.8 cGy for 4 MV photons. It was concluded that the doses in different sections were evaluated to investigate dose changes in different points and depths of fetal tissues in phantom. Precise planning and the use of supplemental fetal shielding may help reduce fetal exposure. PMID:19299479

  12. A study of environmental radioactivity measurements in the Samsun province, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kucukomeroglu, B; Maksutoglu, F; Damla, N; Cevik, U; Celebi, N

    2012-12-01

    This study was concerned with the measurement of natural and artificial radionuclides in soil samples and indoor radon concentrations in the Samsun province, Turkey. In soil samples, the values of individual mean activity of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs radionuclides were found to be 31, 22, 341 and 16 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The radiological parameters, such as the absorbed dose rate in air, the annual effective dose (AED) and excess lifetime cancer risk, were calculated. Indoor radon measurements were carried out with CR-39-based radon dosemeters at 127 dwellings in the Samsun province. The mean annual (222)Rn activity was found to be 106 Bq m(-3) (equivalent to an AED of 1.88 mSv). The seasonal variation of (222)Rn activity shows that maximum levels are observed in the winter, while minimum levels are observed in the summer. The mean lifetime fatality risk for the studied area was estimated at 1.45×10(-4). The results obtained did not significantly differ from those obtained in other parts of the country. PMID:22619352

  13. Luminescence-based retrospective dosimetry using Al2O3 from mobile phones: a simulation approach to determine the effects of position.

    PubMed

    Eakins, J S; Kouroukla, E

    2015-06-01

    Monte Carlo modelling has been performed in support of efforts to establish emergency dosimetry services based on optically or thermally stimulated luminescence (OSL/TL) of the Al(2)O(3) substrate present on the resistors found in mobile phones, which can act as fortuitous retrospective dosemeters for photon exposures. Specifically, a range of exposure conditions has been modelled to assess the dependence of the dosimetry on factors such as the position of resistors within a phone, the orientation of the phone relative to the source, and the location of the phone relative to its owner. Variations due to the resistors' positions and the phone's orientation were generally found to contribute just a few percent to the uncertainty on the dose assessments, though the electrical contacts surrounding the resistors could potentially enhance these by several 10s of percent. But, the location of the phone was found to impact dosimetry greatly. The largest discrepancies in the results were found for low-energy exposures: for (192)Ir, differences of up to an order-of-magnitude were found between resistor and whole body doses. The outcome of the work was to derive correction / calibration factors that can be applied to estimate whole body doses from OSL/TL readings, the accurate application of which would depend on the knowledge of the exposure geometry and the degree of conservatism acceptable for the dose assessment. PMID:25884152

  14. Characterization of neutron calibration fields at the TINT's 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liamsuwan, T.; Channuie, J.; Ratanatongchai, W.

    2015-05-01

    Reliable measurement of neutron radiation is important for monitoring and protection in workplace where neutrons are present. Although Thailand has been familiar with applications of neutron sources and neutron beams for many decades, there is no calibration facility dedicated to neutron measuring devices available in the country. Recently, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (TINT) has set up a multi-purpose irradiation facility equipped with a 50 Ci americium-241/beryllium neutron irradiator. The facility is planned to be used for research, nuclear analytical techniques and, among other applications, calibration of neutron measuring devices. In this work, the neutron calibration fields were investigated in terms of neutron energy spectra and dose equivalent rates using Monte Carlo simulations, an in-house developed neutron spectrometer and commercial survey meters. The characterized neutron fields can generate neutron dose equivalent rates ranging from 156 μSv/h to 3.5 mSv/h with nearly 100% of dose contributed by neutrons of energies larger than 0.01 MeV. The gamma contamination was less than 4.2-7.5% depending on the irradiation configuration. It is possible to use the described neutron fields for calibration test and routine quality assurance of neutron dose rate meters and passive dosemeters commonly used in radiation protection dosimetry.

  15. Personnel radiation dose considerations in the use of an integrated PET-CT scanner for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Carson, K J; Young, V A L; Cosgrove, V P; Jarritt, P H; Hounsell, A R

    2009-11-01

    The acquisition of radiotherapy planning scans on positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scanners requires the involvement of radiotherapy radiographers. This study assessed the radiation dose received by these radiographers during this process. Radiotherapy planning (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET-CT scans were acquired for 28 non-small cell lung cancer patients. In order to minimise the radiation dose received, a two-stage process was used in which the most time-consuming part of the set-up was performed before the patient received their (18)F-FDG injection. Throughout this process, the radiographers wore electronic personal dosemeters and recorded the doses received at different stages of the process. The mean total radiation dose received by a radiotherapy radiographer was 5.1+/-2.6 microSv per patient. The use of the two-stage process reduced the time spent in close proximity to the patient by approximately a factor of four. The two-stage process was effective in keeping radiation dose to a minimum. The use of a pre-injection set-up session reduces the radiation dose to the radiotherapy radiographers because of their involvement in PET-CT radiotherapy treatment planning scans by approximately a factor of three. PMID:19332513

  16. Neural network modelling of dose distribution and dose uniformity in the Tunisian Gamma Irradiator.

    PubMed

    Manai, K; Trabelsi, A

    2013-11-01

    In this paper an approach to model dose distributions, isodose curves and dose uniformity in the Tunisian Gamma Irradiation Facility using artificial neural networks (ANNs) are described. For this purpose, measurements were carried out at different points in the irradiation cell using polymethyl methacrylate dosemeters. The calculated and experimental results are compared and good agreement is observed showing that ANNs can be used as an efficient tool for modelling dose distribution in the gamma irradiation facility. Monte Carlo (MC) photon-transport simulation techniques have been used to evaluate the spatial dose distribution for extensive benchmarking. ANN approach appears to be a significant advance over the time-consuming MC or the less accurate regression methods for dose mapping. As a second application, a detailed dose mapping using two different product densities was carried out. The minimum and maximum dose locations and dose uniformity as a function of the irradiated volume for each product density were determined. Good agreement between ANN modelling and experimental results was achieved. PMID:23633649

  17. Tests of shielding effectiveness of Kevlar and Nextel onboard the International Space Station and the Foton-M3 capsule.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, M; Bengin, V; Casolino, M; Roca, V; Zanini, A; Durante, M

    2010-08-01

    Radiation assessment and protection in space is the first step in planning future missions to the Moon and Mars, where mission and number of space travelers will increase and the protection of the geomagnetic shielding against the cosmic radiation will be absent. In this framework, the shielding effectiveness of two flexible materials, Kevlar and Nextel, were tested, which are largely used in the construction of spacecrafts. Accelerator-based tests clearly demonstrated that Kevlar is an excellent shield for heavy ions, close to polyethylene, whereas Nextel shows poor shielding characteristics. Measurements on flight performed onboard of the International Space Station and of the Foton-M3 capsule have been carried out with special attention to the neutron component; shielded and unshielded detectors (thermoluminescence dosemeters, bubble detectors) were exposed to a real radiation environment to test the shielding properties of the materials under study. The results indicate no significant effects of shielding, suggesting that thin shields in low-Earth Orbit have little effect on absorbed dose. PMID:20364264

  18. High-resolution mapping of 1D and 2D dose distributions using X-band electron paramagnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kolbun, N; Adolfsson, E; Gustafsson, H; Lund, E

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) was performed to visualise 2D dose distributions of homogenously irradiated potassium dithionate tablets and to demonstrate determination of 1D dose profiles along the height of the tablets. Mathematical correction was applied for each relative dose profile in order to take into account the inhomogeneous response of the resonator using X-band EPRI. The dose profiles are presented with the spatial resolution of 0.6 mm from the acquired 2D images; this value is limited by pixel size, and 1D dose profiles from 1D imaging with spatial resolution of 0.3 mm limited by the intrinsic line-width of potassium dithionate. In this paper, dose profiles from 2D reconstructed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) images using the Xepr software package by Bruker are focussed. The conclusion is that using potassium dithionate, the resolution 0.3 mm is sufficient for mapping steep dose gradients if the dosemeters are covering only ±2 mm around the centre of the resonator. PMID:24748487

  19. Novel shielding materials for space and air travel.

    PubMed

    Vana, N; Hajek, M; Berger, T; Fugger, M; Hofmann, P

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of dose onboard spacecraft and aircraft by appropriate shielding measures plays an essential role in the future development of space exploration and air travel. The design of novel shielding strategies and materials may involve hydrogenous composites, as it is well known that liquid hydrogen is most effective in attenuating charged particle radiation. As precursor for a later flight experiment, the shielding properties of newly developed hydrogen-rich polymers and rare earth-doped high-density rubber were tested in various ground-based neutron and heavy ion fields and compared with aluminium and polyethylene as reference materials. Absorbed dose, average linear energy transfer and gamma-equivalent neutron absorbed dose were determined by means of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. First results for samples of equal aerial density indicate that selected hydrogen-rich plastics and rare-earth-doped rubber may be more effective in attenuating cosmic rays by up to 10% compared with conventional aluminium shielding. The appropriate adaptation of shielding thicknesses may thus allow reducing the biologically relevant dose. Owing to the lower density of the plastic composites, mass savings shall result in a significant reduction of launch costs. The experiment was flown as part of the European Space Agency's Biopan-5 mission in May 2005. PMID:16717109

  20. Bubble-detector measurements in the Russian segment of the International Space Station during 2009-12.

    PubMed

    Smith, M B; Khulapko, S; Andrews, H R; Arkhangelsky, V; Ing, H; Lewis, B J; Machrafi, R; Nikolaev, I; Shurshakov, V

    2015-01-01

    Measurements using bubble detectors have been performed in order to characterise the neutron dose and energy spectrum in the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS). Experiments using bubble dosemeters and a bubble-detector spectrometer, a set of six detectors with different energy thresholds that is used to determine the neutron spectrum, were performed during the ISS-22 (2009) to ISS-33 (2012) missions. The spectrometric measurements are in good agreement with earlier data, exhibiting expected features of the neutron energy spectrum in space. Experiments using a hydrogenous radiation shield show that the neutron dose can be reduced by shielding, with a reduction similar to that determined in earlier measurements using bubble detectors. The bubble-detector data are compared with measurements performed on the ISS using other instruments and are correlated with potential influencing factors such as the ISS altitude and the solar activity. Surprisingly, these influences do not seem to have a strong effect on the neutron dose or energy spectrum inside the ISS. PMID:24714114

  1. Evaluation of patient exposure in computerised tomogram in Poland.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, M A

    2002-01-01

    The increasing number of computerised tomography (CT) procedures performed in Poland in recent years has resulted in a growing contribution of these examinations to the whole exposure of the population to ionising radiation from medical sources. (The number of CT examinations in Poland was 170,000 in 1995 and 460,000 in 1999.) An evaluation is presented of doses to patients in CT examinations performed with different types of CT unit. To evaluate the exposure to patients dose linear product (DLP) was measured using a NOMEX dosemeter with a pencil chamber (PTW, Frieburg) and the cylindrical PMMA phantoms 'head' and 'body'. CTDI values were evaluated according to current methodology as described in European Guidelines (EUR 16262). The measurements were performed for seven types of CT unit made by different companies. The CTDI values were also compared to reference levels recommended by IAEA. In conclusion it was found that the value of collective effective dose (2200 man.Sv), has increased in Poland nearly 4 times in comparison to 1995, whereas the number of CT examinations increased nearly 3 times in this period. For most of the 'controlled' CT scanners the values of CTDI in head procedures are near to or higher than the IAEA Reference Level (50 mGy); this can result from the protocols, which are chosen without a dose analysis. PMID:12120672

  2. Effective dose span of ten different cone beam CT devices

    PubMed Central

    Rottke, D; Patzelt, S; Poxleitner, P; Schulze, D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation and reduction of dose are important issues. Since cone beam CT (CBCT) has been established now not just in dentistry, the number of acquired examinations continues to rise. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to compare the doses of available devices on the market owing to different exposition parameters, volumes and geometries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spans of effective doses (EDs) of ten different CBCT devices. Methods: 48 thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed in 24 sites in a RANDO® head phantom. Protocols with lowest exposition parameters and protocols with highest exposition parameters were performed for each of the ten devices. The ED was calculated from the measured energy doses according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations for each protocol and device, and the statistical values were evaluated afterwards. Results: The calculation of the ED resulted in values between 17.2 µSv and 396 µSv for the ten devices. The mean values for protocols with lowest and highest exposition parameters were 31.6 µSv and 209 µSv, respectively. Conclusions: It was not the aim of this study to evaluate the image quality depending on different exposition parameters but to define the spans of EDs in which different CBCT devices work. There is a wide span of ED for different CBCT devices depending on the selected exposition parameters, required spatial resolution and many other factors. PMID:23584925

  3. Radioactivity concentrations and dose assessment for soil samples around nuclear power plant IV in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsuey-Lin; Lin, Chun-Chih; Wang, Tzu-Wen; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2008-09-01

    Activity concentrations and distributions of natural and man-made radionuclides in soil samples collected around nuclear power plant IV, Taiwan, were investigated for five years to assess the environmental radioactivity and characterisation of radiological hazard prior to commercial operation. The activity concentrations of radionuclides were determined via gamma-ray spectrometry using an HPGe detector. Data obtained show that the average concentrations of the (238)U and (232)Th series, and (40)K, were within world median ranges in the UNSCEAR report. The (137)Cs ranged from 2.46 +/- 0.55 to 12.13 +/- 1.31 Bq kg(-1). The terrestrial absorbed dose rate estimated by soil activity and directly measured with a thermoluminescence dosemeter (excluding cosmic rays), and the annual effective doses, were 45.63, 57.34 nGy h(-1) and 57.19 microSv, respectively. Experimental results were compared with international recommended values. Since the soil in this area is an important building material, the mean radium equivalent activity, external and inhalation hazard indices and the representative level index using various models given in the literature for the study area were 98.18 Bq kg(-1), 0.27, 0.34 and 0.73, respectively, which were below the recommended limits. Analytical results demonstrate that no radiological anomaly exists. The baseline data will prove useful and important in estimating the collective dose near the new nuclear power plant under construction in Taiwan. PMID:18714131

  4. Radiation protection in fixed PET/CT facilities—design and operation

    PubMed Central

    Peet, D J; Morton, R; Hussein, M; Alsafi, K; Spyrou, N

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design of a fixed positron emission tomography (PET)/CT facility and the use of a simulated instantaneous dose-rate plot to visually highlight areas of potentially high radiation exposure. We also illustrate the practical implementation of basic radiation protection principles based on the use of distance and shielding and the minimisation of time spent in hot areas. Staff whole body doses for 4 years are presented with results of an optimisation study analysing the dose arising from the different phases within each study using direct reading dosemeters. The total whole body dose for all staff for each patient fell from 9.5 μSv in the first full year of operation to 4.8 µSv in 2008. The maximum dose to an individual member of staff per patient decreased over the same period from 3.2 to 0.9 µSv. The optimisation study showed that the highest dose was recorded during the injection phase. PMID:21976626

  5. The effects of high ambient radon on thermoluminescence dosimetry readings.

    PubMed

    Harvey, John A; Kearfott, Kimberlee J

    2011-11-01

    The effect of a high level of ambient (222)Rn gas on thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) is examined. Groups of LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF(2):Dy TLDs were exposed to (222)Rn under controlled environmental conditions over ∼7 d using a luminous (226)Ra aircraft dial. LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs were tested bare, and both types were tested mounted in cards used for environmental dosimetry and mounted in cards enclosed in plastic badges. A passive continuous radon monitor was used to measure the (222)Rn level in the small chamber during the experiments. The data were analysed to determine the relationship between the integrated (222)Rn level and the TLD response. Although both LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF(2):Dy TLDs showed a strong response to (222)Rn, the badges prevented measurable radon detection by the TLDs within. The TLDs were not used to directly measure the radon concentration; rather, a correction for its influence was desired. PMID:21177272

  6. Calibration of TLD badges for photons of energy above 6 MeV and dosimetric intricacies in high energy gamma ray fields encountered in nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, A S; Bakshi, A K

    2002-01-01

    CaSO4:Dy and LiF TLDs do not exhibit photon energy dependence beyond +/-55% for photons in the energy range from 1 MeV to about 7 MeV. However, when sandwiched between metal filters or used in TLD badge holders having metal filters, the response changes for irradiation from high energy photons as compared to that from 60Co gamma rays (generally used for reference calibrations). This effect is about the same for both the lower atomic number TLD (LiF) and higher atomic number TLD (CaSO4:Dy). For TLDs held on the surface of the phantom and irradiated in collimated photon beams, the response of TLDs without any filter or those under the open window of the TLD badge is considerably reduced due to insufficient build-up to high energy photons, whereas for uncollimated radiation fields from power reactors, an over-response is observed. It is observed that the use of inappropriate encapsulation of dosemeters would cause a significant error not only in the estimation of doses due to penetrating radiations but also in the estimation of beta doses in the mixed fields of beta radiation, high energy gamma rays and high energy electrons often encountered in the fields of pressurised heavy water reactors. PMID:12018745

  7. Microdosemeter instrument (MIDN) for assessing risk in space.

    PubMed

    Pisacane, V L; Dolecek, Q E; Malak, H; Cucinotta, F A; Zaider, M; Rosenfeld, A B; Rusek, A; Sivertz, M; Dicello, J F

    2011-02-01

    Radiation in space generally produces higher dose rates than that on the Earth's surface, and contributions from primary galactic and solar events increase with altitude within the magnetosphere. Presently, no personnel monitor is available to astronauts for real-time monitoring of dose, radiation quality and regulatory risk. This group is developing a prototypic instrument for use in an unknown, time-varying radiation field. This microdosemeter-dosemeter nucleon instrument is for use in a spacesuit, spacecraft, remote rover and other applications. It provides absorbed dose, dose rate and dose equivalent in real time so that action can be taken to reduce exposure. Such a system has applications in health physics, anti-terrorism and radiation-hardening of electronics as well. The space system is described and results of ground-based studies are presented and compared with predictions of transport codes. An early prototype in 2007 was successfully launched, the only solid-state microdosemeter to have flown in space. PMID:21199825

  8. Hand exposure in nuclear medicine workers.

    PubMed

    Chruscielewski, W; Olszewski, J; Jankowski, J; Cygan, M

    2002-01-01

    As a result of the gamma radiation emitted by radioactive elements (e.g. 99mTc and 131I) used in nuclear medicine laboratories for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, nuclear medicine workers are exposed to whole-body doses. These doses arc usually measured by using individual film dosemeters. Lead or lead glass shields used during the handling of radioisotopes minimise the whole-body doses received. Nevertheless, part of the job has to be performed manually, hence the hands are more exposed to radiation. This paper presents the results of measuring the equivalent dose to the hands of workers employed in five selected nuclear medicine laboratories where technetium and iodine radioisotopes are in common use. Sixty workers, including physicians, nurses, radiopharmacists and technicians, were included in the study. Doses were measured at 1 month intervals. The study indicated that, in some instances, the danger of radiation dose to the hand may be significant. Monthly doses exceeded 50 mSv, which may suggest that an annual dose may be higher than 500 mSv. PMID:12382741

  9. Reliability in individual monitoring service.

    PubMed

    Mod Ali, N

    2011-03-01

    As a laboratory certified to ISO 9001:2008 and accredited to ISO/IEC 17025, the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL)-Nuclear Malaysia has incorporated an overall comprehensive system for technical and quality management in promoting a reliable individual monitoring service (IMS). Faster identification and resolution of issues regarding dosemeter preparation and issuing of reports, personnel enhancement, improved customer satisfaction and overall efficiency of laboratory activities are all results of the implementation of an effective quality system. Review of these measures and responses to observed trends provide continuous improvement of the system. By having these mechanisms, reliability of the IMS can be assured in the promotion of safe behaviour at all levels of the workforce utilising ionising radiation facilities. Upgradation of in the reporting program through a web-based e-SSDL marks a major improvement in Nuclear Malaysia's IMS reliability on the whole. The system is a vital step in providing a user friendly and effective occupational exposure evaluation program in the country. It provides a higher level of confidence in the results generated for occupational dose monitoring of the IMS, thus, enhances the status of the radiation protection framework of the country. PMID:21147789

  10. Automation of film densitometry for application in personal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Taheri, M; Movafeghi, A; Rastkhah, N

    2011-03-01

    In this research work, a semi-automatic densitometry system has been developed for large-scale monitoring services by use of film badge dosemeters. The system consists of a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based scanner that can scan optical densities (ODs) up to 4.2, a computer vision algorithm to improve the quality of digitised films and an analyser program to calculate the necessary information, e.g. the mean OD of region of interest and radiation doses. For calibration of the system, two reference films were used. The Microtek scanner International Color Consortium (ICC) profiler is applied for determining the colour attributes of the scanner accurately and a reference of the density step tablet, Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) is used for calibrating the automatic conversion of gray-level values to OD values in the range of 0.2-4.0 OD. The system contributes to achieve more objectives and reliable results. So by applying this system, we can digitise a set of 20 films at once and calculate their relative doses less than about 4 min, and meanwhile it causes to avoid disadvantages of manual process and to enhance the accuracy of dosimetry. PMID:21199823

  11. 41Ca - a possible neutron specific biomarker in tooth enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, A.; Arazi, A.; Faestermann, T.; Knie, K.; Korschinek, G.; Maier, H. J.; Nakamura, N.; Rühm, W.; Rugel, G.

    2004-08-01

    The measurement of long-lived radionuclides, produced by neutrons originating from the atomic-bomb explosions, offers the possibility to reconstruct neutron fluences to which survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were exposed. The long-lived radionuclide, 41Ca (T1/2=103 000 years), is suggested here as a means for a retrospective determination of thermal neutron fluences, directly within the human body of a survivor. As proper material tooth enamel is proposed. The 41Ca signal in tooth enamel may be correlated with the exposure to A-bomb induced thermal neutron fluences, provided the natural background level of 41Ca/Ca is significantly lower. Therefore, tooth samples of unexposed survivors of the A-bomb explosions have been examined by means of accelerator mass spectrometry, in order to quantify the natural background level of 41Ca/Ca. Measured 41Ca/Ca ratios were confirmed to be as low as about 2 × 10-15. Thus, the A-bomb induced additional signal should be detectable for survivors at epidemiological relevant distances. Since tooth enamel had already been used as a dosemeter for gamma radiation from the A-bomb explosion, the detection of 41Ca in tooth enamel would allow, for the first time, an assessment of both, γ-ray and neutron exposures in the same biological material.

  12. Personal radiation doses in PET/CT facility: measurements vs. calculations.

    PubMed

    Hippeläinen, E; Nikkinen, P; Ihalainen, T; Uusi-Simola, J; Savolainen, S

    2008-01-01

    The estimation of shielding requirement of a new positron emission tomography (PET) facility is essential. Because of penetrating annihilation photons, not only radiation safety in the vicinity of patients should be considered, but also rooms adjacent to uptake and imaging rooms should be taken into account. Before installing a PET/CT camera to nuclear medicine facilities of Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH), a typical PET imaging day was simulated using phantoms. Phantoms were filled with 300 +/- 36 MBq of (18)F isotope and dose rates were measured at 12 central locations in the laboratory. In addition to measurements, dose rates were also calculated using guidelines of AAPM Task Group 108. The relationship between the measured and calculated dose rates was found to be good and statistically significant, using Pearson's correlation test. The evaluated monthly doses were compared with personal dosemeter readings. AAPM's report gives practical tools for evaluation of radiation shielding. Calculations can be carried out successfully for existing hospital complexes too. However, calculations should be carried out carefully, because especially doors, windows and partitions can easily cause underestimation of shielding requirements as shown in this work. PMID:18713782

  13. Radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staff involved in PET/CT practice in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Antic, V; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Stankovic, J; Arandjic, D; Todorovic, N; Lucic, S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the radiation exposure to nuclear medicine (NM) staff in the two positron emission tomography-computed tomography centres in Serbia and to investigate the possibilities for dose reduction. Dose levels in terms of Hp(10) for whole body and Hp(0.07) for hands of NM staff were assessed using thermoluminescence and electronic personal dosemeters. The assessed doses per procedure in terms of Hp(10) were 4.2-7 and 5-6 μSv, in two centres, respectively, whereas the extremity doses in terms of Hp(0.07) in one of the centres was 34-126 μSv procedure(-1). The whole-body doses per unit activity were 17-19 and 21-26 μSv GBq(-1) in two centres, respectively, and the normalised finger dose in one centre was 170-680 μSv GBq(-1). The maximal estimated annual whole-body doses in two centres were 3.4 and 2.0 mSv, while the corresponding extremity dose in the later one was 45 mSv. Improvements as introduction of automatic dispensing system and injection and optimisation of working practice resulted in dose reduction ranging from 12 up to 67 %. PMID:24464817

  14. Radiation measurements around X-ray cabinet systems.

    PubMed

    Suric Mihic, M; Vucic, Z; Prlic, I; Lulic, I; Mestrovic, T

    2012-07-01

    Security personnel who operate X-ray units for the control of hand luggage and personal items at airports are generally not under dosimetric surveillance. A significant increase in the number of inspected items per passenger, due to rigorous air traffic security measures, raises a question of extended exposure of these workers to scattered X-ray radiation. A new approach to investigating directions of breaches of scattered X-ray radiation in the area near to an X-ray cabinet system, which is based on using active electronic dosemeters is presented. Influence of the increase in the number of inspected items in time on the dose rate is described. Time-dependent dose rates have showed a very good correlation with passengers undergoing security control prior to boarding an airplane. Measurements confirmed that an increase in the dose rate, coinciding with rush hours, was caused by scattered radiation passing through incompletely closed lead curtains. It is found that the doses at the entrance to the inspection tunnel are 50% higher than those at the exit, which is a consequence of inherent operational characteristics of X-ray cabinet systems. PMID:22302108

  15. Study of the impact of artificial articulations on the dose distribution under medical irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffard, E.; Gschwind, R.; Makovicka, L.; Martin, E.; Meunier, C.; David, C.

    2005-02-01

    Perturbations due to the presence of high density heterogeneities in the body are not correctly taken into account in the Treatment Planning Systems currently available for external radiotherapy. For this reason, the accuracy of the dose distribution calculations has to be improved by using Monte Carlo simulations. In a previous study, we established a theoretical model by using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc [I. Kawrakow, D.W.O. Rogers, The EGSnrc code system: MC simulation of electron and photon transport. Technical Report PIRS-701, NRCC, Ottawa, Canada, 2000] in order to obtain the dose distributions around simple heterogeneities. These simulations were then validated by experimental results obtained with thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionisation chamber. The influence of samples composed of hip prostheses materials (titanium alloy and steel) and a substitute of bone were notably studied. A more complex model was then developed with the Monte Carlo code BEAMnrc [D.W.O. Rogers, C.M. MA, G.X. Ding, B. Walters, D. Sheikh-Bagheri, G.G. Zhang, BEAMnrc Users Manual. NRC Report PPIRS 509(a) rev F, 2001] in order to take into account the hip prosthesis geometry. The simulation results were compared to experimental measurements performed in a water phantom, in the case of a standard treatment of a pelvic cancer for one of the beams passing through the implant. These results have shown the great influence of the prostheses on the dose distribution.

  16. Dosimetric characterization of the irradiation cavity for accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Byun, S H; Pejović-Milić, A; McMaster, S; Matysiak, W; Aslam; Liu, Z; Watters, L M; Prestwich, W V; McNeill, F E; Chettle, D R

    2007-03-21

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo activation analysis has been characterized to estimate its dosimetric specifications. The cavity is defined to confine irradiation to the hand and modifies the neutron spectrum produced by a low energy accelerator neutron source to optimize activation per dose. Neutron and gamma-ray dose rates were measured with the microdosimetric technique using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter at the hand irradiation site and inside the hand access hole. For the outside of the cavity, a spherical neutron dose equivalent meter and a Farmer dosemeter were employed instead due to the low intensity of the radiation field. The maximum dose equivalent rate at the outside of the cavity was 2.94 microSv/100 microA min, which is lower by a factor of 1/2260 than the dose rate at the hand irradiation position. The local dose contributions from a hand, an arm and the rest of a body to the effective dose rate were estimated to be 1.73, 0.782 and 2.94 microSv/100 microA min, respectively. For the standard irradiation protocol of the in vivo hand activation, 300 microA min, an effective dose of 16.3 microSv would be delivered. PMID:17455391

  17. A novel device for automatic withdrawal and accurate calibration of 99m-technetium radiopharmaceuticals to minimise radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staff and patient.

    PubMed

    Nazififard, Mohammad; Mahdizadeh, Simin; Meigooni, A S; Alavi, M; Suh, Kune Y

    2012-09-01

    A Joint Automatic Dispenser Equipment (JADE) has been designed and fabricated for automatic withdrawal and calibration of radiopharmaceutical materials. The thermoluminescent dosemeter procedures have shown a reduction in dose to the technician's hand with this novel dose dispenser system JADE when compared with the manual withdrawal of (99m)Tc. This system helps to increase the precision of calibration and to minimise the radiation dose to the hands and body of the workers. This paper describes the structure of this device, its function and user-friendliness, and its efficacy. The efficacy of this device was determined by measuring the radiation dose delivered to the hands of the nuclear medicine laboratory technician. The user-friendliness of JADE has been examined. The automatic withdrawal and calibration offered by this system reduces the dose to the technician's hand to a level below the maximum permissible dose stipulated by the international protocols. This research will serve as a backbone for future study about the safe use of ionising radiation in medicine. PMID:22628527

  18. Determination of ionisation chamber collection efficiency in a swept electron beam by means of thermoluminescent detectors and the "two-voltage" method.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, J; Rijnders, A; Ang, K K; Mellaerts, M; Grobet, P

    1985-06-01

    Two methods for determining the collection efficiency of a 0.6 cm3 thimble ionisation chamber exposed to the swept electron beam of a linear accelerator Therac 20 Saturne (CGR MeV) have been compared. In one method the chamber signal has been compared to that of simultaneously exposed thermoluminescent LiF dosemeters (TLD), in the other the "two-voltage" method of Boag, adapted for swept beams, has been used. By variation of the electron energy between 20 and 13 MeV, of the focus-skin-distance (FSD) between 200 and 100 cm and of the monitor rate between 400 monitor units (m.u.) and 100 m.u. per minute, different values could be produced for the peak charge density M. The collection efficiency of the chamber, operating at a standard voltage of 250 V, decreases from 0.99 to 0.84 for a charge density increasing from 0.3 X 10(-4) C/m3 to 7.5 X 10(-4) C/m3, respectively. The maximum deviation observed between the TLD and the "two-voltage" method adopted for similar M is never more than 2% and mostly smaller than 1%. It can be concluded that, under the present experimental conditions, the calculated ionisation chamber collection efficiency is confirmed by the experimental method using TL dosimetry. PMID:3925506

  19. Ambient dose and dose rate measurements in the vicinity of Elekta Precise accelerators for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zutz, H; Hupe, O

    2014-12-01

    In radiation therapy, commercially available medical linear accelerators (LINACs) are used. At high primary beam energies in the 10-MeV range, the leakage dose of the accelerator head and the backscatter from the room walls, the air and the patient become more important. Therefore, radiation protection measurements of photon dose rates in the treatment room and in the maze are performed to quantify the radiation field. Since the radiation of the LINACs is usually pulsed with short radiation pulse durations in the microsecond range, there are problems with electronic dose (rate) meters commonly used in radiation protection. In this paper measurements with ionisation chambers are presented and electronic dosemeters are used for testing at selected positions. The measured time-averaged dose rate ranges from a few microsieverts per hour in the maze to some millisieverts per hour in the vicinity of the accelerator head and up to some sieverts per hour in the blanked primary beam and several hundred sieverts per hour in the direct primary beam. PMID:24379437

  20. Compact fluorescent lamp phosphors in accidental radiation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Murthy, K V R; Pallavi, S P; Ghildiyal, Rahul; Parmar, Manish C; Patel, Y S; Ravi Kumar, V; Sai Prasad, A S; Natarajan, V; Page, A G

    2006-01-01

    The application of lamp phosphors for accidental dosimetry is a new concept. Since the materials used in fluorescent lamps are good photo luminescent materials, if one can either use the inherent defects present in the phosphor or add suitable modifiers to induce thermoluminescence (TL) in these phosphors, then the device (fluorescent lamp) can be used as an accidental dosemeter. In continuation of our search for a suitable phosphor material, which can serve both as an efficient lamp phosphor and as a good radiation monitoring device, detailed examination has been carried out on cerium and terbium-doped lanthanum phosphate material. A (90)Sr beta source with 50 mCi strength (1.85 GBq) was used as the irradiation source for TL studies. The TL response as a function of dose received was examined for all phosphors used and it was observed that the intensity of the TL peak vs. dose received was a linear function in the dose range 0.1-200 Gy in each case. Incidentally LaPO(4): Ce,Tb is a component of the compact fluorescent lamp marketed recently as an energy bright light source. Besides having very good luminescence efficiency, good dosimetric properties of these phosphors render them useful for their use in accidental dosimetry also. PMID:16816401

  1. Non-vascular interventional procedures: effective dose to patient and equivalent dose to abdominal organs by means of DICOM images and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Longo, Mariaconcetta; Marchioni, Chiara; Insero, Teresa; Donnarumma, Raffaella; D'Adamo, Alessandro; Lucatelli, Pierleone; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Salvatori, Filippo Maria; Cannavale, Alessandro; Di Castro, Elisabetta

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluates X-ray exposure in patient undergoing abdominal extra-vascular interventional procedures by means of Digital Imaging and COmmunications in Medicine (DICOM) image headers and Monte Carlo simulation. The main aim was to assess the effective and equivalent doses, under the hypothesis of their correlation with the dose area product (DAP) measured during each examination. This allows to collect dosimetric information about each patient and to evaluate associated risks without resorting to in vivo dosimetry. The dose calculation was performed in 79 procedures through the Monte Carlo simulator PCXMC (A PC-based Monte Carlo program for calculating patient doses in medical X-ray examinations), by using the real geometrical and dosimetric irradiation conditions, automatically extracted from DICOM headers. The DAP measurements were also validated by using thermoluminescent dosemeters on an anthropomorphic phantom. The expected linear correlation between effective doses and DAP was confirmed with an R(2) of 0.974. Moreover, in order to easily calculate patient doses, conversion coefficients that relate equivalent doses to measurable quantities, such as DAP, were obtained. PMID:26211013

  2. Experimental simulation of personal dosimetry in production of medical radioisotopes by research reactor.

    PubMed

    Mossadegh, N; Karimian, A; Shahhosseini, E; Mohammadzadeh, A; Sheibani, Sh

    2011-09-01

    Due to their work conditions, research reactor personnel are exposed to ionising nuclear radiations. Because the absorbed dose values are different for different tissues due to variations in sensitivity, in this work personal dosimetry has been performed under normal working conditions at anatomical locations relevant to more sensitive tissues as well as for the whole body by employing a Rando phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Fifty-two TLDs-100H were positioned at high-risk organ locations such as the thyroid, eyes as well as the left breast, which was used to assess the whole-body dose in order to study the absorbed doses originating from selected locations in the vicinity of the reactor. The results have employed the tissue weighting factors based on International Commission on Radiological Protection ICRP 103 and ICRP 60 and the measured results were below the dose limits recommended by ICRP. The mean effective dose rates calculated from ICRP 103 were the following: whole body, 30.64-6.44 µSv h(-1); thyroid, 1.22-0.23 µSv h(-1); prostate, 0.085-0.045 µSv h(-1); gonads, 1.00-0.51 µSv h(-1); breast, 3.68-0.77 µSv h(-1); and eyes, 33.74-7.01 µSv h(-1). PMID:21862507

  3. A parametric model to describe neutron spectra around high-energy electron accelerators and its application in neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Esposito, Adolfo

    2010-03-01

    Due to the increased interest of the scientific community in the applications of synchrotron light, there is an increasing demand of high-energy electron facilities, testified by the construction of several new facilities worldwide. The radiation protection around such facilities requires accurate experimental methods to determine the dose due to prompt radiation fields. Neutron fields, in particular, are the most complex to measure, because they extend in energy from thermal (10 -8 MeV) up to hundreds MeV and because the responses of dosemeters and survey meters usually have large energy dependence. The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer (BSS) is in practice the only instrument able to respond over the whole energy range of interest, and for this reason it is frequently used to derive neutron spectra and dosimetric quantities in accelerator workplaces. Nevertheless, complex unfolding algorithms are needed to derive the neutron spectra from the experimental BSS data. This paper presents a parametric model specially developed for the unfolding of the experimental data measured with BSS around high-energy electron accelerators. The work consists of the following stages: (1) Generation with the FLUKA code, of a set of neutron spectra representing the radiation environment around accelerators with different electron energies; (2) formulation of a parametric model able to describe these spectra, with particular attention to the high-energy component (>10 MeV), which may be responsible for a large part of the dose in workplaces; and (3) implementation of this model in an existing unfolding code.

  4. ACCURATE KAP METER CALIBRATION AS A PREREQUISITE FOR OPTIMISATION IN PROJECTION RADIOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Malusek, A; Sandborg, M; Carlsson, G Alm

    2016-06-01

    Modern X-ray units register the air kerma-area product, PKA, with a built-in KAP meter. Some KAP meters show an energy-dependent bias comparable with the maximum uncertainty articulated by the IEC (25 %), adversely affecting dose-optimisation processes. To correct for the bias, a reference KAP meter calibrated at a standards laboratory and two calibration methods described here can be used to achieve an uncertainty of <7 % as recommended by IAEA. A computational model of the reference KAP meter is used to calculate beam quality correction factors for transfer of the calibration coefficient at the standards laboratory, Q0, to any beam quality, Q, in the clinic. Alternatively, beam quality corrections are measured with an energy-independent dosemeter via a reference beam quality in the clinic, Q1, to beam quality, Q Biases up to 35 % of built-in KAP meter readings were noted. Energy-dependent calibration factors are needed for unbiased PKA Accurate KAP meter calibration as a prerequisite for optimisation in projection radiography. PMID:26743261

  5. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality following changes to tube potential (kVp) in conventional paediatric chest radiography

    PubMed Central

    Ramanaidu, S; Sta Maria, RB; Ng, KH; George, J; Kumar, G

    2006-01-01

    Purpose A study of radiation dose and image quality following changes to the tube potential (kVp) in paediatric chest radiography. Materials and Method A total of 109 patients ranging from 1 month to 15 years were included in two phases of the study. Phase 1 investigated the range of entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values received from patients exposed to the existing exposure factors. In the second phase, new exposure factors using recommended values of tube potential (kVp) with reduced mAs were used. ESAK values were measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Image quality in both phases was evaluated using image quality criteria proposed by the Council of the European Communities (CEC). Results of both techniques were analysed for any differences. Results The overall mean ESAK before the changes was 0.22 mGy (range: 0.05-0.43) Following changes in tube potential, the overall mean reduced to 0.15 mGy (range: 0.03-0.38), a significant reduction by 34%. The interquartile range was reduced from 45% to 40%. However, doses to those below a year in age still remained high. Assessment of image quality was found to have no significant differences as far as the two techniques used were concerned. However, higher image scores were achieved using higher kVps. Conclusion Significant dose reduction was achieved through appropriate changes in tube potential and reduction of mAs without any loss in image quality. PMID:21614244

  6. Dose reduction of cone beam CT scanning for the entire oral and maxillofacial regions with thyroid collars

    PubMed Central

    Qu, XM; Li, G; Sanderink, GCH; Zhang, ZY; Ma, XC

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of thyroid collars on radiation dose during cone beam CT (CBCT) scanning. Methods Average tissue-absorbed dose for a NewTom 9000 CBCT scanner (Quantitative Radiology, Verona, Italy) was measured using thermoluminescent dosemeter chips in a phantom. The scans were carried out with and without thyroid collars. Effective organ dose and total effective dose were derived using International Commission on Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations. Results The effective organ doses for the thyroid gland and oesophagus were 31.0 µSv and 2.4 µSv, respectively, during CBCT scanning without a collar around the neck. When the thyroid collars were used loosely around the neck, no effective organ dose reduction was observed. When one thyroid collar was used tightly on the front of the neck, the effective organ dose for the thyroid gland and oesophagus were reduced to 15.9 µSv (48.7% reduction) and 1.4 µSv (41.7% reduction), respectively. Similar organ dose reduction (46.5% and 41.7%) was achieved when CBCT scanning was performed with two collars tightly on the front and back of the neck. However, the differences to the total effective dose were not significant among the scans with and without collars around the neck (p = 0.775). Conclusions Thyroid collars can effectively reduce the radiation dose to the thyroid and oesophagus if used appropriately. PMID:22707330

  7. Monte carlo study of MOSFET packaging, optimised for improved energy response: single MOSFET filtration.

    PubMed

    Othman, M A R; Cutajar, D L; Hardcastle, N; Guatelli, S; Rosenfeld, A B

    2010-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the energy response of a conventionally packaged single metal-oxide field effect transistors (MOSFET) detector were performed with the goal of improving MOSFET energy dependence for personal accident or military dosimetry. The MOSFET detector packaging was optimised. Two different 'drop-in' design packages for a single MOSFET detector were modelled and optimised using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit. Absorbed photon dose simulations of the MOSFET dosemeter placed in free-air response, corresponding to the absorbed doses at depths of 0.07 mm (D(w)(0.07)) and 10 mm (D(w)(10)) in a water equivalent phantom of size 30 x 30 x 30 cm(3) for photon energies of 0.015-2 MeV were performed. Energy dependence was reduced to within + or - 60 % for photon energies 0.06-2 MeV for both D(w)(0.07) and D(w)(10). Variations in the response for photon energies of 15-60 keV were 200 and 330 % for D(w)(0.07) and D(w)(10), respectively. The obtained energy dependence was reduced compared with that for conventionally packaged MOSFET detectors, which usually exhibit a 500-700 % over-response when used in free-air geometry. PMID:20460400

  8. Geant4 simulation of the CERN-EU high-energy reference field (CERF) facility.

    PubMed

    Prokopovich, D A; Reinhard, M I; Cornelius, I M; Rosenfeld, A B

    2010-09-01

    The CERN-EU high-energy reference field facility is used for testing and calibrating both active and passive radiation dosemeters for radiation protection applications in space and aviation. Through a combination of a primary particle beam, target and a suitable designed shielding configuration, the facility is able to reproduce the neutron component of the high altitude radiation field relevant to the jet aviation industry. Simulations of the facility using the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) toolkit provide an improved understanding of the neutron particle fluence as well as the particle fluence of other radiation components present. The secondary particle fluence as a function of the primary particle fluence incident on the target and the associated dose equivalent rates were determined at the 20 designated irradiation positions available at the facility. Comparisons of the simulated results with previously published simulations obtained using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, as well as with experimental results of the neutron fluence obtained with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, are made. PMID:20511404

  9. Assessment of GeB doped SiO2 optical fiber for the application of remote radiation sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawiah, A.; Fadhli, M. M.; Bauk, S.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Maah, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The research and development efforts on the silica (SiO2) optical fiber for application in radiation sensing and other dosimetry field have become quite active. The widely used LiF based dosimeter (TLD) has shown a relatively low reproducibility and there is a time delay in dose assessment which loses its capability as direct real-time dose assessment dosimeters unlike diodes. The macroscopic size of the optical fiber generally does not allow direct in vivo dose sensing in the inner organ for radiotherapy and medical imaging. A flat optical fiber (FF) with nominal dimensions of (0.08 x10 x 10) mm3 of pure silica SiO2 and GeO2 with Boron doped silica fiber SiO2 was selected for this research. The Germanium was used a dopant to enhance the flat optical fiber to reach much higher responsiveness and dose sensitivity in high energy and high dose irradiation. Together with this combination, both TLD dimension and dose assessment issues was hoped to be overcome. The research conducted by comparing the response of pure silica SiO2 flat optical fiber with a GeO2 with Boron doped silica SiO2 flat optical fiber. The FF sample was annealed at 400°C for one hour before irradiated. Kinetic parameters and dosimetric glow curve of TL response and sensitivity were studied with respect to the electron beam of high dose of micro beam irradiation of 1.0 kGy, 5.0 kGy, 10.0 kGy, 50.0 kGy, 100.0 kGy, 500.0 kGy, and 1.0 MGy using Singapore Synchrotron Light Source's (PCIT) beamline. The PCIT operates at 500mA current with real time current range from 90-100mA, dose rate of 3.03 MGy/hour and energy at 8.9KeV. The source to Source Surface Distance (SSD) was at 6.0 cm, with a field size of 20mm × 8mm diameter of a half circle. The TL response was measured using a TLD reader Harshaw Model 3500. The Time-Temperature-Profile (TTP) of the reader was obtained to a preheat temperature of 150 °C for 5 s, the output signal being acquired at a temperature ramprate of 35 °Cs-1, acquisition time of

  10. Determination of absorbed dose to water around a clinical HDR {sup 192}Ir source using LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs demonstrates an LET dependence of detector response

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa; Elia, Rouba; Hedtjaern, Haakan; Olsson, Sara; Alm Carlsson, Gudrun

    2012-02-15

    LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs and the EPR lithium formate dosimeters was, however, statistically significant and in agreement with the difference in relative detector responses found for the two detector systems by Carlsson Tedgren et al. [Med. Phys. 38, 5539-5550 (2011)] and by Adolfsson et al.[Med. Phys. 37, 4946-4959 (2010)]. Conclusions: When calibrated in {sup 60}Co or MV photon beams, correction for the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti detector response will be needed as to measure absorbed doses to water in a {sup 192}Ir beam with highest accuracy. Such corrections will depend on the manufacturing process (MTS-N Poland or Harshaw TLD-100) and details of the annealing and read-out schemes used.

  11. Comparative dosimetry study of three UK centres implementing total skin electron treatment through external audit

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, R; McGovern, M; Greener, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article describes the external audit measurements conducted in two UK centres implementing total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) and the results obtained. Methods: Measurements of output, energy, beam flatness and symmetry at a standard distance (95 or 100 cm SSD) were performed using a parallel plate chamber in solid water. Similarly, output and energy measurements were also performed at the treatment plane for single and dual fields. Clinical simulations were carried out using thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic® film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ) on an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: Extended distance measurements confirmed that local values for the beam dosimetry at Centres A and B were within 2% for outputs and 1-mm agreement of the expected depth at which the dose is 50% of the maximum for the depth–dose curve in water (R50,D) value. Clinical simulation using TLDs) showed an agreement of −1.6% and −6.7% compared with the expected mean trunk dose for each centre, respectively, and a variation within 10% (±1 standard deviation) across the trunk. The film results confirmed that the delivery of the treatment technique at each audited centre complies with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer recommendations. Conclusion: This audit methodology has proven to be a successful way to confirm the agreement of dosimetric parameters for TSEBT treatments at both audited centres and could serve as the basis for an audit template to be used by other audit groups. Advances in knowledge: TSEBT audits are not established in the UK owing to a limited number of centres carrying out the treatment technique. This article describes the audits performed at two UK centres prior to their clinical implementation. PMID:25761213

  12. Evolution of the CaF2:Tm (TLD-300) glow curve as an indicator of beam quality for low-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, I. D.; Avila, O.; Gamboa-deBuen, I.; Brandan, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    We study the high- to low- temperature signal ratio (HLTR) of the CaF2:Tm glow curve as a function of beam quality for low-energy photon beams with effective energy between 15.2 and 33.6 keV, generated with W, Mo and Rh anodes. CaF2:Tm dosemeters (TLD-300) were exposed to x-rays and 60Co gamma-rays. Glow curves were deconvoluted into 7 peaks, using computerized glow curve deconvolution and HLTR was evaluated. Air kerma and dose in water were between 2.1-15.0 mGy and 49.8-373.8 mGy, respectively. All peaks in the glow curve showed a linear response with respect to air kerma and dose in water. HLTR values decreased monotonically between 1.029  ±  0.010 (at 15.2 keV) and 0.821  ±  0.011 (33.6 keV), and no effects due to the use of different anode/filter combinations were observed. The results indicate a relatively high value of HLTR (about 1 for 17 keV effective energy, or 3 keV μm-1 track-average LET) and a measurable dependence on the photon beam quality. Comparison of these photon data with HLTR for ions shows good quantitative agreement. The reported evolution of the CaF2:Tm glow curve could facilitate the estimation of the effective energy of unknown photon fields by this technique.

  13. Occupational radiation doses to the extremities and the eyes in interventional radiology and cardiology procedures

    PubMed Central

    Efstathopoulos, E P; Pantos, I; Andreou, M; Gkatzis, A; Carinou, E; Koukorava, C; Kelekis, N L; Brountzos, E

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine occupational dose levels in interventional radiology and cardiology procedures. Methods The study covered a sample of 25 procedures and monitored occupational dose for all laboratory personnel. Each individual wore eight thermoluminescent dosemeters next to the eyes, wrists, fingers and legs during each procedure. Radiation protection shields used in each procedure were recorded. Results The highest doses per procedure were recorded for interventionists at the left wrist (average 485 μSv, maximum 5239 μSv) and left finger (average 324 μSv, maximum 2877 μSv), whereas lower doses were recorded for the legs (average 124 μSv, maximum 1959 μSv) and the eyes (average 64 μSv, maximum 1129 μSv). Doses to the assisting nurses during the intervention were considerably lower; the highest doses were recorded at the wrists (average 26 μSv, maximum 41 μSv) and legs (average 18 μSv, maximum 22 μSv), whereas doses to the eyes were minimal (average 4 μSv, maximum 16 μSv). Occupational doses normalised to kerma area product (KAP) ranged from 11.9 to 117.3 μSv/1000 cGy cm2 and KAP was poorly correlated to the interventionists' extremity doses. Conclusion Calculation of the dose burden for interventionists considering the actual number of procedures performed annually revealed that dose limits for the extremities and the lenses of the eyes were not exceeded. However, there are cases in which high doses have been recorded and this can lead to exceeding the dose limits when bad practices are followed and the radiation protection tools are not properly used. PMID:21172967

  14. Preliminary assessment of the dose to the interventional radiologist in fluoro-CT-guided procedures.

    PubMed

    Pereira, M F; Alves, J G; Sarmento, S; Santos, J A M; Sousa, M J; Gouvêa, M; Oliveira, A D; Cardoso, J V; Santos, L M

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary assessment of the occupational dose to the intervention radiologist received in fluoroscopy computerised tomography (CT) used to guide the collection of lung and bone biopsies is presented. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the capability of the reading system as well as of the available whole-body (WB) and extremity dosemeters used in routine monthly monitoring periods to measure per procedure dose values. The intervention radiologist was allocated 10 WB detectors (LiF: Mg, Ti, TLD-100) placed at chest and abdomen levels above and below the lead apron, and at both right and left arms, knees and feet. A special glove was developed with casings for the insertion of 11 extremity detectors (LiF:Mg, Cu, P, TLD-100H) for the identification of the most highly exposed fingers. The H(p)(10) dose values received above the lead apron (ranged 0.20-0.02 mSv) depend mainly on the duration of the examination and on the placement of physician relative to the beam, while values below the apron are relatively low. The left arm seems to receive a higher dose value. H(p)(0.07) values to the hand (ranged 36.30-0.06 mSv) show that the index, middle and ring fingers are the most highly exposed. In this study, the wrist dose was negligible compared with the finger dose. These results are preliminary and further studies are needed to better characterise the dose assessment in CT fluoroscopy. PMID:21112883

  15. Validation of a Monte Carlo simulation for dose assessment in dental cone beam CT examinations.

    PubMed

    Morant, J J; Salvadó, M; Casanovas, R; Hernández-Girón, I; Velasco, E; Calzado, A

    2012-07-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for calculating absorbed dose has been developed and applied for dental applications with an i-CAT cone beam CT (CBCT) system. To validate the method a comparison was made between calculated and measured dose values for two different clinical protocols. Measurements with a pencil CT chamber were performed free-in-air and in a CT dose head phantom; measurements were also performed with a transmission ionization chamber. In addition for each protocol a total number of 58 thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) were packed in groups and placed at 16 representative anatomical locations of an anthropomorphic phantom (Remab system) to assess absorbed doses. To simulate X-ray exposure, a software application based on the EGS4 package was applied. Dose quantities were calculated for different voxelized models representing the CT ionization and transmission chambers, the TLDs, and the phantoms as well. The dose quantities evaluated in the comparison were the accumulated dose averaged along the rotation axis (D(i)), the volume average dose,D(vol) for the dosimetric phantom, the dose area product (DAP) and the absorbed dose for the TLDs. Absolute differences between measured and simulated outcomes were ≤ 2.1% for free-in-air doses; ≤ 6.2% in the 5 cavities of the CT dose head phantom; ≤ 13% for TLDs inside the primary beam. Such differences were considered acceptable in all cases and confirmed the validity of the MC program for different geometries. In conclusion, the devised MC simulation program can be a robust tool to optimize protocols and estimate patient doses for CBCT units in dental, oral and maxillofacial radiology. PMID:21807542

  16. Effective radiation dose and eye lens dose in dental cone beam CT: effect of field of view and angle of rotation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G; Theodorakou, C; Walker, A; Bosmans, H; Jacobs, R; Bogaerts, R; Horner, K

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the effect of field of view (FOV) and angle of rotation on radiation dose in dental cone beam CT (CBCT) and to define a preliminary volume–dose model. Methods: Organ and effective doses were estimated using 148 thermoluminescent dosemeters placed in an anthropomorphic phantom. Dose measurements were undertaken on a 3D Accuitomo 170 dental CBCT unit (J. Morita, Kyoto, Japan) using six FOVs as well as full-rotation (360°) and half-rotation (180°) protocols. Results: For the 360° rotation protocols, effective dose ranged between 54 µSv (4 × 4 cm, upper canine) and 303 µSv (17 × 12 cm, maxillofacial). An empirical relationship between FOV dimension and effective dose was derived. The use of a 180° rotation resulted in an average dose reduction of 45% compared with a 360° rotation. Eye lens doses ranged between 95 and 6861 µGy. Conclusion: Significant dose reduction can be achieved by reducing the FOV size, particularly the FOV height, of CBCT examinations to the actual region of interest. In some cases, a 180° rotation can be preferred, as it has the added value of reducing the scan time. Eye lens doses should be reduced by decreasing the height of the FOV rather than using inferior FOV positioning, as the latter would increase the effective dose considerably. Advances in knowledge: The effect of the FOV and rotation angle on the effective dose in dental CBCT was quantified. The dominant effect of FOV height was demonstrated. A preliminary model has been proposed, which could be used to predict effective dose as a function of FOV size and position. PMID:25189417

  17. A single plan solution to chest wall radiotherapy with bolus?

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez-Sanz, C; Bowles, S; Hirst, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Radiotherapy treatments of post-mastectomy chest walls are complex, requiring treatment close to skin, necessitating bolus use. Commonly used 5- and 10-mm-thick boluses develop full skin dose, needing removal for the latter half of treatment and requiring two treatment plans to be generated. Can a thinner bolus be used for all treatment fractions, requiring only one plan? Methods: Investigation of doses received using (A) a half-time 10-mm-thick Vaseline® bolus (current situation); (B) a brass mesh (Whiting & Davis, Attleboro Falls, MA) and (C) 3- and 5-mm Superflab™ (Mick Radio-Nuclear Instruments, Mount Vernon, NY) for 6 and 15 MV. Dosimetric measurements in Barts WT1 solid water and an anthropomorphic phantom, using ionization chambers and thermoluminescent dosemeters, were used to study the effect of different bolus regimes on the photon depth–dose curves (DDCs) and skin doses. Results: Measured skin doses for the current 10-mm-thick Vaseline bolus, brass mesh and 3-mm bolus were compared (5 mm bolus has been rejected). The brass mesh has the least effect on the DDC, with changes <0.7% for depths greater than dmax. Brass mesh conforms superiorly to skin surfaces. Measurements on an anthropomorphic phantom demonstrate an increased skin dose compared with our current treatment protocol. Conclusion: Brass mesh has the smallest effect on the DDC, whilst sufficiently increasing surface dose. It can be removed at any fraction, based on a clinical decision, without the need for generating a new plan. Treating with one plan significantly reduces planning times. Advances in knowledge: Quantification of skin doses required and achieved from wax-on/wax-off treatment compared with alternative available breast boluses. PMID:24646288

  18. Comparison of effective dose and lifetime risk of cancer incidence of CT attenuation correction acquisitions and radiopharmaceutical administration for myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Szczepura, K; Hogg, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To measure the organ dose and calculate effective dose from CT attenuation correction (CTAC) acquisitions from four commonly used gamma camera single photon emission CT/CT systems. Methods: CTAC dosimetry data was collected using thermoluminescent dosemeters on GE Healthcare's Infinia™ Hawkeye™ (GE Healthcare, Buckinghamshire, UK) four- and single-slice systems, Siemens Symbia™ T6 (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) and the Philips Precedence (Philips Healthcare, Amsterdam, Netherlands). Organ and effective dose from the administration of 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 99mTc-sestamibi were calculated using International Commission of Radiological Protection reports 80 and 106. Using these data, the lifetime biological risk was calculated. Results: The Siemens Symbia gave the lowest CTAC dose (1.8 mSv) followed by the GE Infinia Hawkeye single-slice (1.9 mSv), GE Infinia Hawkeye four-slice (2.5 mSv) and Philips Precedence v. 3.0. Doses were significantly lower than the calculated doses from radiopharmaceutical administration (11 and 14 mSv for 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 99mTc-sestamibi, respectively). Overall lifetime biological risks were lower, which suggests that using CTAC data posed minimal risk to the patient. Comparison of data for breast tissue demonstrated a higher risk than that from the radiopharmaceutical administration. Conclusion: CTAC doses were confirmed to be much lower than those from radiopharmaceutical administration. The localized nature of the CTAC exposure compared to the radiopharmaceutical biological distribution indicated dose and risk to the breast to be higher. Advances in knowledge: This research proved that CTAC is a comparatively low-dose acquisition. However, it has been shown that there is increased risk for breast tissue especially in the younger patients. As per legislation, justification is required and CTAC should only be used in situations that demonstrate sufficient net benefit. PMID:24998249

  19. Radiation exposure to patients and medical staff in hepatic chemoembolisation interventional procedures in Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Khoury, H J; Garzon, W J; Andrade, G; Lunelli, N; Kramer, R; de Barros, V S M; Huda, A

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient and medical staff absorbed doses received from transarterial chemoembolisation of hepatocellular carcinoma, which is the most common primary liver tumour worldwide. The study was performed in three hospitals in Recife, capital of the state of Pernambuco, located in the Brazilian Northeastern region. Two are public hospitals (A and B), and one is private (C). For each procedure, the number of images, irradiation parameters (kV, mA and fluoroscopy time), the air kerma-area product (PKA) and the cumulative air kerma (Ka,r) at the reference point were registered. The maximum skin dose (MSD) of the patient was estimated using radiochromic film. For the medical staff dosimetry, thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD-100) were attached next to the eyes, close to the thyroid (above the shielding), on the thorax under the apron, on the wrist and on the feet. The effective dose to the staff was estimated using the algorithm of von Boetticher. The results showed that the mean value of the total PKA was 267.49, 403.83 and 479.74 Gy cm(2) for Hospitals A, B and C, respectively. With regard to the physicians, the average effective dose per procedure was 17 µSv, and the minimum and maximum values recorded were 1 and 41 µSy, respectively. The results showed that the feet received the highest doses followed by the hands and lens of the eye, since the physicians did not use leaded glasses and the equipment had no lead curtain. PMID:25870436

  20. SU-E-I-04: A Mammography Phantom to Measure Mean Glandular Dose and Image Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Pineda, E; Ruiz-Trejo, C; E, Brandan M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mean glandular dose (MGD) and image quality in a selection of mammography systems using a novel phantom based on thermoluminescent dosemeters and the ACR wax insert. Methods: The phantom consists of two acrylic, 19 cm diameter, 4.5 cm thick, semicircular modules, used in sequence. The image quality module contains the ACR insert and is used to obtain a quality control image under automatic exposure conditions. The dosimetric module carries 15 TLD-100 chips, some under Al foils, to determine air kerma and half-value-layer. TL readings take place at our laboratory under controlled conditions. Calibration was performed using an ionization chamber and a Senographe 2000D unit for a variety of beam qualities, from 24 to 40 kV, Mo and Rh anodes and filters. Phantom MGD values agree, on the average, within 3% with ionization chamber data, and their precision is better than 10% (k=1). Results: MGD and image quality have been evaluated in a selection of mammography units currently used in Mexican health services. The sample includes analogic (screen/film), flexible digital (CR), and full-field digital image receptors. The highest MDG are associated to the CR technology. The most common image quality failure is due to artifacts (dust, intensifying screen scratches, and processor marks for film/screen, laser reader defects for CR). Conclusion: The developed phantom permits the MGD measurement without the need of a calibrated ionization chamber at the mammography site and can be used by a technician without the presence of a medical physicist. The results indicate the urgent need to establish quality control programs for mammography.

  1. Limitations of silicon diodes for clinical electron dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Song, Haijun; Ahmad, Munir; Deng, Jun; Chen, Zhe; Yue, Ning J; Nath, Ravinder

    2006-01-01

    This work investigates the relevance of several factors affecting the response of silicon diode dosemeters in depth-dose scans of electron beams. These factors are electron energy, instantaneous dose rate, dose per pulse, photon/electron dose ratio and electron scattering angle (directional response). Data from the literature and our own experiments indicate that the impact of these factors may be up to +/-15%. Thus, the different factors would have to cancel out perfectly at all depths in order to produce true depth-dose curves. There are reports of good agreement between depth-doses measured with diodes and ionisation chambers. However, our measurements with a Scantronix electron field detector (EFD) diode and with a plane-parallel ionisation chamber show discrepancies both in the build-up and in the low-dose regions, with a ratio up to 1.4. Moreover, the absolute sensitivity of two diodes of the same EFD model was found to differ by a factor of 3, and this ratio was not constant but changed with depth between 5 and 15% in the low-dose regions of some clinical electron beams. Owing to these inhomogeneities among diodes even of the same model, corrections for each factor would have to be diode-specific and beam-specific. All these corrections would have to be determined using parallel plane chambers, as recommended by AAPM TG-25, which would be unrealistic in clinical practice. Our conclusion is that in general diodes are not reliable in the measurement of depth-dose curves of clinical electron beams. PMID:16772305

  2. Peripheral dose measurements for 6 and 18 MV photon beams on a linear accelerator with multileaf collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Zacharopoulou, Fotini; Varveris, Haralambos; Damilakis, John

    2008-10-15

    Peripheral dose (PD) to critical structures outside treatment volume is of clinical importance. The aim of the current study was to estimate PD on a linear accelerator equipped with multileaf collimator (MLC). Dose measurements were carried out using an ionization chamber embedded in a water phantom for 6 and 18 MV photon beams. PD values were acquired for field sizes from 5x5 to 20x20 cm{sup 2} in increments of 5 cm at distances up to 24 cm from the field edge. Dose data were obtained at two collimator orientations where the measurement points are shielded by MLC and jaws. The variation of PD with the source to skin distance (SSD), depth, and lateral displacement of the measurement point was evaluated. To examine the dependence of PD upon the tissue thickness at the entrance point of the beam, scattered dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosemeters placed on three anthropomorphic phantoms simulating 5- and 10-year-old children and an average adult patient. PD from 6 MV photons varied from 0.13% to 6.75% of the central-axis maximum dose depending upon the collimator orientation, extent of irradiated area, and distance from the treatment field. The corresponding dose range from 18 MV x rays was 0.09% to 5.61%. The variation of PD with depth and with lateral displacements up to 80% of the field dimension was very small. The scattered dose from both photon beams increased with the increase of SSD or tissue thickness along beam axis. The presented dosimetric data set allows the estimation of scattered dose outside the primary beam.

  3. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from prostate cancer external beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bezak, Eva; Takam, Rundgham; Marcu, Loredana G

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral photon and neutron doses from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) are associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis in the out-of-field organs; thus, dose estimations of secondary radiation are imperative. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from EBRT of prostate carcinoma were measured in Rando phantom. (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were inserted in slices of a Rando phantom followed by exposure to 80 Gy with 18-MV photon four-field 3D-CRT technique. The TLDs were calibrated using 6- and 18-MV X-ray beam. Neutron dose equivalents measured with CR-39 etch-track detectors were used to derive readout-to-neutron dose conversion factor for (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs. Average neutron dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 3.8±0.9 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 7.0±5.4 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. For photons, the average dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 0.2±0.1 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 8.1±9.7 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. Paired (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs can be used to measure photon and neutron doses simultaneously. Organs in close proximity to target received larger doses from photons than those from neutrons whereas distally located organs received higher neutron versus photon dose. PMID:25564673

  4. Development of an applicator for eye lens dosimetry during radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, J M; Lee, J; Ye, S-J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To develop an applicator for in vivo measurements of lens dose during radiotherapy. Methods: A contact lens-shaped applicator made of acrylic was developed for in vivo measurements of lens dose. This lens applicator allows the insertion of commercially available metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) dosemeters. CT images of an anthropomorphic phantom with and without the applicator were acquired. Ten volumetric modulated arc therapy plans each for the brain and the head and neck cancer were generated and delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. The differences between the measured and the calculated doses at the lens applicator, as well as the differences between the measured and the calculated doses at the surface of the eyelid were acquired. Results: The average difference between the measured and the calculated doses with the applicator was 3.1 ± 1.8 cGy with a micro MOSFET and 2.8 ± 1.3 cGy with a standard MOSFET. The average difference without the lens applicator was 4.8 ± 5.2 cGy with the micro MOSFET and 5.7 ± 6.5 cGy with the standard MOSFET. The maximum difference with the micro MOSFET was 10.5 cGy with the applicator and 21.1 cGy without the applicator. For the standard MOSFET, it was 6.8 cGy with the applicator and 27.6 cGy without the applicator. Conclusion: The lens applicator allowed reduction of the differences between the calculated and the measured doses during in vivo measurement for the lens compared with in vivo measurement at the surface of the eyelid. Advances in knowledge: By using an applicator for in vivo dosimetry of the eye lens, it was possible to reduce the measurement uncertainty. PMID:25111733

  5. NOTE: Determination of the recombination correction factor kS for some specific plane-parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers in pulsed photon and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggmoser, G.; Saum, R.; Schmachtenberg, A.; Schmid, F.; Schüle, E.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown from an evaluation of the inverse reading of the dosemeter (1/M) against the inverse of the polarizing voltage (1/V), obtained with a number of commercially available ionization chambers, using dose per pulse values between 0.16 and 5 mGy, that a linear relationship between the recombination correction factor kS and dose per pulse (DPP) can be found. At dose per pulse values above 1 mGy the method of a general equation with coefficients dependent on the chamber type gives more accurate results than the Boag method. This method was already proposed by Burns and McEwen (1998, Phys. Med. Biol. 43 2033) and avoids comprehensive and time-consuming measurements of Jaffé plots which are a prerequisite for the application of the multi-voltage analysis (MVA) or the two-voltage analysis (TVA). We evaluated and verified the response of ionization chambers on the recombination effect in pulsed accelerator beams for both photons and electrons. Our main conclusions are: (1) The correction factor kS depends only on the DPP and the chamber type. There is no influence of radiation type and energy. (2) For all the chambers investigated there is a linear relationship between kS and DPP up to 5 mGy/pulse, and for two chambers we could show linearity up to 40 mGy/pulse. (3) A general formalism, such as that of Boag, characterizes chambers exclusively by the distance of the electrodes and gives a trend for the correction factor, and therefore (4) a general formalism has to reflect the influence of the chamber construction on the recombination by the introduction of chamber-type dependent coefficients.

  6. The neutron component of two high-energy photon reference fields.

    PubMed

    Röttger, S; Schäler, K; Behrens, R; Nolte, R; Wissmann, F

    2007-01-01

    The 4.4 MeV photon reference field described in ISO 4037 is produced by the (12)C(p,p')(12)C (E(x) = 4.4389 MeV) reaction using a thick elemental carbon target and a proton beam with an energy of 5.7 MeV. The relative abundance of the isotope (13)C in elemental carbon is 1.10%. Therefore, the 4.4 MeV photon field is contaminated by neutrons produced by the (13)C(p,n) (13)N reaction (Q = -3.003 MeV). The ambient dose equivalent H*(10) produced by these neutrons is of the same order of magnitude as the ambient dose equivalent produced by the 4.4 MeV photons. For the calibration of dosemeters, especially those also sensitive to neutrons, the spectral fluence distribution of these neutrons has to be known in detail. On the other hand, a mixed photon/neutron field is very useful for the calibration of tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPC), if this field combines a high-linear energy transfer (LET) component produced by low-energy neutrons and a low-LET component resulting from photons with about the same ambient dose equivalent and energies up to 7 MeV. Such a mixed field was produced at the PTB accelerator facility using a thin CaF(2) + (nat)C target and a 5.7 MeV proton beam. PMID:17675300

  7. External and internal irradiation of a rural Bryansk (Russia) population from 1990 to 2000, following high deposition of radioactive caesium from the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Thornberg, C; Vesanen, R; Wallström, E; Zvonova, I; Jesko, T; Balonov, M; Mattsson, S

    2005-10-01

    In 1990, a joint Nordic-Russian project was initiated in order to make independent estimations of the effective dose to selected groups of inhabitants in a highly contaminated area around the city of Novozybkov in the western Bryansk region of Russia. The inhabitants were living in six villages with initial contamination levels of (137)Cs between 0.9 and 2.7 MBq m(-2). Some villages had been decontaminated, others not. Both school children and adults participated in the study. The external irradiation of 100-130 inhabitants was determined during 1 month in September-October each year from 1990 to 2000 (except 1999), using individual thermoluminescent dosemeters. The body burden of (137,134)Cs was determined by in vivo measurements in about 500 inhabitants annually from 1991 to 2000, and for a subgroup also with analysis of the (137)Cs concentration in urine. The mean effective dose (E) from external and internal irradiation due to (137,134)Cs deposition varied between 2.5 and 1.2 mSv per year between 1990 and 2000. The total mean E decreased, on average, by 9% per year, while the mean external dose decreased by 16% per year. The dose rate from internal radiation decreased more slowly than the dose rate from external radiation, and also showed an irregular time variation. The contribution from the internal dose to the total E was 30-50%, depending on the village. Predictions for the long-term changes in the effective dose to people living in the areas are presented. The cumulated E for the 70 years following the accident was estimated to be about 90 mSv with the assumption that both internal and external dose decrease by 2% per year after year 2000. The highest E during a life-time received by single individuals living in the area may amount to around 500 mSv considering the individual variations in E. PMID:16175396

  8. NUNDO: a numerical model of a human torso phantom and its application to effective dose equivalent calculations for astronauts at the ISS.

    PubMed

    Puchalska, Monika; Bilski, Pawel; Berger, Thomas; Hajek, Michael; Horwacik, Tomasz; Körner, Christine; Olko, Pawel; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Reitz, Günther

    2014-11-01

    The health effects of cosmic radiation on astronauts need to be precisely quantified and controlled. This task is important not only in perspective of the increasing human presence at the International Space Station (ISS), but also for the preparation of safe human missions beyond low earth orbit. From a radiation protection point of view, the baseline quantity for radiation risk assessment in space is the effective dose equivalent. The present work reports the first successful attempt of the experimental determination of the effective dose equivalent in space, both for extra-vehicular activity (EVA) and intra-vehicular activity (IVA). This was achieved using the anthropomorphic torso phantom RANDO(®) equipped with more than 6,000 passive thermoluminescent detectors and plastic nuclear track detectors, which have been exposed to cosmic radiation inside the European Space Agency MATROSHKA facility both outside and inside the ISS. In order to calculate the effective dose equivalent, a numerical model of the RANDO(®) phantom, based on computer tomography scans of the actual phantom, was developed. It was found that the effective dose equivalent rate during an EVA approaches 700 μSv/d, while during an IVA about 20 % lower values were observed. It is shown that the individual dose based on a personal dosimeter reading for an astronaut during IVA results in an overestimate of the effective dose equivalent of about 15 %, whereas under an EVA conditions the overestimate is more than 200 %. A personal dosemeter can therefore deliver quite good exposure records during IVA, but may overestimate the effective dose equivalent received during an EVA considerably. PMID:25119442

  9. An investigation of the radiation doses to the lower legs and feet of staff undertaking interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Artschan, R E R; Chase, K; Fender, A; Howells, P G; Buchan, S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Occupational radiation doses from fluoroscopic procedures are some of the highest doses of exposure amongst medical staff using radiography. Protective equipment and dose monitoring are used to minimize and control the risk from these occupational doses. Other studies have considered the effectiveness of this protection, but this study further considers whether protection is adequate for the lower leg and foot and the extent to which these doses can be reduced. Methods: Scatter air kerma profiles at toe level were measured with an ionization chamber. Thermoluminescent dosemeters and lower extremity phantoms were used to estimate the dose variation with the height of patient couch. A 7-week period of in situ toe dose monitoring of four radiologists was also undertaken. Results: The use of protective curtains effectively reduced the exposure to most of the lower extremities. Toe doses were found to be high and increased with increase in couch height. In situ monitoring indicated annual toe doses of 110 mSv for two of the four radiologists monitored. Conclusion: Protective curtains should be used, but they might have limitations with respect to toe doses. Annual toe doses approaching the classification threshold of 150 mSv were measured for two radiologists. Caution should be exercised when there is a gap below curtains and, when possible, staff should step back from the couch. Lower legs and toes should be included in local radiation protection programmes. Advances in knowledge: Toe doses in interventional radiology may be higher than expected and may have to be included in radiation protection programmes. PMID:24678856

  10. Influence of lead apron shielding on absorbed doses from panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Rottke, D; Grossekettler, L; Sawada, K; Poxleitner, P; Schulze, D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the absorbed doses in a full anthropomorphic body phantom from two different panoramic radiography devices, performing protocols with and without applying a lead apron. Methods: A RANDO® full body phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Inc., Stamford, CT) was equipped with 110 thermoluminescent dosemeters at 55 different sites and set up in two different panoramic radiography devices [SCANORA® three-dimensional (3D) (SOREDEX, Tuusula, Finland) and ProMax® 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland)] and exposed. Two different protocols were performed in the two devices. The first protocol was performed without any lead shielding, whereas the phantom was equipped with a standard adult lead apron for the second protocol. Results: A two-tailed paired samples t-test for the SCANORA 3D revealed that there is no difference between the protocol using lead apron shielding (m = 87.99, s = 102.98) and the protocol without shielding (m = 87.34, s = 107.49), t(54) = −0.313, p > 0.05. The same test for the ProMax 3D showed that there is also no difference between the protocol using shielding (m = 106.48, s = 117.38) and the protocol without shielding (m = 107.75, s = 114,36), t(54) = 0.938, p > 0.05. Conclusions: In conclusion, the results of this study showed no statistically significant differences between a panoramic radiography with or without the use of lead apron shielding. PMID:24174012

  11. Replacement tissue-equivalent proportional counter for the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Perez-Nunez, D; Braby, L A

    2011-02-01

    The tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC)-based dosemeters used on the International Space Station have exceeded their planned useful lives, and are scheduled to be replaced with the new units taking advantage of improved technology. The original TEPC detectors used cylindrical geometry with field tubes to achieve good energy resolution and minimum sensitivity to noise created by vibration. The inside diameter of these detectors is 5.1 cm. The new detectors developed for this application produce the resolution and vibration resistance of the cylindrical detector with the isotropic response and compact size of a spherical detector. The cathode structure consists of conductive tissue-equivalent plastic A-150 layers separated by thin polyethylene layers perpendicular to the anode. Each conductive layer is held at the electrical potential needed to produce uniform electric field strength along the anode wire, and thus the same gas gain for electrons produced in different portions of the spherical volume. The new design contains the whole preamplifier inside the vacuum chamber to reduce electronic noise. Also the vacuum chamber has a novel design with a 0.020-inch-thick aluminium wall to allow a total wall thickness of 0.5 g cm(-2), which is typical of the shielding provided by a space suit. This feature will allow measuring the dose on the astronauts' skin due to low-energy electrons and protons produced during solar events. The vacuum chamber has a new bayonet clamping system that reduces the total detector weight to less than half that of the old TEPC. PMID:21115447

  12. Using GafChromic film to estimate the effective dose from dental cone beam CT and panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Al-Okshi, A; Nilsson, M; Petersson, A; Wiese, M; Lindh, C

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate the feasibility of GafChromic® XR-QA2 (ISP Corp., Wayne, NJ) as a dosemeter when performing measurements of the effective dose from three cone beam CT (CBCT) units and to compare the doses from examinations of three common dental clinical situations. A second aim was to compare the radiation doses for three digital panoramic units with the doses for the CBCT units. Methods: The CBCT units used were Veraviewepocs 3De® (J Morita MFG Corp., Kyoto, Japan), ProMax® 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) and NewTom VGi® (Quantitative Radiology, Verona, Italy). GafChromic XR-QA2 films were placed between the selected layers of the head and neck of a tissue-equivalent human skull (RANDO® phantom; The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY). The exposure parameters were set using the automatic exposure control function of the units. Depending on the availability, medium and smaller field of view (FOV) scanning modes were used. The effective dose was estimated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection formalism. Results: The lowest effective dose of a CBCT unit was observed for ProMax 3D, FOV 4 × 5 cm (10 μSv), the highest for NewTom VGi, FOV 8 × 8 cm—high resolution (129 μSv). The range of effective doses for digital panoramic machines measured was 8–14 μSv. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of using radiochromic films for dental CBCT and panoramic dosimetry. PMID:23610090

  13. The reduction of dose in paediatric panoramic radiography: the impact of collimator height and programme selection

    PubMed Central

    Safi, H; Maddison, S M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this work was to estimate the doses to radiosensitive organs in the head of a young child undergoing panoramic radiography and to establish the effectiveness of a short collimator in reducing dose. Methods: Thermoluminescent dosemeters were used in a paediatric head phantom to simulate an examination on a 5-year-old child. The panoramic system used was an Instrumentarium OP200 D (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland). The collimator height options were 110 and 140 mm. Organ doses were measured using exposure programmes intended for use with adult and child size heads. The performance of the automatic exposure control (AEC) system was also assessed. Results: The short collimator reduced the dose to the brain and the eyes by 57% and 41%, respectively. The dose to the submandibular and sublingual glands increased by 32% and 20%, respectively, when using a programme with a narrower focal trough intended for a small jaw. The effective dose measured with the short collimator and paediatric programme was 7.7 μSv. The dose to the lens of the eye was 17 μGy. When used, the AEC system produced some asymmetry in the dose distribution across the head. Conclusions: Panoramic systems when used to frequently image children should have programmes specifically designed for imaging small heads. There should be a shorter collimator available and programmes that deliver a reduced exposure time and allow reduction of tube current. Programme selection should also provide flexibility for focal trough size, shape and position to match the smaller head size. PMID:25352427

  14. A CCD-based optical CT scanner for high-resolution 3D imaging of radiation dose distributions: equipment specifications, optical simulations and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Simon J.; Klein Koerkamp, Koen; Bero, Mamdouh A.; Jenneson, Paul; Morton, Edward J.; Gilboy, Walter B.

    2001-12-01

    Methods based on magnetic resonance imaging for the measurement of three-dimensional distributions of radiation dose are highly developed. However, relatively little work has been done on optical computed tomography (OCT). This paper describes a new OCT scanner based on a broad beam light source and a two-dimensional charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. A number of key design features are discussed including the light source; the scanning tank, turntable and stepper motor control; the diffuser screen onto which images are projected and the detector. It is shown that the non-uniform pixel sensitivity of the low-cost CCD detector used and the granularity of the diffuser screen lead to a serious ring artefact in the reconstructed images. Methods are described for eliminating this. The problems arising from reflection and refraction at the walls of the gel container are explained. Optical ray-tracing simulations are presented for cylindrical containers with a variety of radii and verified experimentally. Small changes in the model parameters lead to large variations in the signal intensity observed in the projection data. The effect of imperfect containers on data quality is discussed and a method based on a 'correction scan' is shown to be successful in correcting many of the related image artefacts. The results of two tomography experiments are presented. In the first experiment, a radiochromic Fricke gel sample was exposed four times in different positions to a 100 kVp x-ray beam perpendicular to the plane of imaging. Images of absorbed dose with slice thickness of 140 μm were acquired, with 'true' in-plane resolution of 560 × 560 μm2 at the edge of the 72 mm field of view and correspondingly higher resolution at the centre. The nominal doses measured correlated well with the known exposure times. The second experiment demonstrated the well known phenomenon of diffusion in the dosemeter gels and yielded a value of (0.12 +/- 0.02) mm2 s-1 for the diffusion

  15. A CCD-based optical CT scanner for high-resolution 3D imaging of radiation dose distributions: equipment specifications, optical simulations and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Doran, S J; Koerkamp, K K; Bero, M A; Jenneson, P; Morton, E J; Gilboy, W B

    2001-12-01

    Methods based on magnetic resonance imaging for the measurement of three-dimensional distributions of radiation dose are highly developed. However, relatively little work has been done on optical computed tomography (OCT). This paper describes a new OCT scanner based on a broad beam light source and a two-dimensional charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. A number of key design features are discussed including the light source; the scanning tank, turntable and stepper motor control; the diffuser screen onto which images are projected and the detector. It is shown that the non-uniform pixel sensitivity of the low-cost CCD detector used and the granularity of the diffuser screen lead to a serious ring artefact in the reconstructed images. Methods are described for eliminating this. The problems arising from reflection and refraction at the walls of the gel container are explained. Optical ray-tracing simulations are presented for cylindrical containers with a variety of radii and verified experimentally. Small changes in the model parameters lead to large variations in the signal intensity observed in the projection data. The effect of imperfect containers on data quality is discussed and a method based on a 'correction scan' is shown to be successful in correcting many of the related image artefacts. The results of two tomography experiments are presented. In the first experiment, a radiochromic Fricke gel sample was exposed four times in different positions to a 100 kVp x-ray beam perpendicular to the plane of imaging. Images of absorbed dose with slice thickness of 140 microm were acquired. with 'true' in-plane resolution of 560 x 560 microm2 at the edge of the 72 mm field of view and correspondingly higher resolution at the centre. The nominal doses measured correlated well with the known exposure times. The second experiment demonstrated the well known phenomenon of diffusion in the dosemeter gels and yielded a value of (0.12 +/- 0.02) mm2 s(-1) for the diffusion

  16. Assessment of annual whole-body occupational radiation exposure in medical practice in Ghana (2000-09).

    PubMed

    Hasford, F; Owusu-Banahene, J; Amoako, J K; Otoo, F; Darko, E O; Emi-Reynolds, G; Yeboah, J; Arwui, C C; Adu, S

    2012-05-01

    annual doses >1 mSv. The entire study period had 705 instances in which exposed workers received individual annual doses >1 mSv. On thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) return rates, facilities in Volta and Eastern Regions recorded highest return rates of 94.3% each. Ashanti Region recorded the least TLD return rate with 76.7%. PMID:21743072

  17. Mammography dosimetry using an in-house developed polymethyl methacrylate phantom.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reena; Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Mayya, Y S; Chourasiya, G

    2012-08-01

    Phantom-based measurements in mammography are well-established for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures involving equipment performance and comparisons of X-ray machines. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is among the best suitable materials for simulation of the breast. For carrying out QA/QC exercises in India, a mammographic PMMA phantom with engraved slots for keeping thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) has been developed. The radiation transmission property of the developed phantom was compared with the commercially available phantoms for verifying its suitability for mammography dosimetry. The breast entrance exposure (BEE), mean glandular dose (MGD), percentage depth dose (PDD), percentage surface dose distribution (PSDD), calibration testing of automatic exposure control (AEC) and density control function of a mammography machine were measured using this phantom. MGD was derived from the measured BEE following two different methodologies and the results were compared. The PDD and PSDD measurements were carried out using LiF: Mg, Cu, P chips. The in-house phantom was found comparable with the commercially available phantoms. The difference in the MGD values derived using two different methods were found in the range of 17.5-32.6 %. Measured depth ranges in the phantom lie between 0.32 and 0.40 cm for 75 % depth dose, 0.73 and 0.92 cm for 50 % depth dose, and 1.54 and 1.78 cm for 25 % depth dose. Higher PSDD value was observed towards chest wall edge side of the phantom, which is due to the orientation of cathode-anode axis along the chest wall to the nipple direction. Results obtained for AEC configuration testing shows that the observed mean optical density (O.D) of the phantom image was 1.59 and O.D difference for every successive increase in thickness of the phantom was within±0.15 O.D. Under density control function testing, at -2 and -1 density settings, the variation in film image O.D was within±0.15 O.D of the normal density

  18. Determination of nuclear tracks parameters on sequentially etched PADC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwacik, Tomasz; Bilski, Pawel; Koerner, Christine; Facius, Rainer; Berger, Thomas; Nowak, Tomasz; Reitz, Guenther; Olko, Pawel

    Polyallyl Diglycol Carbonate (PADC) detectors find many applications in radiation protection. One of them is the cosmic radiation dosimetry, where PADC detectors measure the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles (from protons to heavy ions), supplementing TLD detectors in the role of passive dosemeter. Calibration exposures to ions of known LET are required to establish a relation between parameters of track observed on the detector and LET of particle creating this track. PADC TASTRAK nuclear track detectors were exposed to 12 C and 56 Fe ions of LET in H2 O between 10 and 544 keV/µm. The exposures took place at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) in Chiba, Japan in the frame of the HIMAC research project "Space Radiation Dosimetry-Ground Based Verification of the MATROSHKA Facility" (20P-240). Detectors were etched in water solution of NaOH with three different temperatures and for various etching times to observe the appearance of etched tracks, the evolution of their parameters and the stability of the etching process. The applied etching times (and the solution's concentrations and temperatures) were: 48, 72, 96, 120 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 50 O C), 20, 40, 60, 80 hours (6.25 N NaOH, 60 O C) and 8, 12, 16, 20 hours (7N NaOH, 70 O C). The analysis of the detectors involved planimetric (2D) measurements of tracks' entrance ellipses and mechanical measurements of bulk layer thickness. Further track parameters, like angle of incidence, track length and etch rate ratio were then calculated. For certain tracks, results of planimetric measurements and calculations were also compared with results of optical track profile (3D) measurements, where not only the track's entrance ellipse but also the location of the track's tip could be directly measured. All these measurements have been performed with the 2D/3D measurement system at DLR. The collected data allow to create sets of V(LET in H2 O) calibration curves suitable for short, intermediate and

  19. Energy responses of the LiF series TL pellets to high-energy photons in the energy range from 1.25 to 21 MV.

    PubMed

    Kim, J L; Lee, J I; Ji, Y H; Kim, B H; Kim, J S; Chang, S Y

    2006-01-01

    The energy responses for the KLT-300(LiF:Mg,Cu,Na,Si, Korea), GR-200(LiF:Mg,Cu,P, China) and MCP-N(LiF:Mg,Cu,P, Poland) thermoluminescence(TL) pellets were studied for a photon radiation with energies from 1.25 MeV(60Co) to 21 MV (Microtron) to verify the usefulness of the calibration for the radiotherapy beams. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have performed thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) audits to verify the calibration of the beams by TL powder, but TL pellets were used in this study because the element correction factor (ECF), defined as the factor to correct the variations that all TL dosemeters cannot be manufactured to have exactly the same TL efficiency, for each TL pellet could be accurately derived and be handled conveniently when compared with the powder. Also several works for the energy response of the TLDs were done for the low-energy photon beams up to 60Co, but they will be extended in this experiment to the high photon energies (up to 20 MV), which are widely used in the therapy level of a radiation. The PTW 30006 ionisation chamber was calibrated by the Korea primary standards to establish the air-kerma rates and the TL pellets were irradiated in a specially designed waterproof pellet holder in a water phantom (30 x 30 x 30 cm3) just like the IAEA postal audits programme. This result was compared with that of another type of phantom [10 (W) x 10 (L) x 10 (H) cm3 PMMA Perspex phantom for the 60Co and 6 MV photon, and 10 x 10 x 20 (H) cm3 for the 10 and 21 MV photon] for its convenient use and easy handling and installation in a hospital. The results show that the differences of the responses for the water phantom and PMMA Perspex phantom were negligible, which is contrary to the general conception that a big difference would be expected. For an application of these results to verify the therapy beams, an appropriate energy correction factor should be applied to the energies and phantom types

  20. Shielding effect of thyroid collar for digital panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Han, G-S; Cheng, J-G; Li, G

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the shielding effect of thyroid collar for digital panoramic radiography. Methods: 4 machines [Orthopantomograph® OP200 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland), Orthophos CD (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Bensheim, Germany), Orthophos XG Plus (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH) and ProMax® (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland)] were used in this study. Average tissue-absorbed doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosemeter chips in an anthropomorphic phantom. Effective organ and total effective doses were derived according to the International Commission of Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations. The shielding effect of one collar in front and two collars both in front and at the back of the neck was measured. Results: The effective organ doses of the thyroid gland obtained from the 4 panoramic machines were 1.12 μSv for OP200, 2.71 μSv for Orthophos CD, 2.18 μSv for Orthophos XG plus and 2.20 μSv for ProMax, when no thyroid collar was used. When 1 collar was used in front of the neck, the effective organ doses of the thyroid gland were 1.01 μSv (9.8% reduction), 2.45 μSv (9.6% reduction), 1.76 μSv (19.3% reduction) and 1.70 μSv (22.7% reduction), respectively. Significant differences in dose reduction were found for Orthophos XG Plus and ProMax. When two collars were used, the effective organ doses of the thyroid gland were also significantly reduced for the two machines Orthophos XG Plus and ProMax. The same trend was observed in the total effective doses for the four machines. Conclusions: Wearing a thyroid collar was helpful when the direct digital panoramic imaging systems were in use, whereas for the indirect digital panoramic imaging systems, the thyroid collar did not have an extra protective effect on the thyroid gland and whole body. PMID:24005060

  1. Skin dose measurements using radiochromic films, TLDS and ionisation chamber and comparison with Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Alashrah, Saleh; Kandaiya, Sivamany; Maalej, Nabil; El-Taher, A

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the surface dose is very important for patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose at the surface of a water phantom at a depth of 0.007 cm as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement with radiochromic films (RFs), thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionisation chamber in a 6-MV photon beam. The results were compared with the theoretical calculation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software (MCNP5, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc). The RF was calibrated by placing the films at a depth of maximum dose (d(max)) in a solid water phantom and exposing it to doses from 0 to 500 cGy. The films were scanned using a transmission high-resolution HP scanner. The optical density of the film was obtained from the red component of the RGB images using ImageJ software. The per cent surface dose (PSD) and percentage depth dose (PDD) curve were obtained by placing film pieces at the surface and at different depths in the solid water phantom. TLDs were placed at a depth of 10 cm in a solid water phantom for calibration. Then the TLDs were placed at different depths in the water phantom and were exposed to obtain the PDD. The obtained PSD and PDD values were compared with those obtained using a cylindrical ionisation chamber. The PSD was also determined using Monte Carlo simulation of a LINAC 6-MV photon beam. The extrapolation method was used to determine the PSD for all measurements. The PSD was 15.0±3.6% for RF. The TLD measurement of the PSD was 16.0±5.0%. The (0.6 cm(3)) cylindrical ionisation chamber measurement of the PSD was 50.0±3.0%. The theoretical calculation using MCNP5 and DOSXYZnrc yielded a PSD of 15.0±2.0% and 15.7±2.2%. In this study, good agreement between PSD measurements was observed using RF and TLDs with the Monte Carlo calculation. However, the cylindrical chamber measurement yielded an overestimate of the PSD

  2. Cosmic Radiation and Aircrew Exposure: Implementation of European Requirements in Civil Aviation, Dublin, 1-3 July 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, Lee

    1999-03-01

    -year period. Professor O'Sullivan said that the NRPB used TLDs for low and high LET radiations and PADC for neutrons. The investigation of dosemeter response was carried out using Monte Carlo codes. The active instruments used for measurements were the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a Bonnersphere spectrometer using eight spheres. The instrumentation used was calibrated in the CERN-CEC reference field. In summary, it was found that the shape of the neutron spectrum does not change with altitudes and that the maximum dose rate was found to be under the seats of the aircraft. Dr Lindbourg of the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute gave a short talk on the importance of using the TEPC for cosmic ray measurements, as it is the only means of reading directly absorbed dose to tissue and the radiation quality (in terms of lineal energy). Dr Schewe from PTB, Germany, gave the next talk on reference fields and calibration procedures. The speaker highlighted the difficulties in measuring radiation fields onboard aircraft, as the calibration fields used are often vastly different to the radiation field the instrumentation is being exposed to. The speaker said that this could lead to errors in the measurements in excess of 50%. One way around this is to use realistic reference fields, which produce similar particle compositions and particle fluences as those present in the cosmic radiation at aircraft altitudes. For this work the reference field facility in one of the secondary beams lines of the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron was used. In summary it was shown that the TEPC could be used as a reference instrument for evaluating ambient dose equivalent in aircraft. The next speaker was Dr Tommasino of the ANPA, Rome, who talked about in-flight measurement of radiation fields and doses. He stated that the problem of radiation dose assessment has been developed within the multinational research programmes of the Commission of the European Communities. The speaker talked