Sample records for hatchery project final

  1. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  2. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Conceptual Design Report, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery (Montgomery Watson, Bellevue, WA)

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  3. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project : Combined-Planning & Design and Operations & Maintenance Reports, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.

    2002-12-31

    Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2000 Combined Maintenance and Operations (O&M) and Planning and Design (P&D) contract is hereby completed based on this annual report patterned after the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration. Primary project activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 process that: (1) Accepted final design, (2) Authorized a capital construction amount of $16,050,000, and (3) Authorized contractor selection, and (4) Provided construction site dedication, and (5) Implemented construction activities over an anticipated 2-year period of July 2000 through October 2002.

  4. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2006-03-01

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

  5. Hatchery Evaluation Report / Bonneville Hatchery - Urb Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Bonneville Hatchery (Upriver bright [URB] Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located on the Columbia River just west of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall Chinook and URB Fall Chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of at two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  6. Hatchery Evaluation Report / Bonneville Hatchery - Tule Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Bonneville Hatchery (Tule Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located on the Columbia River just west of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall Chinook and URB Fall Chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  7. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-12-01

    This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

  8. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01

    No Annual Production Goals were achieved for the year. The Kalispel Hatchery experienced two episodes of brood fish mortality. The first due to a standpipe malfunction and the second attributed to gas bubble disease caused by elevated Total Dissolved Gases (TDG's) in the reservoir. To date, the hatchery has 29 brood fish in the raceway and ready to spawn. If all things go well this spring, hatchery operations should be well underway next year.

  9. Kalispel Resident Fish Project- Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalispel Tribe, Department of Natural Resources

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, construction activities commenced on a largemouth bass hatchery located on the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The major construction activities were complete as of October 1997. Of the six objectives identified in the 1997 Annual Operating Plan two objectives were fully achieved: the assembly of the life support system, and the preparation of the hatchery Operations and Maintenance Manual. The remaining four objectives were not fully achieved due to the hatchery not being completed before the spawning season (spring).

  10. Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1994-1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Michael C.; Waln, Karen; Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    1996-01-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of the Umatilla Hatchery in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan type of rearing using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus nzykiss). The hatchery was completed in the fall of 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to develop considerable knowledge and understanding of new production and supplementation techniques. The use of the Michigan raceways in rearing at Umatilla Hatchery was selected because it could increase smolt production given the limited hatchery well water supply and allow comparison of Michigan raceways with the standard Oregon raceways. Results of testing the Michigan raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia Basin. The Umatilla Hatchery is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council`s goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan . The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. This report covers the first four years of the monitoring of the hatchery.

  11. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon Lovrak; Glen Ward

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's

  12. Gomoku Game: Final project for the honor section Final project

    E-print Network

    ://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gomoku * Online game: http://www.citycat.ru/iq/gomoku.html * Facebook app: www.facebook.com/appsGomoku Game: Final project for the honor section #12;Final project Will replace the final project

  13. 75 FR 60804 - Nimbus Hatchery Fish Passage Project, Lower American River, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ...the Bureau of Reclamation, the lead Federal agency, and the California...Game (CDFG), acting as the lead State agency, have made available...Center, 1901 Hazel Avenue, Gold River, CA 95670. Copies of...Hatchery, 2001 Nimbus Road, Gold River, CA 95670. Special...

  14. Assessment of Present Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, US Fish and Wildlife Hatcheries, Final Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R. Delarm; Robert Z. Smith

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this report is to document current production practices for hatcheries which rear anadromous fish in the Columbia River Basin and to identify those facilities where production can be increased. A total of 85 hatchery and satellite facilities operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game, US Fish and Wildlife Service,

  15. Assessment of Present Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Washington Department of Wildlife Hatcheries, Final Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R. Delarm; Robert Z. Smith

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this report is to document current production practices for hatcheries which rear anadromous fish in the Columbia River Basin and to identify those facilities where production can be increased. A total of 85 hatchery and satellite facilities operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game, US Fish and Wildlife Service,

  16. Assessment of Present Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Washington Department of Fish Hatcheries, Final Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R. Delarm; Robert Z. Smith

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this report is to document current production practices for hatcheries which rear anadromous fish in the Columbia River Basin and to identify those facilities where production can be increased. A total of 85 hatchery and satellite facilities operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game, US Fish and Wildlife Service,

  17. Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2

    E-print Network

    Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 #12;Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The purpose of the UBC Project Services web-based project management portal project on campus within Project Services, and with the rest of the UBC community. We began this project by defining

  18. Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan

    2009-01-01

    The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in

  19. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 3 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Curtis (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

    2004-05-01

    This is the third in a series of annual reports that address reproductive ecological research and comparisons of hatchery and wild origin spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the baseline reproductive ecology, demographics and phenotypic traits of the unsupplemented upper Yakima population, however this report focuses on data collected on hatchery and wild spring chinook returning in 2003; the third year of hatchery adult returns. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter and summarizes data collected between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004 in the Yakima basin. Summaries of each of the chapters in this report are included below. A major component of determining supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is an increase in natural production. Within this context, comparing upper Yakima River hatchery and wild origin fish across traits such as sex ratio, age composition, size-at-age, fecundity, run timing and gamete quality is important because these traits directly affect population productivity and individual fish fitness which determine a population's productivity.

  20. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2003. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2002) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. Each chapter of this report deals with monitoring phenotypic and demographic traits of Yakima River basin spring chinook comparing hatchery and wild returns in 2002; the second year of adult hatchery returns. The first chapter deals specifically with adult traits of American River, Naches basin (excluding the American River), and upper Yakima River spring chinook, excluding gametes. The second chapter examines the gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish. In the third chapter, we describe work begun initially in 2002 to characterize and compare redds of naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River.

  1. matroid theory . 2007 final projects

    E-print Network

    Ardila, Federico

    matroid theory . 2007 final projects . san francisco state university . . universidad de los andes . For the final project of the course, you will develop a solid understanding of a particular aspect of matroid. You may, for instance: · Understand the background and significance of an open problem in matroid

  2. Project BEST Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankratz, David; Friedenberg, Joan

    Project BEST (Building Energy Systems Technology), a bilingual vocational training program, operated at Oakton Community College between March 1986 and September 1987. The purpose of the project was to provide 60 limited English proficient (LEP) Hispanic and Polish adults with sufficient vocational skills, English language skills, and appropriate…

  3. Project NETWORC Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada State Dept. of Human Resources, Sparks.

    The goal of Project NETWORC was to develop a cost-effective model for providing preservice and inservice training in rural areas to individuals interested in working, or already working, with young children with special needs. In cooperation with the department of Instructional Media Services of the University of Nevada, Reno, the project

  4. GIS course final project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barb Tewksbury

    Barbara and David Tewksbury, Hamilton College Summary Final independent GIS analysis designed and carried out by the student; once the analysis is complete, each student develops an assignment or activity based on ...

  5. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hubsch, Tristan [Howard University

    2013-06-20

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  6. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bogucz, E A

    2010-12-13

    This project pursued innovations to improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in commercial and residential buildings. For commercial buildings, the project developed a testbed for “intelligent nested environmental systems technologies (iNEST),” which monitor and control energy flows and IEQ across a cascade of spaces from individuals’ desktops to office suites to floors to whole buildings. An iNEST testbed was constructed at Syracuse University and was used to assess the use of devices such as personal badges and CO2 sensors to study how reduced energy use and improved IEQ could be achieved. For residential buildings, resources were targeted in support of DoE’s Builders Challenge Program and to recruit Syracuse, NY builders. Three homes in Syracuse’s Near Westside neighborhood were also registered under the program by Syracuse University team, with an additional home registered by one of the builders. Findings from the work at the iNEST testbed facility, and results from other related projects were disseminated through Syracuse Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems (SyracuseCoE) 2008 Annual Symposium, the 9th International Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference & Exhibition, and through SyracuseCoE’s website and eNewsletters to inform the broader community of researchers, designers and builders. These public communication activities helped enhance the understanding of high performance buildings and facilitate further market acceptance.

  7. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Nitin S. Baliga and Leroy Hood

    2008-11-12

    The proposed overarching goal for this project was the following: Data integration, simulation and visualization will facilitate metabolic and regulatory network prediction, exploration, and formulation of hypotheses. We stated three specific aims to achieve the overarching goal of this project: (1) Integration of multiple levels of information such as mRNA and protein levels, predicted protein-protein interactions/associations and gene function will enable construction of models describing environmental response and dynamic behavior. (2) Flexible tools for network inference will accelerate our understanding of biological systems. (3) Flexible exploration and queries of model hypotheses will provide focus and reveal novel dependencies. The underlying philosophy of these proposed aims is that an iterative cycle of experiments, experimental design, and verification will lead to a comprehensive and predictive model that will shed light on systems level mechanisms involved in responses elicited by living systems upon sensing a change in their environment. In the previous years report we demonstrated considerable progress in development of data standards, regulatory network inference and data visualization and exploration. We are pleased to report that several manuscripts describing these procedures have been published in top international peer reviewed journals including Genome Biology, PNAS, and Cell. The abstracts of these manuscripts are given and they summarize our accomplishments in this project.

  8. The Thy Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billimoria, Roshan R., Ed.

    Inspiried by a United Nations effort to establish a worldwide university, the four and one-half year project carried out in Thy (Denmark) is explained in this final report, from its historical beginnings in 1973 to its official completion in 1978. Dedicated to the solution of problems which could be considered universal, the project goals are…

  9. Optimized Fault Location Final Project Report

    E-print Network

    Optimized Fault Location Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center A National Engineering Research Center Optimized Fault Location Concurrent Technologies Corporation Final Project Report

  10. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume I of III; Narrative, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Slatick, Emil; Gilbreath, Lyle G.; Harmon, Jerrel R. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-01

    The National Marine Fisheries Service began conducting homing research on Pacific salmon and steelhead. Over 4 million juvenile salmon and steelhead were marked and released, and 23 individual experiments were conducted. The research had the following objectives: (1) develop the techniques for imprinting homing cues while increasing survival of hatchery reared salmonids and (2) provide fishery managers with the information necessary to increase the returns of salmon and steelhead to the Columbia River system and to effectively distribute these fish to the various user groups. Our imprint methods were grouped into three general categories: (1) natural migration imprint from a hatchery of origin or an alternate homing site (by allowing fish to volitionally travel downstream through the river on their seaward journey), (2) single exposure imprinting (cueing fish to a single unique water supply with or without mechanical stimuli prior to transport and release), and (3) sequential exposure imprinting (cueing fish to two or more water sources in a step-by-step process to establish a series of signposts for the route ''home''). With variations, all three techniques were used with all salmonid groups tested: coho salmon, spring and fall chinook salmon, and steelhead. For the single and sequential imprint, fish were transported around a portion of their normal migration route before releasing them into the Columbia River.

  11. Appendix 50 Creston National Fish Hatchery: Hatchery and Genetic

    E-print Network

    Appendix 50 Creston National Fish Hatchery: Hatchery and Genetic Management Plan #12;HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Creston National Fish Hatchery HATCHERY AND GENETIC MANAGEMENT PLAN RESIDENT FISH populations. Culture of bull trout is for development of rearing techniques and provision of eggs for research

  12. Assessment of Present Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Idaho Department of Fish and Game Hatcheries, Final Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R. Delarm; Robert Z. Smith

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this report is to document current production practices for hatcheries which rear anadromous fish in the Columbia River Basin and to identify those facilities where production can be increased. A total of 85 hatchery and satellite facilities operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game, US Fish and Wildlife Service,

  13. Assessment of Present Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Hatcheries, Final Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R. Delarm; Robert Z. Smith

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this report is to document current production practices for hatcheries which rear anadromous fish in the Columbia River Basin and to identify those facilities where production can be increased. A total of 85 hatchery and satellite facilities operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Game, US Fish and Wildlife Service,

  14. Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin [Nez Perce Tribe

    2009-06-10

    The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams per fish, and Meadow Creek received 53,425 BY 2006 direct stream release parr at an average of 4.7 grams per fish. Natural and hatchery origin spring Chinook salmon pre-smolt emigrants were monitored from September - November 2006 and smolts from March-June 2007. Data on adult returns were collected from May-September. A suite of performance measures were calculated including total adult and spawner escapement, juvenile production, and survival probabilities. These measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation and provide information on the capacity of the natural environment to assimilate and support supplemented salmon populations.

  15. Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume III of III; Disease and Physiology Supplements, 1978-1983 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Slatick, Emil; Gilbreath, Lyle G.; Harmon, Jerrel R. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Centr, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

    1988-02-03

    The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Aquaculture Task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status of the stocks was quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains five previously published papers.

  16. Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1999-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Chess, Dale W.; Cameron, William A.; Stonecypher, Jr., R. Wes (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Salem, OR)

    2003-12-01

    REPORT A: UMATILLA HATCHERY MONITORING AND EVALUATION--This report summarizes monitoring and evaluation studies of salmonids reared at Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) for 1 November, 1999 to 31 October, 2002. Studies at UFH are designed to evaluate rearing of chinook salmon and steelhead in ''Michigan raceways''. Characteristics of Michigan raceways include high fish densities, rapid water turnover, oxygen supplementation, reuse of water, and baffles designed to reduce cleaning. Fish health at UFH and other facilities associated with the Umatilla program are intensively monitored and evaluated along with the overall research project. Further, under the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team guidelines, specific requirements for fish health monitoring at UFH are mandatory. An experiment designed to evaluate rearing subyearling fall chinook salmon in Michigan and Oregon raceways has been completed. An evaluation of survival of subyearling fall chinook salmon reared at three densities will be completed with final returns in 2005. Two new evaluations were started during this reporting period. The first is an evaluation of spring chinook survival of groups transferred to Imeques acclimation facility in the fall, overwinter-acclimated and released with the standard acclimated production groups in March. The second is an evaluation of subyearling fall chinook survival and straying of a direct-stream released group in the lower Umatilla River and the standard group acclimated at Thornhollow acclimation facility in the upper Umatilla River. An important aspect of the project is evaluation of the spring chinook and summer steelhead fisheries in the upper and lower Umatilla River. REPORT B: Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000 Fiscal Year--The results presented in this report are from the ninth year of Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation in the Umatilla Hatchery program. Broodstock monitoring for hatchery production was conducted on adult returns to the Umatilla River at Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla adult facilities for salmon; steelhead adults were monitored at Minthorn adult facility. A new addition to this year's report is the effort to bring together an overview of fish health monitoring results including historical and year to date pathogen information. This information is in table form (Appendix Tables A-28, A-29 and A-30). A summary of juvenile disease outbreaks at Umatilla Hatchery is also included (Appendix Table A-31). REPORT C: Fish Health Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Fiscal Year--Results from the 2001 annual report cover the 10th year of Fish Health Monitoring in the Umatilla Hatchery program. Efforts were again made to provide up to date fish health and juvenile disease outbreak loss summary tables from the beginning of the Umatilla Hatchery program (Appendix Tables A-27, A-28, A-29 and A-30). Outmigrant Fish Health Monitoring results were included in this report since this was part of the fish health work statement for this report period. The discussion section for the 2001 and 2002 annual reports are combined in the 2002 report due to time constraints and consolidation efforts to complete this report by the end of May 2003.

  17. Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries, Appendix, 1989 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeland, Robert R.

    1989-10-01

    This document contains 43 appendices for the Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries'' report. This study was initiated to determine the distribution, contribution, and value of artificially propagated fall Chinook Salmon from the Columbia River.

  18. Final Project Biochemistry 218 Computational Molecular Biology

    E-print Network

    of the Human Genome Project in 2003 and the International HapMap Project in 2007 have enabled finding genomicFinal Project Biochemistry 218 Computational Molecular Biology Jong Lee Recent Advances in Statistical Methods for Genome-Wide Association Studies - How do we distinguish a needle from a string of hay

  19. Consumer Education Materials Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, David

    This final report of the Consumer Education Materials Project (CEMP) undertaken by the Educational Services Division of Consumers Union, discusses project methods, results, conclusions, and recommendations. Project objectives were to suggest parameters for consumer education programs, to illustrate effective teaching techniques, to identify other…

  20. Project LIFE, 1963-1975. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfau, Glenn S.

    Presented is the final report on Project Life (Language Improvement to Facilitate Education), a 12-year (1963-75) project which developed filmstrips and supplementary materials for teaching language to deaf children. General overview and historical review sections include information on project goals and objectives, administration agencies and…

  1. Productivity Training Project Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southern Colorado, Pueblo.

    This report describes the Productivity Training Project (PTP), a partnership between the University of Southern Colorado and Latino Chamber of Commerce (LCC) of Pueblo. The project provided "new economy skills" training to employees of LCC member businesses and basic skills training to the unemployed or underemployed. The report explains how PTP…

  2. Project TIME. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroyer, Connie J.; Payne, David L.

    Project TIME (Training Initiative for Manufacturing Employees) was an 18-month National Workplace Literacy Program conducted by Lord Fairfax Community College in conjunction with an automotive parts plant and Triplett Technical and Business Institute in Virginia. Project TIME had three primary objectives: to help employees obtain the basic…

  3. Computer Vision Project Final Project Presentations + Papers

    E-print Network

    Kosecka, Jana

    Jana Kosecka #12;Project Ideas Tracking Human Detection/Tracking (w Kinect) http://www.ros.org/wiki? (hidden slide: list percentages of who in your team did what, e.g.: Dave did 80% of the work, Mike and Ron

  4. Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-04-01

    This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

  5. Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

    1996-01-01

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) die construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Examined in addition to No Action are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of reestablishing naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 is the preferred action. A central hatchery would be built for either alternative, as well as three sites with six raceways each for acclimation and release of spring chinook smolts. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

  6. Bioengineering Evaluation of Retrofitted Oxygen Supplementation in Surface Water Project ; Final Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.D.

    2000-06-01

    The Willamette Oxygen Supplementation Project was designed to answer one major question concerning the decreasing salmon runs in the Columbia Basin: Can available technology be used to increase runs of chinook salmon in the Columbia basin in existing hatcheries. It was recognized that the restoration of salmon runs would require both hatchery supplementation and protection of wild salmon habitat. The large financial outlay required for construction of new hatcheries makes this choice undesirable. If the production of existing hatcheries could be augmented by the use of increased densities with oxygen supplementation, this would be the preferred procedure. Willamette Hatchery was chosen for conducting the experimental releases of chinook salmon reared at high densities with oxygen supplementation for several reasons: (1) It was located far upstream, simulating the long migration distances required for Columbia River salmon; (2) Salmon were not required to navigate through a series of dams, which might make the returns less interpretable; (3) Willamette Hatchery had excellent returns, nearly 2% survival, in the years previous to the experiment; (4) Willamette Hatchery had a history of low disease incidence; (5) Willamette Hatchery had a manager and crew interested in the experiment. In 1999, the last of the adult salmon from the experiment returned to the hatchery. From analyses of these returns, a number of conclusions were reached: (1) Numbers of fish surviving to adulthood increased with increased rearing densities and oxygen supplementation; (2) Percent yield, a measure of the efficiency of rearing, decreased with increased rearing density; (3) Baffled raceways were very poor for raising spring chinook salmon; (4) Oxygen supplementation seemed to increase production, even in the lower densities; (5) The most cost-effective method of rearing spring chinook salmon was rearing at high densities with oxygen supplementation.

  7. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with kokanee production. Fish food, materials, and other supplies associated with this program are also funded by BPA. Other funds from BPA will also improve water quality and supply at the Ford Hatchery, enabling the increased fall kokanee fingerling program. Monitoring and evaluation of the Ford stocking programs will include existing WDFW creel and lake survey programs to assess resident trout releases in trout managed waters. BPA is also funding a creel survey to assess the harvest of hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  8. Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report March 29, 2010 Rev. 8.30.2010 Report Submitted to: Dr. Joyce Mitchell Chair, Department of Medical Informatics Associate Vice President, Health Orientation Checklist (Draft)................................XII #12;Clinical Research Informatics Systems

  9. Project HEED. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Orval D.

    During 1972-73, Project HEED (Heed Ethnic Educational Depolarization) involved 1,350 Indian students in 60 classrooms at Sells, Topowa, San Carlos, Rice, Many Farms, Hotevilla, Peach Springs, and Sacaton. Primary objectives were: (1) improvement in reading skills, (2) development of cultural awareness, and (3) providing for the Special Education…

  10. Project: Drop In. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TIU Adult Education and Job Training Center, Lewistown, PA.

    A project developed and implemented a plan to retain those adult basic education students who are likely to be successful if they stay enrolled in the program but who are likely to drop out if program staff do not intervene. The plan involved use of an assessment instrument to identify these at-risk students, development of an individualized…

  11. The MUST Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atlanta Public Schools, GA.

    Described are planning and operational phases of the Media Utilization Services for Teachers (MUST) Project, an effort to utilize media to individualize and improve instruction for educable mentally retarded (EMR) elementary school students. Aspects of the planning period (1969-70) treated include staffing and orientation procedures, limitation of…

  12. The Compact Project: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The National Alliance of Business (NAB) surveyed the 12 sites that participated in the Compact Project to develop and implement programs of business-education collaboration. NAB studied start-up activities, key players, conditions for collaboration, accomplishments, challenges, and future plans. Program outcomes indicated that building successful…

  13. Final Technical Report for Project \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen J. Vavrus

    2008-01-01

    This project has focused on the simulation of Arctic clouds in CCSM3 and how the modeled cloud amount (and climate) can be improved substantially by altering the parameterized low cloud fraction. The new formula, dubbed 'freeezedry', alleviates the bias of excessive low clouds during polar winter by reducing the cloud amount under very dry conditions. During winter, freezedry decreases the

  14. Cloud Study Final Art Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kim Toops

    This activity is an art project completed at the end of a study of weather and clouds. Using home-made puffy paint, the students paint clouds on a piece of construction paper and write 2-3 facts about each cloud type on a note card that is glued on construction paper next to the appropriate cloud.

  15. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1, Examination of Fish at Lookingglass Hatchery in 1996 : Addendum to Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Groberg, Warren J.

    1996-11-01

    This information is an addendum to the report 'Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids, Phase 1: Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996' by Ralph Elston because there may be relevant observations included here. The author of this document participated in the examinations at Lower Granite Dam described in that report. Because of Endangered Species Act issues, the Rapid River stock of spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery on the Grande Ronde River in northeastern Oregon are annually being captured as returning adults at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River and trucked to Lookingglass. During the peak migration period they are held in an adult holding facility at Lower Granite for as long as 72 hours and then transported by truck to Lookingglass for holding in an adult pond for spawning. In 1996 a total of 572 adults were transported from Lower Granite Dam between May 3 and August 6. Two-hundred eighty-one of these were later transported from Lookingglass to Wallowa Hatchery for artificial spawning and the remaining 291 were held for spawning at Lookingglass. On May 21, 24, 30 and June 2, 1996 hatchery personnel identified a total of 32 off-loaded fish with lesions on the dorsal area of the head they described as having the appearance of blisters (Robert Lund personal communication). By date these are shown in Table 1 (fish with similar lesions were also observed on May 27 but the number of these was not recorded). Such lesions were not observed on fish offloaded on any other dates. On May 24, 1996 hatchery personnel took photographs of fish with these lesions but do to light-meter problems the photographs did not turn out. On June 28, 1996 personnel of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Fish Pathology laboratory in La Grande were notified by James Lauman, ODFW Northeast Region supervisor, of discussions and concerns of head burn on returning adult chinook while he was on a visitation to Lower Granite Dam. That led to subsequent investigations at Lower Granite Dam (Ralph Elston 1996) and Lookingglass Hatchery. The results of the Lookingglass investigations are reported here.

  16. Model Tech Prep Demonstration Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Maryland Educational Consortium, La Plata.

    The Southern Maryland Educational Consortium's Tech Prep Model Demonstration project is described in this final report. The consortium members are Calvert, Charles, and St. Mary's county school districts and Charles County Community College in southern Maryland. The project is based on a 4 + 2 model in which ninth-grade students develop career…

  17. The Nordic Metadata Project: Final Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hakala, Juha.

    1998-01-01

    The final report of the Nordic Metadata Project is now available in two formats. The collaborative Nordic Metadata Project created an indexing and retrieval system based on the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set. The report evaluates the existing uses of metadata, recommends enhancements to the Dublin Core, and discusses three of the project's initiatives: the creation of Dublin Core to MARC converter, the development of a metadata template for end-users, and the construction of a metadata-compliant search engine.

  18. Spray casting project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step.

  19. Lagoon Restoration Project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This project is a multiyear effort focusing on energy flow in the Palace of Fine Arts lagoon just outside the Exploratorium in San Francisco. Phase 1 was a pilot study to determine the feasibility of improving biological energy flow through the small freshwater lagoon, using the expertise and resources of an environmental artist in collaboration with museum biologists and arts department staff. The primary outcome of Phase 1 is an experimental fountain exhibit inside the museum designed by public artist Laurie Lundquist with Exploratorium staff. This fountain, with signage, functions both as a model for natural aeration and filtration systems and as a focal point for museum visitors to learn about how biological processes cycle energy through aquatic systems. As part of the study of the lagoon`s health, volunteers continued biweekly bird consus from March through September, 1994. The goal was to find out whether the poor water quality of the lagoon is affecting the birds. Limited dredging was undertaken by the city Parks and Recreation Department. However, a more peermanent solution to the lagoon`s ecological problems would require an ambitious redesign of the lagoon.

  20. Evaluation of Project Inspire: Title III Evaluation Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC. Dept. of Research and Evaluation.

    This final report is an evaluation of Project Inspire, a program designed to create within the school setting a positive framework and atmosphere for learning through efforts directed toward students and teachers. Conducted at the Francis Junior High School in North-West Washington, D.C., Project Inspire aimed to improve academic achievement,…

  1. 5 CFR 470.311 - Final project approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final project approval. 470.311 Section 470...MANAGEMENT RESEARCH PROGRAMS AND DEMONSTRATIONS PROJECTS Regulatory Requirements Pertaining to Demonstration Projects § 470.311 Final project...

  2. 5 CFR 470.311 - Final project approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final project approval. 470.311 Section 470...MANAGEMENT RESEARCH PROGRAMS AND DEMONSTRATIONS PROJECTS Regulatory Requirements Pertaining to Demonstration Projects § 470.311 Final project...

  3. Research Plan to Determine Timing, Location, Magnitude and Cause of Mortality for Wild and Hatchery Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts Above Lower Granite Dam. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lower Granite Migration Study Steering Committee

    1993-10-01

    From 1966 to 1968, Raymond estimated an average survival rate of 89% for yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) migrating from trap sites on the Salmon River to Ice Harbor Dam, which was then the uppermost dam on the Snake River. During the 1970s, the estimated survival rate declined as the proportion of hatchery fish increased and additional dams were constructed. Recent survival indices for yearling chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin indicate that substantial mortalities are occurring en route to Lower Granite Dam, now the uppermost dam on the Snake River. Detection rates for wild and hatchery PIT-tagged smolts at Lower Granite Dam have been much lower than expected. However, for wild fish, there is considerable uncertainty whether overwinter mortality or smolt loss during migration is the primary cause for low survival. Efforts to rebuild these populations will have a better chance of success after the causes of mortality are identified and addressed. Information on the migrational characteristics and survival of wild fish are especially needed. The goal of this initial planning phase is to develop a research plan to outline potential investigations that will determine the timing, location, magnitude, and cause of smolt mortality above Lower Granite Dam.

  4. Java Security Final Project for ECE578

    E-print Network

    Java Security Final Project for ECE578: Computer and Network Security by Douglas R. Dechow A Brief History of Java and Java Security The Java language and environment began as an outgrowth of a failed eventually become Java. Given that from the very beginning, the intended application domain for Oak (Java

  5. Game Project Crystal Maze Final Report

    E-print Network

    Iverson, Lee

    EECE 478 Game Project ­ Crystal Maze Final Report Instructor: Dr. Lee Iverson Team Members: Student of a 3D game called Crystal Maze. The game is created using OpenGL where the player works his/her way through a maze consisting of nine rooms. Each room introduces certain tasks the player must perform

  6. Initial Learning in Mainstreaming Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Neldon

    The document presents the final report of the Initial Learning in Mainstreaming Project, which developed and tested instructional techniques in 14 specific mathematics skill areas with 429 handicapped and normal elementary school students in Grace and Soda Springs, Idaho. Skill areas included addition facts; subtraction facts; carrying…

  7. Final Project: Musical Memory Jeff Kaufman

    E-print Network

    Meeden, Lisa A.

    in the past and the recent history. A biological approach suggests `short-term' and `long-term' memoryFinal Project: Musical Memory Jeff Kaufman May 12, 2008 Abstract This paper presents a machine a biologically realistic system would likely have the GNG continuing to form and update categories

  8. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    &D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research and Development Division strives to conduct the most project contract number 50009008 conducted by the University of California. The information from Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DEVELOPMENT OF STEAM

  9. Governor's Energy Project, final project report, March 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The report documents the early period of the Governors Energy Project, operated under the auspices of the National Governors Association (NGA) from January 1, 1974 through June 30, 1977, and outlines the context within which NHA's energy program began. Further, the general goals, objectives, and tasks of the project are delineated, and the process and product-oriented mechanisms or techniques used by the Project to fulfill its goals, objectives, and tasks are addressed. Finally, the major outcomes and lessons learned with regard to the development, implementation, and maintenance of the intermediary role in the intergovernmental system in addressing nationwide problems, including those with scientific content, are considered. Results reveal that two types of energy information and expertise-sharing took place: State to State, and State to others. Further, the capability of States to develop energy-related policies based in science and technology was enhanced, and State energy offices were strengthened. Federal support is said to be crucial in initiating projects requiring catalytic and coordinative functions.

  10. Griffith Energy Project Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-04-02

    Griffith Energy Limited Liability Corporation (Griffith) proposes to construct and operate the Griffith Energy Project (Project), a natural gas-fuel, combined cycle power plant, on private lands south of Kingman, Ariz. The Project would be a ''merchant plant'' which means that it is not owned by a utility and there is currently no long-term commitment or obligation by any utility to purchase the capacity and energy generated by the power plant. Griffith applied to interconnect its proposed power plant with the Western Area Power Administration's (Western) Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie and Parker-Davis transmission systems. Western, as a major transmission system owner, needs to provide access to its transmission system when it is requested by an eligible organization per existing policies, regulations and laws. The proposed interconnection would integrate the power generated by the Project into the regional transmission grid and would allow Griffith to supply its power to the competitive electric wholesale market. Based on the application, Western's proposed action is to enter into an interconnection and construction agreement with Griffith for the requested interconnections. The proposed action includes the power plant, water wells and transmission line, natural gas pipelines, new electrical transmission lines and a substation, upgrade of an existing transmission line, and access road to the power plant. Construction of segments of the transmission lines and a proposed natural gas pipeline also require a grant of right-of-way across Federal lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. Public comments on the Draft EIS are addressed in the Final EIS, including addenda and modifications made as a result of the comments and/or new information.

  11. 9 CFR 147.23 - Hatchery sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...the hatchery should be from clean areas to dirty areas (i.e. , from egg room to chick/poult processing rooms) and should avoid tracking from dirty areas back into clean areas. (c) The hatchery rooms, and tables,...

  12. 9 CFR 147.23 - Hatchery sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...the hatchery should be from clean areas to dirty areas (i.e. , from egg room to chick/poult processing rooms) and should avoid tracking from dirty areas back into clean areas. (c) The hatchery rooms, and tables,...

  13. 9 CFR 147.23 - Hatchery sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...the hatchery should be from clean areas to dirty areas (i.e. , from egg room to chick/poult processing rooms) and should avoid tracking from dirty areas back into clean areas. (c) The hatchery rooms, and tables,...

  14. 9 CFR 147.23 - Hatchery sanitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...the hatchery should be from clean areas to dirty areas (i.e. , from egg room to chick/poult processing rooms) and should avoid tracking from dirty areas back into clean areas. (c) The hatchery rooms, and tables,...

  15. 29 CFR 780.127 - Hatchery operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture Raising of Livestock, Bees, Fur-Bearing Animals, Or Poultry § 780.127 Hatchery operations. Hatchery operations incident to the breeding of...

  16. 29 CFR 780.127 - Hatchery operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture Raising of Livestock, Bees, Fur-Bearing Animals, Or Poultry § 780.127 Hatchery operations. Hatchery operations incident to the breeding of...

  17. 29 CFR 780.127 - Hatchery operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture Raising of Livestock, Bees, Fur-Bearing Animals, Or Poultry § 780.127 Hatchery operations. Hatchery operations incident to the breeding of...

  18. Differences in Lateral Line Morphology between Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Steelhead

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew D.; Sisneros, Joseph A.; Jurasin, Tyler; Nguyen, Chau; Coffin, Allison B.

    2013-01-01

    Despite identification of multiple factors mediating salmon survival, significant disparities in survival-to-adulthood among hatchery- versus wild-origin juveniles persist. In the present report, we explore the hypothesis that hatchery-reared juveniles might exhibit morphological defects in vulnerable mechanosensory systems prior to release from the hatchery, potentiating reduced survival after release. Juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from two different hatcheries were compared to wild-origin juveniles on several morphological traits including lateral line structure, otolith composition (a proxy for auditory function), and brain weight. Wild juveniles were found to possess significantly more superficial lateral line neuromasts than hatchery-reared juveniles, although the number of hair cells within individual neuromasts was not significantly different across groups. Wild juveniles were also found to possess primarily normal, aragonite-containing otoliths, while hatchery-reared juveniles possessed a high proportion of crystallized (vaterite) otoliths. Finally, wild juveniles were found to have significantly larger brains than hatchery-reared juveniles. These differences together predict reduced sensitivity to biologically important hydrodynamic and acoustic signals from natural biotic (predator, prey, conspecific) and abiotic (turbulent flow, current) sources among hatchery-reared steelhead, in turn predicting reduced survival fitness after release. Physiological and behavioral studies are required to establish the functional significance of these morphological differences. PMID:23554988

  19. The LiveWire Project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.D.; Nelson, T.T. [Enova Technology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kelly, J.C.; Dominguez, H.A. [Paragon Consulting Services, La Verne, CA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Utilities across the US have begun pilot testing a variety of hardware and software products to develop a two-way communications system between themselves and their customers. Their purpose is to reduce utility operating costs and to provide new and improved services for customers in light of pending changes in the electric industry being brought about by deregulation. A consortium including utilities, national labs, consultants, and contractors, with the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), initiated a project that utilized a hybrid fiber-coax (HFC) wide-area network integrated with a CEBus based local area network within the customers home. The system combined energy consumption data taken within the home, and home automation features to provide a suite of energy management services for residential customers. The information was transferred via the Internet through the HFC network, and presented to the customer on their personal computer. This final project report discusses the design, prototype testing, and system deployment planning of the energy management system.

  20. Forecasting final budget and duration of highway construction projects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wichan Pewdum; Thammasak Rujirayanyong; Vanee Sooksatra

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop models to forecast final budget and duration of a highway construction project during construction stage. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Highway construction project data are collected and analyzed to find out factors affecting project final budget and duration before developing the forecasting models, research for which is based on the principle of Artificial

  1. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Willpinit, WA)

    2003-03-01

    The Spokane Tribal Hatchery (Galbraith Springs) project originated from the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of this project is to aid in the restoration and enhancement of the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries adversely affected by the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam. The objective is to produce kokanee salmon and rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt for maintaining a viable fishery. The goal and objective of this project adheres to the NPPC Resident Fish Substitution Policy and specifically to the biological objectives addressed in the NPPC Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to mitigate for hydropower related fish losses in the blocked area above Chief Joseph/Grand Coulee Dams.

  2. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT SMUD OFFPEAK OVERCOOLING PROJECT DECEMBER 2007 CEC5002013066 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Davis Energy Group #12; PREPARED BY: Primary Author(s): David Springer Davis Energy Group Davis, CA

  3. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    -Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation California Natural Gas StorageEnergy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT CALIFORNIA NATURAL GAS STORAGE, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research and Development Division strives

  4. Modeling the Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Pacific Salmon Culture Programs: An Example at Winthrop National Fish Hatchery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Kyle C.; Peterson, Douglas P.

    2014-09-01

    Hatcheries have long been used in an attempt to mitigate for declines in wild stocks of Pacific salmon ( Oncorhynchus spp.), though the conservation benefit of hatcheries is a topic of ongoing debate. Irrespective of conservation benefits, a fundamental question is whether hatcheries will be able to function as they have in the past given anticipated future climate conditions. To begin to answer this question, we developed a deterministic modeling framework to evaluate how climate change may affect hatcheries that rear Pacific salmon. The framework considers the physiological tolerances for each species, incorporates a temperature-driven growth model, and uses two metrics commonly monitored by hatchery managers to determine the impacts of changes in water temperature and availability on hatchery rearing conditions. As a case study, we applied the model to the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Winthrop National Fish Hatchery. We projected that hatchery environmental conditions remained within the general physiological tolerances for Chinook salmon in the 2040s (assuming A1B greenhouse gas emissions scenario), but that warmer water temperatures in summer accelerated juvenile salmon growth. Increased growth during summer coincided with periods when water availability should also be lower, thus increasing the likelihood of physiological stress in juvenile salmon. The identification of these climate sensitivities led to a consideration of potential mitigation strategies such as chilling water, altering rations, or modifying rearing cycles. The framework can be refined with new information, but in its present form, it provides a consistent, repeatable method to assess the vulnerability of hatcheries to predicted climate change.

  5. NSTX Upgrade Project Final Design Review

    E-print Network

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    &H issues being properly addressed for the fabrication, assembly and testing? 2. Does the final design (attached)? 3. Does the Final Design Review satisfy the objectives of PPPL Procedure ENG?033, "Design being prepared as required by DOE 413.3B? 9. Outage planning and coordination Has a construction

  6. Final Year Engineering Projects in Australia and Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ku, H.; Goh, S.

    2010-01-01

    The paper starts by emphasising that final year engineering projects are regarded important in the training and education of professional engineers in Australia and Europe. The sources of projects available to students were also mentioned. Some Australian universities insist on individual projects but some not, each with their own reasons.…

  7. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    /Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy Technologies Transportation Lighting California for this project. The information from this project contributes to PIER's Buildings EndUse Energy EfficiencyEnergy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE

  8. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    &D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research and Development Division strives to conduct the most Structures Project (contract number 50004025), conducted by the University of California, Santa CruzEnergy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT THE ICHTHYOPLANKTON OF KING HARBOR

  9. EE 290 Final Project Automatic Door Unlock Flush System (ADUF)

    E-print Network

    Kachroo, Pushkin

    Stalbaum 1 EE 290 Final Project Automatic Door Unlock Flush System (ADUF) Prepared For: Dr. Pushkin Stalbaum Date Submitted: 4/30/09 #12;Stalbaum 2 Abstract: The design of project ADUF is to improve bathroom stall to only one flush per visit. Project ADUF: Born a Las Vegas resident, I have witnessed

  10. Community College Technical Mathematics Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Samuel L.

    The purpose of the research project was to develop an applied or technical mathematics curriculum which would meet the needs of vocational-technical students at the community college level. The research project was divided into three distinct phases: Identifying the mathematical concepts requisite for job-entry competencies in each of the…

  11. Project Final Report: HPC-Colony II

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Terry R [ORNL; Kale, Laxmikant V [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Moreira, Jose [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center

    2013-11-01

    This report recounts the HPC Colony II Project which was a computer science effort funded by DOE's Advanced Scientific Computing Research office. The project included researchers from ORNL, IBM, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The topic of the effort was adaptive system software for extreme scale parallel machines. A description of findings is included.

  12. combinatorial commutative algebra . 2009 final projects

    E-print Network

    Ardila, Federico

    learned a lot of mathematics related to CCA! In your proposal you will describe your concrete plan, and broad; there are many topics within your reach. Many papers and books contain interesting open problems which provide good project directions. Some concrete project suggestions and open problems are in: 1

  13. [UMOS Child Center Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Migrant Opportunity Services, Inc., Milwaukee, WI.

    This report presents a description and a brief evaluation of the Child Center Project, a bilingual-bicultural early childhood development program designed to prepare preschool Latino children to succeed in school without losing their bilingual-bicultural identity. Funded by the Office of Child Development, the three-year project was initiated in…

  14. New and Emerging Occupations Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    This document reports a project to define, identify, and describe new and emerging occupations in Nebraska and disseminate that information to vocational education program and curriculum planners. Chapter 1 describes the background, problem, and purpose of the project. Chapter 2 sets forth the objectives and discusses procedures for developing a…

  15. The final focus test beam project

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.

    1991-05-01

    An overview is given of the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) that is being constructed as a prototype final focus system for a future electron-positron linear collider. This beam line will use as input the 50 GeV electron beam from the SLC linac, and is designed to reduce the transverse dimensions of the beam spot at the focal point to 1 {mu}m. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Greenwood Career Education Project. Final Project Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood Municipal Separate School District, MS.

    The Greenwood (Mississippi) Career Education Project was conducted to meet the following objectives: (1) to employ a career staff and establish the administrative structure of the project; (2) to conduct inservice workshops with faculty members for the purpose of acquainting them with project objectives and their responsibilities; (3) to expand…

  17. Project Future Workplace Literacy Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefferson County Public Schools, Louisville, KY.

    Project Future was a 3-year project begun in 1994 as a partnership between the Jefferson County Public Schools and Futura Plastics and Engineering, Inc., Louisville, Kentucky. The project targeted the workplace basic skills of plastic injection molding production workers. The skills classes improved the general education of the workers with…

  18. MASTER PLAN ChiefJosephDamHatcheryProgram This Chief Joseph Dam Hatchery Program Master Plan

    E-print Network

    #12;i MASTER PLAN ChiefJosephDamHatcheryProgram This Chief Joseph Dam Hatchery Program Master Plan Fisheries Enhancement Group ChiefJosephDam HatcheryProgram M A S T E R P L A N #12;ChiefJosephDam Joseph Dam. The Okanogan River is the uppermost tributary of the Columbia that is still available

  19. Smart Gun Technology project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.R.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user form firing a law officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing (or {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes}) surety technologies. This project was funded by the National Institute of Justice. This report lists the findings and results of the project`s three primary objectives. First, to find and document the requirements for a smart firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. Second, to investigate, evaluate, and prioritize technologies that meet the requirements for a law enforcement officer`s smart firearm. Third, to demonstrate and document the most promising technology`s usefulness in models of a smart firearm.

  20. Final Project Report Project 10749-4.2.2.1 2007-2009

    SciTech Connect

    Zacher, Alan H.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Frye, J. G.; Brown, Heather M.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Oberg, Aaron A.

    2009-05-11

    This is the final report for the DOE Project 10749-4.2.2.1 for the FY2007 - FY2009 period. This report is non-proprietary, and will be submitted to DOE as a final project report. The report covers activities under the DOE Project inside CRADA 269 (Project 53231) as well as project activites outside of that CRADA (Project 56662). This is the final report that is summarized from the non-proprietary quarterlies submitted to DOE over the past 2.5 years, which in turn are summaries from the proprietary technical reporting to UOP.

  1. Javanese-English Dictionary Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Elinor Clark

    The purpose of the research covered by this final report was to produce a Javanese-English dictionary, the first ever to exist. Source materials were of two major kinds: (1) pre-Revolution sources: the two most recetnly published Javanese dictionaries (see Bibliography, Pigeaud and Poerwadarminta), predating the 1945 Indonesian war for…

  2. Solar greenhouse project. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-03

    Three (3) passive solar greenhouses were constructed as lean-to attachment to the homes of three (3) low-income families in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina as a demonstration project. CETA labor was provided by a training and work experience project for home repair and construction skills. Some of the walls were constructed from old salvaged windows and a local block company donated blocks that were used for the foundation. Recipients of the greenhouses reported reduced air drafts and fuel consumption savings. Flowers and vegetables were successfully grown during the winter months.

  3. Project Learn To Vote. A 353 Special Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LVA Lancaster-Lebanon Literacy Council, Lebanon, PA.

    A 353 demonstration project was conducted in the Lancaster, Pennsylvania, area to provide adult literacy students with information concerning voting in local, state, and national elections. The project had two components: (1) development and presentation of a series of three learner voting workshops; and (2) creation and presentation of a hands-on…

  4. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT GREENGUIDE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY EFFICIENT REFRIGERATED STORAGE FACILITIES MARCH 2013 CEC-500-2013-145 Prepared for: California Energy for: California Energy Commission Anish Gautam Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy

  5. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DEVELOPMENT Energy Commission Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory #12; PREPARED BY: Primary-09-010 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Matthew Fung Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy

  6. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: San Diego State Research Foundation #12: California Energy Commission Raquel Kravitz Program Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy Systems

  7. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: San Diego State Research Foundation #12 Energy Commission Raquel E. Kravitz Program Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy Systems Research

  8. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ASSESSMENT OF PIEZOELECTRIC MATERIALS FOR ROADWAY ENERGY HARVESTING Cost of Energy and Demonstration Roadmap Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: DNV KEMA Energy & Sustainability JANUARY 2014 CEC5002013007

  9. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    , and SERC Faculty Research Associate, Humboldt State University Luke Scheidler, Graduate Research Assistant, SERC Ruben Garcia Jr., Graduate Research Assistant, SERC Also Contributing: Peter Alstone, Andrea Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT HUMBOLDT COUNTY

  10. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN CALIFORNIA AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS DECEMBER 2011 CEC5002013047 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Synapse Energy

  11. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT COMMERCIALIZING ZERO ENERGY NEW HOME COMMUNITIES Appendices MARCH 2010 CEC5002014007AP Prepared for: California Energy SunPower Corporation Contract Number: 500-04-022 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Golam

  12. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    * Environ · Dr Glenn England* South Coast Air Quality Management District · Ms. Joan Niertit* · Mr energy services and products to the marketplace. The Energy Research and Development Division conductsEnergy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

  13. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT IMPACTS OF SHORTTERM, INTERBASIN, AND INTERPOLLUTANT CREDIT TRADING ON AIR QUALITY AND CREDIT PRICES JULY 2013 CEC5002013025 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: TIAX LLC #12; Prepared by: Primary

  14. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT FLEXIBLE by: National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Northern Power Systems, Inc. JUNE 2012 CEC5002012070 #12;Prepared by: Primary Author(s): Ben Kroposki National Renewable Energy

  15. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY EFFICIENT C. Meister, Ph.D., P.E. Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency Research DIGITAL NETWORKS MARCH 2011 CEC5002013102 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by

  16. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Research · Energy Systems Integration Lighting California's Future: Market Connections is one of nine Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: MARKET CONNECTIONS Prepared for: California Energy Commission

  17. Unaccounted-for gas project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cima, K.M.; Cottengim, T.L.; Wong, R.M.; Cowgill, R.M.; Grinstead, J.R.

    1990-06-01

    The project was undertaken to quantify the losses of gas volume from a gas transmission and distribution system in California due to leaks, customer theft, accounting methods, and gas meter inaccuracies. Separate reports on the findings from each of the four task groups are included on the database.

  18. Coal Manpower Projections: 1980. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clague, Ewan

    The National Petroleum Council has projected a 1980 bituminous coal production of 910 million tons. On that basis, the study estimates the manpower which will be required to produce that volume of coal. On the assumption of a productivity increase of two percent per year from 1974 onwards, the 1980 coal output will require a work force of…

  19. Performance Metrics Research Project - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

    2005-10-01

    NREL began work for DOE on this project to standardize the measurement and characterization of building energy performance. NREL's primary research objectives were to determine which performance metrics have greatest value for determining energy performance and to develop standard definitions and methods of measuring and reporting that performance.

  20. Project Reach: Final Report--Year 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Samuel D.

    The second year of Project Reach, a Federally funded two-year program, pursued two tactics for increasing the adult basic education (ABE) program relevance and effectiveness in South Bend, Indiana: (1) the training/hiring of ABE students as media paraprofessionals, and (2) a media enrollment campaign of various media promotions (television/radio…

  1. Registered Nurse Refresher Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Nurses' Association.

    Returning inactive Nebraska nurses to employment was the purpose of the study conducted between June 1967 and November 1969. A statewide plan involved the identification and recruitment of unemployed registered nurses, setting up of refresher courses, and evaluation of the project. Three existing surveys of Nebraska's nurse needs were reviewed,…

  2. National Workplace Literacy Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little Hoop Community Coll., Fort Totten, ND.

    With funding from a National Workplace Literacy grant, Little Hoop Community College in Fort Totten, North Dakota, conducted a combined literacy and career counseling program for members of the Devils Lake Sioux Tribe. During the project period, 86 participants completed individual education plans appropriate to their personal work objectives and…

  3. MHEC Minority Faculty Development Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Samuel L.; Wilkins, Roy

    As part of a two-year Midwestern Higher Education Commission (MHEC) initiative, this project provided essential background and planning information on minority faculty representation in Midwestern higher education, and proposed regional strategies to advance minority faculty recruitment and retention in Midwestern institutions of higher education.…

  4. Maine Project against Bullying. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saufler, Chuck; Gagne, Cyndi

    Noting that bullying among primary school-age children has become recognized as an antecedent to more violent behavior in later grades, the 3-year Maine Project Against Bullying examined currently available research on bullying and evaluated books, curricula, media materials, and programs to identify resources and strategies which can be applied…

  5. Bilingual Adult Basic Education Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Janet Roth

    The Bilingual Adult Basic Education Project provided bilingual life skills instruction, counseling, and informational services to approximately 150 non-English-dominant adults across Pennsylvania by means of contracts to local education agencies. Students were pre- and post-tested in English and/or their native language to measure their growth in…

  6. Minewater heat recovery project. Final Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1992-04-01

    This report consists of three sections: (1) Design, experimental testing and performance analysis of the 20-ft long DBHE (Downhole Bundle Heat Exchanger); (2) Modified design of mine water heat exchanger; and (3) Performance tests on mine water heat exchanger. Appendices summarize design calculations, discuss the scope of the work tasks, and present a diary of the progress throughout the research and development project.

  7. Southeast geysers effluent pipeline project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dellinger, M.

    1998-01-15

    The project concept originated in 1990 with the convergence of two problems: (1) a need for augmented injection to mitigate declining reservoir productivity at the Geysers; and (2) a need for a new method of wastewater disposal for Lake County communities near the The Geysers. A public/private partnership of Geysers operators and the Lake County Sanitation District (LACOSAN) was formed in 1991 to conduct a series of engineering, environmental, and financing studies of transporting treated wastewater effluent from the communities to the southeast portion of The Geysers via a 29-mile pipeline. By 1994, these evaluations concluded that the concept was feasible and the stakeholders proceeded to formally develop the project, including pipeline and associated facilities design; preparation of an environmental impact statement; negotiation of construction and operating agreements; and assembly of $45 million in construction funding from the stakeholders, and from state and federal agencies with related program goals. The project development process culminated in the system`s dedication on October 16, 1997. As of this writing, all project components have been constructed or installed, successfully tested in compliance with design specifications, and are operating satisfactorily.

  8. Alaska Wood Biomass Energy Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Bolling

    2009-03-02

    The purpose of the Craig Wood Fired Boiler Project is to use waste wood from local sawmilling operations to provide heat to local public buildings, in an effort to reduce the cost of operating those buildings, and put to productive use a byproduct from the wood milling process that otherwise presents an expense to local mills. The scope of the project included the acquisition of a wood boiler and the delivery systems to feed wood fuel to it, the construction of a building to house the boiler and delivery systems, and connection of the boiler facility to three buildings that will benefit from heat generated by the boiler: the Craig Aquatic Center, the Craig Elementary School, and the Craig Middle School buildings.

  9. Final performance report for Project JEM

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, M.J.; Jenkins, S.

    1997-12-31

    Project JEM (Jarvis Enhancement of Males) is a pre-college program directed toward stimulating disadvantaged, talented African American males in grades four, five, and six to attend college and major in mathematics, science, computer science, or related technical areas needed by the US Department of Energy. Twenty young African American male students were recruited from Gladewater Independent School District (ISD), Longview ISD, Hawkins ISD, Tyler ISD, Winona ISD and big Sandy ISD. Students enrolled in the program range from ages 10 to 13 and are in grades four, five and six. Student participants in the 1997 Project JEM Program attended Saturday Academy sessions and a four week intensive, summer residential program. The information here provides a synopsis of the activities which were conducted through each program component.

  10. Enforcement Project Management Handbook. Directive (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    The publication is a basic reference and training manual to assist EPA Superfund field personnel (Remedial Project Managers and On Scene Coordinators) in planning, negotiating, and managing potentially responsible party (PRP) searches and PRP-lead actions at Superfund sites. It provides an overview of each phase of the Superfund enforcement process and discusses specific roles and responsibilities of the RPM/OSC in the process.

  11. Wind energy education projects. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Ziegler; T. R. Conlon; T. Arcadi; R. Burke

    2008-01-01

    Two projects under DOE's Small-Scale Appropriate Energy Technology Grants Program have educated the public in a hands on way about wind energy systems. The first was awarded to Peter Ziegler of Berkeley, California, to design and build a walk-through exhibition structure powered by an adjoining wind-generator. This Wind Energy Pavilion was erected at Fort Funston in the Golden Gate National

  12. Fuel Cell Forklift Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Clifton C

    2013-10-23

    This project addresses the DOE’s priorities related to acquiring data from real-world fuel cell operation, eliminating non-technical barriers, and increasing opportunities for market expansion of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. The project involves replacing the batteries in a complete fleet of class-1 electric lift trucks at FedEx Freight’s Springfield, MO parcel distribution center with 35 Plug Power GenDrive fuel cell power units. Fuel for the power units involves on-site hydrogen handling and dispensing equipment and liquid hydrogen delivery by Air Products. The project builds on FedEx Freight’s previous field trial experience with a handful of Plug Power’s GenDrive power units. Those trials demonstrated productivity gains and improved performance compared to battery-powered lift trucks. Full lift truck conversion at our Springfield location allows us to improve the competitiveness of our operations and helps the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and toxic battery material use. Success at this distribution center may lead to further fleet conversions at some of our distribution centers.

  13. Manzanita Hybrid Power system Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Trisha Frank

    2005-03-31

    The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit, and in 1995 the Tribe established the Manzanita Renewable Energy Office. Through the U.S. Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program the Band received funds to install a hybrid renewable power system to provide electricity to one of the tribal community buildings, the Manzanita Activities Center (MAC building). The project began September 30, 1999 and was completed March 31, 2005. The system was designed and the equipment supplied by Northern Power Systems, Inc, an engineering company with expertise in renewable hybrid system design and development. Personnel of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory provided technical assistance in system design, and continued to provide technical assistance in system monitoring. The grid-connected renewable hybrid wind/photovoltaic system provides a demonstration of a solar/wind energy hybrid power-generating project on Manzanita Tribal land. During the system design phase, the National Renewable Energy Lab estimated that the wind turbine is expected to produce 10,000-kilowatt hours per year and the solar array 2,000-kilowatt hours per year. The hybrid system was designed to provide approximately 80 percent of the electricity used annually in the MAC building. The project proposed to demonstrate that this kind of a system design would provide highly reliable renewable power for community uses.

  14. DOE-EPSCOR SPONSORED PROJECT FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jianting

    2010-03-11

    Concern over the quality of environmental management and restoration has motivated the model development for predicting water and solute transport in the vadose zone. Soil hydraulic properties are required inputs to subsurface models of water flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone. Computer models are now routinely used in research and management to predict the movement of water and solutes into and through the vadose zone of soils. Such models can be used successfully only if reliable estimates of the soil hydraulic parameters are available. The hydraulic parameters considered in this project consist of the saturated hydraulic conductivity and four parameters of the water retention curves. To quantify hydraulic parameters for heterogeneous soils is both difficult and time consuming. The overall objective of this project was to better quantify soil hydraulic parameters which are critical in predicting water flows and contaminant transport in the vadose zone through a comprehensive and quantitative study to predict heterogeneous soil hydraulic properties and the associated uncertainties. Systematic and quantitative consideration of the parametric heterogeneity and uncertainty can properly address and further reduce predictive uncertainty for contamination characterization and environmental restoration at DOE-managed sites. We conducted a comprehensive study to assess soil hydraulic parameter heterogeneity and uncertainty. We have addressed a number of important issues related to the soil hydraulic property characterizations. The main focus centered on new methods to characterize anisotropy of unsaturated hydraulic property typical of layered soil formations, uncertainty updating method, and artificial neural network base pedo-transfer functions to predict hydraulic parameters from easily available data. The work also involved upscaling of hydraulic properties applicable to large scale flow and contaminant transport modeling in the vadose zone and geostatistical characterization of hydraulic parameter heterogeneity. The project also examined the validity of the some simple average schemes for unsaturated hydraulic properties widely used in previous studies. A new suite of pedo-transfer functions were developed to improve the predictability of hydraulic parameters. We also explored the concept of tension-dependent hydraulic conductivity anisotropy of unsaturated layered soils. This project strengthens collaboration between researchers at the Desert Research Institute in the EPSCoR State of Nevada and their colleagues at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of numerical simulations of a field injection experiment at Hanford site in this project could be used to provide insights to the DOE mission of appropriate contamination characterization and environmental remediation.

  15. GUIDELINES FOR FINAL REPORTS ON FWF-FUNDED PROJECTS

    E-print Network

    Fuchs, Clemens

    be downloaded from the FWF web site: DOCX file: http://www.fwf.ac.at/fileadmin/files/Dokumente/Antragstellung/PEEK/ar_endberichtsvorgaben.docx PDF file: http://www.fwf.ac.at/fileadmin/files/Dokumente/Antragstellung/PEEK-BASED RESEARCH (PEEK) 1 FINAL REPORT Project number Project title2

  16. Studies: Educational Laboratory Theatre Project, 1966-70. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoetker, James; And Others

    This second volume of four which comprise the final report on the Educational Laboratory Theatre Project (1966-1970) is composed of the following chapters: (1) The End-of-the-Project Questionnaire: Additional Analyses; (2) Alumni Clubs; (3) The Curriculum Portfolios and Teachers' Uses of Them; (4) Drama in the Secondary English Class; Actor and…

  17. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT Pulsed Flow Guidelines support from the Division of Water Rights of the State Water Resources Control Board. Don Ashton, Amy research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The PIER Program strives

  18. Real Time PMU-Based Stability Monitoring Final Project Report

    E-print Network

    Real Time PMU-Based Stability Monitoring Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future Electric Energy System #12;#12;Real Time PMU for the Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC) research project titled "Real Time PMU-based Stability

  19. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT CALIFORNIA, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The PIER Program strives to conduct the most promising RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants

  20. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT Energy Efficiency. It is important to acknowledge the enthusiasm and patience of our project manager Brad Meister at the California water heaters for testing. We would like to recognize The American Council for an EnergyEfficient

  1. An Evaluation of the Favorable Alternate Sites Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Deborah; Vencill, Mary

    This final report describes and evaluates the Favorable Alternate Sites Project (FASP), developed in response to the oversettlement of refugees (particularly Southeast Asian refugees) in particular areas of the country. The project's goals were to reduce welfare dependency, increase the ability of FASP refugees to be self-supporting, and reduce…

  2. Student Assistance Program Demonstration Project Evaluation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, John A.; Houle, Denise M.

    This document presents the final report on the evaluation of California's model student assistance program (SAP) demonstration projects implemented in five locations across the state from July 1989 through June 1992. The report provides an overall, integrated review of the evaluation of the SAP demonstration projects, summarizes important findings…

  3. Society of Mind project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, M.

    1988-08-01

    This project was concerned with developing a theory of intelligent thinking and learning, based on the Society of Mind model of intelligence. The research was funded over a period of years by the Computer Science Office of the Office of Naval Research. The research included the following specific subjects: Connectionism of Parallel Computers, Exploiting Parallel Processing, Connectedness of Commonsense Knowledge Bases, Connectedness and Society of Mind, Advantages and Deficiencies of Connectionist Networks, Insulation and Interaction, Learning and Representation, Intermediate Units and Significance, Associations and Connections, Unifying Frames and K-lines, Clarifying Conceptual Dependency, Computational linguistics, Research tools for society of mind models, Discovery processes, and Bridges between symbolic and connectionist models.

  4. Combined Final Report for Colony II Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Laxmikant [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois; Jones, Terry [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Moreira, Jose [IBM Corp.] [IBM Corp.

    2013-10-23

    (This report was originally submmited by the lead PI (Terry Jones, ORNL) on October 22, 2013 to the program manager, Lucy Nowell. It is being submitted from University of Illinois in accordance with instructions). HPC Colony II seeks to provide portable performance for leadership class machines. Our strategy is based on adaptive system software that aims to make the intelligent decisions necessary to allow domain scientists to safely focus on their task at hand and allow the system software stack to adapt their application to the underlying architecture. This report describes the research undertaken towards these objectives and the results obtained over the performance period of the project.

  5. Final Report Navajo Transmission Project (NTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Bennie Hoisington; Steven Begay

    2006-09-14

    The Diné Power Authority is developing the Navajo Transmission Project (NTP) to relieve the constraints on the transmission of electricity west of the Four Corners area and to improve the operation flexibility and reliability of the extra-high-voltage transmission system in the region. The NTP creates the wholesale transmission capacity for more economical power transfers, sales, and purchases in the region. It will facilitate the development of Navajo energy resources, improve economic conditions on the Navajo Nation as well as allow DPA to participate in the western electrical utility industry.

  6. Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, Bernie [CHSR,LLC Owner] [CHSR,LLC Owner

    2013-05-31

    The primary objective for the Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project is to provide another source of base-load renewable energy in the Fairbanks North Star Borough (FNSB). To accomplish this, Chena Hot Springs Resort (Chena) drilled a re-injection well to 2700 feet and a production well to 2500 feet. The re-injection well allows a greater flow of water to directly replace the water removed from the warmest fractures in the geothermal reservoir. The new production will provide access to warmer temperature water in greater quantities.

  7. Community Career Education Center Project. Final Project Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooperative Educational Services, Norwalk, CT.

    A project was planned to establish two model community career education centers (CCEC) aimed at providing career development programs and counseling to adults not presently having access to such services; developing instruction programming tailored to local needs and conditions; increasing the effectiveness of such programs which already exist;…

  8. Early Childhood Assessment Project. Final Report. Early Childhood Assessment Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ysseldyke, James E.

    This report summarizes the Early Childhood Assessment Project, which attempted to clarify issues confronting policy makers in early childhood special education through documentation of current practices, in-depth investigation of alternative approaches, and examination of predicted social, political, economic, and educational impact of alternative…

  9. Physics of Correlated Systems, Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Chris H. [University of Colorado at Boulder] [University of Colorado at Boulder

    2014-06-25

    The funding of this DOE project has enabled the P.I. and his collaborators to tackle a number of problems involving nonperturbatively coupled atomic systems, including their interactions with each other and/or with an external electromagnetic field of the type provided by either a continuous-wave or a femtosecond short-pulse laser. The progress includes a new, deeper understanding of an old and famous theory of autoionization lineshapes, developed initially by Ugo Fano in 1935 and later extended in a highly cited 1961 article; the new result specifically is that in a collaboration with the Heidelberg group we have been able to demonstrate an unexpectedly simple behavior in the time domain that is relevant for modern short-pulse lasers. This study also demonstrates a way to modify and even control the lineshapes of unstable atomic and molecular energy levels.

  10. Blade Manufacturing Improvement Project: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    SHERWOOD, KENT

    2002-10-01

    The Blade Manufacturing Improvement Project explores new, unique and improved materials integrated with innovative manufacturing techniques that promise substantial economic enhancements for the fabrication of wind turbine blades. The primary objectives promote the development of advanced wind turbine blade manufacturing in ways that lower blade costs, cut rotor weight, reduce turbine maintenance costs, improve overall turbine quality and increase ongoing production reliability. Foam Matrix (FMI) has developed a wind turbine blade with an engineered foam core, incorporating advanced composite materials and using Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) processes to form a monolithic blade structure incorporating a single molding tool. Patented techniques are employed to increase blade load bearing capability and insure the uniform quality of the manufactured blade. In production quantities, FMI manufacturing innovations may return a sizable per blade cost reduction when compared to the cost of producing comparable blades with conventional methods.

  11. The microscope in the hatchery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1935-01-01

    Without the aid of the microscope, it is safe to assume that fish Culture would now stand exactly where it did seventy-five years ago when methods of artificial fertilization were first applied. It is also safe to assume that the results from fish culture would be as unsatisfactory as they were at that time when the fishery resources were steadily declining in spite of the increased liberation of advanced fry from the hatcheries. During the past few years the microscope has saved millions of fish in our hatcheries which otherwise would have been sacrificed to disease. Moreover, the microscope has permitted all of the recent work in selective breeding, nutritional requirements, and disease control. This work marks most of the progress fish culture has made during the past twenty-five years. This progress forms the first definite step away from the old system of hatching and distributing fish, a system which was founded by the ancient Chinese. The microscope has been the key which enabled the fish culturist to solve the riddle of success which has stood, unanswered, for 2,500 years.

  12. Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Policies and Procedures for Columbia Basin Anadromous Salmonid Hatcheries, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (Northwest Power Planning Council, Portland, OR)

    1995-01-01

    This document outlines regional policies and procedures for hatchery operations in the Columbia River Basin. The purpose of these policies is to provide regional guidelines by which all anadromous fish hatcheries will be operated. These policies will be adopted by the fisheries co-managers, and will provide guidance to operate hatcheries in an efficient and biologically sound manner. The hatchery policies presented in this manual are not intended to establish production priorities. Rather, the intent is to guide hatchery operations once production numbers are established. Hatchery operations discussed in this report include broodstock collection, spawning, incubation of eggs, fish rearing and feeding, fish release, equipment maintenance and operations, and personnel training. Decisions regarding production priorities must be provided by fishery managers through a comprehensive plan that addresses both natural and hatchery fish production. The Integrated Hatchery Operations Team is a multi-agency group called for by the Northwest Power Planning Council. This team was directed to develop new basinwide policies for managing and operating all existing and future anadromous fish hatcheries in the Columbia River Basin. The parties pledge to confer with each other and to use their authorities and resources to accomplish these mutually acceptable hatchery practices.

  13. Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Stonecypher, R. Wess; Groberg, Jr., Warren J.; Farman, Brett M. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    2001-07-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan (MI) raceways using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss). The hatchery was completed in fall 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to evaluate new production and supplementation techniques. MI raceways at UFH increase smolt production with a limited water supply. Test results for MI raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia River basin. The UFH is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River (CTUIR and ODFW 1990) and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council's goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990). The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery (Carmichael 1990) was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. The monitoring and evaluation goals are: (1) Provide information and recommendations for the culture and release of hatchery fish, harvest regulations, and natural escapement to accomplish long-term natural and hatchery production goals in the Umatilla River basin that are consistent with provisions of the Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. (2) Assess the success of achieving the management objectives in the Umatilla River basin that are presented in the Master Plan and the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Plan. A substantial proportion of the production at UFH is reared in MI raceways. This system has not been thoroughly evaluated to determine the effects on Smolt-to-adult survival (SAS). In addition, the rearing strategies proposed for spring chinook salmon require an unusually extensive period of incubation in chilled well water. Extensive background and justification for UFH monitoring and evaluation is presented in Carmichael (1990). In this report, we present findings for the UFH Monitoring and Evaluation Project from 1 November 1998 to 31 October 1999. We designed our program to evaluate fish cultural practices, conduct rearing and survival studies, assess sport fisheries, and provide information for planning and coordination. Additional studies have been designed for fall chinook salmon to evaluate straying and the effects of tagging. We monitored the culture and performance of more than 3.2 million chinook salmon and steelhead produced at UFH in 1997-98 (Appendix Tables A1-8). Individual stock profiles, release, performance, and return data of previously released groups are presented in the following sections.

  14. WSF Biodiesel Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Washington State University; University of Idaho; The Glosten Associates, Inc.; Imperium Renewables, Inc.

    2009-04-30

    In 2004, WSF canceled a biodiesel fuel test because of “product quality issues” that caused the fuel purifiers to clog. The cancelation of this test and the poor results negatively impacted the use of biodiesel in marine application in the Pacific Northwest. In 2006, The U.S. Department of Energy awarded the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency a grant to manage a scientific study investigating appropriate fuel specifications for biodiesel, fuel handling procedures and to conduct a fuel test using biodiesel fuels in WSF operations. The Agency put together a project team comprised of experts in fields of biodiesel research and analysis, biodiesel production, marine engineering and WSF personnel. The team reviewed biodiesel technical papers, reviewed the 2004 fuel test results, designed a fuel test plan and provided technical assistance during the test. The research reviewed the available information on the 2004 fuel test and conducted mock laboratory experiments, but was not able to determine why the fuel filters clogged. The team then conducted a literature review and designed a fuel test plan. The team implemented a controlled introduction of biodiesel fuels to the test vessels while monitoring the environmental conditions on the vessels and checking fuel quality throughout the fuel distribution system. The fuel test was conducted on the same three vessels that participated in the canceled 2004 test using the same ferry routes. Each vessel used biodiesel produced from a different feedstock (i.e. soy, canola and yellow grease). The vessels all ran on ultra low sulfur diesel blended with biodiesel. The percentage of biodiesel was incrementally raised form from 5 to 20 percent. Once the vessels reached the 20 percent level, they continued at this blend ratio for the remainder of the test. Fuel samples were taken from the fuel manufacturer, during fueling operations and at several points onboard each vessel. WSF Engineers monitored the performance of the fuel systems and engines. Each test vessel did experience a microbial growth bloom that produced a build up of material in the fuel purifiers similar to material witnessed in the 2004 fuel test. A biocide was added with each fuel shipment and the problem subsided. In January of 2009, the WSF successfully completed an eleven month biodiesel fuel test using approximately 1,395,000 gallons of biodiesel blended fuels. The project demonstrated that biodiesel can be used successfully in marine vessels and that current ASTM specifications are satisfactory for marine vessels. Microbial growth in biodiesel diesel interface should be monitored. An inspection of the engines showed no signs of being negatively impacted by the test.

  15. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

  16. Aerogel commercialization pilot project. Final program report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-02-13

    Aerogels are extremely light weight, high surface area, very insulative materials that offer many potential improvements to commercial products. Aerogels have been the subject of extensive research at Department of Energy Laboratories and have been considered one of the technology most ready for commercialization. However, commercialization of the technology had been difficult for the National Laboratories since end users were not interested in the high temperature and high pressure chemical processes involved in manufacturing the raw material. Whereas, Aerojet as a supplier of rocket fuels, specialty chemicals and materials had the manufacturing facilities and experience to commercially produce aerogel-type products. Hence the TRP provided a link between the technology source (National Laboratories), the manufacturing (Aerojet) and the potential end users (other TRP partners). The program successfully produced approximately 500 ft{sup 2} of organic aerogel but failed to make significant quantities of silica aerogel. It is significant that this production represents both the largest volume and biggest pieces of organic aerogel ever produced. Aerogels, available from this program, when tested in several prototype commercial products were expected to improve the products performance, but higher than expected projected production costs for large scale manufacture of aerogels has limited continued commercial interest from these partners. Aerogels do, however, offer potential as a specialty material for some high value technology and defense products.

  17. Innovative subsurface stabilization project -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, G.G.; Zdinak, A.P.; Bishop, C.W.

    1996-11-01

    This is a report of results of applying four innovative grouting materials and one commercially available material for creating monoliths out of buried waste sites using jet grouting. The four innovative materials included a proprietary water-based epoxy, an Idaho National Engineering Laboratory-developed two-component grout that resembles hematite when cured with soil, molten low-temperature paraffin, and a proprietary iron oxide cement-based grout called TECT. The commercial grout was Type-H high-sulfate-resistant cement. These materials were tested in specially designed cold test pits that simulate buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In addition to the grouting studies, specially designed field-scale permeameters were constructed to perform full-scale controlled mass balance hydraulic conductivity studies. An ungrouted field-scale permeameter contained simulated buried waste and soil and was left ungrouted, and a second identical field-scale permeameter was grouted with commercial-grade Type-H cement. The field demonstrations were performed in an area referred to as the Cold Test Pit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Cold Test Pit is adjacent to the laboratory`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex. At the complex, 2 million ft{sup 3} of transuranic waste is commingled with 6--8 million ft{sup 3} of soil in shallow land burial, and improving the confinement of this waste is one of the options for final waste disposition. This report gives results of grouting, coring, hydraulic conductivity, and destructive examination of the grouted buried waste matrix.

  18. Self-Correcting HVAC Controls Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Cho, Heejin; Goddard, James K.; Dinh, Liem H.

    2010-01-04

    This document represents the final project report for the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls Project jointly funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP). The project, initiated in October 2008, focused on exploratory initial development of self-correcting controls for selected HVAC components in air handlers. This report, along with the companion report documenting the algorithms developed, Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units (Fernandez et al. 2009), document the work performed and results of this project.

  19. FINAL REPORT FOR THE DIII-D RADIATIVE DIVERTOR PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    O'NEIL, RC; STAMBAUGH, RD

    2002-06-01

    OAK A271 FINAL REPORT FOR THE DIII-D RADIATIVE DIVERTOR PROJECT. The Radiative Divertor Project originated in 1993 when the DIII-D Five Year Plan for the period 1994--1998 was prepared. The Project Information Sheet described the objective of the project as ''to demonstrate dispersal of divertor power by a factor of then with sufficient diagnostics and modeling to extend the results to ITER and TPX''. Key divertor components identified were: (1) Carbon-carbon and graphite armor tiles; (2) The divertor structure providing a gas baffle and cooling; and (3) The divertor cryopumps to pump fuel and impurities.

  20. Final Report on Atomic Database Project

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, J., Gui, Z., and Moses, G.A.

    2006-07-18

    Atomic physics in hot dense plasmas is essential for understanding the radiative properties of plasmas either produced terrestrially such as in fusion energy research or in space such as the study of the core of the sun. Various kinds of atomic data are needed for spectrum analysis or for radiation hydrodynamics simulations. There are many atomic databases accessible publicly through the web, such as CHIANTI (an atomic database for spectroscopic diagnostics for astrophysical plasmas) from Naval Research Laboratory [1], collaborative development of TOPbase (The Opacity Project for astrophysically abundant elements) [2], NIST atomic spectra database from NIST [3], TOPS Opacities from Los Alamos National Laboratory [4], etc. Most of these databases are specific to astrophysics, which provide energy levels, oscillator strength f and photoionization cross sections for astrophysical elements ( Z=1-26). There are abundant spectrum data sources for spectral analysis of low Z elements. For opacities used for radiation transport, TOPS Opacities from LANL is the most valuable source. The database provides mixed opacities from element for H (Z=1) to Zn (Z=30) The data in TOPS Opacities is calculated by the code LEDCOP. In the Fusion Technology Institute, we also have developed several different models to calculate atomic data and opacities, such as the detailed term accounting model (DTA) and the unresolved transition array (UTA) model. We use the DTA model for low-Z materials since an enormous number of transitions need to be computed for medium or high-Z materials. For medium and high Z materials, we use the UTA model which simulates the enormous number of transitions by using a single line profile to represent a collection of transition arrays. These models have been implemented in our computing code JATBASE and RSSUTA. For plasma populations, two models are used in JATBASE, one is the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model and the second is the non-LTE model. For the LTE model, the calculation is simple since the Boltzmann distribution can be used. As long as we have the energy levels and the ionization energy, we can calculate the plasma population very easily. However, for the non-LTE model, the calculation is very complex since various atomic data are required to build the transition balance matrix. Currently, empirical formulas are used to calculate these data such as electron collision ionization and autoionization. Furnished with these tested atomic data computing codes, we have developed a friendly user interface and a flexible atomic database [5]. The UTA model is considered the most practical method for medium and high Z elements since it is very time-consuming and difficult to calculate the enormous number of the transitions. However, the UTA model may overestimate the opacity, therefore, the DTA model is desirable even for medium and high Z elements. With the constant decrease in the cost of the disk storage and increase of CPU speed, it is possible to apply the DTA model to the medium and high Z elements. In this project, we calculate opacities for high Z elements in fully detailed term accounting model for significant populated states. For the various rate coefficients, we calculate the data using the detailed configuration accounting approximation. In order to handle the large volume of data generated for medium to high-Z atoms, we use the HDF data format as our database format, which is becoming a standard for storing scientific data. We have built a sophisticated graphical user interface using Java technology to distinguish our atomic database from other existing databases. Unlike other atomic databases, in which the users can obtain the opacity data in a pair of photon energy and opacity, in our database the user can browser more detailed atomic data information other than the opacity data set by combining our atomic database and Java technology. For example, the user can find out the abundant ion stage and electron configuration state in a certain plasma condition by several clicks on the user interface.

  1. LFS 450: Final Project Report for the Farm-to-Healthcare Project

    E-print Network

    LFS 450: Final Project Report for the Farm-to-Healthcare Project Erin Sine, Samantha Saddler, Erika Picardo, Ashley Sousa, Amy Wong, Nic Paolella, and Hayley Pipher LFS 450: Dr. Andrew Riseman and Professor-year pilot project focusing on farm-to-healthcare at the UBC Hospital. The partnership

  2. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT CALIFORNIA AUTONOMOUS UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE AIR POLLUTION PROFILING STUDY DECEMBER 2009 CEC-500-2011-039 Prepared for: California Energy/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation California Autonomous

  3. Skills Conversion Project: Chapter 2, Executive Summary. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Society of Professional Engineers, Washington, DC.

    This final report describes the Skills Conversion Project conducted by The National Society of Professional Engineers under contract to the Department of Labor to study methods of utilizing the large pool of highly skilled unemployed technicians and professional personnel who were formerly employed in the aerospace and defense industries. If…

  4. National Traffic Safety Documentation Center Project Definition Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    System Development Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    A project definition study was conducted for the development, implementation and operation of a National Traffic Safety Documentation Center. Included in this final comprehensive report are: (1) the results of nationwide surveys of users and sources of traffic safety information; (2) a review of relevant information technology in terms of the…

  5. Automatic Analysis of Spontaneous Facial Behavior: A Final Project Report

    E-print Network

    Bartlett, Marian Stewart

    to the warped images, is a viable and promising technology for automatic facial action recognition. One exciting University, were challenged to develop prototype systems for automatic recognition of spontaneous facialAutomatic Analysis of Spontaneous Facial Behavior: A Final Project Report (UCSD MPLab TR 2001

  6. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DRILLING AND TESTING Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Layman Energy Associates, Inc. #12; PREPARED BY: Primary Author(s): Erik B. Layman Layman Energy Associates, Inc. 1584 Cordova Drive San Luis

  7. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY INNOVATIONS: California Energy Commission Prepared by: San Diego State Research Foundation #12; Prepared by: Primary-1858 (619) 594-1900 Contract Number: 500-98-014 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Raquel E. Kravitz

  8. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOW­COST, ENERGY­SAVING, SOLID STATE SMART WINDOWS AUGUST 2012 CEC5002013026 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Number: PIR-10-049 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Dustin Davis Contract Manager Virginia Lew

  9. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DRILLING AND TESTING5002013083AP Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Layman Energy Associates, Inc. #12; PREPARED BY: Primary Author(s): Erik B. Layman Layman Energy Associates, Inc. 1584 Cordova Drive San Luis

  10. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DEVELOPMENT OF NEW TESTING PROTOCOLS FOR MEASURING THE PERFORMANCE OF SHOWERHEADS MARCH 2010 CEC-500-2013-130 Prepared for: California Energy: California Energy Commission Brad Meister Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency

  11. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT Boiler Burner Energy Systems and development that will help improve the quality of life in California by bringing environmentally safe Preferred Advanced Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy

  12. ASSESSING CHICK SURVIVAL OF SAGE GROUSE FINAL PROJECT REPORT FOR

    E-print Network

    Aldridge, Cameron

    ASSESSING CHICK SURVIVAL OF SAGE GROUSE IN CANADA: FINAL PROJECT REPORT FOR 2000 SAGE GROUSE) 492-9457 aldridge@ualberta.ca December, 2000 #12;ii ABSTRACT The Alberta sage grouse population has also performed a 2-stage pilot experiment, focusing on attaching transmitters to sage grouse chicks. I

  13. Final Report: Abaco Parrot Project: 2011 Breeding season assessment of

    E-print Network

    Final Report: Abaco Parrot Project: 2011 Breeding season assessment of predator control, group Foundation #12;Abaco Parrot Nesting Fifty-five active nests were found and monitored on an every week. Breeding by parrots was initiated during the last week in May with the first active nest being found May 17

  14. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT POTENTIAL TARGETS AND BENEFITS FOR URBAN ENERGY SYSTEMS RESEARCH MAY 2009 CEC-500-2010-009 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Institute of the Environment Los Angeles, CA Contract Number: BOA-99-207-P Prepared for: California Energy

  15. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT RANKING AND PRIORITIZING THE DEPLOYMENT OF COMMUNITY- SCALE ENERGY MEASURES BASED ON THEIR INDIRECT EFFECTS IN CALIFORNIA'S CLIMATE ZONES MARCH 2013 CEC-500-2013-122 ALTOSTRATUS Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by

  16. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT COMMERCIALIZING ZERO ENERGY NEW HOME COMMUNITIES MARCH 2010 CEC-500-2014-007 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Sun: 500-04-022 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Golam Kibrya Contract Manager Linda Spiegel

  17. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONICS INTERFACE-2014-006 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: National Renewable Energy Laboratory #12;PREPARED Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Contract Number

  18. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT SUMMARY OF RECENT WIND INTEGRATION STUDIES Experience from 2007-2010 APRIL 2012 CEC-500-2013-124 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: California Wind Energy Collaborative #12;PRIMARY AUTHOR(S): Phillip de Mello C.P. (Case) van

  19. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY INNOVATIONS: California Energy Commission Prepared by: San Diego State Research Foundation #12; Prepared by: Primary Diego, CA 92182-1858 (619) 594-1900 Contract Number: 500-98-014 Prepared for: California Energy

  20. Encouraging deep learning with E-Learning: Final project report

    E-print Network

    Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    Encouraging deep learning with E- Learning: Final project report Willem-Paul Brinkman & Andrew Rae approach seems to encourage students to adopt a deep learning approach (Hambleton, Foster and Richardson that the material and the learning approach in general encourage deep learning, but do not facilitate students

  1. Final Project: Optimization for Shopping Cart Batch Return Times

    E-print Network

    Rosenthal, Jeffrey S.

    Final Project: Optimization for Shopping Cart Batch Return Times Adel Amodwala, 997064527 where the shopping carts used to be: You either now have to wait for a cart to return, reduce your shopping list, or be prepared to use your juggling skills. In any case, the main problem you as a customer

  2. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    VALIDATION OF A 25 KILOWATT DUAL SHELL STIRLING ENGINE APRIL 2009 CEC5002009061 Prepared for: California · Transportation Proof of Concept and Test Validation of a 25 kW Dualshell Stirling Engine final report for the 25kW Dualshell Stirling Engine Project (Contract Number 50004017) conducted by ADI Thermal Power

  3. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    CONCENTRATOR WITH STIRLING ENGINE DECEMBER 2007 CEC5002013068 Prepared for: California Energy Commission with Stirling Engine is the final report for the SMUD ReGen project (Contract Number 50000034), conducted Corporation produced a 22 kilowatt hybrid solar dish/Stirling power system by upgra

  4. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Martien, Bay Area Air Quality Management District; Carol Bohnenkamp, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and reliable energy services and products to the marketplace. The Energy Research and Development Division Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT AIRQUALITY IMPACTS OF HEAT

  5. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT IMPLEMENTATION OF PHASOR and for their support in conducting this research and implementing phasor measurements into the San Diego Gas in facilitating the integration of phasor measurements into their GE State Estimator. Please

  6. Eaon VuZdez Oil Spill Restoration Project Final Report

    E-print Network

    Fetzner Jr., James W.

    Eaon VuZdez Oil Spill Restoration Project Final Report Genetic Diversityof Sockeye Salmon used in the management and restoration of Kenai River sockeye salmon injuredinthe 1989 Exxon Vuldez oil spill. Kev Words: Alaska,allozymes,CookInlet,geneticdiversity,mtDNA, Oncorhynchus nerku, sockeyesalmon

  7. Final-Year Education Projects for Undergraduate Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme provides an opportunity for students in their final year of the chemistry degree course at the University of Reading to choose an educational project as an alternative to practical research. The undergraduates work in schools where they can be regarded as role models and offer one way of inspiring pupils to…

  8. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    that use natural gas water heaters could see their annual natural gas water heating consumption drop by 35Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT WATER HEATING DESIGN GUIDE DECEMBER 2012 CEC-500-2013-126 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Davis Energy Group

  9. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    GENERATION USING PARABOLIC TROUGH SOLAR COLLECTION NOVEMBER 2010 CEC5002011040 Prepared for: California Generation Using Parabolic Trough Solar Collection is the final report for the Reduce Natural Gas Use for Industrial Process Heat using High- Temperature Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors project (Contract Number

  10. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT Renewable Resource.D. David Olsen Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies Sacramento, California 95814 and information to the authors and to the Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies staff. Ms

  11. Final Master Thesis Project Evaluating the EWI Wind Tunnel Performance

    E-print Network

    Vuik, Kees

    Final Master Thesis Project Evaluating the EWI Wind Tunnel Performance Domenico Lahaye and Matthias simulations of some turbulent flows, and possibly to find strategies to reduce the undesirable wind tunnel and a simplified representation of the EWI wind tunnel. A selection of a turbulent flow (either commercial

  12. Learning in Science Project (Form 1-4). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand).

    The Learning in Science Project investigated teaching and learning in science at the Form 1 to 4 level to identify some of the key difficulties in this subject area and to find ways of overcoming such difficulties. Included in this final report are: (1) brief accounts of the three major phases of the research; (2) a list of papers derived from the…

  13. Final Research Report Research Project T9903, Task 30

    E-print Network

    Final Research Report Research Project T9903, Task 30 IVHS - Network and Data Fusion A Self-describing data stream using the following: 1. existing data description language standards, 2. parsers to enforce language compliance, 3. a simple content language that flows out of the data description language, and 4

  14. CSC-2515 Final Project Tailoring Boltzmann Machines to Netflix Data

    E-print Network

    Penn, Gerald

    CSC-2515 Final Project Tailoring Boltzmann Machines to Netflix Data Wesley George wgeorge distribution, see [HO06]. Salakhutdinov and Mnih obtained impressive results in the netflix competition the error function used by Netflix to evaluate the performance of a prediction model. In section 2 we

  15. cs288: Statistical Natural Language Processing Final Project Guidelines

    E-print Network

    Klein, Dan

    ) being dropped from your final grade. Therefore your project will be either 1/6th or 1/3rd of your grade encourage you to tackle large problems in groups, for multiple classes, or both. Grading and Milestones, and so on. The initial abstract is a required checkpoint, but you will only receive a grade at the end

  16. Shawmut hydroelectric redevelopment project. Final technical and construction cost report

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1982-08-01

    This report describes the major steps undertaken by the Central Maine Power Company to redevelop an old existing lowhead (19 to 23 ft) hydroelectric station and, at the same time, demonstrate the commercial viability of such a venture. The report addresses the process of site selection, preliminary conceptual design for determining economic viability, licensing and the regulatory process, final design, and project construction with the objective of presenting to the reader a technical and economical guide useful for a similar undertaking.

  17. Advanced Air Transportation Technologies Project, Final Document Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard H.; Wold, Sheryl (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This CD ROM contains a compilation of the final documents of the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AAIT) project, which was an eight-year (1996 to 2004), $400M project managed by the Airspace Systems Program office, which was part of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. AAIT focused on developing advanced automation tools and air traffic management concepts that would help improve the efficiency of the National Airspace System, while maintaining or enhancing safety. The documents contained in the CD are final reports on AAIT tasks that serve to document the project's accomplishments over its eight-year term. Documents include information on: Advanced Air Transportation Technologies, Autonomous Operations Planner, Collaborative Arrival Planner, Distributed Air/Ground Traffic Management Concept Elements 5, 6, & 11, Direct-To, Direct-To Technology Transfer, Expedite Departure Path, En Route Data Exchange, Final Approach Spacing Tool - (Active and Passive), Multi-Center Traffic Management Advisor, Multi Center Traffic Management Advisor Technology Transfer, Surface Movement Advisor, Surface Management System, Surface Management System Technology Transfer and Traffic Flow Management Research & Development.

  18. High-Level Computer Vision -Final Project 1 Start date: 24.06

    E-print Network

    High-Level Computer Vision - Final Project 1 Logistics · Start date: 24.06 · Proposal: 3 slides member #12;High-Level Computer Vision - Final Project 2 Project goal · Choose an existing computer vision-Level Computer Vision - Final Project Proposal Slides Structure · Slide 1 ­ Task and motivation Task statement

  19. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2004-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2003 Fourth Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success. The harvest and data collection were the highest level to date with 1,668 rainbow trout and 416 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen continue to praise the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 90% of the rainbows and 93% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2003).

  20. Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Mark; Margolis, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The goal of the Wind Powering America State Outreach Project was to facilitate the adoption of effective state legislation, policy, finance programs, and siting best practices to accelerate public acceptance and development of wind energy. This was accomplished by Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) through provision of informational tools including reports and webinars as well as the provision of technical assistance to state leaders on wind siting, policy, and finance best practices, identification of strategic federal-state partnership activities for both onshore and offshore wind, and participation in regional wind development collaboratives. The Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project provides a summary of the objectives, activities, and outcomes of this project as accomplished by CESA over the period 12/1/2009 - 11/30/2011.

  1. Salmon River Fish Hatchery: Home Base for Released Salmon

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Salmon that have been reared and released at the NY State Salmon River Fish Hatchery imprint on the Hatchery waters, often returning to visit the Hatchery after they are released. Thousands of young Atlantic salmon are being released into Salmon River in an effort to restore this dim...

  2. Salmon River Fish Hatchery: Home Base for Released Salmon

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Salmon that have been reared and released at the NY State Salmon River Fish Hatchery imprint on the Hatchery waters, often returning to visit the Hatchery after they are released. Thousands of young Atlantic salmon are being released into Salmon River in an effort to restore this diminish...

  3. TOE TURTLE EGG HATCHERY AT PENGKALAN BALAK, MELAKA : 1990 REPORT

    E-print Network

    Prestwich, Ken

    -255-4444 / Telex : MA 30423 / Telefax : 03-254-0346 #12;CONTENTS Page 4 .4 Beach Hatchery vs . Styrofoam Box In the Styrofoam Boxes 10 4 .6 Position of Nests Within the Enclosure o f the Beach Hatchery 1 1 4 .6 .1 of nest s incubated in both the beach hatchery and the styrofoam boxes . Handheld digital thermometers

  4. Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project--Final Report. Executive Summary [and] Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project: Final Report on House Bill 1909

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This publication contains the following: (1) Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project--Final Report. Executive Summary (January 2006); and (2) Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project: Final Report on House Bill 1909 (January 2005). In 2003, the legislature and governor enacted House Bill 1909 to create a pilot project on competency-based transfer…

  5. Hatcheries, Conservation, and Sustainable Fisheries—Achieving Multiple Goals: Results of the Hatchery Scientific Review Group's Columbia River Basin Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. Paquet; T. Flagg; A. Appleby; J. Barr; L. Blankenship; D. Campton; M. Delarm; T. Evelyn; D. Fast; J. Gislason; P. Kline; D. Maynard; L. Mobrand; G. Nandor; P. Seidel; S. Smith

    2011-01-01

    New hatchery management strategies in the Columbia River Basin focus on conservation of naturally spawning populations as an equal priority to providing fish for harvest—a difficult halance to achieve. The Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG) assessed 178 hatchery programs and 351 salmonid populations to determine how to achieve managers’ goals for conservation and sustainable fisheries. Modeling determined the best strategy,

  6. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  7. Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project: Public final design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This Public Final Design Report describes the 70 MW(e) Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant under construction in Brilliant, Ohio. This project is receiving cost-sharing from the US Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administered by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-87 MC24132.000. The project is also receiving costsharing from the State of Ohio. This award is being administered by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project is the first utility-scale demonstration project in the US. Its objective is to demonstrate that the Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined-cycle technology is an economic, reliable, and environmentally superior alternative to conventional technology in using high-sulfur coal to generate electricity. Detailed design of the plant began in May 1987, leading to the start of construction in April 1988. First coal fire occurred in November 1990, and the three-year test program began in February 1991.

  8. Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

    2007-10-31

    The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

  9. New York State Salmon River Fish Hatchery

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS scientists release young Atlantic salmon into Lake Ontario tributaries near the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation's Salmon River Fish Hatchery in Altmar, N.Y. Thousands of young Atlantic salmon are being released into Salmon River in an effort to restore this di...

  10. PACIFIC SALMON Hatchery Propagation and Its Role

    E-print Network

    PACIFIC SALMON Hatchery Propagation and Its Role In Fishery Management CIRCULAR 24 FISH- crease have intensified the problems of salmon-fishery maintenance. Natural propagation has been interfered with by pollution and by dams that cut off the salmon from their natural spawning grounds

  11. Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

    2003-01-01

    Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2002 Third Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success with 529 rainbow trout and 80 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen had a lot of praise for the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 84% of the rainbows and 62% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2002).

  12. 76 FR 21403 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ...Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Project, Eureka County, NV AGENCY...Newmont Mining Corporation's proposed Genesis Project and by this notice is announcing...Register. ADDRESSES: Printed copies of the Genesis Project Final EIS are available for...

  13. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  14. Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-11-14

    This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

  15. BPA Instream Habitat Projects Completed within Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999-2001 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2002-10-23

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority WRIA in southeastern WA. Summer steelhead, bull trout, and Snake River spring chinook salmon which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. WDFW manages it as a Wild Steelhead Reserve, because no hatchery fish have been released here since 1997. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. Local students, volunteers and Salmon Corps Members have been instrumental in the success of the Model Watershed Program on Asotin Creek. ACCD began coordinating habitat projects in 1995 with the help of BPA funding. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented as of 1999. The Washington State Legislature was successful in securing funding for endangered salmon and steelhead recovery throughout the State in 1998. While these issues were new to most of the State, southeastern Washington had been dealing with endangered fall and spring chinook salmon since 1994. The Asotin Creek In-Stream Habitat Project teamed BPA and Governor's Salmon Recovery Funding on four instream habitat projects in the Asotin Creek Watershed. These projects provide complex instream habitat for steelhead, bull trout and spring chinook in the stream. 38 pools were created as a result of these instream projects with 860 ft of LWD utilized for habitat.

  16. Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

    2003-08-01

    The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

  17. Decision Analysis in Fish Hatchery Management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. C. Tomlinson; P. S. Brown

    1979-01-01

    Most hatchery management decision problems are “wicked,” that is, they are multilevel and intellectually complex, involve interactions between different areas of analysis, and are often ill defined. Techniques of analysis commonly applied to management problems-operations research, cost-benefit analysis, econometrics, Bayesian analysis-are valuable, but limited. Basically, they are not decision-making techniques but assist participants to assess a situation, before undertaking the

  18. Final Status Survey for the Largest Decommissioning Project on Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, R.W. [Millennium Services, Inc., 222 Creekstone Ridge, Woodstock, GA 30188 (United States); Miller, J. [BNG America, 804 S. Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Quayle, D. [Shonka Research Associates, Inc., 704 S. Illinois Avenue, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    To assist the United States Department of Energy's (US DOE's) re-industrialization efforts at its gaseous diffusion site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, known as the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), the US DOE awarded a 6-year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) contract to BNG America (formerly BNFL Inc.) in 1997. The ETTP 3-Building D and D Project included the removal and disposition of the materials and equipment from the K-33, K-31, and K-29 Gaseous Diffusion Plant buildings. The three buildings comprise more than 4.8 million square feet (446,000 square meters) of floor surface area and more than 350 million pounds (148 million kilograms) of hazardous and radioactively contaminated material, making it the largest nuclear D and D project in progress anywhere in the world. The logistical hurdles involved in a project of this scope and magnitude required an extensive amount of Engineering and Health Physics professionals. In order to accomplish the Final Status Survey (FSS) for a project of this scope, the speed and efficiency of automated survey equipment was essential. Surveys of floors, structural steel and ceilings up to 60 feet (18 meters) were required. The FSS had to be expanded to include additional remediation and surveys due to characterization surveys and assumptions regarding the nature and extent of contamination provided by the US DOE. Survey design and technical bases had to consider highly variable constituents; including uranium from depleted to low enrichment, variable levels of Technetium-99 and transuranic nuclides, which were introduced into the cascade during the 1960's when recycled uranium (RU) from Savannah River was re-enriched at the facility. The RU was transported to unexpected locations from leaks in the cascade by complex building ventilation patterns. The primary survey tool used for the post remediation and FSS was the Surface Contamination Monitor (SCM) and the associated Survey Information Management System (SIMS), developed by Shonka Research Associates, Inc. (SRA). Final Status Radiological surveys have been performed over the last year on a 24-hour per day and seven day per week basis. As many as eight SCMs have been in use at any one time. Each SCM can perform over 250,000 measurements per hour, simultaneously collecting both scan and static measurement requirements to meet FSS regulatory requirements. Thus, efficient management and quality control of giga-bytes of data was needed. In addition, some surveys were accomplished with traditional instrumentation and with some using other automated systems such as smear counters. The FSS Reports required integration of all of the data in a format that permitted undemanding verification by DOE using the ORISE/ESSAP IVT contractor. A project of this scope and magnitude could not have been accomplished without the use of the SCM and SIMS. This paper reports on the survey and logistical issues that required ingenuity of the entire 1,700-person workforce to resolve. In particular, this paper summarizes the issues addressed and resolved by the integrated team of survey technicians, subject matter experts (SMEs), radiological engineers, data processing staff and BNG America management. (authors)

  19. Final-Year Projects as a Major Element in the IE Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitner, G.; Rozenes, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-perspective view of the final-year project of an industrial engineering and management (IEM) department. The final year project is a major element of a 4-year curriculum within any engineering discipline. Such a project gives the student an opportunity to use and implement methods, techniques and tools that he or she…

  20. Project BEAM (Basic Education Action Motivation) Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Moines Public Schools, IA.

    Project BEAM, a special experimental demonstration project funded by the Adult Education Act, attempted to motivate undereducated adult Iowans to learn to read, to make the project known, and to make available for nationwide distribution the television and radio materials developed for the project. The two-phase project was conducted from…

  1. Intermediate-level waste transfer line decommissioning project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, A.A.; Tatum, W.G.; Myrick, T.E.; du Mont, S.P.

    1983-12-01

    The Intermediate-Level Waste (ILW) transfer line at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was an integral part of the liquid radioactive waste disposal system, operating from 1952 until 1975. This line was used to transport ILW from the waste processing facilities in the Bethel Valley area at ORNL to final disposal sites in the adjacent Melton Valley. During the history of pipeline operations, approximately 45 million gallons of liquid waste, containing over 1.5 million curies of mixed fission products, were transferred through the line to waste disposal trenches and to the ORNL hydrofracture facility. Use of the line was discontinued in 1975 when a new, doubly-contained line was installed to service the expanded hydrofracture program. Since 1976, the ILW line has been under the control of the ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP). Due to the presence of contaminated soil at two former leak sites along the line, and the potential for radionuclide migration from that portion of the abandoned line that traverses White Oak Creek and the floodplain, decommissioning of the ILW line was given a high priority by the ORNL SFMP. In 1979, plans were initiated for corrective action along those portions of the line. The decommissioning activities have now been completed, with the abandoned line being placed in a condition that significantly reduces the hazards associated with it. The portion of the line in the White Oak Creek floodplain was removed, and the two leak sites entombed. This report presents the results of the ILW line decommissioning project, outlining the scope of the effort, describing the decommissioning experiences, and summarizing the project costs and schedules. 14 references, 30 figures, 3 tables.

  2. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

    2008-07-25

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

  3. NTRCI Legacy Engine Research and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Connie Smith-Holbert; Joseph Petrolino; Bart Watkins; David Irick

    2011-12-31

    The Legacy engine is a completely new design, transitional diesel engine, replacing the reciprocating engine with a rotary engine. The Legacy engine offers significant advances over conventional internal combustion engines in 1) power to weight ratio; 2) multiple fuel acceptance; 3) fuel economy; and 4) environmental compliance. These advances are achieved through a combination of innovative design geometry, rotary motion, aspiration simplicity, and manufacturing/part simplicity. The key technical challenge to the Legacy engineâ??s commercialization, and the focus of this project, was the development of a viable roton tip seal. The PST concept for the roton tip seal was developed into a manufacturable design. The design was evaluated using a custom designed and fabricated seal test fixture and further refined. This design was incorporated into the GEN2.5A prototype and tested for achievable compression pressure. The Decision Point at the end of Phase 1 of the project (described below) was to further optimize the existing tip seal design. Enhancements to the tip seal design were incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Compression pressures adequate for compression ignition of diesel fuel were achieved, although not consistently in all combustion volumes. The variation in compression pressures was characterized versus design features. As the roton tip seal performance was improved, results pointed toward inadequate performance of the housing side seals. Enhancement of the housing side seal system was accomplished using a custom designed side seal test fixture. The design enhancements developed with the test fixture were also incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Finally, to simplify the requirements for the roton tip seals and to enhance the introduction and combustion of fuel, a flush-mount fuel injector was designed, manufactured and demonstrated in the GEN2.5B prototype.

  4. 76 FR 37090 - Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ...Final Priorities; Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program...Notice of final priorities for two Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERCs...to use these priorities to improve rehabilitation services and outcomes for...

  5. Garrison Dam and Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery and Garrison Dam between Pick City and Riverdale, North Dakota. The Garrison Dam National Fish Hatchery is in the bottom left of the photo. Photo taken by USGS personnel on a Civil Air Patrol flight....

  6. 42 CFR 137.333 - What procedures must the Secretary follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in part...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in...

  7. 42 CFR 137.333 - What procedures must the Secretary follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in part...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in...

  8. 42 CFR 137.333 - What procedures must the Secretary follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in part...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in...

  9. 42 CFR 137.332 - On what basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? 137.332 Section...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? (a) The...

  10. 42 CFR 137.332 - On what basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? 137.332 Section...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? (a) The...

  11. 42 CFR 137.332 - On what basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? 137.332 Section...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? (a) The...

  12. 42 CFR 137.333 - What procedures must the Secretary follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in part...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in...

  13. 42 CFR 137.333 - What procedures must the Secretary follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in part...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in...

  14. 42 CFR 137.332 - On what basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? 137.332 Section 137...TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137.332 On...the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? (a) The only basis...

  15. 42 CFR 137.332 - On what basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? 137.332 Section 137...TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137.332 On...the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? (a) The only basis...

  16. Small-scale hydroelectric power. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Feasibility studies for the following hydroelectric projects are described briefly: National Fish Hatchery, Cottonwood Irrigation District, Prairie Dog Irrigation District; Wildwood Irrigation District; Shoshone Irrigation District; Wyoming Game and Fish Department, and a private hydropower project. (MHR)

  17. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Sampson, Melvin R. [The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

    2009-07-30

    The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

  18. Final report Hanford environmental compliance project 89-D-172

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.R.

    1996-02-08

    The Hanford Environmental Compliance (HEC) Project is unique in that it consisted of 14 subprojects which varied in project scope and were funded from more that one program. This report describes the HEC Project from inception to completion and the scope, schedule, and cost of the individual subprojects. Also provided are the individual subproject Cost closing statements and Project completion reports accompanied by construction photographs and illustrations.

  19. Project HEED. Final Evaluation Report, 1974-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edington, Everett D.; Pettibone, Timothy J.

    Project HEED's (Heed Ethnic Education Deplorization) main emphasis in 1974-75 was to develop reading and cultural awareness skills for kindergarten through 4th grades in the 7 project schools on American Indian reservations in Arizona. In its 4th year of operation, the project (funded under Elementary and Secondary Education Title III) involved…

  20. Project Discovery: College Option Orientation Program. FIPSE Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Total Action Against Poverty, Inc., Roanoke, VA.

    Project Discovery is a community-based educational intervention program for low income and minority students. It operates outside the traditional public education system. The following projects comprise the program: (1) Project Discovery for ninth to eleventh graders, which is a College Option Orientation program; and (2) Discovery Groups for…

  1. Project Aprendizaje. 1990-91 Final Evaluation Profile. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment.

    An evaluation was done of New York City Public Schools' Project Aprendizaje, which served disadvantaged, immigrant, Spanish-speaking high school students at Seward Park High School in Manhattan. The Project enrolled 290 students in grades 9 through 12, 93.1 percent of whom were eligible for the Free Lunch Program. The Project provided students of…

  2. The Workplace Literacy System Project (WLS). Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulton, Bruce R.

    The Workplace Literacy System Project (WLS) prepared interactive CD-ROM discs containing about 50 hours of instruction and drill in basic skills presented within the context of the textile/apparel manufacturing industry. The project was conducted at a Sara Lee knit products plant in North Carolina. During the project, literacy task analyses were…

  3. Nabisco Foods Division--"New Indy" Workplace Literacy Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivy Tech State Coll., Indianapolis, IN.

    This document contains a final report, evaluation, and curriculum materials from a project conducted at the RJR Nabisco plant in Indianapolis to upgrade the literacy and numeracy skills of the workers to facilitate technological changes to production lines. As the final report explains, although the goal of the project was to recruit and test 150…

  4. The protozoan diseases of hatchery fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1935-01-01

    Following the somewhat bleak picture painted in the consideration of the bacterial diseases of hatchery fish in the last number of The Progressive Fish Culturist, it is a relief to turn to another large group of fish diseases caused by small, single-celled parasitic animals known as the protozoa. To the hatcheryman, the protozoan diseases of fish are just as important as the bacterial diseases for they are equally destructive if allowed to run unchecked. The protozoan diseases are just as common as those caused by bacteria, particularly at those hatcheries which depend upon lakes or streams for their water supplies. However, a very cheery point of difference exists between these two groups of diseases—the protozoan diseases are easier to recognize and, for the most part, they are exceedingly easy to eradicate. To the hatcheryman who has struggled day and night for weeks in an attempt to combat an epidemic wherein he is rewarded immediately by the satisfying sight of a complete recovery of his infected fish as the direct result of his labors.

  5. Saudi Arabian seismic deep-refraction profiles; final project report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, J.H.; Mooney, W.D.; Blank, H.R.; Gettings, M.E.; Kohler, W.M.; Lamson, R.J.; Leone, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    In February 1978 a seismic deep-refraction profile was recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey along a 1000-km line across the Arabian Shield in western Saudi Arabia. The line begins in Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, leads southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan (Tihamat-Asir), and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, including 19 in the Farasan Islands. Six shot points were used: five on land, with most charges placed below the water table in drill holes, and one at sea, with charges placed on the sea floor and detonated from a ship. Slightly more than 61 metric tons of explosives were used in 19 discrete firings. Seismic energy was recorded by 100 newly-developed portable seismic stations deployed in approximately 200 km-long arrays for each firing. Each station consisted of a standard 2-Hz vertical component geophone coupled to a self-contained analog recording instrument equipped with a magnetic-tape cassette. In this final report, we fully document the field and data-processing procedures and present the final seismogram data set as both a digital magnetic tape and as record sections for each shot point. Record sections include a normalized set of seismograms, reduced at 6 km/s, and a true-amplitude set, reduced at 8 km/s, which have been adjusted for amplifier gain, individual shot size, and distance from the shot point. Appendices give recorder station and shot information, digital data set descriptions, computer program listings, arrival times used in the interpretation, and a bibliography of reports published as a result of this project. We used two-dimensional ray-tracing techniques in the data analysis, and our interpretation is based primarily on horizontally layered models. The Arabian Shield is composed, to first-order, of two layers, each about 20 km thick, with average velocities of 6.3 km/s and 7.0 km/s, respectively. At the western shield margin the crust thins to less than 20 km total thickness, beyond which the Red Sea shelf and coastal plain are interpreted to be underlain by oceanic crust. A major crustal lateral velocity inhomogeneity northeast of Sabhah in the Shammar Tectonic Province is interpreted as the suture zone of two crustal blocks of different composition. Several high-velocity anomalies in the upper crust correlate with mapped gneissic dome structures. Two intra-crustal reflectors at13 km depth are interpreted as the tops of mafic intrusives. The Mohorovicic discontinuity beneath the shield varies from 43 km depth in the northeast with 8.2 km/s mantle velocity to 38 km depth in the southwest with 8.0 km/s mantle velocity. Two velocity discontinuities are identified in the upper mantle, at 59 and 70 km depth. We suggest further work, including refined analyses of the data employing filtering and synthetic seismogram techniques, as well as consideration of attenuation properties. Extension of the seismic refraction profile to the Arabian Gulf and some short profiles perpendicular to the existing profile would be fruitful areas for future field work.

  6. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Commission Dave Michel Contract Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy Systems Research Office Laurie and the Home Automation Network (AMIHAN) interface project (contract number 50099013, work authorization

  7. 76 FR 81011 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Light Rail Project in Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ...Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Light Rail Project in Washington AGENCY: Federal...The actions relate to the East Link Light Rail Transit Project in King County Washington...in the State of Washington: East Link Light Rail Transit Project, King County,...

  8. Project I-TIP: Inservice Training for Infant Personnel. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freund, Maxine; Rab, Victoria Y.

    This final report describes Project I-TIP (Inservice Training for Infant Personnel), a 3-year project which developed and demonstrated a comprehensive model of inservice training for personnel serving children with handicaps (ages 0-5 years). Specifically the project provided training at 17 sites to over 900 individuals. Training protocols were…

  9. Staff Helping Attain Relevant Education (Project SHARE): Final Evaluation Report, 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranadive, Jyoti

    Project SHARE (Staff Helping Attain Relevant Education), a project funded by Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, was in its third and final year of operation in 1992-93, in eight primary schools in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Manhattan (New York). The project served 141 limited English proficient students from low-income families…

  10. Project Talented and Gifted: Final Evaluation Report. ESEA Title III, Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khatena, Joe

    Presented in the third and final evaluation report (1975-76) of Project Talented and Gifted are results of an appraisal of over 50 student participants (8-15 years old) and the project staff and resource personnel. The project is described as a 3-month institute to provide experiences in areas such as learning to use creative thinking and problem…

  11. Project Talented and Gifted: Appendices to Final Evaluation Report. ESEA Title III, Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khatena, Joe

    Presented are the appendixes to the final evaluation report of Project Talented and Gifted--a 3-year project to develop a model for the identification of talented and gifted students (8-l5 years old), to develop programs for use with this population, and to develop a model for a regional school. Over 50 Ss participated in the project -- described…

  12. Ultrahigh Efficiency Multiband Solar Cells Final Report for Director's Innovation Initiative Project DII-2005-1221

    E-print Network

    Ager III, Joel W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2006-01-01

    Solar Cells Final report for Director’s Innovation Initiative projectPROJECT BACKGROUND The intrinsic power conversion efficiency limit for unconcentrated sunlight for a solar cellProject Accomplishments . 9 Multiband Zn y Mn 1-y O x Te 1-x .. 9 Fabricate multiband solar cells .

  13. Project Aprendizaje. Final Evaluation Report 1992-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Andrew

    This report provides evaluative information regarding the effectiveness of Project Aprendizaje, a New York City program that served 269 Spanish-speaking students of limited English proficiency (LEP). The project promoted parent and community involvement by sponsoring cultural events, such as a large Latin American festival. Students developed…

  14. Project HEED. Final Evaluation Report, 1973-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edington, Everett D.; Pettibone, Timothy

    1973-74 approximately 1,100 Indian students in grades 1 through 8 participated in Project HEED (Heed Ethnic Educational Depolarization) in Arizona. The project target sites were 59 classrooms at Sacaton, Sells, Peach Springs, San Carlos, Topowa, Many Farms, St. Charles Mission, and Hoteville. Primary objectives were: (1) improvement in reading…

  15. Project HEED, Title III, Section 306. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Orval D.

    Project HEED (Heed Ethnic Educational Depolarization) involves over 1,000 Indian children in grades 1-8 in Arizona. The project target sites are 48 classrooms at Sells, Topowa, San Carlos, Many Farms, Hotevilla, Peach Springs, and Sacaton. Objectives are to increase: (1) reading achievement, (2) affective behavior of teachers, (3) motivation by…

  16. NGA/ACT Pilot Project: Increasing Course Rigor. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Increasing Course Rigor Pilot Project, a joint initiative of the National Governors Association (NGA) Center for Best Practices and ACT, Inc., is one component of Phase Two of the NGA Center for Best Practices Honor States Grant Program. The project, which began in winter 2006 and concluded in summer 2007, was designed to improve the quality…

  17. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. I. Pennington; J. E. Dyer; J. D. Lomax; M. D. Deo

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter

  18. Bilingual Education Project, Santa Clara County, California. Final Report, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Clara County Office of Education, San Jose, CA.

    The Spanish Dame Bilingual Education Project, located in Santa Clara County, California, served 190 children who came from homes where the primary language was Spanish and who resided within the target area schools of the Alum Rock School District. The objectives of the preschool project were (1) to demonstrate a home-teaching procedure designed…

  19. Living Room School Project. Final Evaluation Report, 1972-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Lawrence

    This report is an evaluation of the Living Room School Project, in Nassau County, New York, which stresses the use of home settings for a preschool program that involves children and parents. The project's major objective was to help parents meet their child's needs as parents learn to recognize themselves and their home as educational resources.…

  20. Multiple Intelligences: Curriculum and Assessment Project. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Aine, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The "Multiple Intelligences, Curriculum and Assessment Project" at University College Cork was a collaborative project carried out between 1995 and 1999. The key research question focused on whether Howard Gardner's theory of Multiple Intelligences could be applied to, and enhance, aspects of curriculum and assessment at primary and second level…

  1. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    in this report. #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS APPENDICES A THROUGH F APPENDIX A: Western Interconnection Phasor ................................................................................................. ..F1 #12;A1 APPENDIX A: Western Interconnection Phasor Based Projects Prepared by Yuri Makarov ....................................................................................................................... ii APPENDIX A: Western Interconnection Phasor Based Projects

  2. Comprehensive Science Evaluation Project: Hudson County Community College. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oromaner, Mark

    A summary is provided of the goals, objectives, activities, and findings of Hudson County Community College's (HCCC's) comprehensive science evaluation project. After introductory material outlines the status of science education at HCCC, the project's objectives are presented; i.e., to analyze the college's science courses and their ability to…

  3. Honey Lake Geothermal Project, Lassen County, California. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    This report discusses the drilling, completion, and testing of deep well WEN-2 for a hybrid electric power project which will use the area's moderate temperature geothermal fluids and locally procured wood fuel. The project is located within the Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area. (ACR)

  4. Rural Workplace Literacy Demonstration Project. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enterprise State Junior Coll., AL.

    In April 1991, Enterprise State Junior College and MacArthur State Technical College established a rural workplace literacy demonstration project in partnership with adult basic education, seven employers, and a labor organization. The project served 615 persons in classes offered at the 2 colleges, 4 partner locations, and 3 additional worksites.…

  5. The History of the Project on Human Potential. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzig, Margaret McCarthy

    A five-year project that used evidence from a variety of disciplines and cultures to develop a framework to help educational policymakers identify ways of achieving the full range of human potential in a given population is described. The project sponsor is an international non-profit institution dedicated to the cause of disadvantaged children…

  6. Achievement Motivation Development Project. Final Report. Appendix IV, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, David C.; Alschuler, Alfred S.

    The Achievement Motivation Development Project is described. The Project has culminated in the development of course materials designed explicitly to promote aspects of psychological growth. As such, it is viewed as but one thrust in an emerging psychological education movement. Achievement motivation is defined as a way of planning, a set of…

  7. Computer Lessons for Written Harmony. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arenson, Michael A.

    This project was created to help music students in their development of part-writing and harmonization skills, requirements for college-level music study. It was developed and programmed by members of the Instructional Technology Center and Department of Music at the University of Delaware. The software developed during this project provides…

  8. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    : California Energy Commission Marla Mueller Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The project team acknowledges the support of the California Energy conducts public interest research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California

  9. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    in this report. #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The California Energy Commission sponsored this project. Dr. Bruce Bailey conducts public interest research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants

  10. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    : California Energy Commission Dave Michel Project Manager Mike Gravely Office Manager Energy Efficiency, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research and Development Division strivesUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · EnergyRelated Environmental Research · Energy

  11. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Commission Matthew Fung Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency Research Office Laurie;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The project team acknowledges the support of the California Energy Commission PIER program Mills, Chuck Shinneman, and Lowell Shields. This project is funded by the California Energy Commission

  12. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    (s): Mudit Saxena Timothy Perry Charlotte Bonneville Lisa Heschong Heschong Mahone Group, Inc. 11211 Gold Country Blvd, Suite 103 Gold River, CA 95670 916-962-7001 www.h-m-g.com Contract Number: 500 investigator and project lead responsible for the overall project research direction, method development

  13. Project Closeout: Guidance for Final Evaluation of Building America Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, P.; Burch, J.; Hendron, B.

    2008-03-01

    This report presents guidelines for Project Closeout. It is used to determine whether the Building America program is successfully facilitating improved design and practices to achieve energy savings goals in production homes. Its objective is to use energy simulations, targeted utility bill analysis, and feedback from project stakeholders to evaluate the performance of occupied BA communities.

  14. UPPER AUGLAIZE WATERSHED AGNPS MODELING PROJECT FINAL REPORT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Upper Auglaize Watershed agricultural non-point source modeling project was an interagency effort to use a Geographic Information System (GIS)-based modeling approach for assessing and reducing pollution from agricultural runoff and other non-point sources. This project applied the U.S. Departm...

  15. 76 FR 10938 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Sunrise Project, I-205 to Rock Creek Junction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ...Actions on Sunrise Project, I-205 to Rock Creek Junction: Clackamas County, OR...project, Sunrise Project, I-205 to Rock Creek Junction, Clackamas County, Oregon...587-4716. The Sunrise Project, I-205 to Rock Creek Junction Final Environmental...

  16. Marc Normatiu del Projecte Final de Master El Projecte s una assignatura obligatria de 30 ECTS del Mster en

    E-print Network

    Hurtado, Ferran

    projecte podrà ser de 15 ECTS. 1. Definició i característiques El Projecte Final de Màster (PFM) ha de Màster. La defensa del PFM es realitzarà davant un tribunal de tres doctors o doctores que valoraran comunicació oral i escrita de l'estudiant/a. Quant al seu contingut, el PFM haurà de centrar-se en un tema

  17. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    for patiently assisting us with budget and final report submission. i #12;PREFACE The California Energy · Energy-Related Environmental Research · Energy Systems Integration · Environmentally Preferred Advanced Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies

  18. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    REPORT INTERCONNECTION, GRID EFFECTS, AND TARIFF DESIGN FOR DISTRIBUTED ENERGY RESOURCES DECEMBER Effects, and Tariff Design for Distributed Energy Resources. California Energy Commission, PIER Energy Effects, and Tariff Design for Distributed Energy Resources is the final report for the Distributed

  19. Legacy sample disposition project. Volume 2: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, R.N.; Shifty, K.L.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes the legacy sample disposition project at the Idaho Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), which assessed Site-wide facilities/areas to locate legacy samples and owner organizations and then characterized and dispositioned these samples. This project resulted from an Idaho Department of Environmental Quality inspection of selected areas of the INEEL in January 1996, which identified some samples at the Test Reactor Area and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that had not been characterized and dispositioned according to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. The objective of the project was to manage legacy samples in accordance with all applicable environmental and safety requirements. A systems engineering approach was used throughout the project, which included collecting the legacy sample information and developing a system for amending and retrieving the information. All legacy samples were dispositioned by the end of 1997. Closure of the legacy sample issue was achieved through these actions.

  20. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    of their assistance. The H. T. Harvey authors also thank its tireless field crew for the endless walking over research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research

  1. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    FOR REDUCING BIODIESEL FACILITY WATER CONSUMPTION AND WASTEWATER DISCHARGE JULY 2013 CEC5002013018 for the Integrated System for Reducing Biodiesel Facility Water Consumption and Wastewater Discharge project spent water used in producing biodiesel. Biodiesel production within California is anticipated

  2. We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan. For a listing of hatcheries in your state, contact your state USDA

    E-print Network

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    We have only listed Oklahoma Hatcheries as they appear in the National Poultry Improvement Plan-55-040 National Poultry Improvement Plan. A hatchery appearing on this list in no way constitutes endorsement

  3. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    TO DETERMINE WASTE OF WATER AND ENERGY IN RESIDENTIAL HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS JULY 2009 CEC-500 to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems is the final report for the Pilot Phase of Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot Water Distribution

  4. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · Transportation EnergyEfficient HighTech Buildings is the final report for the Energy Efficient High HIGHTECH BUILDINGS DECEMBER 2008 CEC5002013062 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by

  5. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · Transportation EnergyEfficient HighTech Buildings is the final report for the Energy Efficient High Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency Research Office Laurie ten Hope Deputy Director ENERGY

  6. Pacific Northwest Hatcheries Smolt-to-Adult Ratio (SAR) Estimation

    E-print Network

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Pacific Northwest Hatcheries Smolt-to-Adult Ratio (SAR) Estimation using Coded Wire Tags (CWT) Data........................................................................................................ 6 2.1 SAR Estimators......................................................................................................... 6 2.2 Calculating the Variance of SAR

  7. 29 CFR 780.212 - Hatchery employees working on farms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...testing for disese, culling, weighing, cooping, loading, and transporting the culled birds. The catching and loading of broilers on farms by hatchery employees for transportation to market are agricultural...

  8. 29 CFR 780.212 - Hatchery employees working on farms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...testing for disese, culling, weighing, cooping, loading, and transporting the culled birds. The catching and loading of broilers on farms by hatchery employees for transportation to market are agricultural...

  9. 29 CFR 780.212 - Hatchery employees working on farms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...testing for disese, culling, weighing, cooping, loading, and transporting the culled birds. The catching and loading of broilers on farms by hatchery employees for transportation to market are agricultural...

  10. 29 CFR 780.212 - Hatchery employees working on farms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...testing for disese, culling, weighing, cooping, loading, and transporting the culled birds. The catching and loading of broilers on farms by hatchery employees for transportation to market are agricultural...

  11. 29 CFR 780.212 - Hatchery employees working on farms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...testing for disese, culling, weighing, cooping, loading, and transporting the culled birds. The catching and loading of broilers on farms by hatchery employees for transportation to market are agricultural...

  12. 76 FR 56973 - Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Final Policy and Permit Guidance for Submarine Cable Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ...Final Policy and Permit Guidance for Submarine Cable Projects AGENCY: Office of National...final policy and permitting guidance for submarine cable projects proposed in national marine...applications to install and maintain submarine cables in sanctuaries are reviewed...

  13. UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

  14. Final Reclamation Report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploratory shaft site

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

    1990-06-01

    The restoration of areas disturbed by activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) constitutes a unique operation at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, both from the standpoint of restoration objectives and the time frame for accomplishing these objectives. The BWIP reclamation program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) reclamation. The main focus of this report is on determining the success of the revegetation effort 1 year after work was completed. This report also provides a brief overview of the ESF reclamation program. 21 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. FY2003 LDRD Final Annual Report Article: Pathogen Pathway Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S L

    2003-11-10

    Understanding virulence mechanisms of bacterial pathogens is vital to anticipating biological threats and to improving detectors, vaccines, and treatments. This project will characterize factors responsible for virulence of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague and a biothreat agent, which has an inducible Type III secretion virulence mechanism also found in other animal, plant, and human pathogens. Our approach relies on genomic and proteomic characterization of Y. pestis in addition to a bioinformatic infrastructure. Scientific and technical capabilities developed in this project can be applied to other microbes of interest. This work will establish a significant new direction for biodefense at LLNL and expand our national and international scientific collaborations.

  16. OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. The fractured crust will provide a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed and contribute to terminating the core-concrete interaction. Thus, one of the key aims of the current program was to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit, the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in previous

  17. Genetic evaluation of a Great Lakes lake trout hatchery program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, K.S.; Scribner, K.T.; Bast, D.; Holey, M.E.; Burnham-Curtis, M. K.

    2005-01-01

    Efforts over several decades to restore lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in U.S. waters of the upper Great Lakes have emphasized the stocking of juveniles from each of six hatchery broodstocks. Retention of genetic diversity across all offspring life history stages throughout the hatchery system has been an important component of the restoration hatchery and stocking program. Different stages of the lake trout hatchery program were examined to determine how effective hatchery practices have been in minimizing the loss of genetic diversity in broodstock adults and in progeny stocked. Microsatellite loci were used to estimate allele frequencies, measures of genetic diversity, and relatedness for wild source populations, hatchery broodstocks, and juveniles. We also estimated the effective number of breeders for each broodstock. Hatchery records were used to track destinations of fertilized eggs from all spawning dates to determine whether adult contributions to stocking programs were proportional to reproductive effort. Overall, management goals of maintaining genetic diversity were met across all stages of the hatchery program; however, we identified key areas where changes in mating regimes and in the distribution of fertilized gametes and juveniles could be improved. Estimates of effective breeding population size (Nb) were 9-41% of the total number of adults spawned. Low estimates of Nb were primarily attributed to spawning practices, including the pooling of gametes from multiple males and females and the reuse of males. Nonrandom selection and distribution of fertilized eggs before stocking accentuated declines in effective breeding population size and increased levels of relatedness of juveniles distributed to different rearing facilities and stocking locales. Adoption of guidelines that decrease adult reproductive variance and promote more equitable reproductive contributions of broodstock adults to juveniles would further enhance management goals of maintaining genetic diversity and minimize probabilities of consanguineous matings among stocked individuals when sexually mature. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  18. 75 FR 29601 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on a Proposed Highway Project in California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ...DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on a Proposed Highway Project in California AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), U.S. DOT. ACTION:...

  19. Economic Contributions of the Turfgrass Industry Final Project Report to the Florida Turfgrass Association

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    Economic Contributions of the Turfgrass Industry in Florida Final Project Report to the Florida of Food and Agricultural Sciences Food and Resource Economics Department Gainesville, FL Corresponding.....................................................................................................................................................21 Economic Contribution Analysis

  20. Bright Horizons. Iowa GED Writing Skills Pilot Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartwig, John

    A pilot project determined whether a proposed essay addition to the new General Educational Development (GED) test batteries, scheduled for release in 1988, could be successfully administered and scored in local test centers with an acceptable degree of test reliability and validity. Conducted in cooperation with the GED Testing Service, the…

  1. Demonstration project for methane recovery from unmineable coalbeds. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1982-01-01

    Mountain Fuel Supply Company is a publicly-owned, gas-utility company with extensive natural gas production, pipeline, and distribution facilities in Utah and Wyoming. Through its subsidiary Mountain Fuel Resources, an active research program is being conducted under which various nonconventional sources of pipeline gas are being investigated. As part of this program, a jointly funded project was initiated with the US

  2. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    , and Cannon Boiler Works Incorporated for financial, engineering, and technical support of this project the quality of life in California by bringing environmentally safe, affordable, and reliable energy services · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation

  3. Information Retrieval Demonstration and Research Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Center for Studies in Vocational and Technical Education.

    The information retrieval demonstration and research project was designed to demonstrate the computer terminal system of information retrieval from a central computer. Specifically, the system concentrated on computer searching of the ERIC system. The demonstrations took place by locating nine terminals in volunteer districts and conducting…

  4. Adult Basic Education Outreach Project. Final Report (Executive Summary).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Vocational Centre, Edmonton.

    An executive report summarizes the Alberta Vocational Centre's development of a portable individualized, competency-based learning system for use in an adult basic education program in a non-institutional community location. The report deals with the project's rationale, development (including management, curricular development, budget, and site…

  5. Collaborative Project on Serving Linguistically Diverse Seniors. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Miriam

    In 2002, the Center for Applied Linguistics (CAL) collaborated with the Senior Service Association (SSA) and the American Society on Aging (ASA) on a two-phase project to improve the effectiveness of ASA's sub-grantees in serving linguistically and culturally diverse populations. SSA provides subsidized employment for low-income seniors and funds…

  6. Education in Action. Community Based Organization Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Vocational Education Region V, Elizabethtown.

    The Education in Action project is a cooperative effort between the vocational education community and the Central Kentucky Community Action Council to identify economically disadvantaged youth who need basic academic and life skill training, General Educational Development (GED) training, occupational skill training, and job hunting and retention…

  7. Related Reading and Mathematics Project. Final Report, 1981-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monmouth County Vocational School District, Marlboro, NJ.

    A project was conducted in the Monmouth County (New Jersey) Vocational School District to examine the combination of in-shop vocational education with reading and mathematics instruction for special needs students. Related mathematics and reading teachers worked with students in small groups and individualized settings in the school shop to teach…

  8. Final report of Project 617, the Energy Saver

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Project work was begun in January of 1995 and was completed in May of 1996. The authors performed a broad value engineering study to examine all parts and functions to lower costs, improve functioning and safety. The results of the Phase 1 work was a total redesign of the original Energy Saver resulting in two components instead of three, a weight of four pounds versus the original fourteen pounds and a reduction from 21 pieces to 10 pieces. The manufactured cost dropped from $350 to $175. Based on these improvements the Value Improvement Project has been successful. The second generation unit was named the BROIL-MASTER and has been registered under the Provisional Application (Patent) Program. The authors performed a technical analysis to determine the potential energy savings of applications identified and collect data on host product gas consumption, payback period, and other cost/saving relationships. The industrial search for energy project applications for the authors design was not successful. Seven Broil-Master demonstration projects have been successfully completed. The Broil-Master has received certification from the American Gas Association and UL approval is due by the end of July. The Restaurant Equipment Test Center of Pacific Gas and Electric is interested in testing the Broil-Master sometime in 1996. The Broil-Master was shown at an International Restaurant Equipment Show in September, 1995 and the National Restaurant Show in May, 1996. The authors now have under way four tests with chains and several other tests pending.

  9. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    : Giacomo Falorni, Brian Young (TRE Inc., Canada): PSInSARTM analysis of RADARSAT data. Jacopo Allievi, Fabrizio Novali (TRE Italy): PSInSARTM analysis of RADARSAT data. Agram Piyush Shanker (graduate student proposal for 60 RADARSAT scenes, which were made available at no cost to this project. Please cite

  10. Project VITAL. Final Financial Status and Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Arthur

    In its third year of funding, Project VITAL (Volunteers In Training Act and Learn) was designed to provide literacy training to 500 librarians, coordinators, and volunteers working in literacy programs. Through the techniques of improvisational theater, structured scenarios were enacted dealing with illiteracy, women's concerns of domestic…

  11. Game Theory Final Project Lucas Majerowicz id: 329012637

    E-print Network

    Fiat, Amos

    of this project is to improve the results presented in the "On Bitcoins and Red Balloons" paper. For this, I to a more general model than its authors assume. Motivation ­ The Bitcoin Protocol Bitcoin of its transactions. Suppose that Alice wants to transfer 10 bitcoins to Bob. In order to do this, Alice

  12. Parent Services Project Evaluation: Final Report of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Alan R.; Haggard, Molly

    The Parent Services Project (PSP) is a family resource program which provides supportive activities for highly stressed and socially isolated parents based on the "social support as a stress-buffer" model of primary prevention. A PSP evaluation followed parents as they went through the PSP program and compared them with a matched control sample of…

  13. Elko County School District. Career Awareness Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elko County School District, NV.

    A project was undertaken (1) to develop and implement a program at the elementary school level (K-6) that would increase the career awareness of students and (2) to improve the guidance and counseling services at all grade levels. To achieve the goals, the following strategy was developed: develop a curriculum for a career awareness program in…

  14. Facilitating joint implementation and clean energy projects. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-09-18

    The prime objectives of this multiple grant agreement between the United States Department of Energy`s Golden Field Office (DOE/GFO) and the United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE) were to: (1) inform investors of potential Joint Implementation projects; (2) identify clean energy projects and US renewable energy and energy efficiency companies; (3) report on the development of the renewable energy marketplace in Latin America and the Caribbean over the life of the REIA initiative; (4) conduct a survey and develop a recommended plan for streamlining and integrating CORECT activities; and (5) convene a meeting of representatives from the renewable energy industry, US electric utilities, power producers, project developers, other nonutility generators, and users of renewable energy resources to catalyze cooperative projects that support the development of renewable energy opportunities in emerging markets. All of these objectives were achieved by US/ECRE with some help from US/ECRE`s consortium of renewable energy industry trade associations.

  15. Foreign Language/Area Studies Enhancement Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felker, William; Fuller, Clark

    The Foreign Language/Area Studies Enhancement Program at Central State University (Ohio) is an experience-centered work and study program in Africa designed to give students training in language, culture, and technology. It parallels and supports the university's northern Senegal water management project designed to promote self-sufficiency among…

  16. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    SUSTAINABILITY OCTOBER 2010 CEC-500-2013-129 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University Sustainable Energy Systems Research Roadmap project (Contract Number 500-99-013, Work Authorization BOA-99's website at www.energy.ca.gov/research/ or contact the Energy Commission at 916-327-1551. ii #12;ABSTRACT

  17. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    , and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research and Development Division strives-Use Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · Energy-Related Environmental Research · Energy-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation The Value of Natural Gas Storage

  18. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    , and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The PIER Program strives to conduct the most promising&D program areas: · Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · Energy/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Climate Forecasts

  19. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    , and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research and Development Division strivesUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · EnergyRelated Environmental Research · EnergyUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation A Seasonal Perspective

  20. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Office Manager Energy Efficiency Research Office Laurie ten Hope Deputy Director ENERGY RESEARCH research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · Energy

  1. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    public interest research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies

  2. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Energy Commission Brad Meister Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency Research public interest research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants

  3. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    conducts public interest research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies

  4. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    , and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research and Development Division strives-Use Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · Energy-Related Environmental Research · Energy-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Reductions in urban outdoor water use

  5. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Roggensack Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency Research Office Laurie ten Hope, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research are focused on the following RD&D program areas: Buildings End-Use Energy Efficiency Energy

  6. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    Commission Paul Roggensack Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency Research Office, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research and Development Division strives-Use Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · Energy-Related Environmental Research · Energy

  7. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    : California Energy Commission Brad Meister Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency public interest research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants

  8. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit California. The Energy Research&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · Energy · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation

  9. Skills Conversion Project, Chapter 8, Pollution Control. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Society of Professional Engineers, Washington, DC.

    The Skills Conversion Project conducted by the National Society of Professional Engineers sought to study the transition mechanisms required to transfer available technical manpower from aerospace and defense industries into other areas of employment in private industry and public service. Fourteen study teams assessed the likelihood of future…

  10. Leech Lake American Indian Foster Care Project 1978. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker and Associates, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

    In its second year the project continued to attempt to reduce the incidence of separation of Indian children from their families and to establish permanent planning for those children who were removed, thus improving the child welfare services to Minnesota Chippewa Indian children and families on the Leech Lake Reservation through direct foster…

  11. River Bend Tech Prep Project Final Report. FY 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis and Clark Community Coll., Godfrey, IL.

    The River Bend Tech Prep project was undertaken to develop a tech prep curriculum in high schools in the Lewis and Clark Community College (LCCC) district in Illinois to improve students' academic skills and eventual employment opportunities and contribute to the region's economic growth and stability. The following activities were completed…

  12. Project for Evaluating the Benefits from University Libraries. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durham Univ. (England).

    The objective of the project was to develop a method of measuring benefits, to provide criterion functions for quantitative planning in university libraries. The approach chosen was to show what benefit estimates lie behind actual qualitative planning decisions and to build them into exact planning models. The chapters include: library products…

  13. Projecting Labor Requirements for Transportation-Related Construction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Technical Inst., Washington, DC. Center for Urban Services.

    This report examines the urban transportation planning process and its labor market impact, including projections of opportunities for minority participation in construction, operation, and maintenance of a transportation system and forecasts of training needed in critical occupations. It was found that transportation-related construction may be…

  14. Final Evaluation Report of the Therapen Pilot Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamardian, Stepan

    The report presents the results of a pilot project designed to measure the effect of using Therapen (a device in the shape of a pen which contains a ball point pen and which the student uses to perform kinesthetic and tactile exercises) and the accompanying materials (Tape Program) on 238 educationally handicapped students (6 to 12 years old) with…

  15. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-print Network

    equipment is the advanced compressed air energy storage plant. The project team recommends use problem and identifies the preferred type of electric energy storage plants to manage the impacts of wind an energy storage plant at specified sites. Three candidate sites, all located in Kern County, were

  16. Bridging Early Services Transition Project--Outreach. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenkoetter, Sharon; Shotts, Cynthia

    The Bridging Early Services Transition (BEST) Project--Outreach was designed to help families, administrators, and service providers facilitate the transition of young children, birth through age 5, as they move between services and service systems including: from early intervention to special preschool services; from Head Start or preschool to…

  17. The ACCK Preservice Early Intervention Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenkoetter, Sharon; And Others

    The Preservice Early Intervention Project of the Associated Colleges of Central Kansas (ACCK) was designed to recruit highly promising students into the preservice specialization in Early Childhood Special Education and to give them competencies from multiple disciplines to appropriately serve infants/toddlers with disabilities or developmental…

  18. The Community Service Fellowship Planning Project: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Robert L.; Gaffney, Michael J.

    This report describes the findings and recommendations of the Community Service Fellowship (CSF) Planning Project conducted by the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges under a grant from ACTION, the federal agency charged with promoting volunteer service. The proposed CSF program is a means of providing young people with…

  19. Urban Options Solar Greenhouse Demonstration Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cipparone, L.

    1980-10-15

    The following are included: the design process, construction, thermal performance, horticulture, educational activities, and future plans. Included in appendices are: greenhouse blueprints, insulating curtain details, workshop schedules, sample data forms, summary of performance calculations on the Urban Options Solar Greenhouse, data on vegetable production, publications, news articles on th Solar Greenhouse Project, and the financial statement. (MHR)

  20. Advanced lead acid battery development project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This project involved laboratory and road testing of the Horizon (registered) advanced lead acid batteries produced by Electrosource, Inc. A variety of electric vehicles in the fleet operated by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District and McClellan Air Force Base were used for road tests. The project was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency under RA 93-23 entitled Electric Vehicle Technology and Infrastructure. The Horizon battery is a valve regulated, or sealed, lead acid battery produced in a variety of sizes and performance levels. During the project, several design and process improvements on the Horizon battery resulted in a production battery with a specific energy approaching 45 watt-hours per kilogram (Whr/kg) capable of delivering a peak current of 450 amps. The 12 volt, 95 amp-hour (Ahr) Horizon battery, model number 12N95, was placed into service in seven (7) test vehicles, including sedans, prototype lightweight electric vehicles, and passenger vans. Over 20,000 miles have been driven to date on vehicles powered by the Horizon battery. Road test results indicate that when the battery pack is used with a compatible charger and charge management system, noticeably improved acceleration characteristics are evident, and the vehicles provide a useful range almost 20% greater than with conventional lead-acid batteries.

  1. Setup The Problem Basic DSP Approximating Data JPEG2000 Learning Mathematica Final Projects Discrete Wavelets Transform Course

    E-print Network

    Knaust, Helmut

    Setup The Problem Basic DSP Approximating Data JPEG2000 Learning Mathematica Final Projects The Problem Basic DSP Approximating Data JPEG2000 Learning Mathematica Final Projects 1 Course Setup 2 Mathematica - Scaffolding during the Semester 7 Final Projects - Spring 2009 #12;Setup The Problem Basic DSP

  2. Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)] [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

    1992-02-01

    There are 122 commercial nuclear facilities from which spent nuclear fuel will be accepted by the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). Since some facilities share common sites and some facilities are on adjacent sites, 76 sites were identified for the Near-Site Transportation Infrastructure (NSTI) project. The objective of the NSTI project was to identify the options available for transportation of spent-fuel casks from each of these commercial nuclear facility sites to the main transportation routes -- interstate highways, commercial rail lines and navigable waterways available for commercial use. The near-site transportation infrastructure from each site was assessed, based on observation of technical features identified during a survey of the routes and facilities plus data collected from referenced information sources. The potential for refurbishment of transportation facilities which are not currently operational was also assessed, as was the potential for establishing new transportation facilities.

  3. Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

  4. Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

  5. The Andromeda Project: Final Results of Citizen Science Cluster Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Anil; Johnson, L. C.; Wallace, M.; Dalcanton, J.; Kapadia, A.; Lintott, C.; Simpson, R.; Skillman, E. D.; PHAT Team; Andromeda Project Team

    2014-01-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey has completed data collection, having taken over 30 billion pixels of imaging data of the Andromeda galaxy over four years using the Hubble Space Telescope. These data contain the largest sample of star clusters observable in any galaxy, including our own Milky Way. The Andromeda Project is a citizen science project that recruited over 10,000 volunteers to identify thousands of star clusters in the PHAT imaging. We present results culminating from two rounds of cluster searching and the properties of the resulting sample. We discuss catalog completeness results derived from synthetic cluster data. This cluster sample represents a significant advance in our ability to study star and cluster formation on galaxy wide scales. We are using the resulting cluster sample to provide the best available constraints on the high-mass initial mass function and the fraction of star formation that results in bound star clusters.

  6. The project for an energy-enriched curriculum: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The Project for an Energy-Enriched Curriculum (PEEC) reported was a long-running effort at infusing energy/environment/economics (E/E/E) themes into the K-12 curriculum. While it was conducted as a single integrated effort by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), it is supported by a series of contracts and grants, during the period 1976 to 1984, from the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  7. Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project Final Report

    E-print Network

    Berthold, T. Allen; Flores, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    benefits of wetlands, riparian systems, and habitat restoration projects to the environment and the public in outreach and education efforts to encourage: ? The protection and restoration of existing riparian areas, resacas, and freshwater wetlands... development areas to slow storm water runoff from these areas ? Implementation of wetland systems to treat storm water in urban developments, redevelopments and in areas under agricultural production to reduce nonpoint source pollutant loadings to the AC...

  8. Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROBERT W. BRADSHAW; DANIEL B. DAWSON; WILFREDO DE LA ROSA; ROCKWELL GILBERT; STEVEN H. GOODS; MARY JANE HALE; PETER JACOBS; SCOTT A. JONES; GREGORY J. KOLB; JAMES E. PACHECO; MICHAEL R. PRAIRIE; HUGH E. REILLY; STEVEN K. SHOWALTER; LORIN L. VANT-HULL

    2002-01-01

    Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between 11 U. S. industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprised 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system, a steam generation system, and steam-turbine power block. Molten nitrate salt was used as

  9. Canister Cleaning System Final Design Report Project A-2A

    SciTech Connect

    FARWICK, C.C.

    2000-06-15

    Approximately 2,300 metric tons Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are currently stored within two water filled pools, the 105 K East (KE) fuel storage basin and the 105 K West (KW) fuel storage basin, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The SNF Project is responsible for operation of the K Basins and for the materials within them. A subproject to the SNF Project is the Debris Removal Subproject, which is responsible for removal of empty canisters and lids from the basins. The Canister Cleaning System (CCS) is part of the Debris Removal Project. The CCS will be installed in the KW Basin and operated during the fuel removal activity. The KW Basin has approximately 3600 canisters that require removal from the basin. The CCS is being designed to ''clean'' empty fuel canisters and lids and package them for disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility complex. The system will interface with the KW Basin and be located in the Dummy Elevator Pit.

  10. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  11. 2009 ESMD Space Grant Faculty Project Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Gloria; Ghanashyam, Joshi; Guo, Jiang; Conrad, James; Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Cross, William

    2009-01-01

    The Constellation Program is the medium by which we will maintain a presence in low Earth orbit, return to the moon for further exploration and develop procedures for Mars exploration. The foundation for its presence and success is built by the many individuals that have given of their time, talent and even lives to help propel the mission and objectives of NASA. The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Faculty Fellows Program is a direct contributor to the success of directorate and Constellation Program objectives. It is through programs such as the ESMD Space Grant program that students are inspired and challenged to achieve the technological heights that will propel us to meet the goals and objectives of ESMD and the Constellation Program. It is through ESMD Space Grant programs that future NASA scientists, engineers, and mathematicians begin to dream of taking America to newer heights of space exploration. The ESMD Space Grant program is to be commended for taking the initiative to develop and implement programs that help solidify the mission of NASA. With the concerted efforts of the Kennedy Space Center educational staff, the 2009 ESMD Space Grant Summer Faculty Fellows Program allowed faculty to become more involved with NASA personnel relating to exploration topics for the senior design projects. The 2009 Project was specifically directed towards NASA's Strategic Educational Outcome 1. In-situ placement of Faculty Fellows at the NASA field Centers was essential; this allowed personal interactions with NASA scientists and engineers. In particular, this was critical to better understanding the NASA problems and begin developing a senior design effort to solve the problems. The Faculty Fellows are pleased that the ESMD Space Grant program is taking interest in developing the Senior Design courses at the university level. These courses are needed to help develop the NASA engineers and scientists of the very near future. It has been a pleasure to be part of the evaluation process to help ensure that these courses are developed in such a way that the students' educational objectives are maximized. Ultimately, with NASA-related content used as projects in the course, students will be exposed to space exploration concepts and issues while still in college. This will help to produce NASA engineers and scientists that are knowledgeable of space exploration. By the concerted efforts of these five senior design projects, NASA's ESMD Space Grant Project is making great strides at helping to develop talented engineers and scientists that will continue our exploration into space.

  12. Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Project. Final Report: Innovations in Protective Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis-Small, Lucretia

    This final report is a process evaluation of the Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Project describing the efforts to develop a statewide philosophy and an operational plan in Texas toward primary and secondary prevention of child abuse and neglect. Discussion focuses on the background and origin of the project, first and second year operations…

  13. Rsum of final report for the project PSO-F&U 2006-1-6493

    E-print Network

    Résumé of final report for the project PSO-F&U 2006-1- 6493 DK-SOFC b, Long term SOFC development Resumé af slutrapport for projektet PSO-F&U 2006- 1- 6493 DK-SOFC b, Langsigtet SOFC udvikling Project of the Danish SOFC (= Solid Oxide Fuel Cell) program is to commercialize Danish SOFC technology. The present one

  14. Final report on Project ESEPP (LEAP+) for the period January 1, 1996 - August 1, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, Vernard Jr.

    2000-03-10

    This is the final report for the Project to Enhance Student Science and Engineering Preparation at the Pre-College Level (Project ESEPP) for the period from January 1, 1996 through August 1, 1998. This report summarizes the accomplishments of the program and its ability to meet the objectives described in the original proposal (1990).

  15. Project S.T.E.P. (Sequential Training Experiences in the Psychomotor Domain). Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Walter

    The final report documents development and accomplishments of Project STEP (Sequential Training Experiences in the Psychomotor Domain) for elementary level special education students. Evaluation components are outlined for 1979-80, followed by a review of Project STEP activities as related to initial objectives. Target subcomponents listed include…

  16. 40. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road ProjectNR7, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road Project--NR-7, Hawaii National Park, Island of Maui, Territory of Hawaii, T.H. GENERAL VIEW OT THE PROJECT SHOWING CONSPICUOUS SCARS. THE BEFORE PHOTO OF A BEFORE AND AFTER SET. AFTER PHOTO IS HI-52-41. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

  17. Northwest Energy Policy Project: energy demand modeling and forecasting final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    McHugh

    1977-01-01

    The Northwest Energy Policy Project was undertaken to develop the necessary tools for energy policy development in the Pacific Northwest states individually and as a region. Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc. (MSNW) prepared the demand forecasting model for this project. This volume is the final report and incorporates a discussion of alternative methods of demand forecasting, the detailed formulation of MSNW's

  18. Technology and Education: Putting it in context A summary of the final Capital Research Project report

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Technology and Education: Putting it in context A summary of the final Capital Research Project-00593093,version1-13May2011 #12;1 Box 1: Capital Project Capital (Curriculum and Pedagogy in Technology media and research claims such as these about the educational value of new technologies. But often

  19. Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) Project. Final Report FY 78-79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkersburg Community Coll., WV.

    The activities of the Industrial Campus Project (Ind-Camp), designed by Parkersburg Community College to provide business/industry plant workers with access to educational opportunities directly at the scene of their employment, are described in this report. This final report, covering activity from January to June 1978, describes project

  20. EEC 119B Spring 2014 Final Project: System-On-Chip Module

    E-print Network

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    EEC 119B Spring 2014 Final Project: System-On-Chip Module Dept. of Electrical and Computer application area for your system-on-chip design. Download and complete the project proposal document from system-on-chip module design. You will quantitatively evaluate three product models: (1) distributing

  1. Final Undergraduate Project in Engineering: Towards More Efficient and Effective Tutorials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popov, Atanas A.

    2003-01-01

    Presents strategies for improving the quality of student learning in the context of a final undergraduate project in mechanical engineering. Assesses outcomes of changing practice and shows that careful selection of project topics, good balanced groups, and individual tutorials stimulating peer interaction can foster a deep approach to learning.…

  2. Audit and Evaluation of the Georgia Comprehensive Career Guidance Project, Grades 7-12. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walz, Garry R.; Benjamin, Libby

    An external evaluation was conducted to assess the training packages developed by the Georgia Comprehensive Career Guidance Project (see CE 018 130 for the final report of this project). Three secondary staff development training packages (Educational Environment, CE 018 154; Work and Leisure Environments, CE 018 161; and Human Relations, CE 018…

  3. InteriorPoint Algorithms: Final Project Report NSF Grant DDM9207347

    E-print Network

    Ye, Yinyu

    of interior­point algorithms: Design and prove super­ linearly and quadratically convergent interiorInterior­Point Algorithms: Final Project Report NSF Grant DDM­9207347 Principal Investigator: Yinyu DDM­ 9207347. This project is to develop and analyze recent interior­point algorithms, a seminal devel

  4. The Early Childhood Interactive Technology Literacy Curriculum Project: A Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutinger, Patricia; Robinsosn, Linda; Schneider, Carol; Johanson, Joyce

    This final report describes the activities and outcomes of the Interactive Technology Literacy Curriculum (ITLC) project. This federally funded 5-year model demonstration project was designed to advance the availability, quality, use and effectiveness of computer technology in addressing the acquisition of emergent literacy among young children…

  5. Final Report for snf Project no. 9502830 Networks and Paradigms for the Next Generation of Distributed

    E-print Network

    Nielsen, Brian

    Final Report for snf Project no. 9502830 Networks and Paradigms for the Next Generation and aau October 16, 1998 Overall Project Summary The snf funded framework grant ``Networks and Paradigms December 31st 1998. During this pe­ riod two snf workshops and three workshops at international conferences

  6. Snettisham Hydroelectric Project, Alaska second stage development, Crater lake. Final foundation report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-04

    The important geologic features and methods used to construct the Crater Lake stage of the Snettisham Hydroelectric project, built between 1985 and 1989, are discussed. The project added 31 megawatts of non-polluting, renewable electric power for Juneau, Alaska and the surrounding area. Features of the report include the power tunnel and access adits, penstock excavation, surge shaft, gate shaft and lake top. Construction aspects include the general geology, design features, construction methods, geologic conditions encountered, ground support requirements, grouting, instrumentation and tunnel filling. Foundation conditions for the Crater Lake status were excellent, permitting the power and penstock tunnel and shafts to be constructed essentially unlined. The basic rock type throughout the project is a high-quality, quartz diorite gneiss with randomly spaced, subparallel basalt dikes.... Unlined rock tunnels, Power tunnel, Penstocks, Lake tap, Surge shaft.

  7. Final report for SNL/NM environmental drilling project

    SciTech Connect

    Wemple, R.P.; Meyer, R.D.; Staller, G.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Layne, R.R. [Charles Machine Works, Inc., Perry, OK (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Concern for the environment and cost reduction are driving forces for a broad effort in government and the private sector to develop new, more cost-effective technologies for characterizing, monitoring and remediating environmental sites. Secondary goals of the characterization, monitoring and remediation (CMR) activity are: minimize secondary waste generation, minimize site impact, protect water tables, and develop methods/strategies to apply new technologies. The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) project in directional boring for CMR of waste sites with enhanced machinery from the underground utility installation industry was initiated in 1990. The project has tested a variety of prototype machinery and hardware built by the industrial partner, Charles Machine Works (CMW), and SNL at several sites (Savannah River Site (SRS), Hanford, SNL, Kirtland AFB (KAFB), CMW), successfully installed usable horizontal environmental test wells at SRS and SNL/KAFB, and functioned as a clearing house for information regarding application of existing commercial machinery to a variety of governmental and commercial sites. The project has continued to test and develop machinery in FY 94. The original goal of cost-effectiveness is being met through innovation, adaptation, and application of fundamental concepts. Secondary goals are being met via a basic philosophy of {open_quotes}cut/thrust and compact cuttings without adding large quantities of fluid{close_quotes} to an environmental problem site. This technology will be very cost-effective where applicable. Technology transfer and commercialization by CMW is ongoing and will continue into FY 95. Technology transfer to the private sector is ongoing and reflected in increasing machinery sales to environmental contractors. Education of regulatory agencies resulting in restructuring of appropriate regulatory standards for specification of the horizontal drilling techniques continues to be a long-range goal.

  8. SNOX demonstration project: Volume 1, Public design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The SNOX process, developed by Haldor Topsoe A/S and demonstrated and marketed in North America by ABB Environmental Systems (ABBES), is an innovative process which removes both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from power plant flue gases. Sulfur dioxide is recovered as high purity, concentrated sulfuric acid and nitrogen oxides are converted to nitrogen gas and water vapor; no additional waste streams are produced. As part of the Clean Coal Technology Program, this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the US Department of Energy, Ohio Coal Development Office, ABBES, Snamprogetti, and Ohio Edison. The project objective was to demonstrate the SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of the SNOX process on an electric power plant firing high-sulfur Ohio Coal. A 35-MWe demonstration was conducted on a 108-MWe unit, Ohio Edison`s Niles Plant Unit 2, in Trumbull County, Ohio. The $31 million project began site preparation in November 1990 and commenced treating flue gas in March of 1992. Testing at the site concluded in December of 1994. This report presents a description of the technology and design criteria for the demonstration plant including modifications and additions to the Ohio Edison Niles Station Unit 2. Pertinent drawings and a complete list of drawings are provided for information and reference. In addition to design information, cost data is provided for the design and construction of the demonstration plant; and cost estimates are provided for startup and operating expenses of the demonstration unit. The influence of commercial site specific conditions on the design and economics of the technology are also discussed.

  9. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc. (United States); [Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    1996-11-01

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

  10. Steamtown District Heating and Cooling Project, Scranton, Pennsylvania. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1990-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of a study intended to examine the feasibility of a district heating and cooling alternative for the Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton, PA. The objective of the study was to investigate the import of steam from the existing district heating system in Scranton which is operated by the Community Central Energy Corporation and through the use of modern technology provide hot and chilled water to Steamtown for its internal heating and cooling requirements. Such a project would benefit Steamtown by introducing a clean technology, eliminating on-site fuel use, avoiding first costs for central heating and cooling plants and reducing operation and maintenance expenditures. For operators of the existing district heating system, this project represents an opportunity to expand their customer base and demonstrate new technologies. The study was conducted by Joseph Technology Corporation, Inc. and performed for the Community Central Energy Corporation through a grant by the US Department of Energy. Steamtown was represented by the National Park Service, the developers of the site.

  11. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  12. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Aldana, J. [NES, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

  13. [The Southern Sierra Nevada continental dynamics project]. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, R.W.; Saleeby, J.B.

    1997-12-16

    The main objective of this study was to determine whether or not the Southern Sierra Nevada Mountain Range is supported by a crustal root. A secondary goal was to evaluate the relationship between the Sierra Nevada Range and the adjoining Death Valley extensional province. As part of the project, two seismic profiles were executed. The first was a north-south profile running from Ridgecrest to Chafant Valley. The second was an east-west profile from Death Valley to Coalinga. An NPE shot was recorded on the east-west receiver line, and the data were analyzed by forward modeling with a staggered-grid finite-difference code. Concurrently, the authors initiated an in-depth study of lower crustal and upper mantle xenoliths hosted by Neogene volcanic rocks of the central and southern Sierra Nevada region. This initial work focused on thermobarometric estimates of representative xenolith samples aimed at understanding the vertical composition of the Sierra Nevada lithosphere.

  14. Final Report for the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Planning Project

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Kim [EPA Specialist] [EPA Specialist

    2013-09-17

    In 2011 the Tribe was awarded funds from the Department of Energy to formulate the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan. This will be a guiding document used throughout the planning of projects focused on energy reduction on the Reservation. The Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan's goal is to create a Five Year Energy Plan for the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians in San Jacinto, California. This plan will guide the decision making process towards consistent progress leading to the Tribal goal of a 25% reduction in energy consumption in the next five years. It will additionally outline energy usage/patterns and will edentify areas the Tribe can decrease energy use and increase efficiency. The report documents activities undertaken under the grant, as well as incldues the Tribe's strategif energy plan.

  15. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Colorado-Ute Electric Association began a study to evaluate options for upgrading and extending the life of its Nucla power station in 1982. Located in southwestern Colorado near the town of Nucla, this station was commissioned in 1959 with a local bituminous coal as its design fuel for three identical stoker-fired units, each rated at 12.6 MW(e). Poor station efficiency, high fuel costs, and spiraling boiler maintenance costs forced the Nucla Station into low priority in the CUEA dispatch order as early as 1981. Among the options CUEA considered was to serve as a host utility to demonstrate Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) technology. The anticipated environmental benefits and apparent attractive economics of a circulating AFBC led to Colorado-Ute`s decision to proceed with the design and construction of a demonstration project in 1984 at the Nucla facility.

  16. Compost-powered food drying project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Results of a study performed to demonstrate the use of heat generated from compost piles to dry food are presented. Results indicate that compost pile heat, the main source of heat for the dryer, performed rather erratically in past trials, but its positive effects on the environment merit more study. The increase in nitrogen fertilizer value of finished compost over the original materials ranged between 25% and 90%. This replaces nitrogen usually made with fossil fuels, without generating any known toxic effects on the surrounding environment. Bacteria are very efficient workers that can be harnessed to do certain tasks. Heating and producing nitrogen would be using the same bacteria to do two jobs efficiently. When too much heat is extracted from a pile, the bacteria cannot function efficiently and the pile cools down. Therefore there is only a limited amount of heat available for outside uses. This amount of heat is felt to be proportionate to pile size, so a larger pile could meet the heating demands of the dryer used in the project. Operator expertise is very critical in composting for heat and is effectively gained only through experience. Since the cost effectiveness of the operation depends on using waste materials available at the site, the operator must find the correct combination of these materials and combine them correctly. The length of time involved in fully composting materials and the seasonal limitations of the method combine to bring expertise to the operator only after years of composting. A positive side effect of the project has been the realization of the usefulness of the pre-made insulated box (used refrigerator truck body) in temperature controlled situations. It has proved to be a very cost effective and portable dryer.

  17. Final report and recommendations of the ESnet Authentication Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.R.; Moore, J.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Athey, C.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Engert, D.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ramus, J.E. [National Energy Research Supercomputer Center, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    To conduct their work, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) researchers require access to a wide range of computing systems and information resources outside of their respective laboratories. Electronically communicating with peers using the global Internet has become a necessity to effective collaboration with university, industrial, and other government partners. DOE`s Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) needs to be engineered to facilitate this {open_quotes}collaboratory{close_quotes} while ensuring the protection of government computing resources from unauthorized use. Sensitive information and intellectual properties must be protected from unauthorized disclosure, modification, or destruction. In August 1993, DOE funded four ESnet sites (Argonne National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory) to begin implementing and evaluating authenticated ESnet services using the advanced Kerberos Version 5. The purpose of this project was to identify, understand, and resolve the technical, procedural, cultural, and policy issues surrounding peer-to-peer authentication in an inter-organization internet. The investigators have concluded that, with certain conditions, Kerberos Version 5 is a suitable technology to enable ESnet users to freely share resources and information without compromising the integrity of their systems and data. The pilot project has demonstrated that Kerberos Version 5 is capable of supporting trusted third-party authentication across an inter-organization internet and that Kerberos Version 5 would be practical to implement across the ESnet community within the U.S. The investigators made several modifications to the Kerberos Version 5 system that are necessary for operation in the current Internet environment and have documented other technical shortcomings that must be addressed before large-scale deployment is attempted.

  18. Project Senior. Innovations in Educational Programming for the Elderly. A Pilot Project: Thermopolis, Wyoming. [Final Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owsley, Jean

    A pilot project, entitled Project Senior, was developed and implemented to provide innovative educational programing for older adults in the small rural setting of Thermopolis, Wyoming. Included among the major project activities were the following: a door-to-door survey of 759 persons over 55 years old to determine those courses most desired by…

  19. Project Continuity: A Handicapped Children's Early Education Project. Final Report, October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara; Quinn, Judy

    The final report describes Project Continuity, a federally funded effort to provide continuity of care for handicapped infants with chronic illness or complex medical needs while in the acute care setting and to facilitate transition of the infant into the home environment. Goals were accomplished within the context of a family-centered…

  20. Thermostatic Radiator Valve (TRV) Demonstration Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This research measured the energy savings associated with installing thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs) on one-pipe low-pressure steam systems in New York City multifamily buildings. There were three primary objectives: to determine whether fuel consumption was lower in buildings using TRVs; to determine if occupants would accept the TRVs; and to determine if overheating in apartments could be eliminated using TRVs. Eight buildings, ranging in size from 15 to 26 apartments, were monitored for three years. Each building was audited to determine fuel history and quick-payback energy conservation measures. The project covered three phases; phase-1 consisted of installing low-cost energy conservation measures such as pipe insulation, air vents and burner tune-tips; determining each building`s baseline energy use, and recording baseline apartment temperatures. TRV installations occurred in phases 2 and 3. In phase-2, TRVs were installed in half the apartments in four buildings. In phase-3, TRVs were installed in the remainder of the apartments. Experimental results were conclusive. Buildings with overheated apartments achieved energy savings through the installation of TRVs. The authors research shows an average reduction of 9.45% in space heating energy use occurred with partial installation of TRVs, and savings of 15.5% were achieved after full installation. Buildings with the highest average apartment temperatures during the base year showed the greatest energy savings. Simple payback, based on an installed price of $50 per TRV, averaged 3.1 years.

  1. Advanced Large Area Plastic Scintillator Project (ALPS): Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Reeder, Paul L.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Alzheimer, James M.; Crowell, Shannon L.; Sliger, William A.

    2008-02-05

    The advanced Large-Area Plastic Scintillator (ALPS) Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated possible technological avenues for substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in gamma-ray detection via large-area plastic scintillators. The three predominant themes of these investigations comprised the following: * Maximizing light collection efficiency from a single large-area sheet of plastic scintillator, and optimizing hardware event trigger definition to retain detection efficiency while exploiting the power of coincidence to suppress single-PMT "dark current" background; * Utilizing anti-Compton vetoing and supplementary spectral information from a co-located secondary, or "Back" detector, to both (1) minimize Compton background in the low-energy portion of the "Front" scintillator's pulse-height spectrum, and (2) sharpen the statistical accuracy of the front detector's low-energy response prediction as impelmented in suitable energy-windowing algorithms; and * Investigating alternative materials to enhance the intrinsic gamma-ray detection efficiency of plastic-based sensors.

  2. Final report for the Advanced Natural Gas Vehicle Project

    SciTech Connect

    John Wozniak

    1999-02-16

    The project objective was to develop the technologies necessary to prototype a dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) powered, mid-size automobile with operational capabilities comparable to gasoline automobiles. A system approach was used to design and develop the engine, gas storage system and vehicle packaging. The 2.4-liter DOHC engine was optimized for natural gas operation with high-compression pistons, hardened exhaust valves, a methane-specific catalytic converter and multi-point gaseous injection. The chassis was repackaging to increase space for fuel storage with a custom-designed, cast-aluminum, semi-trailing arm rear suspension system, a revised flat trunk sheet-metal floorpan and by equipping the car with run-flat tires. An Integrated Storage system (ISS) was developed using all-composite, small-diameter cylinders encapsulated within a high-strength fiberglass shell with impact-absorbing foam. The prototypes achieved the target goals of a city/highway driving range of 300 miles, ample trunk capacity, gasoline vehicle performance and ultra low exhaust emissions.

  3. BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

  4. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM); Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-01

    Advanced optically-activated solid-state electrical switch development at Sandia has demonstrated multi-kA/kV switching and the path for scalability to even higher current/power. Realization of this potential requires development of new optical sources/switches based on key Sandia photonic device technologies: vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been used to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. In VCSEL arrays, adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and are lithographically patterned to the required dimensions. We have demonstrated multiple-line filament triggering using VCSEL arrays to approximate line generation. These arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs have fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. Using these arrays, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices. Photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices offer advantages of high voltage operation (multi-kV), optical isolation, triggering with laser pulses that cannot occur accidentally in nature, low cost, high speed, small size, and radiation hardness. PCSS devices are candidates for an assortment of potential applications that require multi-kA switching of current. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been demonstrated to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. As a promising alternative to multiple discrete edge-emitting lasers, a single wafer of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be lithographically patterned to achieve the desired layout of parallel line-shaped emitters, in which adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and thereby achieve a degree of intrinsic optical uniformity. Under this LDRD project, we have fabricated arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs to approximate a line-shaped illumination pattern, achieving optical fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. We have applied these VCSEL arrays to demonstrate single and dual parallel line-filament triggering of PCSS devices. Moreover, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices using VCSEL arrays. We have found that reliable triggering of multiple filaments requires matching of the turn-on time of adjacent VCSEL line-shaped-arrays to within approximately 1 ns. Additionally, we discovered that reliable triggering of PCSS devices at low voltages requires more optical power than we obtained with our first generation of VCSEL arrays. A second generation of higher-power VCSEL arrays was designed and fabricated at the end of this LDRD project, and testing with PCSS devices is currently underway (as of September 2008).

  5. High Performance Building Facade Solutions PIER Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eleanor; Selkowitz, Stephen

    2009-12-31

    Building facades directly influence heating and cooling loads and indirectly influence lighting loads when daylighting is considered, and are therefore a major determinant of annual energy use and peak electric demand. Facades also significantly influence occupant comfort and satisfaction, making the design optimization challenge more complex than many other building systems.This work focused on addressing significant near-term opportunities to reduce energy use in California commercial building stock by a) targeting voluntary, design-based opportunities derived from the use of better design guidelines and tools, and b) developing and deploying more efficient glazings, shading systems, daylighting systems, facade systems and integrated controls. This two-year project, supported by the California Energy Commission PIER program and the US Department of Energy, initiated a collaborative effort between The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and major stakeholders in the facades industry to develop, evaluate, and accelerate market deployment of emerging, high-performance, integrated facade solutions. The LBNL Windows Testbed Facility acted as the primary catalyst and mediator on both sides of the building industry supply-user business transaction by a) aiding component suppliers to create and optimize cost effective, integrated systems that work, and b) demonstrating and verifying to the owner, designer, and specifier community that these integrated systems reliably deliver required energy performance. An industry consortium was initiated amongst approximately seventy disparate stakeholders, who unlike the HVAC or lighting industry, has no single representative, multi-disciplinary body or organized means of communicating and collaborating. The consortium provided guidance on the project and more importantly, began to mutually work out and agree on the goals, criteria, and pathways needed to attain the ambitious net zero energy goals defined by California and the US.A collaborative test, monitoring, and reporting protocol was also formulated via the Windows Testbed Facility in collaboration with industry partners, transitioning industry to focus on the importance of expecting measured performance to consistently achieve design performance expectations. The facility enables accurate quantification of energy use, peak demand, and occupant comfort impacts of synergistic facade-lighting-HVAC systems on an apples-to-apples comparative basis and its data can be used to verify results from simulations. Emerging interior and exterior shading technologies were investigated as potential near-term, low-cost solutions with potential broad applicability in both new and retrofit construction. Commercially-available and prototype technologies were developed, tested, and evaluated. Full-scale, monitored field tests were conducted over solstice-to-solstice periods to thoroughly evaluate the technologies, uncover potential risks associated with an unknown, and quantify performance benefits. Exterior shading systems were found to yield net zero energy levels of performance in a sunny climate and significant reductions in summer peak demand. Automated interior shading systems were found to yield significant daylighting and comfort-related benefits.In support of an integrated design process, a PC-based commercial fenestration (COMFEN) software package, based on EnergyPlus, was developed that enables architects and engineers to quickly assess and compare the performance of innovative facade technologies in the early sketch or schematic design phase. This tool is publicly available for free and will continue to improve in terms of features and accuracy. Other work was conducted to develop simulation tools to model the performance of any arbitrary complex fenestration system such as common Venetian blinds, fabric roller shades as well as more exotic innovative facade systems such as optical louver systems.

  6. Project to test for shale gas in Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The search for viable shale gas is the search for fractures in the shale. One possible method to find deep zones of natural fracture is the measurement of the speed of sound in the shale. This speed is expected to be lowered by the presence of fractures, particularly if the fractures contain gas. The seismic reflection method, which times the echoes from deep rock layers, can be used to measure the speed of sound (the seismic velocity) in the shale. Accordingly the present project was undertaken to make such measurements along a 125-mile line crossing SE Ohio, to search for local lowering of this speed, and to drill and test 1 to 3 shale-gas wells on such local lows. The results of the seismic velocity analysis are summarized. Several velocity lows are apparent, and two of these were proposed for test. A well was drilled on one of these anomalies in Elk Township, Noble County. Gas was obtained from two naturally-fractured zones in the Chagrin shale. The well was stimulated and tested at three separate levels: the Rhinestreet shale, the Huron shale, and the Chagrin. Initial production is of the order of 30 Mcf/d from the Rhinestreet, 35 Mcf/d from the Huron, and 110 Mcf/d from the Chagrin. Economic analyses suggest that the Rhinestreet and Huron are not in themselves commercial; the Chagrin is marginal at a gas price of $2/Mcf but commercially attractive at $5/Mcf. Practical problems remain in the preparation of seismic velocity analyses, and enigmas remain in interpreting the test well. However, velocity analysis seems to have a place among the techniques for locating shale-gas wells.

  7. The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Final Report 2000-2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Christopher

    2007-12-15

    A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ? 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report.

  8. Contrasting survival strategies of hatchery and wild red drum: implications for stock enhancement 

    E-print Network

    Beck, Jessica Louise

    2009-05-15

    Post-release survival of hatchery fishes is imperative to the success of any supplemental stocking program. The purpose of this research was to identify differences between hatchery and wild red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and determine if pre...

  9. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

  10. NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector – Final Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger; Takashi Ito

    2014-09-01

    A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), is fundedby the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program to develop and test Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When deployed, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, and high performance reactors, allowing several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs to obtain higher accuracy/higher resolution data from irradiation tests of candidate new fuels and materials. Specifically, deployment of MPFDs will address several challenges faced in irradiations performed at MTRs: • Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe; MPFDs offer this option. • MPFD construction is very different than current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions encountered in-core of high performance MTRs. • The higher accuracy, high fidelity data available from the compact MPFD will significantly enhance efforts to validate new high-fidelity reactor physics codes and new multi-scale, multi-physics codes. • MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs, allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. • The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be deployed, offering the potential to accurately measure the flux and temperature profiles in the reactor. This report summarizes the status at the end of year two of this three year project. As documented in this report, all planned accomplishments for developing this unique new, compact, multipurpose sensor have been completed.

  11. Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project, Final Scientific / Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, Larry, E.

    2007-04-30

    The Mississippi Ethanol (ME) Project is a comprehensive effort to develop the conversion of biomass to ethanol utilizing a proprietary gasification reactor technology developed by Mississippi Ethanol, LLC. Tasks were split between operation of a 1/10 scale unit at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) of Mississippi State University (MSU) and the construction, development, and operation of a full scale pilot unit located at the ME facility in Winona, Mississippi. In addition to characterization of the ME reactor gasification system, other areas considered critical to the operational and economic viability of the overall ME concept were evaluated. These areas include syngas cleanup, biological conversion of syngas to alcohol, and effects of gasification scale factors. Characterization of run data from the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units has allowed development of the factors necessary for scale-up from the small unit to the larger unit. This scale range is approximately a factor of 10. Particulate and tar sampling gave order of magnitude values for preliminary design calculations. In addition, sampling values collected downstream of the ash removal system show significant reductions in observed loadings. These loading values indicate that acceptable particulate and tar loading rates could be attained with standard equipment additions to the existing configurations. Overall operation both the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units proceeded very well. The Pilot Unit was operated as a system, from wood receiving to gas flaring, several times and these runs were used to address possible production-scale concerns. Among these, a pressure feed system was developed to allow feed of material against gasifier system pressure with little or no purge requirements. Similarly, a water wash system, with continuous ash collection, was developed, installed, and tested. Development of a biological system for alcohol production was conducted at Mississippi State University with much progress. However, the current state of biological technology is not deemed to be ready commercially. A preliminary estimate of capital and operating costs of a 12000 gallon per day gasification/biological facility was developed for comparison purposes. In addition, during the biological organism screening and testing, some possible alternative products were identified. One such possibility is the biological production of bio-diesel. Additional research is necessary for further evaluation of all of the biological concepts.

  12. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

  13. Disabled Infants Project and Training & Technical Assistance Project. Final Reports: Innovations in Protective Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Joe G., Jr.

    The goal of the Disabled Infants Project was to develop and implement a plan for updating child protective services in Texas to assure the protection of infants as required by the Child Abuse Amendments of 1984. As a result of the project, the Texas Department of Human Services has in place both policy and mechanisms which guide and enable…

  14. Sherman Creek Hatchery; 1995-1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Mitch [Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA (United States). Hatcheries Program

    1997-01-01

    The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations of the SCH have been modified to better achieve program goals. These strategic changes have been the result of recommendations through the Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) and were implemented to enhance imprinting, improve survival and operate the two kokanee facilities more effectively. The primary change has been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a kokanee yearling (post smolt) program. The second significant change has been to rear 120,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October to enable the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee for the yearling program.

  15. Willamette Hatchery Oxygen Supplementation Studies : Annual Report 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.D.; Ewing, S.K.; Sheahan, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    Hydropower development and operations in the Columbia River basin have caused the loss of 5 million to 11 million salmonids. An interim goal of the Northwest Power Planning Council is to reestablish these historical numbers by doubling the present adult runs from 2.5 million to 5.0 million fish. This increase in production will be accomplished through comprehensive management of both wild and hatchery fish, but artificial propagation will play a major role in the augmentation process. The current husbandry techniques in existing hatcheries require improvements that may include changes in rearing densities, addition of oxygen, removal of excess nitrogen, and improvement in raceway design. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to increase the number of fish released from hatcheries that survive to return as adults.

  16. Reproductive success of hatchery-produced and wild-born brown trout in an experimental stream

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johan Dannewitz; Erik Petersson; Jonas Dahl; Tore Prestegaard; Anna-Carin Lof; Torbjorn Jarvi

    2004-01-01

    Summary 1. Although releases of hatchery-produced salmonids to support conspecific wild populations have increased dramatically during recent decades, little information is available about the performance in the wild of hatchery fish and their offspring. Important factors determining the success and genetic outcomes of supportive breeding programmes include (i) the relative reproductive success of released hatchery fish in the wild, and

  17. ISAB Artificial Production Review Report 3 Recommendations for the Design of Hatchery Monitoring

    E-print Network

    (information type 2) is required to evaluate alternative fish rearing/release strategies and guide hatchery ...................................................................................................2 Monitoring for Type 1 Information - Details of Fish Culture Practices Inside the Hatchery......................................................................................................................3 Monitoring Type 2 Information - Survival and Contribution to Harvest of Hatchery Fish after

  18. 78 FR 45268 - Notice of Availability of the San Diego Gas & Electric Ocotillo Sol Solar Project Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ...the San Diego Gas & Electric Ocotillo Sol Solar Project Final Environmental Impact Statement...Gas & Electric (SDG&E) Ocotillo Sol Solar Project in Imperial County, California...ADDRESSES: Copies of the Ocotillo Sol Solar Project Final EIS/Proposed CDCA...

  19. Erosion Control Progress in the HUA IDAHO SNAKE-PAYETTE RIVERS --HUA WATER QUALITY PROJECT FINAL REPORT

    E-print Network

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Erosion Control Progress in the HUA IDAHO SNAKE-PAYETTE RIVERS -- HUA WATER QUALITY PROJECT FINAL water quality within the HUA used in #12;2 -- Erosion Control IDAHO SNAKE-PAYETTE RIVERS -- HUA WATER QUALITY PROJECT FINAL REPORT this 8-year project was improved erosion control methods. Erosion control

  20. Performance of high-speed TCP Protocols over NS-2 Masters Project Final Report

    E-print Network

    Weigle, Michele

    1 Performance of high-speed TCP Protocols over NS-2 TCP Linux Masters Project Final Report Author-TCP ........................................................... 8 2.6 NS-2 TCP Linux ................................................9 3. Methodology high-speed TCP protocols share the bandwidth among them. Previous work has used the NS-2 network

  1. School Age Multihandicapped Project: Capital Area Rehabilitation Center. Final Report 1977-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capital Area Rehabilitation Center, Austin, TX.

    The document contains the final report of a model project to provide a therapeutically based educational program for severely handicapped, orthopedically impaired children (6 to 21 years old) utilizing the skills of teachers, aides, therapists, and a nurse to provide individualized hands on services. Section I contains an overview of the…

  2. Aerobic Excercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children. (Project AEROBIC). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Univ., Moscow.

    The final report summarizes accomplishments of Project AEROBIC (Aerobic Exercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children), which provided a physical education exercise program for severely, profoundly, and multiply handicapped children aged 10-21. Activities are outlined for the 3 year period and include modification of exercise…

  3. Spent nuclear fuel project - criteria document spent nuclear fuel final safety analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-02-23

    The criteria document provides the criteria and planning guidance for developing the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This FSAR will support the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office decision to authorize the procurement, installation, installation acceptance testing, startup, and operation of the SNF Project facilities (K Basins, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and Canister Storage Building).

  4. PROJECT PATS: "Potentially Academically Talented Students." Final Technical Report, 10/1/80-6/30/82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeffer, J. S.; And Others

    The final report describes a 2-year pilot project to identify and program for disadvantaged potentially gifted students in grades 5-8. Two goals of the program are stated: (1) to establish a working partnership among public and nonpublic schools and higher education; and (2) to integrate disadvantaged potentially gifted with nondisadvantaged…

  5. The Final Year Project (FYP) in Social Sciences: Establishment of Its Associated Competences and Evaluation Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mateo, Joan; Escofet, Anna; Martinez, Francesc; Ventura, Javier; Vlachopoulos, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the fundamental characteristics of the Final Year Project (FYP), its associated competences and some evaluation standards that derived from a research conducted by the regional government of Catalonia (Spain) and the Catalan University Quality Assurance Agency. More analytically, the paper begins with the definition of the…

  6. MAVA [Massachusetts Association of Vocational Administrators] 1972 Summer Workshops and Professional Improvement Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Boston. Div. of Occupational Education.

    The Massachusetts Association of Vocational Administrators (MAVA), with the assistance of the State Division of Occupational Education, developed a series of four-day, in service workshops aimed at vocational teachers throughout the State, and the document provides a final report of this project's first year. Part One covers general information…

  7. Analysis of E-commerce Security ECE 578 Final Project Report

    E-print Network

    Analysis of E-commerce Security ECE 578 Final Project Report Dr. Cetin Kaya Koc Juthamas Pongnukit Witit Tingthanathikul Oregon State University #12;Abstract E-commerce business operators face many challenges in building consumer trust and in providing e-security for their network. Securing e- commerce

  8. Research and Development Project in Career Education. Final Report. Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Coordinating Council for Occupational Education, Olympia.

    The final volume in the report on the Research and Development Project in Career Education is in two parts. The first, "Interest Inventories, Tests, Surveys, and Scales: A Compilation," is by James T. Jurgens. It is designed to acquaint teachers and counselors with 66 interest measurement instruments that are presently on the market. For most,…

  9. The Physical Fitness of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy. Project UNIQUE II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnick, Joseph P.; Short, Francis X.

    The final report describes a 2-year project of the State University of New York, College at Brockport, to study the physical fitness of nonretarded and retarded adolescents with cerebral palsy. The UNIQUE Physical Fitness Test was administered to 203 cerebral palsied adolescents throughout the United States and from segregated and nonsegregated…

  10. Wrap up final projects Hands-on Unix system administration DeCal

    E-print Network

    Walker, Matthew P.

    computer, and the cloud (or more specifically, "Infrastructure as a Service") refers to virtualization instructions for using the DeCal Cloud--which is part of the final project (which is in turn a required part of the course). The DeCal Cloud For more information about virtualization and the cloud, refer to Lecture 9

  11. On the Design of Learning Outcomes for the Undergraduate Engineer's Final Year Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thambyah, Ashvin

    2011-01-01

    The course for the final year project for engineering students, because of its strongly research-based, open-ended format, tends to not have well defined learning outcomes, which are also not aligned with any accepted pedagogical philosophy or learning technology. To address this problem, the revised Bloom's taxonomy table of Anderson and…

  12. Final Results from the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project to Measure the Hubble Constant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy L. Freedman; Barry F. Madore; Brad K. Gibson; Laura Ferrarese; Daniel D. Kelson; Shoko Sakai; Jeremy R. Mould; Robert C. Kennicutt Jr.; Holland C. Ford; John A. Graham; John P. Huchra; Shaun M. G. Hughes; Garth D. Illingworth; Lucas M. Macri; Peter B. Stetson; P. B. Stetson

    2001-01-01

    We present here the final results of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Key Project to measure the Hubble constant. We summarize our method, the results, and the uncertainties, tabulate our revised distances, and give the implications of these results for cosmology. Our results are based on a Cepheid calibration of several secondary distance methods applied over the range of about

  13. A Project to Develop a New Elementary Science Curriculum. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamos, Morris H.; And Others

    This document is the final report to develop a new elementary science curriculum. It contains information related only to the development phase of the Conceptually Oriented Program in Elementary Science (COPES) and was written for an audience that includes all who are interested in curriculum development as it was experienced in this project. The…

  14. The Preparation of Dissemination Media for Learning about Religion in Public Education. Project Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Religion - Social Studies Curriculum Project.

    This is the final report of the Religion-Social Studies Curriculum Project in Florida. The committee: 1) surveyed the prospects and propriety for the academic study of religion in public education; 2) prepared and tested innovative instructional materials for the study of religion in secondary school social studies; 3) conducted two teacher…

  15. Project CREATE Final Report. Cooperative Resources To Enhance Access to Technology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampden County Employment and Training Consortium, Springfield, MA.

    These materials have been developed by Project CREATE (Cooperative Resources to Enhance Access to Jobs through Technical Education), a demonstration program designed to develop a network, specific activities, and resources that would provide education and support services to a wide audience. A 13-page final report describes the hands-on training…

  16. Western Gas Sands Project: Los Alamos NMR Well Logging Tool Development. Progress report. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Brown; J. A. Jackson; A. R. Koelle

    1985-01-01

    This document is the final report on the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Well Logging Tool Development Program, part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Western Gas Sands Project, most recently supported through DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The report covers the entire progress of the program from initial conception of the technique in 1978 to

  17. NORTH PACIFIC RESEARCH BOARD PROJECT FINAL REPORT Reproductive Ecology of Atka Mackerel Pleurogrammus monopterygius in Alaska

    E-print Network

    1 NORTH PACIFIC RESEARCH BOARD PROJECT FINAL REPORT Reproductive Ecology of Atka Mackerel's permission. #12;66 CHAPTER 3: ATKA MACKEREL MATING SYSTEM Genetic assessment of the mating system and patterns of egg cannibalism in Atka mackerel, Pleurogrammus monopterygius Michael F. Canino 1 , Ingrid B

  18. Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project; Long-term Management Plan, Project Report 1993, Final Draft.

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Matthew T.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted on the Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project area, a 4,943 acre ranch purchased for mitigating some habitat losses associated with the original construction of Grand Coulee Dam and innundation of habitat by Lake Roosevelt. A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was used to determine habitat quality and quantity baseline data and future projections. Target species used in the study were sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemoinus), mink (Mustela vison), spotted sandpiper (Actiius colchicus), bobcat (Felis reufs), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura). From field data collected, limiting life values or HSI's (Habitat Suitability Index's) for each indicator species was determined for existing habitats on project lands. From this data a long term management plan was developed. This report is designed to provide guidance for the management of project lands in relation to the habitat cover types discussed and the indicator species used to evaluate these cover types. In addition, the plan discusses management actions, habitat enhancements, and tools that will be used to enhance, protect and restore habitats to desired conditions. Through planned management actions biodiversity and vegetative structure can be optimized over time to reduce or eliminate, limiting HSI values for selected wildlife on project lands.

  19. 76 FR 45649 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on I-5: Fern Valley Interchange Project: Jackson County, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ...Final Federal Agency Actions on I-5: Fern Valley Interchange Project: Jackson County...to a proposed highway project, I-5: Fern Valley Interchange in Jackson County...Telephone: (503) 316-2559. The I-5: Fern Valley Interchange Environmental...

  20. Environmentally conscious manufacturing & technology access project: Final technical progress report, April 1, 1994--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This final report is being submitted in fulfillment of the management obligations associated with the TRP/DOE grant which funded the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing & Technology Access (ECM) Project. A {open_quotes}Federal Assistance Project Status Report{close_quotes} is also being submitted with this form. This report will elaborate on the successful completion of this project in achieving and in most cases exceeding its programmatic goals and fulfilling it statutory financial match obligation. A review of the Year 1 {open_quotes}Technical Progress Report{close_quotes} and the Quarterly Reports filed during the project period, clearly portray that, in all substantive areas, the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing & Technology Access Project (ECM Project) achieved or exceeded its goals. The success of the Project is largely due to the tremendous support provided by the Center for Technology Transfer (CTT) and the Maine Metal Products Association (MMPA). Both organizations provided extensive administrative and financial support and were instrumental in promoting the work of the project within the metals industry. The programmatic oversight provided by the industry Steering Committee and the broad partnership represented on the Board of Advisors were invaluable in developing, promoting and implementing the work of the ECM Project.

  1. Penaeid shrimp fisheries and hatcheries have undergone an accelerated devel-

    E-print Network

    674 Penaeid shrimp fisheries and hatcheries have undergone an accelerated devel- opment during, etc.) countries. Business based on penaeid shrimp trading may be considered as having two components the consumption of imported shrimp has long exceeded landings from their domestic fisheries (Lightner et al., 1997

  2. Scientists Strategize at the Salmon River Fish Hatchery

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS scientists (L to R) Emily Waldt, Ross Abbett, and Jim Johnson chat with Dan Bishop (far left)of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation while watching hundreds of salmon swim into troughs at the state's Salmon River Fish Hatchery. Thousands of young Atlantic salmon&nbs...

  3. USGS Releases Atlantic Salmon at the Salmon River Fish Hatchery

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS scientists (L to R) Ross Abbett and Rich Chiavelli watch as hundreds of salmon swim into troughs at the NY State Salmon River Fish Hatchery. Thousands of young Atlantic salmon are being released into Salmon River in an effort to restore this diminished Lake Ontario fish population, e...

  4. Salmon River Fish Hatchery in Altmar, N.Y.

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS scientists release young Atlantic salmon into Lake Ontario tributaries near the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation's Salmon River Fish Hatchery in Altmar, N.Y. Thousands of young Atlantic salmon are being released into Salmon River in an effort to restore this di...

  5. Marine growth of Columbia River hatchery Chinook salmon

    E-print Network

    is limited >> Food is limited (theory and data) >>> Competition for food occurs >>>> Growth is decreased are hatchery fish #12;Growth varies between years - food is limiting >> there is competition for food #12;Indirect competition for food requires spatial overlap temporal overlap dietary overlap = same place, same

  6. Evaluation of Zooplankton in Hatchery Diets for Channel Catfish Fry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of zooplankton as a supplemental hatchery diet for fry of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was evaluated. When a commercial diet is used as a reference, fry fed exclusively on zooplankton–either live or dried–performed poorly in their growth rate. However, when live or dried zooplan...

  7. The Women's Leadership Project: A One-Year Training Project in Adult Education Administration. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston Univ., MA. School of Education.

    The Women's Leadership Project represents an initial effort to combat discrimination against women in adult education, with special emphasis on adult basic education. Overall goals involved leadership development, impact, and support to: (1) recruit and prepare 10 qualified women adult educators for leadership positions in adult education, (2)…

  8. Final Project Summary Report Bechtel Nevada and Fiberchem Environmental, Inc., Cooperative Research and Technology Development Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Pollina

    1999-01-01

    This is a report summarizing work on a small project dedicated to adapting a new chemical sensing platform for the US Department of Energy and its customers. At the same time and in the spirit of technology transfer, FCI Environmental, Inc., would receive technical support in the form of expertise from the US Department of Energy to assist in developing

  9. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Spring chinook salmon populations in the Imnaha and Grande Ronde rivers are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and are at high risk of extirpation. The Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, are co-managers of conservation/restoration programs for Imnaha and Grande Ronde spring chinook salmon that use hatchery supplementation and conventional and captive broodstock techniques. The immediate goal of these programs is to prevent extirpation and provide the potential for restoration once factors limiting production are addressed. These programs redirect production occurring under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) from mitigation to conservation and restoration. Both the Imnaha and Grande Ronde conservation/restoration programs are described in ESA Section 10 permit applications and the co-managers refer to the fish production from these programs as the Currently Permitted Program (CPP). Recently, co-managers have determined that it is impossible to produce the CPP at Lookingglass Hatchery, the LSRCP facility intended for production, and that without additional facilities, production must be cut from these conservation programs. Development of new facilities for these programs through the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program is considered a new production initiative by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) and requires a master plan. The master plan provides the NPPC, program proponents and others with the information they need to make sound decisions about whether the proposed facilities to restore salmon populations should move forward to design. This master plan describes alternatives considered to meet the facility needs of the CPP so the conservation program can be fully implemented. Co-managers considered three alternatives: modify Lookingglass Hatchery; use existing facilities elsewhere in the Basin; and use new facilities in conjunct ion with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. Each alternative was evaluated based on criteria developed for rearing fish for a conservation program. After this review, the Nez Perce Tribe determined the only alternative that meets the needs of the program is the alternative to use new facilities in conjunction with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. This is the Proposed Alternative. The Proposed Alternative would require: Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Imnaha River and modifications of the existing Gumboot facility to accommodate the Imnaha component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Lostine River to accommodate the Lostine component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; and Modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery to accommodate the Upper Grande Ronde and Catherine Creek components of the Lookingglass Hatchery production. After an extensive screening process of potential sites, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes the Marks Ranch site on the Imnaha River and the Lundquist site on the Lostine River for new facilities. Conceptual design and cost estimates of the proposed facilities are contained in this master plan. The proposed facilities on the Imnaha and Lostine rivers would be managed in conjunction with the existing adult collection and juvenile acclimation/release facilities. Because this master plan has evolved into an endeavor undertaken primarily by the Nez Perce Tribe, the focus of the document is on actions within the Imnaha and Lostine watersheds where the Nez Perce Tribe have specific co-management responsibilities. Nevertheless, modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery could make it possible to provide a quality rearing environment for the remainder of the CPP. The Nez Perce Tribe will assist co-managers in further evaluating facility needs and providing other components of the NPPC master planning process to develop a solution for the entire CPP. Although the fish production for the conservation programs is already authorized and not at issue in this master pla

  10. SNOX demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The SNOX process, developed by Haldor Topsoe A/S and demonstrated and marketed in North America by ABB Environmental Systems (ABBES), is an innovative process which removes both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from power plant flue gases. Sulfur dioxide is recovered as high purity, concentrated sulfuric acid and nitrogen oxides are converted to nitrogen gas and water vapor; no additional waste streams are produced. As part of the Clean Coal Technology Program, this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the US Department of Energy, Ohio Coal Development Office, ABBES, Snamprogetti, and Ohio Edison. The project objective was to demonstrate the SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} reduction efficiencies of the SNOX process on an electric power plant firing high-sulfur Ohio Coal. A 35-MWe demonstration has been conducted on a 108-MWe unit, Ohio Edison`s Niles Plant Unit 2, in Trumbull County, Ohio. The $31.4 million project began site preparation in November 1990 and commenced treating flue gas in March of 1992. A parametric test program has been completed. This report presents a description of the technology, results from the 33 month testing and operation phase, and information from a commercial scale economic evaluation. During the demonstration, the process met or exceeded its design goals of 95% SO{sub 2} removal, 90% NO{sub x} removal, and production of commercial grade (>93.2 wt.%) sulfuric acid. The plant was operated for approximately 8000 hours and produced more than 5600 tons of acid, which was purchased and distributed by a local supplier to end users. Projected economics for a 500 MWe commercial SNOX plant indicate a total capital requirement of 305 $/kW, levelized incremental cost of power at 6.1 mills/kWh, 219 $/ton of SO{sub 2} removed, and 198 $/ton of SO{sub 2}+NO{sub x} removed (all at constant dollars).

  11. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-04-30

    The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

  12. Power Systems Analysis Final Project Report UNI: tdp2114 1 Abstract--This document outlines the importance of, process

    E-print Network

    Lavaei, Javad

    Power Systems Analysis Final Project Report UNI: tdp2114 1 Abstract--This document outlinesB Decibels Hz Hertz C Celsius W Watts s Seconds #12;Power Systems Analysis Final Project Report UNI: tdp of large scale power systems. The maintenance of such power systems is no small affair. Every moment

  13. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. The following national Sea Grant aquaculture extension and technology transfer projects were awarded in 2012 (final year of three-year projects from a 2010 competition)

    E-print Network

    The following national Sea Grant aquaculture extension and technology transfer projects were awarded in 2012 (final year of three-year projects from a 2010 competition): Sea Grant College Program Sea Grant Director Institutional Affiliation Project Title FY12 Federal Share* Connecticut Sea Grant Sylvain

  15. Final Project Report for project titled "Fluoroalkylphosphonic-acid-based proton conductors"

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Creager

    2011-12-08

    The overall objective of this research was to create new proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for use in energy conversion devices including hydrogen fuel cells that could operate at high temperatures (95-130 C) and under low relative humidity (< 50% RH) conditions. The new polymers were based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) groups (see illustration below) which offer prospects for rapid proton transport by a proton-hopping mechanism similar to that which operates in phosphoric acid, a well-known proton-transporting electrolyte that is used in a class of hydrogen fuel cells that work well under the conditions noted above and are already commercially successful. The two specific project objectives were as follows: (1) synthesize and characterize new proton-conducting electrolytes based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) functional groups; and (2) create and apply new computer models to study protonic conduction in FPA-based electrolytes. The project was successful in creating the desired polymer electrolytes and also a series of molecular model compounds which were used to study proton transport in FPA electrolytes in general. Computer models were created to study both structure and proton-transport dynamics in the electrolytes, particularly the molecular model compounds. Rapid proton transport by a hopping mechanism was found in many of the model compounds and correlations with transport rates with molecular structure were identified. Several polymeric analogs of FPA model compounds were prepared and studied, however FPA-based polymeric materials having very high protonic conductivities under either wet or dry conditions were not obtained. Several possible reasons for the failure of polymeric materials to exhibit the expected high protonic conductivities were identified, including a failure of the polymers to adopt the phase-separated secondary structure/morphology necessary for high proton conductivity, and an unexpected polymer crosslinking effect of acidic groups having two P-OH groups. The project has lent insight into how FPA groups transport protons in both liquid and polymeric forms, which provides guidance to future efforts to design and prepare future generations of proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for hydrogen fuel cells and other types of electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices.

  16. Wood-heated Winter Vegetable Greenhouse Demonstration Project. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Prussack, H.

    1985-01-01

    In order to measure the comparative effectiveness of the project greenhouse and its heating system, a smaller greenhouse (24' x 48') was installed during spring 1981 to act as a control. This smaller greenhouse used the same double layered plastic covering and endwalls. The heating system used - a modern wood stove (Ashley) - relies on heating the surrounding air. Hot air is the typical heating system used in New England greenhouses. However, most are using oil to heat the air. The same varieties of seedling plants were placed in the ''control greenhouse'' so that their growth response could be compared to those in the project greenhouse. The closed heating system utilizing underground piping circulates water at 95/sup 0/ F, thus maintaining a 75/sup 0/ F ground temperature and a 55 to 65/sup 0/ F air temperature. The air temperature fluctuates depending upon outside weather conditions, sun, hours of daylight, wind velocity, etc. The ground picks up additinal heat from the sun which is stored in the sand, thus, allowing the furnace to be used less. Initially, it took three days to bring the ground temperature up to 75/sup 0/ F and thereafter, it remained constant with one firing of the wood furnace in the morning and another at dusk. Because the ground mass is not exposed to air movement and is well-insulated, it holds the heat, releasing it mostly through conduction. This does, however, present a problem in the growing of some plants such as hanging baskets that do not touch the ground. These must tolerate cooler night temperatures. On the other hand, the constant floor heat provided a dramatic boost in plant growth compared to plant response in the ''control greenhouse''. Also, stem growth was thicker and plants generally healthier, resulting in a 20% earlier maturation compared to that in the ''control greenhouse''.

  17. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support project (HVTE-TS): Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This final technical report was prepared by Rolls-Royce Allison summarizing the multiyear activities of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) project. The ATTAP program was initiated in October 1987 and continued through 1993 under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Propulsion Systems, Advanced Propulsion Division. ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the automotive ceramic gas turbine engine. The target application was the prime power unit coupled to conventional transmissions and powertrains. During the early 1990s, hybrid electric powered automotive propulsion systems became the focus of development and demonstration efforts by the US auto industry and the Department of energy. Thus in 1994, the original ATTAP technology focus was redirected to meet the needs of advanced gas turbine electric generator sets. As a result, the program was restructured to provide the required hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support and the project renamed HVTE-TS. The overall objective of the combined ATTAP and HVTE-TS projects was to develop and demonstrate structural ceramic components that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating 3,500 hr in an advanced high temperature turbine engine environment. This report describes materials characterization and ceramic component development, ceramic components, hot gasifier rig testing, test-bed engine testing, combustion development, insulation development, and regenerator system development. 130 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.

    1996-05-01

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

  19. Final Project Summary Report Bechtel Nevada and Fiberchem Environmental, Inc., Cooperative Research and Technology Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Pollina

    1999-04-01

    This is a report summarizing work on a small project dedicated to adapting a new chemical sensing platform for the US Department of Energy and its customers. At the same time and in the spirit of technology transfer, FCI Environmental, Inc., would receive technical support in the form of expertise from the US Department of Energy to assist in developing this product. The sensor is a hybrid integrated-circuit, optical waveguide, chemical sensor that is patented by FCI Environmental, Inc., and manufactured under license by Texas Instruments, Inc. A down-hole penetrometer probe was designed for use in hot, 60 C, hydrocarbon-saturated, saline environment at a depth of 200 feet. The probe design includes three chemical sensing, hybrid integrated-circuits with chemical reference and measurement channels, a water seal, output electronics, and a removable measurement head for replacement in the field. A hand-held chemical detector prototype--containing a hybrid integrated-circuit chemical sensor with reference channel, user alarm, and level display--was designed and constructed, and a software interface developed to operate the hand-held sensor interfaced with a laboratory data acquisition system.

  20. Resource Contingency Program - Oregon : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hermiston Power Project.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-09-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. In 1990, to cover the outer range of potential load growth with new resources, BPA embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP). Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later, if and when it is needed. The decision to acquire any of these option energy projects to fulfill statutory supply obligations will be influenced by Federal system load growth, the outcome of BPA`s Business Plan, required operational changes in Columbia-Snake River Hydroelectric facilities, and the loss of major generating resources. In September 1993, three option development agreements were signed with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop, Washington, and near Hermiston, Oregon. Together these three projects could supply BPA with 1,090 average megawatts (aMW) of power. Under these agreements, sponsors are obtaining permits and conducting project design work, and BPA is completing this EIS process. In September 1993, BPA published a Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on these three proposed gas-fired combustion turbine projects and held public scoping meetings in October 1993 at each site. In February 1994, BPA released an Implementation Plan on the proposed scope of the EIS. A draft EIS on the three proposed projects was published in February 1995. The impacts of the Chehalis and Satsop projects located in Washington State will be covered in one EIS document, while the impacts of the Hermiston project located in Oregon are covered in this final EIS document. It is BPA`s intent to continue to base the analysis of impacts on the assumption that all three projects may be constructed at some point in the future.

  1. Upper Mechanicville hydroelectric redevelopment demonstration project. Final technical and construction cost report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    The new powerhouse and intake were designed for installation of two conventional vertical-shaft, adjustable blade propeller (Kaplan) turbines, each driving an 8.4-MW synchronous generator. The plant design flow is 12,000 ft/sup 3//s and the rated net head for the turbines is 19 ft. The turbine runner diameter is 216.5 inches (5500 mm) and the unit spacing is 61 ft. The physical dimensions of the units and associated water passages are comparable to those in much larger facilities. It must be realized, therefore, that the main features which qualify this facility as small hydro are the relatively low head and capacity. Design and construction of projects similar to Upper Mechanicville present challenges which are markedly different in scope than most small or mini hydroelectric facilities. The information in this report is presented in the following sections: historical; project management and scheduling; licensing; engineering studies; final design; construction; and project costs.

  2. Design, construction and operation of an inland red drum hatchery 

    E-print Network

    Turner, John M

    1994-01-01

    seedstock to increase its research program's potential. Dr. Edwin H. Robinson and Dr. William H. Neill secured a grant from the Texas Advanced Technology Research Program (TATRP) of the State of Texas Coordinating Board for Higher Education..., plumbing, filtration and aeration technologies used by their engineering staff. System design and function was very similar to that required for the hatchery to be built at Texas A k. M University System headquarters in central Texas. One major...

  3. Method for Harvesting Large Quantities of Zooplankton from Hatchery Ponds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerry G. Graves; J. C. Morrow

    1988-01-01

    A method for harvesting live zooplankton with a modified propellor-lift pump was tested in nine 0.1-acre unfertilized hatchery ponds. As judged by live-weight estimates of zooplankton harvested, collecting zooplankton at night with a light suspended over the pump intake was more effective than collecting them at night without the light or during the day. This method should be convenient and

  4. Unitarity of black hole evaporation in final-state projection models

    E-print Network

    Seth Lloyd; John Preskill

    2014-07-11

    Almheiri et al. have emphasized that otherwise reasonable beliefs about black hole evaporation are incompatible with the monogamy of quantum entanglement, a general property of quantum mechanics. We investigate the final-state projection model of black hole evaporation proposed by Horowitz and Maldacena, pointing out that this model admits cloning of quantum states and polygamous entanglement, allowing unitarity of the evaporation process to be reconciled with smoothness of the black hole event horizon. Though the model seems to require carefully tuned dynamics to ensure exact unitarity of the black hole S-matrix, for a generic final-state boundary condition the deviations from unitarity are exponentially small in the black hole entropy; furthermore observers inside black holes need not detect any deviations from standard quantum mechanics. Though measurements performed inside old black holes could potentially produce causality-violating phenomena, the computational complexity of decoding the Hawking radiation may render the causality violation unobservable. Final-state projection models illustrate how inviolable principles of standard quantum mechanics might be circumvented in a theory of quantum gravity.

  5. [Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. Final public design report; Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This final Public Design Report (PDR) provides completed design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the operating parameters and benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. Pending development of technically and commercially viable sorbent for the Hot Gas Cleanup System, the HGCU also is demonstrated. The report is organized under the following sections: design basis description; plant descriptions; plant systems; project costs and schedule; heat and material balances; general arrangement drawings; equipment list; and miscellaneous drawings.

  6. Terahertz spectral signatures :measurement and detection LDRD project 86361 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wanke, Michael Clement; Brener, Igal; Lee, Mark

    2005-11-01

    LDRD Project 86361 provided support to upgrade the chemical and material spectral signature measurement and detection capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories using the terahertz (THz) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, which includes frequencies between 0.1 to 10 THz. Under this project, a THz time-domain spectrometer was completed. This instrument measures sample absorption spectra coherently, obtaining both magnitude and phase of the absorption signal, and has shown an operating signal-to-noise ratio of 10{sub 4}. Additionally, various gas cells and a reflectometer were added to an existing high-resolution THz Fourier transform spectrometer, which greatly extend the functionality of this spectrometer. Finally, preliminary efforts to design an integrated THz transceiver based on a quantum cascade laser were begun.

  7. Interactive Peer Coaching/Mentoring Project for Preparing Teachers of Students with Severe Behavioral Disorders Final Report. Volume 1: Project Narrative and Briefing Papers [and] Volume 2: Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Center for Persons with Disabilities, Minot.

    This final report discusses the activities and outcomes of the Interactive Peer Coaching/Mentoring (IPCM) Project, a program designed to prepare teachers of students with severe behavioral disorders (SED) residing in a rural, remote area in North Dakota. The IPCM project was conducted from July 1997 through July 2000 and developed an…

  8. Independent management and financial review, Yucca Mountain Project, Nevada. Final report, Appendix

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-07-15

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425), as amended by Public Law 100-203, December 22, 1987, established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the Department of Energy (DOE), and directed the Office to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine if this site is suitable for the construction of a repository for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. Work on site characterization has been under way for several years. Thus far, about $1.47 billion have been spent on Yucca Mountain programs. This work has been funded by Congressional appropriations from a Nuclear Waste Fund to which contributions have been made by electric utility ratepayers through electric utilities generating power from nuclear power stations. The Secretary of Energy and the Governor of the State of Nevada have appointed one person each to a panel to oversee an objective, independent financial and management evaluation of the Yucca Mountain Project. The Requirements for the work will include an analysis of (1) the Yucca Mountain financial and, contract management techniques and controls; (2) Project schedules and credibility of the proposed milestones; (3) Project organizational effectiveness and internal planning processes, and (4) adequacy of funding levels and funding priorities, including the cost of infrastructure and scientific studies. The recipient will provide monthly progress report and the following reports/documents will be presented as deliverables under the contract: (1) Financial and Contract Management Preliminary Report; (2) Project Scheduling Preliminary Report; (3)Project Organizational Effectiveness Preliminary Report; (4) Project Funding Levels and Funding Priorities Preliminary Report; and (5) Final Report.

  9. Assessing the prevalence of Salmonella enterica in poultry hatcheries by using hatched eggshell membranes.

    PubMed

    Chao, M-R; Hsien, C-H; Yeh, C-M; Chou, S-J; Chu, C; Su, Y-C; Yu, C-Y

    2007-08-01

    Salmonella enterica causes a number of significant poultry diseases and is also a major pathogen in humans. Most poultry infected by Salmonella become carriers; infection may also be fatal, depending on the particular serovar and the age of the bird at infection. Younger birds are more susceptible to infection by Salmonella, so it is critical that hatcheries monitor birds. We developed a method to use hatched eggshell membranes (HEM) to assess contamination by Salmonella in poultry hatching cabinets and to evaluate the prevalence of Salmonella in a goose hatchery and rearing farm. Comparison of the Salmonella isolation rate in hatching cabinets using 3 sampling methods showed that the highest Salmonella contamination was detected in HEM, and that these results differed significantly from those obtained from fluff samples and cabinet swab samples (P < 0.05). Analysis of HEM was also used to evaluate Salmonella contamination in goose, chicken, and duck hatcheries. The lowest Salmonella-positive rate was found for the chicken hatchery, followed by the goose and the duck hatcheries (P < 0.05). Six serogroups of Salmonella were detected in the 3 hatcheries: A, B, C1, C2, D, and E. The distribution of these serogroups differed among the hatcheries. Salmonella serogroup C1 was the major serogroup found in geese, compared with serogroup B in chickens and ducks. However, Salmonella Typhimurium was dominant in 1 goose hatchery and also in geese from this hatchery that had been transferred to a farm. Antibiotic susceptibility analysis showed that Salmonella Typhimurium strains isolated from the farm geese with diarrhea showed significantly higher resistance to doxycycline, colistin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprin, and cephalothin than those isolated from the hatchery (P < 0.05). Therefore, HEM as a detection target can be used to monitor Salmonella contamination in hatching cabinets and also be used to assess Salmonella prevalence in poultry hatcheries and rearing farms. PMID:17626809

  10. A fundamental study of contribution transport theory and channel theory applications. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.L. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center

    1994-07-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a new theoretical method called ``contribution theory`` that can be used to gain deeper understanding of radiation transport phenomena. The method had been propose during the 1970`s as a promising technique for improving radiation shield designs, and was actually applied to several reactor shielding studies at that time. However the theoretical basis of the method was never firmly established, and numerical procedures were not developed for efficient use of the method. Hence one important component of this project is to perform a study of the basic theory of contributions to understand how to better apply the method, and to develop calculational methods for using the theoretical tools effectively. Furthermore, the fundamental concepts of contribution theory can be applied in other areas besides shielding optimization, including Monte Carlo calculations and neutron spectrum analysis; therefore the project also examined possible extended uses of contribution theory. Finally, in order for the method to become a useful tool for radiation transport analysis, it is necessary to demonstrate that it can be used to analyze realistic configurations; therefore the project also has developed computer programs that can be applied to realistic systems.

  11. Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, January 1, 1987--February 9, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-03

    Department of Energy Participation in the Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project began officially on November 9, 1987. Even though their financial participation began at this time, they will receive technical information from the start of the project which was on January 1, 1987. The Rawlins UCG Demonstration Project is progressing in Phase I with the majority of the emphasis on facility design, site characterization and the environmental work. The site characterization field work is estimated to be completed by the end of February with the final report completion towards the end of Phase I. The facility design effort is close to the 40% level. It is anticipated that all permits will be applied for in Phase I and most of them will be granted by the end of Phase I. The obtaining of the private financing continues to be a major activity in the project. All of the financing must be in place before the continuation for DOE funding to Phase II will be applied for.

  12. Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model''

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Marvin L. Adams; Todd S. Palmer; Kord S. Smith; Kevin Clarno; Hikaru Hiruta; Razvan Nes

    2003-08-04

    OAK (B204) Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model'' The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations.

  13. Riparian Planting Projects Completed within Asotin Creek Watershed : 2000-2002 Asotin Creek Riparian Final Report of Accomplishments.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B. J. (Bradley J.)

    2002-01-01

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in Water Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35. According to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) Priority WRIA's by ''At-Risk Stock Significance Map'', it is the highest priority WRIA in southeastern Washington. Summer steelhead, bull trout, and Snake River spring chinook salmon which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. WDFW manages it as a Wild Steelhead Reserve; no hatchery fish have been released here since 1997. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe, Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. Local students, volunteers and Salmon Corps members from the Nez Perce Tribe have been instrumental in the success of the Model Watershed Program on Asotin Creek. ACCD began coordinating habitat projects in 1995 with the help of BPA funding. Approximately two hundred and seventy-six projects have been implemented as of 1999. The Washington State Legislature was successful in securing funding for threatened and endangered salmon and steelhead recovery throughout the State in 1998. While these issues were new to most of the State, the ACCD has been securing and administering funding for threatened salmonids since 1994. The Asotin Creek Riparian Planting 2000-053-00 and Asotin Creek Riparian Fencing 2000-054-00 teamed BPA and the Governor's Salmon Recovery Funding to plant approximately 84,191 trees and shrubs in the Asotin Creek Watershed. In addition BPA and private cost-share dollars were utilized to drill 3 wells, provide 15 off-site alternative water developments (troughs), 5 spring developments, and 9,100 feet of riparian fencing. The trees will provide shade and long-term LWD recruitment to the stream. The wells, alternative water developments, springs and fencing will reduce direct animal impacts on the stream. In one area alone, a well, 3,000 ft of riparian fence with 5 alternative water developments will exclude 300 head of cattle from using the stream as a source of drinking water during the winter months.

  14. DECENTRALIZATION OF RECIRCULATING MARINE HATCHERIES USING THE AIRLIFTED BEAD FILTERS AND MOVING BEAD BIOFILTER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marine hatcheries demand high water quality and must be designed in a biosecure manner. Failure to maintain a pristine disease free environment not only endangers the hatchery operations but can also seriously undermine large scale growout facilities that are dependent on healthy fingerlings. Give...

  15. Identification and Contribution of Wild and Hatchery Steelhead Stocks in Lake Michigan Tributaries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul W. Seelbach; Gary E. Whelan

    1988-01-01

    We developed and validated a simple and accurate assignment rule, based on one quantified scale characteristic, for the identification of wild and hatchery stocks of Great Lakes steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss (formerly Salmo gairdneri). A ratio between the first winter and spring growth rates, inferred from scale circulus patterns, met the criteria of being both distinct between wild and hatchery adults

  16. Proportions of Hatchery and Naturally Produced Steelhead Smolts Migrating past Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles M. Peven; Steven G. Hays

    1989-01-01

    Proportions of hatchery- and naturally produced fish contributing to the outmigrant run of steelhead smolts Oncorhynchus mykiss (formerly Salmo gairdneri) were estimated from data collected at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap between 1 April and 30 June 1986. Hatchery fish, which averaged 28 mm longer than naturally produced fish, made up 72.5% of the run. Two methods were used

  17. Physiological and endocrine changes in Atlantic salmon smolts during hatchery rearing, downstream migration and ocean entry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCormick, Stephen D.; Sheehan, Timothy F.; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur; Lipsky, Christine; Kocik, John F.; Regish, Amy M.; O'Dea, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Billions of hatchery salmon smolts are released annually in an attempt to mitigate anthropogenic impacts on freshwater habitats, often with limited success. Mortality of wild and hatchery fish is high during downstream and early ocean migration. To understand changes that occur during migration, we examined physiological and endocrine changes in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts during hatchery rearing, downstream migration, and early ocean entry in two successive years. Gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity increased in the hatchery during spring, increased further after river release, and was slightly lower after recapture in the ocean. Plasma growth hormone levels increased in the hatchery, were higher in the river, and increased further in the ocean. Plasma IGF-I remained relatively constant in the hatchery, increased in the river, then decreased in the ocean. Plasma thyroid hormones were variable in the hatchery, but increased in both river- and ocean-captured smolts. Naturally reared fish had lower condition factor, gill NKA activity, and plasma thyroxine than hatchery fish in the river but were similar in the ocean. This novel data set provides a vital first step in understanding the role and norms of endocrine function in smolts and the metrics of successful marine entry.

  18. ISAB 2001-3 Hatchery Surplus Letter -Page 1 Independent Scientific Advisory Board

    E-print Network

    ISAB 2001-3 Hatchery Surplus Letter - Page 1 Independent Scientific Advisory Board of these hatchery-origin salmon on the spawning grounds, agency personnel have collected and killed them. This is understandably controversial with the public. Federal and state management agencies are concerned that large

  19. Body pigmentation pattern to assess introgression by hatchery stocks in native Salmo trutta from

    E-print Network

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Body pigmentation pattern to assess introgression by hatchery stocks in native Salmo trutta from brown trout Salmo trutta populations and two hatchery stocks. Simultaneously, the LDH-C1*, a diagnostic; spotting pattern; tree model classification. INTRODUCTION Genetic analyses on brown trout Salmo trutta L

  20. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-92 CHEMISTRY, TEMPERATURE, AND SECCHI DISC DATA FOR HATCHERY BAY,

    E-print Network

    .................................................................................................................................. 3 TABLES Table 1.--Physical and chemical data for samples collected during 1983 in Hatchery Bay, western Lake Erie .... 5 Table 2.--Physical and chemical data for samples collected during 1984 in Hatchery Bay, western Lake Erie .... 6 Table 3.--Physical and chemical data for samples collected during

  1. Persistent organic pollutants in aquafeed and Pacific salmon smolts from fish hatcheries in British Columbia, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry C. Kelly; Marc P. Fernandez; Michael G. Ikonomou; Wayne Knapp

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the occurrence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in commercial feeds used by fish hatcheries and aquaculture facilities. We measured levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzo furans (PCDFs), as well as several organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in several aquafeeds as well as fry and smolts collected from four federal salmonid hatcheries from coastal British

  2. A re-examination of Palaeostruthus hatcheri (Shufeldt), a late Miocene sparrow from kansas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David W. Steadman

    1981-01-01

    Palaeostruthus hatcheri (Shufeldt), from the late Miocene (late Clarendonian-early Hemphillian) Long Island local fauna, Kansas, is the oldest recorded species of Emberizidae. The holotype and only specimen of P. hatcheri is a complete rostrum which, upon re-examination, is seen to be extremely similar to that of Ammodramus savannarum, the living grasshopper sparrow. Therefore, the genus Palaeostruthus Wetmore is synonymized with

  3. Diet-induced phenotypic plasticity in the skull morphology of hatchery-reared Florida

    E-print Network

    Motta, Philip J.

    Diet-induced phenotypic plasticity in the skull morphology of hatchery-reared Florida largemouth in the skull morphology of hatchery-reared Florida largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides floridanus. Ecology change during skull development, and if this change results in a functional difference in the feeding

  4. Harmony in Career Learning and Scholastic System (Project HI-CLASS). Final Evaluation Report 1992-93. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duque, Diana L.

    Harmony in Career Learning and Scholastic System (Project HI-CLASS) was a Transitional Bilingual Education Title VII-funded program in its fifth and final year in 1992-93. The project offered instructional and support services to 641 students of limited English proficiency (LEP) at three sites, all of which had many immigrant students, in…

  5. Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 1: Transmittal documents; Executive summary; Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-01-30

    This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described.

  6. Improving Educational Quality in Maumee Schools: The Project to Design Teacher Incentive Structures. Final Report: Secretary's Discretionary Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gress, James R.; And Others

    This final report of a collaborative project to design teacher incentive structures describes the procedural development and results of studies conducted by participants composed of public and private school representatives, community members, the University of Toledo, and others. Part 1 includes details of such project planning processes as…

  7. Ecological Effects of Hatchery-Reared Juvenile Chinook and Coho Salmon on Wild Juvenile Salmonids in Two Washington Streams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen C. Riley; Howard J. Fuss; Larry L. LeClair

    2004-01-01

    We observed wild salmonid fry at sites downstream (treatment) and upstream (control) from experimental releases of hatchery-reared Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha smolts and coho salmon O. kisutch fry in two streams to estimate the effects of hatchery releases on the density, group size, microhabitat use, and size of wild fish. Most hatchery-reared Chinook salmon smolts that were released left treatment

  8. Microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA polymorphism reveals life-history dependent interbreeding between hatchery and wild brown trout (Salmo trutta L.)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael M. Hansen; Daniel E. Ruzzante; Einar E. nielsen; Karen-lise D. Mensberg

    2000-01-01

    The effects of stocking hatchery trout into wild populations were studied in a Danish river, using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers. Baseline samples were taken from hatchery trout and wild trout assumed to be unaffected by previous stocking. Also, samples were taken from resident and sea trout from a stocked section of the river. Genetic differentiation between the hatchery

  9. Performance Characterization of Influent and Effluent Treatment Systems: A Case Study at Craig Brook National Fish Hatchery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study characterizes the performance of influent and effluent disinfection systems at Craig Brook National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) restoration facility in East Orland, ME. Influent treatment of the hatchery’s water supply limits fish ...

  10. Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume IV of IV; Washington: Rocky Reach Hatchery Addendum, 1992 Annual Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peck

    1993-01-01

    Rocky Reach Hatchery is located along the Columbia Paver, just downstream from Rocky Reach Dam. Site elevation is 800 feet above sea level. The Turtle Rock Island facility, located 2 miles upstream, is operated as a satellite facility (shared with the Washington Department of Wildlife). The facility is staffed with 2.75 FTE`S. The hatchery was originally designed as a mile-long

  11. Biomass bioconversion to calcium magnesium acetate deicing salt. Final project report on Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Trantolo, D.J.

    1989-06-01

    The project experimentally investigated using biomass as feedstock for conversion to calcium magnesium acetate (CMA), an alternative road salt. This new organic road salt will prevent corrosion of bridge decks, underground cables, and rusting of cars and trucks. CMA from biomass will reduce costs, compared to petroleum and natural gas for making this material. Phase I work focused on bioconversion of sewage sludge residuals to CMA. The process is based on a packed bed fermenter to produce acetic acid from biomass, as well as liquid ion exchange to recover acetic acid from the fermenter broth prior to the final production step which occurs by passing the acetic acid over limestone. In Phase I: (1) percent bioconversion and kinetics of biomass to acetic acid have been confirmed in small batch fermenters; (2) equilibrium constants for acetic acid recovery via liquid ion exchange have been documented; and (3) rates of conversion to CMA have been determined.

  12. Western Gas Sands Project: Los Alamos NMR Well Logging Tool Development. Progress report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Jackson, J.A.; Koelle, A.R.

    1985-03-01

    This document is the final report on the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Well Logging Tool Development Program, part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Western Gas Sands Project, most recently supported through DOE's Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The report covers the entire progress of the program from initial conception of the technique in 1978 to field testing of a prototype tool and contract termination in mid-1983. First, a theoretical development of the concept of a remotely-produced region of homogeneous magnetic field is presented, with its verification through laboratory measurements. The results provided confirmation of the concept and estimates of performance of a full-scale tool. A discussion of laboratory experiments undertaken to characterize the NMR response of saturated porous media is then given. The detailed results, presented in Appendix A, describe the limits of applicability of the NMR relaxation data acquired from the new logging tool. The development of the prototype downhole tool is then described, including magnet performance, development of NMR signal processing electronics, and an automated data acquisition system designed for use in downhole testing. Described next is the first downhole test of the prototype tool carried out in May 1983. The raw data acquired from this test, preliminary analysis, and a discussion of the result are then presented. Finally, preparations for extending the performance of the NMR logging tool by using superconducting magnets are described. A description of cryogenic equipment required for construction and testing of a laboratory mockup superconducting tool and initial performance data are given in detail. A summary of the project results and a discussion of potential improvements and inherent limitations of the technique complete the report. 14 references, 78 figures, 4 tables.

  13. KEY COMPARISON: Final report of EUROMET Project 696: pH determination of a phthalate buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, Petra; Charlet, Philippe; Eberhard, Ralf; Karpov, Oleg V.; Philippe, Rachel; Rivier, Cedric; Maximov, Igor; Sudmeier, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    The EUROMET project 696, a trilateral comparison between PTB, Germany, LNE, France and VNIIFTRI, Russia was performed in order to demonstrate and document the capability of the participants to measure the pH of a phthalate buffer by the primary measurement procedure for pH. Good agreement of the reported results was observed. The sample was very similar to the one used in the comparison CCQM-K17. PTB acts as pilot laboratory in CCQM-K17 and in EUROMET 696. This comparison allows one to link the results obtained by LNE to the CCQM-K17 key comparison through the degree of equivalence of PTB. On the other hand, the discrepancy between measured pH values at the VNIIFTRI and PTB for the same type of buffer solution decreased, as compared with a bilateral comparison in 1997. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  14. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and a QA final closeout inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). One radiological surveillance and three radiological audits were performed at the Ambrosia Lake site. The surveillance was performed on 12--16 April 1993 (DOE, 1993d). The audits were performed on 26--29 July 1993 (DOE, 1993b); 21--23 March 1994 (DOE, 1994d); and 1--2 August 1994 (DOE, 1994d). The surveillance and audits resulted in 47 observations. Twelve of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were satisfactorily closed out on 28 December 1994. The radiological surveillance and audits are discussed in this report. A total of seven QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Ambrosia Lake UMTRA site are discussed. The DOE/TAC Ambrosia Lake final remedial action close-out inspection was conducted on 26 July 1995 (DOE, 1995a). To summarize, a total of 155 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. Follow-up to responses required from the RAC for the DOE/TAC surveillance and audit observations indicated that all issues related to the Ambrosia Lake site were resolved and closed to the satisfaction of the DOE.

  15. 76 FR 67178 - Wells Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-31

    ...Commission [Project No. 2149-152] Wells Hydroelectric Project; Notice of Availability...Environmental Impact Statement for the Wells Hydrolectric Project In accordance with...reviewed the application for license for the Wells Hydroelectric Project (FERC No....

  16. Final priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2014-07-25

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce a priority for a Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project (DRRP) on Improving Methods of Evaluating Return on Investment (ROI) for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program (VR Program). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on an area of national need. We intend for the priority to contribute to improved employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. PMID:25118369

  17. Phase II Final Project Report Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project

    E-print Network

    Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Bourdon, Marc

    The Coordinated Water Resources Database and GIS Project (Project) was developed to provide improved access to regional water resources data in the Paso del Norte region for regional water stakeholders to make timely decisions in water operations...

  18. Final report on LDRD Project: The double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT)

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, J.A.; Moon, J.S.; Blount, M.A. [and others

    1998-06-01

    This report describes the research accomplishments achieved under the LDRD Project ``Double Electron Layer Tunneling Transistor.`` The main goal of this project was to investigate whether the recently discovered phenomenon of 2D-2D tunneling in GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum wells (DQWs), investigated in a previous LDRD, could be harnessed and implemented as the operating principle for a new type of tunneling device the authors proposed, the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT). In parallel with this main thrust of the project, they also continued a modest basic research effort on DQW physics issues, with significant theoretical support. The project was a considerable success, with the main goal of demonstrating a working prototype of the DELTT having been achieved. Additional DELTT advances included demonstrating good electrical characteristics at 77 K, demonstrating both NMOS and CMOS-like bi-stable memories at 77 K using the DELTT, demonstrating digital logic gates at 77 K, and demonstrating voltage-controlled oscillators at 77 K. In order to successfully fabricate the DELTT, the authors had to develop a novel flip-chip processing scheme, the epoxy-bond-and-stop-etch (EBASE) technique. This technique was latter improved so as to be amenable to electron-beam lithography, allowing the fabrication of DELTTs with sub-micron features, which are expected to be extremely high speed. In the basic physics area they also made several advances, including a measurement of the effective mass of electrons in the hour-glass orbit of a DQW subject to in-plane magnetic fields, and both measurements and theoretical calculations of the full Landau level spectra of DQWs in both perpendicular and in-plane magnetic fields. This last result included the unambiguous demonstration of magnetic breakdown of the Fermi surface. Finally, they also investigated the concept of a far-infrared photodetector based on photon assisted tunneling in a DQW. Absorption calculations showed a narrowband absorption which persisted to temperatures much higher than the photon energy being detected. Preliminary data on prototype detectors indicated that the absorption is not only narrowband, but can be tuned in energy through the application of a gate voltage.

  19. Final Treatment Center Project for Liquid and Wet Radioactive Waste in Slovakia

    SciTech Connect

    Kravarik, K.; Stubna, M.; Pekar, A.; Krajc, T.; Zatkulak, M.; Holicka, Z. [VUJE, Inc., Okruzna 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Slezak, M. [SE - VYZ, 919 31 Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia)

    2006-07-01

    The Final Treatment Center (FTC) for Mochovce nuclear power plant (NPP) is designed for treatment and final conditioning of radioactive liquid and wet waste produced from plant operation. Mochovce NNP uses a Russian VVER-440 type reactor. Treated wastes comprise radioactive concentrates, spent resin and sludge. VUJE Inc. as an experienced company in field of treatment of radioactive waste in Slovakia has been chosen as main contractor for technological part of FTC. This paper describes the capacity, flow chart, overall waste flow and parameters of the main components in the FTC. The initial project was submitted for approval to the Slovak Electric plc. in 2003. The design and manufacture of main components were performed in 2004 and 2005. FTC construction work started early in 2004. Initial non-radioactive testing of the system is planned for summer 2006 and then radioactive tests are to be followed. A one-year trial operation of facility is planned for completion in 2007. SE - VYZ will be operates the FTC during trial operation and after its completion. SE - VYZ is subsidiary company of Slovak Electric plc. and it is responsible for treatment with radioactive waste and spent fuel in the Slovak republic. SE - VYZ has, besides of other significant experience with operation of Jaslovske Bohunice Treatment Centre. The overall capacity of the FTC is 870 m{sup 3}/year of concentrates and 40 m{sup 3}/year of spent resin and sludge. Bituminization and cementation were provided as main technologies for treatment of these wastes. Treatment of concentrate is performed by bituminization. Concentrate and bitumen are metered into a thin film evaporator with rotating wiping blades. Surplus water is evaporated and concentrate salts are embedded in bitumen. Bitumen product is discharged into 200 l steel drums. Spent resin and sludge are decanted, dried and mixed with bitumen. These mixtures are also discharged into 200 l steel drums. Drums are moved along bituminization line on a roller conveyor. After the drums cool, they are capped and removed from the conveyor and placed in a storage hall. Drums with bitumen product are loaded into Fiber Reinforced Concrete containers (FRC) and grouted with cement. Cement grout is prepared from mixture of cement, additive and radioactive concentrates. By formulating the cement grout with evaporator concentrates the maximum radioactivity is fixed in cement matrix and volume of final waste product is minimized. A batch mixer with rotating blades is used produce the cement grout. FRCs loaded with bitumen drums are placed on roller conveyor and moved along the cementation line. Grouted FRCs are stored in the expedition hall for 28 days of curing and then transported to final disposal. After placed in operation the FTC provides treatment for all liquid and wet LLW produced from the operation of the Mochovce NPP. The final product of the FTC is a FRC loaded with 7 drums of waste fixed in bitumen and the space between the drums is grouted with cement. This container meets all limits for final disposal in the National Radioactive Waste Repository at Mochovce. (authors)

  20. Final LDRD Report for Projects %23 52797 and %23 93362: Rational Understanding and Control of the Magnetic Behavior of Nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. John

    2006-11-01

    This is the final LDRD report for projects %23 52797 and %23 93362 that funded a five year research program directed by Prof. Z. John Zhang at the Georgia Institute of Technology Chemistry Department. Prof. Zhang was awarded this funding after winning a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE) in 2001 with Sandia as the DOE sponsoring lab. The project PI was Blake Simmons and the PM was Alfredo Morales. The page intentionally left blank

  1. Decontamination and decommissioning of the 60-inch Cyclotron facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East project final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Collins; J. Boyance; D. Tinnin; A. Williams

    2001-01-01

    This final report of the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) 60'' Cyclotron Accelerator Facility contains descriptions and evaluations of activities performed, and results obtained in connection with the Cyclotron D&D Project. It provides the following information: Objective of the Cyclotron D&D Project; A brief history of the Cyclotron facility; Overall descriptions of the Cyclotron facility

  2. Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Site, Gunnison, Colorado. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The final audit report for remedial action at the Gunnison, Colorado Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); and on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Two radiological surveillances and four radiological audits were performed at the Gunnison site. The surveillances were performed on 16 to 19 September 1992 and 28 June to 1 July 1993. The radiological audits were performed on 4 to 7 October 1993; 13 to 16 June 1994; 19 to 22 September 1994 and 10 to 12 July 1995. The surveillances and audits resulted in 79 observations. Thirty-four of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on the site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were closed on 12 July 1995. The radiological surveillances and audits are discussed in Section 2.0 of this report. Ten QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site. The surveillances were performed on 24 to 25 September 1992, 7 to 9 July 1993, 29 October 1993, 27 to 28 June 1994, 31 October to 1 November 1994, 19 to 20 June 1 995, 20 to 21 July 1995, 17 to 18 August 1995, 20 September 1995, and 11 to 13 October 1995. The surveillances resulted in 100 observations. Six observations contained recommendations that required responses from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC). Ninety-five observations contained a recommendation that required no response. All outstanding issues were closed on 8 January 1996. The QA in-process surveillances are discussed in Section 3.0 of this report.

  3. ARCH -Architecture 36427 ARCH-4990-02 B ARCH FINAL PROJECT 2 LEC 6 W F 2:00 5:50PM Ngai / Perry * TBA *

    E-print Network

    Bystroff, Chris

    * TBA * 36428 ARCH-4990-03 B ARCH FINAL PROJECT 2 LEC 6 W F 2:00 5:50PM Carvalho / Perry* TBA * 36429 ARCH-4990-04 B ARCH FINAL PROJECT 2 LEC 6 W F 2:00 5:50PM Perry * TBA * 36430 ARCH-4990-05 B ARCH FINAL PROJECT 2 LEC 6 W F 2:00 5:50PM Leitao / Perry * TBA * ARTS - Arts 37796 ARTS-2540-01 THE MULTIMEDIA

  4. ARCH -Architecture 26615 ARCH-4980-01 B ARCH FINAL PROJECT 1 LEC 5 W F 2:00 5:50PM Ngai / Perry * TBA *

    E-print Network

    Varela, Carlos

    * TBA * 26687 ARCH-4980-02 B ARCH FINAL PROJECT 1 REC 5 W F 2:00 5:50PM Carvalho / Perry* TBA * 26688 ARCH-4980-03 B ARCH FINAL PROJECT 1 REC 5 W F 2:00 5:50PM Leitao / Perry * TBA * 28333 ARCH-4980-06 B ARCH FINAL PROJECT 1 LEC 5 W F 2:00 5:50PM Perry * TBA * ARTS - Arts 28204 ARTS-2510-01 HISTORY OF JAZZ

  5. Final Report for Phase I Northern California CO2 Reduction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, J

    2010-10-26

    On June 8, 2009, the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory released a Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA 0000015) with the title, Recovery Act: Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO{sub 2} Use. C6 Resources (C6), an affiliate of Shell Oil Company, responded with a proposal for Technology Area 1: Large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects from industrial sources. As DOE Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) Contractors, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LLNL) proposed to collaborate with C6 and perform technical tasks, which C6 included in the C6 proposal, titled the Northern California CO{sub 2} Reduction Project. The proposal was accepted for Phase I funding and C6 received DOE Award DEFE0002042. LLNL and LBNL each received Phase I funding of $200,000, directly from DOE. The essential task of Phase I was to prepare a proposal for Phase II, which would be a five-year, detailed technical proposal, budget, and schedule for a complete carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage project, with the objective of starting the injection of 1 million tons per year of industrial CO2 by the end of FY2015. LLNL and LBNL developed technical proposals (and DOE Field Work Proposals [FWPs]) for many aspects of the geologic testing and CO{sub 2} monitoring that were included in the C6 Phase II proposal, which C6 submitted by the deadline of April 16, 2010. This document is the Final Report for LLNL's Phase I efforts and is presented in two parts. Part 1 is the complete text of the technical proposal provided to C6 by LLNL and LBNL for inclusion in the C6 Phase II proposal. Because of space limitations, however, C6 may not have included all of this information in their proposal. In addition to developing the proposal presented below, LLNL's Bill Foxall and Laura Chiarmonte, in collaboration with LBNL, undertook preliminary technical work evaluating the potential for induced seismicity in Solano County. Part 2 presents technical work preformed during Phase I in the development of a preliminary Certification Framework: Leakage Risk Assessment for CO{sub 2} Injection at the Montezuma Hills Site, Solano County, California, co-authored by LLNL and LBNL collaborators.

  6. Marginal metabolic scope and growth of hatchery-produced, juvenile red drum by progeny group 

    E-print Network

    Clark, Kevin Wilson

    2003-01-01

    Nine broodstock groups of red drum Sciaenops ocellatus (each consisting of two males and three females) at a State of Texas fish hatchery spawned 13 concurrent progeny groups for which two performance factors, marginal metabolic scope (MMS...

  7. MORPHOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT OF HATCHERY-CULTURED AMERICAN SHAD, ALOSA SAPIDISSIMA (WILSON)I

    E-print Network

    . JOHNSON2 AND JOSEPH G. LOESCH' ABSTRACT Morphometrics and meristics of larval A/osa sapidissima (Wilson) were examined and are described for hatchery-reared samples. A/osa sapidissima morphometrics and body

  8. 29 CFR 780.210 - The typical hatchery operations constitute “agriculture.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS APPLICABLE TO AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES...UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Agriculture as It Relates to Specific Situations...typical hatchery operations constitute “agriculture.” As stated in § 780.127,...

  9. 29 CFR 780.210 - The typical hatchery operations constitute “agriculture.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS APPLICABLE TO AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES...UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Agriculture as It Relates to Specific Situations...typical hatchery operations constitute “agriculture.” As stated in § 780.127,...

  10. 29 CFR 780.210 - The typical hatchery operations constitute “agriculture.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS APPLICABLE TO AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES...UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Agriculture as It Relates to Specific Situations...typical hatchery operations constitute “agriculture.” As stated in § 780.127,...

  11. 29 CFR 780.210 - The typical hatchery operations constitute “agriculture.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS APPLICABLE TO AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES...UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Agriculture as It Relates to Specific Situations...typical hatchery operations constitute “agriculture.” As stated in § 780.127,...

  12. 29 CFR 780.210 - The typical hatchery operations constitute “agriculture.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...REGULATIONS EXEMPTIONS APPLICABLE TO AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES...UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Agriculture as It Relates to Specific Situations...typical hatchery operations constitute “agriculture.” As stated in § 780.127,...

  13. 9 CFR 145.9 - Terminology and classification; hatcheries and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY General Provisions § 145.9 Terminology and classification; hatcheries and dealers. Participating...

  14. 9 CFR 145.9 - Terminology and classification; hatcheries and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY General Provisions § 145.9 Terminology and classification; hatcheries and dealers. Participating...

  15. 9 CFR 145.9 - Terminology and classification; hatcheries and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY General Provisions § 145.9 Terminology and classification; hatcheries and dealers. Participating...

  16. 9 CFR 145.9 - Terminology and classification; hatcheries and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY General Provisions § 145.9 Terminology and classification; hatcheries and dealers. Participating...

  17. 9 CFR 145.9 - Terminology and classification; hatcheries and dealers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY General Provisions § 145.9 Terminology and classification; hatcheries and dealers. Participating...

  18. Bioenergetics estimate of the effects of stocking density on hatchery production of smallmouth bass fingerlings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robel, G.L.; Fisher, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    Production of and consumption by hatchery-reared tingerling (age-0) smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu at various simulated stocking densities were estimated with a bioenergetics model. Fish growth rates and pond water temperatures during the 1996 growing season at two hatcheries in Oklahoma were used in the model. Fish growth and simulated consumption and production differed greatly between the two hatcheries, probably because of differences in pond fertilization and mortality rates. Our results suggest that appropriate stocking density depends largely on prey availability as affected by pond fertilization and on fingerling mortality rates. The bioenergetics model provided a useful tool for estimating production at various stocking density rates. However, verification of physiological parameters for age-0 fish of hatchery-reared species is needed.

  19. Final West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement, Cattaraugus County, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-01-16

    The purpose of the ''Final West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement'' is to provide information on the environmental impacts of the Department of Energy's proposed action to ship radioactive wastes that are either currently in storage, or that will be generated from operations over the next 10 years, to offsite disposal locations, and to continue its ongoing onsite waste management activities. Decommissioning or long-term stewardship decisions will be reached based on a separate EIS that is being prepared for that decisionmaking. This EIS evaluates the environmental consequences that may result from actions to implement the proposed action, including the impacts to the onsite workers and the offsite public from waste transportation and onsite waste management. The EIS analyzes a no action alternative, under which most wastes would continue to be stored onsite over the next 10 years. It also analyzes an alternative under which certain wastes would be shipped to interim offsite storage locations prior to disposal. The Department's preferred alternative is to ship wastes to offsite disposal locations.

  20. Compilation of Diversity Factors and Schedules for Energy and Cooling Load Calculations, ASHRAE Research Project 1093-RP, Final Report

    E-print Network

    Abushakra, B.; Sreshthaputra, A.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report for the ASHRAE 1093-RP project. This report presents the method used to derive the diversity factors and typical load shapes of lighting and receptacle loads in office buildings. In this report the results of the application...