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1

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Watson, Montgomery

1995-03-01

2

Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Conceptual Design Report, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Watson, Montgomery (Montgomery Watson, Bellevue, WA)

1995-03-01

3

Umatilla Hatchery Final Predesign Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the preliminary design of Umatilla Fish Hatchery near Irrigon, Oregon. The fish hatchery will be capable of rearing steelhead and chinook with an initial capacity of 290,000 pounds. Future expansion will allow for a total capacity of 500,000 pounds if the initial production goals are met. The hatchery will consist of both Oregon and Michigan style ponds. The Oregon ponds are similar to those at Irrigon. The Michigan ponds are more narrow and shallow, are self cleaning, and use oxygen supplementation to obtain higher rearing densities as is currently being done in the state of Michigan. The Oregon ponds are a two-pass system with the capability to convert to Michigan style ponds, if this mode of operation proves to be an effective method in the west. The Michigan ponds are three-pass with the capability to expand to four-pass.

Unknown Author

1988-04-01

4

Lynch Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead, Final Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and

1996-01-01

5

Rapid River Hatchery - Spring Chinook, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Rapid River Hatchery (Spring Chinook). The hatchery is located in the lower Snake River basin near Riggins Idaho. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of spring chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, M.

1996-05-01

6

Salmon Fry Predation by Seabirds Near an Alaskan Hatchery. Restoration Project 95320Y. EXXON VALDEZ Oil Spill Restoration Project Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The authors estimated the mortality of hatchery-raised pink Oncorhynchus gorbuscha and chum O. keta salmon fry from seabird predation near a salmon hatchery in Prince William Sound. Field counts of seabirds and observations of feeding rates for plunge-div...

D. Scheel K. R. Hough

1998-01-01

7

Lynch Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, M.

1996-05-01

8

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project : Combined-Planning & Design and Operations & Maintenance Reports, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2000 Combined Maintenance and Operations (O&M) and Planning and Design (P&D) contract is hereby completed based on this annual report patterned after the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration. Primary project activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 process that: (1) Accepted final design, (2) Authorized a capital construction amount of $16,050,000, and (3) Authorized contractor selection, and (4) Provided construction site dedication, and (5) Implemented construction activities over an anticipated 2-year period of July 2000 through October 2002.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.

2002-12-31

9

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project, Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2001 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $2,336,491. They are identified by Bonneville Power Administration as follows: (1) Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and (2) Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4035. The Operations and Maintenance (O&M) budget of $2,166,110 was divided as follows: Facility Development and Fish Production Costs--$860,463; and Equipment Purchases as capital cost--$1,305,647 for equipment and subcontracts. The Planning and Design (P&D) budget of $170,381 was allocated to development of a Coho master planning document in conjunction with Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery. The O&M budget expenditures represent personnel and fish production expenses; e.g., administration, management, coordination, facility development, personnel training and fish production costs for spring Chinook and Coho salmon. Under Objective 1: Fish Culture Training and Education, tribal staff worked at Clearwater Anadromous Hatchery (CAFH) an Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) facility to produce spring Chinook smolt and parr for release that are intended to provide future broodstock for NPTH. As a training exercise, BPA allowed tribal staff to rear Coho salmon at Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) facility. This statement of work allows this type of training to prepare tribal staff to later rear salmon at Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery under Task 1.6. As a subset of the O&M budget, the equipment purchase budget of $1,305,647 less $82,080 for subcontracts provides operational and portable equipment necessary for NPTH facilities after construction. The equipment budget for the year was $1,223,567; this year's purchases amounted $287,364.48 (see Table 5). Purchases are itemized in Appendix D and E. FishPro, Inc. assisted tribal staff with equipment purchases. The unspent contract balances will be carried forward to the ensuing year to complete equipment purchases essential to hatchery operations. The NPTH activities focused on completion of the Northwest Power Planning Council Step-3 decision that authorized hatchery construction. Construction began in July 2000. It is anticipated to continue through October 2002. At the end of 2001, the hatchery facilities were approximately 70% completed and the budget approximately 90% expended. The following facilities are either completed or in final stages of construction: (1) NPTH Central Hatchery facility at Site 1705, and (2) North Lapwai Valley satellite, and (3) Sweetwater Springs satellite, and (4) Yoosa-Camp satellite, and (5) Newsome Creek satellite, and (6) Lukes Gulch satellite, and (7) Cedar Flats satellite.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2006-03-01

10

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the first year of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. As both the hatchery and the evaluation study are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary. The most crucial data for evaluating the success of the hatchery program, the data on post-release performance and survival, is yet unavailable. In addition, several years of data are necessary to make conclusions about rearing performance at Umatilla Hatchery. The conclusions drawn in this report should be viewed as preliminary and should be used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available. A comprehensive fish health monitoring regimen was incorporated into the monitoring and evaluation study for Umatilla Hatchery. This is a unique feature of the Umatilla Hatchery evaluation project.

Keefe, MaryLouise; Carmichael, Richard W.; French, Rod A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1993-03-01

11

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Teams (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Fall Chinook). The audit is being conducted as a requirement of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) ``Strategy for Salmon`` and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Under the audit, the hatcheries are evaluated against policies and related performance measures developed by the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT). IHOT is a multi-agency group established by the NPPC to direct the development of new basinwide standards for managing and operating fish hatcheries. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01

12

Cultural resource survey of proposed hydroelectric development, Willard Fish Hatchery, Washington. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A survey for cultural resources of the proposed Willard Power Project at the Willard Fish Hatchery yielded evidence of aboriginal site utilization. The project area, on the banks of the White Salmon River at an approximate elevation of 1060 feet (353 m), is within the ethnographic territory of the Yakima Indian Nation and is located along a known huckleberry harvesting route.

Abbott, D.W.

1983-11-30

13

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Bonneville Hatchery - Urb Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Bonneville Hatchery (Upriver bright [URB] Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located on the Columbia River just west of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall Chinook and URB Fall Chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of at two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01

14

Hatchery Evaluation Report / Bonneville Hatchery - Tule Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Bonneville Hatchery (Tule Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located on the Columbia River just west of Cascade Locks, Oregon. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall Chinook and URB Fall Chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01

15

Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-0307-SA-01)  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0307) for the Colville Resident Hatchery Project (Project) and published a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) in the Federal Register on September 8, 1986 (Vol. 51, No.173). The Project involved the design, site selection, construction, operation and maintenance of a resident trout hatchery on the Colville Indian Reservation to partially mitigate for anadromours and other fish losses resulting from the construction and operation of the Chief Joseph Dam and Grand Coulee Dam hydroelectric projects. Since the hatchery was constructed, ongoing Operation and Maintenance (O&M) and Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) activities have been funded by BPA. The O&M and M&E activities examined in the EA were very general in nature due to the fact the project was in the conceptual stage. Since that time the hatchery has refined the need for specific O&M and M&E activities, proposed for fiscal year 2004, (funding for projects runs from October 2003 to September 2004). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze the environmental impacts that would result from the specific O&M and M&E activities proposed for fiscal year 2004.

N /A

2003-10-02

16

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Project; Operations and Maintenance and Planning and Design, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the contract obligations based on the Statement of Work (SOW) for the project as contracted with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) Year-2002 annual report combines information from two contracts with a combined value of $3,036,014. Bonneville Power Administration identifies them as follows; (1) Part I--Operations and Maintenance--Project No. 1983-350-00, Contract No. 4504, and $2,682,635 which includes--Equipment costs of $1,807,105. (2) Part II--Planning and Design--Project No. 1983-35-04, Contract No. 4035, $352,379 for Clearwater Coho Restoration Master Plan development Based on NPPC authorization for construction and operation of NPTH, the annual contracts were negotiated for the amounts shown above under (1) and (2). Construction contracts were handled by BPA until all facilities are completed and accepted.

Larson, Roy Edward; Walker, Grant W.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2005-12-01

17

Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

No Annual Production Goals were achieved for the year. The Kalispel Hatchery experienced two episodes of brood fish mortality. The first due to a standpipe malfunction and the second attributed to gas bubble disease caused by elevated Total Dissolved Gases (TDG's) in the reservoir. To date, the hatchery has 29 brood fish in the raceway and ready to spawn. If all things go well this spring, hatchery operations should be well underway next year.

Bluff, Stanley

2000-12-01

18

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1994-1995 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of the Umatilla Hatchery in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan type of rearing using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus nzykiss). The hatchery was completed in the fall of 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to develop considerable knowledge and understanding of new production and supplementation techniques. The use of the Michigan raceways in rearing at Umatilla Hatchery was selected because it could increase smolt production given the limited hatchery well water supply and allow comparison of Michigan raceways with the standard Oregon raceways. Results of testing the Michigan raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia Basin. The Umatilla Hatchery is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council`s goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan . The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. This report covers the first four years of the monitoring of the hatchery.

Hayes, Michael C.; Waln, Karen; Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1996-01-01

19

Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance Annual Report, 2002.  

SciTech Connect

The Kalispel Tribal hatchery successfully spawned largemouth bass broodfish in spring 2002. Approximately 150,000 eggs were produced and hatched. These fry were started on brine shrimp for a period of ten days. At this time, the fry needed more abundance food supply. Cannibalism started and the hatchery staff transferred the remaining fry to the river in hopes that some fish would survive.

Nenema, David

2003-03-01

20

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1994-1995 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of the Umatilla Hatchery in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan type of rearing using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus nzykiss).

Michael C. Hayes; Karen Waln; Richard W. Carmichael

1996-01-01

21

Physiological Assessment of Wild and Hatchery Juvenile Salmonids : Final Report, 2003.  

SciTech Connect

It is generally held that hatchery-reared salmonids are of inferior quality and have lower smolt-to-adult survival compared to naturally-reared salmon. The overall objectives of the work performed under this contract were the following: (1) Characterize the physiology and development of naturally rearing juvenile salmonids to: (2) Allow for the design of effective rearing programs for producing wild-like smolts in supplementation and production hatchery programs. (3) Examine the relationship between growth rate and size on the physiology and migratory performance of fish reared in hatchery programs. (4) Examine the interaction of rearing temperature and feed rate on the growth and smoltification of salmon for use in producing a more wild-like smolt in hatchery programs.

Larsen, Donald A.; Beckman, Brian R.; Dickhoff, Walton W.

2003-08-01

22

Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In October of 1997, The construction of the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was complete. No spawning activity was recorded for the spring of 1998. On June 14, 1999 the first spawn at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was successful. A total of seven nests were fertilized that produced approximately 144,000 fry. The second spawn occurred on July 13, 1999 and a total of six nests were fertilized producing approximately 98,0000 fry. The total amount of largemouth bass fry produced at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was 242,000.

Bluff, Stanley

2000-12-01

23

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

A growing body of literature suggests that adult salmon produced by artificial culture are not as reproductively successful as wild fish when they spawn under natural conditions. Behavioral, morphological, and physiological divergences have been observed between hatchery and wild fish. These disparities are the likely proximate causes of the differences seen in the reproductive success of hatchery and wild salmonids. Two evolutionary paradigms have been proposed to explain why salmonids cultured in hatcheries are genetically and phenotypically different from wild cohorts. The first proposes that natural selection has been significantly relaxed in hatcheries. Consequently, fish that normally would have perished because of the possession of unsuitable traits are able to survive. If these traits have a genetic basis, they may become established in a hatchery population and cause its productivity to be less than expected if the fish are once again exposed to natural selection pressures. The second theorizes that environmental and social conditions in hatcheries are less variable than in the natural environment and that these conditions will remain relatively constant from one generation to the next. In this circumstance, selection for genetic traits that adapt fish to artificial culture will become prevalent in the population. Such traits may be mal-adaptive under natural conditions. Many of the studies that have compared the reproductive success (RS) of hatchery and wild fish, however, have used non-local hatchery fish that have experienced multiple generations of hatchery culture. Few efforts have been made where both the hatchery and wild fish have originated from the same population. When such studies have been performed differences in the competency of the fish to produce offspring have not been detected or are not as great as those expressed when non-local hatchery fish have been used. The hatchery spring Chinook produced by the Yakima Fisheries Project originated from wild fish returning to the upper Yakima River. When they return as adults, almost all of them will spawn naturally in the Yakima River. The offspring they produce are expected to augment the Yakima spring Chinook population. Whether such an increase will occur or how great it may be depends on two factors, the ability of hatchery fish to reproduce under natural conditions and the capacity of their offspring to survive to maturity. One of the objectives of the Yakima Fisheries Project is to determine whether the hatchery-origin adults produced by the project have experienced any reduction in their ability to reproduce under natural conditions. To accomplish that objective an observation stream was built in 2000 on the grounds of the Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility. Beginning in 2001 hatchery and wild spring Chinook from the upper Yakima River stock have been introduced into the stream and allowed to reproduce. Microsatellite DNA is used to establish the genetic relationships between the adults placed into the stream and fry that are produced by each population. Six populations consisting of mixtures of wild and hatchery fish have been placed into the stream. Pedigree assessments have been completed on five of them. These assessments have shown that the reproductive success in males is often twice as variable as that experienced by females. In the five populations so far examined; wild males (age 4 and 5) produced the most offspring. The success of comparable hatchery males relative to wild males ranged from 37% to 113%. Hatchery and wild males maturing as 3-yr-olds (jacks) and as 1- and 0-yr-olds (precocious males) were also used in the study populations. They were not as successful at producing offspring as the larger hatchery and wild males. During 2001 and 2002 two populations of hatchery and wild fish were placed into the observation stream each year. Each one occupied about half of the structure. In these populations wild females exhibited a superior capacity to deposit eggs. In addition, their eggs survived to the fry stage at higher

Schroder, S.L.; Pearsons, T.N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2005-05-01

24

Fish Research Project Oregon; Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1993-1994 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the first three years of comprehensive monitoring and evaluation of the Umatilla Hatchery. Because the hatchery and the evaluation study and the fish health monitoring investigations are in the early stages of implementation, much of the information contained in this report is preliminary. The majority of the data that is crucial for evaluating the success of the hatchery program, the data on post-release performance and survival, is yet unavailable. In addition, several years of data are necessary to make conclusions about rearing performance at Umatilla Hatchery. The conclusions drawn in this report should be viewed as preliminary and should be used in conjunction with additional information as it becomes available.

Hayes, Michael C.; Onjukka, Sam T.; Focher, Shannon M. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1995-01-01

25

Hood River Steelhead Genetics Study; Relative Reproductive Success of Hatchery and Wild Steelhead in the Hood River, Final Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect

There is a considerable interest in using hatcheries to speed the recovery of wild populations. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), under the authority of the Northwest Power Planning Act, is currently funding several hatchery programs in the Columbia Basin as off-site mitigation for impacts to salmon and steelhead caused by the Columbia River federal hydropower system. One such project is located on the Hood River, an Oregon tributary of the Columbia. These hatchery programs cost the region millions of dollars. However, whether such programs actually improve the status of wild fish remains untested. The goal of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Hood River hatchery program as required by the Northwest Power Planning Council Fish and Wildlife Program, by the Oregon Plan for Coastal Salmonids, by NMFS ESA Section 4(d) rulings, and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Wild Fish Management Policy (OAR 635-07-525 through 529) and the ODFW Hatchery Fish Gene Resource Management Policy (OAR 635-07-540 through 541). The Hood River supports two populations of steelhead, a summer run and a winter run. They spawn only above the Powerdale Dam, which is a complete barrier to all salmonids. Since 1991 every adult passed above the dam has been measured, cataloged and sampled for scales. Therefore, we have a DNA sample from every adult steelhead that went over the dam to potentially spawn in the Hood River from 1991 to the present. Similar numbers of hatchery and wild fish have been passed above the dam during the last decade. During the 1990's 'old' domesticated hatchery stocks of each run (multiple generations in the hatchery, out-of-basin origin; hereafter H{sub old}) were phased out, and conservation hatchery programs were started for the purpose of supplementing the two wild populations (hereafter 'new' hatchery stocks, H{sub new}). These samples gave us the unprecedented ability to estimate, via microsatellite-based pedigree analysis, the relative total reproductive success (adult-to-adult production) of hatchery (H{sub old} or H{sub new}) and wild (W) fish for two populations, over multiple brood years. Our analyses of samples from fish that bred in the early to mid 1990's show that fish of 'old' hatchery stocks have much lower total fitness than wild fish (17% to 54% of wild fitness), but that 'new' stocks have fitness that is similar to that of wild fish (ranging from 85% to 108% of wild fitness, depending on parental gender and run year). Therefore, our results show that the decision to phase out the old, out-of-basin stocks and replace them with new, conservation hatchery stocks was well founded. We also conclude that the H{sub new} fish are leaving behind substantial numbers of wild-born offspring. The similar fitnesses of H{sub new} and W fish suggests that wild-born offspring of H{sub new} fish are unlikely to have negative genetic effects on the population when they in turn spawn in the wild. We will test this hypothesis once enough F2 offspring have returned. Another interesting result is that we were unable to match a large fraction of the unclipped, returning fish with parents from their brood year. Furthermore, we were missing more fathers than mothers. Because we sampled almost every possible anadromous parent, these results suggest that nonanadromous trout or precocious parr may be obtaining a substantial number of matings. Substantial reproduction by precocious parr could be one unintended consequence of the hatchery program.

Blouin, Michael

2003-05-01

26

Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Conceptual Design Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production

James M

1992-01-01

27

Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production

James M

1992-01-01

28

Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential and development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Montgomery, James M.

1992-04-01

29

Lahontan National Fish Hatchery, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project proposes construction and operation of additional facilities at the Lahontan National Fish Hatchery, Douglas County, near Gardnerville, Nevada, for the propagation of Lahontan cutthroat trout to restore the fisheries in Pyramid and Walker Lake...

1973-01-01

30

Evaluation of the Reproductive Success of Wild and Hatchery Steelhead in Hatchery and Natural and Hatchery Environments : Annual Report for 2008.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the field, laboratory, and analytical work from December 2007 through November 2008 on a research project that investigates interactions and comparative reproductive success of wild and hatchery origin steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout in Forks Creek, a tributary of the Willapa River in southwest Washington. First, we continued to successfully sample hatchery and wild (i.e., naturally spawned) adult and wild smolt steelhead at Forks Creek. Second, we revealed microsatellite genotype data for adults and smolts through brood year 2008. Finally, four formal scientific manuscripts were published in 2008 and two are in press, one is in revision and two are in preparations.

Quinn, Thomas P.; Seamons, todd; Hauser, Lorenz; Naish, Kerry

2008-12-05

31

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 3 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This is the third in a series of annual reports that address reproductive ecological research and comparisons of hatchery and wild origin spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the baseline reproductive ecology, demographics and phenotypic traits of the unsupplemented upper Yakima population, however this report focuses on data collected on hatchery and wild spring chinook returning in 2003; the third year of hatchery adult returns. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter and summarizes data collected between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004 in the Yakima basin. Summaries of each of the chapters in this report are included below. A major component of determining supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is an increase in natural production. Within this context, comparing upper Yakima River hatchery and wild origin fish across traits such as sex ratio, age composition, size-at-age, fecundity, run timing and gamete quality is important because these traits directly affect population productivity and individual fish fitness which determine a population's productivity.

Knudsen, Curtis (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01

32

Project CARE: Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Project CARE (Child Advocacy Resources Expansion) was established by the Office of Child Development, Center for Child Abuse and Neglect, as an innovative research and development project focusing on cooperation among the military, the civilian community ...

F. W. Killebrew S. M. Schnall M. F. Marley

1978-01-01

33

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in

Dan

2009-01-01

34

Project BEST Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Project BEST (Building Energy Systems Technology), a bilingual vocational training program, operated at Oakton Community College between March 1986 and September 1987. The purpose of the project was to provide 60 limited English proficient (LEP) Hispanic and Polish adults with sufficient vocational skills, English language skills, and appropriate…

Pankratz, David; Friedenberg, Joan

35

Success Project Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Success Project was initiated by the San Diego Community College District in 1985 to improve remedial instruction and support services, increase faculty participation in instructional decision making, and provide a means for following up on decisions. In the first year, task forces on instructional assessment, student assessment, remediation,…

Peed, Garland P.

36

Project Management Plan. Final.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, Public Law 95-604, 42 USC 7901 (hereinafter referred to as the ''Act''). Title I of the ...

1988-01-01

37

The Thy Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Inspiried by a United Nations effort to establish a worldwide university, the four and one-half year project carried out in Thy (Denmark) is explained in this final report, from its historical beginnings in 1973 to its official completion in 1978. Dedicated to the solution of problems which could be considered universal, the project goals are…

Billimoria, Roshan R., Ed.

38

Geothermal Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The project was designed to take 95/sup 0/F water from an existing well and process it through a heat exchanger carrying supply water for our boiler make up and domestic hot water systems. The temperature of this water runs from 55/sup 0/F to 65/sup 0/F. In operation it was possible to raise the temperature of this water an average of approximately 12/sup 0/F. The amount of energy captured was recorded and it was found that one can capture approximately 199 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/Mo. Using current energy costs and a boiler efficiency factor of .8 a potential annual savings of approximately $11,104/year was calculated. The total cost of the project was $31,893.68. Using these figures a simple pay back period of 2.9 years was calculated.

Not Available

1983-03-31

39

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2005-05-01

40

Project Dakota Outreach: Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report describes the activities of Project Dakota Outreach, an early education program for children with disabilities designed to assist families living in Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Empowerment and Enterprise Zones in Texas, New York, and Minnesota. The major feature of the model is power-balancing, a concept…

Kjerland, Linda

41

Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect

Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a substantial impact to the economy. During the past several years the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement project has been collecting data pertaining to fish entraining out of the lake through Grand Coulee Dam. During 1996 and 1997 the lake was deeply drawn down to accommodate the limited available water during a drought year and for the highly unusual draw-down of Lake Roosevelt during the critical Northwest power shortage. The goal of the project is to enhance the resident rainbow trout fishery in Lake Roosevelt lost as a result of the unusual operation of Grand Coulee dam during the drought/power shortage.

LeCaire, Richard

2003-03-01

42

Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha Supplementation in the Clearwater Subbasin ; Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation Project, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) program has the following goals (BPA, et al., 1997): (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Clearwater Subbasin anadromous fish resources; (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater Subbasin; (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project initiation; (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations; (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits; and (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal management of Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. The NPTH program was designed to rear and release 1.4 million fall and 625,000 spring Chinook salmon. Construction of the central incubation and rearing facility NPTH and spring Chinook salmon acclimation facilities were completed in 2003 and the first full term NPTH releases occurred in 2004 (Brood Year 03). Monitoring and evaluation plans (Steward, 1996; Hesse and Cramer, 2000) were established to determine whether the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery program is achieving its stated goals. The monitoring and evaluation action plan identifies the need for annual data collection and annual reporting. In addition, recurring 5-year program reviews will evaluate emerging trends and aid in the determination of the effectiveness of the NPTH program with recommendations to improve the program's implementation. This report covers the Migratory Year (MY) 2007 period of the NPTH Monitoring & Evaluation (M&E) program. There are three NPTH spring Chinook salmon treatment streams: Lolo Creek, Newsome Creek, and Meadow Creek. In 2007, Lolo Creek received 140,284 Brood Year (BY) 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average weight of 34.9 grams per fish, Newsome Creek received 77,317 BY 2006 acclimated pre-smolts at an average of 24.9 grams per fish, and Meadow Creek received 53,425 BY 2006 direct stream release parr at an average of 4.7 grams per fish. Natural and hatchery origin spring Chinook salmon pre-smolt emigrants were monitored from September - November 2006 and smolts from March-June 2007. Data on adult returns were collected from May-September. A suite of performance measures were calculated including total adult and spawner escapement, juvenile production, and survival probabilities. These measures were used to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation and provide information on the capacity of the natural environment to assimilate and support supplemented salmon populations.

Backman, Thomas; Sprague, Sherman; Bretz, Justin [Nez Perce Tribe

2009-06-10

43

Hatchery evaluation report: Lyons Ferry Hatchery -- spring chinook.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Spring Chinook). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery...

1996-01-01

44

Evaluation of Pure Oxygen Systems at the Umatilla Hatchery: Task 1-Review and Evaluation of Supplemental O2 Systems, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council has established a goal of doubling the size of salmon runs in the Columbia River Basin. The achievement of this important goal is largely dependent upon expanding the production of hatchery fish. Pure oxygen has been commonly used to increase the carrying capacity of private sector salmonid hatcheries in the Pacific Northwest. The use of supplemental oxygen to increase hatchery production is significantly less expensive than the construction of new hatcheries and might save up to $500 million in construction costs.

Fish Factory

1991-03-01

45

Community Family Day Care Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The final six months of the Community Family Day Care Project are reported, together with a summary of the total project, recommendations for the future, and an analysis of the cost of replicating such a project. In the final six months of the project, the staff was concerned with building supports for the self-help organization Women Attentive…

Pacific Oaks Coll., Pasadena, CA.

46

Evaluation of the contribution of fall chinook salmon reared at Columbia River hatcheries to the Pacific salmon fisheries. Appendix: Final report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document contains 43 appendices for the ''Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries'' report. This study was initiated to determine the distribution, contribution, and va...

R. R. Vreeland

1990-01-01

47

Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume III of III; Disease and Physiology Supplements, 1978-1983 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) Aquaculture Task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status of the stocks was quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains five previously published papers.

Slatick, Emil; Gilbreath, Lyle G.; Harmon, Jerrel R. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Centr, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

1988-02-03

48

Vanpooling Demonstration Project. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The activities of Grey Advertising Inc. in the design, development, and implementation of the Vanpooling Demonstration Project are detailed. The purpose of the project was to sell individual employers of over 500 employees the concept of vanpooling. Over ...

1977-01-01

49

Columbia River Hatchery Reform System-Wide Report.  

SciTech Connect

The US Congress funded the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project via annual appropriations to the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) beginning in fiscal year 2000. Congress established the project because it recognized that while hatcheries have a necessary role to play in meeting harvest and conservation goals for Pacific Northwest salmonids, the hatchery system was in need of comprehensive reform. Most hatcheries were producing fish for harvest primarily to mitigate for past habitat loss (rather than for conservation of at-risk populations) and were not taking into account the effects of their programs on naturally spawning populations. With numerous species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), conservation of salmon in the Puget Sound area was a high priority. Genetic resources in the region were at risk and many hatchery programs as currently operated were contributing to those risks. Central to the project was the creation of a nine-member independent scientific review panel called the Hatchery Scientific Review Group (HSRG). The HSRG was charged by Congress with reviewing all state, tribal and federal hatchery programs in Puget Sound and Coastal Washington as part of a comprehensive hatchery reform effort to: conserve indigenous salmonid genetic resources; assist with the recovery of naturally spawning salmonid populations; provide sustainable fisheries; and improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of hatchery programs. The HSRG worked closely with the state, tribal and federal managers of the hatchery system, with facilitation provided by the non-profit organization Long Live the Kings and the law firm Gordon, Thomas, Honeywell, to successfully complete reviews of over 200 hatchery programs at more than 100 hatcheries across western Washington. That phase of the project culminated in 2004 with the publication of reports containing the HSRG's principles for hatchery reform and recommendations for Puget Sound/Coastal Washington hatchery programs, followed by the development in 2005 of a suite of analytical tools to support application of the principles (all reports and tools are available at www.hatcheryreform.us). In 2005, Congress directed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) to replicate the Puget Sound and Coastal Washington Hatchery Reform Project in the Columbia River Basin. The HSRG was expanded to 14 members to include individuals with specific knowledge about the Columbia River salmon and steelhead populations. This second phase was initially envisioned as a one-year review, with emphasis on the Lower Columbia River hatchery programs. It became clear however, that the Columbia River Basin needed to be viewed as an inter-connected ecosystem in order for the review to be useful. The project scope was subsequently expanded to include the entire Basin, with funding for a second year provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) Fish and Wildlife Program. The objective of the HSRG's Columbia River Basin review was to change the focus of the Columbia River hatchery system. In the past, these hatchery programs have been aimed at supplying adequate numbers of fish for harvest as mitigation primarily for hydropower development in the Basin. A new, ecosystem-based approach is founded on the idea that harvest goals are sustainable only if they are compatible with conservation goals. The challenge before the HSRG was to determine whether or not conservation and harvest goals could be met by fishery managers and, if so, how. The HSRG determined that in order to address these twin goals, both hatchery and harvest reforms are necessary. The HSRG approach represents an important change of direction in managing hatcheries in the region. It provides a clear demonstration that current hatchery programs can indeed be redirected to better meet both conservation and harvest goals. For each Columbia River Basin Environmentally Significant Unit

Warren, Dan [Hatchery Scientific Review Group

2009-04-16

50

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery-and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In the Yakima Spring Chinook supplementation program, wild fish are brought into the Cle Elum Hatchery, artificially crossed, reared, transferred to acclimation sites, and released into the upper Yakima River as smolts. When these fish mature and return to the Yakima River most of them will be allowed to spawn naturally; a few, however, will be brought back to the hatchery and used for research purposes. In order for this supplementation approach to be successful, hatchery-origin fish must be able to spawn and produce offspring under natural conditions. Recent investigations on salmonid fishes have indicated that exposure to hatchery environments during juvenile life may cause significant behavioral, physiological, and morphological changes in adult fish. These changes appear to reduce the reproductive competence of hatchery fish. In general, males are more affected than females; species with prolonged freshwater rearing periods are more strongly impacted than those with shorter rearing periods; and stocks that have been exposed to artificial culture for multiple generations are more impaired than those with a relatively short exposure history to hatchery conditions.

Schroder, S.L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Rau, J.A. (Cle Elum Supplementation Research, Cle Elum, WA)

2003-01-01

51

Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-04-01

52

Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) die construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Examined in addition to No Action are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of reestablishing naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 is the preferred action. A central hatchery would be built for either alternative, as well as three sites with six raceways each for acclimation and release of spring chinook smolts. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

1996-01-01

53

Insulated siding project: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Research and development on the nibbed vinyl insulative siding product has been completed. The product has been tested and evaluated in response to the issues raised by the first and second stage reviewers in the OERI invention review process. The production run machine design has been completed, prototyped and evaluated and the agreement for full-scale production. Final evaluation and testing of the machine's flawless part production was integral to the manufacture and preparation of samples for purposes of final tests in the Ball State CERES laboratories.

Not Available

1986-12-01

54

Green Schools Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Alliance to Save Energy has responded to interest in the Green Schools concept from the New England states of Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. The Alliance conducted a train-the-trainers workshop in Augusta, Maine March 17--18, 1999. This work is part of a Green Schools replication project leveraged by funds from another source, NORDAX, which contributed $80,000 to provide partial support to staff at the Maine Energy Education Project (MEEP), Vermont Energy Education Program (VEEP), and New Hampshire Governor's Office to develop Green Schools Projects. DOE funds were used to conduct training, develop a network of state and local government, business and school partners to support school efficiency activities in those three states.

Verdict, M.

2000-09-27

55

Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Fish produced by this project in 2004 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 1,655,722 kokanee fingerlings, 537,783 rainbow trout fingerlings and 507,660 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2004 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to have a negative impact on adult kokanee returns and limits the success of hatchery/net pen stocking on the number of harvestable fish. Recommendations for future hatchery/net pen operations include use of stocks compatible or native to the upper Columbia River, continue hatchery-rearing practices to reduce precocity rates of kokanee and continue new kokanee stocking strategies associated with increased kokanee harvest rates.

Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2005-03-01

56

Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Combined fish stocking by the hatcheries and net pen rearing projects in 2003 included: 899,168 kokanee yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt; 1,087,331 kokanee fry/fingerlings released into Banks Lake, 44,000 rainbow trout fingerlings and; 580,880 rainbow trout yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt. Stock composition of 2003 releases consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2003 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to have a negative impact on adult kokanee returns and limits the success of hatchery/net pen stocking on the number of harvestable fish. Preliminary results of gonad necropsies indicate a reduced incidence of precocious kokanee produced at the Spokane Tribal Hatchery in 2003. This was a probable attribute of change in hatchery rearing practices employed on 2002 brood year kokanee produced in 2003, primarily thermal manipulation and feed protein source. Kokanee and rainbow trout fingerlings transferred to Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake net pen rearing operations in the fall of 2003 for subsequent release as yearlings in 2004 consisted of 645,234 rainbow trout and 627,037 kokanee salmon. A total of 590,000 Lake Whatcom kokanee fingerlings were carried over at the Spokane Tribal Hatchery for stocking as yearlings in 2004. Recommendations for future hatchery/net pen operations include use of stocks compatible or native to the upper Columbia River, continue hatchery-rearing practices to reduce precocity rates of kokanee and continue new kokanee stocking strategies associated with increased kokanee harvest rates.

Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2004-05-01

57

Cloud Study Final Art Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is an art project completed at the end of a study of weather and clouds. Using home-made puffy paint, the students paint clouds on a piece of construction paper and write 2-3 facts about each cloud type on a note card that is glued on construction paper next to the appropriate cloud.

Toops, Kim

58

Experimental Schools Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report describes the Experimental Schools Project (ESP) conducted by the Franklin Pierce School District in Tacoma, Washington, under funding from the National Institute of Education. The ESP was a five-year program designed to provide the optimum learning environment for each student. Each of the district's 13 schools attempted, through…

Hill, Edward E.; Eyres, John G.

59

Competitive Skills Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Almost 180 (22.5 percent) of BP Chemicals/HITCO, Inc. (BPCHI) employees have participated in the basic skills courses offered through the Competitive Skills Project (CSP) at El Camino College (Torrance, California). Workplace basics provide a solid foundation for Total Quality Management (TQM), enabling workers to be globally competitive. Two…

El Camino Coll., Torrance, CA.

60

Anthropometric Training Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Anthropometric Training Project was aimed at providing a training program for select students to develop research competency in an area relating body type, composition, anthropometric assessment, and physical performance measures. The program involves interdisciplinary cooperation in training through seminars, laboratory practice, and…

San Diego State Coll., CA.

61

Energy Information Project. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The AFL-CIO Great Lakes Regional Council (GLRC) proposed the Energy Information Project to bridge the organizational gap in the six-state region between state and local labor groups on the one hand, and federal agencies on the other, concerning energy-rel...

1985-01-01

62

Colorado Maglev Project, Final report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The following report documents the eighteen month effort by the Colorado Maglev Project (CMP) Team in developing the technical basis for deployment of the CHSST maglev system for use in the Colorado I-70 Corridor from Denver International Airport (DIA) to...

A. A. Akhil J. R. Wilson R. J. Kaye V. Anisimow W. C. Womack

2004-01-01

63

Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries, Appendix, 1989 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This document contains 43 appendices for the Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries'' report. This study was initiated to determine the distribution, contribution, and value of artificially propagated fall Chinook Salmon from the Columbia River.

Vreeland, Robert R.

1989-10-01

64

Family Connections Research & Demonstration Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report discusses the outcomes of the Family Connections Research and Demonstration Project, a project funded by the Oregon Center for Mental Health Services to study the effectiveness of an intervention designed to address the major problems related to services initiation and continuance within the children's mental health system. The…

Koroloff, Nancy M.; Elliott, Debra J.; Koren, Paul E.; Friesen, Barbara J.

65

California Prison Gang Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A project investigated the cultural life, ideology, and education systems of particular prison gangs. It focused on recent changes in the gang system regarding gang education, organizational structure, and the balance of power in prisons and in relations with street gangs. Finally, the project assessed California's response to its prison gangs,…

Cummins, Eric

66

Bioengineering Evaluation of Retrofitted Oxygen Supplementation in Surface Water Project ; Final Report 2000.  

SciTech Connect

The Willamette Oxygen Supplementation Project was designed to answer one major question concerning the decreasing salmon runs in the Columbia Basin: Can available technology be used to increase runs of chinook salmon in the Columbia basin in existing hatcheries. It was recognized that the restoration of salmon runs would require both hatchery supplementation and protection of wild salmon habitat. The large financial outlay required for construction of new hatcheries makes this choice undesirable. If the production of existing hatcheries could be augmented by the use of increased densities with oxygen supplementation, this would be the preferred procedure. Willamette Hatchery was chosen for conducting the experimental releases of chinook salmon reared at high densities with oxygen supplementation for several reasons: (1) It was located far upstream, simulating the long migration distances required for Columbia River salmon; (2) Salmon were not required to navigate through a series of dams, which might make the returns less interpretable; (3) Willamette Hatchery had excellent returns, nearly 2% survival, in the years previous to the experiment; (4) Willamette Hatchery had a history of low disease incidence; (5) Willamette Hatchery had a manager and crew interested in the experiment. In 1999, the last of the adult salmon from the experiment returned to the hatchery. From analyses of these returns, a number of conclusions were reached: (1) Numbers of fish surviving to adulthood increased with increased rearing densities and oxygen supplementation; (2) Percent yield, a measure of the efficiency of rearing, decreased with increased rearing density; (3) Baffled raceways were very poor for raising spring chinook salmon; (4) Oxygen supplementation seemed to increase production, even in the lower densities; (5) The most cost-effective method of rearing spring chinook salmon was rearing at high densities with oxygen supplementation.

Ewing, R.D.

2000-06-01

67

Spray casting project final report  

SciTech Connect

Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step.

Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

1996-08-01

68

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 2001 hatchery- and wild-origin spring chinook were placed into an observation stream located at the Cle Elum Supplementation Research Facility to compare their reproductive success. Two groups containing both wild- and hatchery fish of both sexes were brought into the stream and allowed to spawn. Their longevity, spawning participation, and reproductive success were assessed. In addition, wild- and hatchery-origin precocious males were also introduced into one of the sections and allowed to spawn. We found that hatchery and wild males generally lived longer than females. In one group hatchery and wild females lived for similar periods of time while in the other wild females lived longer than hatchery fish. Wild females were also more successful at burying their eggs and the eggs they buried had higher survival rates. This result occurred in both groups of fish. Spawning participation in males was estimated by using two statistics referred to as percent gonad depletion (PGD) and percent testes retention (PRT). Both of these measures assumed that loss of testes weight in males would reflect their spawning participation and therefore could be used to estimate reproductive success. Hatchery and wild males had similar PGD and PRT values. One of these measures, PRT, was negatively associated with male reproductive success, confirming the idea that reduction in testes weight can be used as a surrogate measure of a male's ability to produce offspring Fry from the observation stream were collected throughout the emergence period that ran from January through May. Proportionate sub-samples of these fish were removed and microsatellite DNA was extracted from them. Pedigree analyses were performed to ascertain which adult fish had produced them. These analyses disclosed that wild males were more successful at producing progeny in one of the groups. No difference occurred in the other group. Precocial males and jacks fathered fewer progeny than did fish maturing at ages 4 and 5. In addition, male reproductive success was more than twice as variable as that seen in females. Some males apparently never spawned and others produced more than 7,000 offspring an amount that was more than double the quantity generated by the most successful female. Behavioral observations showed that a number of factors besides male origin influenced their reproductive success. One was relative body size; larger males tended to dominate smaller opponents and therefore had greater access to females. However, male dominance was not always related to relative size. The ability to attack and chase opponents was, however, positively related to reproductive success. We also discovered that the reproductive status of females and the social status of males were often reflected by their nuptial coloration. Territorial females typically had a single broad purple black stripe, light green or brown backs and white or gray ventral surfaces. Dominate males on the other hand, were generally a uniform dark brown or black color. The percentage of time that a male possessed a dark color pattern was positively linked to his reproductive success, as was the percentage of time he was observed courting or defending a female. The number of times a male was chased or attacked by a female also affected his reproductive success, in this situation the greater the frequency of such attacks the lower the reproductive success of the male. The pedigree analyses also disclosed that both hatchery and wild precocious males were able to fertilize eggs and produce offspring under natural spawning conditions. In conclusion we found differences in the reproductive competency of hatchery- and wild origin spring chinook. Wild females were better at depositing their eggs and having those eggs produce fry. In one study group wild males were more successful at producing offspring than hatchery males. Additional replications of such evaluations are being carried out to determine if the differences seen can be replicated. A repeat of the work done in 2001, for example, was performed in 2002 and add

Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Watson, Bruce D. (Yakima Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2003-05-01

69

Evaluation of the Contribution of Fall Chinook Salmon Reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries, 1989 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 1979 this study was initiated to determine the distribution, contribution, and value of artificially propagated fall chinook salmon from the Columbia River. Coded wire tagging (CWT) of hatchery fall chinook salmon began in 1979 with the 1978 brood and was completed in 1982 with the 1981 brood of fish at rearing facilities on the Columbia River system. From 18 to 20 rearing facilities were involved in the study each brood year. Nearly 14 million tagged fish, about 4% of the production, were released as part of this study over the four years, 1979 through 1982. Sampling for recoveries of these tagged fish occurred from 1980 through 1986 in the sport and commercial marine fisheries from Alaska through California, Columbia River fisheries, and returns to hatcheries and adjacent streams. The National Marine Fisheries Service coordinated this study among three fishery agencies: US Fish and Wildfire Service, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fisheries. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution, fishery contribution, survival, and value of the production of fall chinook salmon from each rearing facility on the Columbia River system to Pacific coast salmon fisheries. To achieve these objectives fish from each hatchery were given a distinctive CWT. 81 refs., 20 figs., 68 tabs.

Vreeland, Robert R.

1989-10-01

70

Augmented Fish Health Monitoring for Washington Department of Wildlife; Five-year Project Report, 1986-1991 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with the mandate to collect fish health data on the anadromous fish stocks of the Columbia River Basin in a standardized manner. The Washington Department of Wildlife began the project in 1986. Cumulative data and a final summary for this project are presented in this document. Fish stocks were examined monthly for length, weight, and health status at all Washington Department of Wildlife Columbia River Basin hatcheries. Assays for specific fish pathogens were conducted on all stocks of broodfish and smolts in the study area. Pathogens of interest were replicating viral agents, erythrocytic inclusion body syndrome virus (EIBSV), and Renibacterium salmoninarum. Sea-run cutthroat (SCT) were also sampled midway through the rearing cycle for R. salmoninarum. Juvenile fish were examined for the presence of any pathogen. Assays for Myxobolus cerebralis were conducted on fish stocks in several locations along the Columbia River. An organosomatic index analysis was made on each stock of smolts at the Cowlitz and Wells hatcheries. Results of the organosomatic index analysis were consistent between the years at each facility. However, the fish reared at Cowlitz displayed tissue changes associated with ceratomyxosis while those reared at Wells had a more desirable color and quality. Cell culture assays for viral agents in broodfish were positive for infectious hematopoeitic necrosis virus (IHNV) in all stocks at the Cowlitz Hatchery four out of five years in the study. Other stations were less consistent over the years. Only the sea-run cutthroat stock spawned at Beaver Creek was negative for any virus. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) was isolated from summer-run steelhead (SS) broodfish at Wells in 1989 and 1991 and at Yakima in 1991. Inclusions that are characteristic of EIBSV were found in red blood cells of brood fish from the Wells Hatchery in 1990 and 1991. Data collected on EIBSV during the first two years of the project cannot be compared with the later three years due to changes in laboratory protocol. Isolations of IHNV in smolts were made from Cowlitz and Skamania hatcheries and the Gobar Rearing Pond. Epizootics of IHN occurred at Lyons Ferry, Beaver Creek, Cowlitz and Skamania hatcheries during the project, EIBSV inclusions were identified in very low levels from smolts from Beaver Creek, Chelan, Cowlitz, Eastbank, and Ringold. Assays for R. salmoninarum on broodfish and smolts revealed very low levels of infection and the disease was not a problem. Enteric redmouth disease was not observed in the project area. Cytophaga psychrophila was a chronic problem in young fish at Vancouver, Beaver Creek and Cowlitz hatcheries. Ceratomyxa Shasta was the only reportable parasite observed in the fish within the study area and caused yearly outbreaks of ceratomyxosis at the Cowlitz Hatchery. Fish at the Beaver Creek Hatchery were treated for furunculosis three of the five years of the project. An ozone water treatment plant has been installed to minimize the disease. Flow and density indexes and feed conversion did not vary significantly at the hatcheries during this project. Egg mortality averaged 12.94% throughout the project with a range from 4.39% to 29.10%. The mean fry mortality during the project was 15.08% with a range of 2.01 to 37.43%. The overall mortality for early rearing was 20.43%. Prespawning broodstock mortality was recorded for SS and SCT and averaged 5.18% with a range from 0 to 38.8%. Fungal invasion was the primary cause of death in adult fish. Epizootics of furunculosis, ceratomyxosis, bacterial coldwater disease, and IHN occurred during the project. Fewer cases were reported in more recent years. The BPA augmented fish health project helped WDW identify problem areas in fish health while they were occurring. This knowledge allowed us to develop strategies for improved fish quality. Overall the project has been invaluable in assisting us in the improvement of the health of our fish.

Kerwin, John; Roberts, Steve; Oman, Leni; Bolding, Bruce

1992-04-01

71

Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting harvestable fisheries for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). The Spokane Tribe, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Colville Confederated Tribes and Lake Roosevelt Development Association/Lake Roosevelt Volunteer Net Pen Project are cooperating in a comprehensive artificial production program to produce kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for annual releases into the project area. The program consists of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. The Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake Fisheries Evaluation Program monitor and evaluates release strategies and production methods for the aforementioned projects. Between 1985 and 2005 the projects have collectively produced up to 800,000 rainbow trout and 4 million kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry for Banks Lake annually. In 2005, the annual release goal included 3.3 million kokanee fry, 475,000 kokanee yearlings and 500,000 rainbow trout yearlings. Fish produced by this project in 2005 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 3,446,438 kokanee fingerlings, 347,730 rainbow trout fingerlings and 525,721 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Meadow Creek and Lake Whatcom kokanee, diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2004 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to rainbow trout catch and harvest rates while the impact on the kokanee fishery was minimal. Success of the Lake Roosevelt kokanee artificial production program appears to be limited primarily owing to predation, precocity and high entrainment rates through Grand Coulee Dam. Recommendations for future hatchery/net pen operations include use of stocks compatible or native to the upper Columbia River, continue kokanee fry and post-smolt releases, 100% triploid hatchery stock rainbow trout used and adipose fin clip hatchery stock rainbow trout prior to release. The Spokane Tribal Hatchery is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration under directives by the Northwest Power Conservation Council Columbia River Basin Fish & Wildlife Program, Resident Fish Substitution Measures, 1987 to current (Subbasin Plan), as partial mitigation for anadromous and resident fish losses in the blocked areas above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

2006-03-01

72

Pathways: Service Coordination Outreach Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report describes the activities and outcomes of a service coordination outreach project designed to assist states in meeting their urgent needs for qualified and appropriately trained personnel to carry out their new roles as service coordinators in the provision and coordination of early intervention services as stipulated in federal…

Hecht, Elizabeth; Tuchman, Linda; Green, Meredith; Robbins, Sue; Rosin, Peggy; Schneider, Melanie; Duschak, Heidi

73

Family and Community Studies Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report of the Family and Community Studies Project (part of the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory) presents an investigation of the impact of three types of parent education programs on the participant families. The study examines the underlying change philosophy of each program and the changes that families participating in…

Espinoza, Renato; And Others

74

Monitoring and evaluation plan for the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribe has proposed to build and operate the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) in the Clearwater River subbasin of Idaho for the purpose of restoring self-sustaining populations of spring, summer, and fall chinook salmon to their native habitats. The project comprises a combination of incubation and rearing facilities, satellite rearing facilities, juvenile and adult collection sites, and associated production and harvest management activities. As currently conceived, the NPTH program will produce approximately 768,000 spring chinook parr, 800,000 summer chinook fry, and 2,000,000 fall chinook fry on an annual basis. Hatchery fish would be spawned, reared, and released under conditions that promote wild-type characteristics, minimize genetic changes in both hatchery and wild chinook populations, and minimize undesirable ecological interactions. The primary objective is to enable hatchery-produced fish to return to reproduce naturally in the streams in which they are released. These and other characteristics of the project are described in further detail in the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Master Plan, the 1995 Supplement to the Master Plan, and the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Program Environmental Impact Statement. The report in hand is referred to in project literature as the NPTH Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan. This report describes monitoring and evaluation activities that will help NPTH managers determine whether they were successful in restoring chinook salmon populations and avoiding adverse ecological impacts.

Steward, C.R.

1996-08-01

75

Expedited technology demonstration project final report: final forms  

SciTech Connect

ETDP Final Forms was an attempt to demonstrate the fabrication and performance of a ceramic waste form immobilizing the hazardous and radioactive elements of the MSO/SR mineral residues. The ceramic material had been developed previously. The fabrication system was constructed and functioned as designed except for the granulator. Fabrication of our particular ceramic, however, proved unsatisfactory. The ceramic material design was therefore changed toward the end of the project, replacing nepheline with zircon as the sink for silica. Preliminary results were encouraging, but more development is needed. Fabrication of the new ceramic requires major changes in the processing: Calcination and granulation would be replaced by spray drying; and sintering would be at higher temperature. The main goal of the project--demonstrating the fabrication and performance of the waste form--was not achieved. This report summarizes Final Forms' activities. The problem of immobilizing the MSO/SR mineral residues is discussed.

Hopper, R W

1999-05-01

76

Fish Research Project, Oregon : Evaluation of the Success of Supplementing Imnaha River Steelhead with Hatchery Reared Smolts: Phase One : Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect

Two streams in the Imnaha River subbasin (Camp Creek and Little Sheep Creek) and eight streams in the Grande Ronde River subbasin (Catherine, Deer, Five Points, Fly, Indian, Lookingglass, Meadow, and Sheep creeks) were selected as study streams to evaluate the success and impacts of steelhead supplementation in northeast Oregon. The habitat of the study streams was inventoried to compare streams and to evaluate whether habitat might influence the performance parameters we will measure in the study. The mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 1-salts returning to Little Sheep Creek fish facility in 1990 and 1991 ranged from 3,550 to 4,663 eggs/female; the mean fecundity of hatchery and natural steelhead 2-salts ranged from 5,020 to 5,879 eggs/female. Variation in length explained 57% of the variation in fecundity of natural steelhead, but only 41% to 51% of the variation in fecundity of hatchery steelhead. Adult steelhead males had an average spermatocrit of 43.9% at spawning. We were also able to stain sperm cells so that viable cells could be distinguished from dead cells. Large, red disc tags may be the most useful for observing adults on the spawning grounds. The density of wild, juvenile steelhead ranged from 0 fish/l00{sup 2} to 35.1 (age-0) and 14.0 (age-1) fish/l00m{sup 2}. Evidence provided from the National Marine Fisheries Service suggests that hatchery and wild fish within a subbasin are genetically similar. The long-term experimental design is presented as a component of this report.

Carmichael, Richard W.; Whitesel, Timothy A.; Jonasson, Brian C.

1995-08-01

77

Materials And Estimating: Final Estimating Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This final class project asks building design students to evaluate a space and determine the materials needed in that space. Materials include appliances, fixtures and surfacing materials (walls, countertops, floors) . Students will complete two lists of required materials, one of green or sustainable materials and one of traditional materials. This is intended to be a long-term class assignment which will count towards a majority of the students' class grade. This document may be downloaded in Microsoft Word Doc file format.

Wolf, Arlynne

2011-12-02

78

Passive marketable products project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Thermal Technology Corporation contracted to undertake and manage a demonstration project leading to the commercialization of a passive solar product known as the Insulating Curtain Wall. The product was initially developed by Thermal Technology Corporation to provide a system to insulate mass walls in passive systems, improving their performance by reducing thermal losses. All testing, prior to commencement of this project, by Thermal Technology Corporation and, independently, by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories, was restricted to mass wall applications. Before commercialization of the product for direct gain glazings and residential sliding glass doors, then, it was imperative that responsible field testing, as well as independent testing, be performed to assess accurate thermal and mechanical performance for those applications. Specifically, this report addresses itself to the results of four major efforts undertaken to accomplish the objectives of the project: (1) design pilot production line, (2) engineering field testing, (3) final product evaluation, and (4) commercialization plan.

Steele, R.S.; Huntley, D.M.; Low, D.

1982-02-28

79

RESEM-CA Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final deliverable for Project 2.2-Retrofit Tools, in the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program for High Performance Commercial Building Systems (PIER-HPCBS). The objective of Project 2.2 is to deliver an updated and California-Customized retrofit analysis tool based on the earlier federally funded RESEM (Retrofit Energy Savings Estimation Method) tool [1]. Specific tasks to accomplish this were identified in PIER HPCBS Report No. E2P2.2T1c, and addressed (a) modernization, (b) enhancement of basic analysis methods and capabilities, (c) adding, modifying, or updating databases for California building types, systems, components, utility rate structures, and weather.

Carroll, William

2004-06-01

80

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2002-11-01

81

Griffith Energy Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Griffith Energy Limited Liability Corporation (Griffith) proposes to construct and operate the Griffith Energy Project (Project), a natural gas-fuel, combined cycle power plant, on private lands south of Kingman, Ariz. The Project would be a ''merchant plant'' which means that it is not owned by a utility and there is currently no long-term commitment or obligation by any utility to purchase the capacity and energy generated by the power plant. Griffith applied to interconnect its proposed power plant with the Western Area Power Administration's (Western) Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie and Parker-Davis transmission systems. Western, as a major transmission system owner, needs to provide access to its transmission system when it is requested by an eligible organization per existing policies, regulations and laws. The proposed interconnection would integrate the power generated by the Project into the regional transmission grid and would allow Griffith to supply its power to the competitive electric wholesale market. Based on the application, Western's proposed action is to enter into an interconnection and construction agreement with Griffith for the requested interconnections. The proposed action includes the power plant, water wells and transmission line, natural gas pipelines, new electrical transmission lines and a substation, upgrade of an existing transmission line, and access road to the power plant. Construction of segments of the transmission lines and a proposed natural gas pipeline also require a grant of right-of-way across Federal lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. Public comments on the Draft EIS are addressed in the Final EIS, including addenda and modifications made as a result of the comments and/or new information.

N /A

1999-04-02

82

The LiveWire Project final report  

SciTech Connect

Utilities across the US have begun pilot testing a variety of hardware and software products to develop a two-way communications system between themselves and their customers. Their purpose is to reduce utility operating costs and to provide new and improved services for customers in light of pending changes in the electric industry being brought about by deregulation. A consortium including utilities, national labs, consultants, and contractors, with the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), initiated a project that utilized a hybrid fiber-coax (HFC) wide-area network integrated with a CEBus based local area network within the customers home. The system combined energy consumption data taken within the home, and home automation features to provide a suite of energy management services for residential customers. The information was transferred via the Internet through the HFC network, and presented to the customer on their personal computer. This final project report discusses the design, prototype testing, and system deployment planning of the energy management system.

Brown, C.D.; Nelson, T.T. [Enova Technology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kelly, J.C.; Dominguez, H.A. [Paragon Consulting Services, La Verne, CA (United States)

1997-10-01

83

Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2006-11-01

84

What Can Students Learn from Final Year Research Projects?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Final year research projects are a feature of most biosciences undergraduate courses. However, in a climate of increasing student numbers there is growing interest in providing alternatives to such resource-intensive projects. This interest raises some key questions. In particular, what do students learn from traditional final year projects and…

Ryder, Jim

2004-01-01

85

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project. Final Report. Volume 1. Project Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The SOLERAS Project Summary - Final Report contains a synopsis of each completed project based on contractors final report. Additionally, a brief description of the limited testing completed by the SOLERAS staff on the collectors is included. SOLERAS comm...

1986-01-01

86

Solar heated fish hatchery water recycling system. Technical completion report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this project was to rear smolts, young salmonids large enough for seawater entry, in a water recycling hatchery. High reuse was necessary to overcome temperature and groundwater limitations in coastal Maine and New Hampshire. Four rearing units were operated in a partially underground building. Each unit consisted of a 2,000 gallon fish tank and 500 gallon flooded

E. S. Sawyer; P. J. Sawyer

1980-01-01

87

29 CFR 780.127 - Hatchery operations.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture Raising of Livestock, Bees, Fur-Bearing Animals, Or Poultry § 780.127 Hatchery operations. Hatchery operations incident to the breeding of...

2013-07-01

88

9 CFR 147.23 - Hatchery sanitation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Sanitation Procedures § 147.23 Hatchery sanitation. An effective program for the prevention and control of Salmonella and other infections should include the following measures: (a) An effective hatchery sanitation program should...

2013-01-01

89

Final Evaluation of Business Environment Improvement (BEI) Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the final report on the evaluation of the Business Environment Improvement (BEI) project funded by USAID/Central Asian Republics (CAR). The project was implemented by the Pragma Corporation in Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic (KR), and Tajikistan. ...

2013-01-01

90

Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Spokane Tribal Hatchery (Galbraith Springs) project originated from the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of this project is to aid in the restoration and enhancement of the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries adversely affected by the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam. The objective is to produce kokanee salmon and rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt for maintaining a viable fishery. The goal and objective of this project adheres to the NPPC Resident Fish Substitution Policy and specifically to the biological objectives addressed in the NPPC Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to mitigate for hydropower related fish losses in the blocked area above Chief Joseph/Grand Coulee Dams.

Peone, Tim L. (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Willpinit, WA)

2003-03-01

91

TX-100 manufacturing final project report.  

SciTech Connect

This report details the work completed under the TX-100 blade manufacturing portion of the Carbon-Hybrid Blade Developments: Standard and Twist-Coupled Prototype project. The TX-100 blade is a 9 meter prototype blade designed with bend-twist coupling to augment the mitigation of peak loads during normal turbine operation. This structural coupling was achieved by locating off axis carbon fiber in the outboard portion of the blade skins. The report will present the tooling selection, blade production, blade instrumentation, blade shipping and adapter plate design and fabrication. The baseline blade used for this project was the ERS-100 (Revision D) wind turbine blade. The molds used for the production of the TX-100 were originally built for the production of the CX-100 blade. The same high pressure and low pressure skin molds were used to manufacture the TX-100 skins. In order to compensate for the difference in skin thickness between the CX-100 and the TX-100, however, a new TX-100 shear web plug and mold were required. Both the blade assembly fixture and the root stud insertion fixture used for the CX-100 blades could be utilized for the TX-100 blades. A production run of seven TX-100 prototype blades was undertaken at TPI Composites during the month of October, 2004. Of those seven blades, four were instrumented with strain gauges before final assembly. After production at the TPI Composites facility in Rhode Island, the blades were shipped to various test sites: two blades to the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, two blades to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico and three blades to the United States Department of Agriculture turbine field test facility in Bushland, Texas. An adapter plate was designed to allow the TX-100 blades to be installed on existing Micon 65/13M turbines at the USDA site. The conclusion of this program is the kick-off of the TX-100 blade testing at the three testing facilities.

Ashwill, Thomas D.; Berry, Derek S. (TPI Composites, Inc., Warren, RI)

2007-11-01

92

Environmental Management System Demonstration Project. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report outlines the activities of the Environmental Management System (EMS) Demonstration Project, provides an analysis of how the project participants progressed in implementing the ISO 14001 Standard, discusses EMS implementation issues, incentives...

C. P. Diamond

1996-01-01

93

Smart Gun Technology project. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user form firing a law officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing (or {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes}) surety technologies. This project was funded by the National Institute of Justice. This report lists the findings and results of the project`s three primary objectives. First, to find and document the requirements

1996-01-01

94

The MONET project-a final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The MONET project ended in November 1999. Over the five year duration of this project, many significant advances were made in optical networking architectures, components, subsystems, systems, and network demonstrations. In this paper, we report on the major accomplishment of the last year of the MONET project, which was the completion and operation of a transparent, reconfigurable optical network in

William T. Anderson; Janet Jackel; G.-K. Chang; Hongxing Dai; Wei Xin; Matthew Goodman; Chris Allyn; Mario Alvarez; Owen Clarke; Albert Gottlieb; Fred Kleytman; Jay Morreale; Virginia Nichols; Anastasios Tzathas; Ravindra Vora; Linden Mercer; Henry Dardy; Earl Renaud; Leann Williard; James Perreault; Ray McFarland; Terry Gibbons

2000-01-01

95

The Utah Newspaper Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of the United States Newspaper Program, the Marriott Library at the University of Utah undertook the Utah Newspaper Project, a major microfilming project funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. This report reviews the background of the project, describes the grant application process, and discusses the activities of: (1) the…

Holley, Robert P.

96

A New Hatchery Data System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The article contains information on a new recordkeeping system that is being used to keep statistical information on hatchery operations. Included in the article is an illustration of the form being used with a brief explanation on the data information to...

J. W. Nightingale W. K. Hershberger P. Golden G. A. Yokoyama

1974-01-01

97

2+2+2 Dissemination Project Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An overview is provided in this three-part final report of a project designed to disseminate information to assist California high schools, Regional Occupation Programs, and colleges in developing and strengthening 2+2+2 programs. Part I reviews the following project objectives: (1) hire a project coordinator and technical assistant; (2) develop…

Sloane, Diana; And Others

98

Wyoming Department of Education Deaf-Blind Project Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the Wyoming Department of Education Deaf-Blind Project, a 4-year federally supported project to identify children who have deaf-blindness and to provide technical assistance in the development of educational services for these children. Major accomplishments of the project included:…

Whitson, Joanne B.

99

Georgia Vocational Student Assessment Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project was conducted to develop vocational education tests for use in Georgia secondary schools, specifically for welding, machine shop, and sheet metal courses. The project team developed an outline of an assessment model that included the following components: (1) select a program for use in developing test items; (2) verify duties, tasks,…

Vocational Technical Education Consortium of States, Atlanta, GA.

100

Community College Technical Mathematics Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of the research project was to develop an applied or technical mathematics curriculum which would meet the needs of vocational-technical students at the community college level. The research project was divided into three distinct phases: Identifying the mathematical concepts requisite for job-entry competencies in each of the…

Self, Samuel L.

101

Gaylord White Project, Operational Stage. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Gaylord White Project, a pilot program in the use of television to promote the health and well-being of the elderly, used bi-directional cable television to deliver programs to the residents of a low-income, East Harlem housing project for the aged. For 15 months, health education and community information messages were delivered to…

Marshall, Carter L.; And Others

102

Arkansas Educational Research Stimulation Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the Arkansas Educational Research Stimulation project was to encourage educational research in higher education institutions in the State and to foster a high quality product. Activities of the project were initiatory seminars and workshops on educational and institutional research conducted at both the institutional and…

Chamberlin, Gary D.

103

Motivation for Reading Improvement. Final Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document reports on a project aimed at motivating students to develop attitudes that learning can be fun and that it can benefit them, and at discouraging students from working just to please the teacher. The project involved the use of a "News Laboratory," which included a United Press International wire service, various newspapers,…

Kit Carson Union Elementary School District, Hanford, CA.

104

Easter Seal Eldercare Project. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of the project was to increase Easter Seal affiliate, corporate sponsor, and general public awareness of the needs of an aging society and older persons with disabilities. The project was initiated because Easter Seals believed that non-aging org...

R. L. Rutta

1994-01-01

105

New and Emerging Occupations Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document reports a project to define, identify, and describe new and emerging occupations in Nebraska and disseminate that information to vocational education program and curriculum planners. Chapter 1 describes the background, problem, and purpose of the project. Chapter 2 sets forth the objectives and discusses procedures for developing a…

Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

106

Training for Planning Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Concerned with training local educational agencies in planning and administering community education programs, this report summarizes a year-long project in Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado. Included are a narrative description of the project and its activities, a list of objectives and agenda subects, assessment, a summary evaluation, and…

Paddock, Susan C.

107

Informed Instruction in Mathematics. Final Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report describes the results of a three-year study, the Informed Instruction Project, that investigated different approaches to mathematics instruction for students with learning disabilities and at-risk for special education services. The project focused on two strands of inquiry: (1) the effects of a computer-based diagnostic assessment…

Woodward, John; And Others

108

Wisconsin Older Battered Women's Project. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the two year project, the focus was on (1) providing safety and support for older victims of domestic abuse and persons with disabilities, (2) holding abusers accountable, and challenging systems and (3) society's response to domestic abuse in late...

B. Brandl

1997-01-01

109

Supercompaction/Grouting Demonstration Project: Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this supercompaction demonstration project was to allow Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (The Company), to obtain cost analysis and performance information on volume reduction and waste encapsulation of solid, low-level contaminated was...

1987-01-01

110

Library Skills Assessment Project: Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document is a final report of a study that assessed students' use of the Information Online (IO) computer catalog at the Indiana University at South Bend (IUSB) library, as well as their skills and attitudes related to library use. The 38 participants completed multiple choice and true/false exercises testing their understanding of the IO…

Schuck, Brian R.

111

Solar greenhouse project. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Three (3) passive solar greenhouses were constructed as lean-to attachment to the homes of three (3) low-income families in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina as a demonstration project. CETA labor was provided by a training and work experience project for home repair and construction skills. Some of the walls were constructed from old salvaged windows and a local block company donated blocks that were used for the foundation. Recipients of the greenhouses reported reduced air drafts and fuel consumption savings. Flowers and vegetables were successfully grown during the winter months.

Not Available

1983-06-03

112

Inactive Health Personnel Project: Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Inactive Health Personnel Project, conducted by the New Jersey Department of Health in 1967, had as objectives to increase the supply of health manpower by locating health personnel and promoting their active employment; to develop the details of health personnel needs by category of personnel and geographic area; and to assist in the return…

Schiavone, Geraldine R. S.

113

HOME HEALTH AIDE TRAINING PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|THE HOME HEALTH AIDE PERFORMS SIMPLE PERSONAL CARE FUNCTIONS UNDER NURSING SUPERVISION IN THE HOME CARE OF AN ILL OR DISABLED PERSON. THE PROJECT OBJECTIVES WERE TO TRAIN AS AIDES 30 MEN AND WOMEN AGE 45 YEARS AND OLDER WITH LIMITED INCOMES TO MEET A COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT NEED AND TO EXPERIMENT IN RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, TRAINING, AND EMPLOYMENT…

Greater New Haven Community Council, CT.

114

Business and Education Standards Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objectives of the 4-year Laborers-Associated General Contractors (AGC) Business and Education Standards Project are: (1) generate world-class standards for construction craft occupations; (2) develop and promote a certification program for construction craft laborers (this objective was deleted because of negative reaction); (3) promote the…

Tippie, John; Rice, Eric

115

Final Report for LTSN - Development Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY A small-scale pilot project has been undertaken to introduce and investigate the uses of different forms of Knowledge Mapping at physics undergraduate, level 1 for twelve students studying basic electronics. The idea behind Knowledge Maps was introduced by Dr Ashley Clarke at the beginning of semester 1 during an elective, 10 credit, laboratory- based module in 'digital and analogue

Ashley Clarke

116

Elderly Service Workers' Training Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Elderly Service Workers' Training Project (ESWTP) was designed to identify the problems encountered by human service workers in their daily contact with older adults. A needs assessment (mail survey and structured personal interview) was conducted throughout Manitoba to identify and document the scope of human service workers' on-the-job…

Harvey, Dexter; Cap, Orest

117

Minnesota Bilingual Vocational Training Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Organized in September, 1975, to facilitate the vocational training of limited English-speaking Latinos, the Minnesota Bilingual Vocational Training Project (MBVTP) was centered at St. Paul Technical-Vocational Institute. Staff included director, job specialists in charge of recruitment, programming, counseling retention, and job placement, and…

Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

118

School-to-Work Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The document reviews the School-to-Work Project, which has been concerned with improving and developing the school component of the job placement process. Research, design, development, and dissemination phases and results are traced from 1972-1976 through the following stages: (1) Research, 1972-74, involving a literature search to identify…

National Advisory Council on Vocational Education, Washington, DC.

119

(Project to produce hydroelectric power. ) Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project is to use the water current of the Prieto River in Yauco, Puerto Rico, to produce hydroelectric power. The water flow in a 1000-ft long by 2 ft wide channel, moves an hydraulic wheel and a 20-kW generator. The electricity is used to process coffee.

Pietri, J.M.

1986-01-01

120

Trucking Industry Training Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The report was prepared under a grant made to investigate the possibilities of establishing an organized system of training for the trucking industry. It discusses attempts to disseminate information on training, learned through operation of an experimental and demonstration project in Pico Rivera, California. It discusses problems of compliance…

Sanburn, Donald D.

121

Wind Energy Education Projects. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two projects under DOE's Small-Scale Appropriate Energy Technology Grants Program have educated the public in a hands on way about wind energy systems. The first was awarded to Peter Ziegler of Berkeley, California, to design and build a walk-through exhi...

P. Ziegler R. Burke T. Arcadi T. R. Conlon

1981-01-01

122

Vermont gasifier project. Final report, Phase I  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an engineering status report for the Vermont gasifier project. Technical areas of concern are discussed with the cyclone performance, agglomeration problems in the combustor, particlate emissions, valve design, deflagration venting, gasifier and combustion blower surge control, and other related areas. Attachments pertaining to the drawing and specification register are included.

NONE

1995-07-01

123

The Sesame Mother Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The main objective of the Sesame Mother Pilot Project was to increase the effectiveness of the television program with preschool children in densely populated, low-income, inner-city areas. Volunteer Mothers selected from the inner-city areas of Los Angeles and Chicago were trained to conduct viewing sessions in their own homes. Following the…

Filep, Robert T.; And Others

124

LCSH Entry Vocabulary Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) Entry Vocabulary Project established a routine procedure for new cross references, suggested by designated libraries, to be considered for addition to LCSH entries by the Library of Congress Subject Catalog Division. Since October 1982, suggestions from four libraries (the University of California at…

Cochrane, Pauline A.

125

VESL in Industry Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Vocational English as a Second Language (VESL) in Industry Project was designed to develop and implement a competency-based VESL curriculum to be used with industry-linked VESL language training. Language needs for limited-English-proficient workers in companies in the greater Seattle, Everett, and Tacoma areas were identified through a…

Prince, David

126

Yaqui Parent Education Demonstration Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Yaqui Parent Education Demonstration Project was founded in 1975 with the aid of Maricopa County Head Start in Guadalupe, Arizona, to help foster the continuation of the Yaqui language, history, and culture. With a 1-year grant from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare/Office of Child Development, organizers hired a coordinator,…

de Campoy, Antonia

127

Shanghai Sewerage Outfall Project. Final Technical Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The study was conducted on behalf of the Shanghai Sewerage Project Construction Company. The primary purpose of the study was to find ways to improve the water quality in Shanghai's Suzhou Creek and Huangpu River in order to meet national standards. The r...

1988-01-01

128

Industry Panel Curriculum Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This project was conducted to develop and disseminate updated curriculum guides for nine selected cluster areas of vocational education programs in Oregon; only five were developed. The updates were based on recommendations made by industry review panels (IRPs). Specialists from the Oregon Department of Education and Oregon State University…

Kenneke, Larry J.

129

Smart Gun Technology project. Final report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user form firing a law officer's firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing (or (open quotes)smart(close quotes)) surety technologies. This projec...

D. R. Weiss

1996-01-01

130

Home Energy Conservation Training Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is a project designed to present four training sessions for community specialists representing outreach interests such as cooperative extension, senior citizens organizations, and welfare agencies. Training consists of instruction in contemporary knowledge, skills, and methods of home energy conservation, and in how to teach others to…

West Virginia Univ., Morgantown. Coll. of Human Resources and Education.

131

Workplace Training Project, Eugene, Oregon. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Workplace Training Project began as a partnership between Lane Community College in Eugene, Oregon, and four area businesses. Their primary objective was to develop worksite-specific, learner-centered, competency-based workplace curricula in topics such as the following: basic math, fractions and measurement in the workplace, survival math for…

Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

132

American History Laboratory Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The results of an experimental project in American history which introduced to students the methods of historical investigation in specific historical areas through small group research rather than through the college survey course are described in this report. Discussed are (1) the course organization, consisting of two semester units in which…

Taylor, William R.

133

Final Report: Puerto Rico Rice Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Puerto Rico Rice Project is a collaborate effort between University of Missouri Faculty, University of Mayuguez, Puerto Rico faculty, and staff of USDA-NRCS in Puerto Rico to determine the potential market in Puerto Rico for rice produced by farmers i...

V. H. Ayers

2006-01-01

134

Maine Project against Bullying. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Noting that bullying among primary school-age children has become recognized as an antecedent to more violent behavior in later grades, the 3-year Maine Project Against Bullying examined currently available research on bullying and evaluated books, curricula, media materials, and programs to identify resources and strategies which can be applied…

Saufler, Chuck; Gagne, Cyndi

135

National Workplace Literacy Project. Final Performance Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With funding from a National Workplace Literacy grant, Little Hoop Community College in Fort Totten, North Dakota, conducted a combined literacy and career counseling program for members of the Devils Lake Sioux Tribe. During the project period, 86 participants completed individual education plans appropriate to their personal work objectives and…

Little Hoop Community Coll., Fort Totten, ND.

136

Labor Exchange Skills Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Labor Exchange Skills Project, which was conducted under the sponsorship and direction of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, was designed to develop a labor exchange skills database (ETA) that would improve the usability of many Department of Labor applications and products developed by other public and…

Dietrich, Eleanor; Hendrickson-Larson, Joanna; Hoppe, Ruth; Paige, Bruce; Rosenow, Steve

137

Salton Sea Project: Phase 1. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A feasibility study was made for a salt gradient solar pond power plant in or near the Salton Sea of California. The conclusions are very supportive of continuing the project into the next phase; design and construction of a 5-MWe proof-of-concept experim...

M. L. Peelgren

1982-01-01

138

Hartford Labor Mobility Demonstration Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The project was an effort to relocate unemployed and underemployed persons, predominantly Negroes and Puerto Ricans, from the ghetto to the suburbs to learn whether job finding assistance, counseling and relocation could enable families with an able-bodied wage earner to get off welfare rolls. (NTIS)

Connecticut State Dept. of Public Welfare, Hartford.

139

Southeast geysers effluent pipeline project. Final report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project concept originated in 1990 with the convergence of two problems: (1) a need for augmented injection to mitigate declining reservoir productivity at the Geysers; and (2) a need for a new method of wastewater disposal for Lake County communities...

M. Dellinger

1998-01-01

140

Project Reach: Final Report--Year 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The second year of Project Reach, a Federally funded two-year program, pursued two tactics for increasing the adult basic education (ABE) program relevance and effectiveness in South Bend, Indiana: (1) the training/hiring of ABE students as media paraprofessionals, and (2) a media enrollment campaign of various media promotions (television/radio…

McClelland, Samuel D.

141

Alaska Wood Biomass Energy Project Final Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the Craig Wood Fired Boiler Project is to use waste wood from local sawmilling operations to provide heat to local public buildings, in an effort to reduce the cost of operating those buildings, and put to productive use a byproduct from the wood milling process that otherwise presents an expense to local mills. The scope of the

Jonathan Bolling

2009-01-01

142

Sutter Power Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Western Area Power Administration operates and maintains a high-voltage electric transmission system in California to deliver power to qualified customers. Calpine Corporation has requested that Western study and consider the feasibility of an interconnection with Western's Keswick-Elverta/Olinda-Elverta 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines. Calpine proposed to construct and operate of the Sutter Power Project. The project, as proposed, would include a 500 megawatt (MW) natural gas-fueled, combined-cycle, electric generation facility; a new 5.7 mile 230-kV generation tie-line; a transmission line switching station; and a 12-mile (16 inch) natural gas pipeline to connect with Pacific Gas and Electric's Line 302. The siting of the project's generation facility is proposed on a portion of a 77-acre parcel of land owned by Calpine, adjacent to Calpine's existing Greenleaf 1 cogeneration powerplant in Sutter County, approximately 7 miles south of Yuba City and 36 miles northwest of Sacramento. Calpine's stated objective for developing the Sutter Powerplant is to sell power to a mix of retail and wholesale customers in the newly deregulated electricity market. As a ''merchant plant,'' Calpine intends to sell power on a short and mid-term basis to customers, and on the spot market. On July 29, 1998, Western issued a Sutter Powerplant Interconnection Feasibility Study. The study results indicated that the output from the proposed Sutter Powerplant Project would improve system reliability in the generation deficient Sacramento area. Based on Western's interest in improving system reliability and as the owner of the transmission lines for the proposed project interconnection, Western is the lead federal agency responsible for the project's National Environmental Policy Act compliance. The California Energy Commission has the statutory authority to license thermal powerplants of 50 MW or greater. The Energy Commission's siting facility certification process has responsibilities that are functionally equivalent to those of a lead agency under the California Environmental Quality Act. Because of these similar agency responsibilities to examine environmental impacts, Western and the Energy Commission are joint-lead agencies for this project's environmental review. Although this arrangement was successful during the scoping and ''Draft Environmental Impact Statement'' stages of review, the two agency processes were separated at the close of the ''Draft Environmental Impact Statement'' public comment period on December 14, 1998, to assure process integrity for each agency.

N /A

1999-04-23

143

Alcohol-Methane Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Progress accomplished during the period July 1, 1980 to September 30, 1983 is summarized. The purpose of the project was to conduct adult education workshops in alcohol and methane production and cellulose conversion. The attempt to continue the alcohol-methane project at Wilson College via adult education was not successful. A Cellulose Conversion Workshop was attended by fourteen people in November, 1983 despite a large mailing. A number of difficulties were encountered. These have been presented in detail above with the view of documenting in a specific way problems which reflect larger issues beyond the scope of this particular project and which have implications for the field at large. In general, the results of this project suggest: (1) A lack of current interest within the general population in alternative fuels. This is probably related to lower fuel prices. (2) Strong interest in this subject by a few but in numbers not sufficient to support major projects and expenditure of funds. (3) An unusual pattern of expertise in this area. Individuals with the strongest background in alternative fuels tend to be drawn from non-academic circles while the academicians lack experience in practical applications. This accounts for the problems encountered in finding suitable instructors and the difficulty with the teaching tools and quality of instruction. Those who have the expertise have difficulty in conveying it; those who can teach do not have the practical experience. Adult education efforts might better be directed at assisting those with the practical experience in learning how to convey this information to others.

Ricks, N.L.

1983-06-30

144

Edible Landscape Project: final project report for DOE grant  

SciTech Connect

Edible landscaping is an approach to urban agriculture using yards, rooftops, patios, vacant lots, and greenhouses. Project activities are reviewed, both demonstration and educational. Included is Edible Landscaping in Kansas, a 43 page booklet which includes background information, a case study description of the University For Man demonstration landscape, and encyclopedia of edible plants, and an annotated bibliography. (MHR)

Coates, G.

1984-01-01

145

Project Developmental Continuity Evaluation: Final Report. Appendices to Volume I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document provides the appendices for volume 1 of the final evaluation report of Project Developmental Continuity (PDC), a Head Start demonstration project initiated in 1974 to develop program models which enhance children's social competence by fostering developmental continuity from preschool through the early elementary grades.…

Bond, James T.; And Others

146

Science and Engineering Technician Curriculum Development Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Project SET (Science and Engineering for Technicians) developed a series of study guides designed to teach generic science and engineering skills to students interested in becoming technicians. An entire 2-year curriculum is encompassed by these guides, geared for 2-year college students. Described in this final report are the project's rationale,…

Mowery, Donald R.; Wolf, Lawrence J.

147

Alaska Wood Biomass Energy Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Craig Wood Fired Boiler Project is to use waste wood from local sawmilling operations to provide heat to local public buildings, in an effort to reduce the cost of operating those buildings, and put to productive use a byproduct from the wood milling process that otherwise presents an expense to local mills. The scope of the project included the acquisition of a wood boiler and the delivery systems to feed wood fuel to it, the construction of a building to house the boiler and delivery systems, and connection of the boiler facility to three buildings that will benefit from heat generated by the boiler: the Craig Aquatic Center, the Craig Elementary School, and the Craig Middle School buildings.

Jonathan Bolling

2009-03-02

148

Final performance report for Project JEM  

SciTech Connect

Project JEM (Jarvis Enhancement of Males) is a pre-college program directed toward stimulating disadvantaged, talented African American males in grades four, five, and six to attend college and major in mathematics, science, computer science, or related technical areas needed by the US Department of Energy. Twenty young African American male students were recruited from Gladewater Independent School District (ISD), Longview ISD, Hawkins ISD, Tyler ISD, Winona ISD and big Sandy ISD. Students enrolled in the program range from ages 10 to 13 and are in grades four, five and six. Student participants in the 1997 Project JEM Program attended Saturday Academy sessions and a four week intensive, summer residential program. The information here provides a synopsis of the activities which were conducted through each program component.

McKinney, M.J.; Jenkins, S.

1997-12-31

149

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01

150

Coal manpower projections, 1980. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bituminous coal production of 910 million tons in 1980 was projected by the National Petroleum Council in their report on U.S. Energy Outlook, 1971-85. On that foundation this manpower study estimates the manpower which would be required to produce that volume of coal output. Productivity of labor in coal mining declined about 30 percent during 1970-73 under the impact of

Clague

1974-01-01

151

Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Microsoft Academic Search

BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because

Confederated Tribes

1996-01-01

152

Enforcement Project Management Handbook. Directive (Final)  

SciTech Connect

The publication is a basic reference and training manual to assist EPA Superfund field personnel (Remedial Project Managers and On Scene Coordinators) in planning, negotiating, and managing potentially responsible party (PRP) searches and PRP-lead actions at Superfund sites. It provides an overview of each phase of the Superfund enforcement process and discusses specific roles and responsibilities of the RPM/OSC in the process.

Not Available

1989-07-01

153

Baltimore residential assistance demonstration project: Final report  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the City of Baltimore for assistance in developing the Global Action Plan (GAP) EcoTeam Program, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided GAP with $10,000 for a one-year demonstration project. The results of this action are as follows: four EcoTeams were established representing 28 households and 47 people; the self reported resource savings to date per household are on average: energy savings--9%, auto emission reduction--16%, solid waste reduction--52%, water savings--25%, dollar savings--$174; the initial seed team (prior to this funding) replicated and started 2 new teams, one of those teams replicated and started 2 more teams, the other team did not replicate; 4 volunteer coaches were recruited to coach each of these teams; a volunteer coordinator was recruited to provide local guidance for this demonstration project and help GAP reach out to the Fairfield low-income neighborhood, the volunteer coordinator was unable to establish any EcoTeams in this neighborhood as their priorities were establishing a neighborhood action team and addressing immediate health-related environmental issues; the volunteers have communicated information about this demonstration project among many community and Baltimore government leaders to solicit support for a full campaign and to assess the level of that support.

NONE

1998-09-01

154

Manzanita Hybrid Power system Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit, and in 1995 the Tribe established the Manzanita Renewable Energy Office. Through the U.S. Department of Energy's Tribal Energy Program the Band received funds to install a hybrid renewable power system to provide electricity to one of the tribal community buildings, the Manzanita Activities Center (MAC building). The project began September 30, 1999 and was completed March 31, 2005. The system was designed and the equipment supplied by Northern Power Systems, Inc, an engineering company with expertise in renewable hybrid system design and development. Personnel of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory provided technical assistance in system design, and continued to provide technical assistance in system monitoring. The grid-connected renewable hybrid wind/photovoltaic system provides a demonstration of a solar/wind energy hybrid power-generating project on Manzanita Tribal land. During the system design phase, the National Renewable Energy Lab estimated that the wind turbine is expected to produce 10,000-kilowatt hours per year and the solar array 2,000-kilowatt hours per year. The hybrid system was designed to provide approximately 80 percent of the electricity used annually in the MAC building. The project proposed to demonstrate that this kind of a system design would provide highly reliable renewable power for community uses.

Trisha Frank

2005-03-31

155

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima\\/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima\\/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series

Curtis M. Knudsen; Steven L. Schroder; Mark V. Johnston

2005-01-01

156

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima\\/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima\\/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second in a series

Knudsen; Curtis M

2003-01-01

157

The Maralinga Rehabilitation Project: final report.  

PubMed

Maralinga, South Australia was an important site in the United Kingdom nuclear weapons test programme. Seven bombs were exploded and a series of 'safety' tests carried out; the latter in particular disseminated appreciable amounts of uranium and plutonium over a wide area. A programme to clean up the test site over several years was instituted, with in-situ vitrification as a principal measure. The final report on the programme has now been published. However, both the programme and the Report are seriously flawed; this article provides criticisms of both. PMID:15015548

Parkinson, Alan

158

Cryogenic Barrier Demonstration Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A long-term frozen soil barrier was implemented at the HRE (Homogeneous Reactor Experiment) Pond facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1997. This was performed to verify the technical feasibility and costs of deploying a frozen barrier at a radiologically contaminated site. Work began in September 1996 and progressed through to December 1999. The frozen barrier has been operational since November 1997. Verification of the barrier integrity was performed independently by the EPA's SITE Program. This project showed frozen barriers offer a proven technology to retain below grade hazardous substances at relatively low costs with minimal effect on the environment.

Johnson, L.A.; Yarmak, E.; Long, E.L.

2000-03-01

159

Final Report Navajo Transmission Project (NTP)  

SciTech Connect

The Diné Power Authority is developing the Navajo Transmission Project (NTP) to relieve the constraints on the transmission of electricity west of the Four Corners area and to improve the operation flexibility and reliability of the extra-high-voltage transmission system in the region. The NTP creates the wholesale transmission capacity for more economical power transfers, sales, and purchases in the region. It will facilitate the development of Navajo energy resources, improve economic conditions on the Navajo Nation as well as allow DPA to participate in the western electrical utility industry.

Bennie Hoisington; Steven Begay

2006-09-14

160

Solar Total Energy Project final test report  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O.; Towner, M.L. (Georgia Power Co., Shenandoah, GA (USA))

1990-09-01

161

Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

POORE, ROBERT Z.

1999-08-01

162

HIP densification project. Final CRADA report  

SciTech Connect

An investigation was conducted to evaluate the use of HIPed aluminum castings as near-net-shape blanks for large electrostatic focusing electrodes in ion lithography machines. The electrodes must have very smooth finishes which are free of pores and other defects. This has heretofore been achieved by rough-machining the blanks out of large forged aluminum billets and final diamond-turning. The use of a near-net-shape casting for the blank was expected to save a significant amount of money and time. The test was conducted on a single cast blank which was supplied by the Partner in the HIPed and stress relieved condition. Rough machining and diamond turning operations conducted by LMES/ER revealed that the casting contained unacceptably large defects. The conclusion was reached that HIPed aluminum castings in the large sizes and of the quality levels required would probably be unobtainable in a cost-effective manner. An alternative approach, using ring forgings assembled by electron beam welding was proposed and investigated by LMES/ER. Although an electrode blank was not obtained, the study indicated that this approach would be successful and cost-effective.

Franco-Ferreira, E.A. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Finkelstein, W. [Advanced Lithography Group, Columbia, MD (United States)

1997-08-29

163

WSF Biodiesel Demonstration Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, WSF canceled a biodiesel fuel test because of “product quality issues” that caused the fuel purifiers to clog. The cancelation of this test and the poor results negatively impacted the use of biodiesel in marine application in the Pacific Northwest. In 2006, The U.S. Department of Energy awarded the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency a grant to manage a scientific study investigating appropriate fuel specifications for biodiesel, fuel handling procedures and to conduct a fuel test using biodiesel fuels in WSF operations. The Agency put together a project team comprised of experts in fields of biodiesel research and analysis, biodiesel production, marine engineering and WSF personnel. The team reviewed biodiesel technical papers, reviewed the 2004 fuel test results, designed a fuel test plan and provided technical assistance during the test. The research reviewed the available information on the 2004 fuel test and conducted mock laboratory experiments, but was not able to determine why the fuel filters clogged. The team then conducted a literature review and designed a fuel test plan. The team implemented a controlled introduction of biodiesel fuels to the test vessels while monitoring the environmental conditions on the vessels and checking fuel quality throughout the fuel distribution system. The fuel test was conducted on the same three vessels that participated in the canceled 2004 test using the same ferry routes. Each vessel used biodiesel produced from a different feedstock (i.e. soy, canola and yellow grease). The vessels all ran on ultra low sulfur diesel blended with biodiesel. The percentage of biodiesel was incrementally raised form from 5 to 20 percent. Once the vessels reached the 20 percent level, they continued at this blend ratio for the remainder of the test. Fuel samples were taken from the fuel manufacturer, during fueling operations and at several points onboard each vessel. WSF Engineers monitored the performance of the fuel systems and engines. Each test vessel did experience a microbial growth bloom that produced a build up of material in the fuel purifiers similar to material witnessed in the 2004 fuel test. A biocide was added with each fuel shipment and the problem subsided. In January of 2009, the WSF successfully completed an eleven month biodiesel fuel test using approximately 1,395,000 gallons of biodiesel blended fuels. The project demonstrated that biodiesel can be used successfully in marine vessels and that current ASTM specifications are satisfactory for marine vessels. Microbial growth in biodiesel diesel interface should be monitored. An inspection of the engines showed no signs of being negatively impacted by the test.

Washington State University; University of Idaho; The Glosten Associates, Inc.; Imperium Renewables, Inc.

2009-04-30

164

FINAL REPORT FOR THE DIII-D RADIATIVE DIVERTOR PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

OAK A271 FINAL REPORT FOR THE DIII-D RADIATIVE DIVERTOR PROJECT. The Radiative Divertor Project originated in 1993 when the DIII-D Five Year Plan for the period 1994--1998 was prepared. The Project Information Sheet described the objective of the project as ''to demonstrate dispersal of divertor power by a factor of then with sufficient diagnostics and modeling to extend the results to ITER and TPX''. Key divertor components identified were: (1) Carbon-carbon and graphite armor tiles; (2) The divertor structure providing a gas baffle and cooling; and (3) The divertor cryopumps to pump fuel and impurities.

O'NEIL, RC; STAMBAUGH, RD

2002-06-01

165

Self-Correcting HVAC Controls Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document represents the final project report for the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls Project jointly funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP). The project, initiated in October 2008, focused on exploratory initial development of self-correcting controls for selected HVAC components in air handlers. This report, along with the companion report documenting the algorithms developed, Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units (Fernandez et al. 2009), document the work performed and results of this project.

Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Cho, Heejin; Goddard, James K.; Dinh, Liem H.

2010-01-04

166

Aerogel commercialization pilot project. Final program report  

SciTech Connect

Aerogels are extremely light weight, high surface area, very insulative materials that offer many potential improvements to commercial products. Aerogels have been the subject of extensive research at Department of Energy Laboratories and have been considered one of the technology most ready for commercialization. However, commercialization of the technology had been difficult for the National Laboratories since end users were not interested in the high temperature and high pressure chemical processes involved in manufacturing the raw material. Whereas, Aerojet as a supplier of rocket fuels, specialty chemicals and materials had the manufacturing facilities and experience to commercially produce aerogel-type products. Hence the TRP provided a link between the technology source (National Laboratories), the manufacturing (Aerojet) and the potential end users (other TRP partners). The program successfully produced approximately 500 ft{sup 2} of organic aerogel but failed to make significant quantities of silica aerogel. It is significant that this production represents both the largest volume and biggest pieces of organic aerogel ever produced. Aerogels, available from this program, when tested in several prototype commercial products were expected to improve the products performance, but higher than expected projected production costs for large scale manufacture of aerogels has limited continued commercial interest from these partners. Aerogels do, however, offer potential as a specialty material for some high value technology and defense products.

NONE

1996-02-13

167

Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

McKay, R.

1982-03-01

168

Baltimore Zoo digester project. Final report. [Elephants  

SciTech Connect

The results of a project to produce methane using the manure from zoo animals as a feedstock is presented. Two digesters are in operation, the first (built in 1974) utilizing wastes from the Hippo House and a second (built in 1980) utilizing wastes from the Elephant House. Demonstrations on the utilization of the gas were performed during zoo exhibits. The Elephant House Digester has a capacity of 4200 gallons and a floating gas dome which can retain at least 150 cu ft of gas. Solar energy has been incorporated into the design to maintain digester temperature at 95/sup 0/F. The system produces 50 cu ft per day. After cleaning the gas, it is used to generate electricity to power an electric light, a roof fan, and an air conditioner. The gas is also used to operate a gas range and a gas lamp. During the opening day exhibit, 50 meals were cooked using the bio-gas from just 2 elephants. (DMC)

Gibson, P.W.

1980-01-01

169

Demonstration house doctor program. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

Central Oregon Renewable Resources, Inc. (CORR), a non-profit educational organization, received funding from the United States Department of Energy's Appropriate Technology Small Grants Program to demonstrate the House Doctor retrofit program in Central Oregon. The House Doctor program was created at Princeton University. Princeton's energy conservation research project at Twin Rivers, New Jersey, discovered that traditional attic insulation techniques fell short of their predicted fuel savings by between 30 and 70%. The cause of this startling discrepancy between actual and predicted reductions in heat loss was found to be a complex collection of attic bypass routes which were allowing heated interior air to escape around and through the insulation. Tests by the Bonneville Power Administration confirm that simply adding insulation to a house does not reduce air infiltration. CORR's House Doctor program was in most respects an unqualified success. Although CORR was not able to convince people to learn to be house doctors themselves, the Blower Door was shown to be a very effective diagnostic tool and substantial reductions in air infiltration were realized from a one day House Doctor visit. Costs to savings ratios appear to be very favorable. It seems only a matter of time before house doctoring becomes a standard part of the repertoire of the region's residential conservation programs.

McKeever, M.R.; van Houweling, D.

1982-12-01

170

Final Report on Atomic Database Project  

SciTech Connect

Atomic physics in hot dense plasmas is essential for understanding the radiative properties of plasmas either produced terrestrially such as in fusion energy research or in space such as the study of the core of the sun. Various kinds of atomic data are needed for spectrum analysis or for radiation hydrodynamics simulations. There are many atomic databases accessible publicly through the web, such as CHIANTI (an atomic database for spectroscopic diagnostics for astrophysical plasmas) from Naval Research Laboratory [1], collaborative development of TOPbase (The Opacity Project for astrophysically abundant elements) [2], NIST atomic spectra database from NIST [3], TOPS Opacities from Los Alamos National Laboratory [4], etc. Most of these databases are specific to astrophysics, which provide energy levels, oscillator strength f and photoionization cross sections for astrophysical elements ( Z=1-26). There are abundant spectrum data sources for spectral analysis of low Z elements. For opacities used for radiation transport, TOPS Opacities from LANL is the most valuable source. The database provides mixed opacities from element for H (Z=1) to Zn (Z=30) The data in TOPS Opacities is calculated by the code LEDCOP. In the Fusion Technology Institute, we also have developed several different models to calculate atomic data and opacities, such as the detailed term accounting model (DTA) and the unresolved transition array (UTA) model. We use the DTA model for low-Z materials since an enormous number of transitions need to be computed for medium or high-Z materials. For medium and high Z materials, we use the UTA model which simulates the enormous number of transitions by using a single line profile to represent a collection of transition arrays. These models have been implemented in our computing code JATBASE and RSSUTA. For plasma populations, two models are used in JATBASE, one is the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model and the second is the non-LTE model. For the LTE model, the calculation is simple since the Boltzmann distribution can be used. As long as we have the energy levels and the ionization energy, we can calculate the plasma population very easily. However, for the non-LTE model, the calculation is very complex since various atomic data are required to build the transition balance matrix. Currently, empirical formulas are used to calculate these data such as electron collision ionization and autoionization. Furnished with these tested atomic data computing codes, we have developed a friendly user interface and a flexible atomic database [5]. The UTA model is considered the most practical method for medium and high Z elements since it is very time-consuming and difficult to calculate the enormous number of the transitions. However, the UTA model may overestimate the opacity, therefore, the DTA model is desirable even for medium and high Z elements. With the constant decrease in the cost of the disk storage and increase of CPU speed, it is possible to apply the DTA model to the medium and high Z elements. In this project, we calculate opacities for high Z elements in fully detailed term accounting model for significant populated states. For the various rate coefficients, we calculate the data using the detailed configuration accounting approximation. In order to handle the large volume of data generated for medium to high-Z atoms, we use the HDF data format as our database format, which is becoming a standard for storing scientific data. We have built a sophisticated graphical user interface using Java technology to distinguish our atomic database from other existing databases. Unlike other atomic databases, in which the users can obtain the opacity data in a pair of photon energy and opacity, in our database the user can browser more detailed atomic data information other than the opacity data set by combining our atomic database and Java technology. For example, the user can find out the abundant ion stage and electron configuration state in a certain plasma condition by several clicks on the user interface.

Yuan, J., Gui, Z., and Moses, G.A.

2006-07-18

171

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01

172

Navy Career Education Diffusion Project: State of Oregon. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The final report describes a project to research, develop, and field test Navy occupational information for inclusion into the Oregon Career Information System (CIS), a computer-assisted career education program. Five sections include: (1) introductory information; (2) a discussion of the preparation of Navy occupational information and reviewing…

McDermott, Michael M.

173

The Pittsburgh Science Technology Society Project: A Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report on the inservice education of secondary science teachers for the teaching of science via Science Technology Society (STS) materials lists the major objectives of the project as: (1) write four instructional modules with a science, society and technology focus which address special concerns and needs of the underserved and…

O'Brien, George E., Ed.

174

Project PASS: 1982-83 Final Technical Report [and Appendixes].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Austin Independent School District presents the 1982-83 final technical report of Project PASS, which employs the notion of cultural congruence in instruction or culture-specific instruction to explain the poor performance of black students in school. It encouraged teachers to change their perspective about black students who are not…

Totusek, Patsy

175

Expressive Arts Project for Young Children with Disabilities. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the Expressive Arts Project for Young Children with Disabilities, which developed and evaluated a CD-ROM, ArtSpace. The program, developed on a Macintosh platform, allows the child to either view or make art. It offers real time video, music especially produced to accompany images,…

Hutinger, Patricia L.

176

Development of Home Health Aide Curriculum Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This package contains materials intended for use in a new home health aide curriculum that is designed to be presented as a two-quarter program at Tacoma Community College in Tacoma, Washington. Included in the package are a final report outlining the objectives and outcomes of the project to develop a home health aide curriculum that would meet…

Brown, Patricia

177

Northeast Oregon Waste Wood Utilization Project, Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the final report of the Northeast Oregon Waste Wood Utilization Project -- a regional effort in northeast Oregon to combat common problems of high unemployment in the timber industry of the region and the marketing of destroyed timber resulting fr...

1982-01-01

178

Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

2003-03-01

179

Cultural Resource Survey of Proposed Hydroelectric Development, Willard Fish Hatchery, Washington.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A survey for cultural resources of the proposed Willard Power Project at the Willard Fish Hatchery yielded evidence of aboriginal site utilization. The project area, on the banks of the White Salmon River at an approximate elevation of 1060 feet (353 m), ...

D. W. Abbott

1983-01-01

180

75 FR 15430 - Chief Joseph Hatchery Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...AGENCY: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION...implement the proposed action identified in BPA's Chief Joseph Hatchery Program Environmental...Statement (DOE/EIS-0384, November 2009). BPA has decided to fund the construction,...

2010-03-29

181

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 4 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In September of 2003, twenty-nine hatchery and twenty-eight wild spring chinook adults were placed into the observation stream located at the Cle Elum Supplementation Research Facility. In, addition 20 precocious males, 7 hatchery and 13 wild, were simultaneously released into the structure. As in previous years, the fish had small amounts of fin material removed prior to being introduced into the stream so that microsatellite DNA based pedigree analyses could be performed on their subsequent progeny. The entire 127 m long by 7.9 m wide stream was made available to this group of fish. Continuous behavioral observations were made while the females prepared nests and spawned. Moreover, standard measurements of adult longevity, spawning participation, water velocity, redd sizes, gravel composition, water temperature and flow were taken. Fry produced from these fish started to emigrate from the stream in early January 2004. They were trapped and sub-sampled for later microsatellite DNA analyses. In mid May of 2004 fry emergence from the channel was complete and residual fish were captured by seine and electro-fishing so that the entire juvenile population could be proportionately sampled. Audiotape records of the behavior of wild and hatchery adults spawning in the observation stream in 2001 were transcribed into continuous ethograms. Courting, agonistic, and location data were extracted from these chronological records and analyzed to characterize the reproductive behavior of both hatchery and wild fish. In addition, a ''gold standard'' pedigree analysis was completed on the fry originating from the adults placed into the observation stream in 2001. Behavioral and morphological data collected on hatchery and wild males were linked to the results of the pedigree analysis to ascertain what factors affected their reproductive success (RS) or capacity to produce fry. Individual RS values were calculated for each male placed into the observation stream and the coefficient of variation calculated from these values was greater than 100%. To determine what might be responsible for this degree of variation we examined the relative importance of a variety of physical and behavioral traits. Relative body size, for example, was found not be an important predictor of reproductive success. Instead, the capacity to court females and dominate sexual rivals was directly associated with male RS. However, males that had low dominance scores were also successful at producing offspring. These individuals utilized alternative behavioral strategies to gain close proximity to females and were successful in their attempts to fertilize eggs. Observations made on the color patterns of males showed dominance was closely linked with the possession of an overall black or dark brown color pattern. In addition, we discovered that males that had multiple mates achieved higher RS values than those who spawned with fewer females. The approach we are taking to compare the reproductive competency of hatchery and wild fish is to first determine the factors that are strongly linked to reproductive behavior and then assess whether significant differences occur in the expression of these traits based on the fish origin. Transcriptions of audiotapes are continuing and a second gold standard pedigree analyses on the fry produced from adults placed into the observation stream in 2002 is nearing completion. Future work will be directed at discovering the factors that affect female RS values. In the fall of 2004 we will again liberate hatchery and wild fish simultaneously into the entire observation stream to continue our efforts to objectively determine if differences in RS are caused by fish origin.

Schroder, S.L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Watson, B.D. (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2004-05-01

182

Hatchery Evaluation Report\\/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of tall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and

1996-01-01

183

Hatchery Evaluation Report\\/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Spring Chinook : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Spring Chinook). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead. and

1996-01-01

184

Final design review report for K basin dose reduction project  

SciTech Connect

The strategy for reducing radiation dose originating from radionuclides absorbed in the K East Basin concrete is to raise the pool water level to provide additional shielding. This report documents a final design review for cleaning/coating basin walls and modifying other basin components where appropriate. The conclusion of this review was that the documents developed constitute an acceptable design for the Dose Reduction Project.

Blackburn, L.D.

1996-03-28

185

Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project--Final Report. Executive Summary [and] Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project: Final Report on House Bill 1909  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication contains the following: (1) Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project--Final Report. Executive Summary (January 2006); and (2) Competency-Based Transfer Pilot Project: Final Report on House Bill 1909 (January 2005). In 2003, the legislature and governor enacted House Bill 1909 to create a pilot project on competency-based transfer…

Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2006

2006-01-01

186

Hatchery Evaluation Report/Rapid River Hatchery - Spring Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Rapid River Hatchery (Spring Chinook). The hatchery is located in the lower Snake River basin near Riggins Idaho. The hatchery is used for adult collection egg incubation, and rearing of spring chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery.

1996-05-01

187

Project TIES: Towards Inclusion in Early Settings Model Demonstration Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes the activities and outcomes of Project TIES (Towards Inclusion in Early Education), a federally funded demonstration model training program designed to enhance the abilities of child care providers and trainers to include young children, birth to five, with disabilities in developmentally appropriate child care…

Willis, Clarissa A.

188

Optimum Size for Planting Hatchery Produced Oyster Seed.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The ability of hatcheries to produce oyster seed for stocking a variety of oyster culture operations is well established. Hatchery produced seed has not gained acceptance along the Gulf Coast primarily because survival of seed is poorly understood, partic...

R. K. Wallace F. S. Rikard J. C. Howe D. B. Rouse

2001-01-01

189

The Midlands Consortium Star Schools Project: Final Report, Final Evaluation Report, Final Evaluation Report Appendices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The reports presented in this document describe the results of the first 2 years of the Midlands Consortium Star Schools Project (MCSSP) (October 1, 1988-December 31, 1990). The first report summarizes the major accomplishments of the MCSSP, including: (1) the installation of communications satellites at schools in Alabama, Kansas, Mississippi,…

Midlands Consortium.

190

Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operation and evaluation. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribes form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery. The LRHCT also serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. Since 1994 the kokanee fingerling program has changed to yearling releases. By utilizing both the hatcheries and additional net pens, up to 1,000,000 kokanee yearlings can be reared and released. The construction and operation of twenty net pens in 2001 enabled the increased production. Another significant change has been to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native tributary stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2003 Fourth Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success. The harvest and data collection were the highest level to date with 1,668 rainbow trout and 416 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen continue to praise the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 90% of the rainbows and 93% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2003).

Lovrak, Jon (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Ford, WA); Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Fish Management Program, Hatcheries Division, Kettle Falls, WA)

2004-01-01

191

Programmable SAW development :Sandia/NASA project final report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a project to develop both fixed and programmable surface acoustic wave (SAW) correlators for use in a low power space communication network. This work was funded by NASA at Sandia National Laboratories for fiscal years 2004, 2003, and the final part of 2002. The role of Sandia was to develop the SAW correlator component, although additional work pertaining to use of the component in a system and system optimization was also done at Sandia. The potential of SAW correlator-based communication systems, the design and fabrication of SAW correlators, and general system utilization of those correlators are discussed here.

Brocato, Robert Wesley

2004-10-01

192

Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II  

SciTech Connect

The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

2007-10-31

193

Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project: Public final design report  

SciTech Connect

This Public Final Design Report describes the 70 MW(e) Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant under construction in Brilliant, Ohio. This project is receiving cost-sharing from the US Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administered by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-87 MC24132.000. The project is also receiving costsharing from the State of Ohio. This award is being administered by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The Tidd PFBC Demonstration Project is the first utility-scale demonstration project in the US. Its objective is to demonstrate that the Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) combined-cycle technology is an economic, reliable, and environmentally superior alternative to conventional technology in using high-sulfur coal to generate electricity. Detailed design of the plant began in May 1987, leading to the start of construction in April 1988. First coal fire occurred in November 1990, and the three-year test program began in February 1991.

Not Available

1992-10-01

194

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-03-01

195

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project. Final report. Volume 1. Project summary  

SciTech Connect

The SOLERAS Project Summary - Final Report contains a synopsis of each completed project based on contractors final report. Additionally, a brief description of the limited testing completed by the SOLERAS staff on the collectors is included. SOLERAS comments or opinions expressed in the report are solely based on experiences with the SOLERAS Installations. It must be recognized that many product improvements and design modifications have been made since installation completion, many of which are the result of SOLERAS experience. The last chapter of this report is a synopsis of suggested new research areas for the solar cooling program. These suggestions were made by the participants of the cooling workshop held in Phoenix, Arizona in August 1984.

Not Available

1986-01-01

196

Final project report, TA-35 Los Alamos Power Reactor Experiment No. II (LAPRE II) decommissioning project  

SciTech Connect

This final report addresses the decommissioning of the LAPRE II Reactor, safety enclosure, fuel reservoir tanks, emergency fuel recovery system, primary pump pit, secondary loop, associated piping, and the post-remediation activities. Post-remedial action measurements are also included. The cost of the project, including Phase I assessment and Phase II remediation was approximately $496K. The decommissioning operation produced 533 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 5 m{sup 3} of mixed waste.

Montoya, G.M.

1992-05-01

197

Final project report, TA-35 Los Alamos Power Reactor Experiment No. II (LAPRE II) decommissioning project  

SciTech Connect

This final report addresses the decommissioning of the LAPRE II Reactor, safety enclosure, fuel reservoir tanks, emergency fuel recovery system, primary pump pit, secondary loop, associated piping, and the post-remediation activities. Post-remedial action measurements are also included. The cost of the project, including Phase I assessment and Phase II remediation was approximately $496K. The decommissioning operation produced 533 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 5 m{sup 3} of mixed waste.

Montoya, G.M.

1992-01-01

198

Broiler Hatchery (Released on March 16, 2011).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Commercial hatcheries in the 19 State weekly program set 208 million eggs in incubators during the week ending March 12, 2011. This was up 1 percent from the eggs set the corresponding week a year earlier. Average hatchability for chicks hatched during th...

2011-01-01

199

Agricultural Energy Curriculum Development Project. Research and Development Project in Career Education, Vocational. Final Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project was conducted to develop energy instructional units which would fit into each year of a three-year farm business management curriculum. Four curriculum units which focus on fertilizer management in crop production were developed. The first unit was designed to develop farmers' awareness of energy as a vital resource to their businesses…

Wacholz, Marlin

200

Olympia-South Tacoma Reconductor Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to change a 230,000-volt (230-kV) transmission line that runs between Olympia Substation and South Tacoma Switching Station, a distance of about 58 kilometers (36 miles). Under the proposal, they would restrict the line with slightly larger new wire in order to improve line safety. An Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared to determine whether the proposal would cause any significant environmental impact. The EA was reviewed by the public in December 1995. This Final EA has revisions that address the public comments. It was found that the project would cause little overall environmental impact and a Finding of No Significant Impact has been completed.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1996-06-01

201

Joint HVDC Agricultural Study : Final Project Report, Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect

This final project report describes a 3-year study in central Oregon, conducted to assess the possible environmental effects of a +-500-kV d-c transmission line. The study, which involved beef cattle and crops, was conducted by Oregon State University (OSU) through an intergovernmental agreement with BPA. The Grizzly Mt. Facility was established by the BPA because few studies have been done for d-c transmission lines. In addition, when the Pacific Intertie was upgraded to +-500-kV in February 1985, it became the first commercial +-500 d-c line in North America. No adverse biological effects associated with the electrical properties of the Pacific d-c Intertie line were documented during the 15 years the line operated at +-400-kV. Although no such effects were expected at the higher operating voltage, data from the Grizzly Mt. Facility would be used to evaluate this expectation.

Raleigh, Robert J.

1988-09-30

202

Sherman Creek Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program; 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Sherman Creek Hatchery's primary objective is the restoration and enhancement of the recreational and subsistence fishery in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The Sherman Creek Hatchery (SCH) was designed to rear 1.7 million kokanee fry for acclimation and imprinting during the spring and early summer. Additionally, it was designed to trap all available returning adult kokanee during the fall for broodstock operations and evaluations. Since the start of this program, the operations on Lake Roosevelt have been modified to better achieve program goals. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Colville Confederated Tribe form the interagency Lake Roosevelt Hatcheries Coordination Team (LRHCT) which sets goals and objectives for both Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery and serves to coordinate enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake. The primary changes have been to replace the kokanee fingerling program with a yearling (post smolt) program of up to 1,000,000 fish. To construct and operate twenty net pens to handle the increased production. The second significant change was to rear up to 300,000 rainbow trout fingerling at SCH from July through October, for stocking into the volunteer net pens. This enables the Spokane Tribal Hatchery (STH) to rear additional kokanee to further the enhancement efforts on Lake Roosevelt. Current objectives include increased use of native/indigenous stocks where available for propagation into Upper Columbia River Basin Waters. The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program (LRFEP) is responsible for monitoring and evaluation on the Lake Roosevelt Projects. From 1988 to 1998, the principal sport fishery on Lake Roosevelt has shifted from walleye to include rainbow trout and kokanee salmon (Underwood et al. 1997, Tilson and Scholz 1997). The angler use, harvest rates for rainbow and kokanee and the economic value of the fishery has increased substantially during this 10-year period. The investigations on the lake also suggest that the hatchery and net pen programs have enhanced the Lake Roosevelt fishery while not negatively impacting wild and native stocks within the lake. The 2002 Third Annual Two Rivers Trout Derby was again a great success with 529 rainbow trout and 80 kokanee salmon caught. The fishermen had a lot of praise for the volunteer net pen program and the hatchery efforts as 84% of the rainbows and 62% of the kokanee caught were of hatchery origin (Lee, 2002).

Combs, Mitch (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Kettle Falls, WA)

2003-01-01

203

Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-11-14

204

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2004 Annual Operation Plan, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

Harty, Harold R.; Penney, Aaron K.; Larson, Roy Edward (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2005-12-01

205

Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Complex; Operations and Maintenance and 2005 Annual Operation Plan, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery (NPTH) responds directly to a need to mitigate for naturally-reproducing salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin. The overall goal is to produce and release fish that will survive to adulthood, spawn in the Clearwater River subbasin and produce viable offspring that will support future natural production and genetic integrity. Several underlying purposes of fisheries management will be maintained through this program: (1) Protect, mitigate, and enhance Columbia River subbasin anadromous fish resources. (2) Develop, reintroduce, and increase natural spawning populations of salmon within the Clearwater River subbasin. (3) Provide long-term harvest opportunities for Tribal and non-Tribal anglers within Nez Perce Treaty lands within four generations (20 years) following project completion. (4) Sustain long-term fitness and genetic integrity of targeted fish populations. (5) Keep ecological and genetic impacts to non-target populations within acceptable limits. (6) Promote Nez Perce Tribal Management of Nez Perce Tribal hatchery Facilities and production areas within Nez Perce Treaty lands. Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery is a supplementation program that will rear and release spring, fall, and early-fall stocks of chinook salmon. Two life stages of spring chinook salmon will be released: parr and presmolts. Fall and early-fall chinook salmon will be released as subyearling smolts. The intent of NPTHC is to use conventional hatchery and Natural Rearing Enhancement Systems (NATURES) techniques to develop, increase and restore natural populations of spring and fall chinook salmon in the Clearwater River subbasin.

Harty, Harold R.; Lundberg, Jeffrey H.; Penney, Aaron K. (Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID)

2005-02-01

206

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

2008-07-25

207

Human Genome Project: Information access, management, and regulation. Final report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Human Genome Project is a large, internationally coordinated effort in biological research directed at creating a detailed map of human DNA. This report describes the access of information, management, and regulation of the project. The project led to...

J. D. McInerney L. B. Micikas

1996-01-01

208

Idaho ASAP Demonstration Project, Volume I. Final Report Summary (1976).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report provides background information for the Alcohol Safety Action Project in Idaho. Countermeasures implemented to reduce the number of drunken drivers on Idaho highways are discussed. Accident trends in Idaho before the project, during the project...

1977-01-01

209

Assessment of High Rates of Precocious Male Maturation in a Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Hatchery Program, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect

The Yakima River Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project in Washington State is currently one of the most ambitious efforts to enhance a natural salmon population in the United States. Over the past five years we have conducted research to characterize the developmental physiology of naturally- and hatchery-reared wild progeny spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Yakima River basin. Fish were sampled at the main hatchery in Cle Elum, at remote acclimation sites and, during smolt migration, at downstream dams. Throughout these studies the maturational state of all fish was characterized using combinations of visual and histological analysis of testes, gonadosomatic index (GSI), and measurement of plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). We established that a plasma 11-KT threshold of 0.8 ng/ml could be used to designate male fish as either immature or precociously maturing approximately 8 months prior to final maturation (1-2 months prior to release as 'smolts'). Our analyses revealed that 37-49% of the hatchery-reared males from this program undergo precocious maturation at 2 years of age and a proportion of these fish appear to residualize in the upper Yakima River basin throughout the summer. An unnaturally high incidence of precocious male maturation may result in loss of potential returning anadromous adults, skewing of female: male sex ratios, ecological, and genetic impacts on wild populations and other native species. Precocious male maturation is significantly influenced by growth rate at specific times of year and future studies will be conducted to alter maturation rates through seasonal growth rate manipulations.

Larsen, Donald; Beckman, Brian; Cooper, Kathleen

2003-08-01

210

Alaska Oil and Gas Exploration, Development, and Permitting Project. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This is the final technical report for Project 15446, covering the grant period of October 2002 through March 2006. This project connects three parts of the oil exploration, development, and permitting process to form the foundation for an advanced inform...

R. Crandall R. R. McMahon

2006-01-01

211

Hatchery Evaluation Report/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Spring Chinook : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Spring Chinook). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of fall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead. and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery.

1996-05-01

212

Hatchery Evaluation Report/Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Summer Steelhead : an Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Summer Steelhead). Lyons Ferry Hatchery is located downstream of the confluence of the Palouse and Snake rivers, about 7 miles west of Starbuck, Washington. The hatchery is used for adult collection of tall chinook and summer steelhead, egg incubation of fall chinook, spring chinook, steelhead, and rainbow trout and rearing of fall chinook, spring chinook, summer steelhead, and rainbow trout. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery.

1996-05-01

213

Hatchery Evaluation Report/Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery - Tule Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT) Performance Measures.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Spring Creek National Fish Hatchery (Tule Fall Chinook). The hatchery is located along the Columbia River at Underwood, Washington, approximately 30 miles upstream of Bonneville Dam. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of Tule Fall chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, Montgomery

1996-05-01

214

Hawaii Demonstration Project to Avert Unintended Teenage Pregnancy: 1978-1982. Final Report. Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report provides a descriptive overview of three approaches which the Hawaii Demonstration Project initiated to reduce unintended teenage pregnancies. Project evaluation findings are summarized; both qualitative and quantitative data are presented for a comprehensive picture of the project and its input. Project limitations and…

Levitt-Merin, Marta; Sutter, Sharon Kingdon

215

42 CFR 137.332 - On what basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? 137.332 Section...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? (a) The...

2012-10-01

216

42 CFR 137.332 - On what basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? 137.332 Section...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...basis may the Secretary reject a final construction project proposal? (a) The...

2011-10-01

217

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Encoal project final report, July 1, 1997--July 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This document is the summative report on the ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project. It covers the time period from September 17, 1990, the approval date of the Cooperative Agreement between ENCOAL and the US Department of Energy (DOE), to July 17, 1997, the formal end of DOE participation in the Project. The Cooperative Agreement was the result of an application by ENCOAL to the DOE soliciting joint funding under Round III of the Clean Coal Technology Program. By June 1992, the ENCOAL Plant had been built, commissioned and started up, and in October 1994, ENCOAL was granted a two-year extension, carrying the project through to September 17, 1996. No-cost extensions have moved the Cooperative Agreement end date to July 17, 1997 to allow for completion of final reporting requirements. At its inception, ENCOAL was a subsidiary of Shell Mining Company. In November 1992, Shell Mining Company changed ownership, becoming a subsidiary of Zeigler Coal Holding Company (Zeigler) of Fairview Heights, Illinois. Renamed successively as SMC Mining Company and then Bluegrass Coal Development Company, it remained the parent entity for ENCOAL, which has operated a 1,000-ton/day mild coal gasification demonstration plant near Gillette, Wyoming for nearly 5 years. ENCOAL operates at the Buckskin Mine owned by Triton Coal Company (Triton), another Zeigler subsidiary.

NONE

1997-07-01

218

76 FR 57729 - Boundary Hydroelectric Project; Sullivan Creek Project; Notice of Availability of the Final...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Project No. 2225-015] Boundary Hydroelectric Project; Sullivan Creek Project...for the Relicensing of the Boundary Hydroelectric Project and the Surrender of the Sullivan...applications for license for the Boundary Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 2144-38),...

2011-09-16

219

METAMORPHOSIS AND POSTLARVAL GROWTH OF ABALONE HALIOIS RUFESCENS IN A MEXICAN COMMERCIAL HATCHERY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metamorphosis induction and postlarval growth of the red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) were evaluated in a commercial farm of Baja California, Mexico. This hatchery settles larvae with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 1-mM final concentration) and culture postlarvae in 250-L tanks placed in a four-story structure inside a building with artificial illumination. Eight tanks (four at the top and four at the bottom

RICARDO SEARCY-BERNAL; ESTEBAN PÉREZ-SÁNCHEZ; CASANDRA ANGUIANO-BELTRÁN; ROBERTO FLORES-AGUILAR

2007-01-01

220

2001 Storm Drain Monitoring and Municipal Training Project. A Final Report to the New Hampshire Estuaries Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (DES) received funds in 2001 from the New Hampshire Estuaries Project (NHEP) to train municipal staff in coastal communities to identify illicit discharges. This final report describes the resulting t...

A. F. Donlon

2003-01-01

221

Effectiveness of an integrated hatchery program: can genetic-based performance differences between hatchery and wild Chinook salmon be avoided?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Performance of wild (W) and hatchery (H) spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) was evaluated for a sixth generation hatchery program. Management techniques to minimize genetic divergence from the wild stock included regular use of wild broodstock and volitional releases of juveniles. Performance of HH, WW, and HW (hatchery female spawned with wild male) crosses was compared in hatchery and stream environments. The WW juveniles emigrated from the hatchery at two to three times the rate of HH fish in the fall (HW intermediate) and 35% more HH than WW adults returned (27% more HW than WW adults). Performance in the stream did not differ statistically between HH and WW fish, but outmigrants (38% WW, 30% HW, and 32% HH fish) during the first 39 days of the 16-month sampling period composed 74% of total outmigrants. Differences among hatchery-reared crosses were partially due to additive genetic effects, were consistent with domestication (increased fitness for the hatchery population in the hatchery program), and suggested that selection against fall emigration from the hatchery was a possible mechanism of domestication.

Hayes, Michael C.; Reisenbichler, Reginald R.; Rubin, Stephen P.; Drake, Deanne C.; Stenberg, Karl D.; Young, Sewall F.

2013-01-01

222

Time management of final year undergraduate English projects: supervisees’ and the supervisor's coping strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores how the individuality of students affects their time management strategies in doing undergraduate final year projects. This study attempts to investigate how four students responded differently to the same time management advice given by the supervisor of their final year projects in two different teacher education programmes on teaching English as a Second Language. The strategies that

Belinda Ho

2003-01-01

223

Nabisco Foods Division--"New Indy" Workplace Literacy Project. Final Performance Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains a final report, evaluation, and curriculum materials from a project conducted at the RJR Nabisco plant in Indianapolis to upgrade the literacy and numeracy skills of the workers to facilitate technological changes to production lines. As the final report explains, although the goal of the project was to recruit and test 150…

Ivy Tech State Coll., Indianapolis, IN.

224

Time Management of Final Year Undergraduate English Projects: Supervisees' and the Supervisor's Coping Strategies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Explores how the individuality of students affects their time management strategies in doing undergraduate final year projects. Investigates how four students responded differently to the same time management advice given by the supervisor of their final year projects in two different teacher education programs on teaching English as a Second…

Ho, Belinda

2003-01-01

225

Chattanooga SmartBus Project Final Phase II Evaluation Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of Phase II of the national evaluation of the Chattanooga Area Regional Transportation Authority's (CARTA's) SmartBus Project. The Smartbus Project is a comprehensive transit intelligent transportation systems (ITS) progra...

J. Bauer J. Rephlo R. Hass

2008-01-01

226

AgraPure Mississippi Biomass Project. Final Technical Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The AgraPure Mississippi Biomass project was a congressionally directed project, initiated to study the utilization of Mississippi agricultural byproducts and waste products in the production of bio-energy and to determine the feasibility of commercializa...

D. A. Blackwell L. W. Broadhead W. Harrell

2006-01-01

227

Final report Hanford environmental compliance project 89-D-172  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Environmental Compliance (HEC) Project is unique in that it consisted of 14 subprojects which varied in project scope and were funded from more that one program. This report describes the HEC Project from inception to completion and the scope, schedule, and cost of the individual subprojects. Also provided are the individual subproject Cost closing statements and Project completion reports accompanied by construction photographs and illustrations.

Kelly, J.R.

1996-02-08

228

Lower Merrimack Valley Workplace Education Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A description is provided of the Lower Merrimack Valley Workplace Education Project (WEP), an educational project that offers English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) and job-specific education classes to hourly employees in the Semiconductor Division of Alpha Industries. The challenge of the project was to create a WEP that could accommodate the…

Norris, Cynthia Zylkuski; Breen, Patricia K.

229

Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Summary  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) to undertake fishery research and mitigation activities in the Yakima River Basin. The State of Washington and the Yakama Indian Nation (YIN) would jointly direct the project. In cooperation with BPA, the project managers propose to construct, operate and maintain anadromous (e.g. salmon) fish production facilities The

Confederated Tribes

1996-01-01

230

The Workplace Literacy System Project (WLS). Final Performance Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Workplace Literacy System Project (WLS) prepared interactive CD-ROM discs containing about 50 hours of instruction and drill in basic skills presented within the context of the textile/apparel manufacturing industry. The project was conducted at a Sara Lee knit products plant in North Carolina. During the project, literacy task analyses were…

Poulton, Bruce R.

231

Decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East. Project final report  

SciTech Connect

The decontamination and dismantlement of the JANUS Reactor at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) was completed in October 1997. Descriptions and evaluations of the activities performed and analyses of the results obtained during the JANUS D and D Project are provided in this Final Report. The following information is included: objective of the JANUS D and D Project; history of the JANUS Reactor facility; description of the ANL-E site and the JANUS Reactor facility; overview of the D and D activities performed; description of the project planning and engineering; description of the D and D operations; summary of the final status of the JANUS Reactor facility based upon the final survey results; description of the health and safety aspects of the project, including personnel exposure and OSHA reporting; summary of the waste minimization techniques utilized and total waste generated by the project; and summary of the final cost and schedule for the JANUS D and D Project.

Fellhauer, C.R.; Clark, F.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.; Garlock, G.A. [MOTA Corp., Cayce, SC (United States)

1997-10-01

232

Mortality control of scallop larvae in the hatchery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Larval mortalities occurring in molluscan hatcheries have often been associated with bacterial contamination, and more specifically with vibrios. Although batches of oyster and clam larvae have been routinely reared in the hatchery of Argenton (North Brittany, France) without antibiotics, high larval mortalities have been recorded with the great scallop, Pecten maximus, under similar conditions. For this species, an addition of

R. Robert; P. Miner; J. L. Nicolas

1996-01-01

233

Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1998-1999 Annual Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan (MI) raceways using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss).

R. Wess Stonecypher; Groberg Jr. Warren J; Brett M. Farman

2001-01-01

234

A systematic approach to the implementation of final year project in an electrical engineering undergraduate course  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a computerized management system for the processing of a final year project in an electrical engineering undergraduate course including a structured project allocation to students, a comprehensive assessment procedure, an automated processing of marks, and a management supporting system. An optical reader is used to scan the project selection made by all the students, and the allocation

Y. Teo; D. J. Ho

1998-01-01

235

Project I-TIP: Inservice Training for Infant Personnel. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report describes Project I-TIP (Inservice Training for Infant Personnel), a 3-year project which developed and demonstrated a comprehensive model of inservice training for personnel serving children with handicaps (ages 0-5 years). Specifically the project provided training at 17 sites to over 900 individuals. Training protocols were…

Freund, Maxine; Rab, Victoria Y.

236

THE IMPORTANCE AND ASSESSMENT OF FINAL YEAR PROJECTS: CASE STUDIES FROM AFRICA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The importance of final year projects in electrical\\/electronics engineering education cannot be over emphasised. A fair assessment of these projects is therefore essential. Unfortunately assessing projects can be very subjective if no proper guidelines are given. This is actually the case in some institutions where there may be a yawning gap between the marks given by two examiners to the

E. A. Jackson

1987-01-01

237

TASC Russia, Women and Infants' (WIN) Health Project, Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Women and Infants' Health Project (WIN), funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)/Russia, is a comprehensive reproductive health project that has been working in two pilot regions (Perm Oblast and Novgorod the Great/Vel...

2003-01-01

238

Final Report: The Expressive Arts Outreach Project (2000-2003)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Expressive Arts Outreach (EAO) project, housed at the Center for Best Practices in Early Childhood (the Center) at Western Illinois University, was funded in 2000 by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) as a 3-year outreach project. The target population was 3-8 year old children with a wide range of…

Hutinger, Patricia; Johanson, Joyce; Potter, Judy; Schneider, Carol

2005-01-01

239

Concord [New Hampshire] Career Education Project: Final Evaluation Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A summative evaluation of the first year of the Concord career education project is presented in the report. Major first-year goals of the project were the introduction of career education concepts and activities in the classroom, development of career education curriculum programs, and development of student testing and a process for exploration…

Unco, Inc., Rye, NH.

240

Project Closeout: Guidance for Final Evaluation of Building America Communities  

SciTech Connect

This report presents guidelines for Project Closeout. It is used to determine whether the Building America program is successfully facilitating improved design and practices to achieve energy savings goals in production homes. Its objective is to use energy simulations, targeted utility bill analysis, and feedback from project stakeholders to evaluate the performance of occupied BA communities.

Norton, P.; Burch, J.; Hendron, B.

2008-03-01

241

Automobile Mechanic Training Evaluation Project (AMTEP) Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A project was undertaken to identify, develop, and validate those performance, program, and personal standards judged necessary to operate and evaluate a quality automobile mechanic/technician training program. Included among the project activities were the following: (1) a review of existing literature on performance and program standards; (2)…

Losh, Charles

242

Parent Imprisonment and Child Socialization Research Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conducted in response to the 7% increase in black female single-parent families during 1970 to 1975, this project systematically investigates the impact of parent-absence on the socialization of black children. Divided into four separate studies, the project concentrates on (1) community-social variables related to black parent-absent families;…

Howard Univ., Washington, DC. Dept. of Psychology.

243

Solar Energy Information and Education Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The New Mexico Solar Energy Institute (NMSEI) conducted a concentrated information and education program during 1985. This report summarizes NMSEI's Information and Education project activities. It provides detailed descriptions of project costs and concise recommendations for similar programs. Individual sections contain explanations of the scope…

Hensley, Michael

244

Living Room School Project. Final Evaluation Report, 1972-1973.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report is an evaluation of the Living Room School Project, in Nassau County, New York, which stresses the use of home settings for a preschool program that involves children and parents. The project's major objective was to help parents meet their child's needs as parents learn to recognize themselves and their home as educational resources.…

McNally, Lawrence

245

The History of the Project on Human Potential. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A five-year project that used evidence from a variety of disciplines and cultures to develop a framework to help educational policymakers identify ways of achieving the full range of human potential in a given population is described. The project sponsor is an international non-profit institution dedicated to the cause of disadvantaged children…

Herzig, Margaret McCarthy

246

Y-12 RCRA Closure Initiation Projects: Revised Final Environmental Assessment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The program that addresses all remedial action work at the plant is the Y-12 Remedial Action Program (RAP). A major subproject within this program is the Closure and Post-Closure Activities (CAPCA) Project. This project encompasses the RCRA mandated closu...

1988-01-01

247

Manufacturing Technology Continuation Project--FY 92. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A project to identify metalworking subsectors (multiple spindle screw machining and gears machining) for inclusion in the Manufacturing Technology Preparation Program is the subject of this report. The project accomplished the following: developed five courses in multiple spindle, secured large donations of equipment and tooling, established a…

Chicago City Colleges, IL. Richard J. Daley Coll.

248

International project in history of solid state physics. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The International Project in History of Solid State Physics got underway in 1981, planning a large collaborative program to preserve and make known the history of this field. The Project's scholars and sponsors were spurred by the realization that although solid state physics is one of the most important influences on late twentieth civilization, its history was all but unknown

Weart

1984-01-01

249

Honey Lake Geothermal Project, Lassen County, California. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the drilling, completion, and testing of deep well WEN-2 for a hybrid electric power project which will use the area's moderate temperature geothermal fluids and locally procured wood fuel. The project is located within the Wendel-Amedee Known Geothermal Resource Area. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-11-01

250

Early Life History Variation among Hatchery and Wild-Origin Lake Trout Reared in a Hatchery Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hatcheries play a key role in augmenting populations for conservation, harvest, or both, although rapid domestication and adaptation to hatchery conditions may lead to fish that are maladapted to natural environments. Three processes may lead to domestication: (1) negative selection against fish adapted to wild environments, (2) positive selection for fish that thrive in artificial conditions, or (3) relaxation of

Jenni L. McDermid; William N. Sloan; Chris C. Wilson; Brian J. Shuter

2010-01-01

251

Final Report on the Aqueous Homogenous Suspension Reactor Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The most important results of twenty five years of research and development work on circulating aqueous homogeneous suspensions of fissile material are presented. Experiments in the final phase were carried out with a prototype nuclear reactor (KEMA Suspe...

1987-01-01

252

BMDO: New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project. Interim final report  

SciTech Connect

The BMDO-New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project(BMDO-NM) was a collaborative effort among the national laboratories to identify and evaluate the commercial potential of selected SDI-funded technologies. The project was funded by BMDO (formerly known as the Strategic Defense Initiative Office or SDIO), the Technology Enterprise Division (NM-TED) of the NM Economic Development Division, and the three National Laboratories. The project was managed and supervised by SAGE Management Partners of Albuquerque, and project funding was administered through the University of New Mexico. The BMDO-NM Demonstration Project focused on the development of a process to assist technology developers in the evaluation of selected BMDO technology programs so that commercialization decisions can be made in an accelerated manner. The project brought together BMDO, the NM-TED, the University of New Mexico, and three New Mexico Federal laboratories -- Los Alamos (DOE), Phillips (DOD) and Sandia (DOE). Each national laboratory actively participated throughout the project through its technology transfer offices. New Mexico was selected as the site for the Demonstration Program because of its three national and federal research laboratories engaged in BMDO programs, and the existing relationship among state govemment, the labs, universities and local economic development and business assistance organizations. Subsequent Commercialization and Implementation phases for the selected technologies from LANL and SNL were completed by SAGE and the Project Team. Funding for those phases was provided by the individual labs as well as BMDO and NM-TED in kind services. NM-TED played a proactive role in this New Mexico partnership. Its mandate is to promote technology-based economic development, with a commitment to facilitate the use of technology by industry and business statewide. TED assumed the role of program manager and executing agent for BMDO in this demonstration project.

Not Available

1993-11-01

253

Final Report for Project FG02-05ER25685  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the PI summarizes the results and achievements obtained in the sponsored project. Overall, the project has been very successful and produced both research results in massive data-intensive computing and data management for large scale supercomputers today, and in open-source software products. During the project period, 14 conference/journal publications, as well as two PhD students, have been produced due to exclusive or shared support from this award. In addition, the PI has recently been granted tenure from NC State University.

Xiaosong Ma

2009-05-07

254

Austin Children`s Museum ``Go Power`` project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Go Power, was conceived as an interactive exhibit and related set of activities designed to promote in children and families an understanding and appreciation of energy concepts. Planned in 1990, the project culminated its first phase of activities with colorful, interactive exhibit about the pathways and transformations of energy, on display at the Austin Children`s Museum between February 5th and June 6th, 1993. The project was supported by the US Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, the Lower Colorado River Authority and various local foundations and businesses. This report describes the process, product and outcomes of this project.

Not Available

1993-10-01

255

Blade System Design Studies Phase II : Final Project Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report details the work completed under Phase II of the Sandia National Laboratories Blade System Design Study blade design and manufacturing project; an integrated 9 meter blade design, tooling design and manufacturing, assembly fixture design and f...

D. S. Berry

2008-01-01

256

Cascadian farm small hydro project. Final performance report  

SciTech Connect

The first year of this hydroelectric project was spent in obtaining the necessary permits and in pipeline and road construction. The intake, drainage, and powerhouse are also discussed. Maximum power is 80 to 90 kW. (DLC)

Not Available

1982-01-01

257

Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, February 1985. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habit...

S. Sather-Blair S. Preston

1985-01-01

258

SOUTH FLORIDA ECOSYSTEM ASSESSMENT PROJECT: FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT - PHASE I  

EPA Science Inventory

The South Florida Ecosystem Assessment Project is an innovative, large-scale monitoring and assessment program designed to measure current and changing conditions of ecological resources in South Florida using an integrated holistic approach. Using the United States Environmenta...

259

Project Rio Blanco: Detonation Related Activities. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Project Rio Blanco is described in relation to detonation, its history, execution, and results. Topics discussed include generalized site activities, emplacement well, explosive services and operations, operational safety, environmental protection program...

1975-01-01

260

Final Project for Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Qian Yu, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Summary The objective of the project is to extract land cover information for an area covering the Amherst area. Context Type and level of course Introductary level ...

Yu, Qian

261

Final Report for Osteopathic Medical Manpower Information Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A project was initiated to identify, organize, and analyze the available information on osteopathic medical manpower and on educational resources for these professionals. Information on the predoctoral curriculum was obtained through consultation with col...

1977-01-01

262

District heating rehabilitation project. Viljandi - Estonia. Final report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The main objective of the project has been to assist Viljandi Municipality with the rehabilitation of their district heating system, and thereby to support the positive development of the district heating system in Viljandi to a more energy efficient and ...

1998-01-01

263

Gypsy Field project in reservoir characterization. Final report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall objective of this project is to use the extensive Gypsy Field laboratory and data set as a focus for developing and testing reservoir characterization methods that are targeted at improved recovery of conventional oil. The Gypsy Field laborato...

D. J. O'Meara

1997-01-01

264

Evaluation of the School Breakfast Program Pilot Project: Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1998, Congress authorized the School Breakfast Program Pilot Project (SBPP) to study the implementation and effects of providing universal free school breakfast in six school districts across the United States. The six school districts chosen from amon...

J. E. McLaughlin L. M. Daft L. S. Bernstein M. K. Crepinsek

2004-01-01

265

Legacy sample disposition project. Volume 2: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the legacy sample disposition project at the Idaho Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), which assessed Site-wide facilities/areas to locate legacy samples and owner organizations and then characterized and dispositioned these samples. This project resulted from an Idaho Department of Environmental Quality inspection of selected areas of the INEEL in January 1996, which identified some samples at the Test Reactor Area and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that had not been characterized and dispositioned according to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. The objective of the project was to manage legacy samples in accordance with all applicable environmental and safety requirements. A systems engineering approach was used throughout the project, which included collecting the legacy sample information and developing a system for amending and retrieving the information. All legacy samples were dispositioned by the end of 1997. Closure of the legacy sample issue was achieved through these actions.

Gurley, R.N.; Shifty, K.L.

1998-02-01

266

Fabrications of PVDF Gratings: Final Report for LDRD Project 79884.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this project was to do some preliminary studies and process development on electroactive polymers to be used for tunable optical elements and MEMS actuators. Working in collaboration between Sandia National Labs and The University of Illino...

G. R. Bogart J. A. Rogers D. W. Carr

2005-01-01

267

Kametolook River Coho Salmon Subsistence Project. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The legislature of the State of Alaska awarded the Department of Community and Regional Affairs (DCRA) $5 million to fund restoration projects requested by villages in the area impacted by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Perryville's top priority was restorat...

L. Hutchinson-Scarbrough J. McCullough

2003-01-01

268

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plan, Palisades Project: Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho and Wyoming to mitiga...

G. A. Meuleman R. C. Martin H. J. Hansen

1987-01-01

269

Wind Powering America State Outreach Project, Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of the Wind Powering America State Outreach Project was to facilitate the adoption of effective state legislation, policy, finance programs, and siting best practices to accelerate public acceptance and development of wind energy. This was accomp...

A. Margolis M. Sinclair

2012-01-01

270

Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been prepared for waste characterization activities to be conducted by the Transuranic (TRU) Project at the Hanford Site to meet requirements set forth in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, 4890139088-TSDF, Attachment B, including Attachments B1 through B6 (WAP) (DOE, 1999a). The QAPjP describes the waste characterization requirements and

2000-01-01

271

Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004  

SciTech Connect

The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

2007-03-31

272

The Hood River Story : Marketing a Conservation Project : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the marketing efforts behind the Hood River Conservation Project (the Project). The Project was a research effort designed to identify and systematically document the effects and retrofit potential of conservation when rapidly implemented within a limited geographic area. Super-weatherization measures were installed in 85 percent of all qualified households at virtually no cost to the homeowner. The goals of the project were to determine the maximum penetration rate of weatherization participation and measures within a limited period of time; the relative effectiveness of various approaches to conservation marketing; the characteristics of community social interaction and impacts under maximum conservation conditions; the costs associated with the development and conduct of a maximum conservation effort; and the effects of conservation on distribution and transmission systems, load management, and savings. The purpose of this volume is to present the marketing efforts of the Project (drawing from the community assessment, marketing plan, and promotional plan) and their impact in achieving program goals (defined as participation, measures penetration, and pre- and posttest survey results). 20 refs, 8 figs., 10 tabs.

Kaplon, Shellie

1987-09-01

273

Jackson Bluff Hydroelectric Project: Final operation and maintenance report  

SciTech Connect

The Jackson Bluff Hydroelectric Project is the first hydroelectric plant developed by the City of Tallahassee. The project is located on the Ochlockonee River approximately 66 miles upstream from its mouth at the Gulf of Mexico and approximately 20 miles west-southwest of the city of Tallahassee, Florida. The original hydroelectric generating facility with a total capacity of 8800 kw was retired in 1970. In the late seventies, the Department of Energy (DOE) classified the site as potential site for the Hydroelectric Demonstration Project. The City of Tallahassee submitted a proposal to DOE to reinstall generating equipment and operate the facility. The proposal was approved and after a feasibility study, the City was granted $1.75 million by DOE to meet approximately 15/percent/ of the total project cost. The existing powerhouse and intake serves to utilize three vertical-shaft turbines, two fixed blade and one adjustable blade propeller (Kaplan). The two fixed blade turbines drive a 4440 kw synchronous generator each and the adjustable blade propeller drives a 3438 kw synchronous generator. The plant design flow is 5200 cubic feet per second and the rated net head for the turbines is 32 feet. The runner diameters are 125.8 inches (fixed blade) and 104.7 inches (adjustable blade). In early 1983, with the proposal approved and the feasibility study completed, the City of Tallahassee took over the responsibility of the project. The rehabilitation work started in July 1983, and was completed in early 1986.

Hinton, J.; deMontmollin, F.

1988-03-01

274

35. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road ProjectNR7, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

35. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road Project--NR-7, Hawaii National Park, Island of Maui, Territory of Hawaii. LOOKING BACK FROM STATION 335 AT RETURN CURVE. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

275

36. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road ProjectNR7, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

36. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road Project--NR-7, Hawaii National Park, Island of Maui, Territory of Hawaii. TYPICAL RUBBLE MASONRY HEADWALL AND BOX CULVERT. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

276

38. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road ProjectNR7, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

38. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road Project--NR-7, Hawaii National Park, Island of Maui, Territory of Hawaii. BRIDGE AT STATION 85+. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

277

Final Status of the Salt Repository Project Waste Package Program Experimental Database.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the final status of the Salt Repository Project Waste Package Program Experimental Database. The data base serves as a clearinghouse for all data collected within the Waste Package Program (WPP) and its predecessor programs at Pacifi...

B. M. Thornton P. W. Reimus

1988-01-01

278

Alamogordo Regional Water Supply Project. Final Environmental Impact Statement: Volume 2-Appendicies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has prepared the Alamogordo Water Supply Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to assess the City of Alamogordo's (City's) proposal to develop a municipal potable water supply. The City has determined ...

2012-01-01

279

Small Generator Demonstration Project. Final report. [South Tacoma area  

SciTech Connect

The Small Generator Demonstration Project is an experimental effort to decrease the amount of hazardous waste being mishandled and improperly disposed by small businesses in the South Tacoma area of Tacoma, WA. This one-year project is centered around a program of education stressing voluntary compliance to increase recycling and decrease improper waste disposal. The project is designed to make the alternative waste-handling practices presented to the business community easy, inexpensive, and permanent by identifying available disposal resources such as local recyclers. 116 small businesses ranging from the automotive to the wood-products industry were visited and notified of safe methods of handling and disposing of their hazardous wastes. This information resulted in 40% of the businesses with waste-handling problems changing to proper waste disposal.

Not Available

1985-02-01

280

UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

NONE

1996-06-01

281

Final Reclamation Report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploratory shaft site  

SciTech Connect

The restoration of areas disturbed by activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) constitutes a unique operation at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, both from the standpoint of restoration objectives and the time frame for accomplishing these objectives. The BWIP reclamation program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) reclamation. The main focus of this report is on determining the success of the revegetation effort 1 year after work was completed. This report also provides a brief overview of the ESF reclamation program. 21 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

1990-06-01

282

78 FR 26063 - Central Utah Project Completion Act; East Hobble Creek Restoration Project Final Environmental...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...associated with the Final Environmental Assessment--East Hobble...as detailed in the Final Environmental Assessment will not have...the quality of the human environment, and that an environmental impact statement is...

2013-05-03

283

Academic Preparation for College: A Joint Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project to identify competencies needed by students entering college was undertaken jointly by the New Mexico Department of Education and the Commission on Higher Education. The first step was to review statewide data on enrollment in developmental/remedial college courses of graduates from New Mexico's public secondary schools. After a…

New Mexico Commission on Higher Education.

284

Facilitating joint implementation and clean energy projects. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The prime objectives of this multiple grant agreement between the United States Department of Energy`s Golden Field Office (DOE/GFO) and the United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE) were to: (1) inform investors of potential Joint Implementation projects; (2) identify clean energy projects and US renewable energy and energy efficiency companies; (3) report on the development of the renewable energy marketplace in Latin America and the Caribbean over the life of the REIA initiative; (4) conduct a survey and develop a recommended plan for streamlining and integrating CORECT activities; and (5) convene a meeting of representatives from the renewable energy industry, US electric utilities, power producers, project developers, other nonutility generators, and users of renewable energy resources to catalyze cooperative projects that support the development of renewable energy opportunities in emerging markets. All of these objectives were achieved by US/ECRE with some help from US/ECRE`s consortium of renewable energy industry trade associations.

NONE

1998-09-18

285

Phase II: Final Report. Northern New Mexico Energy Education Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objectives of the Northern New Mexico Energy Education Project were to: (1) improve teachers' knowledge of energy-related subject matter and energy-related educational materials; (2) develop continuing communication and cooperation between elementary and junior high staffs and the university on energy-related matters; and (3) provide follow-up…

New Mexico Highlands Univ., Las Vegas.

286

Adult Cuban Immigrant Project. Final Report. May, 1981 - June, 1983.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In its two years of operation, the Adult Cuban Immigrant Project served over 538 Cuban entrants in its prevocational English-as-a-second-language (ESL) program. The prevocational curriculum is a competency-based program that is designed to help students learn English in the context of life-coping skills and job-searching skills. Included in the…

MacNaughton, Carolina

287

Blood Lead Screening Project, Coffeyville, Kansas. Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) conducted a blood lead screening project in Coffeyville, Kansas. The goal was to determine if children from 6 through 71 months of age and pregnant women living in the vicinity of the Sherwin-Willia...

A. J. Luk

1993-01-01

288

Phase II: Final Report. Northern New Mexico Energy Education Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives of the Northern New Mexico Energy Education Project were to: (1) improve teachers' knowledge of energy-related subject matter and energy-related educational materials; (2) develop continuing communication and cooperation between elementary and junior high staffs and the university on energy-related matters; and (3) provide follow-up…

New Mexico Highlands Univ., Las Vegas.

289

Foreign Language/Area Studies Enhancement Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Foreign Language/Area Studies Enhancement Program at Central State University (Ohio) is an experience-centered work and study program in Africa designed to give students training in language, culture, and technology. It parallels and supports the university's northern Senegal water management project designed to promote self-sufficiency among…

Felker, William; Fuller, Clark

290

Leech Lake American Indian Foster Care Project 1978. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In its second year the project continued to attempt to reduce the incidence of separation of Indian children from their families and to establish permanent planning for those children who were removed, thus improving the child welfare services to Minnesota Chippewa Indian children and families on the Leech Lake Reservation through direct foster…

Walker and Associates, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.

291

Urban Options Solar Greenhouse Demonstration Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The following are included: the design process, construction, thermal performance, horticulture, educational activities, and future plans. Included in appendices are: greenhouse blueprints, insulating curtain details, workshop schedules, sample data forms, summary of performance calculations on the Urban Options Solar Greenhouse, data on vegetable production, publications, news articles on th Solar Greenhouse Project, and the financial statement. (MHR)

Cipparone, L.

1980-10-15

292

Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy, Alaska final Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) provides the mechanism to evaluate the integrated coal combustion/emission control system being demonstrated by the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) as part-of the third solicitation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT-III). The EMP monitoring is intended to satisfy two objectives: (1) to develop the information base necessary for identification, assessment, and mitigation of potential environmental problems arising from replication of the technology and (2) to identify and quantify project-specific and site-specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents (Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision). The EMP contains a description of the background and history of development of the project technologies and defines the processes that will take place in the combustion and spray dryer absorber systems, including the formation of flash-calcined material (FCM) and its use in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal from the flue gases. It also contains a description of the existing environmental resources of the project area. The EMP includes two types of environmental monitoring that are to be used to demonstrate the technologies of the HCCP: compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring. Compliance monitoring activities include air emissions, wastewater effluents, and visibility. Monitoring of these resources provide the data necessary to demonstrate that the power plant can operate under the required state and federal statutes, regulations, and permit requirements.

Not Available

1994-06-14

293

Final Report of the Vocational Assessment Project, 1979-80.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To improve vocational rehabilitation programs for schizophrenic persons, a project sought to design an effective assessment strategy. Inactive records of schizophrenic clients at New Jersey sheltered workshops were examined to determine validity and reliability of assessment instruments being used. General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB) profiles of…

Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. School of Medicine.

294

TWTF project criticality task force final review and assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility (TWTF) is being developed to process transuranic waste, stored and buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, into a chemically inert, physically stable basalt-like residue acceptable at a federal repository. A task force was assembled by the TWTF Project Division to review and assess all aspects of criticality safety for the TWTF. This document presents

K. B. McKinley; J. W. Cannon; F. J. Wheeler; H. A. Worle

1980-01-01

295

Final Status Survey for the Largest Decommissioning Project on Earth  

Microsoft Academic Search

To assist the United States Department of Energy's (US DOE's) re-industrialization efforts at its gaseous diffusion site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, known as the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), the US DOE awarded a 6-year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) contract to BNG America (formerly BNFL Inc.) in 1997. The ETTP 3-Building D and D Project included the removal

R. W. Dubiel; J. Miller; D. Quayle

2006-01-01

296

Victorias energy efficiency and cogeneration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a two-phase energy project currently contemplated for joint implementation at the Victorias Milling Company, a large sugar mill and refinery on the island of Negros in the Visayas region of the Philippines. The Energy Efficiency (EE) phase is expected to reduce of eliminate VMC`s fossil fuel consumption, which will have a direct and substantial impact on carbon emissions. Phase I is an EE project which involves the installation of equipment to reduce steam and electricity demand in the factories. Phase II, will involve retrofitting and increasing the capacity of the steam and power generation systems, and selling power to the grid. By increasing efficiency and output, the cogeneration project will allow the factory to use only bagasse sugar cane fiber waste as fuel for energy needs. The cogeneration project will also eliminate VMC`s electricity purchases and supply additional power for the island, which will offset generation capacity expansion on the island and the Visayas region.

NONE

1998-10-31

297

Community Affairs Training Evaluation; Project CATE: Phase I Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Within a program of training system evaluation, optimal training system development cannot occur without evaluation development, and evaluation cannot be very effective in the absence of an optimal approach to training system development. Therefore, the goal of the Community Affairs Training Evaluation (CATE) project was to develop a set of…

Texas Univ., Austin. Research and Development Center for Teacher Education.

298

Skill Standards and Certification Project. Final Detailed Report. Year Two.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document reports on the second year of a project conducted to design a seamless training application model for infusing workplace skills into academic and occupational programs at the secondary, postsecondary, and apprenticeship level using the components of SCANS (Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills). For this pilot…

North Lake Coll., Irving, TX.

299

Final Environmental Impact Statement. Grapevine Canyon Wind Project. Volume 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Grapevine Canyon Wind Project proposed by Foresight Flying M, LLC (Foresight) would include: (1) a wind energy generating facility up to 500 megawatts; (2) a 345-kilovolt (kV) electrical transmission tie-line; and (3) a 345-kV electrical interconnecti...

2012-01-01

300

Managerial Skills in Vocational Education Curriculum Development Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A project was conducted to develop, field test, and disseminate a curriculum guide for vocational education teachers to use in teaching managerial skills to vocational education students on the secondary level. After a cadre of 20 Arkansas secondary vocational education teachers who were either directly involved or interested in establishing a…

Clayton, Dean; Park, Ok

301

Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan required each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site that characterizes transuranic waste to be sent the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan that addresses applicable requirements specified in the quality assurance project plan (QAPP).

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-12-14

302

Final report of Project 617, the Energy Saver  

SciTech Connect

The Project work was begun in January of 1995 and was completed in May of 1996. The authors performed a broad value engineering study to examine all parts and functions to lower costs, improve functioning and safety. The results of the Phase 1 work was a total redesign of the original Energy Saver resulting in two components instead of three, a weight of four pounds versus the original fourteen pounds and a reduction from 21 pieces to 10 pieces. The manufactured cost dropped from $350 to $175. Based on these improvements the Value Improvement Project has been successful. The second generation unit was named the BROIL-MASTER and has been registered under the Provisional Application (Patent) Program. The authors performed a technical analysis to determine the potential energy savings of applications identified and collect data on host product gas consumption, payback period, and other cost/saving relationships. The industrial search for energy project applications for the authors design was not successful. Seven Broil-Master demonstration projects have been successfully completed. The Broil-Master has received certification from the American Gas Association and UL approval is due by the end of July. The Restaurant Equipment Test Center of Pacific Gas and Electric is interested in testing the Broil-Master sometime in 1996. The Broil-Master was shown at an International Restaurant Equipment Show in September, 1995 and the National Restaurant Show in May, 1996. The authors now have under way four tests with chains and several other tests pending.

NONE

1996-12-31

303

Work beyond GED. Final Report. Project #98-7011.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A project was designed to give 43 students enrolled in a GED (General Educational Development) program the opportunity to combine educational and vocational training in order to succeed in both. By focusing on self-awareness, career awareness, career counseling, job shadowing, and job-site mentoring activities while studying for a GED diploma,…

Conrady, Sue R.

304

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-08-18

305

Faculty College. Final Project Report, July 1, 1976 through June 30, 1978.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The final report of a faculty development project, sponsored by the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, is presented. Project objectives were to: augment the existing Faculty College programming with special focus sessions, featuring national leaders who would treat issues in one of the developing areas of the institution; bring…

Wisconsin Univ., Oshkosh.

306

California Peers Outreach Project: Application and Replication of Inclusive Models at the Local Level. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the California PEERS (Providing Education for Everyone in Regular Schools) Outreach Project, a cooperative effort of the California Department of Education, California State University at Hayward, and eight school districts. The project focused on increasing the capacity of the…

Sandoval, Leo; And Others

307

CASE (Community Advocacy and Service Engagement) Project Final Report: LYNX (C.F.R.T.A.).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is a final assessment of the CASE Project, a LYNX-FTA research project designed to study transit education and public engagement methods in Central Florida. In the Orlando area, as in other parts of the country, transit is viewed as a transpor...

R. Houck

2009-01-01

308

High/Scope Outreach Project. Final Report. October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The final report reviews accomplishments of an outreach project designed to provide technical assistance and training to early childhood programs for handicapped children. The project features the Cognitively Oriented Preschool Curriculum, a developmental approach based on Piagetian theory and explained to build on the child's accomplishments. A…

High/Scope Educational Research Foundation, Ypsilanti, MI.

309

Northwest Energy Policy Project: energy demand modeling and forecasting final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Northwest Energy Policy Project was undertaken to develop the necessary tools for energy policy development in the Pacific Northwest states individually and as a region. Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc. (MSNW) prepared the demand forecasting model for this project. This volume is the final report and incorporates a discussion of alternative methods of demand forecasting, the detailed formulation of MSNW's

McHugh

1977-01-01

310

Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Project. Final Report: Innovations in Protective Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report is a process evaluation of the Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention Project describing the efforts to develop a statewide philosophy and an operational plan in Texas toward primary and secondary prevention of child abuse and neglect. Discussion focuses on the background and origin of the project, first and second year operations…

Dennis-Small, Lucretia

311

Flat-Plate Solar Array Project: Final report: Volume 6, Engineering sciences and reliability  

Microsoft Academic Search

This volume of the series of final reports documenting the FSA Project deals with the Project's activities directed at developing the engineering technology base required to achieve modules that meet the functional, safety and reliability requirements of large-scale terrestrial photovoltaic systems applications. These activities included: (1) development of functional, safety, and reliability requirements for such applications; (2) development of the

R. G. Jr. Ross; M. I. Smokler

1986-01-01

312

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report  

SciTech Connect

The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

NONE

1997-07-01

313

Small Commercial Program DOE Project: Impact evaluation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1991, Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) implemented a Department of Energy grant to conduct a small commercial energy conservation project. The small commercial ``Mom, and Pop`` grocery stores within WEC`s service territory were selected as the target market for the project. Energy & Solid Waste Consultant`s (E&SWC) Impact Evaluation is documented here. The evaluation was based on data gathered from a variety of sources, including load profile metering, kWh submeters, elapsed time indicators, and billing histories. Five stores were selected to receive measures under this program: Waits River General Store, Joe`s Pond Store, Hastings Store, Walden General Store, and Adamant Cooperative. Specific measures installed in each store and description of each are included.

Bathgate, R.; Faust, S. [Energy and Solid Waste Consultants, Montpelier, VT (United States)

1992-08-12

314

Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

NONE

1996-09-01

315

THz transceiver characterization : LDRD project 139363 final report.  

SciTech Connect

LDRD Project 139363 supported experiments to quantify the performance characteristics of monolithically integrated Schottky diode + quantum cascade laser (QCL) heterodyne mixers at terahertz (THz) frequencies. These integrated mixers are the first all-semiconductor THz devices to successfully incorporate a rectifying diode directly into the optical waveguide of a QCL, obviating the conventional optical coupling between a THz local oscillator and rectifier in a heterodyne mixer system. This integrated mixer was shown to function as a true heterodyne receiver of an externally received THz signal, a breakthrough which may lead to more widespread acceptance of this new THz technology paradigm. In addition, questions about QCL mode shifting in response to temperature, bias, and external feedback, and to what extent internal frequency locking can improve stability have been answered under this project.

Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wanke, Michael Clement; Cich, Michael Joseph; Reno, John Louis; Fuller, Charles T.; Wendt, Joel Robert; Lee, Mark; Grine, Albert D.

2009-09-01

316

Ocean oil spill concentration and trajectory forecast project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the development of forecast methods to predict the movement and behavior of ocean oil spills. The main purpose of the project was to implement the forecast method for routine use in the National Weather Service (NWS). During oil spill events, the forecast method will be used by the responsible NWS Forecast Offices to support the clean-up and preventive operations. Oil spill forecast models can also be used for design and planning purposes in the coastal areas.

Barrientos, C.S.; Hess, K.W.

1983-08-01

317

Freihoelser Forst Local Training Area rehabilitation project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Intensive and continued use of the Freihoelser Forst Local Training Area (LTA) for military training activities had resulted in serious environmental problems, exemplified by a lack of vegetative cover and severe erosion by water and wind. The project`s goal was to develop and demonstrate rapid, cost-effective methods to stabilize the LTA`s barren, eroding maneuver areas and make training conditions more realistic. The major factors limiting rehabilitation efforts were the sandy, infertile, and acidic soils. The project was conducted in two phases. Phase I demonstrated and evaluated three separate rehabilitation treatments ranging in cost from moderate to expensive. Each treatment used a different type of soil amendment (fertilizer and straw, compost, or chicken manure), but all used identical seedbed preparation methods and seed mixtures. Phase I was conducted on relatively small replicated plots and was monitored three times during each growing season. All three treatments satisfactorily reestablished vegetation and controlled erosion. Because of their small size, the Phase I demonstration plots had only a minor stabilizing effect on the erosion problems of the LTA as a whole. The Phase II treatment was based on lessons teamed from Phase I and from other revegetation projects in Germany. Phase II revegetated a large area of the LTA, which included nearly all of the most severely disturbed land. Phase II, which was monitored in the same way as Phase I but for a shorter period of time, was highly successful in stabilizing most areas treated. The revegetation plant community was dominated by native grasses and legumes that stabilized the loose, sandy soils and improved the training realism of a major portion of the LTA.

Hinchman, R.R.; Zellmer, S.D.; Johnson, D.O.; Severinghaus, W.D.; Brent, J.J. [Army Construction Engineering Research Lab., Champaign, IL (United States). Environmental Div.

1991-12-01

318

Advanced Large Area Plastic Scintillator Project (ALPS): Final Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The advanced Large-Area Plastic Scintillator (ALPS) Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated possible technological avenues for substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in gamma-ray detection via large-area plastic scintillators. The three predominant themes of these investigations comprised the following: * Maximizing light collection efficiency from a single large-area sheet of plastic scintillator, and optimizing hardware event trigger definition to retain detection

David V. Jordan; Paul L. Reeder; Lindsay C. Todd; Glen A. Warren; Kathleen R. McCormick; Daniel L. Stephens; Bruce D. Geelhood; James M. Alzheimer; Shannon L. Crowell; William A. Sliger

2008-01-01

319

Advanced exterior sensor project : final report, September 2004.  

SciTech Connect

This report (1) summarizes the overall design of the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES) system to include detailed descriptions of system components, (2) describes the work accomplished throughout FY04 to evaluate the current health of the original prototype and to return it to operation, (3) describes the status of the AES and the AES project as of September 2004, and (4) details activities planned to complete modernization of the system to include development and testing of the second-generation AES prototype.

Ashby, M. Rodema

2004-12-01

320

Framework for Adaptable Operating and Runtime Systems: Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

In this grant, we examined a wide range of techniques for constructing high-performance con#12;gurable system software for HPC systems and its application to DOE-relevant problems. Overall, research and development on this project focused in three specifc areas: (1) software frameworks for constructing and deploying con#12;gurable system software, (2) applcation of these frameworks to HPC-oriented adaptable networking software, (3) performance analysis of HPC system software to understand opportunities for performance optimization.

Patrick G. Bridges

2012-02-01

321

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Plan, Palisades Project: Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, projects have been developed in Idaho and Wyoming to mitigate the losses of wildlife habitat and annual production due to the development and operation of the Palisades Project. A modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to assess the benefits of the preferred mitigation plan to wildlife. The interagency work group used the target species Habitat Units (HU's) lost with inundation of the reservoir area as a guideline during the mitigation planning process, while considering needs of wildlife in eastern Idaho and western Wyoming. A total of 37,068 HU's were estimated to be lost as a result of the inundation of the Palisades Reservoir area. Through a series of protection/enhancement projects, the preferred mitigation plan will provide benefits of an estimated 37,066 HU's. Target species to be benefited by this mitigation plan include bald eagle, mule deer, elk, mallard, Canada goose, mink, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, ruffed grouse, and peregrine falcon.

Meuleman, G. Allyn

1986-11-01

322

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01

323

Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Summary.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) to undertake fishery research and mitigation activities in the Yakima River Basin. The State of Washington and the Yakama Indian Nation (YIN) would jointly direct the project. In cooperation with BPA, the project managers propose to construct, operate and maintain anadromous (e.g. salmon) fish production facilities The goal is to conduct research activities designed to increase knowledge of supplementation techniques. These techniques would be applied to rebuild naturally spawning anadromous fish stocks historically present in the Yakima River Basin and, ultimately, those throughout the Columbia River Basin. Eventually, the YFP might involve the supplementation of all stocks of anadromous fish known to have occurred in the Yakima Basin. However, at this time only two action alternatives have been proposed, in addition to the No Action alternative: Alternative (1) would supplement depressed naturally spawning populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon; Alternative (2) (preferred) would include all actions under Alternative 1; it would also add a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho salmon in the Yakima Basin (Coho smolts are currently being imported from another basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish Management Plan; the stock is now virtually eliminated from the Basin.)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

1996-01-01

324

Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been prepared for waste characterization activities to be conducted by the Transuranic (TRU) Project at the Hanford Site to meet requirements set forth in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, 4890139088-TSDF, Attachment B, including Attachments B1 through B6 (WAP) (DOE, 1999a). The QAPjP describes the waste characterization requirements and includes test methods, details of planned waste sampling and analysis, and a description of the waste characterization and verification process. In addition, the QAPjP includes a description of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) requirements for the waste characterization program. Before TRU waste is shipped to the WIPP site by the TRU Project, all applicable requirements of the QAPjP shall be implemented. Additional requirements necessary for transportation to waste disposal at WIPP can be found in the ''Quality Assurance Program Document'' (DOE 1999b) and HNF-2600, ''Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan.'' TRU mixed waste contains both TRU radioactive and hazardous components, as defined in the WLPP-WAP. The waste is designated and separately packaged as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH), based on the radiological dose rate at the surface of the waste container. RH TRU wastes are not currently shipped to the WIPP facility.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-06

325

Final Scientifc Report - Hydrogen Education State Partnership Project  

SciTech Connect

Under the leadership of the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells program, Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) educated and worked with state leaders to encourage wider deployment of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Through outreach to state policymakers, legislative leaders, clean energy funds, energy agencies, and public utility commissions, CESA worked to accomplish the following objectives of this project: 1. Provide information and technical assistance to state policy leaders and state renewable energy programs in the development of effective hydrogen fuel cell programs. 2. Identify and foster hydrogen program best practices. 3. Identify and promote strategic opportunities for states and the Department of Energy (DOE) to advance hydrogen technology deployment through partnerships, collaboration, and targeted activities. Over the three years of this project, CESA, with our partner National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), was able to provide credible information on fuel cell policies, finance, and technical assistance to hundreds of state officials and other stakeholders. CESA worked with its membership network to effectively educate state clean energy policymakers, program managers, and decision makers about fuel cell and hydrogen technologies and the efforts by states to advance those technologies. With the assistance of NCSL, CESA gained access to an effective forum for outreach and communication with state legislators from all 50 states on hydrogen issues and policies. This project worked to educate policymakers and stakeholders with the potential to develop and deploy stationary and portable fuel cell technologies.

Leon, Warren

2012-02-03

326

Writing Lab Outreach Project, September 1, 1998-August 31, 2002. Outreach Projects for Children with Disabilities. Final Performance Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the Writing Lab Outreach Project (WLOP), a federally supported 3-year collaborative effort of Western Michigan University and the Kalamazoo (Michigan) Public Schools to prepare teams of general and special educators and speech-language pathologists to implement the writing lab approach…

Nelson, Nickola W.; Bahr, Christine M.; Van Meter, Adelia

327

US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project. Revision 1, Version 1: Final project plan  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date.

Not Available

1993-12-21

328

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Aldana, J. [NES, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

1997-03-01

329

Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

The AMWTP Final EIS assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with alternatives related to the construction and operation of a proposed waste treatment facility at the INEEL. The alternatives analyzed were: the No Action Alternative, the Proposed Action, the Non-Thermal Treatment Alternative, and the Treatment and Storage Alternative. The Proposed Action is the Preferred Alternative. Under the Proposed Action/Preferred Alternative, the AMWTP facility would treat transuranic waste, alpha-contaminated low-level mixed waste, and low-level mixed waste in preparation for disposal. After treatment, transuranic waste would be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Low-level mixed waste would be disposed of at an approved disposal facility depending on decisions to be based on DOE's Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Evaluation of impacts on land use, socioeconomics, cultural resources, aesthetic and scenic resources, geology, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, noise, traffic and transportation, occupational and public health and safety, INEEL services, and environmental justice were included in the assessment.

N /A

1999-02-12

330

On-farm biogas systems information dissemination project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to study how farmers manage anaerobic digesters on three New York State dairy farms. Two years of data collected were from both plug-flow and tower-type mixed-flow digesters at regular intervals over a three-year period revealed that the financial return from the energy produced by a biogass system in the late 1980`s is marginal. Little difficulty was experienced in operation of the anaerobic digester; however, several farms utilizing congeneration to convert biogas into electricity and heat suffered from not applying maintenance to the congenerator in a timely fashion.

Campbell, J.K.; Koelsch, R.K.; Guest, R.W.; Fabian, E.

1997-03-01

331

How do hatcheries influence embryonic development of sea turtle eggs? Experimental analysis and isolation of microorganisms in leatherback turtle eggs.  

PubMed

Many conservation programs consider translocation of turtle nests to hatcheries as a useful technique. The repeated use of the same incubation substrate over several seasons in these hatcheries could, however, be harmful to embryos if pathogens were able to accumulate or if the physical and chemical characteristics of the incubation environment were altered. However, this hypothesis has yet to be tested. We conducted two field experiments to evaluate the effects of hatchery sand and eggshell decay on the embryonic development of leatherback sea turtle eggs in Colombia. We identified the presence of both fungi and bacteria species on leatherback turtle eggs. Sea turtle eggs exposed to previously used hatchery substrates or to decaying eggshells during the first and middle third of the embryonic development produced hatchlings that were smaller and/or weighed less than control eggs. However, this did not negatively influence hatching success. The final third of embryonic development seems to be less susceptible to infection by microorganisms associated with decaying shells. We discuss the mechanisms that could be affecting sea turtle egg development when in contact with fungi. Further studies should seek to understand the infection process and the stages of development in which the fungi are more virulent to the eggs of this critically endangered species. PMID:22021044

Patino-Martinez, Juan; Marco, Adolfo; Quiñones, Liliana; Abella, Elena; Abad, Roberto Muriel; Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier

2011-10-21

332

Wildlife Impact Assessment Palisades Project, Idaho, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate pre- and post-construction habitat conditions of the US Bureau of Reclamation's Palisades Project in eastern Idaho. Eight evaluation species were selected with losses expressed in the number of Habitat Units (HU's). One HU is equivalent to one acre of prime habitat. The evaluation estimated that a loss of 2454 HU's of mule deer habitat, 2276 HU's of mink habitat, 2622 HU's of mallard habitat, 805 HU's of Canada goose habitat, 2331 HU's of ruffed grouse habitat, 5941 and 18,565 HU's for breeding and wintering bald eagles, and 1336 and 704 HU's for forested and scrub-shrub wetland nongame species occurred as a result of the project. The study area currently has 29 active osprey nests located around the reservoir and the mudflats probably provide more feeding habitat for migratory shore birds and waterfowl than was previously available along the river. A comparison of flow conditions on the South Fork of the Snake River below the dam between pre- and post-construction periods also could not substantiate claims that water releases from the dam were causing more Canada goose nest losses than flow in the river prior to construction. 41 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

Sather-Blair, Signe

1985-02-01

333

City of Austin, Texas, Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

On January 10, 1980, the City Council awarded a bid to Jet Industries of Austin, Texas, for fifteen electric vehicles, i.e., nine vans, four sedans, two pickups. In August, 1980, seven vehicles were placed in operation; five vehicles in September; one in October; and two in January, 1981. The vehicles were assigned to eight different city departments and have been operated and maintained for a four year period. Data, which consisted of information on daily operations, maintenance, and battery replacements, were collected on each vehicle throughout the project period. The Vehicle and Equipment Services (VES) Department analyzed the data and concluded that electric vehicles can be used for some city services; however, the cost per mile to operate and the incidence of downtime was considerably higher compared to similar gasoline or diesel-powered vehicles. The high cost to operate the electric vehicles is attributed to several factors; the low usage of the vehicles, the high degree of maintenance, frequent battery replacements, and poor performance. Use of the fleet was minimal, averaging only 6654 miles per unit for the entire project period. The highest mileage recorded on any one vehicle was 13,509 miles and the lowest mileage recorded was 1337 miles.

Brecher, A.

1984-01-01

334

Minimal Technologies Application Project, Hohenfels Training Area, Germany: Final report  

SciTech Connect

At the US Army Hohenfels Training Area in Germany, more than 30 years of continuous and intensive tactical training has caused extensive environmental damage because of the loss of vegetative cover and accelerated soil erosion. A project was conducted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and relative benefits of various revegetation procedures. These procedures involved amendment and seedbed preparation options that were combined with three different durations of site closure. The point-intercept method was used to measure the types and amounts of vegetation established and changes in the vegetative community. Over three growing seasons, applications of fertilizer and seed increased the percent grass, legume, and total vegetative cover. The duration of site closure had no influence on the types or amounts of ground cover established. Materials made up only 10% of the total cost of the fertilization and seeding operations. The results of the research indicate that less expensive methods of amendment application should be evaluated. The data also show that site closure is not practical, economical, or necessary. The results of this project suggest that a regular maintenance program consisting of seeding and fertilization is required to maintain adequate vegetative cover and control erosion on tactical training areas.

Zellmer, S.D.; Hinchman, R.R.; Johnson, D.O. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.); Severinghaus, W.D. (Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)); Brent, J.J. (Army Construction Engineering Research Lab., Champaign, IL (United States))

1991-12-01

335

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

1992-11-10

336

The New Mexico Technology Deployment Pilot Project: A technology reinvestment project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The New Mexico Technology Deployment Project (NMTDP) has been in operation for slightly more than two years. As one of the original TRP projects, NMTDP had the charter to develop and validate a new model for technology extraction which emphasized focused technology collaboration, early industry involvement, and a strong dual use commercialization and productization emphasis. Taken in total, the first two years of the NMTDP have been exceptionally successful, surpassing the goals of the project. This report describes the accomplishments and evolution of the NMTDP to date and discusses the future potential of the project. Despite the end of federal funding, and a subsequent reduction in level of effort, the project partners are committed to continuation of the project.

NONE

1996-11-01

337

HSPA molasses and alcohol stillage characterization project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Samples of final molasses were collected at the Puunene factory of Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company from October 1977 to December 1978 for analysis, conversion into alcohol and stillage, and analysis of the resulting stillage. Sugars, ash, and organic nonsugars were determined on both the soluble and insoluble fractions of the molasses and stillage. The soluble portion of the stillage contained a significant quantity of potassium (average of about 120 lb/ton of molasses) and is of potential value as a fertilizer. The insoluble portion would be a moderately good feed supplement for cattle, swine, and poultry. Centrifuging may be sufficient to separate the fertilizer and animal feed values, although further study will be required to ascertain this. Means of concentrating the fertilizer to practical levels will also require study.

Sloane, G.E.

1979-04-06

338

Peat-harvesting technical-assistance project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Part I describes a 620-acre bog site, located in northeastern Minnesota, owned by the Fens Company. Various tests indicated that the peat bog had a heat value of 9,000 BTU/pound, left a 4-7% ash residue, and was suitable for milled peat as well as sod peat harvesting. Part I concludes by projecting the amount of peat needed to be harvested and sold to revitalize financially the company. Part II evaluates the Fens Company's current marketing plan, reviews the operations of other local firms involved in the industry, and discusses opportunities for peat sales to residential, commercial, industrial, and utility users. The report concludes that since it is practical to retrofit existing systems only for peat pellets, the company should target new installations in its strategy for increasing sales.

Not Available

1986-02-01

339

Town of Edinburg landfill reclamation demonstration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A landfill reclamation demonstration project was hosted at the Town of Edinburg municipal landfill in northwest Saratoga County, with majority funding provided by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. The report examines various separation techniques employed at the site and appropriate uses for reclaimed materials. Specifications regarding engineered work plans, health and safety monitoring, and contingency preparedness are discussed. Major potential applications and benefits of using landfill reclamation technology at existing landfills are identified and discussed. The research and development aspect of the report also examines optimal screening technologies, site selection protocol and the results of a test burn of reclaimed waste at a waste-to-energy facility. Landfill reclamation costs are developed, and economic comparisons are made between reclamation costs and conventional landfill closure costs, with key criteria identified.

Not Available

1992-05-15

340

Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Colorado-Ute Electric Association began a study to evaluate options for upgrading and extending the life of its Nucla power station in 1982. Located in southwestern Colorado near the town of Nucla, this station was commissioned in 1959 with a local bituminous coal as its design fuel for three identical stoker-fired units, each rated at 12.6 MW(e). Poor station efficiency, high fuel costs, and spiraling boiler maintenance costs forced the Nucla Station into low priority in the CUEA dispatch order as early as 1981. Among the options CUEA considered was to serve as a host utility to demonstrate Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) technology. The anticipated environmental benefits and apparent attractive economics of a circulating AFBC led to Colorado-Ute`s decision to proceed with the design and construction of a demonstration project in 1984 at the Nucla facility.

Not Available

1991-10-01

341

[The Southern Sierra Nevada continental dynamics project]. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this study was to determine whether or not the Southern Sierra Nevada Mountain Range is supported by a crustal root. A secondary goal was to evaluate the relationship between the Sierra Nevada Range and the adjoining Death Valley extensional province. As part of the project, two seismic profiles were executed. The first was a north-south profile running from Ridgecrest to Chafant Valley. The second was an east-west profile from Death Valley to Coalinga. An NPE shot was recorded on the east-west receiver line, and the data were analyzed by forward modeling with a staggered-grid finite-difference code. Concurrently, the authors initiated an in-depth study of lower crustal and upper mantle xenoliths hosted by Neogene volcanic rocks of the central and southern Sierra Nevada region. This initial work focused on thermobarometric estimates of representative xenolith samples aimed at understanding the vertical composition of the Sierra Nevada lithosphere.

Clayton, R.W.; Saleeby, J.B.

1997-12-16

342

Final report and recommendations of the ESnet Authentication Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect

To conduct their work, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) researchers require access to a wide range of computing systems and information resources outside of their respective laboratories. Electronically communicating with peers using the global Internet has become a necessity to effective collaboration with university, industrial, and other government partners. DOE`s Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) needs to be engineered to facilitate this {open_quotes}collaboratory{close_quotes} while ensuring the protection of government computing resources from unauthorized use. Sensitive information and intellectual properties must be protected from unauthorized disclosure, modification, or destruction. In August 1993, DOE funded four ESnet sites (Argonne National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory) to begin implementing and evaluating authenticated ESnet services using the advanced Kerberos Version 5. The purpose of this project was to identify, understand, and resolve the technical, procedural, cultural, and policy issues surrounding peer-to-peer authentication in an inter-organization internet. The investigators have concluded that, with certain conditions, Kerberos Version 5 is a suitable technology to enable ESnet users to freely share resources and information without compromising the integrity of their systems and data. The pilot project has demonstrated that Kerberos Version 5 is capable of supporting trusted third-party authentication across an inter-organization internet and that Kerberos Version 5 would be practical to implement across the ESnet community within the U.S. The investigators made several modifications to the Kerberos Version 5 system that are necessary for operation in the current Internet environment and have documented other technical shortcomings that must be addressed before large-scale deployment is attempted.

Johnson, G.R.; Moore, J.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Athey, C.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Engert, D.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ramus, J.E. [National Energy Research Supercomputer Center, Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-01-01

343

Compost-powered food drying project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study performed to demonstrate the use of heat generated from compost piles to dry food are presented. Results indicate that compost pile heat, the main source of heat for the dryer, performed rather erratically in past trials, but its positive effects on the environment merit more study. The increase in nitrogen fertilizer value of finished compost over the original materials ranged between 25% and 90%. This replaces nitrogen usually made with fossil fuels, without generating any known toxic effects on the surrounding environment. Bacteria are very efficient workers that can be harnessed to do certain tasks. Heating and producing nitrogen would be using the same bacteria to do two jobs efficiently. When too much heat is extracted from a pile, the bacteria cannot function efficiently and the pile cools down. Therefore there is only a limited amount of heat available for outside uses. This amount of heat is felt to be proportionate to pile size, so a larger pile could meet the heating demands of the dryer used in the project. Operator expertise is very critical in composting for heat and is effectively gained only through experience. Since the cost effectiveness of the operation depends on using waste materials available at the site, the operator must find the correct combination of these materials and combine them correctly. The length of time involved in fully composting materials and the seasonal limitations of the method combine to bring expertise to the operator only after years of composting. A positive side effect of the project has been the realization of the usefulness of the pre-made insulated box (used refrigerator truck body) in temperature controlled situations. It has proved to be a very cost effective and portable dryer.

Not Available

1983-01-01

344

Project BELIEVE. Final Report. (A National Workplace Literacy Project with Bakery Europa and Straub Clinic & Hospital).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bakery Europa and the Straub Clinic in Hawaii participated in Project BELIEVE, a 3-year (1995-98) workplace literacy project conducted in partnership with the University of Hawaii's College of Education. Instruction focused on the literacy, communication, interpersonal, and problem-solving skills needed to succeed in the baking and health care…

Zane, Lawrence F. H.

345

Comprehensive Plan for Rehabilitation of Anadromous Fish Stocks in the Umatilla River Basin, 1985 Final Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goals of the project were to: establish fishery rehabilitation objectives for naturally and hatchery produced salmonids in the Umatilla Basin; estimate potential benefits of each of the rehabilitation and flow enhancement projects to naturally and hatchery produced salmonids; and develop a plan to set priorities, implement, and evaluate projects that will achieve rehabilitation objectives. This document identifies fishery needs,

Boyce; Raymond R

1986-01-01

346

Town of Edinburg landfill reclamation demonstration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Landfill reclamation is the process of excavating a solid waste landfill to recover materials, reduce environmental impacts, restore the land resource, and, in some cases, extend landfill life. Using conventional surface mining techniques and specialized separation equipment, a landfill may be separated into recyclable material, combustible material, a soil/compost fraction and residual waste. A landfill reclamation demonstration project was hosted at the Town of Edinburg municipal landfill in northwest Saratoga County. The report examines various separation techniques employed at the site and appropriate uses for reclaimed materials. Specifications regarding engineered work plans, health and safety monitoring, and contingency preparedness are discussed. Major potential applications and benefits of using landfill reclamation technology at existing landfills are identified and discussed. The research and development aspect of the report also examines optimal screening technologies, site selection protocol and the results of a test burn of reclaimed waste at a waste-to-energy facility. Landfill reclamation costs are developed, and economic comparisons are made between reclamation costs and conventional landfill closure costs, with key criteria identified. The results indicate that, although dependent on site-specific conditions and economic factors, landfill reclamation can be a technically and economically feasible alternative or companion to conventional landfill closure under a range of favorable conditions. Feasibility can be determined only after an investigation of the variety of landfill conditions and reclamation options.

Not Available

1992-05-15

347

Thermostatic Radiator Valve (TRV) Demonstration Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This research measured the energy savings associated with installing thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs) on one-pipe low-pressure steam systems in New York City multifamily buildings. There were three primary objectives: to determine whether fuel consumption was lower in buildings using TRVs; to determine if occupants would accept the TRVs; and to determine if overheating in apartments could be eliminated using TRVs. Eight buildings, ranging in size from 15 to 26 apartments, were monitored for three years. Each building was audited to determine fuel history and quick-payback energy conservation measures. The project covered three phases; phase-1 consisted of installing low-cost energy conservation measures such as pipe insulation, air vents and burner tune-tips; determining each building`s baseline energy use, and recording baseline apartment temperatures. TRV installations occurred in phases 2 and 3. In phase-2, TRVs were installed in half the apartments in four buildings. In phase-3, TRVs were installed in the remainder of the apartments. Experimental results were conclusive. Buildings with overheated apartments achieved energy savings through the installation of TRVs. The authors research shows an average reduction of 9.45% in space heating energy use occurred with partial installation of TRVs, and savings of 15.5% were achieved after full installation. Buildings with the highest average apartment temperatures during the base year showed the greatest energy savings. Simple payback, based on an installed price of $50 per TRV, averaged 3.1 years.

NONE

1995-09-01

348

Final report for the Advanced Natural Gas Vehicle Project  

SciTech Connect

The project objective was to develop the technologies necessary to prototype a dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) powered, mid-size automobile with operational capabilities comparable to gasoline automobiles. A system approach was used to design and develop the engine, gas storage system and vehicle packaging. The 2.4-liter DOHC engine was optimized for natural gas operation with high-compression pistons, hardened exhaust valves, a methane-specific catalytic converter and multi-point gaseous injection. The chassis was repackaging to increase space for fuel storage with a custom-designed, cast-aluminum, semi-trailing arm rear suspension system, a revised flat trunk sheet-metal floorpan and by equipping the car with run-flat tires. An Integrated Storage system (ISS) was developed using all-composite, small-diameter cylinders encapsulated within a high-strength fiberglass shell with impact-absorbing foam. The prototypes achieved the target goals of a city/highway driving range of 300 miles, ample trunk capacity, gasoline vehicle performance and ultra low exhaust emissions.

John Wozniak

1999-02-16

349

Advanced Large Area Plastic Scintillator Project (ALPS): Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The advanced Large-Area Plastic Scintillator (ALPS) Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated possible technological avenues for substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in gamma-ray detection via large-area plastic scintillators. The three predominant themes of these investigations comprised the following: * Maximizing light collection efficiency from a single large-area sheet of plastic scintillator, and optimizing hardware event trigger definition to retain detection efficiency while exploiting the power of coincidence to suppress single-PMT "dark current" background; * Utilizing anti-Compton vetoing and supplementary spectral information from a co-located secondary, or "Back" detector, to both (1) minimize Compton background in the low-energy portion of the "Front" scintillator's pulse-height spectrum, and (2) sharpen the statistical accuracy of the front detector's low-energy response prediction as impelmented in suitable energy-windowing algorithms; and * Investigating alternative materials to enhance the intrinsic gamma-ray detection efficiency of plastic-based sensors.

Jordan, David V.; Reeder, Paul L.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Warren, Glen A.; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Stephens, Daniel L.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Alzheimer, James M.; Crowell, Shannon L.; Sliger, William A.

2008-02-05

350

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

Not Available

1982-12-01

351

Integrated hatchery operations team: Operation plans for anadromous fish production facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume 1. Annual report 1992.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Individual operational plans for 1993 are provided for the Abernathy Salmon Culture Technology Center, Carson National Fish Hatchery, Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, Eagle Creek National Fish Hatchery, Entiat National Fish Hatchery, Hagerman National Fis...

T. Shelldrake

1993-01-01

352

High Performance Building Facade Solutions PIER Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

Building facades directly influence heating and cooling loads and indirectly influence lighting loads when daylighting is considered, and are therefore a major determinant of annual energy use and peak electric demand. Facades also significantly influence occupant comfort and satisfaction, making the design optimization challenge more complex than many other building systems.This work focused on addressing significant near-term opportunities to reduce energy use in California commercial building stock by a) targeting voluntary, design-based opportunities derived from the use of better design guidelines and tools, and b) developing and deploying more efficient glazings, shading systems, daylighting systems, facade systems and integrated controls. This two-year project, supported by the California Energy Commission PIER program and the US Department of Energy, initiated a collaborative effort between The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and major stakeholders in the facades industry to develop, evaluate, and accelerate market deployment of emerging, high-performance, integrated facade solutions. The LBNL Windows Testbed Facility acted as the primary catalyst and mediator on both sides of the building industry supply-user business transaction by a) aiding component suppliers to create and optimize cost effective, integrated systems that work, and b) demonstrating and verifying to the owner, designer, and specifier community that these integrated systems reliably deliver required energy performance. An industry consortium was initiated amongst approximately seventy disparate stakeholders, who unlike the HVAC or lighting industry, has no single representative, multi-disciplinary body or organized means of communicating and collaborating. The consortium provided guidance on the project and more importantly, began to mutually work out and agree on the goals, criteria, and pathways needed to attain the ambitious net zero energy goals defined by California and the US.A collaborative test, monitoring, and reporting protocol was also formulated via the Windows Testbed Facility in collaboration with industry partners, transitioning industry to focus on the importance of expecting measured performance to consistently achieve design performance expectations. The facility enables accurate quantification of energy use, peak demand, and occupant comfort impacts of synergistic facade-lighting-HVAC systems on an apples-to-apples comparative basis and its data can be used to verify results from simulations. Emerging interior and exterior shading technologies were investigated as potential near-term, low-cost solutions with potential broad applicability in both new and retrofit construction. Commercially-available and prototype technologies were developed, tested, and evaluated. Full-scale, monitored field tests were conducted over solstice-to-solstice periods to thoroughly evaluate the technologies, uncover potential risks associated with an unknown, and quantify performance benefits. Exterior shading systems were found to yield net zero energy levels of performance in a sunny climate and significant reductions in summer peak demand. Automated interior shading systems were found to yield significant daylighting and comfort-related benefits.In support of an integrated design process, a PC-based commercial fenestration (COMFEN) software package, based on EnergyPlus, was developed that enables architects and engineers to quickly assess and compare the performance of innovative facade technologies in the early sketch or schematic design phase. This tool is publicly available for free and will continue to improve in terms of features and accuracy. Other work was conducted to develop simulation tools to model the performance of any arbitrary complex fenestration system such as common Venetian blinds, fabric roller shades as well as more exotic innovative facade systems such as optical louver systems.

Lee, Eleanor; Selkowitz, Stephen

2009-12-31

353

Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.  

SciTech Connect

Advanced optically-activated solid-state electrical switch development at Sandia has demonstrated multi-kA/kV switching and the path for scalability to even higher current/power. Realization of this potential requires development of new optical sources/switches based on key Sandia photonic device technologies: vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been used to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. In VCSEL arrays, adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and are lithographically patterned to the required dimensions. We have demonstrated multiple-line filament triggering using VCSEL arrays to approximate line generation. These arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs have fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. Using these arrays, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices. Photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices offer advantages of high voltage operation (multi-kV), optical isolation, triggering with laser pulses that cannot occur accidentally in nature, low cost, high speed, small size, and radiation hardness. PCSS devices are candidates for an assortment of potential applications that require multi-kA switching of current. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been demonstrated to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. As a promising alternative to multiple discrete edge-emitting lasers, a single wafer of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be lithographically patterned to achieve the desired layout of parallel line-shaped emitters, in which adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and thereby achieve a degree of intrinsic optical uniformity. Under this LDRD project, we have fabricated arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs to approximate a line-shaped illumination pattern, achieving optical fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. We have applied these VCSEL arrays to demonstrate single and dual parallel line-filament triggering of PCSS devices. Moreover, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices using VCSEL arrays. We have found that reliable triggering of multiple filaments requires matching of the turn-on time of adjacent VCSEL line-shaped-arrays to within approximately 1 ns. Additionally, we discovered that reliable triggering of PCSS devices at low voltages requires more optical power than we obtained with our first generation of VCSEL arrays. A second generation of higher-power VCSEL arrays was designed and fabricated at the end of this LDRD project, and testing with PCSS devices is currently underway (as of September 2008).

Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM); Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM)

2008-09-01

354

The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Final Report 2000-2006.  

SciTech Connect

A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ? 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report.

Barton, Christopher

2007-12-15

355

Evaluation of the Contribution of Chinook Salmon reared at Columbia River Hatcheries to the Pacific Salmon Fisheries, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The distribution, contribution, and value of artificially propagated fall chinook on the Columbia River was determined. Total returns of fall chinook to Columbia River facilities in 1984 were 74,401. This was the second smallest return over the past five years. Returns to Bonneville, Spring Creek, Little White Salmon, Klickitat and Klaskanine hatcheries were smaller than any previous year during this study. However, returns to Priest Rapids and Sea Resources hatcheries were greater than in previous years. Final estimated catch values are available through 1982 for British Columbia, Washington, Oregon and Columbia River fisheries. Fall chinook from the Columbia River hatcheries are predominately recovered in these fisheries. The percentages of the 1978-brood fish caught in these fisheries was 40.3, 35.0, 7.5 and 17.2 respectively. Contributions to the fisheries per 1000 fish released for all hatcheries combined were 2.6 and 3.0 for the 1978 and 1979 broods respectively. Three years (1980 to 1982) were included in the contribution values for the 1978 brood and two years (1981 and 1982) for the 1979 brood. Spring Creek Hatchery had the greatest contribution to the fisheries of 8.2 and 12.7 fish per 1000 fish released for the 1978 and 1979-broods respectively. The Spring Creek contribution was followed by Stayton Pond, Abernathy, Bonneville and Big Creek at 6.3, 4.1, 2.9 and 2.6 respectively for the 1978 brood and Big Creek, Stayton Pond and Abernathy at 7.4, 6.2 and 3.9 respectively for the 1979 brood. Other facilities had contributions per 1000 releases of less than 2. These contributions are minimums since all possible catch years are not included. 2 figs., 36 tabs.

Vreeland, Robert R.

1984-12-01

356

Comparison of Hatchery Performance, Agonistic Behavior, and Poststocking Survival between Diploid and Triploid Rainbow Trout of Three Different Utah Strains  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hatchery performance (growth, feed conversion, and survival) of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss was compared between diploid and triploid fish from three Utah strains: Fish Lake-DeSmet (FD), Sand Creek (SC), and Ten Sleep (TS). For FD, specific growth rates were slightly higher for triploids (2.79%\\/d) than for diploids (2.60%\\/d), but final mean weight at 108 d did not significantly differ.

Eric J. Wagner; Ronney E. Arndt; M. Douglas Routledge; David Latremouille; Roger F. Mellenthin

2006-01-01

357

Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

2009-05-01

358

Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project, Final Scientific / Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The Mississippi Ethanol (ME) Project is a comprehensive effort to develop the conversion of biomass to ethanol utilizing a proprietary gasification reactor technology developed by Mississippi Ethanol, LLC. Tasks were split between operation of a 1/10 scale unit at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) of Mississippi State University (MSU) and the construction, development, and operation of a full scale pilot unit located at the ME facility in Winona, Mississippi. In addition to characterization of the ME reactor gasification system, other areas considered critical to the operational and economic viability of the overall ME concept were evaluated. These areas include syngas cleanup, biological conversion of syngas to alcohol, and effects of gasification scale factors. Characterization of run data from the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units has allowed development of the factors necessary for scale-up from the small unit to the larger unit. This scale range is approximately a factor of 10. Particulate and tar sampling gave order of magnitude values for preliminary design calculations. In addition, sampling values collected downstream of the ash removal system show significant reductions in observed loadings. These loading values indicate that acceptable particulate and tar loading rates could be attained with standard equipment additions to the existing configurations. Overall operation both the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units proceeded very well. The Pilot Unit was operated as a system, from wood receiving to gas flaring, several times and these runs were used to address possible production-scale concerns. Among these, a pressure feed system was developed to allow feed of material against gasifier system pressure with little or no purge requirements. Similarly, a water wash system, with continuous ash collection, was developed, installed, and tested. Development of a biological system for alcohol production was conducted at Mississippi State University with much progress. However, the current state of biological technology is not deemed to be ready commercially. A preliminary estimate of capital and operating costs of a 12000 gallon per day gasification/biological facility was developed for comparison purposes. In addition, during the biological organism screening and testing, some possible alternative products were identified. One such possibility is the biological production of bio-diesel. Additional research is necessary for further evaluation of all of the biological concepts.

Pearson, Larry, E.

2007-04-30

359

42 CFR 137.333 - What procedures must the Secretary follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in part...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in...

2012-10-01

360

42 CFR 137.333 - What procedures must the Secretary follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in part...SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Project Assumption Process § 137...follow if the Secretary rejects a final construction project proposal, in whole or in...

2011-10-01

361

Coded wire tag recoveries from pink salmon in Prince William sound salmon fisheries, 1993. Restoration project 93067. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project final report  

SciTech Connect

Coded wire tags applied to pink salmon fry in 1992 at four hatcheries in Prince William Sound were recovered in the commercial catch of 1993 and used to provide inseason estimates of hatchery contributions. These estimates were used by fishery managers to target the numerically superior hatchery returns, and reduce the pressure on oil-damaged wild stocks. Inseason estimates were made in two stages. The postseason analysis revealed that of a catch of 3.51 million pink salmon, 1.12 million were estimated to be of wild origin.

Sharr, S.; Peckham, C.J.; Sharp, D.G.; Evans, D.G.; Bue, B.G.

1995-11-01

362

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01

363

Measuring Soil Phosphates Using Ion-Exchange Resins: A Final Project for Freshman Chemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The chemistry of soils and fertilizers provides an opportunity to teach a variety of fundamental concepts at the freshman level. A model final project for freshman chemistry that uses a discovery-based scenario is described. The effect of solubility of compounds in a practical application is illustrated by allowing the student to discover that limestone (calcium carbonate) will react with phosphates in soils to produce insoluble compounds. The phosphate in the soil is isolated by a mixed-bed, anion-cation exchange resin capsule and analyzed spectrophotometrically. A laboratory notebook is kept on the project and a final written report is submitted at the end.

Storer, Donald A.; Sarquis, A. M.

2000-06-01

364

Stable isotope tracing of trout hatchery carbon to sediments and foodwebs of limestone spring creeks.  

PubMed

Limestone springs support productive ecosystems and fisheries, yet aquaculture may modify or impair these ecosystems. We determined trout hatchery organic contribution to spring creek sediments and foodwebs with natural abundance stable isotope methods. Hatchery feed, waste, and trout were significantly enriched in delta(13)C relative to autotrophs and wild fish. Spring creek sediments were enriched in delta(13)C toward the hatchery endmember relative to reference streams without hatcheries and relative to a larger larger-order, spring-influenced stream. Contribution of hatchery C to spring creek sediments was greatest during March and associated with greatest sediment %C. Contribution of hatchery C to pollution-tolerant isopod diet was 39-51% in a stream receiving limestone spring water via hatchery effluent. Isopods of one spring creek also relied on hatchery-derived C within one month of hatchery closure. Four years later, less pollution pollution-tolerant amphipods dominated and consumed non-vascular over vascular autotrophs (86%). Isopods of a second spring creek with an active hatchery did not appear to be using hatchery matter directly, but were enriched in delta(34)S relative to a spring creek tributary with no hatchery influence. Isopods in both of these streams were relatively enriched in delta(15)N, indicating general nutrient enrichment from surrounding agricultural land use. The contribution of hatchery vs. wild fish in diet of herons and egrets was traced with delta(13)C of guano. These birds were strongly dependent on stocked trout in a spring creek with a recently closed state trout hatchery, and also near another large, state-run hatchery. Heron dependence on hatchery fish in the spring creek decreased with time since hatchery closure. Use of stable isotope natural abundance techniques in karst spring creeks can reveal stream impairment due to aquaculture, specific C sources to bio-indicating consumers, losses of farmed fish to predation, and potential exposure of higher order consumers to contaminants associated with aquaculture. PMID:18674799

Hurd, Todd M; Jesic, Slaven; Jerin, Jessica L; Fuller, Nathan W; Miller, David

2008-07-31

365

Characterization of the radon source in North-Central Florida. Final report part 1 -- Final project report; Final report part 2 -- Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains two separate parts: Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (final report part 1 -- final project report); and Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (technical report). The objectives were to characterize the radon 222 source in a region having a demonstrated elevated indoor radon potential and having geology, lithology, and climate that are different from those in other regions of the U.S. where radon is being studied. Radon availability and transport in this region were described. Approaches for predicting the radon potential of lands in this region were developed.

NONE

1997-12-01

366

Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project; Long-term Management Plan, Project Report 1993, Final Draft.  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted on the Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project area, a 4,943 acre ranch purchased for mitigating some habitat losses associated with the original construction of Grand Coulee Dam and innundation of habitat by Lake Roosevelt. A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was used to determine habitat quality and quantity baseline data and future projections. Target species used in the study were sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemoinus), mink (Mustela vison), spotted sandpiper (Actiius colchicus), bobcat (Felis reufs), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura). From field data collected, limiting life values or HSI's (Habitat Suitability Index's) for each indicator species was determined for existing habitats on project lands. From this data a long term management plan was developed. This report is designed to provide guidance for the management of project lands in relation to the habitat cover types discussed and the indicator species used to evaluate these cover types. In addition, the plan discusses management actions, habitat enhancements, and tools that will be used to enhance, protect and restore habitats to desired conditions. Through planned management actions biodiversity and vegetative structure can be optimized over time to reduce or eliminate, limiting HSI values for selected wildlife on project lands.

Berger, Matthew T.

1994-01-01

367

Inexpensive cross-flow hydropower turbine at Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project: Final construction and cost report  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Mountain Hydroelectric Project is a Cooperative Agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Ron and Carlene Ott. The project's purpose is to build and intensively test an inexpensive American-made cross-flow turbine and to provide information to DOE on the cost, efficiency, operation and maintenance of the unit. This final report discusses the technical and financial aspects of planning, designing, manufacturing, and installing the turbine as well as design and construction details of the site.

Not Available

1988-07-01

368

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 1. Project summary  

SciTech Connect

A summary of the Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project is presented. The design of the greenhouses include transparent double pane glass roof with channels for fluid between the panes, inner pane tinted and double pane extruded acrylic aluminized mylar shade and diffuser. Solar energy technologies provide power for water desalination, for pumping irrigation water, and for cooling and heating the controlled environment space so that crops can grow in arid lands. The project is a joint effort between the United States and Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-12-30

369

Sound waste management plan. Restoration project 95115. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project final report  

SciTech Connect

The project was designed to address marine pollution that is generated from landbased sources within the Prince William Sound communities of Cordova, Valdez, Whittier Tatitlek, and Chenega Bay. The project recommends ways to improve the management of three different waste streams generated within the communities and which are a chronic source of marine pollution: used oil, household hazardous waste, and solid waste. The recommendations, some of which have already been implemented, include: creation of a comprehensive used oil management system in each community, construction of Environmental Operation Stations to improve the overall management of solid and oily wastes, and the development of a regional household hazardous waste program.

NONE

1996-02-01

370

ANALYSIS AND REDUCTION OF DATA RECORDED UNDER PROJECT COWBOY. Final Report. Project VELA UNIFORM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analyses conducted under Project Cowboy were performed on eight ; chemical detonations. The shots consisted of 200-, 500-, and 1000-pound ; decoupled shots in a 30-ft spherical cavity. An additional decoupled 1000-pound ; shot was detonated in a 12-ft spherical cavty. Tamped shots had yields of 200, ; 500, and two 1000 pounds. Analyses from the Cs-filjed thermionic converter

1961-01-01

371

SOLERAS - Photovoltaic Power Systems Project. Rural solar applications. Final report: project summary  

SciTech Connect

The Saudi Solar Village Project photovoltaic system is described, consisting of 160 arrays, a computerized control system, 1100 kW of electrical storage in lead-acid batteries, and an automatic weather data gathering system. Satisfactory overall system performance is reported. Performance degradation due to dust on the array lenses was determined. Field operational problems are discussed. (LEW)

Not Available

1985-01-01

372

50 CFR 71.11 - Opening of national fish hatchery areas to fishing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Opening of national fish hatchery areas to fishing. 71.11 Section 71.11 Wildlife and...OF FISHERIES CONSERVATION AREAS HUNTING AND FISHING ON NATIONAL FISH HATCHERY AREAS Fishing § 71.11 Opening of national fish...

2012-10-01

373

Preschool Services Project. July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The final report describes a project designed to serve preschool handicapped children in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. Seven service components are outlined: creating public awareness of programs and services available to previously unserved handicapped individuals; locating, identifying, and verifying unserved handicapped persons; providing…

Lutz, Carolyn Hebden; And Others

374

VAST [Vocational Adult Secondary Training] Development Project. Phase 1, Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final four-part report describes and evaluates the Vocational Adult Secondary Training Project (VAST) whose goals were to revise and develop: adult basic education curriculum in the areas of mathematics, communications, and science; individualized instruction with clearly defined objectives; a methodology for pretesting and selection of…

British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

375

Garrison-Taft 500 KV Transmission Project : Phase III Hunter Survey, Final Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents the results of the Phase 3 survey of hunters conducted to assess the impacts of Bonneville Power Administration's 500-kV transmission line on elk hunting opportunities in western Montana. This survey is the final in a series of three (Allen, 1983; 1988). These three surveys are the social component of the Elk Monitoring and Mitigation Project being conducted

Stewart D

1989-01-01

376

Measuring Soil Phosphates Using Ion-Exchange Resins: A Final Project for Freshman Chemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The chemistry of soils and fertilizers provides an opportunity to teach a variety of fundamental concepts at the freshman level. A model final project for freshman chemistry that uses a discovery-based scenario is described. The effect of solubility of compounds in a practical application is illustrated by allowing the student to discover that limestone (calcium carbonate) will react with phosphates

Donald A. Storer; A. M. Sarquis

2000-01-01

377

The Final Year Project (FYP) in Social Sciences: Establishment of Its Associated Competences and Evaluation Standards  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the fundamental characteristics of the Final Year Project (FYP), its associated competences and some evaluation standards that derived from a research conducted by the regional government of Catalonia (Spain) and the Catalan University Quality Assurance Agency. More analytically, the paper begins with the definition of the…

Mateo, Joan; Escofet, Anna; Martinez, Francesc; Ventura, Javier; Vlachopoulos, Dimitrios

2012-01-01

378

34. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road ProjectNR7, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

34. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road Project--NR-7, Hawaii National Park, Island of Maui, Territory of Hawaii, H.L. Handley, Assistant Highway Engineer, March 30, 1935. NOTE HOW THE LOCATION FITS THE CONTOUR OF THE HILL. LOOKING FROM STATION 382+00 ON HALEAKALA HIGHWAY. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

379

Project CREATE Final Report. Cooperative Resources To Enhance Access to Technology Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These materials have been developed by Project CREATE (Cooperative Resources to Enhance Access to Jobs through Technical Education), a demonstration program designed to develop a network, specific activities, and resources that would provide education and support services to a wide audience. A 13-page final report describes the hands-on training…

Hampden County Employment and Training Consortium, Springfield, MA.

380

Enhancing student's hands-on learning experience through final year project in industry: Implementations and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Universities aspire to deliver graduates who can function well in the industry. However, universities are still receiving comments from the industry that the graduates are not competent to do hands-on work. Lack of hands-on experience as a result of focusing too much in formal education could have contributed to this scenario. Final year project if carefully structured can be used

Zaimah Hasan

2009-01-01

381

MAVA [Massachusetts Association of Vocational Administrators] 1972 Summer Workshops and Professional Improvement Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Massachusetts Association of Vocational Administrators (MAVA), with the assistance of the State Division of Occupational Education, developed a series of four-day, in service workshops aimed at vocational teachers throughout the State, and the document provides a final report of this project's first year. Part One covers general information…

Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Boston. Div. of Occupational Education.

382

Project CREATE Final Report. Cooperative Resources To Enhance Access to Technology Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|These materials have been developed by Project CREATE (Cooperative Resources to Enhance Access to Jobs through Technical Education), a demonstration program designed to develop a network, specific activities, and resources that would provide education and support services to a wide audience. A 13-page final report describes the hands-on training…

Hampden County Employment and Training Consortium, Springfield, MA.

383

Occupational Adaptability and Transferable Skills: Project Final Report. Information Series No. 129.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The nature and current status of knowledge about occupational adaptability and transferable skills are summarized in this report. It is a synthesis of major conclusions and insights, with some additional perspectives, from eight final reports on an exploratory study (see Note). A brief overview is presented of project objectives and activities…

Pratzner, Frank C.

384

Aerobic Excercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children. (Project AEROBIC). Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The final report summarizes accomplishments of Project AEROBIC (Aerobic Exercise and Research Opportunities to Benefit Impaired Children), which provided a physical education exercise program for severely, profoundly, and multiply handicapped children aged 10-21. Activities are outlined for the 3 year period and include modification of exercise…

Idaho Univ., Moscow.

385

CACI: Cesium137 Agricultural Commodities Irradiator: Final design report. Volume 1, Project summary  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report provides a complete description of the final detailed design of the Cesium-137 Agricultural Commodities Irradiator (CACI). The design was developed and successfully completed by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The CACI project was initiated in April 1985 under DOE`s Byproducts Utilization Program, with the objectives of transferring food irradiation technology

G. Subbaraman; C. C. Conners

1986-01-01

386

Minnesota Deafblind Technical Assistance Project. Final Report: October 1, 1995 to September 30, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes activities of the 4-year federally-funded Minnesota DeafBlind Assistance Project in meeting the following objectives: (1) provide technical assistance throughout the state; (2) deliver training to improve transitions from school to adult life for youth with deaf-blindness; (3) develop and implement procedures to locate…

Holt, George

387

The Final Year Project (FYP) in Social Sciences: Establishment of Its Associated Competences and Evaluation Standards  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper presents the fundamental characteristics of the Final Year Project (FYP), its associated competences and some evaluation standards that derived from a research conducted by the regional government of Catalonia (Spain) and the Catalan University Quality Assurance Agency. More analytically, the paper begins with the definition of the…

Mateo, Joan; Escofet, Anna; Martinez, Francesc; Ventura, Javier; Vlachopoulos, Dimitrios

2012-01-01

388

39. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road ProjectNR7, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

39. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road Project--NR-7, Hawaii National Park, Island of Maui, Territory of Hawaii, T.H., by Merel S. Sager, Resident Landscape Architect, April 16, 1935. COVERING CONSPICOUS ROCK FILLS WITH SOIL. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

389

Adult English-as-a-Second-Language Assessment Project. Final Report: Year 3.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report describes activities in the final year of a 3-year project designed to address the placement needs of adult education agencies teaching English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students in California. The long-term goal was to identify instruments appropriate for use with the state's model standards for language proficiency. The two primary…

Kahn, Andrea B.; Butler, Frances A.; Weigle, Sara Cushing; Sato, Edynn

390

Phase 5 storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included.

Wight, R.H.

1997-05-30

391

Working Parents Project. Final Report (December 1, 1984 - November 30, 1985).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report describes activities undertaken by three school districts in the Austin, Texas area to monitor the implementation of the Employer-Supported Parental Involvement in Education (ES/PIE) Program, an initiative of the Working Parents Project (WPP) of the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (SEDL). The ES/PIE program was…

Espinoza, Renato; And Others

392

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect

This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC).

NONE

1997-01-01

393

Differential Reproductive Success of Sympatric, Naturally Spawning Hatchery and Wild Steelhead, Oncorhynchus mykiss  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hatchery propagation of salmonids has been practiced in western North America for over a century. However, recent declines\\u000a in wild salmon abundance and efforts to mitigate these declines through hatcheries have greatly increased the relative abundance\\u000a of fish produced in hatcheries. The over-harvest of wild salmon by fishing mixed hatchery and wild stocks has been of concern\\u000a for many years

Jennifer E. McLean; Paul Bentzen; Thomas P. Quinn

2004-01-01

394

TVA commercial demonstration plant project. Volume 2. Basis of study assessments and project selection. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is considering the design, construction, and operation of a commercial scale coal gasification facility to produce a clean, medium Btu fuel gas (MBG). The project includes all process and support systems required to convert approximately 20,000 tons per day of Kentucky No. 9 bituminous coal, as fed to the gasifiers, into MBG equivalent to about 300 billion Btu per day. The first phase of the proposed project involves conceptual design, environmental and siting studies and economic analyses of commercial plants emphasizing the following gasification technologies: Babcock and Wilcox entrained flow gasifier, Lurgi dry ash gasifier, BGC/Lurgi slagging gasifier, Texaco entrained flow gasifier, and Koppers Totzek entrained flow gasifier. Foster Wheeler's study and assessments/process selection is summarized in this volume.

Not Available

1980-11-01

395

Quality of Salmonid Hatchery Effluents during a Summer Low-Flow Season  

Microsoft Academic Search

I assessed the quality of salmonid hatchery effluents and receiving streams in Washington State during the 1988 summer low-flow period. Relative to hatchery influent waters, effluents showed significant increases in temperature, pH, suspended solids, ammonia, organic nitrogen, total phosphorus, and chemical oxygen demand. Wastewater discharges sometimes violated state water quality standards; effects were exacerbated by low dilution. Hatchery nutrient loads

Will Kendra

1991-01-01

396

Effect of Acclimation on the Homing and Survival of Hatchery Winter Steelhead  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated prerelease acclimation of hatchery winter steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss in Whittaker Creek, a tributary of the Siuslaw River, Oregon, as a management strategy to attract returning adults to a release site where they could be removed. The objective was to reduce the number of hatchery fish in wild steelhead spawning areas while providing hatchery steelhead for recreational fisheries. We

Kenneth R. Kenaston; Robert B. Lindsay; R. Kirk Schroeder

2001-01-01

397

Reproductive success of hatchery-produced and wild-born brown trout in an experimental stream  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1. Although releases of hatchery-produced salmonids to support conspecific wild populations have increased dramatically during recent decades, little information is available about the performance in the wild of hatchery fish and their offspring. Important factors determining the success and genetic outcomes of supportive breeding programmes include (i) the relative reproductive success of released hatchery fish in the wild, and

Johan Dannewitz; Erik Petersson; Jonas Dahl; Tore Prestegaard; Anna-Carin Lof; Torbjorn Jarvi

2004-01-01

398

Technical assistance for Meharry Medical College Energy Efficiency Project. Final project status and technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a program to provide technical assistance to Meharry Medical College. The purpose of the program is to facilitate Meharry`s effort to finance a campus-wide facility retrofit. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) funded the program through a grant to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TECD). The University of Memphis-Technology and Energy Services (UM-TES), under contract to TECD, performed program services. The report has three sections: (1) introduction; (2) project definition, financing, and participants; and (3) opportunities for federal participation.

NONE

1996-05-08

399

Georgia Deaf-Blind Project. Final Report, 1992-1995. State and Multi-State Projects for Children with Deaf-Blindness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the Georgia Deaf-Blind Project, a 3-year federally supported project encompassing 159 counties and providing technical assistance to 237 infants, children, and youth with deaf-blindness along with their families and their service providers. Project accomplishments included: (1) more…

Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta.

400

Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office final progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects/Nuclear Waste Project Office (NWPO) was formally established by Executive Policy in 1983 following passage of the federal Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Act). That Act provides for the systematic siting, construction, operation, and closure of high-level radioactive defense and research by-products and other forms of high-level radioactive waste from around the country which will be stored at such repositories. In 1985 the Nevada legislature formally established the NWPO as a distinct and statutorily authorized agency to provide support to the Governor and State Legislature on matters concerning the high-level nuclear waste programs. The NWPO utilized a small, central staff supplemented by contractual services for needed technical and specialized expertise in order to provide high quality oversight and monitoring of federal activities, to conduct necessary independent studies, and to avoid unnecessary duplication of efforts. This report summarizes the results of this ongoing program to ensure that risks to the environment and to human safety are minimized. It includes findings in the areas of hydrogeology, geology, quality assurance activities, repository engineering, legislature participation, socioeconomic affects, risk assessments, monitoring programs, public information dissemination, and transportation activities. The bulk of the reporting deals with the Yucca Mountain facility.

NONE

1992-12-31

401

LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics  

SciTech Connect

This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

NONE

1996-01-01

402

Final Project Report for project titled "Fluoroalkylphosphonic-acid-based proton conductors"  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research was to create new proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for use in energy conversion devices including hydrogen fuel cells that could operate at high temperatures (95-130 C) and under low relative humidity (< 50% RH) conditions. The new polymers were based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) groups (see illustration below) which offer prospects for rapid proton transport by a proton-hopping mechanism similar to that which operates in phosphoric acid, a well-known proton-transporting electrolyte that is used in a class of hydrogen fuel cells that work well under the conditions noted above and are already commercially successful. The two specific project objectives were as follows: (1) synthesize and characterize new proton-conducting electrolytes based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) functional groups; and (2) create and apply new computer models to study protonic conduction in FPA-based electrolytes. The project was successful in creating the desired polymer electrolytes and also a series of molecular model compounds which were used to study proton transport in FPA electrolytes in general. Computer models were created to study both structure and proton-transport dynamics in the electrolytes, particularly the molecular model compounds. Rapid proton transport by a hopping mechanism was found in many of the model compounds and correlations with transport rates with molecular structure were identified. Several polymeric analogs of FPA model compounds were prepared and studied, however FPA-based polymeric materials having very high protonic conductivities under either wet or dry conditions were not obtained. Several possible reasons for the failure of polymeric materials to exhibit the expected high protonic conductivities were identified, including a failure of the polymers to adopt the phase-separated secondary structure/morphology necessary for high proton conductivity, and an unexpected polymer crosslinking effect of acidic groups having two P-OH groups. The project has lent insight into how FPA groups transport protons in both liquid and polymeric forms, which provides guidance to future efforts to design and prepare future generations of proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for hydrogen fuel cells and other types of electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices.

Stephen Creager

2011-12-08

403

Wood-heated Winter Vegetable Greenhouse Demonstration Project. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

In order to measure the comparative effectiveness of the project greenhouse and its heating system, a smaller greenhouse (24' x 48') was installed during spring 1981 to act as a control. This smaller greenhouse used the same double layered plastic covering and endwalls. The heating system used - a modern wood stove (Ashley) - relies on heating the surrounding air. Hot air is the typical heating system used in New England greenhouses. However, most are using oil to heat the air. The same varieties of seedling plants were placed in the ''control greenhouse'' so that their growth response could be compared to those in the project greenhouse. The closed heating system utilizing underground piping circulates water at 95/sup 0/ F, thus maintaining a 75/sup 0/ F ground temperature and a 55 to 65/sup 0/ F air temperature. The air temperature fluctuates depending upon outside weather conditions, sun, hours of daylight, wind velocity, etc. The ground picks up additinal heat from the sun which is stored in the sand, thus, allowing the furnace to be used less. Initially, it took three days to bring the ground temperature up to 75/sup 0/ F and thereafter, it remained constant with one firing of the wood furnace in the morning and another at dusk. Because the ground mass is not exposed to air movement and is well-insulated, it holds the heat, releasing it mostly through conduction. This does, however, present a problem in the growing of some plants such as hanging baskets that do not touch the ground. These must tolerate cooler night temperatures. On the other hand, the constant floor heat provided a dramatic boost in plant growth compared to plant response in the ''control greenhouse''. Also, stem growth was thicker and plants generally healthier, resulting in a 20% earlier maturation compared to that in the ''control greenhouse''.

Prussack, H.

1985-01-01

404

Final Project Summary Report Bechtel Nevada and Fiberchem Environmental, Inc., Cooperative Research and Technology Development Project  

SciTech Connect

This is a report summarizing work on a small project dedicated to adapting a new chemical sensing platform for the US Department of Energy and its customers. At the same time and in the spirit of technology transfer, FCI Environmental, Inc., would receive technical support in the form of expertise from the US Department of Energy to assist in developing this product. The sensor is a hybrid integrated-circuit, optical waveguide, chemical sensor that is patented by FCI Environmental, Inc., and manufactured under license by Texas Instruments, Inc. A down-hole penetrometer probe was designed for use in hot, 60 C, hydrocarbon-saturated, saline environment at a depth of 200 feet. The probe design includes three chemical sensing, hybrid integrated-circuits with chemical reference and measurement channels, a water seal, output electronics, and a removable measurement head for replacement in the field. A hand-held chemical detector prototype--containing a hybrid integrated-circuit chemical sensor with reference channel, user alarm, and level display--was designed and constructed, and a software interface developed to operate the hand-held sensor interfaced with a laboratory data acquisition system.

R. J. Pollina

1999-04-01

405

Prince William Sound system investigation: Experimental manipulation. Restoration project 94320l. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project final report  

SciTech Connect

Studies of pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) population dynamics and their role in the complex marine ecosystem of PWS is a central objective of the Sound Ecosystem Assessment program. The systems investigation component proposes that releases of hatchery-nutured and marked pink salmon fry will test the influence of ocean-entry timing and fry size at ocean entry on losses to predators. The rearing and release strategies included; (1) early fed, (2) direct release, (3) mid-release, (4) late fed. Predetermined numbers, sizes, and times allowed us to measure the influence of ocean-entry timing and fry size at ocean entry due to losses by predation. By utilizing multiple release sites for the ocean entry coordinates, an increase in the spatial differences at ocean entry point allows insight into the subtle effect of geographic influences of the interaction of apical predators.

Olsen, J.; Ferren, H.; Kerns, C.

1994-12-01

406

Evaluation of Zooplankton in Hatchery Diets for Channel Catfish Fry  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The efficacy of zooplankton as a supplemental hatchery diet for fry of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was evaluated. When a commercial diet is used as a reference, fry fed exclusively on zooplankton–either live or dried–performed poorly in their growth rate. However, when live or dried zooplan...

407

9 CFR 145.6 - Specific provisions for participating hatcheries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...procedures should be as outlined in § 147.24 of this chapter. (5) Hatchery residue, such as chick/poult down, eggshells, infertile eggs, and dead germs, should be disposed of promptly and in a manner satisfactory to the Official State...

2013-01-01

408

9 CFR 145.6 - Specific provisions for participating hatcheries.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...procedures should be as outlined in § 147.24 of this chapter. (5) Hatchery residue, such as chick/poult down, eggshells, infertile eggs, and dead germs, should be disposed of promptly and in a manner satisfactory to the Official State...

2009-01-01

409

Energy efficient residential new construction: market transformation. Spectral selective glass. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes the following tasks associated with this project: cost and availability of spectrally selective glass (SSG); window labeling problem and field verification of glass; availability of SSG replacement glass and tempered glass; HVAC load reduction due to spectrally selective glass; and comsumer appreciation of spectrally selective glass. Also included in the report are four attachments: builder and HVAC subcontractor presentation, sample advertisements, spectrally selective glass demonstration model, and invitation to SCE Glass mini trade-show.

Hammon, Robert

2000-12-18

410

Kokanee Stock Status and Contribution of Cabinet Gorge Hatchery, Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, 1989 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

The kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka rehabilitation program for Lake Pend Oreille continued to show progress during 1989. Estimated kokanee abundance in late August was 7.71 million fish. Decreased population size is the result of lower hatchery and wild fry recruitment and low age 1+ survival. Lower recruitment of wild fry in 1989 resulted from a smaller parental escapement in 1988 and lower wild fry survival. Six fry release strategies were evaluated in 1989. Two groups were released in Clark Fork River to help improve a spawning run to Cabinet Gorge Hatchery. Survival from the mid-summer release, which was barged down Clark Fork River to avoid low flow problems, was not significantly different from the early release. The final assessment of these release strategies will be evaluated when adults return to Cabinet gorge Hatchery in 1992 and 1993. Fry released to support the Sullivan Springs Creek spawning run also survived will in 1989. Two open-water releases were made during early and mid-summer. 30 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

Hoelscher, Brian

1990-04-01

411

Students' Learning Experience on the Final Year Project for Electrical and Electronics Engineering of Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the courses that the Electrical engineering students in Universiti Technologi Petronas need to undertake is a research project called the Final Year Project (FYP). This project is being taken and finished within two semesters. The students need to choose an engineering problem related to their own field of specialization and be supervised by an instructor. Besides exposing students

A. Shafie; J. B. Janier; R. Herdiana

412

Resource Contingency Program - Oregon : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hermiston Power Project.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. In 1990, to cover the outer range of potential load growth with new resources, BPA embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP). Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later, if and when it is needed. The decision to acquire any of these option energy projects to fulfill statutory supply obligations will be influenced by Federal system load growth, the outcome of BPA`s Business Plan, required operational changes in Columbia-Snake River Hydroelectric facilities, and the loss of major generating resources. In September 1993, three option development agreements were signed with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop, Washington, and near Hermiston, Oregon. Together these three projects could supply BPA with 1,090 average megawatts (aMW) of power. Under these agreements, sponsors are obtaining permits and conducting project design work, and BPA is completing this EIS process. In September 1993, BPA published a Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on these three proposed gas-fired combustion turbine projects and held public scoping meetings in October 1993 at each site. In February 1994, BPA released an Implementation Plan on the proposed scope of the EIS. A draft EIS on the three proposed projects was published in February 1995. The impacts of the Chehalis and Satsop projects located in Washington State will be covered in one EIS document, while the impacts of the Hermiston project located in Oregon are covered in this final EIS document. It is BPA`s intent to continue to base the analysis of impacts on the assumption that all three projects may be constructed at some point in the future.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-09-01

413

Zachary-Fort Lauderdale pipeline construction and conversion project: final supplement to final environmental impact statement. Docket No. CP74-192  

SciTech Connect

This Final Supplement to the Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final Supplement) evaluates the economic, engineering, and environmental aspects of newly developed alternatives to an abandonment/conversion project proposed by Florida Gas Transmission Company (Florida Gas). It also updates the staff's previous FEIS and studies revisions to the original proposal. Wherever possible, the staff has adopted portions of its previous FEIS in lieu of reprinting portions of that analysis which require no change. 60 references, 8 figures, 35 tables.

None

1980-05-01

414

Fuzzy variable speed limit device project. Final report, August 1997--August 1998  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of the Fuzzy Variable Speed Limit Device (FVSLD) Project was to demonstrate that fuzzy logic is well-suited to the design and implementation of a variable speed limit (VSL) system dedicated to speed management on rural highways. This objective was demonstrated through the creation of a real-time fuzzy control system that could continuously display highway speeds that are appropriate to the atmosphere and road surface conditions that exist at any given time at locations of interest. The software that implements the control system was the main product of the project although a micro-controller based hardware prototype of the final fuzzy control system was also created. The geographical area of concern for the project was the I-40 corridor in rural northern Arizona. This corridor passes through a variety of geographic locations that range from desert to mountainous terrain. As a final demonstration, the completed FVSLD Project software was used to remotely display, in real-time at the district headquarters of the Arizona Department of Transportation in Flagstaff, appropriate highway speeds for three target Road Weather Information System (RWIS) sites selected along the I-40 corridor. Information provided by each of these RWIS stations was monitored and an appropriate speed limit for each location was displayed. The sites selected were the RWIS stations located at Riordan, Pine Springs, and Ash Fork.

Placer, J.; Sagahyroon, A.

1998-08-01

415

Stock identification of chum, sockeye, chinook, and coho salmon in Prince William Sound. Restoration projects 93068 and 94137. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project final report  

SciTech Connect

Coded wire tags were applied to sockeye, chum, coho, and chinook salmon at three hatcheries in Prince William Sound, and also to three populations of wild sockeye salmon. Two of these populations were situated in contaminated areas of the Sound, while the other was located in an area distant from the trajectory of the oil plume. Contributions of different hatchery and wild release groups to specific harvest-district-week strata were estimated from recoveries of tags in the commercial fishery, and in the escapements of the wild sockeye populations. Tag-specific survival rates were also estimated where possible. As expected, the proportion of fish from wild populations in the commercial catches decreased with increasing releases of hatchery fish. Significant relationships between release size and survival rates were detected for sockeye salmon.

Sharr, S.; Peckham, C.J.; Sharp, D.G.; Smith, J.L.; Willette, T.M.

1996-08-01

416

Statewide Systems Change Project for the Integration of Severely Disabled Students in California: The PEERS Project (Providing Education for Everyone in Regular Schools). Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report describes the PEERS (Providing Education for Everyone in Regular Schools) Project, a 5-year collaborative systems change project in California to facilitate the integration of students with severe disabilities who were previously served at special centers into services at regular schools and the integration of students in…

Campbell, Patrick; And Others

417

Bacterial Population Association with Phytoplankton Cultured in a Bivalve Hatchery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacterial populations association with phytoplankton cultures used as food for bivalve larvae were enumerated and identified from their partial 16S rDNA gene sequences. Microalgae were provided from different European hatcheries during the larval production season. Average concentration (direct counts) of bacteria ranged from 1.3 × 10 5 to 5.3 × 10 8 mL ?1 while culturable bacteria represented from 10%

J.-L. Nicolas; S. Corre; J.-C. Cochard

2004-01-01

418

Technical approach to finalizing sensible soil cleanup levels at the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect

The remedial strategy for addressing contaminated environmental media was recently finalized for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) following almost 10 years of detailed technical analysis. The FEMP represents one of the first major nuclear facilities to successfully complete the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) phase of the environmental restoration process. A critical element of this success was the establishment of sensible cleanup levels for contaminated soil and groundwater both on and off the FEMP property. These cleanup levels were derived based upon a strict application of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) regulations and guidance, coupled with positive input from the regulatory agencies and the local community regarding projected future land uses for the site. The approach for establishing the cleanup levels was based upon a Feasibility Study (FS) strategy that examined a bounding range of viable future land uses for the site. Within each land use, the cost and technical implications of a range of health-protective cleanup levels for the environmental media were analyzed. Technical considerations in driving these cleanup levels included: direct exposure routes to viable human receptors; cross- media impacts to air, surface water, and groundwater; technical practicality of attaining the levels; volume of affected media; impact to sensitive environmental receptors or ecosystems; and cost. This paper will discuss the technical approach used to support the finalization of the cleanup levels for the site. The final cleanup levels provide the last remaining significant piece to the puzzle of establishing a final site-wide remedial strategy for the FEMP, and positions the facility for the expedient completion of site-wide remedial activities.

Carr, D.; Hertel, B. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Jewett, M. [Brown and Root (United States); Janke, R. [USDOE Fernald Area Office (United States); Conner, B. [Smith Environmental (United States)

1996-02-01

419

Estimating the hatchery fraction of a natural population: a Bayesian approach  

USGS Publications Warehouse

There is strong and growing interest in estimating the proportion of hatchery fish that are in a natural population (the hatchery fraction). In a sample of fish from the relevant population, some are observed to be marked, indicating their origin as hatchery fish. The observed proportion of marked fish is usually less than the actual hatchery fraction, since the observed proportion is determined by the proportion originally marked, differential survival (usually lower) of marked fish relative to unmarked hatchery fish, and rates of mark retention and detection. Bayesian methods can work well in a setting such as this, in which empirical data are limited but for which there may be considerable expert judgment regarding these values. We explored a Bayesian estimation of the hatchery fraction using Monte Carlo–Markov chain methods. Based on our findings, we created an interactive Excel tool to implement the algorithm, which we have made available for free.

Barber, Jarrett J.; Gerow, Kenneth G.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Singh, Sarabdeep

2011-01-01

420

Terahertz spectral signatures :measurement and detection LDRD project 86361 final report.  

SciTech Connect

LDRD Project 86361 provided support to upgrade the chemical and material spectral signature measurement and detection capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories using the terahertz (THz) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, which includes frequencies between 0.1 to 10 THz. Under this project, a THz time-domain spectrometer was completed. This instrument measures sample absorption spectra coherently, obtaining both magnitude and phase of the absorption signal, and has shown an operating signal-to-noise ratio of 10{sub 4}. Additionally, various gas cells and a reflectometer were added to an existing high-resolution THz Fourier transform spectrometer, which greatly extend the functionality of this spectrometer. Finally, preliminary efforts to design an integrated THz transceiver based on a quantum cascade laser were begun.

Wanke, Michael Clement; Brener, Igal; Lee, Mark

2005-11-01

421

[Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. Final public design report; Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

This final Public Design Report (PDR) provides completed design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the operating parameters and benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. Pending development of technically and commercially viable sorbent for the Hot Gas Cleanup System, the HGCU also is demonstrated. The report is organized under the following sections: design basis description; plant descriptions; plant systems; project costs and schedule; heat and material balances; general arrangement drawings; equipment list; and miscellaneous drawings.

NONE

1996-07-01

422

41. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road ProjectNR7, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

41. From Final Construction Report on the Haleakala Road Project--NR-7, Hawaii National Park, Island of Maui, Territory of Hawaii, T.H. VIEW FROM APPROXIMATELY THE SAME SPOT SHOWING HOW COVERING THE ROCK FILLS WITH SOIL HAS ALMOST OBLITERATED THESE SCARS. TO IDENTIFY A POINT FOR COMPARISON NOTICE THE BRIDE GULCH JUST TO THE LEFT OF THE CENTER IN THE UPPER PICTURE AND COMPARE WITH THE SAME GULCH IN THE LOWER PICTURE. THE AFTER PHOTO OF A BEFORE AND AFTER SET. BEFORE PHOTO IS HI-52-40. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

423

Independent management and financial review, Yucca Mountain Project, Nevada. Final report, Appendix  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425), as amended by Public Law 100-203, December 22, 1987, established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the Department of Energy (DOE), and directed the Office to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine if this site is suitable for the construction of a repository for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. Work on site characterization has been under way for several years. Thus far, about $1.47 billion have been spent on Yucca Mountain programs. This work has been funded by Congressional appropriations from a Nuclear Waste Fund to which contributions have been made by electric utility ratepayers through electric utilities generating power from nuclear power stations. The Secretary of Energy and the Governor of the State of Nevada have appointed one person each to a panel to oversee an objective, independent financial and management evaluation of the Yucca Mountain Project. The Requirements for the work will include an analysis of (1) the Yucca Mountain financial and, contract management techniques and controls; (2) Project schedules and credibility of the proposed milestones; (3) Project organizational effectiveness and internal planning processes, and (4) adequacy of funding levels and funding priorities, including the cost of infrastructure and scientific studies. The recipient will provide monthly progress report and the following reports/documents will be presented as deliverables under the contract: (1) Financial and Contract Management Preliminary Report; (2) Project Scheduling Preliminary Report; (3)Project Organizational Effectiveness Preliminary Report; (4) Project Funding Levels and Funding Priorities Preliminary Report; and (5) Final Report.

NONE

1995-07-15

424

Dynamics of seawater bacterial communities in a shellfish hatchery.  

PubMed

Bacterial disease is a significant issue for larviculture of several species of shellfish, including oysters. One source of bacteria is the seawater used throughout the hatchery. In this study carried out at a commercial oyster hatchery in Tasmania, Australia, the diversity of the bacterial community and its relationship with larval production outcomes were studied over a 2-year period using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and tag-encoded pyrosequencing. The bacterial communities were very diverse, dominated by the Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Cyanobacteria. The communities were highly variable on scales of days, weeks and seasons. The difference between the intake seawater and treated clean seawater used in the hatchery was smaller than the observed temporal differences in the seawater throughout the year. No clear correlation was observed between production outcomes and the overall bacterial community structure. However, one group of Cyanobacterial sequences was more abundant when mass mortality events occurred than when healthy spat were produced although they were always present. PMID:23354180

Powell, S M; Chapman, C C; Bermudes, M; Tamplin, M L

2013-01-25

425

Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model''  

SciTech Connect

OAK (B204) Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model'' The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations.

Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Marvin L. Adams; Todd S. Palmer; Kord S. Smith; Kevin Clarno; Hikaru Hiruta; Razvan Nes

2003-08-04

426

Survey and evaluation of instream habitat and stock restoration techniques for wild pink and chum salmon. Restoration study number 105-1 (restoration project 93063). Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report  

SciTech Connect

This project is the result of a three-year survey of the Exxon Valdez oil spill impact area to identify appropriate and cost-effective instream habitat restoration techniques for salmon, including spawning channels and improvement of fish passage through fish ladders or step-pool structures to overcome physical or hydrological barriers. Additional wild salmon stock rehabilitation measures include stream-side incubation boxes, remote egg-taking, incubation at existing hatcheries for fry stocking in oil-impacted streams, and fry rearing. Study results include the identification of the most promising instream habitat restoration projects in each of the spill-impacted areas.

Willette, T.M.; Dudiak, N.C.; Honnold, S.G.; Carpenter, G.; Dickson, M.

1995-08-01

427

[Microsatellite variability and differentiation of hatchery stocks of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum in Sakhalin].  

PubMed

Variability at eight microsatellite loci was examined in five populations of chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum from Sakhalin hatcheries. The population of Kalinino hatchery had the lowest heterozygosity and the lowest average number of alleles per locus. The populations examined exhibited significant differentiation, theta ST = 0.026 on average per locus. The maximum genetic differences were found between the populations of the Kalinino and the Ado-Tymovo hatcheries; the latter differs from the remaining populations also by the highest number and high frequencies of specific alleles. The genetic features of the Taranai hatchery population, observed at microsatellite loci, reflect its "mixed" origin. PMID:17326390

Afanas'ev, K I; Rubtsova, G A; Malinina, T V; Salmenkova, E A; Omel'chenko, V T; Zhivotovski?, L A

2006-12-01

428

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Comments and Responses to Comments volume of the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report prepared for the proposed Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project (Final EIS/EIR). This volume of the Final EIS/EIR provides copies of the written comments received on the Draft EIS/EIR and the leady agency responses to those comments in conformance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

None

1999-02-01

429

Together We Can: The Virginia Project for the Integration of Children with Deaf-Blindness. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The project "Together We Can" is described in this final report as a program to provide training and technical assistance to improve the quality of life for infants, toddlers, children, and youth with deaf-blindness in Virginia. The plan for the project included services based on recommended effective practices in the areas of early…

Malatchi, Anne H.

430

Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 1: Transmittal documents; Executive summary; Project summary  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described.

NONE

1996-01-30

431

EVALUATION OF PROJECT HEAD START READING READINESS IN ISSAQUENA AND SHARKEY COUNTIES, MISSISSIPPI, SUMMER, 1965. FINAL REPORT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE SUBSTANCE OF THIS FINAL REPORT ON THE HEAD START PROJECT OF 1965 IN MISSISSIPPI IS A DEEP CONCERN WITH THE EFFECT OF THE SOCIAL MILIEU IN WHICH THE PROJECT STRUGGLED RATHER THAN WITH THE USUAL VARIETY OF STATISTICS AND RESEARCH CONCLUSIONS. THIS IS DUE, IN PART, TO THE PAUCITY OF SIGNIFICANT RESULTS AND, MORE IMPORTANTLY, TO THE SHOCKINGLY…

GORDON, SOL

432

Expanding the Circle: South Dakota Deaf-Blind Project. Final Report, 10-1-98 through 9-30-99.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes activities and accomplishments of the South Dakota Deaf-Blind Project, a 4-year federally funded project designed to raise awareness of the need for early identification of children who are deaf-blind and reside on Native American reservation lands. To this end, the states of Montana, Minnesota, North Dakota, Nebraska,…

South Dakota State Dept. of Education and Cultural Affairs, Pierre.

433

Project to Design New Patterns for Training R & D Personnel in Education (RFP 70-12). Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the final report on the project to design new patterns for training research and development (R&D) personnel in education; the project was conducted by a consortium of educational agencies coordinated throught the Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh. The report is bound in eight sections: goals and activities…

Pittsburgh Univ., PA. Learning Research and Development Center.

434

(O3) The use of reflective practice to support a final year team research project in biosciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

All final year students in the Faculty of Life Sciences complete a research project module worth 40 credits. In September 2006 the Faculty of Life Sciences (FLS) in partnership with the Manchester Science and Enterprise Centre (MSEC), launched the Life Sciences Enterprise Project (LSEP) as an alternative option to either the traditional laboratory-based, bioinformatics or computer-aided learning\\/education research projects. Based

Tracey Speake; Maggy Fostier; Martin Henery

435

US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 52 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Building 52 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

Krabacher, J.E.

1996-08-01

436

Comparing The Reproductive Success Of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook. Annual Report 2002.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 2001 hatchery- and wild-origin spring chinook were placed into an observation stream located at the Cle Elum Supplementation Research Facility to compare their reproductive success. Two groups containing both wild- and hatchery fish of both sexes were ...

S. L. Schroder C. M. Knudsen B. Watson

2003-01-01

437

Stocking of Offsite Waters for Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation Creston National Fish Hatchery, FY 2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

A total of 350,000, M012 strain, westslope cutthroat trout (WCT) eggs were received from Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP), Washoe Park State Fish Hatchery in June of 2005 to accomplish this fishery management objective. These eggs were incubated, hatched and reared entirely inside the hatchery nursery building using a protected well water supply. Fish grew according to schedule and survival was excellent. The hatchery achieved a 0.78 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for this group of WCT. Not all of the progenies from this fish lot were used for Hungry Horse Dam Fishery Mitigation Implementation. Some were used for other regional fishery management projects. Westslope cutthroat trout were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook and also utilizing a regimen adapted for hatchery specific site conditions. The fish health for these WCT was very good. Survival from first feeding fry stage to stocking was 79%. The hatchery had an annual fish health inspection performed by the USFWS Bozeman Fish Health Center in mid March of 2006. This inspection found all fish lots at Creston to be disease free. The Montana State Fish Health Board has placed the hatchery under a limited quarantine since May of 2005 due to an epizootic of Furunculosis. This classification has allowed the Creston NFH to stock disease free fish in locations approved by regional fish managers. The hatchery has been working with the State Fish Pathologist to remove the limited quarantine classification from the facility. Although fish health for all station fish lots remains disease free, MFWP has asserted it will not remove the limited quarantine until the new influent water treatment system, including the ultraviolet disinfection unit, is running full time, year round. The USFWS is working to secure the additional funding necessary to operate the treatment building year round. Distribution of the WCT took place from March through June. The stocking locations on the Flathead Reservation and State managed waters were identified by Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and MFWP fishery biologists. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by CSKT and MFWP fishery technicians. Stocking numbers and locations vary annually based on the results of biological monitoring, creel evaluations and adaptive management decisions. A total of 99,126 WCT were stocked during nine distribution trips in management approved waters (see Table 1). The average size of WCT at stocking was 3.91-inches. A total of 101,600, Arlee strain, rainbow trout (RBT) eggs were received from the Ennis National Fish Hatchery, Ennis, Montana, in December of 2005 and 35,000 Kamloops strain eggs were received from Murray Springs SFH, Eureka, Montana, in March of 2006 to accomplish this fishery management objective. The RBT were reared using approved fish culture techniques as recommended in the USFWS Fish Hatchery Management Handbook. There was no fish health related problems associated with this lot of fish. Survival from swim up fry stage to stocking was 93% for the Arlee's and 79% for the Kamloops. The hatchery achieved a 0.68 feed fed to pounds gained conversion ratio for the Arlee and 0.97 for the Kamloops RBT. The excellent feed conversion ratio can be attributed to refined feeding techniques and the use of an extruded high performance fry feed made with premium fish meal and marine fish oil. The Arlee strain of rainbow trout is requested for this fishery mitigation objective because the chosen stocking locations are terminal basin reservoirs or lakes, habitat conditions prevent natural spawning runs and returns to the creel are more favorable then for native westslope cutthroat trout. MFWP also requested a fall plant of Kamloops strain RBT and they will be evaluated for performance and future fall stockings in Echo Lake. Post release survival and angler success is monitored routinely by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) fishery techn

Hooley, Sharon

2009-03-20

438

Load combination methodology development. Load combination program. Project II final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of Phase I of a research project to formulate a probabilistic methodology for developing consistent criteria for the design of nuclear power plant components. A method for calculating the reliability of an individual component subjected to static and dynamic loads is developed and applied to the evaluation of reliability implied by a set of design criteria. In addition, load and resistance factors are derived such that the resulting components have, on the average, specified target component reliabilities. Since the design criteria evaluation/development requires that a number of components be studied, a simulation procedure is developed to economically obtain a population of representative component designs. Finally, some preliminary studies for allocating component target reliabilities have been made.

Schwartz, M.W.; Ravindra, M.K.; Cornell, C.A.; Chou, C.K.

1981-07-01

439

Development of a criticality alarm system neutron detector: Final project report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project was to develop a prototype neutron detector for use in criticality alarm systems (CASs) at US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor facilities wherever significant amounts of fissile material are processed or stored. Constraints placed on the design of the detector were that the overall size of the detector was to be as small as practical, the input voltage requirements were to be no more than 24 V, and that the gamma sensitivity would be as low as possible. Also, the detector should give dosimetric neutron response, and should have sufficient temporal capabilities to measure the entire range from fast (>1 ms) to slow (seconds to minutes) excursions, and sufficient dynamic range to measure from background to over 100 times background levels to insure proper activation of the Immediate Evacuation Alarm (IEA). Finally, the detector should insure rapid (<1 s) activation of the IEA in the event of a criticality excursion. 24 figs., 11 tabs.

O'Dell, A.A.

1989-05-01

440

Biomass bioconversion to calcium magnesium acetate deicing salt. Final project report on Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

The project experimentally investigated using biomass as feedstock for conversion to calcium magnesium acetate (CMA), an alternative road salt. This new organic road salt will prevent corrosion of bridge decks, underground cables, and rusting of cars and trucks. CMA from biomass will reduce costs, compared to petroleum and natural gas for making this material. Phase I work focused on bioconversion of sewage sludge residuals to CMA. The process is based on a packed bed fermenter to produce acetic acid from biomass, as well as liquid ion exchange to recover acetic acid from the fermenter broth prior to the final production step which occurs by passing the acetic acid over limestone. In Phase I: (1) percent bioconversion and kinetics of biomass to acetic acid have been confirmed in small batch fermenters; (2) equilibrium constants for acetic acid recovery via liquid ion exchange have been documented; and (3) rates of conversion to CMA have been determined.

Trantolo, D.J.

1989-06-01

441

Evaluation of 1991-1992 Brood Overwinter-Reared Coho Released from Net Pens in Youngs Bay, Oregon : Final Completion Report Youngs Bay Terminal Fishery Project.  

SciTech Connect

Funding from Bonneville Power Administration was provided to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s Fisheries Project to identify and develop terminal fishing opportunities. The 1991 and 1992 brood fingerling coho from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife hatcheries were successfully reared during the winter period to smolt stage in Youngs Bay utilizing floating net pens. Based on coded-wire-tag recoveries during 1991--93 from 2-week net-pen acclimation releases, total accountability of coho adults averaged 40,540 fish, with the Youngs Bay commercial harvest accounting for 39%. With reduced ocean harvest impacts during 1994 and 1995, 92% of 51,640 coho in 1994 and 68% of 23,599 coho in 1995 (based on coded-wire-tag recoveries) were accounted for in the Youngs Bay commercial fishery for combined 2-week and overwinter acclimation net-pen releases. Overwinter net-pen acclimation coho accounted for 35,063 and 15,775 coho adults in 1994 and 1995 with 93% and 68% accountable in the Youngs Bay commercial harvest. Based on coded-wire-tag recoveries, less than 1% of the adults resulting from releases at Youngs Bay net pens strayed to hatcheries, while none were recovered on spawning ground surveys during 1991--95. The highest survival rates were observed for 1991 and 1992 brood overwinter coho released in early May. Time of release, not rearing strategy, appears to be the determining factor affecting survival in Youngs Bay.

Hirose, Paul S.

1997-01-01

442

Survey of Striped Bass Hatchery Management in the Southeastern United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

The conditions under which striped bass are cultured were characterized based upon a survey of 57 hatchery managers in the southeastern United States and the subsequent analysis of water samples collected from those hatcheries. Regression analysis of water quality variables indicated that salinity of 0.5‰ or greater was the single most important factor influencing striped bass production. Surface waters comprised

James G. Geiger; Nick C. Parker

1985-01-01

443

Distinguishing Wild from Hatchery-Produced Juvenile Red Snapper with Otolith Chemical Signatures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Otolith chemical signatures were evaluated as natural tags to distinguish wild from hatchery-produced juvenile red snapper Lutjanus campechanus. Otoliths were sampled from 59 hatchery-reared fish and 146 wild fish collected over the continental shelf from northwest Florida to Texas. One sagitta from each fish was cleaned, dissolved in ultrapure nitric acid, and analyzed with sector field inductively coupled plasma mass

Suzanne M. Gibson; William F. Patterson III; Ronald P. Phelps; William P. Patterson; Zhongxing Chen

2010-01-01

444

Bacterial diversity in a marine hatchery: Balance between pathogenic and potentially probiotic bacterial strains  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aquatic hatcheries contain diverse microbial communities that include pathogenic, innocuous and beneficial bacteria, and the ability to maintain a proper balance of this microflora may be the key to a successful culture environment. Herein, we undertook to identify the bacterial diversity present in a marine hatchery in British Columbia that cultures both fish and shellfish species. Bacterial strains were cultured

Angela D. Schulze; Abayomi O. Alabi; Adele R. Tattersall-Sheldrake; Kristina M. Miller

2006-01-01

445

Identification and Contribution of Wild and Hatchery Steelhead Stocks in Lake Michigan Tributaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed and validated a simple and accurate assignment rule, based on one quantified scale characteristic, for the identification of wild and hatchery stocks of Great Lakes steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss (formerly Salmo gairdneri). A ratio between the first winter and spring growth rates, inferred from scale circulus patterns, met the criteria of being both distinct between wild and hatchery adults

Paul W. Seelbach; Gary E. Whelan

1988-01-01

446

CHAPTER 15 History and effects of hatchery salmon in the Pacific  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been a long history of production of hatchery salmon along the Pacific coast - from California's first efforts in the 1870s using eggs from chinook and rainbow trout to the recent large-scale production hatcheries for pink salmon in Japan and the Russian Far East. The rationale for this production has also varied from replacement of fish lost in

Jennifer Nielsen

447

A Bayesian Approach for Estimating Hatchery Contribution in a Series of Salmon Fisheries  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Bayesian methods provide an under-appreciated way of analyzing tag or mark data for hatchery salmon stock identification. For example, the otolith bones can now be marked in captive juvenile salmon, these marks remaining visible in the returning adults. Fishery managers can summarize what is known and unknown,about the underlying proportion of hatchery fish in these fisheries using Bayesian methods

Harold J. Geiger

1994-01-01

448

Diminished Reproductive Success of Steelhead from a Hatchery Supplementation Program (Little Sheep Creek, Imnaha Basin, Oregon)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hatchery supplementation programs are designed to enhance natural production and maintain the fitness of the target population; however, it can be difficult to evaluate the success of these programs. Key to the success of such programs is a relatively high reproductive success of hatchery fish. This study investigated the relative reproductive success (RRS) of steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss (anadromous rainbow trout)

Ewann A. Berntson; Richard W. Carmichael; Michael W. Flesher; Eric J. Ward; Paul Moran

2011-01-01

449

Characterization of the beneficial properties of lactobacilli isolated from bullfrog ( Rana catesbeiana ) hatchery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work addresses the isolation and partial identification of the microbial population of a R. catesbeiana hatchery in spring and summer as well as some beneficial properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated in different seasons and hatchery areas. The bacterial population was grouped into the following taxa: Lactobacillus spp., Pediococcus spp., Enterococcus faecalis and Ent. faecium, and Enterobacteriaceae (Enterobacter spp.,

Sergio E. Pasteris; Esteban Vera Pingitore; Germán Roig Babot; María C. Otero; Marta I. Bühler; María E. Nader-Macías

2009-01-01

450

Lake Sacajawea Restoration Project, City of Longview, Washington. Final Project Report and Alternative Water Supply Study (Revised).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents the data collected during the lake restoration program and discusses the general success of the project. The report briefly outlines the history of the project and the lake restoration program; presents and analyzes the data collected ...

1985-01-01

451

Innovative Training Practices: Practitioner Research as Staff Development. The Story of a Practitioner Research Project. Final Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper reports on nine research projects conducted by 12 adult literacy practitioners with Literacy South in North Carolina in 1993. The focus of the project was to engage literacy practitioners in self-directed research that generated staff training and development. This report is a chronological account of the research projects with a…

Pates, Andrew; Fingeret, Hanna A.

452

Final report on EURAMET Project no. 1157: Inter-comparison of a 1000 L proving tank  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The EURAMET comparison no. 1157 is a supplementary comparison of European national volume laboratories. The comparison started in September 2010 and the measurements were finished in August 2012. Twelve laboratories took part in the comparison. The aim of this project was to compare results and method calibration of a 1000 L proving tank. The results were quite satisfactory. The majority of the laboratories present results that are consistent with the reference value, and with each other. The presented uncertainties for the volumetric method are in all cases larger than the uncertainties of the gravimetric method, as expected, because it is a secondary calibration method. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

Batista, Elsa; Smits, Erik

2013-01-01

453

Variation in the Early Marine Survival and Behavior of Natural and Hatchery-Reared Hood Canal Steelhead  

PubMed Central

Background Hatchery-induced selection and direct effects of the culture environment can both cause captively bred fish populations to survive at low rates and behave unnaturally in the wild. New approaches to fish rearing in conservation hatcheries seek to reduce hatchery-induced selection, maintain genetic resources, and improve the survival of released fish. Methodology/Principal Findings This study used acoustic telemetry to compare three years of early marine survival estimates for two wild steelhead populations to survival of two populations raised at two different conservation hatcheries located within the Hood Canal watershed. Steelhead smolts from one conservation hatchery survived with probabilities similar to the two wild populations (freshwater: 95.8–96.9%, early marine: 10.0–15.9%), while smolts from the other conservation hatchery exhibited reduced freshwater and early marine survival (freshwater: 50.2–58.7%, early marine: 2.6–5.1%). Freshwater and marine travel rates did not differ significantly between wild and hatchery individuals from the same stock, though hatchery smolts did display reduced migration ranges within Hood Canal. Between-hatchery differences in rearing density and vessel geometry likely affected survival and behavior after release and contributed to greater variation between hatcheries than between wild populations. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that hatchery-reared smolts can achieve early marine survival rates similar to wild smolt survival rates, and that migration performance of hatchery-reared steelhead can vary substantially depending on the environmental conditions and practices employed during captivity.

Moore, Megan; Berejikian, Barry A.; Tezak, Eugene P.

2012-01-01

454

Microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA polymorphism reveals life-history dependent interbreeding between hatchery and wild brown trout (Salmo trutta L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of stocking hatchery trout into wild populations were studied in a Danish river, using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers. Baseline samples were taken from hatchery trout and wild trout assumed to be unaffected by previous stocking. Also, samples were taken from resident and sea trout from a stocked section of the river. Genetic differentiation between the hatchery

Michael M. Hansen; Daniel E. Ruzzante; Einar E. nielsen; Karen-lise D. Mensberg

2000-01-01

455

Use of Otolith Microstructure to Distinguish Wild from Hatchery-Reared American Shad in the Susquehanna River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hatchery production is a major component of the effort to restore American shad Alosa sapidissima in the Susquehanna River. Otoliths of all hatchery-reared American shad are marked by immersion of larvae in a solution of tetracycline. Sagittae from juvenile outmigrants are examined for marks and the data are used to estimate hatchery contributions to the total population of the outmigrants.

Michael L. Hendricks; Donald L. Torsello; Thomas W. H. Backman

1994-01-01

456

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, site  

SciTech Connect

The final audit report for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and a QA final closeout inspection performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). One radiological surveillance and three radiological audits were performed at the Ambrosia Lake site. The surveillance was performed on 12--16 April 1993 (DOE, 1993d). The audits were performed on 26--29 July 1993 (DOE, 1993b); 21--23 March 1994 (DOE, 1994d); and 1--2 August 1994 (DOE, 1994d). The surveillance and audits resulted in 47 observations. Twelve of the observations raised DOE concerns that were resolved on site or through subsequent corrective action. All outstanding issues were satisfactorily closed out on 28 December 1994. The radiological surveillance and audits are discussed in this report. A total of seven QA in-process surveillances were performed at the Ambrosia Lake UMTRA site are discussed. The DOE/TAC Ambrosia Lake final remedial action close-out inspection was conducted on 26 July 1995 (DOE, 1995a). To summarize, a total of 155 observations were noted during DOE/TAC audit and surveillance activities. Follow-up to responses required from the RAC for the DOE/TAC surveillance and audit observations indicated that all issues related to the Ambrosia Lake site were resolved and closed to the satisfaction of the DOE.

NONE

1995-09-01

457

Lawrence Children's Health Project/EPSDT. A Proposal to Integrate Health and Special Education Services for Children in a School-Based Demonstration Project. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This final report describes the Lawrence Children's Health Project (LCHP), set up in Lawrence, Massachusetts in 1979, in order to demonstrate and evaluate the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of an interagency approach to providing health care to children through a school-based local resource network. The LCHP service delivery is said to have…

Merrimack Education Center, Chelmsford, MA.

458

Lightning dock geothermal space heating project, Lightning Dock KGRA, New Mexico. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The proposed project was to take the existing geothermal greenhouse and home heating systems, which consisted of pumping geothermal water and steam through passive steam heaters, and convert the systems to one using modern heat exchange units. It was proposed to complete the existing unfinished, re-inforced glass side wall, wood framed structure, as a nursery lath house, the purpose of which would be to use geothermal water in implementing university concepts on the advantages of bottom heat to establish hardy root systems in nursery and bedding plants. The use of this framework was abandoned in favor of erecting new structures for the proposed purpose. The final project of the proposal was the establishment of a drip irrigation system, to an area just west of the existing greenhouse and within feet of the geothermal well. Through this drip irrigation system geothermal water would be pumped, to prevent killing spring frosts. The purpose of this area of the proposal is to increase the potential use of existing geothermal waters of the Lightning Dock KGRA, in opening a new geothermal agri-industry which is economically feasible for the area and would be extremely energy efficient.

McCants, T.W.

1980-12-01

459

Decontamination and decommissioning of the 60-inch Cyclotron facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East project final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report of the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) 60'' Cyclotron Accelerator Facility contains descriptions and evaluations of activities performed, and results obtained in connection with the Cyclotron D&D Project. It provides the following information: Objective of the Cyclotron D&D Project; A brief history of the Cyclotron facility; Overall descriptions of the Cyclotron facility and the ANL-E site; An overview of the D&D activities performed in connection with the Cyclotron D&D Project; Summary of the final status of the Cyclotron facility, including results of the final and confirmation surveys; Final cost and schedule for the Cyclotron D&D Project; Summaries of personnel exposure and total waste generated in connection with this project; and Final facility condition. This project final report was written in accordance with the requirements of the ANL-E D&D Project Planning Guidance Manual and the ANL-E D&D Program Management Plan. It covers the entire Cyclotron D&D Project, from the initiation of D&D activities to final project closeout. At the conclusion of the Independent Verification Survey (IVS), the Cyclotron facility was released for unrestricted reuse. Residual, elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas, however. The upper floor of the Cyclotron vault contains readily measurable radioactivity from neutron activation of the concrete and other structures resulting from Cyclotron operations. In accessible areas, the exposure rate criteria in DOE Order 5400.5, i.e., <20 {micro}R/hr, was met. No Radiation Work Permits (RWPs), radiation monitors, or other radiological controls are needed to enter the area. There is no planned use for the former Cyclotron vault and hot lab areas at this time. The issuance of this report signifies the conclusion of the Cyclotron D&D Project and the transfer of the Cyclotron facility from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management roster to the landlord.

Collins, E.; Boyance, J.; Tinnin, D.; Williams, A.

2001-03-19

460

Comparison of ozone and formaldehyde as poultry hatchery disinfectants  

SciTech Connect

Ozone and formaldehyde were compared as poultry hatchery disinfectants in a poultry setter, and evaluated for effectiveness. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Salmonella typhimurium, and Proteus spp. were inoculated onto open petri plates and exposed to ozone or onto filter paper strips and exposed to ozone or formaldehyde in a poultry setter. Ozone (1.41 to 1.68% by weight) resulted in significant bacterial reductions of greater than 4 log10 on the open plates and greater than 3 log10 on filter paper strips, whereas formaldehyde (triple strength) resulted in greater than 7 log10 reduction on filter paper strips. Ozone was similarly lethal to organisms on filter paper strips at 90% relative humidity (RH) and 13.9 C, and at 50% RH and 37.7 C. Although under the conditions of this study formaldehyde (triple strength) was more lethal than ozone, ozone killed greater than 99.9% of the starting microbial populations. In the event that formaldehyde can no longer be used in the hatchery, an effective alternative may be ozone.

Whistler, P.E.; Sheldon, B.W. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh (USA))

1989-10-01