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Sample records for hawaii volcanoes national

  1. Health-hazard Evaluation Report Heta 90-179-2172, National Park Service, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hilo, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, G.A.; Stephenson, R.L.; Kawamoto, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In response to a request from the National Park Service, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous exposures to volcanic emissions, both gases and particulates, at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (SIC-7999) on the island of Hawaii in the State of Hawaii. Concerns included exposures to sulfur-dioxide (7446095) (SO2), asphalt decomposition products from burning pavement, acid mists when lava enters the ocean, volcanic caused smog, and Pele's hair (a fibrous glass like material). Two other related requests for study were also received in regard to civil defense workers in these areas. No detectable levels of SO2 were found during long term colorimetric detector tube sampling used to characterize park workers' personal full shift exposures. Short term detector tube samples collected near a naturally occurring sulfur vent showed SO2 levels of 1.2 parts per million (ppm). Work related symptoms reported by more than 50% of the respondents included headache, eye irritation, throat irritation, cough, and phlegm. Chest tightness or wheezing and shortness of breath were also frequently reported. Samples collected for hydrochloric-acid (7647010) and hydrofluoric-acid (7664393) recorded concentrations of up to 15ppm for the former and 1.0ppm for the latter acid. Airborne particulates in the laze plume were comprised largely of chloride salts. Airborne fibers were detected at a concentration of 0.16 fibers per cubic centimeter. The authors conclude that excessive exposure to SO2 can occur at some locations within the park. The authors recommend that workers and visitors to the park be informed of the potential for exposures.

  2. Diet of feral cats in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, S.C.; Hansen, H.; Nelson, D.; Swift, R.; Banko, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    We documented the diet of feral cats by analysing the contents of 42 digestive tracts from Kilauea and Mauna Loa in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Small mammals, invertebrates, and birds were the most common prey types consumed by feral cats. Birds occurred in 27.8-29.2% of digestive tracts. The total number of bird, small mammal, and invertebrate prey differed between Kilauea and Mauna Loa. On Mauna Loa, significantly more (89%) feral cats consumed small mammals, primarily rodents, than on Kilauea Volcano (50%). Mice (Mus musculus) were the major component of the feral cat diet on Mauna Loa, whereas Orthoptera were the major component of the diet on Kilauea. We recovered a mandible set, feathers, and bones of an endangered Hawaiian Petrel (Pterodroma sandwichensis) from a digestive tract from Mauna Loa. This specimen represents the first well-documented endangered seabird to be recovered from the digestive tract of a feral cat in Hawai'i and suggests that feral cats prey on this species.

  3. Egg parasitoids of Sophonia rufofascia (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.T.; Yang, P.; Huber, J.T.; Jones, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    Parasitism of the leafhopper Sophonia rufofascia (Kuoh and Kuoh), a recent immigrant that has become a widespread pest in Hawaii, was examined in a 1-year survey in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Samples of young leaves of four plant species infested with eggs of S. rufofascia were collected at five sites ranging from 880 to 1190 m in elevation. Leafhopper eggs were parasitized principally by three species of Mymaridae (Hymenoptera): Polynema sp., Schizophragma sp. probably bicolor (Dozier), and Chaetomymar sp. Although parasitism by each species fluctuated at levels usually below 10%, all three were detected consistently across most host plants, sites, and sample periods. Total parasitism differed at a marginally significant level among host plants and sites, but not among sample periods. Total parasitism averaged 14.3% (maximum: 26.3%) on Dodonaea viscosa Jacquin, 10.6% (maximum: 17.5%) on Myrica faya Aiton, 8.7% (maximum: 29.5%) on Metrosideros polymorpha Gaudich-Beaupre, and 1.6% (maximum: 4.3%) on Vaccinium reticulatum Smith. Parasitism was generally higher at sites lower in elevation. Further monitoring is recommended to determine whether parasitism will increase to levels that can effectively suppress S. rufofascia populations. The efficacy of natural enemies already present in Hawaii is important because concern over nontarget impacts on endemic leafhoppers makes introduction of new biological control agents difficult. ?? 2001 Academic Press.

  4. Efficacy of fipronil for control of yellowjacket wasps in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foote, David; Hanna, Cause; King, Cynthia; Spurr, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The western yellowjacket wasp (Vespula pensylvanica) invaded Hawai`i’s national parks and refuges following its spread throughout the islands in the late 1970s. The endemic arthropod fauna of Hawai`i is thought to be especially vulnerable to these predacious social Hymenoptera, and methods of wasp control have been a priority for conservation biology in Hawai`i. The efficacy of the insecticide fipronil mixed with minced canned chicken meat for suppression of yellowjacket populations was evaluated in five experimental field trials in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park between 1999 and 2005. Populations of Vespula were monitored in replicate twoto four- hectare study areas in mesic montane and seasonal submontane forests, before and after application of chicken bait, with and without 0.1% fipronil, and in treatment and nontreatment areas. The bait was applied in hanging bait stations for two to three days. The response of yellowjacket wasp populations was measured using at least three different metrics of abundance including instantaneous counts of wasps at bait stations, wasp traffic rates at Vespula nests, as well as heptyl butyrate trap and/or malaise trap catches in the study areas. All indices of wasp abundance exhibited significant reductions in sites treated with fipronil compared with non-treatment sites with the exception of malaise trapping, where only a limited number of traps were available to be deployed. Wasp traffic ceased at all Vespula nests in sites treated with fipronil within a month after baiting in four of the five trials. The only trial where fipronil failed to terminate yellowjacket nest activity occurred late in the fall when wasps switch from feeding on protein to carbohydrate foods. Based on these data, 0.1% fipronil in chicken bait appears to be an effective tool for suppressing local Vespula yellowjacket populations in the park and other natural areas during the period of peak wasp activity in the summer and early fall months.

  5. Hyperspectral and LiDAR remote sensing of fire fuels in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    PubMed

    Varga, Timothy A; Asner, Gregory P

    2008-04-01

    Alien invasive grasses threaten to transform Hawaiian ecosystems through the alteration of ecosystem dynamics, especially the creation or intensification of a fire cycle. Across sub-montane ecosystems of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on Hawaii Island, we quantified fine fuels and fire spread potential of invasive grasses using a combination of airborne hyperspectral and light detection and ranging (LiDAR) measurements. Across a gradient from forest to savanna to shrubland, automated mixture analysis of hyperspectral data provided spatially explicit fractional cover estimates of photosynthetic vegetation, non-photosynthetic vegetation, and bare substrate and shade. Small-footprint LiDAR provided measurements of vegetation height along this gradient of ecosystems. Through the fusion of hyperspectral and LiDAR data, a new fire fuel index (FFI) was developed to model the three-dimensional volume of grass fuels. Regionally, savanna ecosystems had the highest volumes of fire fuels, averaging 20% across the ecosystem and frequently filling all of the three-dimensional space represented by each image pixel. The forest and shrubland ecosystems had lower FFI values, averaging 4.4% and 8.4%, respectively. The results indicate that the fusion of hyperspectral and LiDAR remote sensing can provide unique information on the three-dimensional properties of ecosystems, their flammability, and the potential for fire spread. PMID:18488621

  6. Birds in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: summary of the 2010 inventory and monitoring program survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Camp, Richard J.; Judge, Seth W.; Hart, Patrick J.; Kudray, Greg; Gaudioso, Jacqueline M.; Hsu, Bobby H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) created the Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program in 1998 to establish baseline information and assess long-term trends in "vital signs" or key abiotic and biotic elements of National Parks (Fancy et al. 2009). The Pacific Island Network of the I&M Program developed a Landbirds Monitoring Protocol (LMP; Camp et al. 2011) to estimate species-specific status and monitor longterm trends in landbird distribution and abundance. Parks included in the LMP that harbor habitat critically important to native forest birds are Haleakala National Park (Maui Island), Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO; Hawai'i Island), and the National Park of American Samoa (American Samoa). In 2010, the LMP was implemented in HAVO to survey landbird density and abundance. This implementation was the first anywhere in the Pacific Islands by the I&M Program, and continued monitoring is planned every five years in all three parks.

  7. A preliminary assessment of mouflon abundance at the Kahuku Unit of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Steven C.; Kawakami, Ben, Jr.; Okita, David; Medeiros, Keola

    2006-01-01

    Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) recently acquired the 115,653 acre Kahuku Ranch unit adjacent to the existing Mauna Loa section of HAVO. Kahuku contains numerous exceptional natural resources including many federally listed threatened and endangered species. An apparently large and growing population of alien mouflon sheep (Ovis gmelini musimon), however, threatens sensitive native plants and forest bird habitats. Population composition and abundance estimates were urgently needed to determine the magnitude of resources required to manage this species and justify costs. We surveyed 32,433 acres from helicopter over 2 days in November 2004 during breeding to determine the abundance and population structure. We estimated that there were more than 2,586 ? 705 (90% CI) mouflon at Kahuku. Overall, group sizes averaged 7.8 and the sex ratio was 1:2.4 rams:ewes, but approximately 44% of the population was concentrated in forested areas near ranching operations where group sizes averaged >15 and the sex ratio was 1:3.9 rams:ewes. The remaining 56% of the population occurred widely dispersed in subalpine shrubland and barren lava flows. Abundance estimates are likely to be conservative because they were not adjusted for detection probability. Ground-based surveys of lambs suggest upper biological limit to annual population increase of 33.1% under existing environmental conditions. Historical information used to calculate population trends indicated the apparent rate of population increase to be 21.1%. In the absence of removals, the population increment for 2004-2005, would be more than 546-856, and the population doubling time with these growth rates is 3-4 years.

  8. Distribution of invasive ants and methods for their control in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Robert W.; Banko, Paul C.; Snook, Kirsten; Euaparadorn, Melody

    2013-01-01

    The first invasive ants were detected in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) more than 80 years ago. Ecological impacts of these ants are largely unknown, but studies in Hawai`i and elsewhere increasingly show that invasive ants can reduce abundance and diversity of native arthropod communities as well as disrupt pollination and food webs. Prior to the present study, knowledge of ant distributions in HAVO has primarily been restricted to road- and trail-side surveys of the Kīlauea and Mauna Loa Strip sections of the park. Due to the risks that ants pose to HAVO resources, understanding their distributions and identifying tools to eradicate or control populations of the most aggressive species is an important objective of park managers. We mapped ant distributions in two of the most intensively managed sections of the park, Mauna Loa Strip and Kahuku. We also tested the efficacy of baits to control the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) and the big-headed ant (Pheidole megacephala), two of the most aggressive and ecologically destructive species in Hawai`i. Efficacy testing of formicidal bait was designed to provide park managers with options for eradicating small populations or controlling populations that occur at levels beyond which they can be eradicated. Within the Mauna Loa Strip and Kahuku sections of HAVO we conducted systematic surveys of ant distributions at 1625 stations covering nearly 200 km of roads, fences, and transects between August 2008 and April 2010. Overall, 15 ant species were collected in the two areas, with 12 being found on Mauna Loa Strip and 11 at Kahuku. Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi was most widespread at both sites, ranging in elevation from 920 to 2014 m, and was the only species found above 1530 m. Argentine ants and big-headed ants were also found in both areas, but their distributions did not overlap. Surveys of Argentine ants identified areas of infestation covering 560 ha at Mauna Loa Strip and 585 ha at Kahuku. At both sites

  9. Rare and endangered species of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park; endangered, threatened, and rare animal, plant, and community handbook

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Linda W.; Pratt, Thane K.; Foote, David; Marcos Gorresen, mgorresen@usgs.gov

    2011-01-01

    In some cases, HAVO offers the best opportunity to save these species and communities from extinction. Increasingly, the park has attempted to restore rare populations by conducting surveys to locate them, controlling threats such as feral livestock, and bolstering existing populations or creating new ones by planting nursery stock. To aid such efforts, our original intent was to publish an identification guide for researchers and field management personnel. Particularly, we wanted to familiarize the reader with the many rare plant species which otherwise are known mainly from the technical literature. Because we soon came to realize that this handbook would be useful to a much larger, general readership, our aim is to make this information available to anyone interested in endangered animals and plants at Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.

  10. Reported fatal and non-fatal incidents involving tourists in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, 1992-2002.

    PubMed

    Heggie, Travis W

    2005-08-01

    Objectives. To examine fatal and non-fatal incidents involving tourists in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Methods. Official press releases from the public relations office at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park were examined for reports of fatal and non-fatal incidents involving tourists. Results. Between 1992 and 2002 there were 65 press releases reporting 40 fatalities, 45 serious injuries, 53 minor injuries, and 25 no injury events. Severity information was unavailable for four additional tourists. Aircraft and backcountry incidents each accounted for 30% of all incidents followed by road incidents (22%) and frontcountry incidents (17%). Aircraft incidents reported 17 fatalities, backcountry incidents accounted for 10 fatalities, frontcountry incidents reported seven fatalities, and road incidents totaled six fatalities. One fatality was classified as a suicide. Backcountry (23) and road (10) incidents had the highest number of serious incidents. Male tourists (62) were more frequently involved in incidents than female tourists (41) and tourists aged 20-29 years and 40-49 years accounted for the highest number of fatalities and total incidents. Conclusions. Helicopter tours, hiking in areas with active lava flows, falls into steam vents and earthcracks, and driving unfamiliar rental cars in unfamiliar locations are the major activities resulting in death and serious injury. Additional factors such as tourists ignoring warning signs, wandering off-trail or hiking at night, tourists misinformed by guidebooks and other tourists, and tourists with pre-existing heart and asthma conditions are contributing causes in many incidents. The findings of this study provide information that allows prospective tourists, tourism managers, and travel health providers make informed decisions that promote safe tourism and can aid future efforts in developing preventative strategies at tourist destinations with similar environments and activities. However, in order for preventative

  11. Population dynamics of introduced rodents in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park 1986-1990.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scheffler, Pamela Y.; Foote, D.; Forbes-Perry, Charlotte; Schlappa, K.; Stone, Charles P.

    2012-01-01

    We determined seasonal and geographical distribution patterns for four species of introduced rodents in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park from 1986-1990. We surveyed black rats (Rattus rattus), Polynesian rats (R. exulans), Norway rats (R. norvegicus) and house mice (Mus musculus) along an elevation gradient ranging from 90–1,820 m above sea level in five different sites using baited snap traps. Rodent community structure differed by elevation: there were more mice at montane sites and more Polynesian rats in the lowlands. We found that breeding occurred throughout the year for all species at all sites but that seasonal peaks in reproductive activity were common. Reproduction tended to be more common in the summer months at higher elevation sites and in the winter months at lower elevations. Rodents of all species were more abundant in our study in the winter than in the summer, but the differences were not significant. The overall sex ratio did not vary from a 1:1 ratio, but seasonally there were differences in sex ratio which varied with species and site. We calculated the minimum distance traveled from an assessment line and found that larger-bodied species traveled longer average distances. Pelage color in black rats was darkest in wet forest which may have adaptive value. Black and Polynesian rats were widespread in almost all habitat types, whereas mice were limited to dry and mesic sites; Norway rats were the rarest component of our sampling and found only in wet montane forest (‘Ōla‘a Forest).

  12. Survey of roadside alien plants in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and adjacent residential areas 2001-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bio, Keali'i F.; Pratt, Linda W.; Jacobi, James D.

    2012-01-01

    The sides of all paved roads of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) were surveyed on foot in 2001 to 2005, and the roadside presence of 240 target invasive and potentially invasive alien plant species was recorded in mile-long increments. Buffer zones 5–10 miles (8–16 km) long along Highway 11 on either side of the Kīlauea and Kahuku Units of the park, as well as Wright Road that passed by the disjunct `Ōla`a Tract Unit, were included in the survey. Highway 11 is the primary road through the park and a major island thoroughfare. Three residential subdivisions adjacent to the park were similarly surveyed in 0.5–1 mile (0.8–1.6 km) intervals in 2003, and data were analyzed separately. Two roads to the east and northeast were also surveyed, but data from these disjunct areas were analyzed separately from park roads. In total, 174 of the target alien species were observed along HAVO roads and buffers, exclusive of residential areas, and the mean number of target aliens per mile surveyed was 20.6. Highway 11 and its buffer zones had the highest mean number of target alien plants per mile (26.7) of all park roads, and the Mauna Loa Strip Road had the lowest mean (11.7). Segments of Highway 11 adjacent to HAVO and Wright Road next to `Ōla`a Tract had mean numbers of target alien per mile (24–47) higher than those of any internal road. Alien plant frequencies were summarized for each road in HAVO. Fifteen new records of vascular plants for HAVO were observed and collected along park roads. An additional 28 alien plant species not known from HAVO were observed along the buffer segments of Highway 11 adjacent to the park. Within the adjacent residential subdivisions, 65 target alien plant species were sighted along roadsides. At least 15 potentially invasive species not currently found within HAVO were observed along residential roads, and several other species found there have been previously eliminated from the park or controlled to remnant populations

  13. Glaciation of Haleakala volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.G.; Mark, R. ); Porter, S.C. . Quaternary Research Center)

    1993-04-01

    Early debates regarding the large (5 [times] 10 km) summit crater'' of Haleakala volcano (3,055 m altitude) on the island of Maui attributed its origin to renting, rifting, caldera collapse, or erosion. It now is commonly assumed to have resulted from headward expansion of giant canyons by stream erosion (Stearns, 1942). Slope maps and shaded relief images based on new USGS digital elevation data point to the apparent overfit of the canyons that drain the summit depression. Studies of drowned coral reefs and terraces on the offshore east rift of Haleakala indicate that this part of the volcano has undergone submergence of about 2 km, as well as tilting, since 850 ka ago. Such subsidence indicates that the summit altitude at the end of the shield-building phase reached ca. 5,000 m, well above both the present and full-glacial snowlines. A comparison with the radiometrically dated glacial record of Mauna Kea and its reconstructed snowline history suggests that Haleakala experienced 10 or more glaciations, the most extensive during marine isotope stages 20, 18, and 16. By isotope stage 10, the summit had subsided below the full-glacial snowline. Diamictons on the south slope of the volcano, previously described as mudflows, contain lava clasts with superchilled margins, identical to margins of subglacially erupted lavas on Mauna Kea. Glacier ice that mantled the upper slopes of the volcano continuously for several hundred thousand years and intermittently thereafter, is inferred to have carved Haleakala crater and the upper reaches of large canyons radiating from it.

  14. Status and limiting factors of three rare plant species in the coastal lowlands and mid-elevation woodlands of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Linda W.; VanDeMark, Joshua R.; Euaparadorn, Melody

    2011-01-01

    Two endangered plant species (Portulaca sclerocarpa, `ihi mākole, and Sesbania tomentosa, `ōhai) and a species of concern (Bobea timonioides, `ahakea) native to the coastal lowlands and dry mid-elevation woodlands of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park were studied for more than two years to determine their stand structure, short-term mortality rates, patterns of reproductive phenology, success of fruit production, seed germination rates in the greenhouse, presence of soil seed bank, and survival of both natural and planted seedlings. The role of rodents as fruit and seed predators was evaluated using exclosures and seed offerings in open and closed stations or cages. Rodents were excluded from randomly selected plants of P. sclerocarpa and from branches of S. tomentosa, and flower and fruit production were compared to that of adjacent unprotected plants. Tagged S. tomentosa fruit were also monitored monthly to detect rodent predation.

  15. Living on Active Volcanoes - The Island of Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, Christina; Stauffer, Peter H.; Hendley, James W., II

    1997-01-01

    People on the Island of Hawai'i face many hazards that come with living on or near active volcanoes. These include lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, damaging earthquakes, and tsunamis (giant seawaves). As the population of the island grows, the task of reducing the risk from volcano hazards becomes increasingly difficult. To help protect lives and property, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory closely monitor and study Hawai'i's volcanoes and issue timely warnings of hazardous activity.

  16. Modeling Secular Deformation of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnett, D. K.; Montgomery-Brown, E. D.; Casu, F.; Segall, P.; Fukushima, Y.; Miklius, A.; Poland, M. P.

    2010-12-01

    Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, is a dynamic volcanic and tectonic system that hosts rift intrusions and eruptions, summit inflation/deflation and eruptions, flank earthquakes and slow slip events, as well as quasi-steady flank motion. We seek to identify and characterize the actively deforming structures on Kilauea and study their interactions using a combination of GPS, InSAR, and seismic data. In addition we examine whether the change from summit subsidence to inflation in 2003, led to changes elsewhere in the volcano. We begin by modeling velocities of 16 continuous GPS and 28 campaign GPS sites and mean velocities from three ENVISAT tracks (T93 ascending: 10 acquisitions from 20030120 to 20041115; T200 descending: 13 acquisitions from 20030127 to 20041122, T429 descending: 10 acquisitions from 20030212 to 20041103) between 2003 and 2004, a period lacking major episodic events. We use triangular dislocations to mesh the curving rift zones and décollement. The southwest and east rift zones are continuous through the summit caldera area, where we also include a point center of dilatation beneath the southwest caldera. A décollement beginning about 12 km offshore at seven km depth dips approximately eight degrees northwest to achieving a depth of nine kilometers beneath the summit/rift zone. The décollement mesh continues at a shallower dip beneath the north flank of Kilauea reaching a final depth of 9.5 km beneath the north flank of Kilauea/south flank of Mauna Loa. Kinematic constraints enforce that opening at the base of the rift equal the differential décollement slip across the rift. Future modeling will include tests of Koae and Hilina fault geometries as well as time-dependent modeling of the deformation field.

  17. Space Radar Image of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a deformation map of the south flank of Kilauea volcano on the big island of Hawaii, centered at 19.5 degrees north latitude and 155.25 degrees west longitude. The map was created by combining interferometric radar data -- that is data acquired on different passes of the space shuttle which are then overlayed to obtain elevation information -- acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar during its first flight in April 1994 and its second flight in October 1994. The area shown is approximately 40 kilometers by 80 kilometers (25 miles by 50 miles). North is toward the upper left of the image. The colors indicate the displacement of the surface in the direction that the radar instrument was pointed (toward the right of the image) in the six months between images. The analysis of ground movement is preliminary, but appears consistent with the motions detected by the Global Positioning System ground receivers that have been used over the past five years. The south flank of the Kilauea volcano is among the most rapidly deforming terrains on Earth. Several regions show motions over the six-month time period. Most obvious is at the base of Hilina Pali, where 10 centimeters (4 inches) or more of crustal deformation can be seen in a concentrated area near the coastline. On a more localized scale, the currently active Pu'u O'o summit also shows about 10 centimeters (4 inches) of change near the vent area. Finally, there are indications of additional movement along the upper southwest rift zone, just below the Kilauea caldera in the image. Deformation of the south flank is believed to be the result of movements along faults deep beneath the surface of the volcano, as well as injections of magma, or molten rock, into the volcano's 'plumbing' system. Detection of ground motions from space has proven to be a unique capability of imaging radar technology. Scientists hope to use deformation data acquired by SIR-C/X-SAR and future imaging

  18. Deep magma transport at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, T.L.; Klein, F.W.

    2006-01-01

    The shallow part of Kilauea's magma system is conceptually well-understood. Long-period and short-period (brittle-failure) earthquake swarms outline a near-vertical magma transport path beneath Kilauea's summit to 20 km depth. A gravity high centered above the magma transport path demonstrates that Kilauea's shallow magma system, established early in the volcano's history, has remained fixed in place. Low seismicity at 4-7 km outlines a storage region from which magma is supplied for eruptions and intrusions. Brittle-failure earthquake swarms shallower than 5 km beneath the rift zones accompany dike emplacement. Sparse earthquakes extend to a decollement at 10-12 km along which the south flank of Kilauea is sliding seaward. This zone below 5 km can sustain aseismic magma transport, consistent with recent tomographic studies. Long-period earthquake clusters deeper than 40 km occur parallel to and offshore of Kilauea's south coast, defining the deepest seismic response to magma transport from the Hawaiian hot spot. A path connecting the shallow and deep long-period earthquakes is defined by mainshock-aftershock locations of brittle-failure earthquakes unique to Kilauea whose hypocenters are deeper than 25 km with magnitudes from 4.4 to 5.2. Separation of deep and shallow long-period clusters occurs as the shallow plumbing moves with the volcanic edifice, while the deep plumbing is centered over the hotspot. Recent GPS data agrees with the volcano-propagation vector from Kauai to Maui, suggesting that Pacific plate motion, azimuth 293.5?? and rate of 7.4 cm/yr, has been constant over Kilauea's lifetime. However, volcano propagation on the island of Hawaii, azimuth 325??, rate 13 cm/yr, requires southwesterly migration of the locus of melting within the broad hotspot. Deep, long-period earthquakes lie west of the extrapolated position of Kilauea backward in time along a plate-motion vector, requiring southwesterly migration of Kilauea's magma source. Assumed ages of 0

  19. Seismic Hazards at Kilauea and Mauna LOA Volcanoes, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Fred W.

    1994-04-22

    A significant seismic hazard exists in south Hawaii from large tectonic earthquakes that can reach magnitude 8 and intensity XII. This paper quantifies the hazard by estimating the horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA) in south Hawaii which occurs with a 90% probability of not being exceeded during exposure times from 10 to 250 years. The largest earthquakes occur beneath active, unbuttressed and mobile flanks of volcanoes in their shield building stage.

  20. Complete data listings for CSEM soundings on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Kauahikaua, J.; Jackson, D.B.; Zablocki, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    This document contains complete data from a controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) sounding/mapping project at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The data were obtained at 46 locations about a fixed-location, horizontal, polygonal loop source in the summit area of the volcano. The data consist of magnetic field amplitudes and phases at excitation frequencies between 0.04 and 8 Hz. The vector components were measured in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the loop source. 5 references.

  1. Influence of fortnightly earth tides at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of 52 historic eruptions confirms the premise that fortnightly earth tides play a significant role in triggering activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Since January 1832, nearly twice as many eruptions have occurred nearer fortnightly tidal maximum than tidal minimum (34 vs. 18). A straightforward significance test indicates that the likelihood of a fortnightly tidal influence on Kilauea eruptions is roughly 90%. This is not the case for Mauna Loa Volcano, where 37 historic eruptions have been distributed randomly with respect to the fortnightly tide. At Kilauea, stresses induced by fortnightly earth tides presumably act in concert with volcanic and tectonic stresses to trigger shallow magma movements along preexisting zones of weakness. Differences in structure or internal plumbing may limit the effectiveness of this mechanism at Mauna Loa. Tidal effects seem to be less marked at shields than at some island-arc volcanoes, possibly because higher average volcanic stress rates in Hawaii more often override the effects of tidal stresses.-Author

  2. Influence of fortnightly earth tides at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Dzurisin, D.

    1980-11-01

    Analysis of 52 historic eruptions confirms the premise that fortnightly earth tides play a significant role in triggering activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Since January 1832, nearly twice as many eruptions have occurred nearer fortnightly tidal maximum than tidal minimum (34 vs 18). A straightforward significance test indicates that the likelihood of a fortnightly tidal influence on Kilauea eruptions is roughly 90%. This is not the case for Mauna Loa Volcano, where 37 historic eruptions have been distributed randomly with respect to the fortnightly tide. At Kilauea, stresses induced by fortnightly earth tides presumably act in concert with volcanic and tectonic stresses to trigger shallow magma movements along preexisting zones of weakness. Differences in structure or internal plumbing may limit the effectiveness of this mechanism at Mauna Loa. Tidal effects seem to be less marked at shields than at some island-arc volcanoes, possibly because higher average volcanic stress rates in Hawaii more often override the effects of tidal stresses.

  3. Mantle fault zone beneath Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, C.J.; Okubo, P.G.; Shearer, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Relocations and focal mechanism analyses of deep earthquakes (???13 kilometers) at Kilauea volcano demonstrate that seismicity is focused on an active fault zone at 30-kilometer depth, with seaward slip on a low-angle plane, and other smaller, distinct fault zones. The earthquakes we have analyzed predominantly reflect tectonic faulting in the brittle lithosphere rather than magma movement associated with volcanic activity. The tectonic earthquakes may be induced on preexisting faults by stresses of magmatic origin, although background stresses from volcano loading and lithospheric flexure may also contribute.

  4. Bathymetry of southern Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Garcia, Michael O.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1993-01-01

    Manua Loa, the largest volcano on Earth, lies largely beneath the sea, and until recently only generalized bathymetry of this giant volcano was available. However, within the last two decades, the development of multibeam sonar and the improvement of satellite systems (Global Positioning System) have increased the availability of precise bathymetric mapping. This map combines topography of the subaerial southern part of the volcano with modern multibeam bathymetric data from the south submarine flank. The map includes the summit caldera of Mauna Loa Volcano and the entire length of the 100-km-long southwest rift zone that is marked by a much more pronounced ridge below sea level than above. The 60-km-long segment of the rift zone abruptly changes trend from southwest to south 30 km from the summit. It extends from this bend out to sea at the south cape of the island (Kalae) to 4 to 4.5 km depth where it impinges on the elongate west ridge of Apuupuu Seamount. The west submarine flank of the rift-zone ridge connects with the Kahuku fault on land and both are part of the ampitheater head of a major submarine landslide (Lipman and others, 1990; Moore and Clague, 1992). Two pre-Hawaiian volcanic seamounts in the map area, Apuupuu and Dana Seamounts, are apparently Cretaceous in age and are somewhat younger than the Cretaceous oceanic crust on which they are built.

  5. Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2003-01-01

    This report consists of a large map sheet and a pamphlet. The map shows the geology, some photographs, description of map units, and correlation of map units. The pamphlet gives the full text about the geologic map. The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water; the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones.

  6. Buried caldera of mauna kea volcano, hawaii.

    PubMed

    Porter, S C

    1972-03-31

    An elliptical caldera (2.1 by 2.8 kilometers) at the summit of Mauna Kea volcano is inferred to lie buried beneath hawaiite lava flows and pyroclastic cones at an altitude of approximately 3850 meters. Stratigraphic relationships indicate that hawaiite eruptions began before a pre-Wisconsin period of ice-cap glaciation and that the crest of the mountain attained its present altitude and gross form during a glaciation of probable Early Wisconsin age. PMID:17842285

  7. Postshield stage transitional volcanism on Mahukona Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Calvert, A.T.

    2009-01-01

    Age spectra from 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating experiments yield ages of 298??25 ka and 310??31 ka for transitional composition lavas from two cones on submarine Mahukona Volcano, Hawaii. These ages are younger than the inferred end of the tholeiitic shield stage and indicate that the volcano had entered the postshield alkalic stage before going extinct. Previously reported elevated helium isotopic ratios of lavas from one of these cones were incorrectly interpreted to indicate eruption during a preshield alkalic stage. Consequently, high helium isotopic ratios are a poor indicator of eruptive stage, as they occur in preshield, shield, and postshield stage lavas. Loihi Seamount and Kilauea are the only known Hawaiian volcanoes where the volume of preshield alkalic stage lavas can be estimated. ?? Springer-Verlag 2008.

  8. Space Radar Image of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-dimensional image of the volcano Kilauea was generated based on interferometric fringes derived from two X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data takes on April 13, 1994 and October 4, 1994. The altitude lines are based on quantitative interpolation of the topographic fringes. The level difference between neighboring altitude lines is 20 meters (66 feet). The ground area covers 12 kilometers by 4 kilometers (7.5 miles by 2.5 miles). The altitude difference in the image is about 500 meters (1,640 feet). The volcano is located around 19.58 degrees north latitude and 155.55 degrees west longitude. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.V.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations and data processing of X-SAR. The Instituto Ricerca Elettromagnetismo Componenti Elettronici (IRECE) at the University of Naples was a partner in the interferometry analysis.

  9. Deformation measurements on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, R.W.; Hill, D.P.; Wright, T.L.

    1966-01-01

    Repeated electronic distance measurements across Kilauea Caldera with Tellurometers and Geodimeter show definite horizontal expansion related to the vertical uplift and outward tilting of the summit prior to an eruption, and contraction during and after a flank eruption. Measurements started in October 1964, along a 3098 meter line between Uwekahuna and Keanakakoi, indicate a relatively uniform lengthening of 12 centimeters during the interval October 22, 1964 to March 1, 1965. Rapid shortening of the line by 28 centimeters was measured 4 days after the beginning of a flank eruption which involved emission of approximately 29 million cubic meters of lava during the period March 5 to March 15, 1965. During the expansion, the standard deviation of 10 Tellurometer measurements from a least-squares srtaight line solution is ?? 2.0 centimeters (6.5 ppm) whereas 9 Geodimeter measurements have a standard deviation of ?? 1.1 (3.6 ppm) centimeters. Absolute distance readings between the two instruments differ by 4 centimeters (13 ppm), but relative changes in distance were the same on both instruments. Changes in distance across Kilauea Caldera can, therefore, be easily measured to accuracies of 4 to 7 parts per million with standard electronic distance measuring systems. On active volcanoes where ground surface deformation exceeds 10-100 parts per million with changes in subsurface magma pressure or volume, repeated horizontal distance measurements can be a most useful technique. ?? 1966 Stabilimento Tipografico Francesco Giannini & Figli.

  10. Underwater observations of active lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tribble, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Underwater observation of active submarine lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, in March-June 1989 revealed both pillow lava and highly channelized lava streams flowing down a steep and unconsolidated lava delta. The channelized streams were 0.7-1.5 m across and moved at rates of 1-3 m/s. The estimated flux of a stream was 0.7 m3/s. Jets of hydrothermal water and gas bubbles were associated with the volcanic activity. The rapidly moving channelized lava streams represent a previously undescribed aspect of submarine volcanism. -Author

  11. The 1977 eruption of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Helz, R.T.; Dzurisin, D.; Eaton, G.P.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Lipman, P.W.; Lockwood, J.P.; Puniwai, G.S.

    1980-01-01

    Kilauea volcano began to erupt on September 13, 1977, after a 21.5-month period of quiescence. Harmonic tremor in the upper and central east rift zone and rapid deflation of the summit area occurred for 22 hours before the outbreak of surface activity. On the first night, spatter ramparts formed along a discontinuous, en-echelon, 5.5-km-long fissure system that trends N70??E between two prehistoric cones, Kalalua and Puu Kauka. Activity soon became concentrated at a central vent that erupted sporadically until September 23 and extruded flows that moved a maximum distance of 2.5 km to the east. On September 18, new spatter ramparts began forming west of Kalalua, extending to 7 km the length of the new vent system. A vent near the center of this latest fissure became the locus of sustained fountaining and continued to extrude spatter and short flows intermittently until September 20. The most voluminous phase of the eruption began late on September 25. A discontinuous spatter rampart formed along a 700-m segment near the center of the new, 7-km-long fissure system; within 24 hours activity became concentrated at the east end of this segment. One flow from the 35-m-high cone that formed at this site moved rapidly southeast and eventually reached an area 10 km from the vent and 700 m from the nearest house in the evacuated village of Kalapana. We estimate the total volume of material produced during this 18-day eruption to be 35 ?? 106 m3. Samples from active vents and flows are differentiated quartz-normative tholeiitic basalt, similar in composition to lavas erupted from Kilauea in 1955 and 1962. Plagioclase is the only significant phenocryst; augite, minor olivine, and rare orthopyroxene and opaque oxides accompany it as microphenocrysts. Sulfide globules occur in fresh glass and as inclusions in phenocrysts in early 1977 lavas; their absence in chemically-similar basalt from the later phases of the eruption suggests that more extensive intratelluric degassing

  12. Observing and Predicting Vog Dispersion from Hawai'i's K¯i lauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Businger, Steven; Pattantyus, Andre; Horton, Keith; Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jeff

    2014-05-01

    In 2014, the Kīlauea volcano on the Island of Hawai'i enters its 32st year of nearly continuous eruption. Since 1983, east rift SO2 emissions have ranged from <50 tonnes, during the periods of eruptive pause, to over 30,000 tonnes per day, during periods of enhanced activity. Emissions from Kīlauea volcano pose significant environmental and health risks to the Hawai'i community. The Vog Measurement and Prediction (VMAP) project was conceived to help mitigate the negative impacts of Kīlauea's emissions. To date, VMAP has achieved the following milestones: (i) created a custom application of the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HY-SPLIT) model (Vog Model, hereafter) to produce real-time statewide forecasts of the concentration and dispersion of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfate aerosol from Kīlauea volcano; (ii) developed an ultraviolet (UV) spectrometer array to provide near real-time volcanic gas emission rate measurements for use as input to the dispersion model; (iii) developed and deployed a stationary array of ambient SO2 and meteorological sensors to record the spatial characteristics of Kīlauea's gas plume in high temporal and spatial resolution for model verification; and (iv) developed web-based dissemination of observations and forecasts that provide guidance for safety officials to protect the public and raise public awareness of the potential hazards of volcanic emissions to respiratory health, agriculture, and general aviation (http://weather.hawaii.edu/vmap/). Wind fields and thermodynamic data from the state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model provide input to the vog model, with a statewide resolution of 3 km and a resolution of 1 km covering Hawai'i Island. Validation of the vog model predictions is accomplished with reference to data from Hawai'i State Department of Health ground-based Air Quality monitors. VMAP results show that this approach can provide useful guidance for the people of Hawai'i. An

  13. Monitoring very-long-period seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Benítez, M. C.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Wilson, David; Okubo, Paul G.

    2010-09-01

    On 19 March, 2008 eruptive activity returned to the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii with the formation of a new vent within the Halemaumau pit crater. The new vent has been gradually increasing in size, and exhibiting sustained degassing and the episodic bursting of gas slugs at the surface of a lava pond ˜200 m below the floor of Halemaumau. The spectral characteristics, source location obtained by radial semblance, and Hidden Markov Model pattern recognition of the degassing burst signals are consistent with an increase in gas content in the magma transport system beginning in October, 2007. This increase plateaus between March - September 2008, and exhibits a fluctuating pattern until 31 January, 2010, suggesting that the release of gas is slowly diminishing over time.

  14. Mechanism of explosive eruptions of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    A small explosive eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, occurred in May 1924. The eruption was preceded by rapid draining of a lava lake and transfer of a large volume of magma from the summit reservoir to the east rift zone. This lowered the magma column, which reduced hydrostatic pressure beneath Halemaumau and allowed groundwater to flow rapidly into areas of hot rock, producing a phreatic eruption. A comparison with other events at Kilauea shows that the transfer of a large volume of magma out of the summit reservoir is not sufficient to produce a phreatic eruption. For example, the volume transferred at the beginning of explosive activity in May 1924 was less than the volumes transferred in March 1955 and January-February 1960, when no explosive activity occurred. Likewise, draining of a lava lake and deepening of the floor of Halemaumau, which occurred in May 1922 and August 1923, were not sufficient to produce explosive activity. A phreatic eruption of Kilauea requires both the transfer of a large volume of magma from the summit reservoir and the rapid removal of magma from near the surface, where the surrounding rocks have been heated to a sufficient temperature to produce steam explosions when suddenly contacted by groundwater. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  15. An isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea volcano area, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Janik, C.J.; Kauahikaua, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Isotope tracer methods were used to determine flow paths, recharge areas, and relative age for ground water in the Kilauea volcano area on the Island of Hawaii. Stable isotopes in rainfall show three distinct isotopic gradients with elevation, which are correlated with trade-wind, rain shadow, and high-elevation climatological patterns. Temporal variations in isotopic composition of precipitation are controlled more by the frequency of large storms than b.y seasonal temperature fluctuations. Consistency in results between two separate areas with rainfall caused by tradewinds and thermally-driven upslope airflow suggests that isotopic gradients with elevation may be similar on other islands in the tradewind belt, especially the other Hawaiian Islands, which have similar climatology and temperature lapse rates. Areal contrasts in ground-water stable isotopes and tritium indicate that the volcanic ri~ zones compartmentalize the regional ground-water system. Tritium levels in ground water within and downgradient of Kilauea's ri~ zones indicate relatively long residence times. Part of Kilauea's Southwest Ri~ Zone appears to act as a conduit for water from higher elevation, but there is no evidence for extensive down-ri~ flow in the lower East Ri~ Zone.

  16. Pb Isotopic Evolution of Koolau Volcano (Oahu, Hawaii)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekiacova, Z.; Abouchami, W.

    2003-12-01

    High precision Pb isotopes in Hawaiian shield lavas have revealed the existence of source heterogeneities between volcanoes, as well as within a single volcano during its temporal evolution, e.g. Mauna Kea [1, 2]. The Koolau Scientific Drilling Project (KSDP) was initiated in order to evaluate the long-term evolution of Koolau volcano (Oahu), whose subaerial Makapuu stage lavas define the isotopically enriched endmember of Hawaiian shield lavas. We report Pb triple spike data on KSDP main shield-stage lavas (depth range: 304-632 mbsl) and post-erosional Honolulu volcanics. KSDP lavas show a small range of Pb isotopic compositions (206Pb/204Pb=18.02-18.15; 207Pb/204Pb=15.44-15.46; 208Pb/204Pb=37.82-37.87). Pb isotope ratios increase with depth until ˜450 m and then decrease again to a depth of 616 m. Superimposed on this "bell" trend, 206Pb/204Pb ratios oscillate at depth intervals of ˜10m. The Honolulu volcanics display, at a given 206Pb/204Pb ratio, similar 207Pb/204Pb but lower 208Pb/204Pb ratios than KSDP lavas. In 208Pb/204Pb-206Pb/204Pb space, KSDP and Honolulu lavas define two distinct linear arrays which converge at the radiogenic end. However, in 207Pb/204Pb-206Pb/204Pb space, KSDP and Honolulu lavas form a single array, with Honolulu lying at the radiogenic end of the array. While KSDP lavas have more radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions than Makapuu stage lavas [1], they show close resemblance to Nuuanu 1 and Nuuanu 2 landslide blocks [3]. The distinct Pb isotopic features of subaerial, main-shield and post-erosional lavas reflect compositional source changes during the growth of Koolau volcano. The mixing lines defined by KSDP and Honolulu lavas in 208Pb-206Pb space require the presence of three distinct Pb isotopic components. While the enriched "Koolau" component is predominantly sampled during the subaerial stage, its contribution during the main shield building stage has been waxing and waning. The radiogenic Pb endmember common to Honolulu and KSDP

  17. Avian disease and mosquito vectors in the Kahuku unit of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and Ka`u Forest Reserve

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaudioso, Jacqueline; Lapointe, Dennis; Atkinson, Carter T.; Egan, Ariel N.

    2015-01-01

    While avian disease has been well-studied in windward forests of Hawai‘i Island, there have been few studies in leeward Ka‘u. We surveyed four altitudinal sites ranging from 1,200 to 2,200 m asl in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park (Kahuku) and three altitudinal sites ranging from 1,200 to 1,500 m asl in the Ka‘u Forest Reserve (Ka‘u) for the prevalence of avian disease and presence of mosquitoes. We collected blood samples from native and non-native forest birds and screened for avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum) using PCR diagnostics. We examined birds for signs of avian pox (Avipoxvirus sp.), knemidokoptic mange (Knemidokoptes jamaicensis) and feather ectoparasites. We also trapped adult mosquitoes (Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes japonicus japonicus) and surveyed for available larval habitat. Between September, 2012 and October, 2014, we completed 3,219 hours of mist-netting in Kahuku capturing 515 forest birds and 3,103 hours of mist-netting in Ka‘u capturing 270 forest birds. We screened 750 blood samples for avian malaria. Prevalence of avian malaria in all species was higher in Ka‘u than Kahuku when all sites were combined for each tract. Prevalence of avian malaria in resident Hawai‘i ‘amakihi (Chlorodrepanis virens) was greatest at the lowest elevation sites in Kahuku (26%; 1,201 m asl) and Ka‘u (42%; 1,178 m asl) and in general, prevalence decreased with increasing elevation and geographically from east to west. Significantly higher prevalence was seen in Ka‘u at comparable low and mid elevation sites but not at comparable high elevation sites. The overall presumptive pox prevalence was 1.7% (13/785) for both tracts, and it was higher in native birds than non-native birds, but it was not significant. Presumptive knemidokoptic mange was detected at two sites in lower elevation Kahuku, with prevalence ranging from 2‒4%. The overall prevalence of ectoparasites (Analges and Proctophyllodes spp.) was 6.7% (53

  18. Modeling volcano growth on the Island of Hawaii: deep-water perspectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, Peter W.; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent ocean-bottom geophysical surveys, dredging, and dives, which complement surface data and scientific drilling at the Island of Hawaii, document that evolutionary stages during volcano growth are more diverse than previously described. Based on combining available composition, isotopic age, and geologically constrained volume data for each of the component volcanoes, this overview provides the first integrated models for overall growth of any Hawaiian island. In contrast to prior morphologic models for volcano evolution (preshield, shield, postshield), growth increasingly can be tracked by age and volume (magma supply), defining waxing alkalic, sustained tholeiitic, and waning alkalic stages. Data and estimates for individual volcanoes are used to model changing magma supply during successive compositional stages, to place limits on volcano life spans, and to interpret composite assembly of the island. Volcano volumes vary by an order of magnitude; peak magma supply also varies sizably among edifices but is challenging to quantify because of uncertainty about volcano life spans. Three alternative models are compared: (1) near-constant volcano propagation, (2) near-equal volcano durations, (3) high peak-tholeiite magma supply. These models define inconsistencies with prior geodynamic models, indicate that composite growth at Hawaii peaked ca. 800–400 ka, and demonstrate a lower current rate. Recent age determinations for Kilauea and Kohala define a volcano propagation rate of 8.6 cm/yr that yields plausible inception ages for other volcanoes of the Kea trend. In contrast, a similar propagation rate for the less-constrained Loa trend would require inception of Loihi Seamount in the future and ages that become implausibly large for the older volcanoes. An alternative rate of 10.6 cm/yr for Loa-trend volcanoes is reasonably consistent with ages and volcano spacing, but younger Loa volcanoes are offset from the Kea trend in age-distance plots. Variable magma flux

  19. The geology and petrology of Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii; a study of postshield volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Edward W.; Wise, William S.; Dalrymple, G. Brent

    1997-01-01

    Mauna Kea Volcano, on the Island of Hawaii, is capped by lavas of alkalic and transitional basalt (Hamakua Volcanics) erupted between approximately 250-200 and 70-65 ka and hawaiite, mugearite, and benmoreite (Laupahoehoe Volcanics) erupted between approximately 65 and 4 ka. These lavas, which form the entire subaerial surface of the volcano, issued from numerous scattered vents and are intercalated on the upper slopes with glacial deposits. The lavas record diminishing magma-supply rate and degree of partial melting from the shield stage through the postshield stage. Much of the compositional variation apparently reflects fractionation of basaltic magma in reservoirs within and beneath the volcano.

  20. Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: A search for the volcanomagnetic effect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, P.M.; Jackson, D.B.; Field, J.; Stacey, F.D.

    1973-01-01

    Brief excursions of magnetic field differences between a base station and two satellite station magnetometers show only slight correlation with ground tilt at Kilauea Volcano. This result suggests that only transient, localized stresses occur during prolonged periods of deformation and that the volcano can support no large-scale pattern of shear stresses.

  1. Structural map of the summit area of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The map shows the faults, sets of fissures, eruptive vent lines and collapse features in the summit area of the volcano. It covers most of the USGS Kilauea Crater 7-1/2 minute quadrangle, together with parts of Volcano, Makaopuhi Crater, and Kau Desert 7-1/2 minute quadrangles. (ACR)

  2. Two Decades of Degassing at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i: Perspectives on Island Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, T.; Sutton, A. J.

    2003-12-01

    The ongoing eruption of Kilauea provides an opportunity to examine how volcanic emissions impact the natural and human environment of the island of Hawai`i. Kilauea has released ˜ 13 megatons of SO2 gas into the troposphere since the current eruption began in 1983, more than any single anthropogenic source in the U.S. During prevailing trade wind conditions, measurements of SO2 gas, aerosol mass, and aerosol acidity downwind of Kilauea document the conversion of SO2 to acid aerosol as the plume propagates to the leeward side of the island. Lidar measurements suggest a gas-to-particle conversion rate (t1/2) of 6 hours. When trade winds are disrupted, ambient SO2 and particle measurements in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park have shown episodes of particle concentrations of ˜ 100 μ g/m3 and SO2 concentrations in excess of 4000 ppb. Federal health standards and WHO guidelines for SO2 have been exceeded repeatedly at this near-source location. Documented effects from volcanic emissions on the island of Hawai`i include the rapid corrosion of metal objects, degradation of domestic water quality, agricultural crop damage, and adverse impacts on human respiratory and pulmonary function. Other impacts may include decreases in local rainfall and increased mortality of asthmatics. For the period 1986 to 1993, after the eruption became continuous, deaths from asthma on the island of Hawai`i increased by a factor of ten. Three current health studies seek to investigate the relationship between exposure to volcanic pollution and health effects. In addition to measuring gas and particle exposures, these studies examine lung development in children around the island, disease prevalence in adults residing in communities downwind of volcanic degassing sources, and acute effects in asthmatic children and healthy children and adults. In the absence of conclusive evidence linking exposure and health effects, the USGS, in collaboration with the National Park Service, has developed a

  3. One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, J.; Poland, M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Klauea volcano (Figure 1)one of the most active volcanoes on Earthhas provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  4. One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, Jim; Poland, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Kilauea volcano (Figure 1)—one of the most active volcanoes on Earth—has provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  5. Bathymetry of the southwest flank of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chadwick, William W.; Moore, James G.; Fox, Christopher G.

    1994-01-01

    Much of the seafloor topography in the map area is on the southwest submarine flank of the currently active Mauna Loa Volcano. The benches and blocky hills shown on the map were shaped by giant landslides that resulted from instability of the rapidly growing volcano. These landslides were imagined during a 1986 to 1991 swath sonar program of the United States Hawaiian Exclusive Economic Zone, a cooperative venture by the U.S. Geological Survey and the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (Lipman and others, 1988; Moore and others, 1989). Dana Seamount (and probably also the neighboring Day Seamount) are apparently Cretaceous in age, based on paleomagnetic studies, and predate the growth of the Hawaiian Ridge volcanoes (Sager and Pringle, 1990).

  6. Stress control of deep rift intrusion at Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Amelung, Falk; Yun, Sang-Ho; Walter, Thomas R; Segall, Paul; Kim, Sang-Wan

    2007-05-18

    Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii, deforms by a combination of shallow dike intrusions in the rift zones and earthquakes along the base of the volcano, but it is not known how the spreading is accommodated in the lower part of the volcanic edifice. We present evidence from interferometric synthetic aperture radar data for secular inflation of a dike-like magma body at intermediate depth in the southwest rift zone during 2002 to 2005. Magma accumulation occurred in a section of the rift zone that was unclamped by previous dikes and earthquakes, suggesting that stress transfer plays an important role in controlling subsurface magma accumulation. PMID:17510364

  7. Chronology of the episode 54 eruption at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, from GOES-9 satellite data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, A.J.L.; Keszthelyi, L.; Flynn, L.P.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Thornber, C.; Kauahikaua, J.; Sherrod, D.; Trusdell, F.; Sawyer, M.W.; Flament, P.

    1997-01-01

    The free availability of GOES satellite data every 15 minutes makes these data an attractive tool for studying short-term changes on cloud-free volcanoes in the Pacific basin. We use cloud-free GOES-9 data to investigate the chronology of the January 1997, episode 54 eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Seventy-six images for this effusive eruption were collected over a 60-hour period and show the opening and shutdown of active fissures, the draining and refilling of the Pu'u 'O'o lava lake, and the cessation of activity at the ocean entry. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Rapid deformation of the south flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, S.; Segall, P.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Miklius, Asta; Denlinger, R.; Arnadottir, T.; Sako, M.; Burgmann, R.

    1995-01-01

    The south flank of Kilauea volcano has experienced two large [magnitude (M) 7.2 and M 6.1] earthquakes in the past two decades. Global Positioning System measurements conducted between 1990 and 1993 reveal seaward displacements of Kilauea's central south flank at rates of up to about 10 centimeters per year. In contrast, the northern side of the volcano and the distal ends of the south flank did not displace significantly. The observations can be explained by slip on a low-angle fault beneath the south flank combined with dilation deep within Kilauea's rift system, both at rates of at least 15 centimeters per year.

  9. Geochronology, geochemistry and geophysics of Mahukona Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanano, D.; Garcia, M. O.; Weis, D. A.; Flinders, A. F.; Ito, G.; Kurz, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Mahukona is an extinct submarine volcano that fills a gap in the Loa-trend of paired Hawaiian volcanoes between Hualalai and Kaho`olawe. A new marine survey of the seamount was undertaken in an attempt to resolve the location of the volcano’s summit. The multibeam bathymetry showed no clear summit. The gravity data reveals a central oval-shaped residual gravity anomaly with a maximum density 85 kg/m3 greater than the surrounding edifice, which could be the frozen magmatic center of Mahukona. Eighteen weakly to strongly olivine-phyric samples were collected by submersible from the shallower parts (>2 km) of the volcano to supplement previous dredged samples. These fresh, mostly glassy samples vary from low-silica tholeiites to weakly alkali basalts. Ar-Ar weighted plateau ages range from 653 ka for a tholeiite to 479 and 351 ka for transitional basalts. These ages straddle the predicted age for the end of shield building (435 ka) and are older than previous ages for transitional basalts (310-298 ka; Clague and Calvert, 2008). Trace elements show a moderate range of variability (33% for Ba and Nb) and parallel primitive mantle normalized patterns suggesting variable degrees of melting of a similar source. Zr/Nb ratios for this Loa chain volcano (11-14) span the Loa-Kea boundary. Pb, Sr, Nd and Hf isotope ratios for 12 samples are distinct from adjacent Kohala volcano with Loihi-like values, although they are slightly higher in Hf and Nd at a given Pb isotope value. Most samples have Loa-like Pb isotope ratios, although two tholeiites have Kea-like ratios but high, Loa-like Zr/Nb. Sr isotopes are well correlated with the other isotopic systems indicating no ancient carbonate-rich sediment source component is needed. Mahukona He isotope ratios overlap with those found at Lo`ihi Seamount. Higher values are found in transitional basalts and lower in the tholeiites (16-21 vs. 12-14 Ra), which is opposite to other Hawaiian volcanoes. With high-precision data sets for

  10. Database for the Geologic Map of the Summit Region of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dutton, Dillon R.; Ramsey, David W.; Bruggman, Peggy E.; Felger, Tracey J.; Lougee, Ellen; Margriter, Sandy; Showalter, Patrick; Neal, Christina A.; Lockwood, John P.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The area covered by this map includes parts of four U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5' topographic quadrangles (Kilauea Crater, Volcano, Ka`u Desert, and Makaopuhi). It encompasses the summit, upper rift zones, and Koa`e Fault System of Kilauea Volcano and a part of the adjacent, southeast flank of Mauna Loa Volcano. The map is dominated by products of eruptions from Kilauea Volcano, the southernmost of the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawai`i and one of the world's most active volcanoes. At its summit (1,243 m) is Kilauea Crater, a 3 km-by-5 km collapse caldera that formed, possibly over several centuries, between about 200 and 500 years ago. Radiating away from the summit caldera are two linear zones of intrusion and eruption, the east and the southwest rift zones. Repeated subaerial eruptions from the summit and rift zones have built a gently sloping, elongate shield volcano covering approximately 1,500 km2. Much of the volcano lies under water: the east rift zone extends 110 km from the summit to a depth of more than 5,000 m below sea level; whereas, the southwest rift zone has a more limited submarine continuation. South of the summit caldera, mostly north-facing normal faults and open fractures of the Koa`e Fault System extend between the two rift zones. The Koa`e Fault System is interpreted as a tear-away structure that accommodates southward movement of Kilauea's flank in response to distension of the volcano perpendicular to the rift zones. This digital release contains all the information used to produce the geologic map published as USGS Geologic Investigations Series I-2759 (Neal and Lockwood, 2003). The main component of this digital release is a geologic map database prepared using ArcInfo GIS. This release also contains printable files for the geologic map and accompanying descriptive pamphlet from I-2759.

  11. Deep magma body beneath the summit and rift zones of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.; Fiske, R.S.; Miklius, Asta; Okamura, A.T.; Sako, M.K.

    1990-01-01

    A magnitude 7.2 earthquake in 1975 caused the south flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, to move seaward in response to slippage along a deep fault. Since then, a large part of the volcano's edifice has been adjusting to this perturbation. The summit of Kilauea extended at a rate of 0.26 meter per year until 1983, the south flank uplifted more than 0.5 meter, and the axes of both the volcano's rift zones extended and subsided; the summit continues to subside. These ground-surface motions have been remarkably steady and much more widespread than those caused by either recurrent inflation and deflation of the summit magma chamber or the episodic propagation of dikes into the rift zones. Kilauea's magmatic system is, therefore, probably deeper and more extensive than previously thought; the summit and both rift zones may be underlain by a thick, near vertical dike-like magma system at a depth of 3 to 9 kilometers.

  12. Color composite C-band and L-band image of Kilauea volcanoe on Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This color composite C-band and L-band image of the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii was acuired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperature Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying on the Space Shuttle Endeavour. The city of Hilo can be seen at the top. The image shows the different types of lava flows around the crater Pu'u O'o. Ash deposits which erupted in 1790 from the summit of Kilauea volcano show up as dark in this image, and fine details associated with lava flows which erupted in 1919 and 1974 can be seen to the south of the summit in an area called the Ka'u Desert. Other historic lava flows can also be seen. Highway 11 is the linear feature running from Hilo to the Kilauea volcano. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43918.

  13. National Priorities List sites: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    Together with the companion National Overview volume this publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. The document is intended to clearly describe what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the Nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. The State volume compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund program.

  14. The Puu Oo eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, E.W. )

    1988-01-01

    The Puu Oo eruption is the most voluminous and longest-lived historical flank eruption of Kilauea volcano. A pattern of episodic lava discharge developed in which relatively brief periods of vigorous fountaining and high-volume flow production alternated with longer repose periods. The activity was intensely monitored, and results of the first 11/2 yrs of observation and measurement are reported, including geologic observations, lava sampling, temperature measurements, compositional analyses, petrologic study, studies of gas composition and the role of gases in the eruptive process, geodetic measurements during emplacement of the feeder dike, and seismic and electrical studies.

  15. Remote Sensing Studies of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, as an Aid to Understanding Volcanic Processes on Mars, Venus and Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.

    2004-12-01

    By virtue of the near-continuous activity, relatively safety of the eruptions, and excellent field access within a U.S. National Park, extensive testing of new field, airborne and orbital remote sensing data sets has taken place at Kilauea, Hawaii, over the last 20 years. Here I review the important role that such studies of Kilauea have had in understanding volcano morphology and eruption processes on Mars, Venus and Io. Many types of remote sensing data have been collected over Kilauea that have direct planetary analogs. Two space shuttle radar missions (SIR-B and SIR-C) had Kilauea as a primary target, and there have been three deployments of the TOPSAR airborne radar (1993, 1996, and 2000) to Hawaii. These data have been used to understand the radar scattering properties of lava flows on Venus, as well as assessing the importance of multi-incidence angle and look-direction radar data for structural mapping. Topographic mapping of Kilauea caldera by an airborne lidar was conducted at 1 m/pixel in 2004 to facilitate the analysis of the topography of lava flows, vents and fractures at a scale that is not possible using MOLA data for Mars, but may be relevant when data are studied from the Mars Express stereo camera or the HiRISE instrument on MRO. Thermal studies of active lava flows and the Kupianaha lava lake provide insights into effusive volcanism on Io. Not only can the dynamics of Ionian lava lakes (e.g., Loki Patera) be studied, but also on-going work with MODIS and GOES satellite data for Kilauea are being used to understand lava flow and vent dynamics as they may relate to the resurfacing mechanism(s) of Io. Comparison of data acquisition for on-going Mars missions and Kilauea also show similarities in the approach to planetary and terrestrial volcanology. Systematic imaging of Kilauea volcano at increasingly high spatial resolution (for both multispectral and topographic mapping) continues to be of value for planetary analogs and technique development

  16. Singularity spectrum of intermittent seismic tremor at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.; Chouet, B.

    1989-01-01

    Fractal singularity analysis (FSA) is used to study a 22-yr record of deep seismic tremor (30-60 km depth) for regions below Kilauea Volcano on the assumption that magma transport and fracture can be treated as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators. Tremor episodes range from 1 to 100 min (cumulative duration = 1.60 ?? 104 min; yearly average - 727 min yr-1; mean gradient = 24.2 min yr-1km-1). Partitioning of probabilities, Pi, in the phase space of normalized durations, xi, are expressed in terms of a function f(??), where ?? is a variable exponent of a length scale, l. Plots of f(??) vs. ?? are called multifractal singularity spectra. The spectrum for deep tremor durations is bounded by ?? values of about 0.4 and 1.9 at f = O; fmax ???1.0 for ?? ??? 1. Results for tremor are similar to those found for systems transitional between complete mode locking and chaos. -Authors

  17. Magmatically triggered slow slip at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Benjamin A; Foster, James; Sandwell, David; Wolfe, Cecily J; Okubo, Paul; Poland, Michael; Myer, David

    2008-08-29

    We demonstrate that a recent dike intrusion probably triggered a slow fault-slip event (SSE) on Kilauea volcano's mobile south flank. Our analysis combined models of Advanced Land Observing Satellite interferometric dike-intrusion displacement maps with continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) displacement vectors to show that deformation nearly identical to four previous SSEs at Kilauea occurred at far-field sites shortly after the intrusion. We model stress changes because of both secular deformation and the intrusion and find that both would increase the Coulomb failure stress on possible SSE slip surfaces by roughly the same amount. These results, in concert with the observation that none of the previous SSEs at Kilauea was directly preceded by intrusions but rather occurred during times of normal background deformation, suggest that both extrinsic (intrusion-triggering) and intrinsic (secular fault creep) fault processes can lead to SSEs. PMID:18755967

  18. VEPP Exercise: Volcanic Activity and Monitoring of Pu`u `O`o, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. A.

    2010-12-01

    A 10-week project will be tested during the Fall semester 2010, for a Volcanic Hazards elective course, for undergraduate Geology students of the University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez. This exercise was developed during the Volcanoes Exploration Project: Pu`u `O`o (VEPP) Workshop, held on the Big Island of Hawaii in July 2010. For the exercise the students will form groups (of 2-4 students), and each group will be assigned a monitoring technique or method, among the following: seismic (RSAM data), deformation (GPS and tilt data), observations (webcam and lava flow maps), gas and thermal monitoring. The project is designed for Geology undergraduates who have a background in introductory geology, types of volcanoes and eruptions, magmatic processes, characteristics of lava flows, and other related topics. It is divided in seven tasks, starting with an introduction and demonstration of the VEPP website and the VALVE3 software, which is used to access monitoring data from the current eruption of Pu`u `O`o, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The students will also familiarize themselves with the history of Kilauea volcano and its current eruption. At least weekly the groups will acquire data (mostly near-real-time) from the different monitoring techniques, in the form of time series, maps, videos, and images, in order to identify trends in the data. The groups will meet biweekly in the computer laboratory to work together in the analysis and interpretation of the data, with the support of the instructor. They will give reports on the progress of the exercise, and will get feedback from the instructor and from the other expert groups. All groups of experts will relate their findings to the recent and current activity of Kilauea volcano, and the importance of their specific type of monitoring. The activity will culminate with a written report and an oral presentation. The last task of the project consists of a wrap-up volcano monitoring exercise, in which the students will

  19. The complex filling of alae crater, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, D.A.; Duffield, W.A.; Jackson, D.B.; Peterson, D.W.

    1972-01-01

    Since February 1969 Alae Crater, a 165-m-deep pit crater on the east rift of Kilauea Volcano, has been completely filled with about 18 million m3 of lava. The filling was episodic and complex. It involved 13 major periods of addition of lava to the crater, including spectacular lava falls as high as 100 m, and three major periods of draining of lava from the crater. Alae was nearly filled by August 3, 1969, largely drained during a violent ground-cracking event on August 4, 1969, and then filled to the low point on its rim on October 10, 1969. From August 1970 to May 1971, the crater acted as a reservoir for lava that entered through subsurface tubes leading from the vent fissure 150 m away. Another tube system drained the crater and carried lava as far as the sea, 11 km to the south. Much of the lava entered Alae by invading the lava lake beneath its crust and buoying the crust upward. This process, together with the overall complexity of the filling, results in a highly complicated lava lake that would doubtless be misinterpreted if found in the fossil record. ?? 1972 Stabilimento Tipografico Francesco Giannini & Figli.

  20. SBAS-InSAR analysis of surface deformation at Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casu, F.; Lanari, Riccardo; Sansosti, E.; Solaro, G.; Tizzani, Pietro; Poland, M.; Miklius, Asta

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the deformation of Mauna Loa and K??lauea volcanoes, Hawai'i, by exploiting the advanced differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) technique referred to as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm. In particular, we present time series of line-of-sight (LOS) displacements derived from SAR data acquired by the ASAR instrument, on board the ENVISAT satellite, from the ascending (track 93) and descending (track 429) orbits between 2003 and 2008. For each coherent pixel of the radar images we compute time-dependent surface displacements as well as the average LOS deformation rate. Our results quantify, in space and time, the complex deformation of Mauna Loa and K??lauea volcanoes. The derived InSAR measurements are compared to continuous GPS data to asses the quality of the SBAS-InSAR products. ??2009 IEEE.

  1. Seismic evidence for a crustal magma reservoir beneath the upper east rift zoneof Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Guoqing; Amelung, Falk; Lavallee, Yan; Okubo, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    An anomalous body with low Vp (compressional wave velocity), low Vs (shear wave velocity), and high Vp/Vs anomalies is observed at 8–11 km depth beneath the upper east rift zone of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii by simultaneous inversion of seismic velocity structure and earthquake locations. We interpret this body to be a crustal magma reservoir beneath the volcanic pile, similar to those widely recognized beneath mid-ocean ridge volcanoes. Combined seismic velocity and petrophysical models suggest the presence of 10% melt in a cumulate magma mush. This reservoir could have supplied the magma that intruded into the deep section of the east rift zone and caused its rapid expansion following the 1975 M7.2 Kalapana earthquake.

  2. Geophysical characteristics of the hydrothermal systems of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Kauahikaua, J. )

    1993-08-01

    Clues to the structure of Kilauea volcano can be obtained from spatial studies of gravity, magnetic, and seismic velocity variations. The rift zones and summit are underlain by dense, magnetic, and seismic velocity variations. The rift zones and summit are underlain by dense, magnetic, high P-wave-velocity rocks at depths of about 2 km less. The gravity and seismic velocity studies indicate that the rift structures are broad, extending farther to the north than to the south of the surface features. The magnetic data allow separation into a narrow, highly-magnetized, shallow zone and broad, flanking, magnetic lows. The patterns of gravity, magnetic variations, and seismicity document the southward migration of the upper east rift zone. Regional, hydrologic features of Kilauea can be determined from resistivity and self-potential studies. High-level groundwater exists beneath Kilauea summit to elevations of +800 m within a triangular area bounded by the west edge of the upper southwest rift zone, the east edge of the upper east rift zone, and the Koa'e fault system. High-level groundwater is present within the east rift zone beyond the triangular summit area. Self-potential mapping shows that areas of local heat produce local fluid circulation in the unconfined aquifer (water table). Shallow seismicity and surface deformation indicate that magma is intruding and that fractures are forming beneath the rift zones and summit area. Heat flows of 370--820 mW/m[sup 2] are calculated from deep wells within the lower east rift zone. The estimated heat input rate for Kilauea of 9 gigawatts (GW) is at least 25 times higher than the conductive heat loss as estimated from the heat flow in wells extrapolated over the area of the summit caldera and rift zones. 115 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  3. CO2 Emissions Measurements at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.

    2012-12-01

    The importance of volcanic CO2 release in Hawaii has been recognized for at least 100 years. The early gas collections of Jaggar, Shepherd, and Day showed that CO2 was the second most prevalent gas, next to water, in Kilauea's eruptive emissions. As one of Earth's few long-lived, effusive eruptions that have been closely monitored, Kilauea's measured CO2 emissions have served as a global benchmark. At Kilauea in the mid-1980's, conventional airborne, in-plume profiling measurements of CO2 underestimated emissions, due to plume geometry. Remotely-Piloted Aircraft (RPA) and vehicle-based measurements made a decade later showed that at Kilauea, CO2 concentrations were highest near ground level. Methods for quantifying emission rates of CO2 have since been improved via vehicle-based measurements of the ground-hugging plume. Gerlach and others, 2002, used the integrated CO2/SO2 molecular ratio and SO2 emission rate to derive the CO2 emission rate. Their results established a long-term characteristic CO2 emission rate for the summit of Kilauea of 8,500 t/d. This rate was based on several nearly equal measurements spanning a 4 year period, along with an independently reported, steady magma supply rate. Gerlach and others (1998) estimated a contemporaneous east rift CO2 emission rate of 300 t/d. From 2004 to mid-2007, summit CO2 emissions from Kilauea increased twofold on average, and then declined as a surge in magma supply eventually resulted in the forceful opening of a new vent within Halema`uma`u crater at Kilauea's summit in 2008. The elevated summit activity has provided opportunities to test other methods for measuring CO2 abundance in Kilauea's poorly mixed summit plume. Closed space continuous CO2 concentration monitoring within a subsurface vault, recorded transient (minutes-to-days) ambient fluctuations of thousands of parts per million, atop an overall slowly-varying (weeks to months) increase that led up to the 2008 summit eruption. Fumarole gas molecular CO2

  4. Fissure distribution at Mauna Loa (Hawaii) as an example to understand shallow magma transfer at volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Marra, Daniele; Acocella, Valerio; Trusdell, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Mauna Loa (Hawaii) is the largest active shield volcano on the Island of Hawai'i, covering more than half of it and rising to 4,169 meters above sea level. The volcano hosts the Moku'aweoweo summit caldera, from which two elongated rift zones depart: the Northeast Rift Zone (NERZ) and the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ). Most of Mauna Loa's eruptions begin with lava fountains from a series of fissure vents in the summit region and then often migrate to vents down either rift zone. Mauna Loa volcano shows a distinctive feature, being characterized by minor radial eruptive fissures (not related to the two main rifts) on the NW flank only. This study tries to explain such a selective distribution of vents, and thus of shallow magma transfer. To this aim, we run numerical models with different amount of opening of the two rift zones of Mauna Loa, as well as different amount of slip on its SE flank. Our results suggest that the selective occurrence of the radial fissures may be explained by the competition between two processes: a) rift intrusion (especially along the NERZ), promoting the development of radial dikes along the NW flank; b) flank slip, inhibiting the development of the radial dikes on the SE flank. The opening of the two non-parallel main rift zones of Mauna Loa promotes the local extension necessary to develop the radial dikes on the NW flank. A general model for the development of a third branch of radial rift, which may be also applied to Mt. Etna and some volcanoes on the Canary Islands, is proposed.

  5. Buried Rift Zones and Seamounts in Hawaii: Implications for Volcano Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Morgan, J. K.; Zelt, C. A.; Okubo, P. G.

    2005-12-01

    As volcanoes grow, they deform due to their own weight and ongoing magmatic intrusions. For example, Kilauea's south flank is moving seaward ~10 cm/yr, apparently pushed by dike injection along rift zones and/or gravitational spreading. Offshore, Kilauea's south flank has developed a broad bench, attributed to overthrusting at the toe of the mobile flank. Mauna Loa's southeastern flank is much less mobile today, and exhibits no offshore bench. The great variability in present-day surface motions and deformation of these two volcanoes is not well explained by the distribution of surface structures, which might influence the driving and resisting forces acting on the flanks. Using first-arrival seismic tomography of a unique onshore-offshore airgun dataset, we have developed a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the southeastern part of the Island of Hawaii. This model provides an unprecedented view into both the submarine and subaerial portions of Kilauea, Mauna Loa, and Loihi volcanoes, helping to resolve some outstanding puzzles. The preferred velocity model shows that the known summits and rift zones of Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Loihi volcanoes are underlain by high velocity anomalies (6.5-7.0 km/s), indicating the presence of intrusive magma cumulates and dike complexes. In addition, we observe an anomalously high velocity feature (7.0-7.5 km/s) within the southeastern flank of Mauna Loa that extends ~40 km south of the volcano's summit. Our model also shows anomalously high velocity materials (6.3-6.8 km/s) in the oceanic crust beneath Kilauea's outer bench. Based on the geometry of their high velocities, we propose that these features represent previously unrecognized intrusive complexes that have influenced the evolution of the two volcanoes. The high velocity feature within Mauna Loa's southeastern flank appears to represent a buried rift zone, either of ancient Mauna Loa, or an older volcano perhaps related to the Ninole Hills. Curiously, at shallow depths (5-9 km

  6. The Ninole Basalt - Implications for the structural evolution of Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Rhodes, J.M.; Dalrymple, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    Lava flows of the Ninole Basalt, the oldest rocks exposed on the south side of the island of Hawaii, provide age and compositional constraints on the evolution of Mauna Loa volcano and the southeastward age progression of Hawaiian volcanism. Although the tholeiitic Ninole Basalt differs from historic lavas of Mauna Loa volcano in most major-element contents (e.g., variably lower K, Na, Si; higher Al, Fe, Ti, Ca), REE and other relatively immobile minor elements are similar to historic and prehistoric Mauna Loa lavas, and the present major-element differences are mainly due to incipient weathering in the tropical environment. New K-Ar whole-rock ages, from relatively fresh roadcut samples, suggest that the age of the Ninole Basalt is approximately 0.1-0.2 Ma, although resolution is poor because of low contents of K and radiogenic Ar. Originally considered the remnants of a separate volcano, the Ninole Hills are here interpreted as faulted remnants of the old south flank of Mauna Loa. Deep canyons in the Ninole Hills, eroded after massive landslide failure of flanks of the southwest rift zone, have been preserved from burial by younger lava due to westward migration of the rift zone. Landslide-induced depressurization of the southwest rift zone may also have induced phreatomagmatic eruptions that could have deposited widespread Basaltic ash that overlies the Ninole Basalt. Subaerial presence of the Ninole Basalt documents that the southern part of Hawaii Island had grown to much of its present size above sea level by 0.1-0.2 Ma, and places significant limits on subsequent enlargement of the south flank of Mauna Loa. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Prevalence of pox-like lesions and malaria in forest bird communitites on leeward Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, C.T.; Lease, J.K.; Dusek, R.J.; Samuel, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    Introduced avian pox virus and malaria have had devastating impacts on native Hawaiian forest birds, yet little has been published about their prevalence and distribution in forest bird communities outside of windward Hawaii Island. We surveyed native and non-native forest birds for these two diseases at three different elevations on leeward Mauna Loa Volcano at the Kona Forest Unit of Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge. Prevalence of malaria by both serology and microscopy varied by elevation and ranged from 28% at 710 m to 13% at 1830 m. Prevalence of pox-like lesions also varied by altitude, ranging in native species from 10% at 710 m to 2% at 1830 m. Native species at all elevations had the highest prevalence of malarial antibody and pox-like lesions. By contrast, pox-like lesions were not detected in individuals of four non-native species and only 5% of Japanese White-eye (Zosterops japonicus) was positive for malaria. A significantly high proportion of birds with pox-like lesions also had serological evidence of concurrent, chronic malarial infections, suggesting an interaction between these diseases, dual transmission of both diseases by the primary mosquito vector (Culex quinquefasciatus) or complete recovery of some pox-infected birds without loss of toes. Results from this study document high prevalence of malaria and pox at this refuge. Development of effective disease control strategies will be important for restoration of remnant populations of the endangered 'Akiapola'au (Hemignathus munroi), Hawaii Creeper (Oreomystis mana), and Hawaii 'Akepa (Loxops coccineus coccineus) that still occur on the refuge.

  8. Imaging the crustal magma sources beneath Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okubo, P.G.; Benz, H.M.; Chouet, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Three-dimensional seismic P-wave traveltime tomography is used to image the magma sources beneath Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes, Hawaii. High-velocity bodies (>6.4 km/s) in the upper 9 km of the crust beneath the summits and rift zones of the volcanoes correlate with zones of high magnetic intensities and are interpreted as solidified gabbro-ultramafic cumulates from which the surface volcanism is derived. The proximity of these high-velocity features to the rift zones is consistent with a ridge-spreading model of the volcanic flank. Southeast of the Hilina fault zone, along the south flank of Kilauea, low-velocity material (<6.0 km/s) is observed extending to depths of 9-11 km, indicating that the Hilina fault may extend possibly as deep as the basal decollement. Along the southeast flank of Mauna Loa, a similar low -velocity zone associated with the Kaoiki fault zone is observed extending to depths of 6-8 km. These two upper crustal low-velocity zones suggest common stages in the evolution of the Hawaiian shield volcanoes in which these fault systems are formed as a result of upper crustal deformation in response to magma injection within the volcanic edifice.

  9. Rates of volcanic activity along the southwest rift zone of Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    Flow-by-flow mapping of the 65 km long subaerial part of the southwest rift zone and adjacent flanks of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii, and about 50 new 14C dates on charcoal from beneath these flows permit estimates of rates of lava accumulation and volcanic growth over the past 10 000 years. The sequence of historic eruptions along the southwest rift zone, beginning in 1868, shows a general pattern of uprift migration and increasing eruptive volume, culminating in the great 1950 eruption. No event comparable to 1950, in terms of volume or vent length, is evident for at least the previous 1000 years. Rates of lava accumulation along the zone have been subequal to those of Kilauea Volcano during the historic period but they were much lower in late prehistoric time (unpubl. Kilauea data by R. T. Holcomb). Rates of surface covering and volcanic growth have been markedly asymmetric along Mauna Loa's southwest rift zone. Accumulation rates have been about half again as great on the northwest side of the rift zone in comparison with the southeast side. The difference apparently reflects a westward lateral shift of the rift zone of Mauna Loa away from Kilauea Volcano, which may have acted as a barrier to symmetrical growth of the rift zone. -Author

  10. Isotope Compositions of Submarine North Kona Tholeiitic Lavas, Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, S.; Tagami, T.; Kani, T.; Hanan, B. B.

    2006-12-01

    Four remote and manned submersible dives examined the deep submarine portion of the North Kona region, offshore Hualalai during 2001 and 2002 JAMSTEC cruises. The dives encountered compositionally homogeneous tholeiitic pillow lavas that are interpreted to have erupted from Hualalai during its shield stage. Hualalai volcano, the westernmost volcano on the Island of Hawaii is presently in the post-shield alkalic stage and most of its subaerial surface is covered by alkalic basalt. Difficulty accessing buried tholeiite is one reason that compositional data from the volumetrically dominant stage in the volcano's edifice are scarce. To identify source materials involved in shield stage of Hualalai can provide important information about the isotopic variation and evolution during Hawaiian volcano growth. We report the results of Hf, Pb, Sr, Nd isotopic compositions of 34 tholeiitic lava samples collected from submarine North Kona region. Hf, Nd, Sr isotopic compositions of the submarine North Kona lavas are similar to Mauna Loa tholeiites, and define a clear mixing line showing that the mantle source consists of at least two components. Some of new Pb isotopic data have higher 207Pb/204Pb and ^{208}Pb/204Pb, for a given 206Pb/204Pb, than published data from Mauna Loa and Hualalai. The trend emerges towards to 'Kea'-like component. Although in general Hawaiian basalts require more than two components to account for their geochemical variations, the isotopic variations in Hualalai shield lavas appear dominated by a mixture of two components: 'Koolau'-like enriched component and a 'Kea'-like depleted component, and contributed to relatively higher proportion of the 'Kea'-like component than the Mauna Loa.

  11. Isotope and trace element characteristics of Waianae Volcano, Oahu, Hawaii: evidence for crustal melting in Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zander, I.; Sinton, J. M.; Mahaoney, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    Well-exposed sections within the 3-4 Ma Waianae Volcano of Oahu, Hawaii, encompass much of the Hawaiian volcano "life" cycle, ranging from early or main shield stage (Lualualei) through late shield (Kamaileunu) to postshield (Palehua and Kolekole) stage. New data on 25 samples indicate a relatively restricted range in Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic ratios. 87Sr/86Sr ranges from 0.70352 to 0.70379, \\UpsilonNd from +4.5 to +6.7 and 206Pb/204Pb 17.793 to 18.295. The largest range within the sample suite occurs in the shield stage lavas (Lualualei and Kamaileunu), suggesting less time for homogenization of magma in a magma chamber(s) during this period. The late shield stage contains silicic lavas and dikes (basaltic icelandites, icelandites and rhyodacites). In 206Pb/204Pb versus 207Pb/204Pb or ^{208}Pb/204Pb diagrams, most shield and postshield lavas fall on a single array, which may be a binary (or pseudo-binary) mixing array. However, data for the silicic lavas lie well off the array at low 206Pb/204Pb (~17.8). Incompatible-element patterns for these samples are distinct in having peaks at Pb. Greater scatter in Sr-Pb and Nd-Pb isotope diagrams compared to Pb-Pb isotope diagrams suggests that the variations in Sr-Pb and Nd-Pb isotope diagrams are related to fractionation of Sr, Nd and Pb by different degrees of melting of different components. Geochemical modeling of the isotopic and trace element data suggests that the silicic lavas (which are petrographically, chemically and mineralogically calc-alkalic) likely represent hydrous melts of amphibolite in the lower Hawaiian crust. We propose that the occurrence of these lavas in the late shield stage results from deep crustal melting as a consequence of compression and crustal thickening after the accumulation and alteration of a thick pile of lavas earlier in the shield stage. The Koolau Volcano's late shield (Makapuu stage) exhibits similar Pb isotope ratios, perhaps indicating that the "exotic" Koolau component might

  12. Carbon isotopes in xenoliths from the Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii, and the generation of isotopic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Pineau, F. ); Mathez, E.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The isotopic composition of carbon has been determined in a suite of xenoliths from lava of the 1800-1801 Kaupulehu eruption of Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii. Several lithologies are represented in the suite, including websterite, dunite, wehrlite, pyroxenite, and gabbro. In addition, there are composite xenoliths in which contacts between lithologies are preserved. Most of the xenoliths represent deformed cumulates. The contact relations in the composite samples indicate that the lithologies originated from the same source region, which, based on pressures determined from fluid inclusions, is estimated to be at a depth of {approx}20 km, or near the crust-mantle boundary. The observations and isotopic results demonstrate that isotopic variability can be generated by multistage fractionation processes such as degassing of CO{sub 2} from magma and precipitation of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids to form graphitic compounds. Such processes operated over regions the scales of which were determined by style and intensity of deformation and by lithology.

  13. Ground Water in Kilauea Volcano and Adjacent Areas of Mauna Loa Volcano, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takasaki, Kiyoshi J.

    1993-01-01

    About 1,000 million gallons of water per day moves toward or into ground-water bodies of Kilauea Volcano from the lavas of Mauna Loa Volcano. This movement continues only to the northern boundaries of the east and southwest rift zones of Kilauea, where a substantial quantity of ground water is deflected downslope to other ground-water bodies or to the ocean. In the western part of Kilauea, the kaoiki fault system, which parallels the southwest rift zone, may be the main barrier to ground-water movement. The diversion of the ground water is manifested in the western part of Kilauea by the presence of large springs at the shore end of the Kaoiki fault system, and in the eastern part by the apparently large flow of unheated basal ground water north of the east rift zone. Thus, recharge to ground water in the rift zones of Kilauea and to the areas to the south of the rift zones may be largely by local rainfall. Recharge from rainfall for all of Kilauea is about 1,250 million gallons per day. Beneath the upper slopes of the Kilauea rift zones, ground-water levels are 2,000 feet or more above mean sea level, or more than 1,000 feet below land surface. Ground-water levels are at these high altitudes because numerous and closely spaced dikes at depth in the upper slopes impound the ground water. In the lower slopes, because the number of dikes decreases toward the surface, the presence of a sufficient number of dikes capable of impounding ground water at altitudes substantially above sea level is unlikely. In surrounding basal ground-water reservoirs, fresh basal ground water floats on seawater and, through a transition zone of mixed freshwater and seawater, discharges into the sea. The hydraulic conductivity of the dike-free lavas ranges from about 3,000 to about 7,000 feet per day. The conductivity in the upper slopes of the rift ranges from about 5 to 30 feet per day and that of the lower slopes of the east rift zone was calculated at about 7,000 feet per day. The

  14. Interagency collaboration on an active volcano: a case study at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, James P.; Orlando, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    Because Kilauea and Mauna Loa are included within the National Park, there is a natural intersection of missions for the National Park Service (NPS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). HAVO staff and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists have worked closely together to monitor and forecast multiple eruptions from each of these volcanoes since HAVO’s founding in 1916.

  15. ASAR images a diverse set of deformation patterns at Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.

    2007-01-01

    Since 2003, 27 independent look angles have been acquired by ENVISAT’s Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) instrument over the island of Hawai`i, allowing for the formation of thousands of interferograms showing deformation of the ground surface. On Kīlauea volcano, a transition from minor to broad-scale summit inflation was observed by interferograms that span 2003 to 2006. In addition, radar interferometry (InSAR) observations of Kīlauea led to the discovery of several previously unknown areas of localized subsidence in the caldera and along the volcano’s east rift zone. These features are probably caused by the cooling and contraction of accumulated lavas. After November 2005, a surface instability near the point that lava entered the ocean on the south flank of Kīlauea was observed in interferograms. The motion is most likely a result of unbuttressing of a portion of the coast following the collapse of a large lava delta in November 2005. InSAR data can also be used to map lava flow development over time, providing ~30 m spatial resolution maps at approximately monthly intervals. Future applications of InSAR to Kīlauea will probably result in more discoveries and insights, both as the style of volcano deformation changes and as data from new instruments are acquired.

  16. Emplacement of Xenolith Nodules in the Kaupulehu Lava Flow, Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, J. E.; Spudis, P. D.; Greeley, R.; Taylor, G. J.; Baloga, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    The basaltic Kaupulehu 1800-1801 lava flow of Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii contains abundant ultramafic xenoliths. Many of these xenoliths occur as bedded layers of semi-rounded nodules, each thinly coated with a veneer (typically 1 mm thick) of lava. The nodule beds are analogous to cobble deposits of fluvial sedimentary systems. Although several mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of the nodule beds, it was found that, at more than one locality, the nodule beds are overbank levee deposits. The geological occurrence of the nodules, certain diagnostic aspects of the flow morphology and consideration of the inferred emplacement process indicate that the Kaupulehu flow had an exceptionally low viscosity on eruption and that the flow of the lava stream was extremely rapid, with flow velocities of at least 10 m/s (more than 40 km/h. This flow is the youngest on Hualalai Volcano and future eruptions of a similar type would pose considerable hazard to life as well as property.

  17. Degassing history of water, sulfur, and carbon in submarine lavas from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, J.E.; Stolper, E.M. ); Clague, D.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Major, minor, and dissolved volatile element concentrations were measured in tholeiitic glasses from the submarine portion (Puna Ridge) of the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Dissolved H{sub 2}O and S concentrations display a wide range relative to nonvolatile incompatible elements at all depths. This range cannot be readily explained by fractional crystallization, degassing of H{sub 2}O and S during eruption on the seafloor, or source region heterogeneities. Dissolved CO{sub 2} concentrations, in contrast, show a positive correlation with eruption depth and typically agree within error with the solubility at that depth. The authors propose that most magmas along the Puna Ridge result from (1) mixing of a relatively volatile-rich, undegassed component with magmas that experienced low pressure (perhaps subaerial) degassing during which substantial H{sub 2}O, S, and CO{sub 2} were lost, followed by (2) fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene, and plagioclase from this mixture to generate a residual liquid; and (3) further degassing, principally of CO{sub 2} for samples erupted deeper than 1,000 m, during eruption on the seafloor. They predict that average Kilauean primary magmas with 16% MgO contain {approximately}0.47 wt % H{sub 2}0, {approximately}900 ppm S, and have {delta}D values of {approximately}{minus}30 to {minus}40%. The model predicts that submarine lavas from wholly submarine volcanoes (i.e., Loihi), for which there is no opportunity to generate the degassed end member by low pressure degassing, will be enriched in volatiles relative to those from volcanoes whose summits have breached the sea surface (i.e., Kilauea and Mauna Loa).

  18. Coastal lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualalai volcanoes, Kona, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Clague, D.

    1987-01-01

    A major carbonate reef which drowned 13 ka is now submerged 150 m below sea level on the west coast of the island of Hawaii. A 25-km span of this reef was investigated using the submersible Makali'i. The reef occurs on the flanks of two active volcanoes, Mauna Loa and Hualalai, and the lavas from both volcanoes both underlie and overlie the submerged reef. Most of the basaltic lava flows that crossed the reef did so when the water was much shallower, and when they had to flow a shorter distance from shoreline to reef face. Lava flows on top of the reef have protected it from erosion and solution and now occur at seaward-projecting salients on the reef face. These relations suggest that the reef has retreated shoreward as much as 50 m since it formed. A 7-km-wide "shadow zone" occurs where no Hualalai lava flows cross the reef south of Kailua. These lava flows were probably diverted around a large summit cone complex. A similar "shadow zone" on the flank of Mauna Loa volcano in the Kealakekua Bay region is downslope from the present Mauna Loa caldera, which ponds Mauna Loa lava and prevents it from reaching the coastline. South of the Mauna Loa "shadow zone" the - 150 m reef has been totally covered and obscured by Mauna Loa lava. The boundary between Hualalai and Mauna Loa lava on land occurs over a 6-km-wide zone, whereas flows crossing the - 150 m reef show a sharper boundary offshore from the north side of the subaerial transition zone. This indicates that since the formation of the reef, Hualalai lava has migrated south, mantling Mauna Loa lava. More recently, Mauna Loa lava is again encroaching north on Hualalai lava. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Perception of Lava Flow Hazards and Risk at Mauna Loa and Hualalai Volcanoes, Kona, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, C. E.; Houghton, B. F.; Johnston, D. M.; Paton, D.; Swanson, D. A.

    2001-12-01

    The island of Hawaii is composed of five sub-aerially exposed volcanoes, three of which have been active since 1801 (Kilauea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai). Hawaii has the fastest population growth in the state and the local economy in the Kona districts (i.e., western portion of the island) is driven by tourism. Kona is directly vulnerable to future lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualalai volcanoes, as well as indirectly from the effects of lava flows elsewhere that may sever the few roads that connect Kona to other vital areas on the island. A number of factors such as steep slopes, high volume eruptions, and high effusion rates, combine to mean that lava flows from Hualalai and Mauna Loa can be fast-moving and hence unusually hazardous. The proximity of lifelines and structures to potential eruptive sources exacerbates societies' risk to future lava flows. Approximately \\$2.3 billion has been invested on the flanks of Mauna Loa since its last eruption in 1984 (Trusdell 1995). An equivalent figure has not yet been determined for Hualalai, but an international airport, several large resort complexes, and Kailua-Kona, the second largest town on the island, are down-slope and within 15km of potential eruptive Hualalai vents. Public and perhaps official understanding of specific lava flow hazards and the perceptions of risk from renewed volcanism at each volcano are proportional to the time lapsed since the most recent eruption that impacted Kona, rather than a quantitative assessment of risk that takes into account recent growth patterns. Lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualalai last directly impacted upon Kona during the notorious 1950 and circa 1801 eruptions, respectively. Various non-profit organizations; local, state and federal government entities; and academic institutions have disseminated natural hazard information in Kona but despite the intuitive appeal that increased hazard understanding and risk perception results in increased hazard adjustment adoption, this

  20. Rover-Based Instrumentation and Scientific Investigations During the 2012 Analog Field Test on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, L. D.; Graff, T. G.

    2013-01-01

    Rover-based 2012 Moon and Mars Analog Mission Activities (MMAMA) were recently completed on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii. Scientific investigations, scientific input, and operational constraints were tested in the context of existing project and protocols for the field activities designed to help NASA achieve the Vision for Space Exploration [1]. Several investigations were conducted by the rover mounted instruments to determine key geophysical and geochemical properties of the site, as well as capture the geological context of the area and the samples investigated. The rover traverse and associated science investigations were conducted over a three day period on the southeast flank of the Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii. The test area was at an elevation of 11,500 feet and is known as "Apollo Valley" (Fig. 1). Here we report the integration and operation of the rover-mounted instruments, as well as the scientific investigations that were conducted.

  1. Seismic tomography of compressional wave attenuation structure for Kı¯lauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Amelung, Falk; Okubo, Paul G.

    2015-04-01

    We present a frequency-independent three-dimensional (3-D) compressional wave attenuation model (indicated by the reciprocal of quality factor Qp) for Kı¯lauea Volcano in Hawai`i. We apply the simul2000 tomographic algorithm to the attenuation operator t* values for the inversion of Qp perturbations through a recent 3-D seismic velocity model and earthquake location catalog. The t* values are measured from amplitude spectra of 26708 P wave arrivals of 1036 events recorded by 61 seismic stations at the Hawaiian Volcanology Observatory. The 3-D Qp model has a uniform horizontal grid spacing of 3 km, and the vertical node intervals range between 2 and 10 km down to 35 km depth. In general, the resolved Qp values increase with depth, and there is a correlation between seismic activity and low-Qp values. The area beneath the summit caldera is dominated by low-Qp anomalies throughout the entire resolved depth range. The Southwest Rift Zone and the East Rift Zone exhibit very high Qp values at about 9 km depth, whereas the shallow depths are characterized with low-Qp anomalies comparable with those in the summit area. The seismic zones and fault systems generally display relatively high Qp values relative to the summit. The newly developed Qp model provides an important complement to the existing velocity models for exploring the magmatic system and evaluating and interpreting intrinsic physical properties of the rocks in the study area.

  2. Origin of xenoliths in the trachyte at Puu Waawaa, Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Bohrson, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    Rare dunite and 2-pyroxene gabbro xenoliths occur in banded trachyte at Puu Waawaa on Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii. Mineral compositions suggest that these xenoliths formed as cumulates of tholeiitic basalt at shallow depth in a subcaldera magma reservoir. Subsequently, the minerals in the xenoliths underwent subsolidus reequilibration that particularly affected chromite compositions by decreasing their Mg numbers. In addition, olivine lost CaO and plagioclase lost MgO and Fe2O3 during subsolidus reequilibration. The xenoliths also reacted with the host trachyte to form secondary mica, amphibole, and orthopyroxene, and to further modify the compositions of some olivine, clinopyroxene, and spinel grains. The reaction products indicate that the host trachyte melt was hydrous. Clinopyroxene in one dunite sample and olivine in most dunite samples have undergone partial melting, apparently in response to addition of water to the xenolith. These xenoliths do not contain CO2 fluid inclusions, so common in xenoliths from other localities on Hualalai, which suggests that CO2 was introduced from alkalic basalt magma between the time CO2-inclusion-free xenoliths erupted at 106??6 ka and the time CO2-inclusion-rich xenoliths erupted within the last 15 ka. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  3. The isotope systematics of a juvenile intraplate volcano: Pb, Nd, and Sr isotope ratios of basalts from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staudigel, H.; Zindler, A.; Hart, S.R.; Leslie, T.; Chen, C.-Y.; Clague, D.

    1984-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios for a representative suite of 15 basanites, alkali basalts, transitional basalts and tholeiites from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, display unusually large variations for a single volcano, but lie within known ranges for Hawaiian basalts. Nd isotope ratios in alkali basalts show the largest relative variation (0.51291-0.51305), and include the nearly constant tholeiite value ( ??? 0.51297). Pb isotope ratios show similarly large ranges for tholeiites and alkali basalts and continue Tatsumoto's [31] "Loa" trend towards higher 206Pb 204Pb ratios, resulting in a substantial overlap with the "Kea" trend. 206Pb 204Pb ratios for Loihi and other volcanoes along the Loa and Kea trends [31] are observed to correlate with the age of the underlying lithosphere suggesting lithosphere involvement in the formation of Hawaiian tholeiites. Loihi lavas display no correlation of Nd, Sr, or Pb isotope ratios with major element compositions or eruptive age, in contrast with observations of some other Hawaiian volcanoes [38]. Isotope data for Loihi, as well as average values for Hawaiian volcanoes, are not adequately explained by previously proposed two-end-member models; new models for the origin and the development of Hawaiian volcanoes must include mixing of at least three geochemically distinct source regions and allow for the involvement of heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere. ?? 1984.

  4. Silicon isotope systematics of acidic weathering of fresh basalts, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, Steven M.; Rossman, George R.; Young, Edward D.; Ziegler, Karen; Moynier, Fréderic; Eiler, John M.; Hurowitz, Joel A.

    2015-11-01

    Silicon stable isotopes are fractionated by a host of low-temperature aqueous processes, making them potentially useful as a weathering proxy. Here we characterize the silicon isotope signature of surficial chemical weathering of glassy basaltic lava flows at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Fresh basalt flow surfaces (<40 years old) frequently feature opaque amorphous silica surface coatings up to 80 μm thick. These silica coatings and associated silica cements are enriched in the heavier isotopes of Si (δ30SiNBS-28 = +0.92‰ to +1.36‰) relative to their basaltic substrate (δ30SiNBS-28 = -0.3‰ to -0.2‰). Secondary clays and opals are typically depleted in 30Si relative to the dissolved reservoirs from which they precipitated, so this sense of isotopic fractionation is unusual. Mechanisms capable of producing isotopically heavy secondary minerals were explored by conducting batch alteration experiments on fresh basaltic glass. Batch acidic alteration of basalt glass in HCl, H2SO4, and HF produced silica-rich surface layers resembling the Hawaiian surface coatings. Differences in fluid chemical composition affected the direction and magnitude of Si isotope fractionation. Basalt leaching in HCl or H2SO4 produced 30Si-enriched fluids (1000 ln αprecip-Si(aq) ≅ -0.8‰) and 30Si-depleted secondary silica layers. In contrast, HF-bearing experiments produced highly 30Si-depleted fluid compositions (1000 ln αprecip-Si(aq) up to +8‰). Larger isotopic fractionations were observed in experiments with lower fluid-rock ratios. In Hawaii, where altering fluids contain H2SO4 and HCl but minimal HF, high δ30Si values for the silica coatings were likely achieved by Rayleigh fractionation. Aqueous 30Si-enriched silica was released during incongruent basalt dissolution then subsequently transported and deposited from an evaporating solution at the flow surface. Our results indicate that (1) altering fluid chemistry and fluid-rock ratio impact the Si isotope signature of

  5. Topographic analyses of K*lauea Volcano, Hawai'i, from interferometric airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Scott K.; MacKay, Mary E.; Garbeil, Harold; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.

    We analyze digital topographic data collected in September 1993 over a 500-km2 portion of K*lauea Volcano, Hawai'i, by the C-band (5.6-cm wavelength) topographic synthetic aperture radar (TOPSAR) airborne interferometric radar. Field surveys covering an 1-km2 area of the summit caldera and the distal end of an 8-m-thick 'a'* flow indicate that the 10-m spatial resolution TOPSAR data have a vertical accuracy of 1-2m over a variety of volcanic surfaces. After conversion to a common datum, TOPSAR data agree favorably with a digital elevation model (DEM) produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), with the important exception of the region of the ongoing eruption (which postdates the USGS DEM). This DEM comparison gives us confidence that subtracting the USGS data from TOPSAR data will produce a reasonable estimate of the erupted volume as of September 1993. This subtraction produces dense rock equivalent (DRE) volumes of 392, 439, and 90×106m3 for the Pu'u '*'*, K*pa'ianah*, and episode 50-53 stages of the eruption, respectively. These are 124, 89, and 94% of the volumes calculated by staff of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) but do not include lava of K*pa'ianah* and episodes 50-53 that flowed into the ocean and are thus invisible to TOPSAR. Accounting for this lava increases the TOPSAR volumes to 124, 159, and 129% of the HVO volumes. Including the +/-2-m uncertainty derived from the field surveys produces TOPSAR-derived volumes for the eruption as a whole that range between 81 and 125% of the USGS-derived values. The vesicularity- and ocean-corrected TOPSAR volumes yield volumetric eruption rates of 4.5, 4.5, and 2.7m3/s for the three stages of the eruption, which compare with HVO-derived values of 3.6, 2.8, and 2.1m3/s, respectively. Our analysis shows that care must be taken when vertically registering the TOPSAR and USGS DEMs to a common datum because C-band TOPSAR penetrates only partially into thick forest and therefore produces a DEM within the tree

  6. Applications of the VLF induction method for studying some volcanic processes of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zablocki, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    The very low-frequency (VLF) induction method has found exceptional utility in studying various volcanic processes of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii because: (1) significant anomalies result exclusively from ionically conductive magma or still-hot intrusions (> 800??C) and the attendant electrolytically conductive hot groundwater; (2) basalt flows forming the bulk of Kilauea have very high resistivities at shallow depths that result in low geologic noise levels and relatively deep depths of investigation (???100 m); and (3) the azimuths to two of the usable transmitters (NLK and NPM) are aligned favorably with most of the principal geologic features. Measurements of the tilt angle and ellipticity of the polarization ellipse of the magnetic field, using a simple, hand-held receiver, have been used to: (1) delineate the lateral extent of shallow, partially solidified lava lakes, active lava tubes, and recent intrusive dikes; (2) obtain an indication of the attitude of some recent dikes; (3) show that many eruptive fissures cool faster than their intrusive counterparts; (4) show that some fumarolic areas are underlain by shallow, highly altered, and conductive zones; and (5) provide control information for interpreting data obtained with other electrical techniques. Complementary measurements of scalar apparent resistivity and surface impedance phase, using a new attachment for the VLF receiver, have substantially increased the utility of VLF studies in Kilauea. They provide better lateral resolution of conductors and reduce the ambiguity in interpretation. Notwithstanding recent advances in theoretical modeling techniques, the excellent quality of some of the data warrants extension of interpretive techniques, particularly for quantitatively characterizing the configuration and conductivity of small-dimension bodies. These VLF induction methods should have wide application to studies of active volcanic regions in other parts of the world and could provide some insights into

  7. Puhimau thermal area: a window into the upper east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, K.A.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Doukas, M.P.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of two soil CO2 efflux surveys by the closed chamber circulation method at the Puhimau thermal area in the upper East Rift Zone (ERZ) of  volcano, Hawaii. The surveys were undertaken in 1996 and 1998 to constrain how much CO2 might be reaching the ERZ after degassing beneath the summit caldera and whether the Puhimau thermal area might be a significant contributor to the overall CO2 budget of  . The area was revisited in 2001 to determine the effects of surface disturbance on efflux values by the collar emplacement technique utilized in the earlier surveys. Utilizing a cutoff value of 50 g m−2 d−1 for the surrounding forest background efflux, the CO2 emission rates for the anomaly at Puhimau thermal area were 27 t d−1 in 1996 and 17 t d−1 in 1998. Water vapor was removed before analysis in all cases in order to obtain CO2 values on a dry air basis and mitigate the effect of water vapor dilution on the measurements. It is clear that Puhimau thermal area is not a significant contributor to  CO2 output and that most of  CO2 (8500 t d−1) is degassed at the summit, leaving only magma with its remaining stored volatiles, such as SO2, for injection down the ERZ. Because of the low CO2emission rate and the presence of a shallow water table in the upper ERZ that effectively scrubs SO2 and other acid gases, Puhimau thermal area currently does not appear to be generally well suited for observing temporal changes in degassing at  .

  8. Petrology, geochemistry, and petrogenesis of ultramafic xenoliths from 1800-1801 Kaupulehu flow, Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    The 1800-1801 Kaupulehu alkalic flow on Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii, contains abundant xenoliths of dunite, wehrlite, and olivine-clinopyroxenite with minor gabbro, troctolite, anorthosite, and websterite. The petrography and mineral chemistry of forty-six dunite, wehrlite, and olivine-clinopyroxenite xenoliths have been studied; eight were selected for determination of trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios of separated clinopyroxenes. Temperatures of equilibrium obtained from both olivine-spinel and pyroxene geo-thermometers range from 1000 C to 1200 C for these ultramafic xenoliths. A depth of 8-25 km is suggested for the formation of these ultramafic xenoliths. The rarity of othopyroxene, presence of clinopyroxene, Fe-rich olivine and clinopyroxene compositions, and high TiO content in spinel and clinopyroxene indicate that these xenoliths have a cumulate origin and are not residues from partial melting. Sr and Nd isotopic ratios from clinopyroxene are different from those of most Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts. Rare earth element (REE) concentrations in liquid that equilibrated with xenolith clinopyroxenes have light rare earth element (LREE) enriched patterns with (Ce/Yb)n between 4 and 10. Similar olivine, spinel, and clinopyroxene compositions in xenoliths and Hawaiian basalts as well as good agreement of their Sr and Nd isotopic ratios suggests a genetic relationship between Hualalai ultramafic xenoliths and Hawaiian basalts. Some xenoliths possibly are cumulates from alkalic or tholeiitic basalts. However, Hualalai tholeiitic basalts are excluded due to their different /sup 3/He//sup 4/He values and REE patterns. The magmas that crystallized the Mg-rich (>Fo/sub 87/) dunites with high REE contents are similar in Sr and Nd isotopic values to Hualalai 1800-1801 alkalic basalts but have higher REE and Sr contents.

  9. Volcanic geology and eruption frequency, lower east rift zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    Detailed geologic mapping and radiocarbon dating of tholeiitic basalts covering about 275 km2 on the lower east rift zone (LERZ) and adjoining flanks of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, show that at least 112 separate eruptions have occurred during the past 2360 years. Eruptive products include spatter ramparts and cones, a shield, two extensive lithic-rich tuff deposits, aa and pahoehoe flows, and three littoral cones. Areal coverage, number of eruptions and average dormant interval estimates in years for the five age groups assigned are: (I) historic, i.e. A D 1790 and younger: 25%, 5, 42.75; (II) 200-400 years old: 50%, 15, 14.3: (III) 400-750 years old: 20%, 54, 6.6; (IV) 750-1500 years old: 5%, 37, 20.8; (V) 1500-3000 years old: <1%, 1, unknown. At least 4.5-6 km3 of tholeiitic basalt have been erupted from the LERZ during the past 1500 years. Estimated volumes of the exposed products of individual eruptions range from a few tens of cubic meters for older units in small kipukas to as much as 0.4 km3 for the heiheiahulu shield. The average dormant interval has been about 13.6 years during the past 1500 years. The most recent eruption occurred in 1961, and the area may be overdue for its next eruption. However, eruptive activity will not resume on the LERZ until either the dike feeding the current eruption on the middle east rift zone extends farther down rift, or a new dike, unrelated to the current eruption, extends into the LERZ. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Earthquakes triggered by silent slip events on Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Segall, Paul; Desmarais, Emily K; Shelly, David; Miklius, Asta; Cervelli, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Slow-slip events, or 'silent earthquakes', have recently been discovered in a number of subduction zones including the Nankai trough in Japan, Cascadia, and Guerrero in Mexico, but the depths of these events have been difficult to determine from surface deformation measurements. Although it is assumed that these silent earthquakes are located along the plate megathrust, this has not been proved. Slow slip in some subduction zones is associated with non-volcanic tremor, but tremor is difficult to locate and may be distributed over a broad depth range. Except for some events on the San Andreas fault, slow-slip events have not yet been associated with high-frequency earthquakes, which are easily located. Here we report on swarms of high-frequency earthquakes that accompany otherwise silent slips on Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii. For the most energetic event, in January 2005, the slow slip began before the increase in seismicity. The temporal evolution of earthquakes is well explained by increased stressing caused by slow slip, implying that the earthquakes are triggered. The earthquakes, located at depths of 7-8 km, constrain the slow slip to be at comparable depths, because they must fall in zones of positive Coulomb stress change. Triggered earthquakes accompanying slow-slip events elsewhere might go undetected if background seismicity rates are low. Detection of such events would help constrain the depth of slow slip, and could lead to a method for quantifying the increased hazard during slow-slip events, because triggered events have the potential to grow into destructive earthquakes. PMID:16823451

  11. Surface deformation and coherence measurements of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, from SIR C radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Zebker, H. A.; Webb, F. H.; Fielding, E. J.

    1996-10-01

    The shuttle imaging radar C/X synthetic aperture radar (SIR C/X SAR) radar on board the space shuttle Endeavor imaged Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, in April and October 1994 for the purpose of measuring active surface deformation by the methods of repeat-pass differential radar interferometry. Observations at 24 cm (L band) and 5.6 cm (C band) wavelengths were reduced to interferograms showing apparent surface deformation over the 6-month interval and over a succession of 1-day intervals in October. A statistically significant local phase signature in the 6-month interferogram is coincident with the Pu'u O'o lava vent. Interpreted as deformation, the signal implies centimeter-scale deflation in an area several kilometers wide surrounding the vent. Peak deflation is roughly 14 cm if the deformation is purely vertical, centered southward of the Pu'u O'o caldera. Delays in the radar signal phase induced by atmospheric refractivity anomalies introduce spurious apparent deformation signatures, at the level of 12 cm peak-to-peak in the radar line-of-sight direction. Though the phase observations are suggestive of the wide-area deformation measured by Global Positioning System (GPS) methods, the atmospheric effects are large enough to limit the interpretation of the result. It is difficult to characterize centimeter-scale deformations spatially distributed over tens of kilometers using differential interferometry without supporting simultaneous, spatially distributed measurements of refractivity along the radar line of sight. Studies of the interferometric correlation of images acquired at different times show that L band is far superior to C band in the vegetated areas, even when the observations are separated by only 1 day. These results imply longer wavelength instruments are more appropriate for studying surfaces by repeat-pass observations.

  12. Wavefield properties of a shallow long-period event and tremor at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccorotti, G.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.

    2001-01-01

    The wavefields of tremor and a long-period (LP) event associated with the ongoing eruptive activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, are investigated using a combination of dense small-aperture (300 m) and sparse large-aperture (5 km) arrays deployed in the vicinity of the summit caldera. Measurements of azimuth and slowness for tremor recorded on the small-aperture array indicate a bimodal nature of the observed wavefield. At frequencies below 2 Hz, the wavefield is dominated by body waves impinging the array with steep incidence. These arrivals are attributed to the oceanic microseismic noise. In the 2-6 Hz band, the wavefield is dominated by waves propagating from sources located at shallow depths (<1 km) beneath the eastern edge of the Halemaumau pit crater. The hypocenter of the LP event, determined from frequency-slowness analyses combined with phase picks, appears to be located close to the source of tremor but at a shallower depth (<0.1 km). The wavefields of tremor and LP event are characterized by a complex composition of body and surface waves, whose propagation and polarization properties are strongly affected by topographic and structural features in the summit caldera region. Analyses of the directional properties of the wavefield in the 2-6 Hz band point to the directions of main scattering sources, which are consistent with pronounced velocity contrasts imaged in a high-resolution three-dimensional velocity model of the caldera region. The frequency and Q of the dominant peak observed in the spectra of the LP event may be explained as the dominant oscillation mode of a crack with scale length 20-100 m and aperture of a few centimeters filled with bubbly water. The mechanism driving the shallow tremor appears to be consistent with a sustained excitation originating in the oscillations of a bubbly cloud resulting from vesiculation and degassing in the magma. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Moessbauer/XRF MIMOS Instrumentation and Operation During the 2012 Analog Field Test on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Trevor G.; Morris, R. V.; Klingelhofer, G.; Blumers, M.

    2013-01-01

    Field testing and scientific investigations were conducted on the Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii, as part of the 2012 Moon and Mars Analog Mission Activities (MMAMA). Measurements were conducted using both stand-alone and rover-mounted instruments to determine the geophysical and geochemical properties of the field site, as well as provide operational constraints and science considerations for future robotic and human missions [1]. Reported here are the results from the two MIMOS instruments deployed as part of this planetary analog field test.

  14. Hawaii

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... clouds in the stereo image are the Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa volcanoes, each peaking at about 4.2 km above sea level. The southern face of a ... April to June 2000 - Big Island vegetation and volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  15. Huge landslide blocks in the growth of piton de la fournaise, La réunion, and Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Stieltjes, Laurent; Varet, Jacques

    1982-03-01

    Piton de la Fournaise, on the island of La Réunion, and Kilauea volcano, on the island of Hawaii, are active, basaltic shield volcanoes growing on the flanks of much larger shield volcanoes in intraplate tectonic environments. Past studies have shown that the average rate of magma production and the chemistry of lavas are quite similar for both volcanoes. We propose a structural similarity — specifically, that periodic displacement of parts of the shields as huge landslide blocks is a common mode of growth. In each instance, the unstable blocks are within a rift-zone-bounded, unbuttressed flank of the shield. At Kilauea, well-documented landslide blocks form relatively surficial parts of a much larger rift-zone-bounded block; scarps of the Hilina fault system mark the headwalls of the active blocks. At Fournaise, Hilina-like slump blocks are also present along the unbuttressed east coast of the volcano. In addition, however, the existence of a set of faults nested around the present caldera and northeast and southeast rift zones suggests that past chapters in the history of Fournaise included the slumping of entire rift-zone-bounded blocks themselves. These nested faults become younger to the east southeast and apparently record one of the effects of a migration of the focus of volcanism in that direction. Repeated dilation along the present set of northeast and southeast rift zones, most recently exemplified by an eruption in 1977, suggests that the past history of rift-zone-bounded slumping will eventually be repeated. The record provided by the succession of slump blocks on Fournaise is apparently at a relatively detailed part of a migration of magmatic focus that has advanced at least 30 km to the east-southeast from neighboring Piton des Neiges, an extinct Pliocene to Pleistocene volcano.

  16. Huge landslide blocks in the growth of piton de la fournaise, La réunion, and Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Stieltjes, Laurent; Varet, Jacques

    1982-01-01

    Piton de la Fournaise, on the island of La Réunion, and Kilauea volcano, on the island of Hawaii, are active, basaltic shield volcanoes growing on the flanks of much larger shield volcanoes in intraplate tectonic environments. Past studies have shown that the average rate of magma production and the chemistry of lavas are quite similar for both volcanoes. We propose a structural similarity — specifically, that periodic displacement of parts of the shields as huge landslide blocks is a common mode of growth. In each instance, the unstable blocks are within a rift-zone-bounded, unbuttressed flank of the shield. At Kilauea, well-documented landslide blocks form relatively surficial parts of a much larger rift-zone-bounded block; scarps of the Hilina fault system mark the headwalls of the active blocks. At Fournaise, Hilina-like slump blocks are also present along the unbuttressed east coast of the volcano. In addition, however, the existence of a set of faults nested around the present caldera and northeast and southeast rift zones suggests that past chapters in the history of Fournaise included the slumping of entire rift-zone-bounded blocks themselves. These nested faults become younger to the east southeast and apparently record one of the effects of a migration of the focus of volcanism in that direction. Repeated dilation along the present set of northeast and southeast rift zones, most recently exemplified by an eruption in 1977, suggests that the past history of rift-zone-bounded slumping will eventually be repeated. The record provided by the succession of slump blocks on Fournaise is apparently at a relatively detailed part of a migration of magmatic focus that has advanced at least 30 km to the east-southeast from neighboring Piton des Neiges, an extinct Pliocene to Pleistocene volcano.?? 1982.

  17. On the interaction of Tropical Cyclone Flossie and emissions from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattantyus, Andre; Businger, Steven

    2014-06-01

    On 29 July 2013, Tropical Storm Flossie passed the Hawaiian Islands. This is the first interaction between an active, vigorously degassing volcano and a tropical cyclone captured by a vog (volcanic smog) dispersion model run over the Hawaiian Islands since operational simulations began in 2010, providing a unique opportunity to analyze the influence of robust volcanic emissions entrained into a tropical cyclone. Results from the vog dispersion model are compared with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations, lightning data from Vaisala's Global Lightning Dataset (GLD360), and the National Weather Service Weather Surveillance Radar, 1988 Dual-Polarmetric Doppler radar to investigate the effect of volcanic emissions on the storm. Observations and model results suggest that aerosol loading resulted in deep convection and glaciation which in turn enhanced charge separation and promoted active lightning.

  18. Very long period conduit oscillations induced by rockfalls at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, Bernard; Dawson, Phillip

    2013-10-01

    Eruptive activity at the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, beginning in 2010 and continuing to the present time is characterized by transient outgassing bursts accompanied by very long period (VLP) seismic signals triggered by rockfalls from the vent walls impacting a lava lake in a pit within the Halemaumau pit crater. We use raw data recorded with an 11-station broadband network to model the source mechanism of signals accompanying two large rockfalls on 29 August 2012 and two smaller average rockfalls obtained by stacking over all events with similar waveforms to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. To determine the source centroid location and source mechanism, we minimize the residual error between data and synthetics calculated by the finite difference method for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium that takes topography into account. We apply a new waveform inversion method that accounts for the contributions from both translation and tilt in horizontal seismograms through the use of Green's functions representing the seismometer response to translation and tilt ground motions. This method enables a robust description of the source mechanism over the period range 1-1000 s. The VLP signals associated with the rockfalls originate in a source region ˜1 km below the eastern perimeter of the Halemaumau pit crater. The observed waveforms are well explained by a simple volumetric source with geometry composed of two intersecting cracks including an east striking crack (dike) dipping 80° to the north, intersecting a north striking crack (another dike) dipping 65° to the east. Each rockfall is marked by a similar step-like inflation trailed by decaying oscillations of the volumetric source, attributed to the efficient coupling at the source centroid location of the pressure and momentum changes induced by the rock mass impacting the top of the lava column. Assuming a simple lumped parameter representation of the shallow magmatic system, the observed

  19. Diabasic intrusion and lavas, segregation veins, and magma differentiation at Kahoolawe volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, R. V.; Bauer, G. R.

    2014-04-01

    A mafic sill-like intrusion, ~5 × 30 m, exposed along the eastern shoreline of Kahoolawe Island, Hawaii, represents tholeiitic magma emplaced as diabase among caldera-filling lavas. It differentiated from ~7.8 wt.% MgO to yield low-MgO (2.9 wt.%) vesicular segregation veins. We examined the intrusion for whole-rock and mineral compositions for comparison to Kahoolawe caldera-fill lavas (some also diabasic), to the Uwekahuna laccolith (Kilauea), and to gabbros, diabases, and segregations and oozes of other tholeiitic shield volcanoes (e.g., Mauna Loa and Kilauea lava lakes). We also evaluate this extreme differentiation in terms of MELTS modeling, using parameters appropriate for Hawaiian crystallization environments. Kahoolawe intrusion diabase samples have major and trace element abundances and plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine compositions in agreement with those in gabbros and diabases of other volcanoes. However, the intrusion samples are at the low-MgO end of the large MgO range formed by the collective comparative samples, as many of those have between 8 and 20 wt.% MgO. The intrusion's segregation vein has SiO2 53.4 wt.%, TiO2 3.2 wt.%, FeO 13.5 wt.%, Zr 350 ppm, and La 16 ppm. It plots in compositional fields formed by other Hawaiian segregations and oozes that have MgO <5 wt.%—fields that show large variances, such as factor of ~2 differences for incompatible element abundances accompanying SiO2 from ~49 to 59 wt.%. Our MELTS modeling assesses the Kahoolawe intrusion as differentiating from ~8 wt.% MgO parent magma beginning along oxygen buffers equivalent to FMQ and FMQ-2, having magmatic H2O of 0.15 and 0.7 wt.% (plus traces of CO2 and S), and under 100 and 500 bars pressure. Within these parameters, MELTS calculates that <3 wt.% MgO occurs at ~1,086 to 1,060 °C after ~48 to 63 % crystallization, whereby the lesser crystallization percentages and lower temperatures equate to higher magmatic H2O, leading to high SiO2, ~56-58 wt.%. To contrast

  20. A Versatile Time-Lapse Camera System Developed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory for Use at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.; Hoblitt, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    Volcanoes can be difficult to study up close. Because it may be days, weeks, or even years between important events, direct observation is often impractical. In addition, volcanoes are often inaccessible due to their remote location and (or) harsh environmental conditions. An eruption adds another level of complexity to what already may be a difficult and dangerous situation. For these reasons, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) have, for years, built camera systems to act as surrogate eyes. With the recent advances in digital-camera technology, these eyes are rapidly improving. One type of photographic monitoring involves the use of near-real-time network-enabled cameras installed at permanent sites (Hoblitt and others, in press). Time-lapse camera-systems, on the other hand, provide an inexpensive, easily transportable monitoring option that offers more versatility in site location. While time-lapse systems lack near-real-time capability, they provide higher image resolution and can be rapidly deployed in areas where the use of sophisticated telemetry required by the networked cameras systems is not practical. This report describes the latest generation (as of 2008) time-lapse camera system used by HVO for photograph acquisition in remote and hazardous sites on Kilauea Volcano.

  1. 36 CFR 7.25 - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... registration. No person shall explore or climb about the lava tubes or pit craters in the park without first... Thruston Lava Tube, nor the maintained trail down and across Kilauea Iki pit crater....

  2. 36 CFR 7.25 - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... registration. No person shall explore or climb about the lava tubes or pit craters in the park without first... Thruston Lava Tube, nor the maintained trail down and across Kilauea Iki pit crater....

  3. 36 CFR 7.25 - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... registration. No person shall explore or climb about the lava tubes or pit craters in the park without first... Thruston Lava Tube, nor the maintained trail down and across Kilauea Iki pit crater....

  4. 36 CFR 7.25 - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... registration. No person shall explore or climb about the lava tubes or pit craters in the park without first... Thruston Lava Tube, nor the maintained trail down and across Kilauea Iki pit crater....

  5. 36 CFR 7.25 - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... registration. No person shall explore or climb about the lava tubes or pit craters in the park without first... Thruston Lava Tube, nor the maintained trail down and across Kilauea Iki pit crater....

  6. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  7. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  8. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  9. MATLAB tools for improved characterization and quantification of volcanic incandescence in Webcam imagery; applications at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Antolik, Loren

    2010-01-01

    Webcams are now standard tools for volcano monitoring and are used at observatories in Alaska, the Cascades, Kamchatka, Hawai'i, Italy, and Japan, among other locations. Webcam images allow invaluable documentation of activity and provide a powerful comparative tool for interpreting other monitoring datastreams, such as seismicity and deformation. Automated image processing can improve the time efficiency and rigor of Webcam image interpretation, and potentially extract more information on eruptive activity. For instance, Lovick and others (2008) provided a suite of processing tools that performed such tasks as noise reduction, eliminating uninteresting images from an image collection, and detecting incandescence, with an application to dome activity at Mount St. Helens during 2007. In this paper, we present two very simple automated approaches for improved characterization and quantification of volcanic incandescence in Webcam images at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i. The techniques are implemented in MATLAB (version 2009b, Copyright: The Mathworks, Inc.) to take advantage of the ease of matrix operations. Incandescence is a useful indictor of the location and extent of active lava flows and also a potentially powerful proxy for activity levels at open vents. We apply our techniques to a period covering both summit and east rift zone activity at Kilauea during 2008?2009 and compare the results to complementary datasets (seismicity, tilt) to demonstrate their integrative potential. A great strength of this study is the demonstrated success of these tools in an operational setting at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) over the course of more than a year. Although applied only to Webcam images here, the techniques could be applied to any type of sequential images, such as time-lapse photography. We expect that these tools are applicable to many other volcano monitoring scenarios, and the two MATLAB scripts, as they are implemented at HVO, are included in the appendixes

  10. Concentric cylinder viscometry at subliquidus conditions on Mauna Ulu lavas, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehlke, A.; Robert, B.; Harris, A. J.; gurioli, L.; Whittington, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    The morphology of lava flows is controlled by the physical properties of the lava and its effusion rates, as well as environmental influences such as surface medium, slope and ambient temperature and pressure conditions. The important physical properties of lavas include viscosity (η), yield strength (σy), thermal diffusivity (κ) and heat capacity (CP), all of which strongly depend on temperature (T), composition (Χ), crystal fraction (φc) and vesicularity (φb). The crystal fraction (φc) typically increase as temperature decreases, and therefore is temperature dependent itself and influences the residual liquid composition (Χ). The rheological behavior of multi-phase lavas in lava flows is expressed as different flow types, forced from a smooth pahoehoe to a blocky ';a'a within a transition zone. Recent field studies of overflow units at the Muliwai a Pele lava flow erupted from Mauna Ulu in 1974 on Kilauea volcano (Hawaii) reveal a transition zone in a distance approximately 4.5 km from the vent as a result of a cooling gradient of 6 °C/km, crystallization rates of 0.05/km and a density increase from 1010 × 150 kg/m3 near to 1410 × 120 kg/m3 6 km distant from the vent due to degassing. Concentric cylinder viscometry under atmospheric conditions has been conducted in order to investigate the rheological response of crystal-liquid lava suspensions at different equilibrium temperatures for Mauna Ulu lavas. We detect first solid phases around 1230 °C being clinopyroxene, olivine and spinel, followed by plagioclase appearing as microlites as observed in natural rock samples. Measured apparent viscosities (ηapp) with applied strain rates between 50 s-1 and 0.3 s-1 at 1201 °C, 1192 °C and 1181 °C show a strong stress-strain rate dependency, classifying our 2-phase suspensions as Herschel-Bulkey fluids with an extrapolated apparent yield strength (τ0) around 200 to 150 Pa in presence of different crystal fractions, resulting in a 2.5 fold increase of

  11. Application of near real-time radial semblance to locate the shallow magmatic conduit at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.; Whilldin, D.; Chouet, B.

    2004-01-01

    Radial Semblance is applied to broadband seismic network data to provide source locations of Very-Long-Period (VLP) seismic energy in near real time. With an efficient algorithm and adequate network coverage, accurate source locations of VLP energy are derived to quickly locate the shallow magmatic conduit system at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. During a restart in magma flow following a brief pause in the current eruption, the shallow magmatic conduit is pressurized, resulting in elastic radiation from various parts of the conduit system. A steeply dipping distribution of VLP hypocenters outlines a region extending from sea level to about 550 m elevation below and just east of the Halemaumau Pit Crater. The distinct hypocenters suggest the shallow plumbing system beneath Halemaumau consists of a complex plexus of sills and dikes. An unconstrained location for a section of the conduit is also observed beneath the region between Kilauea Caldera and Kilauea Iki Crater.

  12. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii from local seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Okubo, Paul G.; Amelung, Falk

    2016-01-01

    We present a new three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crustal and upper mantle structure for Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii. Our model is derived from the first-arrival times of the compressional and shear waves from about 53,000 events on and near the Island of Hawaii between 1992 and 2009 recorded by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory stations. The Vp model generally agrees with previous studies, showing high-velocity anomalies near the calderas and rift zones and low-velocity anomalies in the fault systems. The most significant difference from previous models is in Vp/Vs structure. The high-Vp and high-Vp/Vs anomalies below Mauna Loa caldera are interpreted as mafic magmatic cumulates. The observed low-Vp and high-Vp/Vs bodies in the Kaoiki seismic zone between 5 and 15 km depth are attributed to the underlying volcaniclastic sediments. The high-Vp and moderate- to low-Vp/Vs anomalies beneath Kilauea caldera can be explained by a combination of different mafic compositions, likely to be olivine-rich gabbro and dunite. The systematically low-Vp and low-Vp/Vs bodies in the southeast flank of Kilauea may be caused by the presence of volatiles. Another difference between this study and previous ones is the improved Vp model resolution in deeper layers, owing to the inclusion of events with large epicentral distances. The new velocity model is used to relocate the seismicity of Mauna Loa and Kilauea for improved absolute locations and ultimately to develop a high-precision earthquake catalog using waveform cross-correlation data.

  13. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii from local seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Matoza, Robin S.; Okubo, Paul G.; Amelung, Falk

    2014-05-01

    We present a new three-dimensional seismic velocity model of the crustal and upper mantle structure for Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii. Our model is derived from the first-arrival times of the compressional and shear waves from about 53,000 events on and near the Island of Hawaii between 1992 and 2009 recorded by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory stations. The Vp model generally agrees with previous studies, showing high-velocity anomalies near the calderas and rift zones and low-velocity anomalies in the fault systems. The most significant difference from previous models is in Vp/Vs structure. The high-Vp and high-Vp/Vs anomalies below Mauna Loa caldera are interpreted as mafic magmatic cumulates. The observed low-Vp and high-Vp/Vs bodies in the Kaoiki seismic zone between 5 and 15 km depth are attributed to the underlying volcaniclastic sediments. The high-Vp and moderate- to low-Vp/Vs anomalies beneath Kilauea caldera can be explained by a combination of different mafic compositions, likely to be olivine-rich gabbro and dunite. The systematically low-Vp and low-Vp/Vs bodies in the southeast flank of Kilauea may be caused by the presence of volatiles. Another difference between this study and previous ones is the improved Vp model resolution in deeper layers, owing to the inclusion of events with large epicentral distances. The new velocity model is used to relocate the seismicity of Mauna Loa and Kilauea for improved absolute locations and ultimately to develop a high-precision earthquake catalog using waveform cross-correlation data.

  14. Never Trust Anyone Over 30: Mitigation Strategies for Adapting to Three Decades of Persistent Degassing at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, T.; Sutton, A. J.; Tam, E.; Businger, S.; Horton, K. A.; Ley, D.; Petrie, L.

    2014-12-01

    As Kīlauea Volcano approaches its 33rd year of nearly continuous activity, simultaneous summit and rift eruptions continue to challenge island populations, agriculture, and infrastructure with elevated levels of acidic gases and particles. In 2008, the opening of a new summit vent attended a ten- to one hundred- fold increase in SO2 summit emissions which, combined with the ongoing east rift emissions, resulted in the highest combined annual SO2 release since regular measurements began in 1979. While the overall emissions have decreased in a step-wise manner since 2008, this large local source still contributes 20-60% of the SO2 emitted by all stationary fuel combustion sources in the U.S., and ~ 7-20% of the estimated time-averaged annual global volcanogenic SO2 contribution. Research on the long-term health and environmental effects of chronic exposure to volcanic pollution is ongoing in Hawai'i. Public health statistics suggest that incidences of respiratory emergency increased coincident with the onset of the summit eruption. From 2008-2011, Hawaii County received a Disaster Designation by the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture due to agricultural losses from the effects of volcanic emissions. A multifaceted approach is being used to address the current gas and particle hazards and to mitigate the impacts to affected areas. Multi-agency websites are providing forecast and real-time data regarding acid particle and SO2 gas concentrations to help people minimize their exposures. The short-term concentration data is linked to color-coded health-advisory levels developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Hawaii State Department of Health, with input from the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey. Questions remain, however, on the appropriateness of the designated advisory levels for protecting chronically exposed populations, and if these tools are sufficiently useful to Hawai'i residents and visitors. Other mitigation efforts include

  15. Mapping the sources of the seismic wave field at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, using data recorded on multiple seismic Antennas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almendros, J.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.; Huber, Caleb G.

    2002-01-01

    Seismic antennas constitute a powerful tool for the analysis of complex wave fields. Well-designed antennas can identify and separate components of a complex wave field based on their distinct propagation properties. The combination of several antennas provides the basis for a more complete understanding of volcanic wave fields, including an estimate of the location of each individual wave-field component identified simultaneously by at least two antennas. We used frequency-slowness analyses of data from three antennas to identify and locate the different components contributing to the wave fields recorded at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, in February 1997. The wave-field components identified are (1) a sustained background volcanic tremor in the form of body waves generated in a shallow hydrothermal system located below the northeastern edge of the Halemaumau pit crater; (2) surface waves generated along the path between this hydrothermal source and the antennas; (3) back-scattered surface wave energy from a shallow reflector located near the southeastern rim of Kilauea caldera; (4) evidence for diffracted wave components originating at the southeastern edge of Halemaumau; and (5) body waves reflecting the activation of a deeper tremor source between 02 hr 00 min and 16 hr 00 min Hawaii Standard Time on 11 February.

  16. Reconnaissance gas measurements on the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jefferson; Doukas, Michael P.; Zemek, Peter G.; Gerlach, Terrence M.

    2005-01-01

    We report the results of a set of measurements of volcanic gases on two small ground level plumes in the vicinity of Pu`u `O`o cone on the middle East Rift Zone (ERZ) of Kilauea volcano, Hawai`i on 15 June 2001 using open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The work was carried out as a reconnaissance survey to assess the monitoring and research value of FTIR measurements at this volcano. Despite representing emissions of residual volatiles from lava that has undergone prior degassing, the plumes contained detectable amounts of CO2, CO, SO2, HCl, HF and SiF4. Various processes, including subsurface cooling, condensation of water in the atmospheric plume, oxidation, dissolution in water, and reactions with wall rocks at plume vents affect the abundance of these gases. Low concentrations of volcanic CO2 measured against a high ambient background are not well constrained by FTIR spectroscopy. Although there appear to be some differences between these gases and Pu`u `O`o source gases, ratios of HCl/SO2, HF/SO2 and CO/SO2 determined by FTIR measurements of these two small plumes compare reasonably well with earlier published analyses of ERZ vent samples. The measurements yielded emission rate estimates of 4, 11 and 4 t d-1

  17. Implications of historical eruptive-vent migration on the northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, J.P. )

    1990-07-01

    Five times within the past 138 yr (1852, 1855-1856, 1880-1881, 1942, and 1984), lava flows from vents on the northeast rift zone of Mauna Loa Volcano have reached within a few kilometres of Hilo (the largest city on the Island of Hawaii). Most lavas erupted on this right zone in historical time have traveled northeastward (toward Hilo), because their eruptive vents have been concentrated north of the rift zone's broad topographic axis. However, with few exceptions each successive historical eruption on the northeast rift zone has occurred farther southeast than the preceding one. Had the 1984 eruptive vents (the most southeasterly yet) opened less than 200 m farther southeast, the bulk of the 1984 lavas would have flowed away from Hilo. If this historical vent-migration pattern continues, the next eruption on the northeast rift zone could send lavas to the southeast, toward less populated areas. The historical Mauna Loa vent-migration patterns mimic southeastern younging of the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain and may be cryptically related to northwestward movement of the Pacific plate. Systematic temporal-spatial vent-migration patterns may characterize eruptive activity at other volcanoes with flank activity and should be considered as an aid to long-term prediction of eruption sites.

  18. Remote-controlled pan, tilt, zoom cameras at Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoblitt, Richard P.; Orr, Tim R.; Castella, Frederic; Cervelli, Peter F.

    2008-01-01

    Lists of important volcano-monitoring disciplines usually include seismology, geodesy, and gas geochemistry. Visual monitoring - the essence of volcanology - is usually not mentioned. Yet, observations of the outward appearance of a volcano provide data that is equally as important as that provided by the other disciplines. The eye was almost certainly the first volcano monitoring-tool used by early man. Early volcanology was mostly descriptive and was based on careful visual observations of volcanoes. There is still no substitute for the eye of an experienced volcanologist. Today, scientific instruments replace or augment our senses as monitoring tools because instruments are faster and more sensitive, work tirelessly day and night, keep better records, operate in hazardous environments, do not generate lawsuits when damaged or destroyed, and in most cases are cheaper. Furthermore, instruments are capable of detecting phenomena that are outside the reach of our senses. The human eye is now augmented by the camera. Sequences of timed images provide a record of visual phenomena that occur on and above the surface of volcanoes. Photographic monitoring is a fundamental monitoring tool; image sequences can often provide the basis for interpreting other data streams. Monitoring data are most useful when they are generated and are available for analysis in real-time or near real-time. This report describes the current (as of 2006) system for real-time photograph acquisition and transmission from remote sites on Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes to the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). It also describes how the photographs are archived and analyzed. In addition to providing system documentation for HVO, we hope that the report will prove useful as a practical guide to the construction of a high-bandwidth network for the telemetry of real-time data from remote locations.

  19. Expert elicitation for a national-level volcano hazard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark; Stirling, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Wang, Ting; Jolly, Gill

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of volcanic hazard at national level is a vital pre-requisite to placing volcanic risk on a platform that permits meaningful comparison with other hazards such as earthquakes. New Zealand has up to a dozen dangerous volcanoes, with the usual mixed degrees of knowledge concerning their temporal and spatial eruptive history. Information on the 'size' of the eruptions, be it in terms of VEI, volume or duration, is sketchy at best. These limitations and the need for a uniform approach lend themselves to a subjective hazard analysis via expert elicitation. Approximately 20 New Zealand volcanologists provided estimates for the size of the next eruption from each volcano and, conditional on this, its location, timing and duration. Opinions were likewise elicited from a control group of statisticians, seismologists and (geo)chemists, all of whom had at least heard the term 'volcano'. The opinions were combined via the Cooke classical method. We will report on the preliminary results from the exercise.

  20. Community preparedness for lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualālai volcanoes, Kona, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregg, Chris E.; Houghton, Bruce F; Paton, Douglas; Swanson, Donald A.; Johnston, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Lava flows from Mauna Loa and Huala??lai volcanoes are a major volcanic hazard that could impact the western portion of the island of Hawai'i (e.g., Kona). The most recent eruptions of these two volcanoes to affect Kona occurred in A.D. 1950 and ca. 1800, respectively. In contrast, in eastern Hawai'i, eruptions of neighboring Ki??lauea volcano have occurred frequently since 1955, and therefore have been the focus for hazard mitigation. Official preparedness and response measures are therefore modeled on typical eruptions of Ki??lauea. The combinations of short-lived precursory activity (e.g., volcanic tremor) at Mauna Loa, the potential for fast-moving lava flows, and the proximity of Kona communities to potential vents represent significant emergency management concerns in Kona. Less is known about past eruptions of Huala??lai, but similar concerns exist. Future lava flows present an increased threat to personal safety because of the short times that may be available for responding. Mitigation must address not only the specific characteristics of volcanic hazards in Kona, but also the manner in which the hazards relate to the communities likely to be affected. This paper describes the first steps in developing effective mitigation plans: measuring the current state of people's knowledge of eruption parameters and the implications for their safety. We present results of a questionnaire survey administered to 462 high school students and adults in Kona. The rationale for this study was the long lapsed time since the last Kona eruption, and the high population growth and expansion of infrastructure over this time interval. Anticipated future growth in social and economic infrastructure in this area provides additional justification for this work. The residents of Kona have received little or no specific information about how to react to future volcanic eruptions or warnings, and short-term preparedness levels are low. Respondents appear uncertain about how to respond

  1. Lava Lake Thermal Pattern Classification Using Self-Organizing Maps and Relationships to Eruption Processes at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzynski, A. M.; Anderson, S. W.; Morrison, K.; LeWinter, A. L.; Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Finnegan, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Nested within the Halema'uma'u Crater on the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, the active lava lake of Overlook Crater poses hazards to local residents and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park visitors. Since its formation in March 2008, the lava lake has enlarged to +28,500 m2 and has been closely monitored by researchers at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Time-lapse images, collected via visible and thermal infrared cameras, reveal thin crustal plates, separated by incandescent cracks, moving across the lake surface as lava circulates beneath. We hypothesize that changes in size, shape, velocity, and patterns of these crustal plates are related to other eruption processes at the volcano. Here we present a methodology to identify characteristic lava lake surface patterns from thermal infrared video footage using a self-organizing maps (SOM) algorithm. The SOM is an artificial neural network that performs unsupervised clustering and enables us to visualize the relationships between groups of input patterns on a 2-dimensional grid. In a preliminary trial, we input ~4 hours of thermal infrared time-lapse imagery collected on December 16-17, 2013 during a transient deflation-inflation deformation event at a rate of one frame every 10 seconds. During that same time period, we also acquired a series of one-second terrestrial laser scans (TLS) every 30 seconds to provide detailed topography of the lava lake surface. We identified clusters of characteristic thermal patterns using a self-organizing maps algorithm within the Matlab SOM Toolbox. Initial results from two SOMs, one large map (81 nodes) and one small map (9 nodes), indicate 4-6 distinct groups of thermal patterns. We compare these surface patterns with lava lake surface slope and crustal plate velocities derived from concurrent TLS surveys and with time series of other eruption variables, including outgassing rates and inflation-deflation events. This methodology may be applied to the continuous stream of

  2. Gravity fluctuations induced by magma convection at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in magma chambers is thought to play a key role in the activity of persistently active volcanoes, but has only been inferred indirectly from geochemical observations or simulated numerically. Continuous microgravity measurements, which track changes in subsurface mass distribution over time, provide a potential method for characterizing convection in magma reservoirs. We recorded gravity oscillations with a period of ~150 s at two continuous gravity stations at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i. The oscillations are not related to inertial accelerations caused by seismic activity, but instead indicate variations in subsurface mass. Source modeling suggests that the oscillations are caused by density inversions in a magma reservoir located ~1 km beneath the east margin of Halema‘uma‘u Crater in Kīlauea Caldera—a location of known magma storage.

  3. Natural hazards and risk reduction in Hawai'i: Chapter 10 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, James P.; Tilling, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Although HVO has been an important global player in advancing natural hazards studies during the past 100 years, it faces major challenges in the future, among which the following command special attention: (1) the preparation of an updated volcano hazards assessment and map for the Island of Hawai‘i, taking into account not only high-probability lava flow hazards, but also hazards posed by low-probability, high-risk events (for instance, pyroclastic flows, regional ashfalls, volcano flank collapse and associated megatsunamis), and (2) the continuation of timely and effective communications of hazards information to all stakeholders and the general public, using all available means (conventional print media, enhanced Web presence, public-education/outreach programs, and social-media approaches).

  4. Emplacement of the most recent lava flows on Hualālai Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, James P.; Cashman, K.; Clague, D.; Champion, D.; Hagstrum, J.

    2002-01-01

    A detailed field and petrologic study of the ca. 1800 a.d. flows at Hualālai Volcano documents at least two eruptive episodes, the Hu‘ehu‘e flow field ending in 1801, and the Ka‘ūpūlehu flow several decades earlier. The morphology and stratigraphy of the Ka‘ūpūlehu flow require an emplacement duration of several days to weeks. Based on a comparison with recent eruptive activity at Mauna Loa volcano, the eruption cannot have occurred at the anomalously high rate (104–105 m3/s) proposed by previous workers. The hummocky flow surface of the later phase of the Hu‘ehu‘e eruption suggests a duration of months, based on a comparison with recent eruptive activity at Kīlauea Volcano. Although none of the ca. 1800 flows show evidence for extraordinarily fast emplacement or unusual fluid rheologies, both flows show unusual features. The abundant xenoliths for which the Ka‘ūpūlehu flow is famous were transported in numerous episodes of deposition and remobilization, during which they eroded the channel systems through which they traveled. Lava transport in proximal and medial regions of both flow fields was probably through lava tubes, as evidenced by preserved tubes and by the prevalence of pāhoehoe-lined channels that require thermally efficient transport of lava over great distances. Both flows also show abundant evidence for re-occupation of older cones and lava tubes, a characteristic that may typify infrequent eruptions of older volcanic systems. Although lava flows from Hualālai Volcano do not show anomalous eruptive behavior, they pose a substantial hazard for coastal communities of Kona.

  5. Tholeiitic basalt magmatism of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.

    1970-01-01

    The primitive magmas of Kilauca and Mauna Loa are generated by partial melting of mantle peridotite at depths of -60 km or more. Results of high-pressure melting experiments indicate that the primitive melt must contain at least 20% MgO in order to have olivine as a liquidus mineral. The least fractionated lavas of both volcanoes have olivine (Fa13) on the liquidus at 1 atmosphere, suggesting that the only substance lost from the primitive melt, during a rather rapid ascent to the surface, is olivine. This relation allows the primitive composition to be computed by adding olivine to the composition of an erupted lava until total MgO is at least 20 percent. Although roughly similar, historic lavas of the two volcanoes show a consistent difference in composition. The primitive melt of Mauna Loa contains 20% more dissolved orthopyroxene, a high-temperature melting phase in the mantle, and is deficient in elements such as potassium, uranium, and niobium, which presumably occur in minor low-melting phases. Mauna Loa appears to be the older volcano, deriving its magma at higher temperature and greater depth from a more depleted source rock. ?? 1970 Springer-Verlag.

  6. A large submarine sand-rubble flow on kilauea volcano, hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fornari, D.J.; Moore, J.G.; Calk, L.

    1979-01-01

    Papa'u seamount on the south submarine slope of Kilauea volcano is a large landslide about 19 km long, 6 km wide, and up to 1 km thick with a volume of about 39 km3. Dredge hauls, remote camera photographs, and submersible observations indicate that it is composed primarily of unconsolidated angular glassy basalt sand with scattered basalt blocks up to 1 m in size; no lava flows were seen. Sulfur contents of basalt glass from several places on the sand-rubble flow and nearby areas are low (< 240 ppm), indicating that the clastic basaltic material was all erupted on land. The Papa'u sandrubble flow was emplaced during a single flow event fed from a large near-shore bank of clastic basaltic material which in turn was formed as lava flows from the summit area of Kilauea volcano disintegrated when they entered the sea. The current eruptive output of the volcano suggests that the material in the submarine sand-rubble flow represents about 6000 years of accumulation, and that the flow event occurred several thousand years ago. ?? 1979.

  7. Implications for eruptive processes as indicated by sulfur dioxide emissions from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, 1979-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Gerlach, T.M.; Stokes, J.B.

    2001-01-01

    Ki??lauea Volcano, Hawai'i, currently hosts the longest running SO2 emission-rate data set on the planet, starting with initial surveys done in 1975 by Stoiber and his colleagues. The 17.5-year record of summit emissions, starting in 1979, shows the effects of summit and east rift eruptive processes, which define seven distinctly different periods of SO2 release. Summit emissions jumped nearly 40% with the onset (3 January 1983) of the Pu'u 'O??'o??-Ku??paianaha eruption on the east rift zone (ERZ). Summit SO2 emissions from Ki??lauea showed a strong positive correlation with short-period, shallow, caldera events, rather than with long-period seismicity as in more silicious systems. This correlation suggests a maturation process in the summit magma-transport system from 1986 through 1993. During a steady-state throughput-equilibrium interval of the summit magma reservoir, integration of summit-caldera and ERZ SO2 emissions reveals an undegassed volume rate of effusion of 2.1 ?? 105 m3/d. This value corroborates the volume-rate determined by geophysical methods, demonstrating that, for Ki??lauea, SO2 emission rates can be used to monitor effusion rate, supporting and supplementing other, more established geophysical methods. For the 17.5 years of continuous emission rate records at Ki??lauea, the volcano has released 9.7 ?? 106 t (metric tonnes) of SO2, 1.7 ?? 106 t from the summit and 8.0 ?? 106 t from the east rift zone. On an annual basis, the average SO2 release from Ki??lauea is 4.6 ?? 105 t/y, compared to the global annual volcanic emission rate of 1.2 ?? 107 t/y. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Shallow degassing events as a trigger for very-long-period seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Wilson, D.; Fee, D.; Orr, T. R.; Swanson, D.

    2009-12-01

    The ongoing eruptive activity at the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, provides numerous opportunities for integrated data analysis due to dense geophysical monitoring combined with ease of viewing vent behavior. We focus on two behaviors not present during the preceding non-eruptive period. First, episodic seismic tremor, consisting of high-amplitude bursts lasting a few minutes and separated by seismically quiet intervals of similar duration, has appeared sporadically. Second, the eruptive activity has included seven small explosive eruptions in addition to the initial March 19, 2008, vent-opening explosion. Associated with many of the episodic tremor bursts and all of the explosive eruptions are very-long-period (VLP) seismic signals, and previous studies have shown the VLP source location to be at a depth of about 1 km beneath the central part of Kilauea caldera. By comparing precisely-timed video data with broadband seismicity and infrasound, we show that the largest amplitude portions of the VLP events coincide in time with apparent peak degassing from the top of the lava column during both the episodic tremor bursts and explosive eruptions. Because the top of the lava column is only a few hundred meters below local ground level, this timing suggests that the VLP events are caused by degassing-related energy transmitted down the magma column, which then couples with the surrounding rock at a depth of 1 km. This “top-down” model for the VLPs runs counter to previous analogue models which support a “bottom-up” process for VLPs at basaltic volcanoes, whereby gas slugs rise through a deep flare in the conduit, triggering VLPs at that location. Our work, which focuses on the geologic observations and their integration with geophysical data, is consistent with - and complements - recent seismic modeling of Kilauea’s VLPs by other researchers.

  9. Joint analysis of deformation, gravity, and lava lake elevation reveals temporal variations in lava lake density at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael; Patrick, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    We find a tight correlation between (i) changes in lava level within the summit eruptive vent at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, observed for at least 2 years since early 2011, and (ii) ground deformation in the vicinity of the vent. The observed correlation indicates that changing pressure within the shallow magma reservoir feeding the lava lake influences both deformation and lava level. However, those two parameters are related to chamber pressure through different properties, namely, the density of the lava filling the vent (for the lava level) and the size/position of the reservoir plus the elastic parameters of the host rock (for the deformation). Joint analyses in the time and frequency domains of lava level (determined from thermal camera imagery of the lava lake) and tilt measured on a borehole instrument (~2 km from the summit vent) reveal a good correlation throughout the studied period. The highest correlation occurs over periods ranging between 1 and 20 days. The ratio between lava level and tilt is not constant over time, however. Using data from a continuously recording gravimeter located near the rim of the summit eruptive vent, we demonstrate that the tilt-lava level ratio is controlled by the fluctuations in the density of the lava inside the vent (i.e., its degree of vesicularity). A second continuous gravimeter was installed near the summit eruptive vent in 2014, providing a new observation point for gravity change associated with summit lava lave activity to test models developed from the previously existing instrument. In addition, a continuous gravimeter was installed on the rim of the Puu Oo eruptive vent on Kilauea's East Rift Zone in 2013. Puu Oo is connected via the subvolcanic magma plumbing system to the summit eruptive vent and often deforms in concert with the summit. This growing network of continuously recording gravimeters at Kilauea can be used to examine correlations in gravity change associated with variations in eruptive activity

  10. Gravity changes and deformation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, associated with summit eruptive activity, 2009-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagnardi, Marco; Poland, Michael P.; Carbone, Daniele; Baker, Scott; Battaglia, Maurizio; Amelung, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of microgravity and surface displacement data collected at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii (USA), between December 2009 and November 2012 suggests a net mass accumulation at ~1.5 km depth beneath the northeast margin of Halema‘uma‘u Crater, within Kīlauea Caldera. Although residual gravity increases and decreases are accompanied by periods of uplift and subsidence of the surface, respectively, the volume change inferred from the modeling of interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data can account for only a small portion (as low as 8%) of the mass addition responsible for the gravity increase. We propose that since the opening of a new eruptive vent at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008, magma rising to the surface of the lava lake outgasses, becomes denser, and sinks to deeper levels, replacing less dense gas-rich magma stored in the Halema‘uma‘u magma reservoir. In fact, a relatively small density increase (<200 kg m−3) of a portion of the reservoir can produce the positive residual gravity change measured during the period with the largest mass increase, between March 2011 and November 2012. Other mechanisms may also play a role in the gravity increase without producing significant uplift of the surface, including compressibility of magma, formation of olivine cumulates, and filling of void space by magma. The rate of gravity increase, higher than during previous decades, varies through time and seems to be directly correlated with the volcanic activity occurring at both the summit and the east rift zone of the volcano.

  11. Evolution of dike opening during the March 2011 Kamoamoa fissure eruption, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lundgren, Paul; Poland, Michael; Miklius, Asta; Orr, Tim R.; Yun, Sang-Ho; Fielding, Eric; Liu, Zhen; Tanaka, Akiko; Szeliga, Walter; Hensley, Scott; Owen, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The 5–9 March 2011 Kamoamoa fissure eruption along the east rift zone of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i, followed months of pronounced inflation at Kīlauea summit. We examine dike opening during and after the eruption using a comprehensive interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data set in combination with continuous GPS data. We solve for distributed dike displacements using a whole Kīlauea model with dilating rift zones and possibly a deep décollement. Modeled surface dike opening increased from nearly 1.5 m to over 2.8 m from the first day to the end of the eruption, in agreement with field observations of surface fracturing. Surface dike opening ceased following the eruption, but subsurface opening in the dike continued into May 2011. Dike volumes increased from 15, to 16, to 21 million cubic meters (MCM) after the first day, eruption end, and 2 months following, respectively. Dike shape is distinctive, with a main limb plunging from the surface to 2–3 km depth in the up-rift direction toward Kīlauea's summit, and a lesser projection extending in the down-rift direction toward Pu`u `Ō`ō at 2 km depth. Volume losses beneath Kīlauea summit (1.7 MCM) and Pu`u `Ō`ō (5.6 MCM) crater, relative to dike plus erupted volume (18.3 MCM), yield a dike to source volume ratio of 2.5 that is in the range expected for compressible magma without requiring additional sources. Inflation of Kīlauea's summit in the months before the March 2011 eruption suggests that the Kamoamoa eruption resulted from overpressure of the volcano's magmatic system.

  12. Gravity changes and deformation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, associated with summit eruptive activity, 2009-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco; Poland, Michael P.; Carbone, Daniele; Baker, Scott; Battaglia, Maurizio; Amelung, Falk

    2014-09-01

    Analysis of microgravity and surface displacement data collected at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii (USA), between December 2009 and November 2012 suggests a net mass accumulation at ~1.5 km depth beneath the northeast margin of Halema`uma`u Crater, within Kīlauea Caldera. Although residual gravity increases and decreases are accompanied by periods of uplift and subsidence of the surface, respectively, the volume change inferred from the modeling of interferometric synthetic aperture radar deformation data can account for only a small portion (as low as 8%) of the mass addition responsible for the gravity increase. We propose that since the opening of a new eruptive vent at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008, magma rising to the surface of the lava lake outgasses, becomes denser, and sinks to deeper levels, replacing less dense gas-rich magma stored in the Halema`uma`u magma reservoir. In fact, a relatively small density increase (<200 kg m-3) of a portion of the reservoir can produce the positive residual gravity change measured during the period with the largest mass increase, between March 2011 and November 2012. Other mechanisms may also play a role in the gravity increase without producing significant uplift of the surface, including compressibility of magma, formation of olivine cumulates, and filling of void space by magma. The rate of gravity increase, higher than during previous decades, varies through time and seems to be directly correlated with the volcanic activity occurring at both the summit and the east rift zone of the volcano.

  13. A dynamic balance between magma supply and eruption rate at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denlinger, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamic balance between magma supply and vent output at Kilauea volcano is used to estimate both the volume of magma stored within Kilauea volcano and its magma supply rate. Throughout most of 1991 a linear decline in volume flux from the Kupaianaha vent on Kilauea's east rift zone was associated with a parabolic variation in the elevation of Kilauea's summit as vent output initially exceeded then lagged behind the magma supply to the volcano. The correspondence between summit elevation and tilt established with over 30 years of data provided daily estimates of summit elevation in terms of summit tilt. The minimum in the parabolic variation in summit tilt and elevation (or zero elevation change) occurs when the magma supply to the reservoir from below the volcano equals the magma output from the reservoir to the surface, so that the magma supply rate is given by vent flux on that day. The measurements of vent flux and tilt establish that the magma supply rate to Kilauea volcano on June 19, 1991, was 217,000 ?? 10,000 m3/d (or 0.079 ?? 0.004 km3/yr). This is close to the average eruptive rate of 0.08 km3/yr between 1958 and 1984. In addition, the predictable response of summit elevation and tilt to each east rift zone eruption near Puu Oo since 1983 shows that summit deformation is also a measure of magma reservoir pressure. Given this, the correlation between the elevation of the Puu Oo lava lake (4 km uprift of Kupaianaha and 18 km from the summit) and summit tilt provides an estimate for magma pressure changes corresponding to summit tilt changes. The ratio of the change in volume to the change in reservoir pressure (dV/dP) during vent activity may be determined by dividing the ratio of volume erupted to change in summit tilt (dV/dtilt) by the ratio of pressure change to change in summit tilt (dP/dtilt). This measure of dV/dP, when combined with laboratory measurements of the bulk modulus of tholeitic melt, provides an estimate of 240 ?? 50 km3 for the volume

  14. Land and Water Conservation; Hawaii Volcanoes National Park; Little Rock Central High School; and Arches National Park. Hearing on S. 1333, S. 2106, S. 2129, S. 2232, H.R. 2283 before the Subcommittee on National Parks, Historic Preservation, and Recreation of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. United States Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

    A Senate hearing considered five bills related to the national parks. Of interest to the education community is S. 2232, which would establish Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site in Arkansas as a unit of the National Park Service. In 1957 the school became a center of controversy over school desegregation when nine African…

  15. Evidence for water influx from a caldera lake during the explosive hydromagmatic eruption of 1790, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.G.

    1997-01-01

    In 1790 a major hydromagmatic eruption at the summit of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, deposited up to 10 m of pyroclastic fall and surge deposits and killed several dozen Hawaiian natives who were crossing the island. Previous studies have hypothesized that the explosivity of this eruption was due to the influx of groundwater into the conduit and mixing of the groundwater with ascending magma. This study proposes that surface water, not groundwater, was the agent responsible for the explosiveness of the eruption. That is, a lake or pond may have existed in the caldera in 1790 and explosions may have taken place when magma ascended into the lake from below. That assertion is based on two lines of evidence: (1) high vesicularity (averaging 73% of more than 3000 lapilli) and high vesicle number density (105-107 cm-3 melt) of pumice clasts suggest that some phases of the eruption involved vigorous, sustained magma ascent; and (2) numerical calculations suggest that under most circumstances, hydrostatic pressure would not be sufficient to drive water into the eruptive conduit during vigorous magma ascent unless the water table were above the ground surface. These results are supported by historical data on the rate of infilling of the caldera floor during the early 1800s. When extrapolated back to 1790, they suggest that the caldera floor was below the water table.

  16. Multispectral thermal infrared mapping of sulfur dioxide plumes: A case study from the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Realmuto, V.J.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.

    1997-01-01

    The synoptic perspective and rapid mode of data acquisition provided by remote sensing are well suited for the study of volcanic SO2 plumes. In this paper we describe a plume-mapping procedure that is based on image data acquired with NASA's airborne thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) and apply the procedure to TIMS data collected over the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, on September 30, 1988. These image data covered the Pu'u 'O'o and Kupaianaha vents and a skylight in the lava tube that was draining the Kupaianaha lava pond. Our estimate of the SO2 emission rate from Pu'u 'O'o (17 - 20 kg s-1) is roughly twice the average of estimates derived from correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) measurements collected 10 days prior to the TIMS overflight (10 kg s-1). The agreement between the TIMS and COSPEC results improves when we compare SO2 burden estimates, which are relatively independent of wind speed. We demonstrate the feasibility of mapping Pu'u 'O'o - scale SO2 plumes from space in anticipation of the 1998 launch of the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflectance radiometer (ASTER). Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Mechanical response of the south flank of kilauea volcano, hawaii, to intrusive events along the rift systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dvorak, J.J.; Okamura, A.T.; English, T.T.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Nakata, J.S.; Sako, M.K.; Tanigawa, W.T.; Yamashita, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Increased earthquake activity and compression of the south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, have been recognized by previous investigators to accompany rift intrusions. We further detail the temporal and spatial changes in earthquake rates and ground strain along the south flank induced by six major rift intrusions which occurred between December 1971 and January 1981. The seismic response of the south flank to individual rift intrusions is immediate; the increased rate of earthquake activity lasts from 1 to 4 weeks. Horizontal strain measurements indicate that compression of the south flank usually accompanies rift intrusions and eruptions. Emplacement of an intrusion at a depth greater than about 4 km, such as the June 1982 southwest rift intrusion, however, results in a slight extension of the subaerial portion of the south flank. Horizontal strain measurements along the south flank are used to locate the January 1983 east-rift intrusion, which resulted in eruptive activity. The intrusion is modeled as a vertical rectangular sheet with constant displacement perpendicular to the plane of the sheet. This model suggests that the intrusive body that compressed the south flank in January 1983 extended from the surface to about 2.4 km depth, and was aligned along a strike of N66??E. The intrusion is approximately 11 km in length, extended beyond the January 1983 eruptive fissures, which are 8 km in length and is contained within the 14-km-long region of shallow rift earthquakes. ?? 1986.

  18. Acute bronchitis and volcanic air pollution: a community-based cohort study at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, USA.

    PubMed

    Longo, Bernadette M; Yang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    Eruption at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, has continued since 1983, emitting sulfurous air pollution into nearby communities. The purpose of this cohort study was to estimate the relative risk (RR) of acute bronchitis over a period from January 2004 to December 2006 in communities exposed to the volcanic air pollution. A community-based case review was conducted using medical records from clinics and emergency rooms in exposed and unexposed study areas. Initial visits by local residents for diagnosed acute bronchitis were clinically reviewed. The cumulative incidence rate for the 3-yr period was 117.74 per 1000 in unexposed communities and 184.63 per 1000 in exposed communities. RR estimates were standardized for age and gender, revealing an elevated cumulative incidence ratio (CIR) of 1.57 (95% CI = 1.36-1.81) for acute bronchitis in the exposed communities. Highest risk [CIR: 6.56 (95% CI = 3.16-13.6)] was observed in children aged 0-14 yr who resided in the exposed communities. Exposed middle-aged females aged 45-64 yr had double the risk for acute bronchitis than their unexposed counterparts. These findings suggest that communities continuously exposed to sulfurous volcanic air pollution may have a higher risk of acute bronchitis across the life span. PMID:18850456

  19. Evolution of Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii: Petrologic and geochemical constraints on postshield volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, F.A.; Kennedy, A. ); Wise, W.S.; Kwon, S.T. ); Garcia, M.O.; West, H. )

    1990-02-10

    The postshield stage of volcano construction formed as the magma supply rate from the mantle decreased. The basaltic substage (Hamakua Volcanics) contains a diverse array of lava types including picrites, ankaramites, alkalic and tholeiitic basalt, and high Fe-Ti basalt. In contrast, the hawaiite substage (Laupahoehoe Volcanics) contains only evolved alkalic lavas, hawaiite, and mugearite; basalts are absent. Sr and Nd isotopic ratios for lavas from the two substages are similar, but there is a distinct compositional gap between the substages. The authors conclude that the petrogenetic processes forming the postshield lavas at Maina Kea and other Hawaiian volcanoes reflect movement of the volcano away from the hotspot. Specifically, they postulate the following sequence of events for postshield volcanism at Mauna Kea: (1) As the magma supply rate from the mantle decreased, major changes in volcanic plumbing occurred. The shallow magma chamber present during shield construction cooled and crystallized, and the fractures enabling magma ascent to the magma chamber closed. (2) Therefore subsequent basaltic magma ascending from the mantle stagnated within the lower crust, or perhaps at the crust-mantle boundary. Eruptions of basaltic magma ceased. (3) Continued volcanism was inhibited until basaltic magma in the lower crust cooled sufficiently to create relatively low-density, residual hawaiitic melts. Minor assimilation of MORB-related wall rocks, reflected by a trend toward lower {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}/Pb in evolved postshield lavas, may have occurred at this time. A compositional gap developed because magma ascent was not possible until a low-density hawaiitic melt could escape from a largely crystalline mush.

  20. Evidence for two shield volcanoes exposed on the island of Kauai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, R.T.; Reiners, P.W.; Nelson, B.K.; Sawyer, N.-L.E.

    1997-01-01

    The island of Kauai has always been interpreted as a single shield volcano, but lavas of previously correlated reversed-to-normal magnetic-polarity transitions on opposite sides of the island differ significantly in isotopic composition. Samples from west Kauai have 87Sr/86Sr 18.25; samples from east Kauai have 87Sr/86Sr > 0.7037, ??Nd ??? 6.14, and 206Pb/204Pb < 18.25. Available data suggest that a younger eastern shield grew on the collapsed flank of an older western one.

  1. Argon-40: Excess in submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Moore, J.G.

    1968-01-01

    Submarine pillow basalts from Kilauea Volcano contain excess radiogenic argon-40 and give anomalously high potassium-argon ages. Glassy rims of pillows show a systematic increase in radiogenic argon-40 with depth, and a pillow from a depth of 2590 meters shows a decrease in radiogenic argon-40 inward from the pillow rim. The data indicate that the amount of excess radiogenic argon-40 is a direct function of both hydrostatic pressure and rate of cooling, and that many submarine basalts are not suitable for potassium-argon dating.

  2. Compositional variation within thick (>10 m) flow units of Mauna Kea Volcano cored by the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shichun; Vollinger, Michael J.; Frey, Frederick A.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Zhang, Qun

    2016-07-01

    Geochemical analyses of stratigraphic sequences of lava flows are necessary to understand how a volcano works. Typically one sample from each lava flow is collected and studied with the assumption that this sample is representative of the flow composition. This assumption may not be valid. The thickness of flows ranges from <1 to >100 m. Geochemical heterogeneity in thin flows may be created by interaction with the surficial environment whereas magmatic processes occurring during emplacement may create geochemical heterogeneities in thick flows. The Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP) cored ∼3.3 km of basalt erupted at Mauna Kea Volcano. In order to determine geochemical heterogeneities in a flow, multiple samples from four thick (9.3-98.4 m) HSDP flow units were analyzed for major and trace elements. We found that major element abundances in three submarine flow units are controlled by the varying proportion of olivine, the primary phenocryst phase in these samples. Post-magmatic alteration of a subaerial flow led to loss of SiO2, CaO, Na2O, K2O and P2O5, and as a consequence, contents of immobile elements, such as Fe2O3 and Al2O3, increase. The mobility of SiO2 is important because Mauma Kea shield lavas divide into two groups that differ in SiO2 content. Post-magmatic mobility of SiO2 adds complexity to determining if these groups reflect differences in source or process. The most mobile elements during post-magmatic subaerial and submarine alteration are K and Rb, and Ba, Sr and U were also mobile, but their abundances are not highly correlated with K and Rb. The Ba/Th ratio has been used to document an important role for a plagioclase-rich source component for basalt from the Galapagos, Iceland and Hawaii. Although Ba/Th is anomalously high in Hawaiian basalt, variation in Ba abundance within a single flow shows that it is not a reliable indicator of a deep source component. In contrast, ratios involving elements that are typically immobile, such as La

  3. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, 1979-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A.J.; Stokes, J.B.; Casadevall, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Casadevall and others, 1987; Greenland and others, 1985; Elias and others, 1993; Elias and Sutton, 1996). The purpose of this report is to present a compilation of Kilauea SO2 emission rate data from 1979 through 1997 with ancillary meteorological data (wind speed and wind direction). We have included measurements previously reported by Casadevall and others (1987) for completeness and to improve the usefulness of this current database compilation. Kilauea releases SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and rift zones (fig. 1). From 1979 through 1982, vehicle-based COSPEC measurements made within the summit caldera were adequate to quantify most of the SO2 emitted from the volcano. Beginning in 1983, the focus of SO2 release shifted from the summit to the east rift zone (ERZ) eruption site at Pu`u `O`o and, later, Kupaianaha. Since 1984, the Kilauea gas measurement effort has been augmented with intermittent airborne and tripod-based surveys made near the ERZ eruption site. In addition, beginning in 1992 vehicle-based measurements have been made along a section of Chain of Craters Road approximately 9 km downwind of the eruption site. These several types of COSPEC measurements continue to the present.

  4. Infrasound from the 2007 fissure eruptions of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fee, D.; Garces, M.; Orr, T.; Poland, M.

    2011-01-01

    Varied acoustic signals were recorded at Kīlauea Volcano in mid-2007, coincident with dramatic changes in the volcano's activity. Prior to this time period, Pu'u 'Ō'ō crater produced near-continuous infrasonic tremor and was the primary source of degassing and lava effusion at Kīlauea. Collapse and draining of Pu'u 'Ō'ō crater in mid-June produced impulsive infrasonic signals and fluctuations in infrasonic tremor. Fissure eruptions on 19 June and 21 July were clearly located spatially and temporally using infrasound arrays. The 19 June eruption from a fissure approximately mid-way between Kīlauea's summit and Pu'u 'O'o produced infrasound for ~30 minutes-the only observed geophysical signal associated with the fissure opening. The infrasound signal from the 21 July eruption just east of Pu'u 'Ō'ō shows a clear azimuthal progression over time, indicative of fissure propagation over 12.9 hours. The total fissure propagation rate is relatively slow at 164 m/hr, although the fissure system ruptured discontinuously. Individual fissure rupture times are estimated using the acoustic data combined with visual observations.

  5. A multipurpose camera system for monitoring Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.; Lee, Lopaka; Moniz, Cyril J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a low-cost, compact multipurpose camera system designed for field deployment at active volcanoes that can be used either as a webcam (transmitting images back to an observatory in real-time) or as a time-lapse camera system (storing images onto the camera system for periodic retrieval during field visits). The system also has the capability to acquire high-definition video. The camera system uses a Raspberry Pi single-board computer and a 5-megapixel low-light (near-infrared sensitive) camera, as well as a small Global Positioning System (GPS) module to ensure accurate time-stamping of images. Custom Python scripts control the webcam and GPS unit and handle data management. The inexpensive nature of the system allows it to be installed at hazardous sites where it might be lost. Another major advantage of this camera system is that it provides accurate internal timing (independent of network connection) and, because a full Linux operating system and the Python programming language are available on the camera system itself, it has the versatility to be configured for the specific needs of the user. We describe example deployments of the camera at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, to monitor ongoing summit lava lake activity. 

  6. Orographic cloud over the eastern slopes of Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii, related to insolation and wind

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.J.

    1980-07-01

    During the period 1 to 11 June 1978, solar radiation and other meteorological data were gathered at eight stations arranged in a nearly linear transection extending from the coast at Hilo, Hawaii to Mauna Loa Observatory, 60 km inland and 3400 m higher. Solar radiation distributions followed climatological rainfall patterns; the driest areas were sunniest. At the wettest sites, underneath the orographic cloud, measured global solar radiation was only 50% of clear-sky potential, and the diffuse component probably accounted for more than 50% of the global radiation. The orographic cloud developed during the day in upslope winds, and sharply reduced afternoon solar radiation at all sites. Total cloudiness, and hence insolation, varied greatly from day to day due to the passage of trade wind cloud masses and jet stream cirrus.

  7. Integration of Petrologic, Geophysical, and Gas Monitoring Data at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornber, C. R.; Lee, R. L.; Gansecki, C. A.; Orr, T. R.; Miklius, A.; Sutton, A. J.; Thelen, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Well-quenched, near-vent lava samples taken at weekly to monthly intervals during the past 31 years of near-continuous Kilauea East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption have yielded an unprecedented temporal record of petrology and geochemistry. Salient petrologic parameters derived from bulk lava major- and trace-element geochemistry, and from microprobe analyses of matrix glasses, phenocrysts, and melt-inclusions, are now incorporated into the USGS Volcano Science Center's near real-time volcano-monitoring software platform, called the Volcano Analysis and Visualization Environment (VALVE). The petrologic parameters now imported into VALVE for correlation with geophysical and gas data streams are: 1) MgO systematics of bulk lava, glass, and olivine, used to portray pre-eruptive magma temperature and temperature of lava erupted at the vent, 2) incompatible element ratios of bulk lava and glass, used to track either sudden or long-term magma-mixing or magma-source changes , and 3) magmatic sulfur, measured within glass inclusions of olivine, used to infer pre-eruptive volatile content of magma. Petrologic data in VALVE provides added insight into magmatic processes. For example, since the onset of Kilauea's summit eruption in 2008, correlations of summit deformation with MgO systematics and magmatic sulfur in coeval summit tephra and ERZ lava, along with their identical incompatible-element signatures, demonstrate summit-to-ERZ magmatic continuity. As constrained by geophysical and geologic observations at both ends of the eruptive plumbing system, changes in petrology of lava erupted at Puu Oo are likely associated with physical maturation of magma pathways along the shallow ERZ conduit, repeated intrusions and systematic over-pressurization during the 2003-2007 surge in magma supply. Two fissure eruptions uprift of Puu Oo in January 1997 and March 2011 also show a strong correlation of geophysical and gas signatures with a petrologic shift to cooler, incompatible

  8. Enriched components in the Hawaiian plume: Evidence from Kahoolawe Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shichun; Frey, Frederick A.; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Fodor, R. V.; Bauer, Glenn R.; Xu, Guangping

    2005-11-01

    The geochemical differences between individual Hawaiian shields provide clues to the magma source components in the Hawaiian plume. Lavas from Koolau (Makapuu-stage) and Kahoolawe volcanoes define the enriched, i.e., relatively high 87Sr/86Sr and low 143Nd/144Nd, extreme for Hawaiian shield lavas. There are, however, important geochemical differences between these shields; Kahoolawe lavas lack the relatively high SiO2, low CaO, and high Sr/Nb and La/Nb that are characteristic of Makapuu-stage Koolau lavas, and they are offset from other Hawaiian shield lavas to high 87Sr/86Sr at a given 143Nd/144Nd. Consequently, a varying role for recycled plagioclase-rich gabbro is inferred, in particular, lower amounts of the low 87Sr/86Sr component in Kahoolawe lavas. Also, lavas from Loa-trend volcanoes, such as Kahoolawe, define trends ranging toward high 208Pb*/206Pb* and 87Sr/86Sr and low 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf. Such trends are consistent with variable amounts of recycled sediment sampled by Loa-trend volcanoes, with the largest proportion in Makapuu-stage Koolau lavas. Therefore the enriched component in the Hawaiian plume, the Koolau component, is recycled oceanic crust, which is heterogeneous because of varying proportions of sediment, basalt, and gabbro. Hawaiian shield-stage lavas range widely in 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, 176Hf/177Hf, and 206Pb/204Pb, but they have similar ratios of Sr/Nd, Nd/Hf, and Hf/Pb, each varying by a factor of <3 among the Hawaiian shields. This observation has important consequences. Namely, the similar Hf/Pb ratios are inconsistent with a two-component (i.e., Kea and Koolau) mixing model for explaining the hyperbolic trend of 176Hf/177Hf versus 206Pb/204Pb defined by shield lavas. Such a model requires end-members with very different Hf/Pb (a factor of 15 to 40), but this is not observed; therefore a third component must be involved. On the basis of trends of 208Pb*/206Pb* versus 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, and 176Hf/177Hf, we infer that Loa

  9. Electron microprobe analyses of glasses from Kīlauea tephra units, Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helz, Rosalind L.; Clague, David A.; Mastin, Larry G.; Rose, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents approximately 2,100 glass analyses from three tephra units of Kīlauea Volcano: the Keanakākoʻi Tephra, the Kulanaokuaiki Tephra, and the Pāhala Ash. It also includes some new analyses obtained as part of a re-evaluation of the MgO contents of glasses in two of the three original datasets; this re-evaluation was conducted to improve the consistency of glass MgO contents among the three datasets. The glass data are a principal focus of Helz and others (in press), which will appear in the AGU Monograph Hawaiian Volcanoes—From Source to Surface. The report is intended to support this publication, in addition to making the data available to the scientific community.

  10. Preliminary results from an isotope hydrology study of the Kilauea Volcano area, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Janik, C.J.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Kauathikaua, J.P.; Trusdell, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Deuterium (D) content of groundwater and precipitation, and tritium content of selected groundwater samples are used to infer flowpaths for groundwater in the Kilauea Volcano area. The spatial distribution of calculated recharge elevations and residence times for groundwater samples tends to support the idea that Kilauea's rift zones comprise leaky boundaries within the regional groundwater flow system, partly isolating the groundwater in the area bounded by the rift zones and the Pacific Ocean. The southwest rift zone also appears to act as a conduit for groundwater recharged at relatively high elevation. The relation between precipitation ??D values and elevation differs between areas receiving frequent rainfall and areas where most rainfall occurs during storm events.

  11. Gas analyses from the Pu'u O'o eruption in 1985, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic gas samples were collected from July to November 1985 from a lava pond in the main eruptive conduit of Pu'u O'o from a 2-week-long fissure eruption and from a minor flank eruption of Pu'u O'o. The molecular composition of these gases is consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium at a temperature slightly less than measured lava temperatures. Comparison of these samples with previous gas samples shows that the composition of volatiles in the magma has remained constant over the 3-year course of this episodic east rift eruption of Kilauea volcano. The uniformly carbon depleted nature of these gases is consistent with previous suggestions that all east rift eruptive magmas degas during prior storage in the shallow summit reservoir of Kilauea. Minor compositional variations within these gas collections are attributed to the kinetics of the magma degassing process. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Storage, migration, and eruption of magma at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, 1971-1972

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Christiansen, R.L.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Peterson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    The magmatic plumbing system of Kilauea Volcano consists of a broad region of magma generation in the upper mantle, a steeply inclined zone through which magma rises to an intravolcano reservoir located about 2 to 6 km beneath the summit of the volcano, and a network of conduits that carry magma from this reservoir to sites of eruption within the caldera and along east and southwest rift zones. The functioning of most parts of this system was illustrated by activity during 1971 and 1972. When a 29-month-long eruption at Mauna Ulu on the east rift zone began to wane in 1971, the summit region of the volcano began to inflate rapidly; apparently, blockage of the feeder conduit to Mauna Ulu diverted a continuing supply of mantle-derived magma to prolonged storage in the summit reservoir. Rapid inflation of the summit area persisted at a nearly constant rate from June 1971 to February 1972, when a conduit to Mauna Ulu was reopened. The cadence of inflation was twice interrupted briefly, first by a 10-hour eruption in Kilauea Caldera on 14 August, and later by an eruption that began in the caldera and migrated 12 km down the southwest rift zone between 24 and 29 September. The 14 August and 24-29 September eruptions added about 107 m3 and 8 ?? 106 m3, respectively, of new lava to the surface of Kilauea. These volumes, combined with the volume increase represented by inflation of the volcanic edifice itself, account for an approximately 6 ?? 106 m3/month rate of growth between June 1971 and January 1972, essentially the same rate at which mantle-derived magma was supplied to Kilauea between 1952 and the end of the Mauna Ulu eruption in 1971. The August and September 1971 lavas are tholeiitic basalts of similar major-element chemical composition. The compositions can be reproduced by mixing various proportions of chemically distinct variants of lava that erupted during the preceding activity at Mauna Ulu. Thus, part of the magma rising from the mantle to feed the Mauna Ulu

  13. Storage, migration, and eruption of magma at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, 1971 1972

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Christiansen, Robert L.; Koyanagi, Robert Y.; Peterson, Donald W.

    1982-08-01

    The magmatic plumbing system of Kilauea Volcano consists of a broad region of magma generation in the upper mantle, a steeply inclined zone through which magma rises to an intravolcano reservoir located about 2 to 6 km beneath the summit of the volcano, and a network of conduits that carry magma from this reservoir to sites of eruption within the caldera and along east and southwest rift zones. The functioning of most parts of this system was illustrated by activity during 1971 and 1972. When a 29-month-long eruption at Mauna Ulu on the east rift zone began to wane in 1971, the summit region of the volcano began to inflate rapidly; apparently, blockage of the feeder conduit to Mauna Ulu diverted a continuing supply of mantle-derived magma to prolonged storage in the summit reservoir. Rapid inflation of the summit area persisted at a nearly constant rate from June 1971 to February 1972, when a conduit to Mauna Ulu was reopened. The cadence of inflation was twice interrupted briefly, first by a 10-hour eruption in Kilauea Caldera on 14 August, and later by an eruption that began in the caldera and migrated 12 km down the southwest rift zone between 24 and 29 September. The 14 August and 24-29 September eruptions added about 10 7 m 3 and 8 × 10 6 m 3, respectively, of new lava to the surface of Kilauea. These volumes, combined with the volume increase represented by inflation of the volcanic edifice itself, account for an approximately 6 × 10 6 m 3/month rate of growth between June 1971 and January 1972, essentially the same rate at which mantle-derived magma was supplied to Kilauea between 1952 and the end of the Mauna Ulu eruption in 1971. The August and September 1971 lavas are tholeiitic basalts of similar major-element chemical composition. The compositions can be reproduced by mixing various proportions of chemically distinct variants of lava that erupted during the preceding activity at Mauna Ulu. Thus, part of the magma rising from the mantle to feed the

  14. Airborne volcanic plume measurements using a FTIR spectrometer, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, K.A.; Gerlach, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    A prototype closed-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometer system (FTIK), operating from battery power and with a Stirling engine microcooler for detector cooling, was successfully used for airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide at Kilauea volcano. Airborne profiles of the volcanic plume emanating from the erupting Pu'u 'O'o vent on the East Rift of Kilauea revealed levels of nearly 3 ppm SO2 in the core of the plume. An emission rate of 2,160 metric tons per day of sulfur dioxide was calculated from the FTIR data, which agrees closely with simultaneous measurements by a correlation spectrometer (COSPEC). The rapid spatial sampling possible from an airborne platform distinguishes the methodology described here from previous FTIR measurements.

  15. January 30, 1997 eruptive event on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, as monitored by continuous GPS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, S.; Segall, P.; Lisowski, M.; Miklius, Asta; Murray, M.; Bevis, M.; Foster, J.

    2000-01-01

    A continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) network on Kilauea Volcano captured the most recent fissure eruption in Kilauea's East Rift Zone (ERZ) in unprecedented spatial and temporal detail. The short eruption drained the lava pond at Pu'u O' o, leading to a two month long pause in its on-going eruption. Models of the GPS data indicate that the intrusion's bottom edge extended to only 2.4 km. Continuous GPS data reveal rift opening 8 hours prior to the eruption. Absence of precursory summit inflation rules out magma storage overpressurization as the eruption's cause. We infer that stresses in the shallow rift created by the continued deep rift dilation and slip on the south flank decollement caused the rift intrusion.

  16. Magma transport and storage at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii I: 1790-1952

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. L.; Klein, F.

    2011-12-01

    We trace the evolution of Kilauea from the time of the first oral records of an explosive eruption in 1790 to the long eruption in Halemaumau crater in 1952. The establishment of modern seismic and geodetic networks in the early 1960s showed that eruptions and intrusions were fed from two magma sources beneath the summit at depths of 2-6 and ~1 km respectively (sources 1 and 2), and that seaward spreading of the south flank took place on a decollement at 10-12 km depth at the base of the Kilauea edifice. A third diffuse, pressure-transmitting magma system (source 3) between the shallow East rift zone and the decollement was also identified. We test the null hypothesis that the volcano has behaved similarly throughout its lifetime, and conclude that the null hypothesis is not met for the period preceding the 1952 summit eruption because of changes in magma supply rate and differences in ground deformation patterns. The western missionaries arriving at Kilauea in 1823 were confronted with a caldera-wide lava lake. Filling rates determined by visual observation correspond to magma supply rates that averaged more than 0.3 km3/yr prior to 1840 and declined to 1894, when lava disappeared altogether at Halemaumau crater. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established by Thomas A. Jaggar in 1912 adjacent to the Volcano House Hotel on the rim of Kilauea. Instrumental observation at HVO began using a seismometer that doubled as a tiltmeter. A 1912-1924 magma supply rate of 0.024 km3/yr agreed with the rate of filling of Kilauea caldera from 1840-1894. 1924 was a critical year. An intrusion that moved down Kilauea's East rift zone beginning in February culminated beneath the lower East rift zone in April. In May, explosive eruptions accompanied a dramatic draining of Halemaumau. Triangulation results between 1912 and 1921 showed uplift extending far beyond Kilauea caldera and an equally large regional subsidence occurred between 1921 and 1927. HVO tilt narrows the

  17. Local earthquake tomography with the inclusion of full topography and its application to Kīlauea volcano, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Lin, Guoqing

    2016-04-01

    We develop a new three-dimensional local earthquake tomography algorithm with the inclusion of full topography (LETFT). We present both synthetic and real data tests based on the P- and S-wave arrival time data for Kīlauea volcano in Hawai'i. A total of 33,768 events with 515,711 P-picks and 272,217 S-picks recorded by 35 stations at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory are used in these tests. The comparison between the new and traditional methods based on the synthetic test shows that our new algorithm significantly improves the accuracy of the velocity model, especially at shallow depths. In the real data application, the P- and S-wave velocity models of Kīlauea show several intriguing features. We observe discontinuous high Vp (> 7.0 km/s) and Vs (> 3.9 km/s) zones at 5-14 km depth below Kīlauea caldera, its East Rift Zone (ERZ) and the Southwest Rift Zone, which may represent consolidated intrusive gabbro-ultramafic cumulates. At Kīlauea caldera, Vp and Vs decrease from ~ 3.9 km/s and ~ 2.6 km/s from the surface to ~ 3.7 km/s and ~ 2.3 km/s at 2 km depth. We resolve a high Vp zone (> 7.0 km/s) at 5-14 km depth and high Vs zone (> 3.9 km/s) at 5-11 km depth. This high Vp and Vs zone extends to the north of the ERZ at 5-10 km depth and to the upper ERZ at 8-12 km depth. In the Hilina Fault System, there is a high Vp layer (~ 7.0 km/s) at 4-6 km depth and a low Vp body of ~ 5.7 km/s at 6-11 km depth. The high Vp layer could be associated with the intrusive ultramafic gabbro sills. The velocity contrast on the north and south sides of the Koa'e Fault System indicates that the intrusive activities mainly occur to the north of the fault. Our new LETFT method performs well in both the synthetic and real data tests and we expect that it will reveal more robust velocity structures in areas with larger topographic variations.

  18. Deformation precursory to the March 2011 Kamoamoa fissure eruption, Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, P.; Poland, M. P.; Miklius, A.

    2012-12-01

    We examine surface deformation of Kilauea Volcano prior to the March 5, 2011, Kamoamoa fissure eruption along the volcano's east rift zone (ERZ). The Kamoamoa eruption followed several months of magma accumulation beneath Kilauea's summit. In addition to inflation of a shallow (1.5-2 km depth) source near Halema'uma'u Crater, precursory deformation at Kilauea 's summit is attributable to sources distinct in space and time from previously identified zones of magma storage and faulting. Differential interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) and TerraSAR-X (TSX) satellites, combined with GPS data, show evidence for two additional sources active during the inflation prior to the Kamoamoa eruption: 1) progressive inflation of a triangular-shaped area extending from the southern edge of Kilauea Caldera and west of the ERZ, and 2) a nearly vertical extensional feature beneath the western edge of Kilauea Caldera. While the shallow Hale'mau'mau source appears to have gained in volume during the entire period, the triangular source in the south caldera became active in the final month prior to the Kamoamoa eruption. Inflation of this source reversed to deflation during the eruption. The extensional source beneath the western caldera, evident in the last quarter of 2010, also appears to have reversed its sense of motion during the eruption. To model the sources, we use a Markov chain Monte Carlo optimization. Compared to previously observed deformation due to deflation-inflation events within the caldera, the deformation preceding the Kamoamoa eruption extends farther ESE. In these preliminary models, we use a spheroidal source with a sub-horizontal long axis striking roughly E-W. The source south of the caldera is modeled as a rectangular tensile dislocation that is sub-horizontal at roughly 2 km depth, similar to the spheroidal source. The western caldera sub-vertical tensile dislocation extends from within a few hundred meters

  19. Ancient carbonate sedimentary signature in the Hawaiian plume: Evidence from Mahukona volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shichun; Abouchami, Wafa; Blichert-Toft, Janne; Clague, David A.; Cousens, Brian L.; Frey, Frederick A.; Humayun, Munir

    2009-08-01

    Lavas from Mahukona, a small Hawaiian volcano on the Loa trend, exhibit major and trace element abundance variations exceeding those in lavas from large Hawaiian shields, such as Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea. Mahukona lavas define three geochemically distinct groups of tholeiitic shield basalt and a transitional group of postsshield basalt. At 10% MgO the tholeiitic groups range from 9 to 12% CaO; such differences in CaO can reflect partial melts derived from garnet pyroxenite (low CaO) and peridotite (high CaO), but the negative CaO-Yb (both at 10% MgO) trend formed by Mahukona lavas is inconsistent with this explanation. Within Mahukona lavas, radiogenic Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic ratios are highly correlated with each other; however, 87Sr/86Sr is decoupled from these radiogenic isotopic ratios. Rather, 87Sr/86Sr is correlated with trace element abundance ratios involving Sr, and importantly, Mahukona lavas define a negative Rb/Sr-87Sr/86Sr trend, implying that a Sr-rich source component characterized by high 87Sr/86Sr is important in the petrogenesis of Mahukona lavas. We infer that this Sr-rich source component is recycled ancient carbonate-rich sediments. Intershield heterogeneity among Hawaiian shields also shows a negative Rb/Sr-87Sr/86Sr trend. For example, Makapuu-stage Koolau lavas have higher 87Sr/86Sr but lower Rb/Sr than Mauna Kea lavas. Consequently, we infer that a recycled ancient carbonate-rich sedimentary source component is important in the Hawaiian plume. Although most lavas from Loa and Kea trend volcanoes define distinct fields in isotopic ratios of Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb, the majority of Mahukona lavas have isotopic ratios at the boundary between the fields defined by Loa and Kea trend lavas. However, a subgroup of Mahukona shield lavas have Kea-like isotopic and trace element signatures, an observation that can be explained by vertical heterogeneity in a bilaterally asymmetrical plume.

  20. Development of lava tubes in the light of observations at Mauna Ulu, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.W.; Holcomb, R.T.; Tilling, R.I.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    During the 1969-1974 Mauna Ulu eruption on Kilauea's upper east rift zone, lava tubes were observed to develop by four principal processes: (1) flat, rooted crusts grew across streams within confined channels; (2) overflows and spatter accreted to levees to build arched roofs across streams; (3) plates of solidified crust floating downstream coalesced to form a roof; and (4) pahoehoe lobes progressively extended, fed by networks of distributaries beneath a solidified crust. Still another tube-forming process operated when pahoehoe entered the ocean; large waves would abruptly chill a crust across the entire surface of a molten stream crossing through the surf zone. These littoral lava tubes formed abruptly, in contrast to subaerial tubes, which formed gradually. All tube-forming processes were favored by low to moderate volume-rates of flow for sustained periods of time. Tubes thereby became ubiquitous within the pahoehoe flows and distributed a very large proportionof the lava that was produced during this prolonged eruption. Tubes transport lava efficiently. Once formed, the roofs of tubes insulate the active streams within, allowing the lava to retain its fluidity for a longer time than if exposed directly to ambient air temperature. Thus the flows can travel greater distances and spread over wider areas. Even though supply rates during most of 1970-1974 were moderate, ranging from 1 to 5 m3/s, large tube systems conducted lava as far as the coast, 12-13 km distant, where they fed extensive pahoehoe fields on the coastal flats. Some flows entered the sea to build lava deltas and add new land to the island. The largest and most efficient tubes developed during periods of sustained extrusion, when new lava was being supplied at nearly constant rates. Tubes can play a major role in building volcanic edifices with gentle slopes because they can deliver a substantial fraction of lava erupted at low to moderate rates to sites far down the flank of a volcano. We

  1. Chemistry and isotope ratios of sulfur in basalts and volcanic gases at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakai, H.; Casadevall, T.J.; Moore, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Eighteen basalts and some volcanic gases from the submarine and subaerial parts of Kilauea volcano were analyzed for the concentration and isotope ratios of sulfur. By means of a newly developed technique, sulfide and sulfate sulfur in the basalts were separately but simultaneously determined. The submarine basalt has 700 ?? 100 ppm total sulfur with ??34S??s of 0.7 ?? 0.1 ???. The sulfate/sulfide molar ratio ranges from 0.15 to 0.56 and the fractionation factor between sulfate and sulfide is +7.5 ?? 1.5???. On the other hand, the concentration and ??34S??s values of the total sulfur in the subaerial basalt are reduced to 150 ?? 50 ppm and -0.8 ?? 0.2???, respectively. The sulfate to sulfide ratio and the fractionation factor between them are also smaller, 0.01 to 0.25 and +3.0???, respectively. Chemical and isotopic evidence strongly suggests that sulfate and sulfide in the submarine basalt are in chemical and isotopic equilibria with each other at magmatic conditions. Their relative abundance and the isotope fractionation factors may be used to estimate the f{hook}o2 and temperature of these basalts at the time of their extrusion onto the sea floor. The observed change in sulfur chemistry and isotopic ratios from the submarine to subaerial basalts can be interpreted as degassing of the SO2 from basalt thereby depleting sulfate and 34S in basalt. The volcanic sulfur gases, predominantly SO2, from the 1971 and 1974 fissures in Kilauea Crater have ??34S values of 0.8 to 0.9%., slightly heavier than the total sulfur in the submarine basalts and definitely heavier than the subaerial basalts, in accord with the above model. However, the ??34S value of sulfur gases (largely SO2) from Sulfur Bank is 8.0%., implying a secondary origin of the sulfur. The ??34S values of native sulfur deposits at various sites of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanos, sulfate ions of four deep wells and hydrogen sulfide from a geothermal well along the east rift zone are also reported. The high

  2. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, an Update: 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jefferson

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Greenland and others, 1985; Casadevall and others, 1987; Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001). A compilation of SO2 emission-rate and wind-vector data from 1979 through 1997 is available as Open-File Report 98-462 (Elias and others, 1998) and on the web at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/products/OF98462/. The purpose of this report is to update the existing database through 2001. Kilauea releases SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and east rift zone (ERZ) (fig. 1), as described in previous reports (Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001). These two distinct sources are quantified independently. The summit and east rift zone emission rates reported here were derived using vehicle-based Correlation Spectrometry (COSPEC) measurements as described in Elias and others (1998). In 1998 and 1999, these measurements were augmented with airborne and tripod-based surveys.

  3. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, an Update: 2002-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Greenland and others, 1985; Casadevall and others, 1987; Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001, Elias and Sutton, 2002, Sutton and others, 2003). Compilations of SO2 emission-rate and wind-vector data from 1979 through 2001 are available on the web. (Elias and others, 1998 and 2002). This report updates the database through 2006, and documents the changes in data collection and processing that have occurred during the interval 2002-2006. During the period covered by this report, Kilauea continued to release SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and east rift zone (ERZ) (Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001, Elias and others, 2002, Sutton and others, 2003). These two distinct sources are always measured independently (fig.1). Sulphur Banks is a minor source of SO2 and does not contribute significantly to the total emissions for Kilauea (Stoiber and Malone, 1975). From 1979 until 2003, summit and east rift zone emission rates were derived using vehicle- and tripod- based Correlation Spectrometry (COSPEC) measurements. In late 2003, we began to augment traditional COSPEC measurements with data from one of the new generation of miniature spectrometer systems, the FLYSPEC (Horton and others, 2006; Elias and others, 2006, Williams-Jones and others, 2006).

  4. The 12 September 1999 Upper East Rift Zone dike intrusion at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cervelli, Peter; Segall, P.; Amelung, F.; Garbeil, H.; Meertens, C.; Owen, S.; Miklius, Asta; Lisowski, M.

    2002-01-01

    Deformation associated with an earthquake swarm on 12 September 1999 in the Upper East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano was recorded by continuous GPS receivers and by borehole tiltmeters. Analyses of campaign GPS, leveling data, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data from the ERS-2 satellite also reveal significant deformation from the swarm. We interpret the swarm as resulting from a dike intrusion and model the deformation field using a constant pressure dike source. Nonlinear inversion was used to find the model that best fits the data. The optimal dike is located beneath and slightly to the west of Mauna Ulu, dips steeply toward the south, and strikes nearly east-west. It is approximately 3 by 2 km across and was driven by a pressure of ??? 15 MPa. The total volume of the dike was 3.3 x 106 m3. Tilt data indicate a west to east propagation direction. Lack of premonitory inflation of Kilauea's summit suggests a passive intrusion; that is, the immediate cause of the intrusion was probably tensile failure in the shallow crust of the Upper East Rift Zone brought about by persistent deep rifting and by continued seaward sliding of Kilauea's south flank.

  5. Observations on basaltic lava streams in tubes from Kilauea Volcano, island of Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, J.; Cashman, K.V.; Mattox, T.N.; Christina, Heliker C.; Hon, K.A.; Mangan, M.T.; Thornber, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    From 1986 to 1997, the Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption of Kilauea produced a vast pahoehoe flow field fed by lava tubes that extended 10-12 km from vents on the volcano's east rift zone to the ocean. Within a kilometer of the vent, tubes were as much as 20 m high and 10-25 m wide. On steep slopes (4-10??) a little farther away from the vent, some tubes formed by roofing over of lava channels. Lava streams were typically 1-2 m deep flowing within a tube that here was typically 5 m high and 3 m wide. On the coastal plain (<1??), tubes within inflated sheet flows were completely filled, typically 1-2 m high, and several tens of meters wide. Tubes develop as a flow's crust grows on the top, bottom, and sides of the tubes, restricting the size of the fluid core. The tubes start out with nearly elliptical cross-sectional shapes, many times wider than high. Broad, flat sheet flows evolve into elongate tumuli with an axial crack as the flanks of the original flow were progressively buried by breakouts. Temperature measurements and the presence of stalactites in active tubes confirmed that the tube walls were above the solidus and subject to melting. Sometimes, the tubes began downcutting. Progressive downcutting was frequently observed through skylights; a rate of 10 cm/d was measured at one skylight for nearly 2 months.

  6. Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, C.J.; Nathenson, M.; Scholl, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springs on Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understand processes that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water, and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower east rift of Kilauea. Samples of thermal water from shallow wells in the lower east rift and vicinity have rather variable chemistry indicating that a number of processes operate in the near surface. Water sampled from the available deep wells is different in composition from the shallow thermal water, indicating that generally there is not a significant component of deep water in the shallow wells. Data for samples from available deep wells show significant gradients in chemistry and steam content of the reservoir fluid. These gradients are interpreted to indicate that the reservoir tapped by the existing wells is an evolving vapor-dominated system.

  7. Magma transport and storage at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii II: 1952-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, F.; Wright, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    swarms herald rift earthquake swarms associated with rift eruption and intrusion by minutes to hours, consistent with the existence of a deep pressure-transmitting magma system beneath the rift zones. 4) Seaward movement and rift dilation during the M 7.2 earthquake on Nov. 29, 1975 changed the volcano's behavior. Before the 1975 earthquake, magma supply drove flank spreading. Following the earthquake, spreading rates were similar to the time before the earthquake but the magma supply rate increased partly because the flank was de-stressed and new magma was unconstrained by the flank. 5) Recent slow intrusions have a seismic signature that matches 'slow' or 'silent' earthquakes and we suggest that such events date from the 1960s. 6) The effects of Mauna Loa on Kilauea and vice versa are manifested in the increased magma supply rate at Kilauea since 1952 and the decreased Mauna Loa activity since 1950, a pattern also seen in the 19th century and earlier. This relationship is further emphasized by the lack of any Mauna Loa eruption since Kilauea began continuous eruption in 1983. We interpret Kilauea's long history as one of crisis and recovery. Crises are anticipated by increased seismic activity and recovery is associated with major changes in volcano behavior.

  8. Infrasonic harmonic tremor and degassing bursts from Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fee, David; Garcés, Milton; Patrick, Matt; Chouet, Bernard; Dawson, Phil; Swanson, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    The formation, evolution, collapse, and subsequent resurrection of a vent within Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano, produced energetic and varied degassing signals recorded by a nearby infrasound array between 2008 and early 2009. After 25 years of quiescence, a vent-clearing explosive burst on 19 March 2008 produced a clear, complex acoustic signal. Near-continuous harmonic infrasonic tremor followed this burst until 4 December 2008, when a period of decreased degassing occurred. The tremor spectra suggest volume oscillation and reverberation of a shallow gas-filled cavity beneath the vent. The dominant tremor peak can be sustained through Helmholtz oscillations of the cavity, while the secondary tremor peak and overtones are interpreted assuming acoustic resonance. The dominant tremor frequency matches the oscillation frequency of the gas emanating from the vent observed by video. Tremor spectra and power are also correlated with cavity geometry and dynamics, with the cavity depth estimated at ~219 m and volume ~3 x 106 m3 in November 2008. Over 21 varied degassing bursts were observed with extended burst durations and frequency content consistent with a transient release of gas exciting the cavity into resonance. Correlation of infrasound with seismicity suggests an open system connecting the atmosphere to the seismic excitation process at depth. Numerous degassing bursts produced very long period (0.03-0.1 Hz) infrasound, the first recorded at Kilauea, indicative of long-duration atmospheric accelerations. Kilauea infrasound appears controlled by the exsolution of gas from the magma, and the interaction of this gas with the conduits and cavities confining it.

  9. Waters associated with an active basaltic volcano, Kilauea, Hawaii: Variation in solute sources, 1973-1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.; Jones, B.F.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic analyses of samples collected from a 1262-m-deep research borehole at the summit of Kilauea Volcano provide unique time-series data for composition of waters in the uppermost part of its hydrothermal system. These waters have a distinctive geochemical signature: a very low proportion of chloride relative to other anions compared with other Hawaiian wa-ters - thermal (???30 ??C) or nonthermal (<30 ??C) - and with most thermal waters of the world. Isotope data demonstrate that the borehole waters are of essentially meteoric origin, with minimal magmatic input. The water chemistry exhibits marked temporal variations, including pronounced short-term (days to weeks) effects of rainfall dilution and longer term (months to years) decline of total solutes. The 1973-1974 samples are Na-sulfate-dominant, but samples collected after July 1975 are (Mg + Ca)-bicarbonate-dominant. This compositional shift, probably abrupt, was associated with an increase in the partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) related to volcanic degassing of CO2 accompanying a large eruption (December 31, 1974) and associated intense seismicity. Following the initial sharp increase, the PCO2 then decreased, approaching preemption values in April 1976. Beginning in mid-1975, solute concentrations of the borehole waters decreased substantially, from ???45 meq/L to <25 meq/L in only eight months; by 1991, total solute concentrations were <17 meq/L. This decline in solutes cannot be attributed to rainfall dilution and is inferred to reflect the decreasing availability with time of the easily leachable salts of alkali metals and sulfate, which originated in sublimates and fumarolic encrustations in fractures and cavities of rocks along the hydrologic flow paths. The overall chemistry of the summit-borehole waters is largely determined by hydrolysis reactions associated with normal weathering of host tholeiitic basalts on a geologic time scale, despite short-term perturbations in composition

  10. The airborne lava-seawater interaction plume at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edmonds, M.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    Lava flows into the sea at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, and generates an airborne gas and aerosol plume. Water (H2O), hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) gases were quantified in the plume in 2004–2005, using Open Path Fourier Transform infra-red Spectroscopy. The molar abundances of these species and thermodynamic modelling are used to discuss their generation. The range in molar HCl / H2O confirms that HCl is generated when seawater is boiled dry and magnesium salts are hydrolysed (as proposed by [T.M. Gerlach, J.L. Krumhansl, R.O. Fournier, J. Kjargaard, Acid rain from the heating and evaporation of seawater by molten lava: a new volcanic hazard, EOS (Trans. Am. Geophys. Un.) 70 (1989) 1421–1422]), in contrast to models of Na-metasomatism. Airborne droplets of boiled seawater brine form nucleii for subsequent H2O and HCl condensation, which acidifies the droplets and liberates CO2 gas from bicarbonate and carbonate. NO2 is derived from the thermal decomposition of nitrates in coastal seawater, which takes place as the lava heats droplets of boiled seawater brine to 350–400 °C. SO2 is derived from the degassing of subaerial lava flows on the coastal plain. The calculated mass flux of HCl from a moderate-sized ocean entry significantly increases the total HCl emission at Kīlauea (including magmatic sources) and is comparable to industrial HCl emitters in the United States. For larger lava ocean entries, the flux of HCl will cause intense local environmental hazards, such as high localised HCl concentrations and acid rain.

  11. Infrasonic harmonic tremor and degassing bursts from Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fee, David; GarcéS, Milton; Patrick, Matt; Chouet, Bernard; Dawson, Phil; Swanson, Don

    2010-11-01

    The formation, evolution, collapse, and subsequent resurrection of a vent within Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano, produced energetic and varied degassing signals recorded by a nearby infrasound array between 2008 and early 2009. After 25 years of quiescence, a vent-clearing explosive burst on 19 March 2008 produced a clear, complex acoustic signal. Near-continuous harmonic infrasonic tremor followed this burst until 4 December 2008, when a period of decreased degassing occurred. The tremor spectra suggest volume oscillation and reverberation of a shallow gas-filled cavity beneath the vent. The dominant tremor peak can be sustained through Helmholtz oscillations of the cavity, while the secondary tremor peak and overtones are interpreted assuming acoustic resonance. The dominant tremor frequency matches the oscillation frequency of the gas emanating from the vent observed by video. Tremor spectra and power are also correlated with cavity geometry and dynamics, with the cavity depth estimated at ˜219 m and volume ˜3 × 106 m3 in November 2008. Over 21 varied degassing bursts were observed with extended burst durations and frequency content consistent with a transient release of gas exciting the cavity into resonance. Correlation of infrasound with seismicity suggests an open system connecting the atmosphere to the seismic excitation process at depth. Numerous degassing bursts produced very long period (0.03-0.1 Hz) infrasound, the first recorded at Kilauea, indicative of long-duration atmospheric accelerations. Kilauea infrasound appears controlled by the exsolution of gas from the magma, and the interaction of this gas with the conduits and cavities confining it.

  12. Very-long-period seismicity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, 2007-2010 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, P. B.; Benítez, M. C.; Chouet, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    On 19 March, 2008 eruptive activity returned to the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai‘i with the formation of a new vent within the Halema‘uma‘u pit crater. The new vent has been gradually increasing in size, and exhibiting sustained degassing and the episodic bursting of gas slugs at the surface of a lava pond ~200 m below the floor of Halema‘uma‘u. The observation of broadband seismicity recorded within Kilauea Caldera provides an unprecedented view into the processes leading up to and beyond the renewal of eruptive activity at the summit. Resonant features in the Very-Long-Period spectra begin to appear in October, 2007, and by the end of November, 2007 the magma transport system sustained continuous oscillations that persist through 31 January, 2010. The lowest observed frequency, at about 0.04 Hz, represents the breathing mode of the shallow magmatic system with a source centroid located 1 km beneath the caldera floor and ~500 m north-northeast of the new pit in Halema‘uma‘u. Spectral peaks seen at 0.2 and 0.45 Hz are inferred to represent higher modes of resonance in the system. The marked shifts in frequencies over time are due to the complex interaction between the slowly changing magma-static head, conduit structure, and the acoustic properties of the magmatic fluid. Rockfall and collapse signals appear as random processes statistically disassociated from the degassing burst signals. These events have a frequency content ranging from 5 to 20 Hz. The spectral characteristics, source location obtained by radial semblance, and Hidden Markov Model pattern recognition of the degassing burst signals are consistent with an increase in gas content in the magma transport system beginning in October, 2007. This increase plateaus between March-September 2008, and exhibits a fluctuating pattern until 31 January, 2010, suggesting that the release of gas is slowly diminishing over time.

  13. Shallow-velocity models at the Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, determined from array analyses of tremor wavefields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccorotti, G.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.

    2003-01-01

    The properties of the surface wavefield at Kilauea Volcano are analysed using data from small-aperture arrays of short-period seismometers deployed in and around the Kilauea caldera. Tremor recordings were obtained during two Japan-US cooperative experiments conducted in 1996 and 1997. The seismometers were deployed in three semi-circular arrays with apertures of 300, 300 and 400 m, and a linear array with length of 1680 m. Data are analysed using a spatio-temporal correlation technique well suited for the study of the stationary stochastic wavefields of Rayleigh and Love waves associated with volcanic activity and scattering sources distributed in and around the summit caldera. Spatial autocorrelation coefficients are obtained as a function of frequency and are inverted for the dispersion characteristics of Rayleigh and Love waves using a grid search that seeks phase velocities for which the L-2 norm between data and forward modelling operators is minimized. Within the caldera, the phase velocities of Rayleigh waves range from 1400 to 1800 m s-1 at 1 Hz down to 300-400 m s-1 at 10 Hz, and the phase velocities of Love waves range from 2600 to 400 m s-1 within the same frequency band. Outside the caldera, Rayleigh wave velocities range from 1800 to 1600 m s-1 at 1 Hz down to 260-360 m s-1 at 10 Hz, and Love wave velocities range from 600 to 150 m s-1 within the same frequency band. The dispersion curves are inverted for velocity structure beneath each array, assuming these dispersions represent the fundamental modes of Rayleigh and Love waves. The velocity structures observed at different array sites are consistent with results from a recent 3-D traveltime tomography of the caldera region, and point to a marked velocity discontinuity associated with the southern caldera boundary.

  14. Phyllosilicate-poor palagonitic dust from Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii): A mineralogical analogue for magnetic Martian dust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2001-03-01

    The mineralogical and elemental composition of dust size fractions (<2 and <5 μm) of eight samples of phyllosilicate-poor palagonitic tephra from the upper slopes of Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii) were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), visible and near-IR reflectance spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic properties methods, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The palagonitic dust samples are spectral analogues of Martian bright regions at visible and near-IR wavelengths. The crystalline phases in the palagonitic dust are, in variable proportions, plagioclase feldspar, Ti-containing magnetite, minor pyroxene, and trace hematite. No basal reflections resulting from crystalline phyllosilicates were detected in XRD data. Weak, broad XRD peaks corresponding to X-ray amorphous phases (allophane, nanophase ferric oxide (possibly ferrihydrite), and, for two samples, hisingerite) were detected as oxidative alteration products of the glass; residual unaltered glass was also present. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the iron-bearing phases are nanophase ferric oxide, magnetite/titanomagnetite, hematite, and minor glass and ferrous silicates. Direct observation by TEM showed that the crystalline and X-ray amorphous phases observed by XRD and Mössbauer are normally present together in composite particles and not normally present as discrete single-phase particles. Ti-bearing magnetite occurs predominantly as 5-150 nm particles embedded in noncrystalline matrix material and most likely formed by crystallization from silicate liquids under conditions of rapid cooling during eruption and deposition of glassy tephra and prior to palagonitization of glass. Rare spheroidal halloysite was observed in the two samples that also had XRD evidence for hisingerite. The saturation magnetization Js and low-field magnetic susceptibility for bulk dust range from 0.19 to 0.68 Am2/kg and 3.4×10-6 to 15.5×10-6m3/kg at 293 K, respectively. Simulation

  15. Isotopic evolution of Mauna Kea volcano: Results from the initial phase of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lassiter, J.C.; DePaolo, D.J.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of Mauna Kea lavas recovered by the first drilling phase of the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project. These lavas, which range in age from ???200 to 400 ka, provide a detailed record of chemical and isotopic changes in basalt composition during the shied/postshield transition and extend our record of Mauna Kea volcanism to a late-shield period roughly equivalent to the last ???100 ka of Mauna Loa activity. Stratigraphic variations in isotopic composition reveal a gradual shift over time toward a more depleted source composition (e.g., higher 143Nd/144Nd, lower 87Sr/86Sr, and lower 3He/4He). This gradual evolution is in sharp contrast with the abrupt appearance of alkalic lavas at ???240 ka recorded by the upper 50 m of Mauna Kea lavas from the core. Intercalated tholeiitic and alkalic lavas from the uppermost Mauna Kea section are isotopically indistinguishable. Combined with major element evidence (e.g., decreasing SiO2 and increasing FeO) that the depth of melt segregation increased during the transition from tholeiitic to alkalic volcanism, the isotopic similarity of tholeiitic and alkalic lavas argues against significant lithosphere involvement during melt generation. Instead, the depleted isotopic signatures found in late shield-stage lavas are best explained by increasing the proportion of melt generated from a depleted upper mantle component entrained and heated by the rising central plume. Direct comparison of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa lavas erupted at equivalent stages in these volcanoes' life cycles reveals persistent chemical and isotopic differences independent of the temporal evolution of each volcano. The oldest lavas recovered from the drillcore are similar to modern Kilauea lavas, but are distinct from Mauna Loa lavas. Mauna Kea lavas have higher 143Nd/144Nd and 206Pb/204Pb and lower 87Sr/86Sr. Higher concentrations of incompatible trace elements in primary magmas, lower SiO2, and higher FeO also

  16. Thermally Enhanced Magnetic Fabrics of Basaltic Dikes from Kapaa Quarry, Koolau Volcano, Oahu, Hawaii, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, J.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Urrutia Fucugauchi, J.

    2007-05-01

    Progressive thermal treatment has been used to investigate the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of a wide range of lithologies. Initial results on e.g., red sandstones, glacial tillites, granites and gneisses showed that laboratory stepwise heating resulted in thermal enhancement of AMS, showing the potential of thermal treatment in studying weak AMS and masked or cryptic fabrics. Studies have however shown that heating induced changes in AMS may be more complex that simple enhancement of the magnetic fabric In general, thermal induced magneto-mineralogical alterations are complex and not well understood, and further investigation of heating induced effects in mineralogy, grain size and texture systematically investigated for different lithologies is needed. For our experiment we have used a suite of samples from eight basaltic dikes from the Kappa Quarry, Koolau volcanic range in Oahu, Hawaii. The AMS fabric was determined as part of a study to investigate the influence of hydrothermal alteration by Krasa and Herrero-Bervera (2005). They found that hydrothermal alteration changes the bulk susceptibility and anisotropy degree, but AMS ellipsoid principal axes are not affected. Since hydrothermal alteration transforms the primary Ti-poor titanomagnetites into granular intergrowths of titanomagnetites, titanomaghemite and hematite, and that samples show varying degrees of alteration, the samples react differently to laboratory stepwise heating permitting study of thermal effects on the magnetic mineralogy, and AMS parameters and principal susceptibility axes. Further, thermal treatment results in fabric enhancement with reduced axial scatter associated with weak bulk susceptibilities and anisotropy degrees in the dikes. For the AMS experiment samples were heated progressively to temperatures up to 400° C or 560° C and the AMS measured after each step. AMS parameters and bulk susceptibility show changes with increasing temperature while the AMS

  17. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at

  18. Mapping the Spatial Distribution of CO2 release from Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, T.; Werner, C. A.; Kern, C.; Sutton, A. J.; Hauri, E. H.; Kelly, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Kīlauea Volcano is a large emitter of volcanic CO2 with emission rates ranging from 7500-30,000 t/d. However, Kīlauea presents a challenging situation for CO2 emission rate measurement in that the main source of SO2 is the active vent in Halema'uma'u Crater, whereas CO2 emits mainly from a large (> 1km2) diffuse region east of the vent. Previous researchers recognized this issue and advocated for the use of a plume-integrated concentration ratio paired with the SO2 emission to determine CO2 emission rates; however, this worked best prior to the opening of the summit vent in 2008, or when SO2emission was still diffuse as opposed to focused degassing from the vent. We used two techniques to study the spatial distribution and temporal variability of CO2 release from the summit caldera in July, 2014. Eddy covariance measurements made at 14 locations in the area of diffuse emission resulted in elevated fluxes that generally ranged from 500 to > 5000 g/m2d, or typical of other volcanic and hydrothermal areas worldwide. MultiGas measurements of the CO2 and SO2 concentration in air at 1-m above the ground identified approximately seven areas of elevated area of CO2 degassing in the caldera. The CO2 concentrations in air were spatially well correlated to approximately 100 m and displayed anisotropy that was consistent with the measured wind direction. Areas of highest CO2 concentration correlated with the areas of highest flux using the eddy covariance method and were found near the middle of the caldera approximately 1 km NE of the active vent. This area overlies the inferred location of the shallow summit reservoir, and is characterized by linear fractures with adhered sublimate deposits at the surface. A few of the fractures are visibly fuming, but much of the degassing in the area is not apparent. Future work includes monitoring the fluxes in this area over time, and attempting to quantify emission rates from the areas of measured flux.

  19. Spatiotemporal evolution of dike opening and décollement slip at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery-Brown, E. K.; Sinnett, D.K.; Larson, K.M.; Poland, Michael P.; Segall, P.; Miklius, Asta

    2011-01-01

    Rapid changes in ground tilt and GPS positions on Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, are interpreted as resulting from a shallow, two-segment dike intrusion into the east rift zone that began at 1217 UTC (0217 HST) on 17 June 2007 and lasted almost 3 days. As a result of the intrusion, a very small volume of basalt (about 1500 m3) erupted on 19 June. Northward tilt at a coastal tiltmeter, subsidence of south flank GPS sites, southeastward displacements at southwestern flank GPS sites, and a swarm of flank earthquakes suggest that a slow slip event occurred on the décollement beneath Kīlauea's south flank concurrent with the rift intrusion. We use 4 min GPS positions that include estimates of time-dependent tropospheric gradients and ground tilt data to study the spatial and temporal relationships between the two inferred shallow, steeply dipping dike segments extending from the surface to about 2 km depth and décollement slip at 8 km depth. We invert for the temporal evolution of distributed dike opening and décollement slip in independent inversions at each time step using a nonnegative least squares algorithm. On the basis of these inversions, the intrusion occurred in two stages that correspond spatially and temporally with concentrated rift zone seismicity. The dike opening began on the western of the two segments before jumping to the eastern segment, where the majority of opening accumulated. Dike opening preceded the start of décollement slip at an 84% confidence level; the latter is indicated by the onset of northward tilt of a coastal tiltmeter. Displacements at southwest flank GPS sites began about 18 h later and are interpreted as resulting from slow slip on the southwestern flank. Additional constraints on the evolution of the intrusion and décollement slip come from inversion of an Envisat interferogram that spans the intrusion until 0822 UTC on 18 June 2007, combined with GPS and tilt data. This inversion shows that up to 0822 UTC on 18 June, d

  20. Mass changes at different levels revealed by micro-gravity and deformation measurements at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, M.; Poland, M. P.; Battaglia, M.; Carbone, D.; Baker, S.; Amelung, F.

    2013-12-01

    Using campaign micro-gravity measurements collected at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i (United States), between December 2009 and November 2012, we document significant mass variations at the summit of the volcano. These variations produce a maximum residual gravity change of +370 × 14 μGal near the east margin of Halema'uma'u Crater, within Kilauea's summit caldera, where in March 2008 a new eruptive vent opened. This vent has progressively enlarged through several collapses and now forms a 210x160 m elliptical cavity that is currently occupied by a lava lake whose surface fluctuates between 25 and 200 meters below the vent rim. Five micro-gravity surveys were performed using two Scintrex CG-5 gravimeters. Each survey was completed following a double-looping procedure, and each measurement was corrected for earth-tides, ocean loading, and instrument drift. Gravity changes at each station were then corrected for the free-air effect using vertical displacements calculated from combined ascending and descending InSAR measurements. InSAR data are from both the German Space Agency (DLR) TerraSAR-X satellite and the Italian Space Agency (ASI) Cosmo-SkyMed satellite-constellation. The spatial distribution of the gravity changes suggests that they are predominantly caused by the enlargement of the vent and variations in the height of the summit lava lake. The contribution to the gravity measurements caused by changes in lava level within the conduit feeding the lava lake is therefore estimated using a numerical model that takes into account its geometry, as inferred from visual and remotely sensed (LiDAR) observations, and lava height at the time of each gravity survey, determined from thermal camera data. These results can be used to make inferences on the density of the magma filling the lava lake, which we compare to values obtained using independent data from continuous gravimeters located near the campaign stations. Estimates of the lava level effect on the gravity allow

  1. Kulanaokuaiki Tephra (ca, A.D. 400-1000): Newly recognized evidence for highly explosive eruptions at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fiske, R.S.; Rose, T.R.; Swanson, D.A.; Champion, D.E.; McGeehin, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    K??lauea may be one of the world's most intensively monitored volcanoes, but its eruptive history over the past several thousand years remains rather poorly known. Our study has revealed the vestiges of thin basaltic tephra deposits, overlooked by previous workers, that originally blanketed wide, near-summit areas and extended more than 17 km to the south coast of Hawai'i. These deposits, correlative with parts of tephra units at the summit and at sites farther north and northwest, show that K??lauea, commonly regarded as a gentle volcano, was the site of energetic pyroclastic eruptions and indicate the volcano is significantly more hazardous than previously realized. Seventeen new calibrated accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon ages suggest these deposits, here named the Kulanaokuaiki Tephra, were emplaced ca. A.D. 400-1000, a time of no previously known pyroclastic activity at the volcano. Tephra correlations are based chiefly on a marker unit that contains unusually high values of TiO2 and K2O and on paleomagnetic signatures of associated lava flows, which show that the Kulanaokuaiki deposits are the time-stratigraphic equivalent of the upper part of a newly exhumed section of the Uw??kahuna Ash in the volcano's northwest caldera wall. This section, thought to have been permanently buried by rockfalls in 1983, is thicker and more complete than the previously accepted type Uw??kahuna at the base of the caldera wall. Collectively, these findings justify the elevation of the Uw??kahuna Ash to formation status; the newly recognized Kulanaokuaiki Tephra to the south, the chief focus of this study, is defined as a member of the Uw??kahuna Ash. The Kulanaokuaiki Tephra is the product of energetic pyroclastic falls; no surge- or pyroclastic-flow deposits were identified with certainty, despite recent interpretations that Uw??kahuna surges extended 10-20 km from K??lauea's summit. ?? 2009 Geological Society of America.

  2. Volcano-tectonic implications of 3-D velocity structures derived from joint active and passive source tomography of the island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.; Morgan, J.K.; Zelt, C.A.; Okubo, P.G.

    2009-01-01

    We present a velocity model of the onshore and offshore regions around the southern part of the island of Hawaii, including southern Mauna Kea, southeastern Hualalai, and the active volcanoes of Mauna Loa, and Kilauea, and Loihi seamount. The velocity model was inverted from about 200,000 first-arrival traveltime picks of earthquakes and air gun shots recorded at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Reconstructed volcanic structures of the island provide us with an improved understanding of the volcano-tectonic evolution of Hawaiian volcanoes and their interactions. The summits and upper rift zones of the active volcanoes are characterized by high-velocity materials, correlated with intrusive magma cumulates. These high-velocity materials often do not extend the full lengths of the rift zones, suggesting that rift zone intrusions may be spatially limited. Seismicity tends to be localized seaward of the most active intrusive bodies. Low-velocity materials beneath parts of the active rift zones of Kilauea and Mauna Loa suggest discontinuous rift zone intrusives, possibly due to the presence of a preexisting volcanic edifice, e.g., along Mauna Loa beneath Kilauea's southwest rift zone, or alternatively, removal of high-velocity materials by large-scale landsliding, e.g., along Mauna Loa's western flank. Both locations also show increased seismicity that may result from edifice interactions or reactivation of buried faults. New high-velocity regions are recognized and suggest the presence of buried, and in some cases, previously unknown rift zones, within the northwest flank of Mauna Loa, and the south flanks of Mauna Loa, Hualalai, and Mauna Kea. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Hawaii.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Hawaii. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  4. The Big Island of Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Boasting snow-covered mountain peaks and tropical forest, the Island of Hawaii, the largest of the Hawaiian Islands, is stunning at any altitude. This false-color composite (processed to simulate true color) image of Hawaii was constructed from data gathered between 1999 and 2001 by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) instrument, flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. The Landsat data were processed by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to develop a landcover map. This map will be used as a baseline to chart changes in land use on the islands. Types of change include the construction of resorts along the coastal areas, and the conversion of sugar plantations to other crop types. Hawaii was created by a 'hotspot' beneath the ocean floor. Hotspots form in areas where superheated magma in the Earth's mantle breaks through the Earth's crust. Over the course of millions of years, the Pacific Tectonic Plate has slowly moved over this hotspot to form the entire Hawaiian Island archipelago. The black areas on the island (in this scene) that resemble a pair of sun-baked palm fronds are hardened lava flows formed by the active Mauna Loa Volcano. Just to the north of Mauna Loa is the dormant grayish Mauna Kea Volcano, which hasn't erupted in an estimated 3,500 years. A thin greyish plume of smoke is visible near the island's southeastern shore, rising from Kilauea-the most active volcano on Earth. Heavy rainfall and fertile volcanic soil have given rise to Hawaii's lush tropical forests, which appear as solid dark green areas in the image. The light green, patchy areas near the coasts are likely sugar cane plantations, pineapple farms, and human settlements. Courtesy of the NOAA Coastal Services Center Hawaii Land Cover Analysis project

  5. The perception of volcanic risk in Kona communities from Mauna Loa and Hualālai volcanoes, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregg, Chris E.; Houghton, B.F.; Johnston, David M.; Paton, Douglas; Swanson, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Volcanic hazards in Kona (i.e. the western side of the island of Hawai'i) stem primarily from Mauna Loa and Huala??lai volcanoes. The former has erupted 39 times since 1832. Lava flows were emplaced in Kona during seven of these eruptions and last impacted Kona in 1950. Huala??lai last erupted in ca. 1800. Society's proximity to potential eruptive sources and the potential for relatively fast-moving lava flows, coupled with relatively long time intervals since the last eruptions in Kona, are the underlying stimuli for this study of risk perception. Target populations were high-school students and adults ( n =462). Using these data, we discuss threat knowledge as an influence on risk perception, and perception as a driving mechanism for preparedness. Threat knowledge and perception of risk were found to be low to moderate. On average, fewer than two-thirds of the residents were aware of the most recent eruptions that impacted Kona, and a minority felt that Mauna Loa and Huala??lai could ever erupt again. Furthermore, only about one-third were aware that lava flows could reach the coast in Kona in less than 3 h. Lava flows and ash fall were perceived to be among the least likely hazards to affect the respondent's community within the next 10 years, whereas vog (volcanic smog) was ranked the most likely. Less than 18% identified volcanic hazards as amongst the most likely hazards to affect them at home, school, or work. Not surprisingly, individual preparedness measures were found on average to be limited to simple tasks of value in frequently occurring domestic emergencies, whereas measures specific to infrequent hazard events such as volcanic eruptions were seldom adopted. Furthermore, our data show that respondents exhibit an 'unrealistic optimism bias' and infer that responsibility for community preparedness for future eruptions primarily rests with officials. We infer that these respondents may be less likely to attend to hazard information, react to warnings as

  6. Sun photometer and lidar measurements of the plume from the Hawaii Kilauea Volcano Pu'u O'o vent: Aerosol flux and SO2 lifetime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, J.N.; Horton, K.A.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Lienert, B.; Sharma, S.K.; Lau, E.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Oppenheimer, C.

    2002-01-01

    Aerosol optical depths and lidar measurements were obtained under the plume of Hawaii Kilauea Volcano on August 17, 2001, ???9 km downwind from the erupting Pu'u O'o vent. Measured aerosol optical depths (at 500 nm) were between 0.2-0.4. Aerosol size distributions inverted from the spectral sun photometer measurements suggest the volcanic aerosol is present in the accumulation mode (0.1-0.5 micron diameter), which is consistent with past in situ optical counter measurements. The aerosol dry mass flux rate was calculated to be 53 Mg d-1. The estimated SO2 emission rate during the aerosol measurements was ???1450 Mg d-1. Assuming the sulfur emissions at Pu'u O'o vent are mainly SO2 (not aerosol), this corresponds to a SO2 half-life of 6.0 hours in the atmosphere.

  7. Estimating the volcanic emission rate and atmospheric lifetime of SO2 from space: a case study for Kīlauea volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beirle, Steffen; Hörmann, Christoph; Penning de Vries, Malouse; Dörner, Stefan; Kern, Christoph; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of SO2 column densities derived from GOME-2 satellite measurements for the Kīlauea volcano (Hawai`i) for 2007–2012. During a period of enhanced degassing activity in March–November 2008, monthly mean SO2 emission rates and effective SO2 lifetimes are determined simultaneously from the observed downwind plume evolution and meteorological wind fields, without further model input. Kīlauea is particularly suited for quantitative investigations from satellite observations owing to the absence of interfering sources, the clearly defined downwind plumes caused by steady trade winds, and generally low cloud fractions. For March–November 2008, the effective SO2 lifetime is 1–2 days, and Kīlauea SO2 emission rates are 9–21 kt day−1, which is about 3 times higher than initially reported from ground-based monitoring systems.

  8. Snow on Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    With summits of 13,792 ft (4,205 m) and 13,674 ft (4,169 m), it's not unusual for the Mauna Kea (north) and Mauna Loa (south) volcanoes on Hawaii's Big Island to get wintertime snowfall. In this true-color MODIS image from February 28, 2002, a late winter snow has settled on the volcanoes' flanks, creating large white circles in the north and central portions of the island. The white patchy areas along the west coast are clouds, and not snow, which is more evident in the false color image, in which ice crystals on the ground appear solid red and clouds appear peach. Don't be fooled by the red outlines on the eastern coast. They aren't snow, but rather are used to mark locations where MODIS detected the thermal signature of the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The dark streaks and patches reveal the location of lava flows.

  9. 2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF MEDIAN. NOTE VOLCANIC STONE CURBING (EDGING) TYPICAL OF MOST PARKING AREAS; TRIANGLING AT END NOT TYPICAL. MAUNA LOA VOLCANO IN BACK. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  10. 76 FR 75557 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement for General Management Plan/Wilderness Study, Hawaii...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ...The National Park Service is expanding the scope of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that is being prepared for updating the General Management Plan (GMP) for Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. As part of this conservation planning and environmental impact analysis effort, the Draft EIS will include a wilderness study to determine if any additional portions of the park should be......

  11. New Insights into the Influence of Structural Controls Affecting Groundwater Flow and Storage Within an Ocean Island Volcano, Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.; Haskins, E.; Wallin, E.; Pierce, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Humu'ula Groundwater Research Project was undertaken on the Island of Hawaii in an effort to characterize the hydrologic structures controlling groundwater movement and storage within Saddle region between Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea volcanoes. In 2013, the project drilled a 1764 m, continuously-cored, borehole from an elevation of 1946 m amsl near the center of the Saddle, and has now completed a second borehole at an elevation of 1645 m on the western edge of the Saddle. Although the stratigraphy of the rocks is similar, dominantly pahoehoe lava flows with somewhat fewer a'a lavas and occasional dike rock intervals, the hydrologic character of the formation in the latter is distinctly different from the former. Whereas the former test hole encountered a few high elevation perched aquifers that were underlain by an inferred regional, dike-impounded, water table at an elevation of 1390 m amsl, the latter bore encountered a sequence of confined aquifers with heads substantially higher than depth of entry. The shallowest of the confined aquifers was encountered at an elevation of 1340 m and showed a hydrostatic head of >160 m when the capping formation was breached. Deeper confined aquifers showed initial heads of > 400 m although none had heads sufficient to discharge at the surface. Most of the confined aquifers were associated with clay-rich ash beds that mantled the more permeable lavas however one of the deeper confined zones, that showed the highest head, was associated with a highly compacted breccia zone that has tentatively been ascribed to an explosive deposit. Chemical analysis of the clasts within this layer is underway to determine whether this deposit is associated with explosive activity of Mauna Kea or with another volcano on the island. Previous geophysical surveys have suggested that these confined aquifers may extend well down the leeward slopes of Mauna Kea. Evidence of multiple confining layers within the flanks of Mauna Kea suggest that its

  12. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of Acid-Sulfate Alteration of Basaltic Material on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii: Jarosite and Hydrated Halloysite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Trevor G.; Morris, R. V.; Archilles C. N.; Agresti, D. G.; Ming, D. W.; Hamilton, J. C.; Mertzman, S. A.; Smith, J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfates have been identified on the martian surface during robotic surface exploration and by orbital remote sensing. Measurements at Meridiani Planum (MP) by the Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) and Mossbauer (MB) instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity document the presence of a ubiquitous sulfate-rich outcrop (20-40% SO3) that has jarosite as an anhydrous Fe3+-sulfate [1- 3]. The presence of jarosite implies a highly acidic (pH <3) formation environment [4]. Jarosite and other sulfate minerals, including kieserite, gypsum, and alunite have also been identified in several locations in orbital remote sensing data from the MEx OMEGA and MRO CRISM instruments [e.g. 5-8]. Acid sulfate weathering of basaltic materials is an obvious pathway for formation of sulfate-bearing phases on Mars [e.g. 4, 9, 10]. In order to constrain acid-sulfate pathways on Mars, we are studying the mineralogical and chemical manifestations of acid-sulfate alteration of basaltic compositions in terrestrial environments. We have previously shown that acidsulfate alteration of tephra under hydrothermal conditions on the Puu Poliahu cone (summit region of Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii) resulted in jarosite and alunite as sulfate-bearing alteration products [11-14]. Other, more soluble, sulfates may have formed, but were leached away by rain and melting snow. Acidsulfate processes on Puu Poliahu also formed hematite spherules similar (except in size) to the hematite spherules observed at MP as an alteration product [14]. Phyllosilicates, usually smectite }minor kaolinite are also present as alteration products [13]. We discuss here an occurrence of acid-sulfate alteration on Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii). We report VNIR spectra (0.35-2.5 microns ASD spectrometer), Mossbauer spectra (MER-like ESPI backscatter spectrometer), powder XRD (PANalytical), and major element chemical compositions (XRF with LOI and Fe redox) for comparison to similar data acquired or to be acquired by MRO

  13. Microearthquake streaks and seismicity triggered by slow earthquakes on the mobile south flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, C.J.; Brooks, B.A.; Foster, J.H.; Okubo, P.G.

    2007-01-01

    We perform waveform cross correlation and high precision relocation of both background seismicity and seismicity triggered by periodic slow earthquakes at Kilauea Volcano's mobile south flank. We demonstrate that the triggered seismicity dominantly occurs on several preexisting fault zones at the Hilina region. Regardless of the velocity model employed, the relocated earthquake epicenters and triggered seismicity localize onto distinct fault zones that form streaks aligned with the slow earthquake surface displacements determined from GPS. Due to the unknown effects of velocity heterogeneity and nonideal station coverage, our relocation analyses cannot distinguish whether some of these fault zones occur within the volcanic crust at shallow depths or whether all occur on the decollement between the volcano and preexisting oceanic crust at depths of ???8 km. Nonetheless, these Hilina fault zones consistently respond to stress perturbations from nearby slow earthquakes. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Thermal and rheological controls on magma migration in dikes: Examples from the east rift zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, E. A.; Wilson, L.; Pinkerton, H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-lived eruptions from basaltic volcanoes involving episodic or steady activity indicate that a delicate balance has been struck between the rate of magma cooling in the dike system feeding the vent and the rate of magma supply to the dike system from a reservoir. We describe some key factors, involving the relationships between magma temperature, magma rheology, and dike geometry that control the nature of such eruptions.

  15. National priorities list sites: California and Hawaii, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The publication provides general Superfund background information and descriptions of activities at each State National Priorities List (NPL) site. It clearly describes what the problems are, what EPA and others participating in site cleanups are doing, and how the nation can move ahead in solving these serious problems. Compiles site summary fact sheets on each State site being cleaned up under the Superfund Program.

  16. Mapping three-dimensional surface deformation by combining multiple-aperture interferometry and conventional interferometry: Application to the June 2007 eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jung, H.-S.; Lu, Zhiming; Won, J.-S.; Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta

    2011-01-01

    Surface deformation caused by an intrusion and small eruption during June 17-19, 2007, along the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, was three-dimensionally reconstructed from radar interferograms acquired by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) phased-array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) (PALSAR) instrument. To retrieve the 3-D surface deformation, a method that combines multiple-aperture interferometry (MAI) and conventional interferometric SAR (InSAR) techniques was applied to one ascending and one descending ALOS PALSAR interferometric pair. The maximum displacements as a result of the intrusion and eruption are about 0.8, 2, and 0.7 m in the east, north, and up components, respectively. The radar-measured 3-D surface deformation agrees with GPS data from 24 sites on the volcano, and the root-mean-square errors in the east, north, and up components of the displacement are 1.6, 3.6, and 2.1 cm, respectively. Since a horizontal deformation of more than 1 m was dominantly in the north-northwest-south-southeast direction, a significant improvement of the north-south component measurement was achieved by the inclusion of MAI measurements that can reach a standard deviation of 3.6 cm. A 3-D deformation reconstruction through the combination of conventional InSAR and MAI will allow for better modeling, and hence, a more comprehensive understanding, of the source geometry associated with volcanic, seismic, and other processes that are manifested by surface deformation.

  17. What makes hydromagmatic eruptions violent? Some insights from the Keanakāko'i Ash, Kı̄lauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.; Christiansen, Robert L.; Thornber, Carl R.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Beeson, Melvin H.

    2004-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions at the summit of Ki??ilauea volcano, Hawai'i, are of two dramatically contrasting types: (1) benign lava flows and lava fountains; and (2) violent, mostly prehistoric eruptions that dispersed tephra over hundreds of square kilometers. The violence of the latter eruptions has been attributed to mixing of water and magma within a wet summit caldera; however, magma injection into water at other volcanoes does not consistently produce widespread tephras. To identify other factors that may have contributed to the violence of these eruptions, we sampled tephra from the Keanaka??ko'i Ash, the most recent large hydromagmatic deposit, and measured vesicularity, bubble-number density and dissolved volatile content of juvenile matrix glass to constrain magma ascent rate and degree of degassing at the time of quenching. Bubble-number densities (9 ?? 104- 1 ?? 107 cm-3) of tephra fragments exceed those of most historically erupted Ki??lauean tephras (3 ?? 103-1.8 ?? 105 cm-3), and suggest exceptionally high magma effusion rates. Dissolved sulfur (average = 330 ppm) and water (0.15-0.45 wt.%) concentrations exceed equilibrium-saturation values at 1 atm pressure (100-150 ppm and ???0.09%, respectively), suggesting that clasts quenched before equilibrating to atmospheric pressure. We interpret these results to suggest rapid magma injection into a wet crater, perhaps similar to continuous-uprush jets at Surtsey. Estimates of Reynolds number suggest that the erupting magma was turbulent and would have mixed with surrounding water in vortices ranging downward in size to centimeters. Such fine-scale mixing would have ensured rapid heat exchange and extensive magma fragmentation, maximizing the violence of these eruptions.

  18. Mass accumulation beneath the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i (2008-2012): new constraints from micro-gravity and deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, M.; Poland, M. P.; Battaglia, M.; Amelung, F.

    2012-12-01

    Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, is currently erupting at two locations: from vents on the volcano's east rift zone (ERZ) since 1983 and at the summit, within Halema'uma'u Crater, since March 2008. A previous study that combined micro-gravity and deformation measurements acquired between 1975 and January 2008 revealed shallow magma accumulation ~1 km beneath the southeastern rim of Halema'uma'u Crater, near where the new eruptive vent opened. This vent is now occupied by a > 100 m diameter lava lake whose surface fluctuates between 60 and 150 meters below the vent rim. New gravity surveys of about 50 stations in the summit area of Kilauea have been performed since the start of the summit eruption. The measurements span a sequence of important volcanic events: (i) long-term deflation across the summit until March 2010, (ii) re-inflation until March 5, 2011, when (iii) an eruptive fissure opened along the ERZ causing rapid deflation at the summit of the volcano and, (iv) re-inflation from the end of the fissure eruption on March 9, 2011, through 2012. Microgravity measurements were performed using two Scintrex CG-5 gravimeters and following a double-looping procedure. GPS data and InSAR measurements from both the German Space Agency (DLR) TerraSAR-X satellite and the Italian Space Agency (ASI) satellite-constellation Cosmo-SkyMed are used to adjust the gravity measurements for the free-air effect and to constrain magmatic sources. Preliminary results show that, while no significant residual gravity changes are recorded from 2008 to March 2011, following the March 2011 eruption a positive gravity anomaly (> 100 ± 25 μGal) is present in the same area that showed signs of mass accumulation during 1975-2008. The positive residual gravity change is also accompanied by inflation of the summit (maximum uplift was about 0.12 m). We investigate the nature of this mass accumulation through the combined analysis of deformation and micro-gravity data.

  19. Rift zones and magma plumbing system of Piton de la Fournaise volcano: How do they differ from Hawaii and Etna?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Laurent; Ferrazzini, Valérie; Di Muro, Andrea; Villeneuve, Nicolas; Famin, Vincent

    2015-09-01

    On ocean basaltic volcanoes, magma transfer to the surface proceeds by subvertical ascent from the mantle lithosphere through the oceanic crust and the volcanic edifice, possibly followed by lateral propagation along rift zones. We use a 19-year-long database of volcano-tectonic seismic events together with detailed mapping of the cinder cones and eruptive fissures to determine the geometry and the dynamics of the magma paths intersecting the edifice of Piton de la Fournaise volcano. We show that the overall plumbing system, from about 30 km depth to the surface, is composed of two structural levels that feed distinct types of rift zones. The deep plumbing system is rooted between Piton des Neiges and Piton de la Fournaise volcanoes and has a N30-40 orientation. Above 20 km below sea level (bsl), the main axis switches to a N120 orientation, which permits magma transfer from the lithospheric mantle to the base of the oceanic crust, below the summit of Piton de la Fournaise. The related NW-SE rift zone is 15 km wide, linear, spotted by small to large pyroclastic cones and related lava flows and emits slightly alkaline magmas resulting from high-pressure fractionation of clinopyroxene ± olivine. This rift zone has low magma production rate of ~ 0.5-3.6 × 10- 3 m3s- 1 and an eruption periodicity of around 200 years over the last 30 ka. Seismic data suggest that the long-lasting activity of this rift zone result from regional NNE-SSW extension, which reactivates inherited lithospheric faults by the effect of underplating and/or thermal erosion of the mantle lithosphere. The shallow plumbing system (< 11 km bsl) connects the base of the crust with the Central Cone. It is separated from the deep plumbing system by a relatively large aseismic zone between 8 and 11 km bsl, which may represent a deep storage level of magma. The shallow plumbing system feeds frequent, short-lived summit and flank (NE and SE flanks) eruptions along summit and outer rift zones, respectively

  20. The Importance of Sampling Strategies on AMS Determination of Dykes II. Further Examples from the Kapaa Quarry, Koolau Volcano, Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Borunda, R.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Canon-Tapia, E.

    2012-12-01

    Recent work has suggested the convenience of dyke sampling along several profiles parallel and perpendicular to its walls to increase the probability of determining a geologically significant magma flow direction using anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements. For this work, we have resampled in great detail some dykes from the Kapaa Quarry, Koolau Volcano in Oahu Hawaii, comparing the results of a more detailed sampling scheme with those obtained previously with a traditional sampling scheme. In addition to the AMS results we will show magnetic properties, including magnetic grain sizes, Curie points and AMS measured at two different frequencies on a new MFK1-FA Spinner Kappabridge. Our results thus far provide further empirical evidence supporting the occurrence of a definite cyclic fabric acquisition during the emplacement of at least some of the dykes. This cyclic behavior can be captured using the new sampling scheme, but might be easily overlooked if the simple, more traditional sampling scheme is used. Consequently, previous claims concerning the advantages of adopting a more complex sampling scheme are justified since this approach can serve to reduce the uncertainty in the interpretation of AMS results.

  1. TerraSAR-X interferometry reveals small-scale deformation associated with the summit eruption of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Nicole; Poland, Michael P.; Lundgren, Paul R.

    2013-04-01

    On 19 March 2008, a small explosive eruption at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i, heralded the formation of a new vent along the east wall of Halema`uma`u Crater. In the ensuing years, the vent widened due to collapses of the unstable rim and conduit wall; some collapses impacted an actively circulating lava pond and resulted in small explosive events. We used synthetic aperture radar data collected by the TerraSAR-X satellite, a joint venture between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and EADS Astrium, to identify and analyze small-scale surface deformation around the new vent during 2008-2012. Lidar data were used to construct a digital elevation model to correct for topographic phase, allowing us to generate differential interferograms with a spatial resolution of about 3 m in Kīlauea's summit area. These interferograms reveal subsidence within about 100 m of the rim of the vent. Small baseline subset time series analysis suggests that the subsidence rate is not constant and, over time, may provide an indication of vent stability and potential for rim and wall collapse—information with obvious hazard implications. The deformation is not currently detectable by other space- or ground-based techniques.

  2. A century of studying effusive eruptions in Hawai'i: Chapter 9 in Characteristics of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cashman, Katherine V.; Mangan, Margaret T.

    2014-01-01

    The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) was established as a natural laboratory to study volcanic processes. Since the most frequent form of volcanic activity in Hawai‘i is effusive, a major contribution of the past century of research at HVO has been to describe and quantify lava flow emplacement processes. Lava flow research has taken many forms; first and foremost it has been a collection of basic observational data on active lava flows from both Mauna Loa and Kīlauea volcanoes that have occurred over the past 100 years. Both the types and quantities of observational data have changed with changing technology; thus, another important contribution of HVO to lava flow studies has been the application of new observational techniques. Also important has been a long-term effort to measure the physical properties (temperature, viscosity, crystallinity, and so on) of flowing lava. Field measurements of these properties have both motivated laboratory experiments and presaged the results of those experiments, particularly with respect to understanding the rheology of complex fluids. Finally, studies of the dynamics of lava flow emplacement have combined detailed field measurements with theoretical models to build a framework for the interpretation of lava flows in numerous other terrestrial, submarine, and planetary environments. Here, we attempt to review all these aspects of lava flow studies and place them into a coherent framework that we hope will motivate future research.

  3. Trace element abundances of high-MgO glasses from Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Haleakala volcanoes, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, T.P.; Clague, D.A.; Hauri, E.H.; Grove, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    We performed an ion-microprobe study of eleven high-MgO (6.7-14.8 wt%) tholeiite glasses from the Hawaiian volcanoes Kilauea, Mauna Loa and Haleakala. We determined the rare earth (RE), high field strength, and other selected trace element abundances of these glasses, and used the data to establish their relationship to typical Hawaiian shield tholeiite and to infer characteristics of their source. The glasses have trace element abundance characteristics generally similar to those of typical shield tholeiites, e.g. L(light)REE/H(heavy)REE(C1) > 1. The Kilauea and Mauna Loa glasses, however, display trace and major element characteristics that cross geochemical discriminants observed between Kilauea and Mauna Loa shield lavas. The glasses contain a blend of these discriminating chemical characteristics, and are not exactly like the typical shield lavas from either volcano. The production of these hybrid magmas likely requires a complexly zoned source, rather than two unique sources. When corrected for olivine fractionation, the glass data show correlations between CaO concentration and incompatible trace element abundances, indicating that CaO may behave incompatibly during melting of the tholeiite source. Furthermore, the tholeiite source must contain residual garnet and clinopyroxene to account for the variation in trace element abundances of the Kilauea glasses. Inversion modeling indicates that the Kilauea source is flat relative to C1 chondrites, and has a higher bulk distribution coefficient for the HREE than the LREE.

  4. Geologic Resource Evaluation of Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site, Hawai'i: Part I, Geology and Coastal Landforms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, Bruce M.; Cochran, Susan A.; Gibbs, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    Geologic resource inventories of lands managed by the National Park Service (NPS) are important products for the parks and are designed to provide scientific information to better manage park resources. Park-specific geologic reports are used to identify geologic features and processes that are relevant to park ecosystems, evaluate the impact of human activities on geologic features and processes, identify geologic research and monitoring needs, and enhance opportunities for education and interpretation. These geologic reports are planned to provide a brief geologic history of the park and address specific geologic issues forming a link between the park geology and the resource manager. The Kona coast National Parks of the Island of Hawai'i are intended to preserve the natural beauty of the Kona coast and protect significant ancient structures and artifacts of the native Hawaiians. Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site (PUHE), Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park (KAHO), and Pu'uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Park (PUHO) are three Kona parks studied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Team in cooperation with the National Park Service. This report is one of six related reports designed to provide geologic and benthic-habitat information for the three Kona parks. Each geology and coastal-landform report describes the regional geologic setting of the Hawaiian Islands, gives a general description of the geology of the Kona coast, and presents the geologic setting and issues for one of the parks. The related benthic-habitat mapping reports discuss the marine data and habitat classification scheme, and present results of the mapping program. Pu'ukohola Heiau National Historic Site (PUHE) is the smallest (~86 acres) of three National Parks located on the leeward Kona coast of the Island of Hawai'i. The main structure at PUHE, Pu'ukohola Heiau, is an important historical temple that was built during 1790-91 by King Kamehameha I

  5. Exploring Geology on the World-Wide Web--Volcanoes and Volcanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schimmrich, Steven Henry; Gore, Pamela J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on sites on the World Wide Web that offer information about volcanoes. Web sites are classified into areas of Global Volcano Information, Volcanoes in Hawaii, Volcanoes in Alaska, Volcanoes in the Cascades, European and Icelandic Volcanoes, Extraterrestrial Volcanism, Volcanic Ash and Weather, and Volcano Resource Directories. Suggestions…

  6. Groundwater level changes in a deep well in response to a magma intrusion event on Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Johnston, M.J.S.

    2003-01-01

    On May 21, 2001, an abrupt inflation of Kilauea Volcano's summit induced a rapid and large increase in compressional strain, with a maximum of 2 ??strain recorded by a borehole dilatometer. Water level (pressure) simultaneously dropped by 6 cm. This mode of water level change (drop) is in contrast to that expected for compressional strain from poroelastic theory, and therefore it is proposed that the stress applied by the intrusion has caused opening of fractures or interflows that drained water out of the well. Upon relaxation of the stress recorded by the dilatometer, water levels have recovered at a similar rate. The proposed model has implications for the analysis of ground surface deformation and for mechanisms that trigger phreatomagmatic eruptions.

  7. Two hundred years of magma transport and storage at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, 1790-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Thomas L.; Klein, Fred W.

    2014-01-01

    Kīlauea’s history can be considered in cycles of equilibrium, crisis, and recovery. The approach of a crisis is driven by a magma supply rate that greatly exceeds the capacity of the plumbing to deliver magma to the surface. Crises can be anticipated by inflation measured at Kīlauea’s summit coupled with an increase in overall seismicity, particularly manifest by intrusion and eruption in the southwest sector of the volcano. Unfortunately the nature of the crisis—for example, large earthquake, new eruption, or edifice-changing intrusion—cannot be specified ahead of time. We conclude that Kīlauea’s cycles are controlled by nonlinear dynamics, which underscores the difficulty in predicting eruptions and earthquakes.

  8. Characterization of very-long-period seismicity accompanying summit activity at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i: 2007-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Phillip; Chouet, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Eruptive activity returned to the summit region of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai'i with the formation of the “Overlook crater” within the Halema'uma'u Crater in March 2008. The new crater continued to grow through episodic collapse of the crater walls and as of late 2013 had grown into an approximately elliptical opening with dimensions of ~ 160 × 215 m extending to a depth of ~ 200 m. Occasional weak explosive events and a persistent gas plume continued to occur through 2013. Lava was first observed in the new crater in September 2008, and through 2009 the lava level remained deep in the crater and was only occasionally observed. Since early 2010 a lava lake with fluctuating level within the Overlook crater has been nearly continuously present, and has reached to within 22 m of the Overlook crater rim. Volcanic activity at Kīlauea Volcano is episodic at all time scales and the characterization of very-long-period seismicity in the band 2–100 s for the years 2007–2013 illuminates a portion of this broad spectrum of volcanic behavior. Three types of very-long-period events have been observed over this time and each is associated with distinct processes. Type 1 events are associated with vigorous degassing and occurred primarily between 2007 and 2009. Type 2 events are associated with rockfalls onto the lava lake and occurred primarily after early 2010. Both of these event types are induced by pressure and momentum changes at the top of the magma column that are transmitted downward to a source centroid ~ 1 km below the northeast corner of the Halema'uma'u Crater where the energy couples to the solid Earth at a geometrical discontinuity in the underlying dike system. Type 3 events are not related to surficial phenomena but are associated with transients in mass transfer that occur within the dike system. Very-long-period tremor has also accompanied the return of eruptive activity, with increasing amplitude associated with hours- to months-long changes in gas

  9. Satellite monitoring of dramatic changes at Hawai'i's only alpine lake: Lake Waiau on Mauna Kea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Kauahikaua, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Lake Waiau is a small, typically 100-meter-long lake, located near the summit of Mauna Kea volcano, on the Island of Hawaiʻi. It is Hawaiʻi’s only alpine lake and is considered sacred in Hawaiian cultural tradition. Over the past few years, the lake has diminished in size, and, by October 2013, surface water had almost completely disappeared from the lake. In this study, we use high-resolution satellite images and aerial photographs to document recent changes at the lake. Based on our reconstructions covering the past 200 years, the historical lake surface area has typically ranged from 5,000 to 7,000 square meters, but in 2010 a dramatic plunge in lake area ensued. The lake area rebounded significantly in early 2014, following heavy winter storms. This near disappearance of the lake, judging from analysis of visitor photographs and field reports, appears to be highly unusual, if not unprecedented, in the historical record. The unusually low water levels in the lake are consistent with a recent severe drought in Hawaiʻi.

  10. InSAR observations of deformation associated with new episodes of volcanism at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    In June 2007, the Pu'u 'O??'o??-Kupaianaha eruption of Ki??lauea Volcano was interrupted when magma intruded the east rift zone (ERZ), resulting in a small extrusion of lava near Makaopuhi Crater. Deformation associated with the activity was exceptionally well-documented by ASAR interferometry, which indicates deflation of the summit and uplift and extension of the ERZ. Models of co-intrusion interferograms suggest that the dike was emplaced in two distinct segments. The modeled volume of the dike greatly exceeds that of the deflation source, raising the possibility that magma from the downrift Pu'u 'O??'o?? vent (dominant extrusion site at Ki??lauea since 1983) contributed to the eruption near Makaopuhi, or that the magma that fed the eruption from the summit was compressible. A month following the Makaopuhi eruption, an eruptive fissure opened on the east flank of Pu'u 'O??'o??. Interferograms, processed within 48 hours of the event, were critical in demonstrating that the magma source feeding the eruption was shallow. The eruption probably resulted from overpressure in Pu'u 'O??'o??'s magmatic system.

  11. A delicate balance of magmatic-tectonic interaction at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, revealed from slow slip events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery-Brown, Emily; Poland, Michael; Miklius, Asta

    2015-01-01

    Eleven slow slip events (SSEs) have occurred on the southern flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai’i, since 1997 through 2014. We analyze this series of SSEs in the context of Kilauea’s magma system to assess whether or not there are interactions between these tectonic events and eruptive/intrusive activity. Over time, SSEs have increased in magnitude and become more regular, with interevent times averaging 2.44 ± 0.15 years since 2003. Two notable SSEs that impacted both the flank and the magmatic system occurred in 2007, when an intrusion and small eruption on the East Rift Zone were part of a feedback with a SSE and 2012, when slow slip induced 2.5 cm of East Rift Zone opening (but without any change in eruptive activity). A summit inflation event and surge in East Rift Zone lava effusion was associated with a SSE in 2005, but the inferred triggering relation is not clear due to a poorly constrained slip onset time. Our results demonstrate that slow slip along Kilauea’s décollement has the potential to trigger and be triggered by activity within the volcano’s magma system. Since only three of the SSEs have been associated with changes in magmatic activity within the summit and rift zones, both the décollement and magma system must be close to failure for triggering to occur.

  12. Geothermal evolution of an intruded dike in the rift zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii from VLF and self-potential measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2015-09-01

    Self-potential (SP) and VLF measurements were made in 1973, 1975, 1995, 1997 and 2012 across a basaltic dike that intruded into the Koae fault zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii in May 1973. The SP anomaly remained strong throughout. In 2012 it was at about 60% of the strength it had in 1973. In contrast, the VLF anomaly, though diminished, was still observable in 1995/1997, but by 2012 it had disappeared. A hydrothermal dike model, with parameters calibrated by modeling the solidification of Kilauea Iki lava lake, is used to calculate temperatures and conductivity variation. Following Jaeger's (1957) method, we find that the time in years for a dike of width W (m) to solidify is 0.0075W2. Thus, a 1 m dike solidifies within the first few days, and after 39 years is only tens of degrees above ambient. Given the orders of magnitude difference between the conductivities of wet and dry basalt, we infer, that after solidification, the VLF anomalies were caused by induction in a localized veil of wet, hot basalt enveloping the dike, that was generated initially by condensation of steam, and subsequently by condensation of evaporated water as temperatures reduced. The conductivity anomaly persisted until the mid-nineties. By 2012, temperatures and condensation were too small for a VLF signal. The persistent SP anomaly is attributed to localized fluid disruption, with evaporation mainly at the water table and in the vadose zone. Streaming potentials are associated with evaporative circulation in the vadose zone. Next to the dike a positive potential is generated by upward flow of moisture-laden air, with a smaller negative potential on its flanks from downward infiltrating rainwater. The analysis indicates that the combination of SP and VLF measurements can characterize the evolving geothermal regime of intrusions above the water table.

  13. Petrology of lavas from episodes 2-47 of the Puu Oo eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Evaluation of magmatic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, M.O.; Rhodes, J.M.; Wolfe, E.W.; Ulrich, G.E.; Ho, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Puu Oo eruption of Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii is one of its largest and most compositionally varied historical eruptions. The mineral and whole-rock compositions of the Puu Oo lavas indicate that there were three compositionally distinct magmas involved in the eruption. Two of these magmas were differentiated (<6.8 wt% MgO) and were apparently stored in the rift zone prior to the eruption. A third, more mafic magma (9-10 wt% MgO) was probably intruded as a dike from Kilauea's summit reservoir just before the start of the eruption. Its intrusion forced the other two magmas to mix, forming a hybrid that erupted during the first three eruptive episodes from a fissure system of vents. A new hybrid was erupted during episode 3 from the vent where Puu Oo later formed. The composition of the lava erupted from this vent became progressively more mafic over the next 21 months, although significant compositional variation occurred within some eruptive episodes. The intra-episode compositional variation was probably due to crystal fractionation in the shallow (0.0-2.9 km), dike-shaped (i.e. high surface area/volume ratio) and open-topped Puu Oo magma reservoir. The long-term compositional variation was controlled largely by mixing the early hybrid with the later, more mafic magma. The percentage of mafic magma in the erupted lava increased progressively to 100% by episode 30 (about two years after the eruption started). Three separate magma reservoirs were involved in the Puu Oo eruption. The two deeper reservoirs (3-4 km) recharged the shallow (0.4-2.9 km) Puu Oo reservoir. Recharge of the shallow reservoir occurred rapidly during an eruption indicating that these reservoirs were well connected. The connection with the early hybrid magma body was cut off before episode 30. Subsequently, only mafic magma from the summit reservoir has recharged the Puu Oo reservoir. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Puhimau Thermal Area: A Window into the Upper East Rift Zone of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] Volcano, Hawaii?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, K. A.; Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.; Doukas, M. P.; Gerlach, T. M.

    2006-04-01

    We report the results of two soil CO2 efflux surveys by the closed chamber circulation method at the Puhimau thermal area in the upper East Rift Zone (ERZ) of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] volcano, Hawaii. The surveys were undertaken in 1996 and 1998 to constrain how much CO2 might be reaching the ERZ after degassing beneath the summit caldera and whether the Puhimau thermal area might be a significant contributor to the overall CO2 budget of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.]. The area was revisited in 2001 to determine the effects of surface disturbance on efflux values by the collar emplacement technique utilized in the earlier surveys. Utilizing a cutoff value of 50 g m-2 d-1 for the surrounding forest background efflux, the CO2 emission rates for the anomaly at Puhimau thermal area were 27 t d-1 in 1996 and 17 t d-1 in 1998. Water vapor was removed before analysis in all cases in order to obtain CO2 values on a dry air basis and mitigate the effect of water vapor dilution on the measurements. It is clear that Puhimau thermal area is not a significant contributor to [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] CO2 output and that most of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.] CO2 (8500 t d-1) is degassed at the summit, leaving only magma with its remaining stored volatiles, such as SO2, for injection down the ERZ. Because of the low CO2 emission rate and the presence of a shallow water table in the upper ERZ that effectively scrubs SO2 and other acid gases, Puhimau thermal area currently does not appear to be generally well suited for observing temporal changes in degassing at [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.].

  15. Low intensity hawaiian fountaining as exemplified by the March 2011, Kamoamoa eruption at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, T. R.; Houghton, B. F.; Poland, M. P.; Patrick, M. R.; Thelen, W. A.; Sutton, A. J.; Parcheta, C. E.; Thornber, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The latest 'classic' hawaiian high-fountaining activity at Kilauea Volcano occurred in 1983-1986 with construction of the Pu`u `O`o pyroclastic cone. Since then, eruptions at Kilauea have been dominated by nearly continuous effusive activity. Episodes of sustained low hawaiian fountaining have occurred but are rare and restricted to short-lived fissure eruptions along Kilauea's east rift zone. The most recent of these weakly explosive fissure eruptions--the Kamoamoa eruption--occurred 5-9 March 2011. The Kamoamoa eruption was probably the consequence of a decrease in the carrying capacity of the conduit feeding the episode 58 eruptive vent down-rift from Pu`u `O`o in Kilauea's east rift zone. As output from the vent waned, Kilauea's summit magma storage and east rift zone transport system began to pressurize, as manifested by an increase in seismicity along the upper east rift zone, inflation of the summit and Pu`u `O`o, expansion of the east rift zone, and rising lava levels at both the summit and Pu`u `O`o. A dike began propagating towards the surface from beneath Makaopuhi Crater, 6 km west of Pu`u `O`o, at 1342 Hawaiian Standard Time (UTC - 10 hours) on 5 March. A fissure eruption started about 3.5 hours later near Nāpau Crater, 2 km uprift of Pu`u `O`o. Activity initially jumped between numerous en echelon fissure segments before centering on discrete vents near both ends of the 2.4-km-long fissure system for the final two days of the eruption. About 2.6 mcm of lava was erupted over the course of four days with a peak eruption rate of 11 m3/s. The petrologic characteristics of the fissure-fed lava indicate mixing between hotter mantle-derived magma and cooler rift-stored magma, with a greater proportion of the cooler component than was present in east rift zone lava erupting before March 2011. The fissure eruption was accompanied by the highest SO2 emission rates since 1986. Coincidentally, the summit and Pu`u `O`o deflated as magma drained away, causing

  16. Father's Day dike intrusion and eruption reveals interaction between magmatic and tectonic processes at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. H.; Brooks, B. A.; Sandwell, D. T.; Poland, M.; Miklius, A.; Myer, D.; Okubo, P. G.; Patrick, M.; Wolfe, C.

    2007-12-01

    The June 17-19, 2007, Father's Day dike intrusion and eruption at Kilauea volcano brought to an end a seven- year period of steady state lava effusion at the Pu'u 'O'o vent. The event was observed by an unprecedented number of geophysical instruments, with temporary arrays of GPS and tiltmeters augmenting the continuous monitoring network. Envisat and ALOS SAR scenes were also acquired during this event and provide further information on the surface deformation as the event progressed. Fortuitously, the Envisat acquisition was during a pause in the middle of the sequence, while the ALOS PALSAR scene was acquired at the end of the sequence, allowing us to model each phase separately. Analysis of these data sets indicates that, in addition to three phases of the dike intrusion, a slow earthquake also occurred on the south flank of Kilauea. The slow earthquake apparently began near the end of the second phase of the dike intrusion. It was still underway the following day, when the third phase of the intrusion began and culminated in a small eruption. This suggests the possibility that the slow earthquake was triggered by the initial diking, and then in turn influenced the progression of the intrusion. Two of the largest previous slow earthquakes also hint at a connection between slow earthquakes and eruptive activity on Kilauea. The range of observations of the Father's Day events provides us with a unique opportunity to investigate the complex interactions between the tectonic processes of the south flank and magmatic processes within the summit and rift zones.

  17. Petrologic constraints on rift-zone processes - Results from episode 1 of the Puu Oo eruption of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, M.O.; Ho, R.A.; Rhodes, J.M.; Wolfe, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Puu Oo eruption in the middle of Kilauea volcano's east rift zone provides an excellent opportunity to utilize petrologic constraints to interpret rift-zone processes. Emplacement of a dike began 24 hours before the start of the eruption on 3 January 1983. Seismic and geodetic evidence indicates that the dike collided with a magma body in the rift zone. Most of the lava produced during the initial episode of the Puu Oo eruption is of hybrid composition, with petrographic and geochemical evidence of mixing magmas of highly evllved and more mafic compositions. Some olivine and plagioclase grains in the hybrid lavas show reverse zoning. Whole-rock compositional variations are linear even for normally compatible elements like Ni and Cr. Leastsquares mixing calculations yield good residuals for major and trace element analyses for magma mixing. Crystal fractionation calculations yield unsatisfactory residuals. The highly evolved magma is similar in composition to the lava from the 1977 eruption and, at one point, vents for these two eruptions are only 200 m apart. Possibly both the 1977 lava and the highly evolved component of the episode 1 Puu Oo lava were derived from a common body of rift-zone-stored magma. The more mafic mixing component may be represented by the most mafic lava from the January 1983 eruption; it shows no evidence of magma mixing. The dike that was intruded just prior to the start of the Puu Oo eruption may have acted as a hydraulic plunger causing mixing of the two rift-zone-stored magmas. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Geophysical observations of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, 2. Constraints on the magma supply during November 1975-September 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.; Anderson, L.A.; Eaton, G.P.; Koyanagi, R.Y.; Lipman, P.W.; Lockwood, J.P.; Okamura, R.T.; Puniwai, G.S.; Sako, M.K.; Yamashita, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    Following a 22-month hiatus in eruptive activity, Kilauea volcano extruded roughly 35 ?? 106 m3 of tholeiitic basalt from vents along its middle east rift zone during 13 September-1 October, 1977. The lengthy prelude to this eruption began with a magnitude 7.2 earthquake on 29 November, 1975, and included rapid summit deflation episodes in June, July, and August 1976 and February 1977. Synthesis of seismic, geodetic, gravimetric, and electrical self-potential observations suggests the following model for this atypical Kilauea eruptive cycle. Rapid summit deflation initiated by the November 1975 earthquake reflected substantial migration of magma from beneath the summit region of Kilauea into the east and southwest rift zones. Simultaneous leveling and microgravity observations suggest that 40-90 ?? 106 m3 of void space was created within the summit magma chamber as a result of the earthquake. If this volume was filled by magma from depth before the east rift zone intrusive event of June 1976, the average rate of supply was 6-13 ?? 106 m3/month, a rate that is consistent with the value of 9 ?? 106 m3/month suggested from observations of long-duration Kilauea eruptions. Essentially zero net vertical change was recorded at the summit during the 15-month period beginning with the June 1976 intrusion and ending with the September 1977 eruption. This fact suggests that most magma supplied from depth during this interval was eventually delivered to the east rift zone, at least in part during four rapid summit deflation episodes. Microearthquake epicenters migrated downrift to the middle east rift zone for the first time during the later stages of the February 1977 intrusion, an occurrence presumably reflecting movement of magma into the eventual eruptive zone. This observation was confirmed by tilt surveys in May 1977 that revealed a major inflation center roughly 30 km east of the summit in an area of anomalous steaming and forest kill first noted in March 1976. ?? 1980.

  19. A compilation of whole-rock and glass major-element geochemistry of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, near-vent eruptive products: January 1983 through September 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thornber, Carl R.; Hon, Ken; Heliker, Christina; Sherrod, David A.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents major-element geochemical data from 652 glasses (~6,520 analyses) and 795 whole-rock aliquots from 1,002 fresh samples of olivine-tholeiitic lava collected throughout the near-continuous eruption of Kïlauea Volcano, Hawai'i, from January 1983 through September 2001. The data presented herein provide a unique temporal compilation of lava geochemistry that best reflects variations of pre-eruptive magma compositions during prolonged rift-zone eruption. This document serves as a repository for geochemical data referred to in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1676 (Heliker, Swanson, and Takahashi, eds., 2003) which includes multidisciplinary research papers pertaining to the first twenty years of Puu Oo-Kupaianaha eruption activity. Details of eruption characteristics and nomenclature are provided in the introductory chapter of that volume (Heliker and Mattox, 2003). Geochemical relations among all or portions of this data set are depicted and interpreted by Thornber (2003), Thornber and others (2003) and Thornber (2001). Trace element compositions and Nd, Sr and Pb isotopic analyses of representative samples of this select eruption suite will be provided in a separate and complimentary open file report. From 1983 to October 2001, approximately 2,500 eruption samples were collected and archived by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Geochemical data for 1,002 of these samples are included here. Previous reports present bulk-lava major- element chemistry for eruption samples collected from 1983 to 1986 and from 1990 to 1994 (Neal and others, 1988 and Mangan and others, 1995, respectively). Major element glass chemistry and thermometry data for samples collected from 1983 to 1994 is reported by Helz and Hearn (1998) and whole-rock and glass chemistry for samples collected from September 1994 to October 2001 is provided by Thornber and others (2002). This report is a compilation of previously published data along

  20. Response To And Lessons Learned From Two Back-To-Back Disasters At Kilauea Volcano, Puna District, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, C. E.; Houghton, B. F.; Kim, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Puna District, Hawaii, is exposed to many natural hazards, including those associated with volcanic eruptions and tropical storms, but for decades Puna has also been the fastest growing District in the state due to its affordable real estate. In 2014, populated areas were affected by back-to-back hurricane and volcanic eruption crises. Both events were declared Presidential Disasters and tested response and recovery systems of many of Puna's 49, 000 residents, government services and businesses. This paper summarizes individual and organizational response to the two crises: the relatively rapid onset Tropical Storm Iselle, which made landfall in Puna on August 5 and the slow onset June 27 lava flow. The latter took some 2 months to advance to the edge of developed areas, prompting widespread community reaction. While the lava flows no longer pose an immediate threat to development because they are repaving remote, near-source and upflow areas, the lava could again advance into developed areas over similar time scales as in 2014. Puna is mostly a rural setting with many narrow, privately owned dirt roads. Some residents have no municipal electricity and water; they use solar and gasoline generators and rain catchment systems. High winds and collapse of exotic Albizia trees during Iselle isolated many residents, but people self-organized through social media to respond and recover. Social media and community meetings dominated information sharing during the lava crisis. Major expenses were incurred in response to the lava crisis, primarily through upgraded alternate roads that provide redundancy and construction of temporary school buildings linked to evacuation and relocation of students. Experiences during Iselle primed residents to rapidly self-organize and address the impending inundation by slow moving lava flows which advanced in uncertain directions at rates of 0-450 m/day. People's demand for constant and near-real time information from authorities placed

  1. The 2008 Eruption of Chaitén Volcano, Chile and National Volcano-Monitoring Programs in the U.S. and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, J. W.; Lara, L. E.; Moreno, H.

    2008-12-01

    Minería (SERNAGEOMIN) that will emphasize studies of volcanic history, volcano hazard assessments, and establishing real time monitoring at 43 of the highest threat volcanoes. To prioritize monitoring and hazard mitigation efforts in Chile, SERNAGEOMIN has adopted the threat assessment methodology developed by the USGS for U.S. volcanoes along with the USGS conceptual framework for a National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS). When complete, the new Chilean volcano monitoring networks will close one of the largest gaps in global volcano monitoring.

  2. Juvenile i`iwi detected in lower elevations of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaudioso, Jacqueline M.; Beck, Angela T.

    2013-01-01

    The Hawaiian islands are home to a diverse array of plants and animals found nowhere else on Earth. Among the most famous of these are the spectacular Hawaiian honeycreepers, a group that evolved from a single flock of ancestral finches into at least 54 unique species. Unfortunately, the same isolation that fostered such dramatic adaptive radiation left Hawaiian species vulnerable. Under the onslaught of alien species predation and competition, habitat degradation, and introduced infectious diseases and parasites, most of the surviving honeycreepers have become largely confined to higher elevations. Intact habitat exists above the warm-weather range of deadly introduced avian malaria (Plasmodium relictum), and its mosquito vector (Culex quinquefasciatus).

  3. Summary of the stakeholders workshop to develop a National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, Marianne; Scott, William E.; Driedger, Carolyn L.; Ewert, John W.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of investing in monitoring, mitigation, and preparedness before natural hazards occur has been amply demonstrated by recent disasters such as the Indian Ocean Tsunami in December 2004 and Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. Playing catch-up with hazardous natural phenomena such as these limits our ability to work with public officials and the public to lessen adverse impacts. With respect to volcanic activity, the starting point of effective pre-event mitigation is monitoring capability sufficient to detect and diagnose precursory unrest so that communities at risk have reliable information and sufficient time to respond to hazards with which they may be confronted. Recognizing that many potentially dangerous U.S. volcanoes have inadequate or no ground-based monitoring, the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) and partners recently evaluated U.S. volcano-monitoring capabilities and published 'An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities in the United States: Framework for a National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS).' Results of the NVEWS volcanic threat and monitoring assessment are being used to guide long-term improvements to the national volcano-monitoring infrastructure operated by the USGS and affiliated groups. The NVEWS report identified the need to convene a workshop of a broad group of stakeholders--such as representatives of emergency- and land-management agencies at the Federal, State, and local levels and the aviation sector--to solicit input about implementation of NVEWS and their specific information requirements. Accordingly, an NVEWS Stakeholders Workshop was held in Portland, Oregon, on 22-23 February 2006. A summary of the workshop is presented in this document.

  4. Phreatomagmatic and phreatic fall and surge deposits from explosions at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, 1790 a.d.: Keanakakoi Ash Member

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhie, J.; Walker, G.P.L.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    In or around 1790 a.d. an explosive eruption took place in the summit caldera of Kilauea shield volcano. A group of Hawaiian warriors close to the caldera at the time were killed by the effects of the explosions. The stratigraphy of pyroclastic deposits surrounding Kilauea (i.e., the Keanakakoi Ash Member) suggests that the explosions referred to in the historic record were the culmination of a prolonged hydrovolcanic eruption consisting of three main phases. The first phase was phreatomagmatic and generated well-bedded, fine fallout ash rich in glassy, variably vesiculated, juvenile magmatic and dense, lithic pyroclasts. The ash was mainly dispersed to the southwest of the caldera by the northeasterly trade winds. The second phase produced a Strombolian-style scoria fall deposit followed by phreatomagmatic ash similar to that of the first phase, though richer in accretionary lapilli and lithics. The third and culminating phase was phreatic and deposited lithic-rich lapilli and block fall layers, interbedded with cross-bedded surge deposits, and accretionary lapilli-rich, fine ash beds. These final explosions may have been responsible for the deaths of the warriors. The three phases were separated by quiescent spells during which the primary deposits were eroded and transported downwind in dunes migrating southwestward and locally excavated by fluvial runoff close to the rim. The entire hydrovolcanic eruption may have lasted for weeks or perhaps months. At around the same time, lava erupted from Kilauea's East Rift Zone and probably drained magma from the summit storage. The earliest descriptions of Kilauea (30 years after the Keanakakoi eruption) emphasize the great depth of the floor (300-500 m below the rim) and the presence of stepped ledges. It is therefore likely that the Keanakakoi explosions were deepseated within Kilauea, and that the vent rim was substantially lower than the caldera rim. The change from phreatomagmatic to phreatic phases may reflect the

  5. Hawaii Gravity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-12-15

    Gravity model for the state of Hawaii. Data is from the following source: Flinders, A.F., Ito, G., Garcia, M.O., Sinton, J.M., Kauahikaua, J.P., and Taylor, B., 2013, Intrusive dike complexes, cumulate cores, and the extrusive growth of Hawaiian volcanoes: Geophysical Research Letters, v. 40, p. 3367–3373, doi:10.1002/grl.50633.

  6. 14 CFR 91.138 - Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii. 91.138 Section 91.138 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES...

  7. 14 CFR 91.138 - Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii. 91.138 Section 91.138 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES...

  8. 14 CFR 91.138 - Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii. 91.138 Section 91.138 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES...

  9. 14 CFR 91.138 - Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii. 91.138 Section 91.138 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES...

  10. 14 CFR 91.138 - Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Temporary flight restrictions in national disaster areas in the State of Hawaii. 91.138 Section 91.138 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES...

  11. 75 FR 52546 - Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai`i County, HI; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... process by publishing a notice of intent in the ] Federal Register on February 25, 2009 (74 FR 8564). The... February 25, 2009 (74 FR 8564), announcing our intention to complete a CCP/EA for the refuge, inviting the... Fish and Wildlife Service Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai`i County, HI;...

  12. Geodetic evidence for en echelon dike emplacement and concurrent slow slip during the June 2007 intrusion and eruption at Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery-Brown, E. K.; Sinnett, D.K.; Poland, M.; Segall, P.; Orr, T.; Zebker, H.; Miklius, Asta

    2010-01-01

    A series of complex events at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii, 17 June to 19 June 2007, began with an intrusion in the upper east rift zone (ERZ) and culminated with a small eruption (1500 m3). Surface deformation due to the intrusion was recorded in unprecedented detail by Global Positioning System (GPS) and tilt networks as well as interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired by the ENVISAT and ALOS satellites. A joint nonlinear inversion of GPS, tilt, and InSAR data yields a deflationary source beneath the summit caldera and an ENE-striking uniform-opening dislocation with ~2 m opening, a dip of ∼80° to the south, and extending from the surface to ~2 km depth. This simple model reasonably fits the overall pattern of deformation but significantly misfits data near the western end of an inferred dike-like source. Three more complex dike models are tested that allow for distributed opening including (1) a dike that follows the surface trace of the active rift zone, (2) a dike that follows the symmetry axis of InSAR deformation, and (3) two en echelon dike segments beneath mapped surface cracks and newly formed steaming areas. The en echelon dike model best fits near-field GPS and tilt data. Maximum opening of 2.4 m occurred on the eastern segment beneath the eruptive vent. Although this model represents the best fit to the ERZ data, it still fails to explain data from a coastal tiltmeter and GPS sites on Kīlauea's southwestern flank. The southwest flank GPS sites and the coastal tiltmeter exhibit deformation consistent with observations of previous slow slip events beneath Kīlauea's south flank, but inconsistent with observations of previous intrusions. Slow slip events at Kīlauea and elsewhere are thought to occur in a transition zone between locked and stably sliding zones of a fault. An inversion including slip on a basal decollement improves fit to these data and suggests a maximum of ~15 cm of seaward fault motion, comparable to previous slow

  13. Combined U-Th/He and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Aciego, S.M.; Jourdan, F.; DePaolo, D.J.; Kennedy, B.M.; Renne, P.R.; Sims, K.W.W.

    2009-10-01

    Late Quaternary, post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes on the Big Island of Hawaii have been dated using the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar and U-Th/He methods. The objective of the study is to compare the recently demonstrated U-Th/He age method, which uses basaltic olivine phenocrysts, with {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages measured on groundmass from the same samples. As a corollary, the age data also increase the precision of the chronology of volcanism on the Big Island. For the U-Th/He ages, U, Th and He concentrations and isotopes were measured to account for U-series disequilibrium and initial He. Single analyses U-Th/He ages for Hamakua lavas from Mauna Kea are 87 {+-} 40 ka to 119 {+-} 23 ka (2{sigma} uncertainties), which are in general equal to or younger than {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages. Basalt from the Polulu sequence on Kohala gives a U-Th/He age of 354 {+-} 54 ka and a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 450 {+-} 40 ka. All of the U-Th/He ages, and all but one spurious {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages conform to the previously proposed stratigraphy and published {sup 14}C and K-Ar ages. The ages also compare favorably to U-Th whole rock-olivine ages calculated from {sup 238}U - {sup 230}Th disequilibria. The U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results agree best where there is a relatively large amount of radiogenic {sup 40}Ar (>10%), and where the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 36}Ar intercept calculated from the Ar isochron diagram is close to the atmospheric value. In two cases, it is not clear why U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages do not agree within uncertainty. U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results diverge the most on a low-K transitional tholeiitic basalt with abundant olivine. For the most alkalic basalts with negligible olivine phenocrysts, U-Th/He ages were unattainable while {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results provide good precision even on ages as low as 19 {+-} 4 ka. Hence, the strengths and weaknesses of the U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar methods are

  14. Eruption of Trident Volcano, Katmai National Monument, Alaska, February-June 1953

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, George L.

    1954-01-01

    Trident Volcano, one of several 'extinct' volcanoes in Katmai National Monument, erupted on February 15, 1953. Observers in a U. S. Navy plane, 50 miles away, and in King Salmon, 75 miles away, reported an initial column of smoke that rose to an estimated 30, 000 feet. Thick smoke and fog on the succeeding 2 days prevented observers from identifying the erupting volcano or assessing the severity of the eruption. It is almost certain, however, that during the latter part of this foggy period, either Mount Martin or Mount Mageik, or both, were also erupting sizable ash clouds nearby. The first close aerial observations were made in clear weather on February 18. At this time a thick, blocky lava flow was seen issuing slowly from a new vent at an altitude of 3,600 feet on the southwest flank of Trident Volcano. Other volcanic orifices in the area were only steaming mildly on this and succeeding days. Observations made in the following weeks from Naval aircraft patrolling the area indicated that both gas and ash evolution and lava extrusion from the Trident vent were continuing without major interruption. By March 11 an estimated 80-160 million cubic yards of rock material had been extruded. Air photographs taken in April and June show that the extrusion of lava had continued intermittently and, by June 17, the volume of the pile was perhaps 300-400 million cubic yards of rock material. Ash eruptions also apparently occurred sporadically during this period, the last significant surge taking place June 30. No civilian or military installations have been endangered by this eruption at the date of writing.

  15. Coastal change rates and patterns: Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Gmirkin, Rick; Richmond, Bruce M.

    2005-01-01

    A collaborative project between the U.S. Geological Survey's Coastal and Marine Geology Program and the National Park Service (NPS) has been developed to create an inventory of geologic resources for National Park Service lands on the Big Island of Hawai'i. The NPS Geologic Resources Inventories are recognized as essential for the effective management, interpretation, and understanding of vital park resources. In general, there are three principal components of the inventories: geologic bibliographies, digital geologic maps, and geologic reports. The geologic reports are specific to each individual park and include information on the geologic features and processes that are important to the management of park resources, including ecological, cultural and recreational resources. This report summarizes a component of the geologic inventory concerned specifically with characterizing the coastal geomorphology of the beach system within Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park (NHP) and describes an analysis that utilizes georeferenced and orthorectified aerial photography to understand the spatial and temporal trends in shoreline change from 1950 to 2002. In addition, spatial patterns of beach change were examined and a beach stability map was developed. Both the shoreline change rates and the beach stability map are designed to help Park personnel effectively manage the valuable park resources within the context of understanding natural changes to the KAHO beach system.

  16. Workforce: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Employment in Hawaii (including hourly and salaried jobs and self-employment) is projected to grow by 14 percent from 2002 to 2012, adding over 78,000 new jobs to the state's economy and growing the workforce from 558,220 to 636,480. The rate of growth is slightly lower than the 15 percent increase projected for the nation as a whole. Over the…

  17. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  18. InSAR observations of localized deformation of volcanic deposits apparently triggered by regional earthquakes: Examples from Hawai`i and Lascar volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jay, J.; Poland, M. P.; Pritchard, M. E.; Calder, E. S.; Whelley, P.; Pavez, A.

    2009-12-01

    We document that large earthquakes (e.g., Mw > 6.7) can induce surface deformation on volcanic deposits (lava and pyroclastic flows) using satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data. The observed deformation may provide clues to the material properties of the deposits or the subsurface, and to the intensity of ground shaking. InSAR data spanning 1993 to 2009 show long-term subsidence of the pyroclastic flow deposit from the 19-20 April 1993 eruption of Lascar volcano in northern Chile. We constructed 39 InSAR interferograms using data obtained from the JERS-1 (L-band), ERS-1 and -2 (C-band), and Envisat (C-band) radar satellites spanning the time intervals 1993-1994, 1995-2001, and 2003-2009, respectively. We remove topographic effects with the 3 m/pixel DEM of Pavez et al., (2005). Time periods of individual interferograms range from one month to four years. Rates of subsidence were highest immediately after emplacement and have decreased with time, a general trend that is consistent with a model of a rapidly de-aerating deposit followed by gradual sedimentary compaction. Over the time period covered by the available data, subsidence rates are seen to show two sudden, isolated increases that are concurrent with the 1995 Antofagasta earthquake (Mw 8.1) and the 2007 Tocopilla earthquake (Mw 7.7). The centers of both earthquakes are about 280 km from Lascar. In the two-month interferogram spanning the 1995 earthquake, the subsidence rate is ~2.4 cm/yr (extrapolating the 2 months to an entire year), an increase from the ~1.1 cm/yr subsidence rate observed from 1993 to 1994. Likewise, concurrent with the 2007 earthquake, a deformation pattern with a subsidence rate of ~2.3 cm/yr (again extrapolated to the entire year) is seen to reappear after 7 years of little to no deformation of the deposit (~0.2 cm/yr). This phenomenon suggests that shaking helps to accelerate/intensify the compaction by aiding grain reorientation into a more densely packed

  19. Anomalously high b-values in the South Flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii: Evidence for the distribution of magma below Kilauea's East rift zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyss, M.; Klein, F.; Nagamine, K.; Wiemer, S.

    2001-01-01

    The pattern of b-value of the frequency-magnitude relation, or mean magnitude, varies little in the Kaoiki-Hilea area of Hawaii, and the b-values are normal, with b = 0.8 in the top 10 km and somewhat lower values below that depth. We interpret the Kaoiki-Hilea area as relatively stable, normal Hawaiian crust. In contrast, the b-values beneath Kilauea's South Flank are anomalously high (b = 1.3-1.7) at depths between 4 and 8 km, with the highest values near the East Rift zone, but extending 5-8 km away from the rift. Also, the anomalously high b-values vary along strike, parallel to the rift zone. The highest b-values are observed near Hiiaka and Pauahi craters at the bend in the rift, the next highest are near Makaopuhi and also near Puu Kaliu. The mildest anomalies occur adjacent to the central section of the rift. The locations of the three major and two minor b-value anomalies correspond to places where shallow magma reservoirs have been proposed based on analyses of seismicity, geodetic data and differentiated lava chemistry. The existence of the magma reservoirs is also supported by magnetic anomalies, which may be areas of dike concentration, and self-potential anomalies, which are areas of thermal upwelling above a hot source. The simplest explanation of these anomalously high b-values is that they are due to the presence of active magma bodies beneath the East Rift zone at depths down to 8 km. In other volcanoes, anomalously high b-values correlate with volumes adjacent to active magma chambers. This supports a model of a magma body beneath the East Rift zone, which may widen and thin along strike, and which may reach 8 km depth and extend from Kilauea's summit to a distance of at least 40 km down rift. The anomalously high b-values at the center of the South Flank, several kilometers away from the rift, may be explained by unusually high pore pressure throughout the South Flank, or by anomalously strong heterogeneity due to extensive cracking, or by both

  20. Absolute Paleointensity Study of Halawa Excursion (ca. 2.514+/- 0.039 Ma) Recorded on Koolau Volcano at Halawa, Oahu, Hawaii.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, J. K.; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2006-12-01

    Absolute Paleointensity determinations coupled with directional analyses and precise 40Ar/39Ar radioisotopic dating, have rendered a record of an excursion of the geomagnetic field providing an insight of the rapid variation of the short-term behavior of the paleomagnetic field. We have sampled a long volcanic section located on the buttressed flank of the Koolau volcano within the Halawa Valley, Oahu, Hawaii and studied 120 m thick sequence of flows providing an excellent candidate for detailed paleomagnetic analysis. At least eight samples collected from each of 28 successive flow-sites were stepwise demagnetized by both alternating field (5mT to 100mT) and thermal (from 28° C to 575-650°C) methods, and the mean directions obtained by principal component analysis. All samples yielded a strong and stable ChRM trending towards the origin based on no less than seven to nine steps, with thermal and AF results agreeing to a very high degree. Low field susceptibility versus temperature (k-T) analyses were conducted for individual lava flows, and the majority of them show reversible curves. Curie point determinations revealed a temperature close to or equal to 580°C, indicative of almost pure magnetite for most of the flows. Magnetic grain sizes analysis indicated SD-PSD sizes. The mean directions of magnetization of the entire section sampled indicate that about 10 m of the section are characterized by excursional directions (5 lava flows). In addition to the directional analyses we performed absolute paleointensity determinations on the 28 lavas sampled. We used the modified Thellier- Coe double heating method to determine paleointensities. pTRM checks were performed systematically one temperature step down the last pTRM acquisition in order to document magnetomineralogical changes during heating. The temperature was incremented by steps of 50° C between room temperature and 500°C and every 25-30° C. The paleointensity determinations were obtained from the slope

  1. Population trends of forest birds at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Camp, Richard J.; Pratt, Thane K.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Jeffrey, John J.; Woodworth, Bethany L.

    2010-01-01

    The Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge was established to protect native Hawaiian forest birds, particularly endangered species. Management for forest restoration on the refuge has consisted mainly of removing feral ungulates, controlling invasive alien plants, and reforesting former pastures. To assess effects of this habitat improvement for forest birds, we estimated density annually by distance sampling and examined population trends for native and alien passerines over the 21 years since the refuge was established. We examined long-term trends and recent short-term trajectories in three study areas: (1) reforested pastureland, (2) heavily grazed open forest that was recovering, and (3) lightly grazed closed forest that was relatively intact. Three species of native birds and two species of alien birds had colonized the reforested pasture and were increasing. In the open forest, densities of all eight native species were either stable or increasing. Long-term trends for alien birds were also generally stable or increasing. Worryingly, however, during the most recent 9 years, in the open forest trajectories of native species were decreasing or inconclusive, but in the reforested pasture they generally increased. The closed forest was surveyed in only the most recent 9 years, and trajectories of native species there were mixed. Overall, long-term population trends in Hakalau are stable or increasing, contrasting with declines in most other areas of Hawai'i over the same period. However, more recent mixed results may indicate emergent problems for this important bird area.

  2. Effects of ungulate management on vegetation at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai'i Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, S.C.; Jeffrey, J.J.; Pratt, L.W.; Ball, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    We compiled and analysed data from 1987-2004 on vegetation monitoring during feral ungulate management at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, a tropical montane rainforest on the island of Hawai'i All areas in the study had previously been used by ungulates, but cattle (Bos taurus) were removed and feral pig (Sus scrofa) populations were reduced during the study period. We monitored six line-intercept transects, three in previously high ungulate use areas and three in previously low ungulate use areas. We measured nine cover categories with the line-intercept method: native ferns; native woody plants; bryophytes; lichens; alien grasses; alien herbs; litter; exposed soil; and coarse woody debris. Vegetation surveys were repeated four times over a 16-year period. Vegetation monitoring revealed a strong increase in native fern cover and slight decreases in cover of bryophytes and exposed soil. Mean cover of native plants was generally higher in locations that were formerly lightly grazed, while alien grass and herb cover was generally higher in areas that were heavily grazed, although these effects were not statistically significant. These responses may represent early serai processes in forest regeneration following the reduction of feral ungulate populations. In contrast to many other Hawaiian forests which have become invaded by alien grasses and herbs after ungulate removal, HFNWR has not experienced this effect.

  3. Coastal circulation and water column properties off Kalaupapa National Historical Park, Molokai, Hawaii, 2008-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Presto, Katherine; Brown, Eric K.

    2011-01-01

    More than 2.2 million measurements of oceanographic forcing and the resulting water-column properties were made off U.S. National Park Service's Kalaupapa National Historical Park on the north shore of Molokai, Hawaii, between 2008 and 2010 to understand the role of oceanographic processes on the health and sustainability of the area's marine resources. The tides off the Kalaupapa Peninsula are mixed semidiurnal. The wave climate is dominated by two end-members: large northwest Pacific winter swell that directly impacts the study site, and smaller, shorter-period northeast trade-wind waves that have to refract around the peninsula, resulting in a more northerly direction before propagating over the study site. The currents primarily are alongshore and are faster at the surface than close to the seabed; large wave events, however, tend to drive flow in a more cross-shore orientation. The tidal currents flood to the north and ebb to the south. The waters off the peninsula appear to be a mix of cooler, more saline, deeper oceanic waters and shallow, warmer, lower-salinity nearshore waters, with intermittent injections of freshwater, generally during the winters. Overall, the turbidity levels were low, except during large wave events. The low overall turbidity levels and rapid return to pre-event background levels following the cessation of forcing suggest that there is little fine-grained material. Large wave events likely inhibit the settlement of fine-grained sediment at the site. A number of phenomena were observed that indicate the complexity of coastal circulation and water-column properties in the area and may help scientists and resource managers to better understand the implications of the processes on marine ecosystem health.

  4. Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This 60 by 55 km ASTER scene shows almost the entire island of Oahu, Hawaii on June 3, 2000. The data were processed to produce a simulated natural color presentation. Oahu is the commercial center of Hawaii and is important to United States defense in the Pacific. Pearl Harbor naval base is situated here. The chief agricultural industries are the growing and processing of pineapples and sugarcane. Tourism also is important to the economy. Among the many popular beaches is the renowned Waikiki Beach, backed by the famous Diamond Head, an extinct volcano. The largest community, Honolulu, is the state capital.

    The image is located at 21.5 degrees north latitude and 158 degrees west longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties

  5. The Uwekahuna Ash Member of the Puna Basalt: product of violent phreatomagmatic eruptions at Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, between 2800 and 2100 14C years ago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.; Lockwood, J.P.; Casadevall, T.J.; Rubin, M.

    1995-01-01

    Kilauea volcano's reputation for relatively gentle effusive eruptions belies a violent geologic past, including several large phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions that are recorded by Holocene pyroclastic deposits which mantle Kilauea's summit area and the southeast flank of adjacent Mauna Loa volcano. The most widespread of these deposits is the Uwekahuna Ash Member, a basaltic surge and fall deposit emplaced during two or more eruptive episodes separated by a few decades to several centuries. It is infered that the eruptions which produced the Uwekahuna were driven by water interacting with a fluctuating magma column. The volume, extent and character of the Uwekahuna deposits underscore the hazards posed by relatively infrequent but potentially devastating explosive eruptions at Kilauea, as well as at other basaltic volcanoes. -from Authors

  6. Island of Hawaii, Hawaiian Archipelago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    This single photo covers almost all of the big island of Hawaii (19.5N, 155.5E) in the Hawaiian Archipelago. The active Kilauea Volcano and lava flow is under clouds and hardly visible at the lower right edge but the Mauna Loa volcano crater and its older lava flow is at the bottom center. The Kona Coast, that produces the only coffee grown in the United States, is to the left. Mauna Kea is the extinct volcano and lava flow in the right center.

  7. New rain shed (Building No. 241) interior showing posts, braces, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    New rain shed (Building No. 241) interior showing posts, braces, and roof structure. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  8. A Broadly-Based Training Program in Volcano Hazards Monitoring at the Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.; Bevens, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes, in cooperation with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program at HVO and CVO, offers a broadly based volcano hazards training program targeted toward scientists and technicians from developing nations. The program has been offered for 25 years and provides a hands-on introduction to a broad suite of volcano monitoring techniques, rather than detailed training with just one. The course content has evolved over the life of the program as the needs of the trainees have changed: initially emphasizing very basic monitoring techniques (e.g. precise leveling, interpretation of seismic drum records, etc.) but, as the level of sophistication of the trainees has increased, training in more advanced technologies has been added. Currently, topics of primary emphasis have included volcano seismology and seismic networks; acquisition and modeling of geodetic data; methods of analysis and monitoring of gas geochemistry; interpretation of volcanic deposits and landforms; training in LAHARZ, GIS mapping of lahar risks; and response to and management of volcanic crises. The course also provides training on public outreach, based on CSAV's Hawaii-specific hazards outreach programs, and volcano preparedness and interactions with the media during volcanic crises. It is an intensive eight week course with instruction and field activities underway 6 days per week; it is now offered in two locations, Hawaii Island, for six weeks, and the Cascades volcanoes of the Pacific Northwest, for two weeks, to enable trainees to experience field conditions in both basaltic and continental volcanic environments. The survival of the program for more than two decades demonstrates that a need for such training exists and there has been interaction and contribution to the program by the research community, however broader engagement with the latter continues to present challenges. Some of the reasons for this will be discussed.

  9. Spaceport Hawaii - Environmental issues

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, T.B. )

    1992-03-01

    The geographical, economic, and infrastructural factors of the Island of Hawaii make this island an ideal site for a privately owned and operated commercial launching facility for launching small- to medium-sized payloads into both equatorial and polar orbits. This paper describes the preparation of an environmental impact statement, which was initiated as a prelude to the eventual construction and operation of the commercial launching facility on the Island of Hawaii and which follows the Hawaii State law and the National Environmental Policy Act. The issues discussed are the regional characteristics of the Island of Hawaii, the candidate launch vehicles, the flight safety considerations, the spaceport development issues, and the potential impact of the future spaceport on the Mauna Kea Observatory on the Island of Hawaii.

  10. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.