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Sample records for hazardous fumes udvikling

  1. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R. ); Schmalz, H. Thermal Surveys, Inc., Rockford, IL )

    1992-01-01

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated.

  2. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R.; Schmalz, H. |

    1992-11-01

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated.

  3. Barbecue Fumes: An Overlooked Source of Health Hazards in Outdoor Settings?

    PubMed

    Wu, Chen-Chou; Bao, Lian-Jun; Guo, Ying; Li, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2015-09-01

    Barbecuing or charcoal-grilling has become part of popular outdoor recreational activities nowadays; however, potential human health hazards through outdoor exposure to barbecue fumes have yet to be adequately quantified. To fill this knowledge gap, atmospheric size-fractioned particle and gaseous samples were collected near an outdoor barbecuing vendor stall (along with charcoal-grilled food items) in Xinjiang of Northwest China with a 10-stage micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor and a polyurethane foam (PUF) sampler and were analyzed for particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Exposure to PAHs through inhalation and dermal contact by adult consumers who spent 1 h per day near a charcoal-grilling vendor for a normal meal (lunch or dinner) amounted to a BaP equivalent (BaPeq) dosage of 3.0-77 ng day(-1) (inhalation: 2.8-27 ng day(-1) of BaPeq; dermal contact: 0.2-50 ng day(-1) of BaPeq), comparable to those (22-220 ng day(-1) of BaPeq) from consumer exposure through the consumption of charcoal-grilled meat, assumed to be at the upper limit of 50-150 g. In addition, the potential health risk was in the range of 3.1 × 10(-10) to 1.4 × 10(-4) for people of different age groups with inhalation and dermal contact exposure to PAHs once a day, with a 95% confidence interval (7.2 × 10(-9) to 1.2 × 10(-5)) comparable to the lower limit of the potential cancer risk range (1 × 10(-6) to 1 × 10(-4)). Sensitivity analyses indicated that the area of dermal contact with gaseous contaminants is a critical parameter for risk assessment. These results indicated that outdoor exposure to barbecue fumes (particularly dermal contact) may have become a significant but largely neglected source of health hazards to the general population and should be well-recognized. PMID:26259039

  4. Low flow fume hood

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Feustel, Helmut E.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

    2002-01-01

    A fume hood is provided having an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A displacement flow fume hood works on the principal of a displacement flow which displaces the volume currently present in the hood using a push-pull system. The displacement flow includes a plurality of air supplies which provide fresh air, preferably having laminar flow, to the fume hood. The displacement flow fume hood also includes an air exhaust which pulls air from the work chamber in a minimally turbulent manner. As the displacement flow produces a substantially consistent and minimally turbulent flow in the hood, inconsistent flow patterns associated with contaminant escape from the hood are minimized. The displacement flow fume hood largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 70% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance. The fume hood also includes a number of structural adaptations which facilitate consistent and minimally turbulent flow within a fume hood.

  5. Updating Older Fume Hoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, G. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Provides information on updating older fume hoods. Areas addressed include: (1) adjustment of the hood's back baffle; (2) hood air leakage; (3) light level; (4) hood location in relation to room traffic and room air; and (5) establishing and maintaining hood performance. (JN)

  6. Immunotoxicology of arc welding fume: Worker and experimental animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Erdely, Aaron; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Arc welding processes generate complex aerosols composed of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Millions of workers worldwide are exposed to welding aerosols daily. A health effect of welding that is of concern to the occupational health community is the development of immune system dysfunction. Increased severity, frequency, and duration of upper and lower respiratory tract infections have been reported among welders. Specifically, multiple studies have observed an excess mortality from pneumonia in welders and workers exposed to metal fumes. Although several welder cohort and experimental animal studies investigating the adverse effects of welding fume exposure on immune function have been performed, the potential mechanisms responsible for these effects are limited. The objective of this report was to review both human and animal studies that have examined the effect of welding fume pulmonary exposure on local and systemic immune responses. PMID:22734811

  7. Immunotoxicology of arc welding fume: worker and experimental animal studies.

    PubMed

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Erdely, Aaron; Antonini, James M

    2012-01-01

    Arc welding processes generate complex aerosols composed of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Millions of workers worldwide are exposed to welding aerosols daily. A health effect of welding that is of concern to the occupational health community is the development of immune system dysfunction. Increased severity, frequency, and duration of upper and lower respiratory tract infections have been reported among welders. Specifically, multiple studies have observed an excess mortality from pneumonia in welders and workers exposed to metal fumes. Although several welder cohort and experimental animal studies investigating the adverse effects of welding fume exposure on immune function have been performed, the potential mechanisms responsible for these effects are limited. The objective of this report was to review both human and animal studies that have examined the effect of welding fume pulmonary exposure on local and systemic immune responses. PMID:22734811

  8. Polymer fume fever.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Taro; Hamada, Osamu; Sasaki, Akinori; Ikeda, Mari

    2012-01-01

    A 29-year-old Japanese man presented with fever, dyspnoea and non-productive cough after massive inhalation of evaporant from a polytetrafluoroethylene-coated cooking pan. Chest CT scan showed diffuse interstitial infiltration in both lungs. Based on the patient history, images and the pan he brought to the hospital, polymer fume fever was strongly suspected. His symptoms dramatically improved over the following 2 days after admission. PMID:23230259

  9. 30 CFR 70.305 - Respiratory equipment; gas, dusts, fumes, or mists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall be provided to persons exposed for short periods to inhalation hazards from gas, dusts, fumes, or mist. When the exposure is for prolonged periods, other measures to...

  10. 30 CFR 70.305 - Respiratory equipment; gas, dusts, fumes, or mists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall be provided to persons exposed for short periods to inhalation hazards from gas, dusts, fumes, or mist. When the exposure is for prolonged periods, other measures to...

  11. 30 CFR 70.305 - Respiratory equipment; gas, dusts, fumes, or mists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall be provided to persons exposed for short periods to inhalation hazards from gas, dusts, fumes, or mist. When the exposure is for prolonged periods, other measures to...

  12. 30 CFR 70.305 - Respiratory equipment; gas, dusts, fumes, or mists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall be provided to persons exposed for short periods to inhalation hazards from gas, dusts, fumes, or mist. When the exposure is for prolonged periods, other measures to...

  13. 30 CFR 70.305 - Respiratory equipment; gas, dusts, fumes, or mists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall be provided to persons exposed for short periods to inhalation hazards from gas, dusts, fumes, or mist. When the exposure is for prolonged periods, other measures to...

  14. Estimation of regional pulmonary deposition and exposure for fumes from SMAW and GMAW mild and stainless steel consumables.

    PubMed

    Hewett, P

    1995-02-01

    The particle size distributions and bulk fume densities for mild steel and stainless steel welding fumes generated using two welding processes (shielded metal arc welding [SMAW] and gas metal arc welding [GMAW]) were used in mathematical models to estimate regional pulmonary deposition (the fraction of each fume expected to deposit in each region of the pulmonary system) and regional pulmonary exposure (the fraction of each fume expected to penetrate to each pulmonary region and would be collected by a particle size-selective sampling device). Total lung deposition for GMAW fumes was estimated at 60% greater than that of SMAW fumes. Considering both the potential for deposition and the fume specific surface areas, it is likely that for equal exposure concentrations GMAW fumes deliver nearly three times the particle surface area to the lungs as SMAW fumes. This leads to the hypothesis that exposure to GMAW fumes constitutes a greater pulmonary hazard than equal exposure to SMAW fumes. The implications of this hypothesis regarding the design of future health studies of welders is discussed. PMID:7856514

  15. 222-S LABORATORY FUME HOOD TESTING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    RUELAS, B.H.

    2007-03-26

    The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing chemicals within the subject fume hood. Following the event, testing of the fume hood was conducted to assess the performance of the fume hood. Based on observations from the testing, it was deemed appropriate to conduct performance evaluations of other fume hoods within the laboratory.

  16. Photochemical Degradation Of Organic-Solvent Fumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzstock, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Quality of air in laboratory or industrial ventilation airstream enhanced by proposed technique. Source of ultraviolet light placed in airstream to degrade fumes photochemically. If fumes acceptable in degraded form, no further processing needed.

  17. GENERATION OF FUMES SIMULATING PARTICULATE AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes techniques developed for generating large quantities of reproducible, stable, inorganic, fine-particle aerosol fumes. These fumes simulated particulate air pollutants emitted from power generation, basic oxygen furnaces, electric arc furnaces, and zinc smelti...

  18. [Metal fume fever, an almost forgotten disease].

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Y; Cantin, D; Le Guerroué, G; Pourriat, J-L

    2010-05-01

    Metal fume fever is an ancient and almost forgotten occupational disease found among welders. Diagnosis is made difficult by the frequency and the non-specific flue-like symptomatology. We present the cases of three patients admitted for developing the symptoms after being exposed to welding fumes. Treatment was symptom based. Severe cases have been described after exposure to military fumes. PMID:20378299

  19. Energy efficient laboratory fume hood

    DOEpatents

    Feustel, Helmut E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a low energy consumption fume hood that provides an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A low-flow fume hood in accordance with the present invention works on the principal of providing an air supply, preferably with low turbulence intensity, in the face of the hood. The air flow supplied displaces the volume currently present in the hood's face without significant mixing between the two volumes and with minimum injection of air from either side of the flow. This air flow provides a protective layer of clean air between the contaminated low-flow fume hood work chamber and the laboratory room. Because this protective layer of air will be free of contaminants, even temporary mixing between the air in the face of the fume hood and room air, which may result from short term pressure fluctuations or turbulence in the laboratory, will keep contaminants contained within the hood. Protection of the face of the hood by an air flow with low turbulence intensity in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 75% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance.

  20. Gaps in scientific knowledge about the carcinogenic potential of asphalt/bitumen fumes.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    Despite a relatively large body of published research, the potential carcinogenicity of asphalt/bitumen fumes is still a vexing question. Various uncertainties and gaps in scientific knowledge need to be addressed. These include uncertainties in chemistry, animal studies, and human studies. The chemistry of asphalt/bitumen fumes is complex and varies according to the source of the crude oil and the application parameters. The epidemiological studies, while showing weak evidence of lung cancer, are inconsistent and many confounding factors have not been addressed. Studies of animal exposure are also inconsistent regarding laboratory and field-generated fumes. There is a need for further human studies that address potential confounding factors such as smoking, diet, coal tar, and diesel exposures. Animal inhalation studies need to be conducted with asphalt/bitumen fumes that are chemically representative of roofing and paving fumes. Underlying all of this is the need for continued characterization of fumes so their use in animal and field studies can be properly assessed. Nonetheless, uncertainties such as these should not preclude appropriate public health actions to protect workers in the even that asphalt fumes are found to be a carcinogenic hazard. PMID:17503268

  1. Pulmonary adverse effects of welding fume in automobile assembly welders.

    PubMed

    Sharifian, Seyed Akbar; Loukzadeh, Ziba; Shojaoddiny-Ardekani, Ahmad; Aminian, Omid

    2011-01-01

    Welding is one of the key components of numerous manufacturing industries, which has potential physical and chemical health hazards. Many components of welding fumes can potentially affect the lung function. This study investigates the effects of welding fumes on lung function and respiratory symptoms among welders of an automobile manufacturing plant in Iran. This historical cohort study assesses 43 male welders and 129 office workers by a questionnaire to record demographic data, smoking habits, work history and respiratory symptoms as well as lung function status by spirometry. The average pulmonary function values of welders were lower relative to controls with dose-effect relationship between work duration and pulmonary function impairment. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was higher in welders than controls. Our findings suggest that welders are at risk for pulmonary disease. PMID:21598218

  2. Combustion fume structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Flagan, R.C.

    1992-08-01

    The focus of this research program is on elucidating the fundamental processes that determine the particle size distribution, composition, and agglomerate structures of coal ash fumes. The ultimate objective of this work is the development and validation of a model for the dynamics of combustion fumes, describing both the evolution of the particle size distribution and the particle morphology. The study employs model systems to address the fundamental questions and to provide rigorous validation of the models to be developed. This first phase of the project has been devoted to the development of a detailed experimental strategy that will allow agglomerates with a broad range of fractal dimensions to be studied in the laboratory. (VC)

  3. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist... oxygen-gas flame on molten lead. (e) Samples of the test suspension will be taken during each test...

  4. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist... oxygen-gas flame on molten lead. (e) Samples of the test suspension will be taken during each test...

  5. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist... oxygen-gas flame on molten lead. (e) Samples of the test suspension will be taken during each test...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist... oxygen-gas flame on molten lead. (e) Samples of the test suspension will be taken during each test...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... fume, calculated as lead (Pb), per cubic meter of air. (d) The fume will be generated by impinging an..., which is analyzed and calculated as lead (Pb), shall not exceed 1.5 milligrams of lead for a...

  8. Removal of formaldehyde and xylene fumes from histopathology laboratories: a functional approach to the design of extraction systems.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, F P; Campbell, A R

    1984-01-01

    There have been many reports of the relative hazards of formaldehyde, xylene, and hot paraffin wax fumes in pathology laboratories. In contrast, there have been comparatively few describing efficient extraction systems for their removal. When the opportunity presented to design a new laboratory the efficient removal of these fumes was given a high priority. In designing the extraction systems described consideration was given to the physical properties of the fumes and the degree of freedom of use of the bench, with the object of achieving sub-threshold limit values for each area of exposure. The efficiency of removal of the formaldehyde and xylene was measured using infrared spectroscopy. Images PMID:6707225

  9. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    PubMed

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  10. Comparative Microscopic Study of Human and Rat Lungs After Overexposure to Welding Fume

    PubMed Central

    ANTONINI, JAMES M.; ROBERTS, JENNY R.; SCHWEGLER-BERRY, DIANE; MERCER, ROBERT R.

    2015-01-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2 mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  11. Comparative microscopic study of human and rat lungs after overexposure to welding fume.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Mercer, Robert R

    2013-11-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  12. Mutagenicity of bitumen and asphalt fumes.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, P R; Väänänen, V; Hämeilä, M; Linnainmaa, K

    2003-08-01

    The mutagenicity of asphalt fumes was tested with the Salmonella bioassays. The aim was to investigate if recycled additives modify the genotoxicity of emissions. Recycling of old asphalt is increasing, and we studied also the mutagenicity of emissions sampled during the re-use of asphalt. The composition of vapours and fumes were analysed by gas chromatography and by liquid chromatography. Bitumens containing coal fly ash (CFA) or waste plastics were heated to the paving temperatures in the laboratory. In the field, bitumen fumes were collected during paving of stone mastic asphalts (lime or CFA as a filler), remixing of stone mastic asphalt (lime or CFA as a filler), and of asphalt concrete. All the lab-generated vapour fractions were non-mutagenic. The particulate fractions were mutagenic with TA98 in the presence of the S9 activation. In addition, the lab-fumes from bitumen containing waste plastics were positive with both strains without S9. Only particulate fractions sampled in the field were tested. They were mutagenic with and without metabolic activation with both strains. The mutagenic potency of the field samples was higher than that of the lab-generated fumes without S9, and the remixing fumes were more mutagenic than the normal paving and lab-generated fumes with S9. The use of inorganic additive, CFA, did not change the mutagenicity of the fumes, whereas the organic additive, waste plastics, increased the mutagenicity of the laboratory emissions significantly. PMID:12849723

  13. Numerical simulation of laboratory fume hood airflow performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, A.T.; Reither, R.

    1998-12-31

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been used to predict airflow patterns in laboratory fume hoods. The simulation includes bypass fume hood primary operational features including the top and bottom bypasses, front airfoils, and rear-slotted baffles. All results were validated experimentally, and the simulation was found to adequately predict fume hood airflow patterns. The results indicate that fume hood flow patterns are highly dependent on inlet flow boundary conditions so that the computation must include the near field room airflow. Additionally, the study included the effects on the fume hood airflow of sash height changes, an operator positioned outside the fume hood, and equipment within the main fume hood chamber. It was shown that for conditions of a fully open sash height, a person in front of the fume hood, and an object inside the fume hood, the fume hood experiences a loss of containment of the flow.

  14. A Simple, Transparent Fume Hood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredericks, John

    1998-10-01

    An inexpensive transparent fume hood can be constructed from a clear-plastic two-liter soft drink bottle that is cut just above the base. A length of vacuum tubing is secured to the opening of the bottle using black electrical tape. The tubing is then connected to a water aspirator. Beakers or flasks easily fit inside the bottle, and the bottle may be secured with a clamp and ring stand for added stability. This device has been used to collect the noxious NO2 gas generated from the reaction of copper metal with nitric acid. It also may be used in the collection of other gases. It should not be used to collect gases that are not water-soluble or in experiments that involve open flames.

  15. Cables and fire hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanelli, C.; Philbrick, S.; Beretta, G.

    1986-01-01

    Besides describing the experiments conducted to develop a nonflammable cable, this article discusses several considerations regarding other hazards which might result from cable fires, particularly the toxicity and opacity of the fumes emitted by the burning cable. In addition, this article examines the effects of using the Oxygen Index as a gauge of quality control during manufacture.

  16. Design for a Miniature Portable Fume Hood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Ronald A.; Wait, Samuel C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the design of undergraduate chemical laboratory fume hoods. Proves that folding the sides and top permit the hood and its duct hose to be stored in a standard 18-inch-wide laboratory cabinet. (WRM)

  17. Identification of carcinogens in cooking oil fumes.

    PubMed

    Chiang, T A; Wu, P F; Ko, Y C

    1999-07-01

    According to earlier studies, fumes from cooking oils were found to be genotoxic in several short-term tests such as the Ames test, sister chromatid exchange, and SOS chromotest. Fume samples from six different commercial cooking oils (safflower, olive, coconut, mustard, vegetable, and corn) frequently used in Taiwan were collected. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were extracted from the air samples and identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Extracts of fumes from safflower oil, vegetable oil, and corn oil contained benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), dibenz[a,h]anthracene (DBahA), benzo[b]fluoranthene (BbFA), and benzo[a]anthracene (BaA). Concentrations of BaP, DbahA, BbFA, and BaA were 2.1, 2.8, 1.8, and 2.5 microg/m3 in fumes from safflower oil; 2.7, 3.2, 2.6, and 2.1 microg/m3 in vegetable oil; and 2.6, 2.4, 2.0, and 1.9 microg/m3 in corn oil, respectively. The authors constructed models to study the efficacy of table-edged fume extractors used commonly by Taiwanese restaurants. Concentrations of BaP were significantly decreased when the fume extractor was working (P<0.05) and the average reduction in percentage was 75%. The other identified PAHs were undetected. These results indicated that exposure to cooking oil fumes could possibly increase exposure to PAHs, which may be linked to an increased risk of lung cancer. The potential carcinogenic exposure could be reduced by placing table-edged fume extractors near cooking pots. PMID:10361022

  18. Profiling mild steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions and costs in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael J; Siert, Arlen; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel G

    2014-05-01

    To provide quantitative information to choose the best welding processes for minimizing workplace emissions, nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for mild steel were assessed for fume generation rates, normalized fume generation rates (milligram fume per gram of electrode consumed), and normalized generation rates for elemental manganese, nickel, and iron. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) processes were also profiled. The fumes were collected quantitatively in an American Welding Society-type fume chamber and weighed, recovered, homogenized, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for total metals. The processes included GMAW with short circuit, globular transfer, axial spray, pulsed spray, Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, and Cold Metal Transfer™ (CMT) modes. Flux-cored welding was gas shielded, and SMAW was a single rod type. Results indicate a wide range of fume emission factors for the process variations studied. Fume emission rates per gram of electrode consumed were highest for SMAW (~13 mg fume g(-1) electrode) and lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed spray (~1.5mg g(-1)) and CMT (~1mg g(-1)). Manganese emission rates per gram of electrode consumed ranged from 0.45 mg g(-1) (SMAW) to 0.08 mg g(-1) (CMT). Nickel emission rates were generally low and ranged from ~0.09 (GMAW short circuit) to 0.004 mg g(-1) (CMT). Iron emission rates ranged from 3.7 (spray-mode GMAW) to 0.49 mg g(-1) (CMT). The processes studied have significantly different costs, and cost factors are presented based on a case study to allow comparisons between processes in specific cost categories. Costs per linear meter of weld were $31.07 (SMAW), $12.37 (GMAW short circuit), and $10.89 (FCAW). Although no single process is the best for minimizing fume emissions and costs while satisfying the weld requirements, there are several processes that can minimize emissions. This study provides

  19. Profiling Mild Steel Welding Processes to Reduce Fume Emissions and Costs in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Michael J.; Siert, Arlen; Chen, Bean T.; Stone, Samuel G.

    2015-01-01

    To provide quantitative information to choose the best welding processes for minimizing workplace emissions, nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for mild steel were assessed for fume generation rates, normalized fume generation rates (milligram fume per gram of electrode consumed), and normalized generation rates for elemental manganese, nickel, and iron. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) processes were also profiled. The fumes were collected quantitatively in an American Welding Society-type fume chamber and weighed, recovered, homogenized, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for total metals. The processes included GMAW with short circuit, globular transfer, axial spray, pulsed spray, Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, and Cold Metal Transfer™ (CMT) modes. Flux-cored welding was gas shielded, and SMAW was a single rod type. Results indicate a wide range of fume emission factors for the process variations studied. Fume emission rates per gram of electrode consumed were highest for SMAW (~13 mg fume g−1 electrode) and lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed spray (~1.5 mg g−1) and CMT (~1 mg g−1). Manganese emission rates per gram of electrode consumed ranged from 0.45 mg g−1 (SMAW) to 0.08 mg g−1 (CMT). Nickel emission rates were generally low and ranged from ~0.09 (GMAW short circuit) to 0.004 mg g−1 (CMT). Iron emission rates ranged from 3.7 (spray-mode GMAW) to 0.49 mg g−1 (CMT). The processes studied have significantly different costs, and cost factors are presented based on a case study to allow comparisons between processes in specific cost categories. Costs per linear meter of weld were $31.07 (SMAW), $12.37 (GMAW short circuit), and $10.89 (FCAW). Although no single process is the best for minimizing fume emissions and costs while satisfying the weld requirements, there are several processes that can minimize emissions. This study provides

  20. Stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash using silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinying; Chen, Quanyuan; Zhou, Yasu; Tyrer, Mark; Yu, Yang

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash was investigated. • The addition of silica fume effectively reduced the leaching of Pb and Cd. • The relation of solid phase transformation and leaching behavior of heavy metals was discussed. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of silica fume on stabilizing heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. In addition to compressive strength measurements, hydrated pastes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal-analyses (DTA/TG), and MAS NMR ({sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si) techniques. It was found that silica fume additions could effectively reduce the leaching of toxic heavy metals. At the addition of 20% silica fume, leaching concentrations for Cu, Pb and Zn of the hydrated paste cured for 7 days decreased from 0.32 mg/L to 0.05 mg/L, 40.99 mg/L to 4.40 mg/L, and 6.96 mg/L to 0.21 mg/L compared with the MSWI fly ash. After curing for 135 days, Cd and Pb in the leachates were not detected, while Cu and Zn concentrations decreased to 0.02 mg/L and 0.03 mg/L. The speciation of Pb and Cd by the modified version of the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) extractions showed that these metals converted into more stable state in hydrated pastes of MSWI fly ash in the presence of silica fume. Although exchangeable and weak-acid soluble fractions of Cu and Zn increased with hydration time, silica fume addition of 10% can satisfy the requirement of detoxification for heavy metals investigated in terms of the identification standard of hazardous waste of China.

  1. Asphalt fume dermal carcinogenicity potential: I. dermal carcinogenicity evaluation of asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles R; Burnett, Donald M; Parker, Craig M; Arp, Earl W; Swanson, Mark S; Minsavage, Gary D; Kriech, Anthony J; Osborn, Linda V; Freeman, James J; Barter, Robert A; Newton, Paul E; Beazley, Shelley L; Stewart, Christopher W

    2011-10-01

    Asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates collected from the headspace above paving and Type III built up roofing asphalt (BURA) tanks were evaluated in two-year dermal carcinogenicity assays in male C3H/HeNCrl mice. A third sample was generated from the BURA using a NIOSH laboratory generation method. Similar to earlier NIOSH studies, the BURA fume condensates were applied dermally in mineral oil twice per week; the paving sample was applied 7 days/week for a total weekly dose of 50 mg/wk in both studies. A single benign papilloma was observed in a group of 80 mice exposed to paving fume condensate at the end of the two-year study and only mild skin irritation was observed. The lab generated BURA fume condensate resulted in statistically significant (P<0.0001) increases in squamous cell carcinomas (35 animals or 55% of animals at risk). The field-matched BURA condensate showed a weaker but significant (P=0.0063) increase (8 carcinomas or 13% of animals) and a longer average latency (90 weeks vs. 76 for the lab fume). Significant irritation was observed in both BURA condensates. It is concluded that the paving fume condensate was not carcinogenic under the test conditions and that the field-matched BURA fume condensate produced a weak tumor response compared to the lab generated sample. PMID:21524677

  2. Combustion fume structure and dynamics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flagan, R.C.

    1995-06-29

    An investigation of the fundamental physical processes that govern the structures of fume particles that are produced from the vapor phase in a wide range of high temperature systems has been conducted. The key objective of this study has been to develop models of the evolution of fine particles of refractory materials that are produced from the vapor phase, with particular emphasis on those processes that govern the evolution of ash fumes produced from volatilized mineral matter during coal combustion. To accomplish this goal, the study has included investigations of a number of fundamental aspects of pyrogenous fumes: Structural characterization of agglomerate particles in terms of fractal structure parameters; the relationship between the structures of agglomerate particles and the aerodynamic drag forces they experience; coagulation kinetics of fractal-like particles; sintering of aerosol agglomerates past the early stage of neck formation and incorporating the simultaneous influences of several transport mechanisms.

  3. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  4. MIXING PHENOMENA IN INDUSTRIAL FUME AFTERBURNER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report reviews the physical-mixing phenomena involved in the reactions that occur in afterburners or fume incinerators. It considers mixing in after-burners from three points of view. It first covers typical designs of afterburner components that are involved in the mixing ph...

  5. Persistence of Change: Fume Hood Campaign Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feder, Elah; Robinson, Jennifer; Wakefield, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability initiatives typically operate for a limited time period, but it is often unclear whether they have lasting effects. The purpose of this paper is to examine a laboratory fume hood campaign, in order to identify factors that might contribute or detract from long-term change persistence. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  6. Hazardous Fluids Compatibility Test Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, Frank; Daniel, James

    1995-01-01

    Document describes test apparatus designed to hold test tubes containing hazardous fluids such as hydrazine, nitrogen tetroxide, or ammonia. Test tube suspended over water bath or other solution or mixture. Control of test sample performed by one-hand operation within fume hood or glove box. System adaptable for automated control of lowering and raising of test samples.

  7. Relation between various chromium compounds and some other elements in fumes from manual metal arc stainless steel welding.

    PubMed Central

    Matczak, W; Chmielnicka, J

    1993-01-01

    For the years 1987-1990 160 individual samples of manual metal arc stainless steel (MMA/SS) welding fumes from the breathing zone of welders in four industrial plants were collected. Concentrations of soluble and insoluble chromium (Cr) III and Cr VI compounds as well as of some other welding fume elements (Fe, Mn, Ni, F) were determined. Concentration of welding fumes in the breathing zone ranged from 0.2 to 23.4 mg/m3. Total Cr amounted to 0.005-0.991 mg/m3 (including 0.005-0.842 mg/m3 Cr VI). Total Cr content of fumes varied from 0.1 to 7.4%. The distribution of particular Cr compounds was: 52.6% soluble Cr (including 50.7% Cr VI), 65.5% total Cr VI, and 11.4% insoluble Cr VI. The results obtained indicate that MMA/SS welding is a process that could be highly hazardous to human health. Evaluation of occupational exposure has shown that MMA/SS welders may exceed the admissible concentrations of soluble and insoluble Cr VI forms as well as of Mn and Ni. In the plants investigated the sum of the ratios of concentrations of particular welding fumes in the breathing zone of welders exceeded corresponding maximum allowable concentration values by 24 times (including 17 times for total Cr VI). Due to the variety and changeability of particular parameters occurring in the working environment, the composition of MMA/SS welding fumes (in the welder's breathing zone) is so variable that it is not possible to assess the exposure by means of one universal exposure indicator (maximum additive hygienic limit value). The evaluation should be based on the results of measurements of concentrations of particular elements in welding fumes. PMID:8457491

  8. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm−3, with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. PMID:26464505

  9. Stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash using silica fume.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinying; Chen, Quanyuan; Zhou, Yasu; Tyrer, Mark; Yu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of silica fume on stabilizing heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. In addition to compressive strength measurements, hydrated pastes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal-analyses (DTA/TG), and MAS NMR ((27)Al and (29)Si) techniques. It was found that silica fume additions could effectively reduce the leaching of toxic heavy metals. At the addition of 20% silica fume, leaching concentrations for Cu, Pb and Zn of the hydrated paste cured for 7 days decreased from 0.32 mg/L to 0.05 mg/L, 40.99 mg/L to 4.40 mg/L, and 6.96 mg/L to 0.21 mg/L compared with the MSWI fly ash. After curing for 135 days, Cd and Pb in the leachates were not detected, while Cu and Zn concentrations decreased to 0.02 mg/L and 0.03 mg/L. The speciation of Pb and Cd by the modified version of the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) extractions showed that these metals converted into more stable state in hydrated pastes of MSWI fly ash in the presence of silica fume. Although exchangeable and weak-acid soluble fractions of Cu and Zn increased with hydration time, silica fume addition of 10% can satisfy the requirement of detoxification for heavy metals investigated in terms of the identification standard of hazardous waste of China. PMID:25277825

  10. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm(-3), with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. PMID:26464505

  11. Rapid detection of transition metals in welding fumes using paper-based analytical devices.

    PubMed

    Cate, David M; Nanthasurasak, Pavisara; Riwkulkajorn, Pornpak; L'Orange, Christian; Henry, Charles S; Volckens, John

    2014-05-01

    Metals in particulate matter (PM) are considered a driving factor for many pathologies. Despite the hazards associated with particulate metals, personal exposures for at-risk workers are rarely assessed due to the cost and effort associated with monitoring. As a result, routine exposure assessments are performed for only a small fraction of the exposed workforce. The objective of this research was to evaluate a relatively new technology, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs), for measuring the metals content in welding fumes. Fumes from three common welding techniques (shielded metal arc, metal inert gas, and tungsten inert gas welding) were sampled in two welding shops. Concentrations of acid-extractable Fe, Cu, Ni, and Cr were measured and independently verified using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Results from the µPAD sensors agreed well with ICP-OES analysis; the two methods gave statistically similar results in >80% of the samples analyzed. Analytical costs for the µPAD technique were ~50 times lower than market-rate costs with ICP-OES. Further, the µPAD method was capable of providing same-day results (as opposed several weeks for ICP laboratory analysis). Results of this work suggest that µPAD sensors are a viable, yet inexpensive alternative to traditional analytic methods for transition metals in welding fume PM. These sensors have potential to enable substantially higher levels of hazard surveillance for a given resource cost, especially in resource-limited environments. PMID:24515892

  12. Rapid Detection of Transition Metals in Welding Fumes Using Paper-Based Analytical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Volckens, John

    2014-01-01

    Metals in particulate matter (PM) are considered a driving factor for many pathologies. Despite the hazards associated with particulate metals, personal exposures for at-risk workers are rarely assessed due to the cost and effort associated with monitoring. As a result, routine exposure assessments are performed for only a small fraction of the exposed workforce. The objective of this research was to evaluate a relatively new technology, microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs), for measuring the metals content in welding fumes. Fumes from three common welding techniques (shielded metal arc, metal inert gas, and tungsten inert gas welding) were sampled in two welding shops. Concentrations of acid-extractable Fe, Cu, Ni, and Cr were measured and independently verified using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Results from the µPAD sensors agreed well with ICP-OES analysis; the two methods gave statistically similar results in >80% of the samples analyzed. Analytical costs for the µPAD technique were ~50 times lower than market-rate costs with ICP-OES. Further, the µPAD method was capable of providing same-day results (as opposed several weeks for ICP laboratory analysis). Results of this work suggest that µPAD sensors are a viable, yet inexpensive alternative to traditional analytic methods for transition metals in welding fume PM. These sensors have potential to enable substantially higher levels of hazard surveillance for a given resource cost, especially in resource-limited environments. PMID:24515892

  13. Identification of sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma using an electronic nose

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xia; Wan, Jun; Chu, Liang; Liu, Wengang; Jing, Yafeng; Wu, Chunjie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pinelliae Rhizoma is a commonly used Chinese herb which will change brown during the natural drying process. However, sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma will get a better appearance than naturally dried one. Sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma is potentially toxical due to sulfur dioxide and sulfites formed during the fuming procedures. The odor components in sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma is complex. At present, there is no analytical method available to determine sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma simply and rapidly. To ensure medication safety, it is highly desirable to have an effective and simple method to identify sulfur fumed Pinelliae Rhizoma. Materials and Methods: This paper presents a novel approach using an electronic nose based on metal oxide sensors to identify whether Pinelliae Rhizoma was fumed with sulfur, and to predict the fuming degree of Pinelliae Rhizoma. Multivariate statistical methods such as principal components analysis (PCA), discriminant factorial analysis (DFA) and partial least squares (PLS) were used for data analyzing and identification. The use of the electronic nose to discriminate between different fuming degrees Pinelliae Rhizoma and naturally dried Pinelliae Rhizoma was demonstrated. Results: The electronic nose was also successfully applied to identify unknown samples including sulfur fumed samples and naturally dried samples, high recognition value was obtained. Quantitative analysis of fuming degree of Pinelliae Rhizoma was also demonstrated. The method developed is simple and fast, which provides a new quality control method of Chinese herbs from the aspect of odor. Conclusion: It has shown that this electronic nose based metal oxide sensor is sensitive to sulfur and sulfides. We suggest that it can serve as a supportive method to detect residual sulfur and sulfides. PMID:24914293

  14. 13. View of interior, north wall featuring fume hood, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of interior, north wall featuring fume hood, facing north (Note: B/W scale on fume hood is in 1/2 ft increments) - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  15. A Low-Cost, Effective, Fumes Exhaust System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, C. O.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the importance of avoiding welding fumes. The sources of these fumes are presented in a table. Criticizes currently used ventilation systems and reviews the Occupational Safety and Health Act requirements. Describes a low-cost exhaust system developed for agricultural mechanics laboratories. (LRA)

  16. A review of published quantitative experimental studies on factors affecting laboratory fume hood performance.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kwangseog; Woskie, Susan; DiBerardinis, Louis; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2008-11-01

    This study attempted to identify the important factors that affect the performance of a laboratory fume hood and the relationship between the factors and hood performance under various conditions by analyzing and generalizing the results from other studies that quantitatively investigated fume hood performance. A literature search identified 43 studies that were published from 1966 to 2006. For each of those studies, information on the type of test methods used, the factors investigated, and the findings were recorded and summarized. Among the 43 quantitative experimental studies, 21 comparable studies were selected, and then a meta-analysis of the comparable studies was conducted. The exposure concentration variable from the resulting 617 independent test conditions was dichotomized into acceptable or unacceptable using the control level of 0.1 ppm tracer gas. Regression analysis using Cox proportional hazards models provided hood failure ratios for potential exposure determinants. The variables that were found to be statistically significant were the presence of a mannequin/human subject, the distance between a source and breathing zone, and the height of sash opening. In summary, performance of laboratory fume hoods was affected mainly by the presence of a mannequin/human subject, distance between a source and breathing zone, and height of sash opening. Presence of a mannequin/human subject in front of the hood adversely affects hood performance. Worker exposures to air contaminants can be greatly reduced by increasing the distance between the contaminant source and breathing zone and by reducing the height of sash opening. Many other factors can also affect hood performance. Checking face velocity by itself is unlikely to be sufficient in evaluating hood performance properly. An evaluation of the performance of a laboratory fume hood should be performed with a human subject or a mannequin in front of the hood and should address the effects of the activities

  17. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Gate, Laurent . E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Herve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stephane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  18. Effects of doorsill jet injection on fume cupboard containment.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Li-Ching; Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2008-10-01

    The flow separation and its accompanied recirculation induced when the airflow passes over the inappropriately designed doorsill of a chemical fume cupboard are the key factors which would lead to deterioration of the cupboard performance. In order to alleviate the contaminant leakage of the fume cupboard induced by inherent aerodynamic deficiency, a technique using doorsill jet injection is developed and validated. A planar jet is ejected upward through a slot located across the inner surface of the doorsill of a full-scale, transparent fume cupboard and is ejected upward. The laser-light-sheet-assisted smoke flow visualization is performed to explore the physical mechanism of changing and controlling the flow structure. It is found that the upward injected jet is curved by the airflow drawn into the sash opening and forms a layer of clean air which can isolate the contaminant and alleviate the diffusion through the recirculating vortex on the doorsill, if the jet velocity is properly adjusted. The tracer gas concentration measurements present extraordinarily satisfactory results--the order of magnitude of the leakage of tracer gas near the doorsill may be reduced from original levels of approximately 10(2) to approximately 10(-2) p.p.m. Except for the experimental fume cupboard used for development of technique, two commercial fume cupboards are employed for verifications and comparisons on the proposed method. Tests about the two modified commercial fume cupboards demonstrate good agreement to those of the model fume cupboard. PMID:18660505

  19. [Analysis on oil fume particles in catering industry cooking emission].

    PubMed

    Tan, De-Sheng; Kuang, Yuan-Cheng; Liu, Xin; Dai, Fei-Hong

    2012-06-01

    By measuring the particulate matter of oil fume which is over 10 microm or below 10 microm separately and using microradiography and Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), it is found out the distributing characteristic of oil fume particles in catering industry cooking emission. The result shows that the diameter of the oil fume particles which was sedimentated in the kitchen is between 10-400 microm, the concentration peak value is between 10-100 microm. The diameter of oil fume aerosol is mostly smaller than 1 microm, while the concentration peak value is between 0.063-0.109 microm. In addition, the mass concentration peak value is between 6.560-9.990 microm. Through the analysis to the physical characteristics of oil fume from catering industry cooking emissions, the eigenvalue of the oil fume has been found and the feature matter for monitoring the oil fume has been discovered to provide a reasonable standard for controlling and monitoring the catering industry cooking emission. PMID:22946182

  20. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  1. Reduction of Acute Inflammatory Effects of Fumed Silica Nanoparticles in the Lung by Adjusting Silanol Display through Calcination and Metal Doping.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingbing; Pokhrel, Suman; Dunphy, Darren R; Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Meiying; Liao, Yu-Pei; Chang, Chong Hyun; Dong, Juyao; Li, Ruibin; Mädler, Lutz; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Nel, André E; Xia, Tian

    2015-09-22

    The production of pyrogenic (fumed) silica is increasing worldwide at a 7% annual growth rate, including expanded use in food, pharmaceuticals, and other industrial products. Synthetic amorphous silica, including fumed silica, has been generally recognized as safe for use in food products by the Food and Drug Administration. However, emerging evidence from experimental studies now suggests that fumed silica could be hazardous due to its siloxane ring structure, high silanol density, and "string-of-pearl-like" aggregate structure, which could combine to cause membrane disruption, generation of reactive oxygen species, pro-inflammatory effects, and liver fibrosis. Based on this structure-activity analysis (SAA), we investigated whether calcination and rehydration of fumed silica changes its hazard potential in the lung due to an effect on silanol density display. This analysis demonstrated that the accompanying change in surface reactivity could indeed impact cytokine production in macrophages and acute inflammation in the lung, in a manner that is dependent on siloxane ring reconstruction. Confirmation of this SAA in vivo, prompted us to consider safer design of fumed silica properties by titanium and aluminum doping (0-7%), using flame spray pyrolysis. Detailed characterization revealed that increased Ti and Al doping could reduce surface silanol density and expression of three-membered siloxane rings, leading to dose-dependent reduction in hydroxyl radical generation, membrane perturbation, potassium efflux, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and cytotoxicity in THP-1 cells. The reduction of NLRP3 inflammasome activation was also confirmed in bone-marrow-derived macrophages. Ti doping, and to a lesser extent Al doping, also ameliorated acute pulmonary inflammation, demonstrating the possibility of a safer design approach for fumed silica, should that be required for specific use circumstances. PMID:26200133

  2. 4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CHEMISTRY LAB LOOKING SOUTHEAST; NOTE FUME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CHEMISTRY LAB LOOKING SOUTHEAST; NOTE FUME EXHAUST HOOD AT LEFT & ORIGINAL CEILING FIXTURE - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1033, North side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  3. In vitro RPM fibrogenic potential assay of welding fumes.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, R M; Pigott, G H

    1983-01-01

    The fibrogenic potential of 11 different welding fumes and metallic aerosols, considered to be reference standard surrogates for the commonly used welding technologies and applications responsible for 70% of welders exposure, is screened by using the rat peritoneal macrophage (RPM) in vitro bioassay. Only one class of fumes, that from the manual metal are welding of stainless steel, shows distinct fibrogenic potential. This fume, however, is not common to more than four or five of the heretofore 90 cases of pulmonary fibrosis reported among welders. Thus, although insoluble Cr(VI) is probably the active fibrogen in stainless steel fumes, an etiological factor common to all fibrogenic welding exposures must be sought; it is tentatively proposed to be NO chi, a potent experimental in vivo fibrogen copiously produced by certain welding processes and ubiquitous at low concentrations in the welding environment. PMID:6641657

  4. 10. LOOKING SOUTH IN BOP SHOP AT FUME HOOD AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. LOOKING SOUTH IN BOP SHOP AT FUME HOOD AND SPARE OXYGEN LANCES ON THE SERVICE FLOOR OF THE FURNACE AISLE. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  5. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cooking oil fumes.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Pan, D; Wang, G

    1994-01-01

    Various samples of cooking oil fumes were analyzed to an effort to study the relationship between the high incidence of pulmonary adenocarcinoma in Chinese women and cooking oil fumes in the kitchen. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in samples of cooking oil fumes were extracted, chromatographed, and measured by fluorescence spectrophotometer. The samples included oil fumes from three commercial cooking oils and fumes from three catering shops. All samples contained benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and dibenzo (a,h)anthracene (DBahA). In addition, the concentration of DBahA was 5.7 to 22.8 times higher than that of BaP in the fume samples. Concentrations of BaP and DBahA were, respectively, 0.463 and 5.736 micrograms/g in refined vegetable oil, 0.341 and 3.725 micrograms/g in soybean oil, and 0.305 and 4.565 micrograms/g in vegetable oil. Investigation of PAH concentrations at three catering shops showed that the level of BaP at a Youtiao (deep-fried twisted dough sticks) shop was 4.18 micrograms/100 m3, 2.28 micrograms/100 m3 at a Seqenma (candied fritters) workshop, and 0.49 micrograms/100 m3 at a kitchen of a restaurant; concentrations of DBahA were 33.80, 14.41, and 3.03 micrograms/100 m3, respectively. The high concentration of carcinogens, such as BaP and DBahA, in cooking oil fumes might help explain why Chinese women, who spend more time exposed to cooking oil fumes than men, have a high incidence of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. PMID:8161241

  6. Decreasing biotoxicity of fume particles produced in welding process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuei-Min; Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Tseng, Yiider; Wu, Chang-Yu; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Cho, Kuk

    2011-01-30

    Welding fumes contain heavy metals, such as chromium, manganese, and nickel, which cause respiratory diseases and cancer. In this study, a SiO(2) precursor was evaluated as an additive to the shielding gas in an arc welding process to reduce the biotoxicity caused by welding fume particles. Transmission electron micrographic images show that SiO(2) coats on the surface of welding fume particles and promotes particle agglomeration. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy further shows that the relative amount of silicon in these SiO(2)-coated agglomerates is higher than in baseline agglomerates. In addition, Escherichia coli (E. coli) exposed to different concentrations of pure SiO(2) particles generated from the arc welding process exhibits similar responses, suggesting that SiO(2) does not contribute to welding fume particle toxicity. The trend of E. coli growth in different concentrations of baseline welding fume particle shows the most significant inhibition occurs in higher exposure concentrations. The 50% lethal logarithmic concentrations for E. coli in arc welding particles of baseline, 2%, and 4.2% SiO(2) precursor additives were 823, 1605, and 1800 mg/L, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that using SiO(2) precursors as an additive to arc welding shielding gas can effectively reduce the biotoxicity of welding fume. PMID:21030147

  7. Design considerations for fume hoods for process plants.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, H D; Bender, M

    1980-07-01

    Proper design of fume hoods is a necessary requisite for a clean working environment for many industrial processes. Until recently, the design of these hoods has been rather a trial and error approach and not based on sound engineering design principles. Hatch Associates have developed and applied new techniques to establish hood parameters for different industrail processes. The paper reviews the developed techniques and illustrates practical application of these techniques to the solving of difficult and comples fume hood design and operating performance problems. The scope of the paper covers the following subject areas: definitions and general considerations: evaluation of volume and heat flow rates for emission sources; local capture of process emissions; remote capture of process emissions and case studies of fume hood applications. The purpose of the paper is to detail a coherent approach in the analysis of emission problems which will result in the development of an efficient design of a fume capture hood. An efficient fume hood can provide a safe working place as well as a clean external environment. Although the techniques can be applied to smaller sources, the case studies which will be examined will be for fume hoods in the flow design range of 50 000 CFM to +1 000 000 CFM. PMID:7415967

  8. Metal fume fever among galvanized welders.

    PubMed

    Wardhana; Datau, E A

    2014-07-01

    The metal fume fever (MFF) is an inhalation fever syndrome in welders of galvanized steel, who join and cut metal parts using flame or electric arc and other sources of heat. Inhalation of certain freshly formed metal oxides produced from welding process can cause MFF as an acute self-limiting flulike illness. The most common cause of MFF is the inhalation of zinc oxide (ZnO). The inhalation of ZnO particles can provoke a number of clinical responses of which accompanied by changes in composition of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, including early increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory marker, and recruitment of inflammatory cells in the lungs. The MFF is characterized by fever, cough, sputing, wheezing, chest tightness, fatique, chills, fever, myalgias, cough, dyspnea, leukocytosis with a left shift, thirst, metallic taste, and salivations. The diagnosis of MFF diagnosis is based on clinical finding and occupational history. The symptoms resolved spontaneously. The treatment of MFF is entirely symptomatic, no specific treatment is indicated for MFF. The mainstay of management of MFF is prevention of sub-sequent exposure to harmful metals. Including public and physician awareness of MFF may help to reduce the occurrence of the disease. PMID:25348190

  9. Interaction of poly(ethylene oxide) with fumed silica.

    PubMed

    Voronin, E F; Gun'ko, V M; Guzenko, N V; Pakhlov, E M; Nosach, L V; Leboda, R; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J; Malysheva, M L; Borysenko, M V; Chuiko, A A

    2004-11-15

    Interaction of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO, 600 kDa) with fumed silica A-300 (SBET = 316 m2/g) was investigated under different conditions using adsorption, infrared (IR), thermal analysis (TG-DTA), AFM, and quantum chemical methods. The studied dried silica/PEO samples were also carbonized in a flow reactor at 773 K. The structural characteristics of fumed silica, PEO/silica, and pyrocarbon/fumed silica were investigated using nitrogen adsorption-desorption at 77.4 K. PEO adsorption isotherm depicts a high affinity of PEO to the fumed silica surface in aqueous medium. PEO adsorbed in the amount of 50 mg per gram of silica (PEO monolayer corresponds to CPEO approximately 190 mg/g) can disturb approximately 70% of isolated surface silanols. However, at the monolayer coverage, only 20% of oxygen atoms of PEO molecules take part in the hydrogen bonding with the surface silanols. An increase in the PEO amount adsorbed on fumed silica leads to a diminution of the specific surface area and contributions of micro- (pore radius R < 1 nm) and mesopores (1 < R < 25 nm) to the pore volume but contribution of macropores (R > 25 nm) increases with CPEO. Quantum chemical calculations of a complex of a PEO fragment with a tripple bond SiOH group of a silica cluster in the gas phase and with consideration for the solvent (water) effect show a reduction of interaction energy in the aqueous medium. However, the complex remains strong enough to provide durability of the PEO adsorption complexes on fumed silica; i.e., PEO/fumed silica nanocomposites could be stable in both gaseous and liquid media. PMID:15464796

  10. Numerical analysis of fume formation mechanism in arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Zeniya, Tasuku; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tanaka, Manabu; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Murphy, Anthony B.; Yamamoto, Eri; Yamazaki, Kei; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2010-11-01

    In order to clarify the fume formation mechanism in arc welding, a quantitative investigation based on the knowledge of interaction among the electrode, arc and weld pool is indispensable. A fume formation model consisting of a heterogeneous condensation model, a homogeneous nucleation model and a coagulation model has been developed and coupled with the GTA or GMA welding model. A series of processes from evaporation of metal vapour to fume formation from the metal vapour was totally investigated by employing this simulation model. The aim of this paper is to visualize the fume formation process and clarify the fume formation mechanism theoretically through a numerical analysis. Furthermore, the reliability of the simulation model was also evaluated through a comparison of the simulation result with the experimental result. As a result, it was found that the size of the secondary particles consisting of small particles with a size of several tens of nanometres reached 300 nm at maximum and the secondary particle was in a U-shaped chain form in helium GTA welding. Furthermore, it was also clarified that most part of the fume was produced in the downstream region of the arc originating from the metal vapour evaporated mainly from the droplet in argon GMA welding. The fume was constituted by particles with a size of several tens of nanometres and had similar characteristics to that of GTA welding. On the other hand, if the metal transfer becomes unstable and the metal vapour near the droplet diffuses directly towards the surroundings of the arc not getting into the plasma flow, the size of the particles reaches several hundred nanometres.

  11. Environmental exposure to cooking oil fumes and cervical intraepithelial neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Tsang; Lee, Li-Hung; Ho, Chi-Kung; Wu, Su-Chu; Lin, Long-Yau; Cheng, Bi-Hua; Liu, Chia-Ling; Yang, Chun-Yuh; Tsai, Hsiu-Ting; Wu, Trong-Neng

    2004-01-01

    The fumes from cooking oil, similar to cigarette smoke, contain numerous carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, etc. In this study, we examined the association between exposure to cooking oil fumes and the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasm. The study population in this nested case-control study consisted of women above the age of 19 years living in Chia-Yi County, located in the southwestern Taiwan, who had received pap smear screening between October, 1999, and December, 2000 (n=32,466). The potential cases were women having lesions greater than cervical intraepithelium neoplasm II (> or =CIN2) reconfirmed by cervical biopsy (n=116). The potential controls (case: control=1:2) were age-matched (+/-2 years) and residence-matched women who had normal pap smears within 6 months of the cases. In total, 100 cases and 197 controls were completely interviewed by public health nurses about cooking methods, ventilation, and other potential risk factors. Women who cooked at home in a kitchen (n=269) without the presence of a fume extractor at least once a week between the ages of 20 and 40 had a 2.29 times higher risk [95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-4.87] of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasm than those who did not cook once a week in such a kitchen during the same age span, after adjusting for other potential confounders. This finding was further strengthened by the finding that women who did not use the fume extractors had a 2.47 times higher risk (95% CI=1.15-5.32) of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasm than women who cooked in kitchens with fume extractors that were always switched on while cooking. We also found a joint protective effect of fume extractor use among women older than 40 years (n=202) if they used the extractors during both age spans of their lives, ages 20-40 and >40 years. Comparing our findings on women more than 40 years old who used fume extractors

  12. Reactions Involved in Fingerprint Development Using the Cyanoacrylate - Fuming Method

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L.A.

    2001-07-30

    The Learning Objective is to present the basic chemistry research findings to the forensic community regarding development of latent fingerprints using the cyanoacrylate fuming method. Chemical processes involved in the development of latent fingerprints using the cyanoacrylate fuming method have been studied, and will be presented. Two major types of latent prints have been investigated--clean (eccrine) and oily (sebaceous) prints. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used as a tool for determining the morphology of the polymer developed separately on clean and oily prints after cyanoacrylate fuming. A correlation between the chemical composition of an aged latent fingerprint, prior to development, and the quality of a developed fingerprint was observed in the morphology. The moisture in the print prior to fuming was found to be a critical factor for the development of a useful latent print. In addition, the amount of time required to develop a high quality latent print was found to be minimal. The cyanoacrylate polymerization process is extremely rapid. When heat is used to accelerate the fuming process, typically a period of 2 minutes is required to develop the print. The optimum development time is dependent upon the concentration of cyanoacrylate vapors within the enclosure.

  13. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1140 - Dust, fume, and mist respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist respirators; performance... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1140 Dust, fume, and mist respirators; performance...

  15. Exposure to Inhalable, Respirable, and Ultrafine Particles in Welding Fume

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Beate

    2012-01-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m−3 for inhalable and 1.29 mg m−3 for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m−3). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements fume. Concentrations were mainly predicted by the welding process and were significantly higher when local exhaust ventilation (LEV) was inefficient or when welding was performed in confined spaces. Substitution of high-emission techniques like FCAW, efficient LEV, and using PAPRs where applicable can reduce exposure to welding fume. However, harmonizing the different exposure metrics for UFP (as particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  16. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements fume. Concentrations were mainly predicted by the welding process and were significantly higher when local exhaust ventilation (LEV) was inefficient or when welding was performed in confined spaces. Substitution of high-emission techniques like FCAW, efficient LEV, and using PAPRs where applicable can reduce exposure to welding fume. However, harmonizing the different exposure metrics for UFP (as particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging. PMID:22539559

  17. Study of how sash movement affects performance of fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Hardwick, T.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted to determine how sash movements affect the performance of fume hoods. The performance of two fume hoods was studied as the sashes were moved from closed to open position at speeds of 2 ft/s, 1.5 ft/s, and 1 ft/s. The tests were conducted with fume hoods operated at both constant volume and variable air volume. The tests indicate that sash movements can disturb airflow patterns at the face of the hood and potentially affect the performance of the hood. The effect of the sash movement varied with hood type and speed of sash movement. The faster sash movements of 2 ft/s and 1.5 ft/s had a greater effect on the performance of the hoods than the slower movement of 1 ft/s. Constant-volume hoods and variable-air-volume hoods were both affected by sash movements. Constant-volume hoods set to a full open face velocity of 60 ft/min were more susceptible to the sash movement than at 100 ft/min full open face velocity. The performance of variable-air-volume hoods is affected not only by sash movement speed but also by the response time of the controller. The drop in face velocity that occurs when the sash is moved is determined by the speed of the VAV controller. The required response time for containment depends on the fume hood design and the speed of the sash movement.

  18. Fume hood performance: Face velocity variability inconsistent air volume systems

    SciTech Connect

    Volin, C.E.; Joao, R.V.; Gershey, E.L.; Reiman, J.S.; Party, E.

    1998-09-01

    A 3-year survey of 366 bench-type fume hoods in working laboratories in conventional, constant air volume settings showed that face velocities varied greatly from unit to unit and over time. Fume hoods with bypasses performed better than those without; however, even newly fabricated bypass hoods exhibited large variations. These variations were due to several factors; however, face velocities at 100 {+-} 10 ft/min at working sash heights in the range of 20 to 40 cm (8 to 16 inches) were attainable. The use of smoke showed poor containment, especially at face velocities below 85 ft/min (0.425 m/s) or above 130 ft/min (0.65 m/s) and when the hoods were obstructed by large items placed on the work surface. Auxiliary/supplemental air created unstable face velocities and poor smoke patterns. The analysis of 3 years of fume hood monitoring showed clearly the need for and importance of a maintenance program where the fume hood lower slots are cleaned and fans, ducts, dampers, and hoods are checked periodically.

  19. 2. In the foreground is the fan which removed fumes ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. In the foreground is the fan which removed fumes from the galvanizing area in building #8. In the background are the waste treatment tanks for the acids and alkali used in the zinc-electro-plating process. - American Chain & Cable Company, East Princess Street (400 Block), York, York County, PA

  20. Metabolomic characterization of laborers exposed to welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Ching; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Tian, Tze-Feng; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Chiung, Yin-Mei; Hsiech, Chun-Ming; Tsai, Sung-Jeng; Wang, San-Yuan; Tsai, Dong-Ming; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Tseng, Y Jane

    2012-03-19

    The complex composition of welding fumes, multiplicity of molecular targets, diverse cellular effects, and lifestyles associated with laborers vastly complicate the assessment of welding fume exposure. The urinary metabolomic profiles of 35 male welders and 16 male office workers at a Taiwanese shipyard were characterized via (1)H NMR spectroscopy and pattern recognition methods. Blood samples for the same 51 individuals were also collected, and the expression levels of the cytokines and other inflammatory markers were examined. This study dichotomized the welding exposure variable into high (welders) versus low (office workers) exposures to examine the differences of continuous outcome markers-metabolites and inflammatory markers-between the two groups. Fume particle assessments showed that welders were exposed to different concentrations of chromium, nickel, and manganese particles. Multivariate statistical analysis of urinary metabolomic patterns showed higher levels of glycine, taurine, betaine/TMAO, serine, S-sulfocysteine, hippurate, gluconate, creatinine, and acetone and lower levels of creatine among welders, while only TNF-α was significantly associated with welding fume exposure among all cytokines and other inflammatory markers measured. Of the identified metabolites, the higher levels of glycine, taurine, and betaine among welders were suspected to play some roles in modulating inflammatory and oxidative tissue injury processes. In this metabolomics experiment, we also discovered that the association of the identified metabolites with welding exposure was confounded by smoking, but not with drinking, which is a finding consistent with known modified response of inflammatory markers among smokers. Our results correspond with prior studies that utilized nonmetabolomic analytical techniques and suggest that the metabolomic profiling is an efficient method to characterize the overall effect of welding fume exposure and other confounders. PMID:22292500

  1. Hexavalent chromium content in stainless steel welding fumes is dependent on the welding process and shield gas type.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean; Slaven, James; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Antonini, James

    2009-02-01

    Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a known health hazard. To isolate elements in stainless steel welding fumes with high potential for adverse health outcomes, fumes were generated using a robotic gas metal arc system, using four shield gases of varying oxygen content. The objective was to measure Cr(VI) concentrations in a broad spectrum of gas metal arc welding processes, and identify processes of exceptionally high or low Cr(VI) content. The gases used were 95% Ar/5% O(2), 98% Ar/2% O(2), 95% Ar/5%CO(2), and 75% He/25% Ar. The welder was operated in axial spray mode (Ar/O(2), Ar/CO(2)), short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO(2) low voltage and He/Ar), and pulsed axial-spray mode (98% Ar/2% O(2)). Results indicate large differences in Cr(VI) in the fumes, with Ar/O(2) (Pulsed)>Ar/O(2)>Ar/CO(2)>Ar/CO(2) (SC)>He/Ar; values were 3000+/-300, 2800+/-85, 2600+/-120, 1400+/-190, and 320+/-290 ppm respectively (means +/- standard errors for 2 runs and 3 replicates per run). Respective rates of Cr(VI) generation were 1.5, 3.2, 4.4, 1.3, and 0.46 microg/min; generation rates were also calculated in terms of microg Cr(VI) per metre of wire used. The generation rates of Cr(VI) increased with increasing O(3) concentrations. Particle size measurements indicated similar distributions, but somewhat higher >0.6 microm fractions for the short-circuit mode samples. Fumes were also sampled into 2 selected size ranges, a microspatter fraction (>or=0.6 microm) and a fine (<0.6 microm) fraction; analysis indicated that Cr(VI) is primarily associated with particles <0.6 microm. The conclusion of the study is that Cr(VI) concentrations vary significantly with welding type and shield gas type, and this presents an opportunity to tailor welding practices to lessen Cr(VI) exposures in workplaces by selecting low Cr(VI)-generating processes. Short-circuit processes generated less Cr(VI) than axial-spray methods, and inert gas shielding gave lower Cr(VI) content than shielding with active

  2. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-043-1760, American Crystal Sugar Company, Hillsboro, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Boiano, J.M.; Almaguer, D.

    1986-12-01

    In response to a request from management of the American Crystal Sugar Company (ACSCO) and the American Federation of Grain Millers International Union, employee exposures to welding fumes during facility maintenance and to airborne contaminants during beet processing were determined at a sugar-beet mill owned by ACSCO. Exposures exceeding the most stringent environmental criteria were found for calcium carbonate and carbon monoxide in lime kiln workers and sugar dust in sugar bin workers. Beet pulp dust was considered a potential hazard based on its content of crystalline silica. Welding produced excessive exposures to total welding fumes, hexavalent chromium, nickel, iron-oxide, and calcium-oxide. Chromium and nickel posed potential cancer risks. The authors conclude that workers were overexposed to calcium carbonate, carbon monoxide, sugar dust, total welding fumes, hexavalent chromium, iron oxide, nickel, and calcium oxide fumes at this facility. The authors recommend dust containment, ventilation, respiratory protection, and correction of slipping hazards.

  3. Environmental monitoring of mutagenic/carcinogenic hazards during road paving operations with bitumens.

    PubMed

    Monarca, S; Pasquini, R; Scassellati Sforzolini, G; Savino, A; Bauleo, F A; Angeli, G

    1987-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of mutagenic/carcinogenic hazards associated with occupational exposure to bitumen fumes was performed during road paving operations. Bitumen samples were collected and analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) content by HPLC and for mutagenicity by the Ames test. The exposure of sixteen road workers to bitumen fumes was studied. Time-weighted average values of bitumen fumes were determined by personal samplers. PAH concentration in the air and the mutagenicity of airborne particulates were also analysed. The results showed that bitumen samples contained low levels of total PAH (microgram/g) and were not mutagenic. Environmental monitoring showed a low level of exposure to bitumen fumes, which were found to contain only trace levels of PAH and not to be mutagenic. The authors suggest that these workers' exposure to mutagenic/carcinogenic agents is low. PMID:3610339

  4. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a smelter exposed to zinc fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ameille, J.; Brechot, J.M.; Brochard, P.; Capron, F.; Dore, M.F. )

    1992-03-01

    A smelter exposed to zinc fumes reported severe recurrent episodes of cough, dyspnea and fever. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed a marked increase in lymphocytes count with predominance of CD8 T-lymphocytes. Presence of zinc in alveolar macrophages was assessed by analytic transmission electron microscopy. This is the first case of recurrent bronchoalveolitis related to zinc exposure in which the clinical picture and BAL results indicate a probable hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

  5. A study of the bio-accessibility of welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Berlinger, Balázs; Ellingsen, Dag G; Náray, Miklós; Záray, Gyula; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2008-12-01

    The respiratory bio-accessibility of a substance is the fraction that is soluble in the respiratory environment and is available for absorption. In the case of respiratory exposure the amount of absorbed substance plays a main role in the biological effects. Extensive bio-accessibility studies have always been an essential requirement for a better understanding of the biological effects of different workplace aerosols, such as welding fumes. Fumes generated using three different welding techniques, manual metal arc (MMA) welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding, and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were investigated in the present study. Each technique was used for stainless steel welding. Welding fumes were collected on PVC membrane filters in batches of 114 using a multiport air sampler. Three different fluids were applied for the solubility study: deionised water and two kinds of lung fluid simulants: lung epithelial lining fluid simulant (Gamble's solution) and artificial lung lining fluid simulant (Hatch's solution). In order to obtain sufficient data to study the tendencies in solubility change with time, seven different leaching periods were used (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 h), each of them with three replicates. The effect of dissolution temperature was also studied. The total amounts of selected metals in the three different welding fumes were determined after microwave-assisted digestion with the mixture of aqua regia and hydrofluoric acid. The most obvious observation yielded by the results is that the solubility of individual metals varies greatly depending on the welding technique, the composition of the leaching fluid and leaching time. This study shows that the most reasonable choice as a media for the bio-assessment of solubility might be Hatch's solution by a dissolution time of 24 h. PMID:19037486

  6. Detailed characterization of welding fumes in personal exposure samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quémerais, B.; Mino, James; Amin, M. R.; Golshahi, H.; Izadi, H.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the project was to develop a method allowing for detailed characterization of welding particles including particle number concentration, size distribution, surface chemistry and chemical composition of individual particles, as well as metal concentration of various welding fumes in personal exposure samples using regular sampling equipment. A sample strategy was developed to evaluate the variation of the collection methods on mass concentration. Samples were collected with various samplers and filters at two different locations using our collection system. The first location was using a robotic welding system while the second was manual welding. Collected samples were analysed for mass concentration using gravimetryand metal concentration using ICP/OES. More advanced analysis was performed on selected filters using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to determine surface composition of the particles, and X-Ray Diffraction to determine chemical composition of the fumes. Results showed that the robotic system had a lot of variation in space when the collection system was located close to the weld. Collection efficiency was found to be quite variable depending upon the type of filter. As well, metal concentrations in blank filters were dependent upon the type of filter with MCE presenting with the highest blank values. Results obtained with the XRD and XPS systems showed that it was possible to analyse a small of powdered welding fume sample but results on filters were not conclusive.

  7. In vitro method for medical risk assessment of laser fumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkusch, W.; Rehn, B.; Bruch, J.

    1995-02-01

    Laser processing of different materials may produce toxic fumes. In preventive occupational medicine it is necessary to evaluate valid hygienic standards for work places. The basis for such hygienic standards is the classification of laser fumes by their fibrogenic, emphysematous, immunological or other harmful potencies in biological assay systems. This paper is part of a European project on laser safety. Our part in this project is the development of a method for the investigation of lung responses using in vitro cell assays. The appropriate laser fume samples will be supplied by other groups in this European project. In contrast to the cell assays usually used in risk assessment, our method is based on isolated target cells in the lung, such as alveolar macrophages. The test criteria are mediator release, surfactant reactions, release of reactive oxygen species and cell proliferation. As demonstrated in the lung response to other dusts (minerals, fibres etc) these parameters are medically relevant factors in the pathogenic alveolar dust response. The paper gives basic information about the method using lung cell assays and the results of known substances, in comparison with a dust generated by laser processing.

  8. The effect of thermal loading on laboratory fume hood performance.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J D; Chessin, S J; Chesnovar, B W; Lillquist, D R

    2000-11-01

    A modified version of the ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995 Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods was used to evaluate the relationship between thermal loading in a laboratory fume hood and subsequent tracer gas leakage. Three types of laboratory burners were used, alone and in combination, to thermally challenge the hood. Heat output from burners was measured in BTU/hr, which was based on the fuel heat capacity and flow rate. Hood leakage was measured between 2824 and 69,342 BTU/hr. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was released at 23.5 LPM for each level of thermal loading. Duct temperature was also measured during the heating process. Results indicate a linear relationship for both BTU/hr vs. hood leakage and duct temperature vs. hood leakage. Under these test conditions, each increase of 10,000 BTU/hr resulted in an additional 4 ppm SF6 in the manikin's breathing zone (r2 = 0.68). An additional 3.1 ppm SF6 was measured for every 25 degrees F increase in duct temperature (r2 = 0.60). Both BTU/hr and duct temperature models showed p < 0.001. For these tests, BTU/hr was a better predictor of hood leakage than duct temperature. The results of this study indicate that heat output may compromise fume hood performance. This finding is consistent with those of previous studies. PMID:11062932

  9. Effects of densified silica fume on microstructure and compressive strength of blended cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Yajun; Cahyadi, Jong Herman

    2003-10-01

    Some experimental investigations on the microstructure and compressive strength development of silica fume blended cement pastes are presented in this paper. The silica fume replacement varies from 0% to 20% by weight and the water/binder ratio (w/b) is 0.4. The pore structure by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), the micromorphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the compressive strength at 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 and 90 days have been studied. The test results indicate that the improvements on both microstructure and mechanical properties of hardened cement pastes by silica fume replacement are not effective due to the agglomeration of silica fume particles. The unreacted silica fume remained in cement pastes, the threshold diameter was not reduced and the increase in compressive strength was insignificant up to 28 days. It is suggested that the proper measures should be taken to disperse silica fume agglomeration to make it more effective on improving the properties of materials.

  10. A research on the radiation shielding effects of clay, silica fume and cement samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbulut, Suat; Sehhatigdiri, Arvin; Eroglu, Hayrettin; Çelik, Semet

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, as the application areas of nuclear technology increases, protection from radiation has become even more important. Especially, the importance of radiation-shielding is important for the environment and employees which are in close proximity. Clays can be used as additives for shielding the radioactive materials. In this study, the shielding properties of micronize clay-white cement, clay-silica fume, gypsum, gypsum-silica fume, cement, white cement, cement-silica fume, white cement-gypsum, white cement-silica fume, red mud-silica fume, silica fume and red mud at different energy levels were examined. Additionally, compaction and unconfined compression tests were carried out on the samples. The results of clays and other samples were compared with each other. As a result, it was found that clays, especially clay-white cement mixture were superior than other samples in radioactive shielding.

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Single Ion Conductors from High Surface Area Fumed Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, H.; Maitra, P.; Liu, B.; Wunder, S. L.; Lin, H.-P.; Salomon, M.; Hagedorn, Norman H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Anions that can form dissociative salts with Li(+) have been prepared and covalently attached to high surface area fumed silica. When blended with polyethylene oxide (PEO), the functionalized fumed silica suppresses the crystallization of the PEO, provides dimensional stability, and serves as a single ion conductor. Since functionalized fumed silica is easily dispersed in common polar solvents, it can be incorporated in both the polymer electrolyte and the electrodes.

  12. Manganese in occupational arc welding fumes--aspects on physiochemical properties, with focus on solubility.

    PubMed

    Taube, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Physicochemical properties, such as particle sizes, composition, and solubility of welding fumes are decisive for the bioaccessibility of manganese and thereby for the manganese cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects arising from various welding fumes. Because of the diverse results within the research on welding fume solubility, this article aims to review and discuss recent literature on physicochemical properties of gas metal arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, and flux-cored arc welding fumes, with focus on solubility properties. This article also presents a short introduction to the literature on arc welding techniques, health effects from manganese, and occupational exposure to manganese among welders. PMID:22997412

  13. Kinetics of the metal components of intratracheally instilled stainless steel welding fume suspensions in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kalliomäki, P L; Hyvärinen, H K; Aitio, A; Lakoma, E L; Kalliomäki, K

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of iron, chromium, nickel, and cobalt from manual metal arc and metal inert gas stainless steel welding fumes were studied. Neutron activated welding fumes, in aqueous suspensions, were instilled intratracheally into rats. The follow up continued for up to 106 days. From both fumes, approximately 10% of the injection bolus was immediately lost into the gastrointestinal tract, to be recovered in the faeces within three days. Thereafter, a pronounced difference was seen in the kinetics of the two types of fumes. After the first day, chromium, nickel, and iron were lost from the lungs with half times of about 53, 49, and 73 days after exposure to MMA/SS fumes, whereas practically no loss could be seen in the metal components of the metal inert gas welding fumes within two months. The disposition of chromium from MMA/SS fumes closely resembled that of intratracheally instilled water soluble chromates. On the other hand, the disappearance of trivalent chromium from MIS/SS fumes was considerably slower than that of the practically water insoluble chromates, or even of trivalent chromium salts. Thus the physical characteristics of the fume appreciably affect the kinetics of the clearance of chromium compounds from the lungs. PMID:3947567

  14. A Comparison of Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress from Welding Fumes Generated with a New Nickel-, Copper-Based Consumable versus Mild and Stainless Steel-Based Welding in RAW 264.7 Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Badding, Melissa A.; Fix, Natalie R.; Antonini, James M.; Leonard, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    Welding processes that generate fumes containing toxic metals, such as hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni), have been implicated in lung injury, inflammation, and lung tumor promotion in animal models. While federal regulations have reduced permissible worker exposure limits to Cr(VI), this is not always practical considering that welders may work in confined spaces and exhaust ventilation may be ineffective. Thus, there has been a recent initiative to minimize the potentially hazardous components in welding materials by developing new consumables containing much less Cr(VI) and Mn. A new nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu)-based material (Ni-Cu WF) is being suggested as a safer alternative to stainless steel consumables; however, its adverse cellular effects have not been studied. This study compared the cytotoxic effects of the newly developed Ni-Cu WF with two well-characterized welding fumes, collected from gas metal arc welding using mild steel (GMA-MS) or stainless steel (GMA-SS) electrodes. RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages were exposed to the three welding fumes at two doses (50 µg/ml and 250 µg/ml) for up to 24 hours. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, phagocytic function, and cytokine production were examined. The GMA-MS and GMA-SS samples were found to be more reactive in terms of ROS production compared to the Ni-Cu WF. However, the fumes from this new material were more cytotoxic, inducing cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction at a lower dose. Additionally, pre-treatment with Ni-Cu WF particles impaired the ability of cells to phagocytize E. coli, suggesting macrophage dysfunction. Thus, the toxic cellular responses to welding fumes are largely due to the metal composition. The results also suggest that reducing Cr(VI) and Mn in the generated fume by increasing the concentration of other metals (e.g., Ni, Cu) may not necessarily improve welder safety. PMID:24977413

  15. A comparison of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress from welding fumes generated with a new nickel-, copper-based consumable versus mild and stainless steel-based welding in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Badding, Melissa A; Fix, Natalie R; Antonini, James M; Leonard, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    Welding processes that generate fumes containing toxic metals, such as hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni), have been implicated in lung injury, inflammation, and lung tumor promotion in animal models. While federal regulations have reduced permissible worker exposure limits to Cr(VI), this is not always practical considering that welders may work in confined spaces and exhaust ventilation may be ineffective. Thus, there has been a recent initiative to minimize the potentially hazardous components in welding materials by developing new consumables containing much less Cr(VI) and Mn. A new nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu)-based material (Ni-Cu WF) is being suggested as a safer alternative to stainless steel consumables; however, its adverse cellular effects have not been studied. This study compared the cytotoxic effects of the newly developed Ni-Cu WF with two well-characterized welding fumes, collected from gas metal arc welding using mild steel (GMA-MS) or stainless steel (GMA-SS) electrodes. RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages were exposed to the three welding fumes at two doses (50 µg/ml and 250 µg/ml) for up to 24 hours. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, phagocytic function, and cytokine production were examined. The GMA-MS and GMA-SS samples were found to be more reactive in terms of ROS production compared to the Ni-Cu WF. However, the fumes from this new material were more cytotoxic, inducing cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction at a lower dose. Additionally, pre-treatment with Ni-Cu WF particles impaired the ability of cells to phagocytize E. coli, suggesting macrophage dysfunction. Thus, the toxic cellular responses to welding fumes are largely due to the metal composition. The results also suggest that reducing Cr(VI) and Mn in the generated fume by increasing the concentration of other metals (e.g., Ni, Cu) may not necessarily improve welder safety. PMID:24977413

  16. [Emission Characteristics of Water-Soluble Ions in Fumes of Coal Fired Boilers in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-qi; Ma, Zhao-hui; Feng, Ya-jun; Wang, Chen; Chen, Yuan-yuan; He, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Selecting coal fired boilers with typical flue gas desulfurization and dust extraction systems in Beijing as the study objects, the issues and characteristics of the water-soluble ions in fumes of coal fired boilers and theirs influence factors were analyzed and evaluated. The maximum mass concentration of total water-soluble ions in fumes of coal fired boilers in Beijing was 51.240 mg x m(-3) in the benchmark fume oxygen content, the minimum was 7.186 mg x m(-3), and the issues of the water-soluble ions were uncorrelated with the fume moisture content. SO4(2-) was the primary characteristic water-soluble ion for desulfurization reaction, and the rate of contribution of SO4(2-) in total water-soluble ions ranged from 63.8% to 81.0%. F- was another characteristic water-soluble ion in fumes of thermal power plant, and the rate of contribution of F- in total water-soluble ions ranged from 22.2% to 32.5%. The fume purification technologies significantly influenced the issues and the emission characteristics of water-soluble ions in fumes of coal fired boilers. Na+ was a characteristic water-soluble ion for the desulfurizer NaOH, NH4+ and NO3+ were characteristic for the desulfurizer NH4HCO3, and Mg2+ was characteristic for the desulfurizer MgO, but the Ca2+ emission was not increased by addition of the desulfurizer CaO or CaCO3 The concentrations of NH4+ and NO3- in fumes of thermal power plant were lower than those in fumes of industrial or heating coal fired boilers. The form of water-soluble ions was significantly correlated with fume temperature. The most water-soluble ions were in superfine state at higher fume temperature and were not easily captured by the filter membrane. PMID:26387296

  17. Efficiency of different respiratory protective devices for removal of particulate and gaseous reactive oxygen species from welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Chung, Shih-Hsiang; Jhuo, Ming-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light inherent to welding processes generates ozone (O(3)) with subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through photochemical reactions when UV light is present with O(3). This study aimed to determine the performance of filters used as respiratory protective devices by welding personnel to simultaneously mitigate particulate and gaseous inhalation hazards. Four respiratory protective devices were selected for this study, including a surgical facemask, a cotton-fabric facemask, an activated-carbon facemask, and an N95 respirator. The removal efficiencies for the particulates in welding fumes were all above 98%. For particulate-phase ROS, the removal efficiencies of the different respiratory protective devices ranged from 83.5% to 94.1%; however, the removal efficiencies for gaseous ROS were only 1.3% (active carbon facemask) to 21.1% (N95 respirator). The data indicated that the respiratory protective devices commercially available cannot block the passage of the gas-phase ROS found in welding fumes. PMID:23428060

  18. Infant leukemia and paternal exposure to motor vehicle exhaust fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Vianna, N.J.; Kovasznay, B.; Polan, A.; Ju, C.

    1984-09-01

    The children of fathers who work in gas stations, automobile or truck repair, and aircraft maintenance appear to be at increased risk for acute leukemia during their first year of life. The odds ratio was found to be about 2.5 overall, but risk appears to be greater for female offspring. A decline in sex ratio was observed for the three decades of the study, with the lowest ratio observed from 1969 through 1978. These preliminary findings suggest that exposure to one or more of the components of exhaust fumes might be of etiologic importance for this malignancy. The limitations of this investigation are discussed.

  19. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Akkaş, Ayşe; Başyiğit, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-12-16

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes’ added Silica fume have been investigated.

  20. 42 CFR 84.1147 - Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1147 Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist... nor more than 25 milligrams of silica mist, weighed as silica dust, per cubic meter of air. (d)...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1147 - Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1147 Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist... nor more than 25 milligrams of silica mist, weighed as silica dust, per cubic meter of air. (d)...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1147 - Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1147 Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist... nor more than 25 milligrams of silica mist, weighed as silica dust, per cubic meter of air. (d)...

  3. 42 CFR 84.1147 - Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1147 Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist... nor more than 25 milligrams of silica mist, weighed as silica dust, per cubic meter of air. (d)...

  4. 42 CFR 84.1147 - Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1147 Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist... nor more than 25 milligrams of silica mist, weighed as silica dust, per cubic meter of air. (d)...

  5. Physicochemical Characterization of Simulated Welding Fume from a Spark Discharge System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hong; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.; Kim, Jong Sung; Stanam, Aditya; Thorne, Peter S.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Peters, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces spark discharge system (SDS) as a way to simulate welding fumes. The SDS was developed using welding rods as electrodes with an optional coagulation chamber. The size, morphology, composition, and concentration of the fume produced and the concentration of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOX) were characterized. The number median diameter (NMD) and total number concentration (TNC) of fresh fume particles were ranged 10–23 nm and 3.1×107–6×107 particles/cm3, respectively. For fresh fume particles, the total mass concentration (TMC) measured gravimetrically ranged 85–760 μg/m3. The size distribution was stable over a period of 12 h. The NMD and TNC of aged fume particles were ranged 81–154 nm and 1.5×106–2.7×106 particles/cm3, respectively. The composition of the aged fume particles was dominated by Fe and O with an estimated stoichiometry between that of Fe2O3 and Fe3O4. Concentrations of O3 and NOX were ranged 0.07–2.2 ppm and 1–20 ppm, respectively. These results indicate that the SDS is capable of producing stable fumes over a long-period that are similar to actual welding fumes. This system may be useful in toxicological studies and evaluation of instrumentation. PMID:25097299

  6. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  8. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench..., fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. (a) Gas mask canisters containing filters for protection against dusts, fumes, mists, and...

  10. A laboratory rig for studying aspects of worker exposure to bitumen fumes.

    PubMed

    Brandt, H C; de Groot, P C

    1999-01-01

    This study was performed to establish which factors related to the hot application of bitumen products are relevant to worker exposure to benzene-soluble matter (as part of the total fume emission) and to the polycyclic aromatic compound (PAH) content of bitumen fume. Because personal exposure measurements in field surveys can be influenced by many uncontrollable variables, a simple laboratory rig was developed in which bitumen fumes can be generated reproducibly under well-controlled conditions. Laboratory results were related to personal exposure measurements during asphalt paving and roofing. A quantitative relationship for predicting the laboratory fume emission was derived, with bitumen volatility and temperature the only variables. The variable part of the equation is termed the fuming index (FI). The FI correlates well with measured personal exposures in asphalt paving and in roofing and can be used to predict average personal exposures during these activities if bitumen volatility, application temperature, and for paving, the asphalt type, are known. The laboratory fumes, generated at a standard temperature of 160 degrees C, are representative for fumes emitted in the temperature range relevant for asphalt paving, those generated at 250 degrees C for roofing. The PAH profiles of the fumes collected as personal samples during asphalt paving and roofing operations were similar to those of the fumes generated in the laboratory from the same bitumen and at the same temperature. Because it produces conditions representative of actual bitumen operations, this laboratory set-up is an excellent tool for assessing bitumens in terms of fuming tendency and PAH emissions/exposures. PMID:10222568

  11. Evaluation of one-step luminescent cyanoacrylate fuming.

    PubMed

    Khuu, Alicia; Chadwick, Scott; Spindler, Xanthe; Lam, Rolanda; Moret, Sébastien; Roux, Claude

    2016-06-01

    One-step luminescent cyanoacrylates have recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional cyanoacrylate fuming methods. These new techniques do not require the application of a luminescent post-treatment in order to enhance cyanoacrylate-developed fingermarks. In this study, three one-step polymer cyanoacrylates: CN Yellow Crystals (Aneval Inc.), PolyCyano UV (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) and PECA Multiband (BVDA), and one monomer cyanoacrylate: Lumikit™ (Crime Scene Technology), were evaluated against a conventional two-step cyanoacrylate fuming method (Cyanobloom (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) with rhodamine 6G stain). The manufacturers' recommended conditions or conditions compatible with the MVC™ 1000/D (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) were assessed with fingermarks aged for up to 8 weeks on non-porous and semi-porous substrates. Under white light, Cyanobloom generally gave better development than the one-step treatments across the substrates. Similarly when viewed under the respective luminescent conditions, Cyanobloom with rhodamine 6G stain resulted in improved contrast against the one-step treatments except on polystyrene, where PolyCyano UV and PECA Multiband gave better visualisation. Rhodamine 6G post-treatment of one-step samples did not significantly enhance the contrast of any of the one-step treatments against Cyanobloom/rhodamine 6G-treated samples. PMID:27105155

  12. Stainless steel manual metal arc welding fumes in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kalliomäki, P L; Lakomaa, E; Kalliomäki, K; Kiilunen, M; Kivelä, R; Vaaranen, V

    1983-01-01

    Forty two male Wistar rats were exposed to manual metal arc (MMA) stainless steel (SS) welding fumes generated by an automatic welding device for "nose-only" exposure. The exposure simulated an actual MMA/SS welding environment as closely as possible. For the retention study, the duration of exposure was one hour per workday for one, two, three, of four weeks and for the clearance study four weeks. The retention and clearance of the chromium, nickel, and iron found in MMA/SS welding fumes in the rats' lungs were studied as was the distribution of the metals to other organs. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used for the multi-element chemical activation analyses. The concentrations of chromium and nickel in the blood and the urine were determined by atomic absorption method (AAS). The retention of exogenous iron was determined by a magnetic measuring method. The results indicated that the lungs were the target organs of soluble hexavalent chromates. The half times of lung clearance for Cr, Ni, and Fe were 40 +/- 4 d, 20 +/- d, and 50 +/- 10 d. When the lung clearance curves are compared, the half times of Cr and Fe lung clearance are similar but nickel disappears faster. The distribution and clearance patterns of chromium to other organs differ from those obtained after single intravenous or intratracheal injections of alkaline chromates. PMID:6830723

  13. Urinary excretion of mutagens, thioethers and D-glucaric acid in workers exposed to bitumen fumes.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, R; Monarca, S; Scassellati Sforzolini, G; Savino, A; Bauleo, F A; Angeli, G

    1989-01-01

    The authors carried out biological monitoring of the mutagenic/carcinogenic hazards associated with exposure to bitumen fumes during paving operations, analysing some biological parameters in the urine of a group of exposed workers. The urine samples were studied for mutagenicity by the Ames test and for thioethers concentration. D-Glucaric acid urine excretion was also determined to investigate the enzymatic induction potential of bitumens. Even though, in a previous environmental monitoring phase, a low content of mutagenic/carcinogenic compounds was found in bitumen and air samples, urinary mutagenicity data of exposed workers were statistically higher than those of a group of unexposed subjects. The urinary mutagenicity increased further if exposure to bitumens was associated with cigarette smoking. Thioethers were higher only in subjects exposed simultaneously to bitumens and cigarettes. D-Glucaric acid excretion did not increase significantly. The authors think that this type of coupled environmental and biological monitoring is a valid tool for a better evaluation of the mutagenic/carcinogenic exposure to bitumens or similar complex mixtures. PMID:2707871

  14. Double shroud delivery of silica precursor for reducing hexavalent chromium in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Guan, Jianying; Theodore, Alexandros; Sharby, Jessica; Wu, Chang-Yu; Paulson, Kathleen; Es-Said, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The welding process yields a high concentration of nanoparticles loaded with hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)), a known human carcinogen. Previous studies have demonstrated that using tetramethylsilane (TMS) as a shielding gas additive can significantly reduce the Cr(6+) concentration in welding fume particles. In this study, a novel insulated double shroud torch (IDST) was developed to further improve the reduction of airborne Cr(6+) concentration by separating the flows of the primary shielding gas and the TMS carrier gas. Welding fumes were collected from a welding chamber in the laboratory and from a fixed location near the welding arc in a welding facility. The Cr(6+) content was analyzed with ion chromatography and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results from the chamber sampling demonstrated that the addition of 3.2 ≈ 5.1% of TMS carrier gas to the primary shielding gas resulted in more than a 90% reduction of airborne Cr(6+) under all shielding gas flow rates. The XPS result confirmed complete elimination of Cr(6+) inside the amorphous silica shell. Adding 100 ≈ 1000 ppm of nitric oxide or carbon monoxide to the shielding gas could also reduce Cr(6+) concentrations up to 57% and 35%, respectively; however, these reducing agents created potential hazards from the release of unreacted agents. Results of the field test showed that the addition of 1.6% of TMS carrier gas to the primary shielding gas reduced Cr(6+) concentration to the limitation of detection (1.1 μg/m(3)). In a worst-case scenario, if TMS vapor leaked into the environment without decomposition and ventilation, the estimated TMS concentration in the condition of field sampling would be a maximum 5.7 ppm, still well below its flammability limit (1%). Based on a previously developed cost model, the use of TMS increases the general cost by 3.8%. No visual deterioration of weld quality caused by TMS was found, although further mechanical testing is necessary. PMID:23113576

  15. 78 FR 33894 - Proposed Information Collection (Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment... members of the Armed Forces to toxic airborne chemicals and fumes caused by open burn pits. DATES: Written...: cynthia.harvey-pryor@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW, Open Burn Pit Registry...

  16. Hazardous Waste

    MedlinePlus

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  17. Combustion fume structure and dynamics. Semiannual report, August 16, 1993--February 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Flagan, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    During pulverized coal combustion, a fume of submicron particles is formed from the mineral matter in the parent coal. Studies of the variation in chemical composition with particle size have revealed that much of the submicron fume is formed from volatilized coal ash. The formation and evolution of the ash fume is governed by homogeneous nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. Vapors of refractory species nucleate relatively early in the combustion process. Coagulation of those fine particles results in a size distribution that is approximately log normal. More volatile species remain in the gas phase until after the nucleation has taken place. Condensation on the surfaces of both the fume and the larger residual ash particles results in the enrichment of the fine particles with volatile, A comprehensive theoretical treatment of the aerosol dynamics of pyrogenous fumes requires a number of extensions of the classical descriptions. Rigorous descriptions of the coagulation of dense, spherical particles are available, but fume particles are rarely spherical. The materials involved tend to be refractory, so high temperatures are required to achieve complete coalescence. Flame temperatures may be hot enough to melt some materials, so coalescence is not always achieved. Even with systems that can melt the particles in the primary reaction zone, coagulation during the cooling or quench process can form agglomerates. To predict the dynamics of the fumes produced when coalescence is rate limiting, the structure and dynamics of the resulting aggregates must be understood.

  18. Development of an animal model to study the potential neurotoxic effects associated with welding fume inhalation.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; O'Callaghan, James P; Miller, Diane B

    2006-09-01

    Serious questions have been raised regarding a possible causal association between neurological effects in welders and the presence of manganese in welding fume. An experimental model is needed that could examine the potential neurotoxic effect of manganese after pulmonary exposure to welding fume. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has recently finished construction of a completely automated, computer controlled welding fume generation and inhalation exposure system for laboratory animals. The system is comprised of a programmable six-axis robotic welding arm and a water-cooled arc welding torch. A flexible trunk has been attached to the robotic arm of the welder and is used to collect and transport fume from the vicinity of the arc to the animal exposure chamber. Preliminary fume characterization studies have indicated that particle morphology, size, and chemical composition were comparable to welding fume generated in the workplace. Animal inhalation studies are currently underway. With the development of this novel system, an animal model has been established using controlled welding exposures to investigate the possible mechanisms by which welding fume may affect the central nervous system. PMID:16546258

  19. Effect of Silica Fume on two-stage Concrete Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelgader, H. S.; El-Baden, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Two-stage concrete (TSC) is an innovative concrete that does not require vibration for placing and compaction. TSC is a simple concept; it is made using the same basic constituents as traditional concrete: cement, coarse aggregate, sand and water as well as mineral and chemical admixtures. As its name suggests, it is produced through a two-stage process. Firstly washed coarse aggregate is placed into the formwork in-situ. Later a specifically designed self compacting grout is introduced into the form from the lowest point under gravity pressure to fill the voids, cementing the aggregate into a monolith. The hardened concrete is dense, homogeneous and has in general improved engineering properties and durability. This paper presents the results from a research work attempt to study the effect of silica fume (SF) and superplasticizers admixtures (SP) on compressive and tensile strength of TSC using various combinations of water to cement ratio (w/c) and cement to sand ratio (c/s). Thirty six concrete mixes with different grout constituents were tested. From each mix twenty four standard cylinder samples of size (150mm×300mm) of concrete containing crushed aggregate were produced. The tested samples were made from combinations of w/c equal to: 0.45, 0.55 and 0.85, and three c/s of values: 0.5, 1 and 1.5. Silica fume was added at a dosage of 6% of weight of cement, while superplasticizer was added at a dosage of 2% of cement weight. Results indicated that both tensile and compressive strength of TSC can be statistically derived as a function of w/c and c/s with good correlation coefficients. The basic principle of traditional concrete, which says that an increase in water/cement ratio will lead to a reduction in compressive strength, was shown to hold true for TSC specimens tested. Using a combination of both silica fume and superplasticisers caused a significant increase in strength relative to control mixes.

  20. The effects of utilizing silica fume in Portland Cement Pervious Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Daniel Allen

    Silica fume has long been used as a supplementary cementing material to provide a high density, high strength, and durable building material. Silica fume has a particle size a fraction of any conventional cement, which allows it to increase concrete strength by decreasing the porosity especially near the aggregates surface. Because Portland Cement Pervious Concrete (PCPC) has a smaller bond area between aggregate and paste, silica fume has significant impacts on the properties of the PCPC. The research in this paper studies the workability of a cement paste containing silica fume in addition to analyzing the results of testing on Portland Cement Pervious Concrete mixtures that also contained silica fume. Testing conducted included a study of the effects of silica fume on cement's rheological properties at various dosage rates ranging from zero to ten percent by mass. It was determined that silica fume has negligible effects on the viscosity of cement paste until a dosage rate of five percent, at which point the viscosity increases rapidly. In addition to the rheological testing of the cement paste, trials were also conducted on the pervious concrete samples. Sample groups included mixes with river gravel and chipped limestone as aggregate, washed and unwashed, and two different void contents. Workability tests showed that mixtures containing a silica fume dosage rate of 5 percent or less had comparable or slightly improved workability when compared to control groups. Workability was found to decrease at a 7 percent dosage rate. Samples were tested for compressive strength at 7 and 28 days and splitting tensile strength at 28 days. It was found in most sample groups, strength increased with dosage rates of 3 to 5 percent but often decreased when the dosage reached 7 percent. Abrasion testing showed that both samples containing washed aggregate and samples containing silica fume exhibited a reduced mass loss.

  1. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X; Jefferson, Amy M; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Roberts, Jenny R; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2015-02-01

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m(3); 3h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas-metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their fine counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks. PMID:25549921

  2. Pulmonary toxicity and extrapulmonary tissue distribution of metals after repeated exposure to different welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Chapman, Rebecca S; Soukup, Joleen M; Ghio, Andrew J; Sriram, Krishnan

    2010-08-01

    Welders are exposed to fumes with different metal profiles. The goals of this study were to compare lung responses in rats after treatment with chemically different welding fumes and to examine the extrapulmonary fate of metals after deposition in the lungs. Rats were treated by intratracheal instillation (0.5 mg/rat, once a week for 7 weeks) with gas metal arc-mild steel (GMAW-MS) or manual metal arc-hardsurfacing (MMAW-HS) welding fumes. Controls were treated with saline. At 1, 4, 35, and 105 days after the last treatment, lung injury and inflammation were measured, and elemental analysis of different organs was determined to assess metal clearance. The MMAW-HS fume was highly water-soluble and chemically more complex with higher levels of soluble Mn and Cr compared to the GMAW-MS fume. Treatments with the GMAW-MS fume had no effect on toxicity when compared with controls. The MMAW-HS fume induced significant lung damage early after treatment that remained elevated until 35 days. Metals associated with each fume sample was cleared at different rates from the lungs. Mn was cleared from the lungs at a faster rate and to a greater extent compared to the other metals over the 105-day recovery period. Mn and Cr in the MMAW-HS fume translocated from the respiratory tract and deposited in other organs. Importantly, increased deposition of Mn, but not other metals, was observed in discrete brain regions, including dopamine-rich areas (e.g., striatum and midbrain). PMID:20560776

  3. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J.; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L.; Roberts, Jenny R.; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m3; 3 h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas–metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their ne counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks. PMID:25549921

  4. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Results Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Conclusion Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute lung injury. Since type of

  5. Microstructural characterization of a fumed titanium dioxide photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Datye, A.K.; Huang, Min; Riegel, G.; Bolton, J.R.

    1995-02-15

    The authors present observations of a fumed titania photocatalyst using high resolution TEM and X-ray diffraction. The catalyst was observed as-received and after being used for photocatalytic destruction of salicylic acid. The characterization results suggest that the photocatalyst consists of individual single crystal particles of the rutile and anatase phases of titania; no amorphous titania particles could be identified conclusively. The authors also did not detect any particles of anatase that were covered by a layer of rutile, as proposed previously by Bickley et al. No changes were seen in the titania after it was used for photocatalysis of salicylic acid at pH 6 for short times (less than 1 hr).

  6. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome following metal fume fever.

    PubMed

    Dube, Daniel; Puruckherr, Michael; Byrd, Ryland P; Roy, Thomas M

    2002-06-01

    Metal fume fever (MFF) is an acute response to the inhalation of heavy metals used in industry. The patient typically experiences symptoms of cough, fever, chills, malaise, and myalgia that are self-limited and of short duration. Wheezing may occur and pulmonary function may be acutely impaired with a decrease in lung volumes and diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. Nevertheless, respiratory function quickly returns to normal, and persistent pulmonary insufficiency is unusual. Irritant-induced asthma is a non-immunogenic form of airway injury that may be associated with industrial inhalation exposure. In this situation, the direct toxic effect on the airways causes persistent airway inflammation and bronchial hyperreactivity. The two conditions are considered distinct entities, but we report a previously healthy worker who had classic MFF and was left with irritant-induced asthma or reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). PMID:12056129

  7. [Case of polymer fume fever with interstitial pneumonia caused by inhalation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon)].

    PubMed

    Son, Masami; Maruyama, Eiichi; Shindo, Yuichiro; Suganuma, Nobukazu; Sato, Shinji; Ogawa, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    A 30-year old man was admitted to our hospital with cough, slight fever, and dyspnea that he had developed several hours after inhaling the fumes produced from a Teflon-coated pan, after evaporation of the water in the pan. Chest radiography revealed diffuse infiltrations, and a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed patchy interstitial shadows in both lungs. In pulmonary function tests, the diffusing capacity of the lungs showed a moderate decrease. Leukocytosis and slight hypoxemia were observed. The patient recovered clinically in a few days without any specific treatment. We speculated that the pulmonary problems in this patient may have been induced by the products of thermal degradation of Teflon that were present in the fumes. When Teflon is heated, the fumes generated cause an influenza like syndrome (polymer fume fever) or cause severe toxic effects such as pulmonary edema, pneumonitis, and death in the exposed individual. PMID:16922460

  8. 30 CFR 72.701 - Respiratory equipment; gas, dusts, fumes, or mists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... equipment; gas, dusts, fumes, or mists. Respiratory equipment approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall... mists. When the exposure is for prolonged periods, other measures to protect such persons or to...

  9. The mechanism of cesium immobilization in densified silica-fume blended cement pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Bar-Nes, G. Katz, A.; Peled, Y.; Zeiri, Y.

    2008-05-15

    The role of silica-fume agglomerates, found in densified silica-fume (DSF) pastes, in the immobilization mechanism of Cs ions was studied. Samples of cementitious pastes containing two different forms of silica fume - DSF and raw silica fume (RSF) - were prepared. Leaching experiments showed that both additives reduced the leachability of the metal ion, but the effect of the DSF paste was much stronger. Scanning Electron Microscopy, together with Differential Thermal Analysis, proved that no agglomerated particles were present in the RSF pastes and that the extent of pozzolanic reactivity was higher. We therefore believe that unreacted silica within the DSF agglomerates adsorbs Cs ions and consequently increases their immobilization. Furthermore, this work suggests that during the pozzolanic reaction, a hydrated rim develops around the agglomerate that acts as an additional diffusion barrier for the Cs ions, resulting in an increased efficiency of Cs immobilization.

  10. 5. West SideElevated Tank Structure with fume exhaust system and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. West Side-Elevated Tank Structure with fume exhaust system and support structure in foreground. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Acid Mixing Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  11. Workplace field testing of the pressure drop of particulate respirators using welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that respirator testing with a sodium chloride aerosol gave a conservative estimate of filter penetration for welding fume aerosols. A rapid increase in the pressure drop (PD) of some respirators was observed as fumes accumulated on the filters. The present study evaluated particulate respirator PD based on workplace field tests. A field PD tester was designed and validated using the TSI 8130 Automatic Filter Tester, designed in compliance with National Institute for Occupational and Safety and Health regulation 42 CFR part 84. Three models (two replaceable dual-type filters and one replaceable single-type filter) were evaluated against CO(2) gas arc welding on mild steel in confined booths in the workplace. Field tests were performed under four airborne concentrations (27.5, 15.4, 7.9, and 2.1 mg m(-3)). The mass concentration was measured by the gravimetric method, and number concentration was monitored using P-Trak (Model 8525, TSI, USA). Additionally, photos and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to visualize and analyze the composition of welding fumes trapped in the filters. The field PD tester showed no significant difference compared with the TSI tester. There was no significant difference in the initial PD between laboratory and field results. The PD increased as a function of fume load on the respirator filters for all tested models. The increasing PD trend differed by models, and PD increased rapidly at high concentrations because greater amount of fumes accumulated on the filters in a given time. The increase in PD as a function of fume load on the filters showed a similar pattern as fume load varied for a particular model, but different patterns were observed for different models. Images and elemental analyses of fumes trapped on the respirator filters showed that most welding fumes were trapped within the first layer, outer web cover, and second layer, in order, while no fumes

  12. A comparison between atmospheric/humidity and vacuum cyanoacrylate fuming of latent fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Fraser, Joanna; Friel, Lauren; Adams, Duncan; Attard-Montalto, Nicola; Deacon, Paul

    2015-12-01

    A number of pseudo-operational trials were set up to compare the atmospheric/humidity and vacuum cyanoacrylate fuming processes on plastic carrier bags. The fuming processes were compared using two-step cyanoacrylate fuming with basic yellow 40 (BY40) staining and a one-step fluorescent cyanoacrylate fuming, Lumicyano 4%. Preliminary work using planted fingermarks and split depletions were performed to identify the optimum vacuum fuming conditions. The first pseudo-operational trial compared the different fuming conditions (atmospheric/humidity vs. vacuum) for the two-step process where an additional 50% more marks were detected with the atmospheric/humidity process. None of the marks by the vacuum process could be observed visually; however, a significant number of marks were detected by fluorescence after BY40 staining. The second trial repeated the same work in trial 1 using the one-step cyanoacrylate process, Lumicyano at a concentration of 4%. Trial 2 provided comparable results to trial 1 and all the items were then re-treated with Lumicyano 4% at atmospheric/humidity conditions before dyeing with BY40 to provide the sequences of process A (Lumicyano 4% atmospheric-Lumicyano 4% atmospheric-BY40) and process B (Lumicyano 4% vacuum-Lumicyano 4% atmospheric-BY40). The number of marks (visual and fluorescent) was counted after each treatment with a substantial increase in the number of detected marks in the second and third treatments of the process. The increased detection rate after the double Lumicyano process was unexpected and may have important implications. Trial 3 was performed to investigate whether the amount of cyanoacrylate and/or fuming time had an impact on the results observed in trial 2 whereas trial 4 assessed if the double process using conventional cyanoacrylate, rather than Lumicyano 4%, provided an increased detection rate. Trials 3 and 4 confirmed that doubling the amount of Lumicyano 4% cyanoacrylate and fuming time produced a lower

  13. Strength and pore structure of ternary blended cement mortars containing blast furnace slag and silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Bagel, L.

    1998-07-01

    Blended cement mortars with fixed workability and incorporating blast furnace slag and silica fume, were tested for compressive strength and mercury intrusion, with a view to comparing their performance with that of plain Portland cement mortar and/or slag-cement mortar. The obtained results showed that with high portions of slag and silica fume in the binding system, the mortars reached relatively satisfactory level of compressive strength and contributed to the significantly denser pore structure.

  14. 42 CFR 84.1158 - Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Respirator types Pressure tightness test 1 Isoamyl acetate test 84.1141 84.1142 Dusts: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 or 2 mppcf X Fumes: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 X X Mists: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 or 2 mppcf X Dusts, Fumes, and Mists:...

  15. 42 CFR 84.1158 - Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Respirator types Pressure tightness test 1 Isoamyl acetate test 84.1141 84.1142 Dusts: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 or 2 mppcf X Fumes: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 X X Mists: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 or 2 mppcf X Dusts, Fumes, and Mists:...

  16. 42 CFR 84.1158 - Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Respirator types Pressure tightness test 1 Isoamyl acetate test 84.1141 84.1142 Dusts: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 or 2 mppcf X Fumes: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 X X Mists: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 or 2 mppcf X Dusts, Fumes, and Mists:...

  17. Numerical investigation of turbulent diffusion in push-pull and exhaust fume cupboards.

    PubMed

    Chern, Ming-Jyh; Cheng, Wei-Ying

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate airflow motions and associated pollutant distributions in fume hoods. Currently, most exhaust fume hoods are designed to use an airflow induced by a fan at the top to remove pollutants. Ambient fluids are drawn, flowing toward the opening and subsequently turning to the outlet at the roof. Pollutants are supposedly captured by the airflow and brought out from the cupboard. The present numerical study based on the finite-volume method and the standard k-epsilon turbulence model simulates flow patterns and pollutant distributions in an exhaust fume hood with and without a manikin present. Subsequently, a push-pull air curtain technique is applied to a fume cupboard. To investigate the capturing performance of a push-pull fume cupboard, numerical approaches are used to simulate flow and concentration variations. Numerical results reveal that four characteristic flow modes exist for a variety of speed ratios of push-pull flows and openings. A concave curtain mode which has a fast pull flow and a weak push flow is suggested for the operation of a push-pull fume cupboard. According to ANSI-ASHRAE Standard 110-1995, the local concentration at the specified point is <0.1 parts per million (p.p.m.). Meanwhile, we also examine concentration variations at 12 selected points in front of the sash, and all where the concentration is <0.1 p.p.m. A manikin is put in front of the sash to observe its effect. As a result, the flow and the concentration contours in a push-pull fume cupboard are not affected by a manikin. In terms of those predicted results, it turns out that a push-pull fume cupboard successfully captures pollutants and prevents an operator from breathing pollutants. PMID:17638713

  18. 42 CFR 84.1158 - Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Respirator types Pressure tightness test 1 Isoamyl acetate test 84.1141 84.1142 Dusts: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 or 2 mppcf X Fumes: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 X X Mists: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 or 2 mppcf X Dusts, Fumes, and Mists:...

  19. 42 CFR 84.1158 - Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Respirator types Pressure tightness test 1 Isoamyl acetate test 84.1141 84.1142 Dusts: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 or 2 mppcf X Fumes: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 X X Mists: Air Contamination Level not less than 0.05 mg/M3 or 2 mppcf X Dusts, Fumes, and Mists:...

  20. Cytotoxic effects of four types of welding fumes on macrophages in vitro: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pasanen, J T; Gustafsson, T E; Kalliomäki, P L; Tossavainen, A; Järvisalo, J O

    1986-01-01

    The effects of fume particles given off by the manual metal arc (MMA) and metal inert gas (MIG) welding of stainless steel (SS) and mild steel (MS) were studied on rat alveolar macrophage cultures in vitro. The fumes were generated by welding, and particulate material obtained was collected on membrane filters. The macrophage cultures were exposed to the total dust and to its water-insoluble fractions. Cell variability and the release of both lactate dehydrogenase and one lysosomal enzyme from the cells to the medium were measured after an exposure period of 24 h. The cytotoxic control dust was DQ 12 quartz, and the inert control dust was pure titanium dioxide. According to the parameters studied, SS/MMA and MS/MMA welding fumes were cytotoxic to rat alveolar macrophages. The cytotoxic effect of SS/MMA welding fumes decreased after the samples had been washed with phosphate-buffered salt solution. The MIG welding fumes of SS and MS had markedly smaller effects on the cells. Diluted solutions of potassium chromate were also tested in order to investigate its role in the cytotoxicity of SS/MMA welding fumes. The results suggest that hexavalent chromium may be responsible for the cytotoxicity of SS/MMA. PMID:3701879

  1. Alternatives for Benzene in the Extraction of Bitumen Fume from Exposure Sample Media.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Benjamin; Ravera, Christel; Hussard, Caroline; Langlois, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is frequently used to extract collected bitumen fumes from personal sampler substrates. However, this solvent is particularly dangerous because of its carcinogenicity (group 1 of the International Agency for Research on Cancer classification). Therefore, to prevent the exposure of laboratory technicians to benzene during the fume extraction step from samplers, a compromise had to be found to identify a less toxic solvent with the same extraction capacity. To compare the extraction capacities of selected solvents, bitumen fumes were generated in the laboratory from three different batches of road surfacing bitumen collected on dedicated bitumen fume samplers. The samplers were then extracted by benzene and the solvents tested. Of 11 selected solvents less toxic than benzene and used in studies on bitumen and bitumen fume analyses, n-hexane and n-heptane were identified as alternatives to benzene. In particular, the results demonstrated that n-heptane was the best candidate solvent for benzene replacement, due to its extraction efficiency comparable to benzene for the three bitumen fumes tested and its low toxicity, which is highly compatible with benzene replacement. PMID:26400870

  2. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m³ (3 h/day × 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile. PMID:21281223

  3. Mutagenicity and aromatic amine content of fumes from heated cooking oils produced in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiang, T A; Pei-Fen, W; Ying, L S; Wang, L F; Ko, Y C

    1999-01-01

    According to toxicological studies, there are several unidentified mutagens derived from cooking oil fumes appearing in kitchens of Chinese homes where women daily prepare food. Data are limited to an analysis of aromatic amines from cooking oil fumes, which are known to be carcinogenic for bladder cancer. Fume samples from three different commercial cooking oils frequently used in Taiwan were collected and analysed for mutagenicity in the Salmonella/microsome assay. Aromatic amines were extracted from the samples and identified by HPLC and confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Extracts from three cooking oil fumes were found to be mutagenic in the presence of S-9 mix. All samples contained 2-naphthylamine (2-NA) and 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP). Concentrations of 2-NA and 4-ABP were 31.5 and 35.7 microg/m3 in fumes from sunflower oil, 31.9 and 26.4 mg/m3 in vegetable oil, and 48.3 and 23.3 microg/m3 in refined-lard oil, respectively. Mutagenicities of the three cooking oil condensates were significantly reduced (P<0.05) by adding the antioxidant catechin (CAT) into the oils before heating. Significant difference existed between the amounts of aromatic amines with and without adding CAT (P<0.05). These results indicate that exposure to cooking oil fumes in Taiwan might be an important but controllable risk factor in the aetiology of bladder cancer. PMID:10227736

  4. Manganese speciation of laboratory-generated welding fumes

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Ronnee N.; Keane, Michael; Hanley, Kevin W.; Feng, H. Amy; Ashley, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this laboratory study was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) fractions in chamber-generated welding fumes (WF) and to evaluate and compare the results from a sequential extraction procedure for Mn fractions with that of an acid digestion procedure for measurement of total, elemental Mn. To prepare Mn-containing particulate matter from representative welding processes, a welding system was operated in short circuit gas metal arc welding (GMAW) mode using both stainless steel (SS) and mild carbon steel (MCS) and also with flux cored arc welding (FCAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) using MCS. Generated WF samples were collected onto polycarbonate filters before homogenization, weighing and storage in scintillation vials. The extraction procedure consisted of four sequential steps to measure various Mn fractions based upon selective solubility: (1) soluble Mn dissolved in 0.01 M ammonium acetate; (2) Mn (0,II) dissolved in 25 % (v/v) acetic acid; (3) Mn (III,IV) dissolved in 0.5% (w/v) hydroxylamine hydrochloride in 25% (v/v) acetic acid; and (4) insoluble Mn extracted with concentrated hydrochloric and nitric acids. After sample treatment, the four fractions were analyzed for Mn by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). WF from GMAW and FCAW showed similar distributions of Mn species, with the largest concentrations of Mn detected in the Mn (0,II) and insoluble Mn fractions. On the other hand, the majority of the Mn content of SMAW fume was detected as Mn (III,IV). Although the concentration of Mn measured from summation of the four sequential steps was statistically significantly different from that measured from the hot block dissolution method for total Mn, the difference is small enough to be of no practical importance for industrial hygiene air samples, and either method may be used for Mn measurement. The sequential extraction method provides valuable information about the oxidation state of Mn in samples

  5. Work Environments and Exposure to Hazardous Substances in Korean Tire Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-kyu; Jeong, Sijeong; Yi, Gwang Yong; Shin, Jungah

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate the tire manufacturing work environments extensively and to identify workers' exposure to hazardous substances in various work processes. Methods Personal air sampling was conducted to measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon disulfide, 1,3-butadiene, styrene, methyl isobutyl ketone, methylcyclohexane, formaldehyde, sulfur dioxide, and rubber fume in tire manufacturing plants using the National Institute for Occupational Safety Health Manual of Analytical Methods. Noise, carbon monoxide, and heat stress exposure were evaluated using direct reading instruments. Past concentrations of rubber fume were assessed using regression analysis of total particulate data from 2003 to 2007, after identifying the correlation between the concentration of total particulate and rubber fume. Results Workers were exposed to rubber fume that exceeded 0.6 mg/m3, the maximum exposure limit of the UK, in curing and production management processes. Forty-seven percent of workers were exposed to noise levels exceeding 85 dBA. Workers in the production management process were exposed to 28.1℃ (wet bulb globe temperature value, WBGT value) even when the outdoor atmosphere was 2.7℃ (WBGT value). Exposures to other substances were below the limit of detection or under a tenth of the threshold limit values given by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. Conclusion To better classify exposure groups and to improve work environments, examining closely at rubber fume components and temperature as risk indicators in tire manufacturing is recommended. PMID:22993718

  6. Effects of paving asphalt fume exposure on genotoxic and mutagenic activities in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H W; Yin, X J; Frazer, D; Barger, M W; Siegel, P D; Millecchia, L; Zhong, B Z; Tomblyn, S; Stone, S; Ma, J K H; Castranova, V; Ma, J Y C

    2004-02-14

    Asphalt fumes are complex mixtures of aerosols and vapors containing various organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Previously, we have demonstrated that inhalation exposure of rats to asphalt fumes resulted in dose-dependent induction of CYP1A1 with concomitant down-regulation of CYP2B1 and increased phase II enzyme quinone reductase activity in the rat lung. In the present study, the potential genotoxic effects of asphalt fume exposure due to altered lung microsomal enzymes were studied. Rats were exposed to air or asphalt fume generated under road paving conditions at various concentrations and sacrificed the next day. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage and examined for DNA damage using the comet assay. To evaluate the systemic genotoxic effect of asphalt fume, micronuclei formation in bone marrow polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) was monitored. Lung S9 from various exposure groups was isolated from tissue homogenates and characterized for metabolic activity in activating 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) mutagenicity using the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium YG1024 and YG1029. This study showed that the paving asphalt fumes significantly induced DNA damage in AM, as revealed by DNA migration in the comet assay, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the micronuclei formation in bone marrow PCEs was not detected even at a very high exposure level (1733 mg h/m3). The conversion of 2-AA to mutagens in the Ames test required lung S9-mediated metabolic activation in a dose-dependent manner. In comparison to the controls, lung S9 from rats exposed to asphalt fume at a total exposure level of 479+/-33 mg h/m3 did not significantly enhance 2-AA mutagenicity with either S. typhimurium YG1024 or YG1029. At a higher total asphalt fume exposure level (1150+/-63 mg h/m3), S9 significantly increased the mutagenicity of 2-AA as compared to the control. However, S9 from asphalt fume-exposed rats

  7. Reproductive Hazards

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as lead and mercury Chemicals such as pesticides Cigarettes Some viruses Alcohol For men, a reproductive hazard can affect the sperm. For a woman, a reproductive hazard can cause different effects during pregnancy, depending on when she is exposed. ...

  8. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy under the fume hood.

    PubMed

    Küster, Simon K; Danieli, Ernesto; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2011-08-01

    This work reports the possibility to acquire high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra with a fist-sized NMR magnet directly installed under the fume hood. The small NMR sensor based on permanent magnets was used to monitor the trimerization of propionaldehyde catalyzed by indium trichloride in real time by continuously circulating the reaction mixture through the magnet bore in a closed loop with the help of a peristaltic pump. Thanks to the chemical selectivity of NMR spectroscopy the progress of the reaction can be monitored on-line by determining the concentrations of both reactant and product from the area under their respective lines in the NMR spectra as a function of time. This in situ measurement demonstrates that NMR probes can be used in chemistry laboratories, e.g. for reaction optimization, or installed at specific points of interest along industrial process lines. Therefore, it will open the door for the implementation of feedback control based on spectroscopic NMR data. PMID:21698335

  9. Accidental exposure to isocyanate fumes in a group of firemen.

    PubMed Central

    Axford, A T; McKerrow, C B; Jones, A P; Le Quesne, P M

    1976-01-01

    A total of 35 firemen involved in fighting a fire in a factory in which polyurethane foam was made were exposed to fumes of toluene di-isocyanate from two large storage tanks which were damaged during the fire, resulting in massive spillage. Most of the men experienced symptoms during the fire or during the three weeks after it. The symptoms were mainly gastrointestinal, respiratory, or neurological. Altogether 15 men described gastrointestinal symptoms which subsided within two days of onset. Respiratory symptoms were described by 31 men and were most pronounced during the three days after the fire, thereafter tending to improve. The neurological findings are described separately. When the men were reviewed at six months there was a suggestion that some of them might have sustained long-term damage to the respiratory tract, and almost four years later 20 men had persistent respiratory symptoms. Serial measurements of ventilatory capacity revealed a marked decline in the first six months although this was not sustained. PMID:179561

  10. Exposure to fumes in typical New Zealand welding operations.

    PubMed

    Dryson, E W; Rogers, D A

    1991-08-28

    Sixteen welders, welding under typical New Zealand conditions, had ambient air within their welding helmets sampled and analysed for ozone, nitrogen oxides, fluoride, carbon monoxide, aluminium, chromium, iron, nickel, zinc and total dust. Postshift urinary metals were also analysed, and a respiratory questionnaire completed for each welder. Levels above the New Zealand Workplace Exposure Standard (WES) were found for nitrogen dioxide in four welders (two TIG, one MMA and one plasma cutter), and for total chromium in one plasma cutter, who also had a nickel level of 24% of the WES. Dust levels were highest in the plasma cutters, with one reaching 8.67 mg/m3 (WES = 5 mg/m3). Urinary levels however did not indicate excessive short or long term uptake. Where efficient fume extraction was in use, levels of air contaminants were lower than with natural ventilation. Respiratory symptoms were reported by 67% of welders, 38% meeting criteria for chronic bronchitis (relative risk = 2.0). Smoking welders reported more symptoms than nonsmoking welders. PMID:1891137

  11. Respiratory response of guinea pigs to zinc oxide fume

    SciTech Connect

    Amdur, M.O.; McCarthy, J.F.; Gill, M.W.

    1983-02-01

    Zinc has been found enriched in the fine particle fraction of atmospheric aerosols and in the surface layer of fly ash. Experimental combustion studies of coal have demonstrated that zinc is vaporized and recondensed into the submicrometer fraction of the combustion aerosols. This size fraction may contain as much as 1.5% zinc when a coal of high zinc content (Illinois No. 6) is used. Zinc sulfate and zinc ammonium sulfate are among the sulfates with demonstrable irritant potency. Zinc oxide was thus chosen as the initial aerosol for studies of biological and chemical interaction of high temperature generated submicrometer metal oxides with sulfur dioxide. This paper reports the respiratory response of guinea pigs to short term exposure to freshly formed zinc oxide fume. These studies of zinc oxide alone have relevance to industrial exposure. The recommended TLV for zinc oxide is 5 mg/m/sup 3/ and the recommended STEL is 10 mg/m/sup 3/. Concentrations used in our studies were below these recommended levels.

  12. Analysis of heat transfer and contaminant transport in fume hoods

    SciTech Connect

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents the analysis of three-dimensional flow patterns and the associated heat and mass transfer mechanisms in a fume hood enclosure. The flow enters the hood through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leaves the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow pattern around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its training surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. Both temperature and concentration were found to be maximum near the source and gradually decreased as the heated air or gaseous contaminant entrained with incoming air. The local concentration decreased with increase in sash opening area. The results will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air inside the room.

  13. International studies to compare methods for personal sampling of bitumen fumes.

    PubMed

    Ekström, L G; Kriech, A; Bowen, C; Johnson, S; Breuer, D

    2001-10-01

    A newly recommended Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler, optimized for the inhalable fraction, was compared with 'total particulate' samplers currently used by five laboratories in different countries for the analysis of bitumen fumes. Using a laboratory fume generator, all samplers were uniformly exposed to bitumen fumes from typical USA bitumen (commercial Pen 65). The results show that, for laboratory-generated bitumen fumes, benzene-extractable inhalable particulate data for the IOM sampler are consistent with benzene soluble matter data from the other samplers. Direct comparison of the IOM sampler with the 37 mm closed-face cassette (USA sampler) using an identical protocol in a single laboratory gave a ratio of 1.05:1 (USA:IOM). Similarly, for total particulate matter, the standard previously recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), an average value of approximately 1 between the IOM and the five samplers was obtained. For unadulterated bitumen fumes, the geometry of the cassettes does not appear to affect entry of the particles into the sampler. Field studies may show differences in results as other factors, e.g. wind and its effect on sampling efficiency, and also particulates originating from sources other than bitumen, such as dust, are involved. These will require thorough investigation prior to the assessment of the impact of the new sampler and prior to any reconsideration of occupational exposure limits taking into account practical feasibility. Other tests were conducted on the bitumen fume samples including total organic matter, simulated distillation and polycyclic aromatic compound analysis. These additional tests were performed on the fume collected on the filter plus the volatile portion that passed through the filter and was captured on various adsorbent materials. Protocols for sample collection and analysis varied in different countries with results reflective of these differences

  14. The detection of drugs of abuse in fingerprints using Raman spectroscopy II: cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Joanna S.; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Dobrowski, Steven A.; Voice, Alison M.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the application of Raman spectroscopy to the detection of exogenous substances in cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints. The scenario considered was that of an individual handling a substance and subsequently depositing a contaminated fingerprint. These fingerprints were enhanced by cyanoacrylate fuming, a process in which a layer of white cyanoacrylate polymer is deposited on the fingerprint material, enabling visual detection. Five drugs of abuse (codeine phosphate, cocaine hydrochloride, amphetamine sulphate, barbital and nitrazepam) and five non-controlled substances of similar appearance, which may be used in the adulteration of drugs of abuse (caffeine, aspirin, paracetamol, starch and talc), were used. The substances studied could be clearly distinguished using their Raman spectra and were all successfully detected in cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints. Photobleaching was necessary to reduce the fluorescence background in the spectra of some substances. Raman spectra obtained from the substances in cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints were of a similar quality to spectra obtained from the substances under normal sampling conditions, however, interfering Raman bands arising from the cyanoacrylate polymer were present in the spectra. In most cases the only interfering band was the CN stretching mode of the polymer, and there were no cases where the interfering bands prevented identification of the substances. If necessary, the interfering bands could be successfully removed by spectral subtraction. The most difficult aspect of the detection of these substances in cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints was visually locating the substance in the fingerprint beneath the polymer layer in order to obtain a Raman spectrum.

  15. Home cage locomotor changes in non-human primates after prolonged welding-fume exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong Yong; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Jung Duck; Han, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jong Seong; Heo, Jeong Doo; Yu, Il Je

    2013-12-01

    To define the relationship between the brain concentration of manganese and neurological signs, such as locomotion, after prolonged welding-fume exposure, cynomolgus monkeys were acclimated for 1 month and then divided into three concentration groups: unexposed, low concentration (31 mg/m(3) total suspended particulate (TSP), 0.9 mg/m(3) of Mn), and high concentration (62 mg/m(3) TSP, 1.95 mg/m(3) of Mn) of TSP. The monkeys were exposed to manual metal-arc stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fumes for 2 h per day over 8 months in an inhalation chamber system equipped with an automatic fume generator. The home cage locomotor activity and patterns were determined using a camera system over 2-4 consecutive days. After 25 and 32 weeks of exposure, the home cage locomotor activity of the high-concentration primates was found to be 5-6 times higher than that of the unexposed primates, and this increased locomotor activity was maintained for 7 weeks after ceasing the welding-fume exposure, eventually subsiding to three times higher after 13 weeks of recovery. Therefore, the present results, along with our previous observations of a high magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T1 signal in the globus pallidus and increased blood Mn concentration, indicate that prolonged welding-fume exposure can cause neurobehavioral changes in cynomolgus monkeys. PMID:24304306

  16. Increase of the reactivity of densified silica fume by sonication treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Erich D; Soriano, Lourdes; Payá, Jordi; Borrachero, María Victoria; Monzó, José M

    2012-09-01

    Five silica fumes from different manufacturers were subjected to ultrasonic treatment in order to decrease particle agglomeration and improve particle dispersion. The effectiveness of the sonication was observed as a reduction in particle size distribution of sonicated silica fume (SSF) compared to non-sonicated silica fume. SSF was added to Portland cement, and then the hydrated paste was analysed by thermogravimetric analyses (TGA/DTG) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDX). The results were compared with those of control pastes made with untreated densified silica fume (DSF), as well as a reference cement paste of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). A maximum grade of de-agglomeration by the sonication was obtained, with a high volume of particles of diameter less than 1 μm. Images obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the SSF showed sintered particles that could not be fragmented by the treatment. Micro-structural characterisation results showed an increase in the reactivity of the silica fume after the treatment. PMID:22356800

  17. Effects of Exposure to Welding Fume on Lung Function: Results from the German WELDOX Study.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, M; Hoffmeyer, F; Gawrych, K; Lotz, A; Heinze, E; Berresheim, H; Merget, R; Harth, V; Van Gelder, R; Hahn, J-U; Hartwig, A; Weiß, T; Pesch, B; Brüning, T

    2015-01-01

    The association between exposure to welding fume and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been insufficiently clarified. In this study we assessed the influence of exposure to welding fume on lung function parameters. We investigated forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC, and expiratory flow rates in 219 welders. We measured current exposure to respirable particles and estimated a worker's lifetime exposure considering welding techniques, working conditions and protective measures at current and former workplaces. Multiple regression models were applied to estimate the influence of exposure to welding fume, age, and smoking on lung function. We additionally investigated the duration of working as a welder and the predominant welding technique. The findings were that age- and smoking-adjusted lung function parameters showed no decline with increasing duration, current exposure level, and lifetime exposure to welding fume. However, 15% of the welders had FEV1/FVC below the lower limit of normal, but we could not substantiate the presence of an association with the measures of exposure. Adverse effects of cigarette smoking were confirmed. In conclusion, the study did not support the notion of a possible detrimental effect of exposure to welding fume on lung function in welders. PMID:25315619

  18. Study of flow patterns in fume hood enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    A three-dimensional model for flow inside a fume hood enclosure was developed and numerical computations were carried out to explore the flow pattern and possible path of contaminant transport under different operating conditions of the hood. Equations for the conservation of mass and momentum were solved for different flow rate and opening conditions in the hood. The face velocity was maintained constant at its rated value of 0.4 m/s. The flow was assumed to enter through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leave the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The {kappa}-{var_epsilon} model was used for the prediction of turbulence. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow patterns around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. In addition, the effect of a person standing in front of the hood on the flow pattern was investigated. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its trailing surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. The computed flow patterns will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air from inside the room.

  19. Natural Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Edward

    2005-02-01

    This updated new edition presents a comprehensive, inter-disciplinary analysis of the complete range of natural hazards. Edward Bryant describes and explains how hazards occur, examines prediction methods, considers recent and historical hazard events and explores the social impact of such disasters. Supported by over 180 maps, diagrams and photographs, this standard text is an invaluable guide for students and professionals in the field. First Edition Hb (1991): 0-521-37295-X First Edition Pb (1991): 0-521-37889-3

  20. Quantitative {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy of cement and silica fume containing paramagnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Hilbig, H. . E-mail: hilbig@cbm.bv.tum.de; Koehler, F.H.; Schiessl, P.

    2006-02-15

    The low natural abundance and the long spin lattice relaxation time of {sup 29}Si lead to long measurement times and/or low signal-to-noise ratios using {sup 29}Si magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. By contrast, samples containing paramagnetic iron ions have much shorter relaxation times, making measurements up to seven times more efficient, but at the same time making quantitative analysis unreliable. To solve the problem, the spin-lattice relaxation times of ordinary Portland cement (opc) and silica fume with and without iron content has been determined with inversion recovery experiments. The effect of varying the spectrum repetition time on the quantitative analysis is demonstrated for mixtures of opc with silica fume. For opc and silica fume with iron impurities repetition times as short as 5 s has permitted accurate quantitative analysis of the silicates present in these materials.

  1. 42 CFR 84.1152 - Silica dust loading test; respirators designed as protection against dusts, fumes, and mists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Silica dust loading test; respirators designed as protection against dusts, fumes, and mists having an air contamination level less than 0.05 milligram per... Silica dust loading test; respirators designed as protection against dusts, fumes, and mists having...

  2. 42 CFR 84.1152 - Silica dust loading test; respirators designed as protection against dusts, fumes, and mists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Silica dust loading test; respirators designed as protection against dusts, fumes, and mists having an air contamination level less than 0.05 milligram per... Silica dust loading test; respirators designed as protection against dusts, fumes, and mists having...

  3. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. 84.1143 Section 84.1143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  4. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. 84.1143 Section 84.1143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  5. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. 84.1143 Section 84.1143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. 84.1143 Section 84.1143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  7. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. 84.1143 Section 84.1143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  8. Kinetics of the zinc slag-Fuming process: Part i. industrial measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, G. G.; Brimacombe, J. K.; Toop, G. W.

    1985-09-01

    A study involving industrial measurements and mathematical modeling has been conducted to eluci-date kinetic phenomena in the zinc slag fuming process. In the first part of this three-part paper, the results of industrial measurements and observations are presented. In Part II a mathematical model of the process is developed, and finally in Part III the implications of a kinetic conception of the process for process improvement are explored. The industrial work consisted primarily of slag sampling through the fuming cycles of five different fuming operations. In addition, tuyere back-pressure mea-surements, tuyere photography using a tuyerescope, and sampling of the fume product were under-taken at one operation. Analysis of the slag samples has shown that, in general, the zinc elimination curve is linear with time and that a portion of the injected coal entrains in the slag. Analysis of tuyere back-pressure fluctuations and movie photographs of the tuyere tip indicate that the coal-air mixture enters the slag in the form of discrete bubbles. From these results it can be deduced that the fuming furnace consists of two reaction zones which are created by the division of coal between the slag and the tuyere gas stream. The coal entrained in the slag reduces ZnO and Fe3O4 in a “reduction zone” which is responsible for fuming. The coal remaining in the tuyere gas stream combusts in an “oxidation zone” although a fraction passes through the bath unconsumed and reports to the solid products. The oxidation zone supplies heat to the endothermic reduction reactions and heat losses.

  9. A comparative study for radiological decontamination of laboratory fume hood materials.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Sweet, Lucas; MacFarlan, Paul; McNamara, Bruce; Kerschner, Harrison

    2012-08-01

    The efficacy for radiological decontamination of the laboratory standard fume hood as constructed of stainless steel, compared to that of powder-coated carbon steel is described. While the chemical inertness of powder-coated surfaces is good, faced with everyday abrasion, aggressive inorganic solutions and vapors, and penetrating organics commonly employed in government laboratory fume hoods, radiological decontamination of powder-coated steel surfaces was found to be similar to those made of stainless steel for easily solubilized or digestible radionuclides. Plutonium was difficult to remove from stainless steel and powder-coated surfaces, especially after prolonged contact times. PMID:22739967

  10. Energy efficient fume and odor control equipment for coil coating line

    SciTech Connect

    Coughran, G.

    1982-06-01

    Wolverine Aluminum Corporation, producer of exterior siding building material, recently installed a Variable Energy Recovery Control System at its Lincoln Park coil coating plant. Boilers had an incinerator which emitted odors and consumed large volumes of gas. The fume incinerators were eliminated by one Model G 56,000 SCFM RE-THE M thermal Oxidizer from Reeco of Morris Plains, NJ. Its chambers, preheaters, two main ducts, and other design features are described. Installation was simple, as was operation. Fumes and odor have been controlled; operating costs have been reduced.

  11. Hazardous materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... people how to work with hazardous materials and waste. There are many different kinds of hazardous materials, including: Chemicals, like some that are used for cleaning Drugs, like chemotherapy to treat cancer Radioactive material that is used for x-rays or ...

  12. Influence of welding fume on systemic iron status.

    PubMed

    Casjens, Swaantje; Henry, Jana; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Welge, Peter; Lotz, Anne; Gelder, Rainer Van; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Stiegler, Hugo; Eisele, Lewin; Weiss, Tobias; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate

    2014-11-01

    Iron is the major metal found in welding fumes, and although it is an essential trace element, its overload causes toxicity due to Fenton reactions. To avoid oxidative damage, excess iron is bound to ferritin, and as a result, serum ferritin (SF) is a recognized biomarker for iron stores, with high concentrations linked to inflammation and potentially also cancer. However, little is known about iron overload in welders. Within this study, we assessed the iron status and quantitative associations between airborne iron, body iron stores, and iron homeostasis in 192 welders not wearing dust masks. Welders were equipped with personal samplers in order to determine the levels of respirable iron in the breathing zone during a working shift. SF, prohepcidin and other markers of iron status were determined in blood samples collected after shift. The impact of iron exposure and other factors on SF and prohepcidin were estimated using multiple regression models. Our results indicate that respirable iron is a significant predictor of SF and prohepcidin. Concentrations of SF varied according to the welding technique and respiratory protection used, with a median of 103 μg l(-1) in tungsten inert gas welders, 125 μg l(-1) in those wearing air-purifying respirators, and 161 μg l(-1) in other welders. Compared to welders with low iron stores (SF < 25 μg l(-1)), those with excess body iron (SF ≥ 400 μg l(-1)) worked under a higher median concentration of airborne iron (60 μg m(-3) versus 148 μg m(-3)). Even though air concentrations of respirable iron and manganese were highly correlated, and low iron stores have been reported to increase manganese uptake in the gastrointestinal tract, no correlation was seen between SF and manganese in blood. In conclusion, monitoring SF may be a reasonable method for health surveillance of welders. Respiratory protection with air-purifying respirators can decrease iron exposure and avoid chronically higher SF in welders working with

  13. Implication of cytochrome P-450 1A isoforms and the AH receptor in the genotoxicity of coal-tar fume condensate and bitumen fume condensates.

    PubMed

    Genevois, C; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, A; Boillot, K; Brandt, H; Castegnaro, M

    1998-06-01

    During the hot application of bitumen- or coal-tar-containing materials, fumes are emitted that contain polycyclic aromatic compounds. Although workers' exposure to these fumes is low, it might lead to health problems. No study has reported the metabolic pathways involved in the genotoxicity of coal tar or bitumen fume condensates (CTFC, BFCs). We have therefore studied the DNA adducts formed by incubation of CTFC or BFCs with liver microsomes from several type of mice and with yeast microsomes expressing individual human CYP enzymes. Our results demonstrates that: (1) the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) plays an important role in the biotransformation of BFCs and to a lesser extent of CTFC; (2) for CTFC, both cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A isoforms are involved in the formation of genotoxic compounds, and the reactive metabolites formed via CYP 1A1, are substrates for epoxide hydrolase (mEH); (3) for BFCs, the genotoxicity is partially dependent upon CYP 1A1 and the reactive metabolites are not substrates for mEH; (4) CYP 1A isoforms are not exclusively responsible for the genotoxicity of the CTFC and BFCs as other CYPs and also enzymes of the [AH] gene battery, may play an important role. PMID:21781875

  14. Low Temperature Synthesis of Belite Cement Based on Silica Fume and Lime

    PubMed Central

    Tantawy, M. A.; Shatat, M. R.; El-Roudi, A. M.; Taher, M. A.; Abd-El-Hamed, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the low temperature synthesis of belite (β-C2S) from silica fume. Mixtures of lime, BaCl2, and silica fume with the ratio of (Ca + Ba)/Si = 2 were hydrothermally treated in stainless steel capsule at 110–150°C for 2–5 hours, calcined at 600–700°C for 3 hours, and analyzed by FTIR, XRD, TGA/DTA, and SEM techniques. Dicalcium silicate hydrate (hillebrandite) was prepared by hydrothermal treatment of lime/silica fume mixtures with (Ca + Ba)/Si = 2 at 110°C for 5 hours. Hillebrandite partially dehydrates in two steps at 422 and 508°C and transforms to γ-C2S at 734°C which in turn transforms to α′-C2S at 955°C which in turn transforms to β-C2S when cooled. In presence of Ba2+ ions, β-C2S could be stabilized with minor transformation to γ-C2S. Mixture of silica fume, lime, and BaCl2 with the ratio of (Ca + Ba)/Si = 2 was successfully utilized for synthesis of β-C2S by hydrothermal treatment at 110°C for 5 hours followed by calcination of the product at 700°C for 3 hours. PMID:27437495

  15. Fume hood performance: Using a bypass in variable air volume systems

    SciTech Connect

    Joao, R.V.; Party, E.; Gershey, E.L.

    1998-10-01

    Variable air volume (VAV) exhaust systems provide sophisticated engineering controls for maintaining laboratory ventilation. Depending on how they are installed, they may be very responsive to changes in air flows and air pressures. Some of these changes are a consequence of natural phenomena and some are induced by the transit and actions of laboratory occupants. While the responsiveness of VAV controls can provide tight regulation, the dynamic nature of the VAV system may also introduce undesirable air flow fluctuations. Furthermore, since the volumes of air being exhausted vary, the amount of air available for fume hood capture and containment will also vary. These studies examine the responsiveness and consequences of ventilation system perturbations, as well as the effect of fume hood exhaust being reduced to very low air volumes. Face velocity and air volumes were measured at different sash heights and in response to rapid sash movements. In addition, capture of contaminants was evaluated at different sash heights by American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers 110-85 tests. The authors have found that at low sash heights the total volume of air may be reduced to a level that is insufficient to efficiently capture airborne contaminants. The addition of a fume hood bypass was necessary to ensure that the volume of air exhausted is sufficient to remove the contaminants present. Understanding the causes and characteristics of fume hood instabilities provides insight into how to prevent these perturbations.

  16. Blunted Behavioral and C Fos Responses to Acidic Fumes in the African Naked Mole-Rat

    PubMed Central

    LaVinka, Pamela Colleen; Park, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Acidosis in the skin triggers activation of pain pathways and behaviors indicative of pain in vertebrates. The exception is the naked mole-rat, the only known vertebrate to show physiological and behavioral insensitivity to acid pain in the skin. The goal of the present study was to determine behavioral and physiological responses of this species to airborne acidic fumes, which would be expected to affect the trigeminal pain pathway in other species. Behaviorally, naked mole-rats did not avoid fumes from moderately high concentrations of acetic acid (10 and 20%), and c Fos labeling showed no increase in activity in the trigeminal nuclei and nucleus tractus solitarius. In contrast, these concentrations triggered behavioral aversion and increased Fos activity in other laboratory rodents. For a very high concentration of acetic acid (50%), naked mole-rats showed significant avoidance behavior and increased Fos labeling in the nucleus tractus solitarius caudal region, which receives vagal chemosensory information. However, there was no increase in trigeminal labeling, and in fact, activity significantly decreased. This pattern is opposite of that associated with another irritant, ammonia fumes, which elicited an increase in trigeminal but not nucleus tractus solitarius Fos labeling, and no behavioral avoidance. Behavioral avoidance of acidic fumes, but no increased labeling in the trigeminal pain nucleus is consistent with the notion of adaptations to blunt acid pain, which would be advantageous for naked mole-rats as they normally live under chronically high levels of acidosis-inducing CO2. PMID:23028761

  17. The Use of Feedback in Lab Energy Conservation: Fume Hoods at MIT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesolowski, Daniel; Olivetti, Elsa; Graham, Amanda; Lanou, Steve; Cooper, Peter; Doughty, Jim; Wilk, Rich; Glicksman, Leon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of an Massachusetts Institute of Technology Chemistry Department campaign to reduce energy consumption in chemical fume hoods. Hood use feedback to lab users is a crucial component of this campaign. Design/methodology/approach: Sash position sensor data on variable air volume fume…

  18. A novel method for assessing respiratory deposition of welding fume nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cena, L G; Keane, M J; Chisholm, W P; Stone, S; Harper, M; Chen, B T

    2014-01-01

    Welders are exposed to high concentrations of nanoparticles. Compared to larger particles, nanoparticles have been associated with more toxic effects at the cellular level, including the generation of more reactive oxygen species activity. Current methods for welding-fume aerosol exposures do not differentiate between the nano-fraction and the larger particles. The objectives of this work are to establish a method to estimate the respiratory deposition of the nano-fraction of selected metals in welding fumes and test this method in a laboratory setting. Manganese (Mn), Nickel (Ni), Chromium (Cr), and hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) are commonly found in welding fume aerosols and have been linked with severe adverse health outcomes. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography (IC) were evaluated as methods for analyzing the content of Mn, Ni, Cr, and Cr(VI) nanoparticles in welding fumes collected with nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) samplers. NRD samplers collect nanoparticles at deposition efficiencies that closely resemble physiological deposition in the respiratory tract. The limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) for ICP-MS and IC were determined analytically. Mild and stainless steel welding fumes generated with a robotic welder were collected with NRD samplers inside a chamber. LODs (LOQs) for Mn, Ni, Cr, and Cr(VI) were 1.3 μg (4.43 μg), 0.4 μg (1.14 μg), 1.1 μg (3.33 μg), and 0.4 μg (1.42 μg), respectively. Recovery of spiked samples and certified welding fume reference material was greater than 95%. When testing the method, the average percentage of total mass concentrations collected by the NRD samplers was ~30% for Mn, ~50% for Cr, and ~60% for Ni, indicating that a large fraction of the metals may lie in the nanoparticle fraction. This knowledge is critical to the development of toxicological studies aimed at finding links between exposure to welding fume nanoparticles and adverse health

  19. Suppression in lung defense responses after bacterial infection in rats pretreated with different welding fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, James M. . E-mail: jga6@cdc.gov; Taylor, Michael D.; Millecchia, Lyndell; Bebout, Alicia R.; Roberts, Jenny R.

    2004-11-01

    Epidemiology suggests that inhalation of welding fumes increases the susceptibility to lung infection. The effects of chemically distinct welding fumes on lung defense responses after bacterial infection were compared. Fume was collected during gas metal arc (GMA) or flux-covered manual metal arc (MMA) welding using two consumable electrodes: stainless steel (SS) or mild steel (MS). The fumes were separated into water-soluble and -insoluble fractions. The GMA-SS and GMA-MS fumes were found to be relatively insoluble, whereas the MMA-SS was highly water soluble, with the soluble fraction comprised of 87% Cr and 11% Mn. On day 0, male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with saline (vehicle control) or the different welding fumes (0.1 or 2 mg/rat). At day 3, the rats were intratracheally inoculated with 5 x 10{sup 3} Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, left lungs were removed, homogenized, cultured overnight, and colony-forming units were counted to assess pulmonary bacterial clearance. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on right lungs to recover phagocytes and BAL fluid to measure the production of nitric oxide (NO) and immunomodulatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, and IL-10. In contrast to the GMA-SS, GMA-MS, and saline groups, pretreatment with the highly water soluble MMA-SS fume caused significant body weight loss, extensive lung damage, and a dramatic reduction in pulmonary clearance of L. monocytogenes after infection. NO concentrations in BAL fluid and lung immunostaining of inducible NO synthase were dramatically increased in rats pretreated with MMA-SS before and after infection. MMA-SS treatment caused a significant decrease in IL-2 and significant increases in TNF-{alpha}, IL-6, and IL-10 after infection. In conclusion, pretreatment with MMA-SS increased production of NO and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) after infection, which are likely

  20. Suppression in lung defense responses after bacterial infection in rats pretreated with different welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Taylor, Michael D; Millecchia, Lyndell; Bebout, Alicia R; Roberts, Jenny R

    2004-11-01

    Epidemiology suggests that inhalation of welding fumes increases the susceptibility to lung infection. The effects of chemically distinct welding fumes on lung defense responses after bacterial infection were compared. Fume was collected during gas metal arc (GMA) or flux-covered manual metal arc (MMA) welding using two consumable electrodes: stainless steel (SS) or mild steel (MS). The fumes were separated into water-soluble and -insoluble fractions. The GMA-SS and GMA-MS fumes were found to be relatively insoluble, whereas the MMA-SS was highly water soluble, with the soluble fraction comprised of 87% Cr and 11% Mn. On day 0, male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with saline (vehicle control) or the different welding fumes (0.1 or 2 mg/rat). At day 3, the rats were intratracheally inoculated with 5 x 10(3) Listeria monocytogenes. On days 6, 8, and 10, left lungs were removed, homogenized, cultured overnight, and colony-forming units were counted to assess pulmonary bacterial clearance. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed on right lungs to recover phagocytes and BAL fluid to measure the production of nitric oxide (NO) and immunomodulatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, and IL-10. In contrast to the GMA-SS, GMA-MS, and saline groups, pretreatment with the highly water soluble MMA-SS fume caused significant body weight loss, extensive lung damage, and a dramatic reduction in pulmonary clearance of L. monocytogenes after infection. NO concentrations in BAL fluid and lung immunostaining of inducible NO synthase were dramatically increased in rats pretreated with MMA-SS before and after infection. MMA-SS treatment caused a significant decrease in IL-2 and significant increases in TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-10 after infection. In conclusion, pretreatment with MMA-SS increased production of NO and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-6) after infection, which are likely responsible for

  1. Nanocomposite polymer electrolytes: Modulation of mechanical properties using surface-functionalized fumed silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerian, Jeffrey Alan

    Rechargeable lithium metal batteries are potential next-generation power sources for portable electronic devices and electric vehicles due to their high-energy density and low self-discharge rate. However, high reactivity of lithium metal with the electrolyte impedes commercialization. Improved performance of the electrolyte can be achieved by adding surface-functionalized fumed silica to enhance mechanical stability and reduce reactivity with lithium metal. Crosslinkable fumed silica in polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether (PEGdm, Mn = 250) + lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide can be subsequently reacted in the presence of a chemically similar monomer, e.g., butyl methacrylate (BMA) monomer, to form covalent bonds between silica particles rather than physical interactions. The conductivity decreases by only a factor of two after crosslinking with 20 wt% BMA despite significant increases in elastic modulus (G'). These electrolytes exhibit room-temperature conductivity near 10-3 S cm-1 , G' greater than 10 5 Pa, and a yield stress approaching 104 Pa. Addition of fumed silica to polyethylene oxide (PEO, MW = 200K) increases G'; decreases the frequency dependence of G'; and increases percent recoverable strain. The extent of elasticity enhancement depends on fumed silica surface chemistry and concentration. The largest increase in elasticity is observed for hydrophilic silica due to interactions between hydroxyl groups on the silica and ether oxygens on PEO. These interactions facilitate bridging of fumed silica particles through entanglements of adsorbed PEO, which increases G '. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic blends of fumed silica are studied in mineral oil and PEGdm (250) to determine how the presence of two silica types affects the strength and mechanism of gel formation. In mineral oil, blends exhibit G' between those of single-component systems since both hydrophilic and hydrophobic fumed silica interacts via hydrogen bonding. Consequently, G' of blend

  2. A Novel Method for Assessing Respiratory Deposition of Welding Fume Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cena, L. G.; Keane, M. J.; Chisholm, W. P.; Stone, S.; Harper, M.; Chen, B. T.

    2016-01-01

    Welders are exposed to high concentrations of nanoparticles. Compared to larger particles, nanoparticles have been associated with more toxic effects at the cellular level, including the generation of more reactive oxygen species activity. Current methods for welding-fume aerosol exposures do not differentiate between the nano-fraction and the larger particles. The objectives of this work are to establish a method to estimate the respiratory deposition of the nano-fraction of selected metals in welding fumes and test this method in a laboratory setting. Manganese (Mn), Nickel (Ni), Chromium (Cr), and hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) are commonly found in welding fume aerosols and have been linked with severe adverse health outcomes. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography (IC) were evaluated as methods for analyzing the content of Mn, Ni, Cr, and Cr(VI) nanoparticles in welding fumes collected with nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) samplers. NRD samplers collect nanoparticles at deposition efficiencies that closely resemble physiological deposition in the respiratory tract. The limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) for ICP-MS and IC were determined analytically. Mild and stainless steel welding fumes generated with a robotic welder were collected with NRD samplers inside a chamber. LODs (LOQs) for Mn, Ni, Cr, and Cr(VI) were 1.3 μg (4.43 μg), 0.4 μg (1.14 μg), 1.1 μg (3.33 μg), and 0.4 μg (1.42 μg), respectively. Recovery of spiked samples and certified welding fume reference material was greater than 95%. When testing the method, the average percentage of total mass concentrations collected by the NRD samplers was ~30% for Mn, ~50% for Cr, and ~60% for Ni, indicating that a large fraction of the metals may lie in the nanoparticle fraction. This knowledge is critical to the development of toxicological studies aimed at finding links between exposure to welding fume nanoparticles and adverse health

  3. Hazardous materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be in a room with good airflow Work Safely If you find a spill, treat it like ... Hazard communication; Material Safety Data Sheet; MSDS References Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Healthcare. Available at: www.osha. ...

  4. Coastal Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandas, Steve

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on hurricanes and tsunamis and uses these topics to address other parts of the science curriculum. In addition to a discussion on beach erosion, a poster is provided that depicts these natural hazards that threaten coastlines. (DDR)

  5. Hazardous Waste

    MedlinePlus

    ... wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, ... drain, flush them, or put them in the garbage. See if you can donate or recycle. Many ...

  6. Reproductive Hazards

    MedlinePlus

    ... and female reproductive systems play a role in pregnancy. Problems with these systems can affect fertility and ... a reproductive hazard can cause different effects during pregnancy, depending on when she is exposed. During the ...

  7. ALTERATIONS IN CARDIOMYOCYTE FUNCTION AFTER PULMONARY TREATMENT WITH STAINLESS STEEL WELDING FUME IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Popstojanov, Risto; Antonini, James M.; Salmen, Rebecca; Ye, Morgan; Zheng, Wen; Castranova, Vincent; Fekedulegn, Desta B.; Kan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Welding fume is composed of a complex of different metal particulates. Pulmonary exposure to different welding fumes may exert a negative impact on cardiac function, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of welding fumes on cardiac function, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to 2 mg/rat of manual metal arc hard surfacing welding fume (MMA-HS) once per week for 7 wk. Control rats received saline. Cardiomyocytes were isolated enzymatically at d 1 and 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) transients (fluorescence ratio) were measured on the stage of an inverted phase-contrast microscope using a myocyte calcium imaging/cell length system. Phosphorylation levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were determined by Western blot. The levels of nonspecific inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced at d 1 and d 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased in response to extracellular calcium stimulation at d 7 postexposure. Changes of intracellular calcium levels after isoprenaline hydrochloride (ISO) stimulation were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Phosphorylation levels of cTnI in the left ventricle were significantly lower at d 1 post-exposure. The serum levels of CRP were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Serum levels of IL-6 were not detectable in both groups. Cardiomyocyte alterations observed after welding fume treatment were mainly due to alterations in intracellular calcium handling and phosphorylation levels of cTnI. PMID:24786677

  8. Effects on the efficiency of activated carbon on exposure to welding fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, D.

    1995-02-01

    It is the intention of this paper to document that certain types of welding fumes have little or no effect on the effectiveness of the carbon filter air filtration efficiency when directly exposed to a controlled amount of welding fumes for a short-term period. The welding processes studied were restricted to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Contrary to the SMAW and FCAW processes, the GTAW (or TIG) and the GMAW (or MIG) welding processes do not require the use of flux as part of the overall process. Credit was taken for these processes occurring in inert gas environments and producing minimal amount of smoke. It was concluded that a study involving the SMAW process would also envelop the effects of the TIG and MIG welding processes. The quantity of welding fumes generated during the arc welding process is a function of the particular process, the size and type of electrode, welding machine amperage, and operator proficiency. For this study, the amount of welding for specific testing was equated to the amount of welding normally conducted during plant unit outages. Different welding electrodes were also evaluated, and the subsequent testing was limited to an E7018 electrode which was judged to be representative of all carbon and stainless steel electrodes commonly used at the site. The effect of welding fumes on activated charcoal was tested using a filtration unit complete with prefilters, upstream and downstream high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and a carbon adsorber section. The complete system was field tested in accordance with ANSI N510 standards prior to exposing the filters and the adsorber bed to welding fumes. The carbon samples were tested at an established laboratory using ASTM D3803-1989 standards.

  9. Total fume and metal concentrations during welding in selected factories in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Balkhyour, Mansour Ahmed; Goknil, Mohammad Khalid

    2010-07-01

    Welding is a major industrial process used for joining metals. Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a serious occupational health problem all over the world. The degree of risk to welder's health from fumes depends on composition, concentration, and the length of exposure. The aim of this study was to investigate workers' welding fume exposure levels in some industries in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In each factory, the air in the breathing zone within 0.5 m from welders was sampled during 8-hour shifts. Total particulates, manganese, copper, and molybdenum concentrations of welding fumes were determined. Mean values of eight-hour average particulate concentrations measured during welding at the welders breathing zone were 6.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 1), 5.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 2), 11.3 mg/m(3) (Factory 3), 6.8 mg/m(3) (Factory 4), 4.7 mg/m(3) (Factory 5), and 3.0 mg/m(3) (Factory 6). Mean values of airborne manganese, copper, and molybdenum levels measured during welding were in the range of 0.010 mg/m(3)-0.477 mg/m(3), 0.001 mg/m(3)-0.080 mg/m(3) and 0.001 mg/m(3)-0.058 mg/m(3) respectively. Mean values of calculated equivalent exposure values were: 1.50 (Factory 1), 1.56 (Factory 2), 5.14 (Factory 3), 2.21 (Factory 4), 2.89 (Factory 5), and 1.20 (Factory 6). The welders in factories 1, 2, 3, and 4 were exposed to welding fume concentration above the SASO limit value, which may increase the risk of respiratory health problems. PMID:20717553

  10. Dynamic effects on containment of air-curtain fume hood operated with heat source.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Kun; Huang, Rong Fung; Hsin, Pei-Yi

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the leakage characteristics of the air-curtain fume hood that are subject to the influences of sash movement and walk-by motion while a high temperature heat source was operated in the hood. The flow visualization and trace gas test method were used to investigate the performance of the air-curtain fume hood. An electric heater was placed in the hood to simulate the heat source. The temperature of the heat source installed inside the air-curtain fume hood varied between 180°C and 300°C. Trace gas tests following the dynamic test methods of EN-14175 protocol were employed to measure the spillages of sulfur hexafluoride gas that were released in the hood. When subject to the influence of sash movement at a heat source temperature lower than 260°C, the leakage level was high at the suction velocity V(s) < 8 m/sec but was negligibly small at V(s) > 10 m/sec. When subject to the influence of people walk-by, the leakage level was relatively low at the suction velocity larger than 8 m/sec at sash height H = 50 cm. The height of the sash opening was a crucial parameter for the containment of the air-curtain fume hood. At the sash opening lower than about 25 cm, suction velocity less than or equal to 6 m/sec was enough to make the sulfur hexafluoride leakage less than the threshold value, 0.65 ppm, suggested by the BG Chemie. The air-curtain fume hood presented a great performance to resist the effect of drafts even though there was a high temperature heat source working in the hood. PMID:23009207

  11. [Inhalation exposure to welding fumes of arc welders in processing Cr-Ni steel in large chemical industry].

    PubMed

    Dyrba, B C; Richter, K H

    1989-05-01

    For clearing up the inhalative load by welding fumes and gases of arc welders in industrial workshops mainly working on Cr-Ni-steels the following welding processes were studied: tungsten inert-gas (TIG), electrode-by-hand (EH), metal inert-gas (MIG), and plasma cutting (plasma). From the total load by welding fumes follows the rank TIG less than EH less than plasma less than MIG. Observing the maximum allowable concentration (MACD) for the total welding fume, no MACD for Cr and Ni was found exceeded. Regarding the welding gases ozone and CO no limit values were exceeded. From the results conclusions were made. PMID:2750235

  12. Response of the mouse lung transcriptome to welding fume: effects of stainless and mild steel fumes on lung gene expression in A/J and C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Debate exists as to whether welding fume is carcinogenic, but epidemiological evidence suggests that welders are an at risk population for the development of lung cancer. Recently, we found that exposure to welding fume caused an acutely greater and prolonged lung inflammatory response in lung tumor susceptible A/J versus resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mice and a trend for increased tumor incidence after stainless steel (SS) fume exposure. Here, our objective was to examine potential strain-dependent differences in the regulation and resolution of the lung inflammatory response induced by carcinogenic (Cr and Ni abundant) or non-carcinogenic (iron abundant) metal-containing welding fumes at the transcriptome level. Methods Mice were exposed four times by pharyngeal aspiration to 5 mg/kg iron abundant gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS), Cr and Ni abundant GMA-SS fume or vehicle and were euthanized 4 and 16 weeks after the last exposure. Whole lung microarray using Illumina Mouse Ref-8 expression beadchips was done. Results Overall, we found that tumor susceptibility was associated with a more marked transcriptional response to both GMA-MS and -SS welding fumes. Also, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that gene regulation and expression in the top molecular networks differed between the strains at both time points post-exposure. Interestingly, a common finding between the strains was that GMA-MS fume exposure altered behavioral gene networks. In contrast, GMA-SS fume exposure chronically upregulated chemotactic and immunomodulatory genes such as CCL3, CCL4, CXCL2, and MMP12 in the A/J strain. In the GMA-SS-exposed B6 mouse, genes that initially downregulated cellular movement, hematological system development/function and immune response were involved at both time points post-exposure. However, at 16 weeks, a transcriptional switch to an upregulation for neutrophil chemotactic genes was found and included genes such as S100A8, S100A9 and MMP9. Conclusions

  13. 42 CFR 84.1141 - Isoamyl acetate tightness test; dust, fume, and mist respirators designed for respiratory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... contamination level not less than 0.05 milligram per cubic meter; minimum requirements. 84.1141 Section 84.1141... protection against fumes of various metals having an air contamination level not less than 0.05 milligram...

  14. 42 CFR 84.1141 - Isoamyl acetate tightness test; dust, fume, and mist respirators designed for respiratory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... contamination level not less than 0.05 milligram per cubic meter; minimum requirements. 84.1141 Section 84.1141... protection against fumes of various metals having an air contamination level not less than 0.05 milligram...

  15. [Evaluation of exposure to fumes arising during welding of non-alloyed and low-alloyed steel by various methods].

    PubMed

    Matczak, W; Chmielnicka, J

    1988-01-01

    Evaluated in the paper is welders' exposure to fumes resulting from welding of nonalloyed and low-alloyed steel, whether pure or coated with protective layers, using two most popular welding techniques for those types of steel, i.e. metal active gas welding (MAG) and manual welding with covered electrode (MMA). Due to different chemical composition of fumes at particular workstations, the proper hygienic evaluation was based on measurements of individual concentrations of fumes in workers' breathing zone. A considerable contribution of the combined exposure was yielded by such fume constituents as manganese, ferrum and zinc (welding of steel coated with zinc protective layers), also chromium (welding of low- and -highalloyed steel), as well as copper (metal gas welding). The highest combined exposure (10-fold allowable value) was that of welders of steel coated with the zinc layer, using the metal active gas welding. PMID:3237059

  16. Prediction of Flexural Strength of Concretes Containing Silica Fume and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR) with an Empirical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafieyzadeh, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the flexural test, the theoretical maximum tensile stress at the bottom fiber of a test beam is known as the modulus of rupture or flexural strength. This work deals with the effects of Silica Fume and Styrene-Butadiene Latex (SBR) on flexural strength of concrete. An extensive experimentation was carried out to determine the effects of silica fume and SBR on flexural strength of concrete. Two water-binder ratios and several percentages of silica fume and SBR were considered. Abrams' Law, which was originally formulated for conventional concrete containing cement as the only cementations material, is used for prediction of flexural strength of these concretes. The aim of this work is to construct an empirical model to predict the flexural strength of silica fume-SBR concretes using concrete ingredients and time of curing in water. Also, the obtained results for flexural strength tests have been compared with predicted results.

  17. Influence of silica fume on the immobilization properties of cementitious mortars exposed to freeze-thaw cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Quaresima, R.; Scoccia, G.; Volpe, R.; Medici, F.; Merli, C.

    1996-12-31

    This study deals with the durability of immobilization matrices, drawing comparisons among the release characteristics of cementitious mortars with or without silica fume, before and after freezing-thawing cycles. Three different dosages of silica fume have been experimented, using silica fume as a substitute of cement. The results obtained from the leaching tests have emphasized, in all the matrices which had undergone the freeze-thaw cycles, an increase of the percentage of tracer released with respect to the same matrices before the freezing-thawing cycles. As a consequence of the freezing-thawing cycles, the velocity of release has also increased in all the experimented matrices. However, the tests have reconfirmed the positive effect of the addition of silica fume.

  18. 42 CFR 84.1141 - Isoamyl acetate tightness test; dust, fume, and mist respirators designed for respiratory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... contamination level not less than 0.05 milligram per cubic meter; minimum requirements. 84.1141 Section 84.1141... protection against fumes of various metals having an air contamination level not less than 0.05 milligram...

  19. 42 CFR 84.1141 - Isoamyl acetate tightness test; dust, fume, and mist respirators designed for respiratory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... contamination level not less than 0.05 milligram per cubic meter; minimum requirements. 84.1141 Section 84.1141... protection against fumes of various metals having an air contamination level not less than 0.05 milligram...

  20. 42 CFR 84.1141 - Isoamyl acetate tightness test; dust, fume, and mist respirators designed for respiratory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... contamination level not less than 0.05 milligram per cubic meter; minimum requirements. 84.1141 Section 84.1141... protection against fumes of various metals having an air contamination level not less than 0.05 milligram...

  1. Ignition Delays of Alkyl Thiophosphites with White and Red Fuming Nitric Acids Within Temperature Range 80 to -105 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Riley O; Ladanyi, Dezso J

    1953-01-01

    Ignition delays of alkyl thiophosphites were obtained in a modified open-cup apparatus and a small-scale rocket engine apparatus. At -40 F, mixed alkyl thiophosphites gave short delays with white fuming nitric acid containing 2 percent water and red fuming nitric acids of widely varying compositions. At -40 F and higher, triethyl trithiophosphite blended with as much as 40 percent n-heptane gave satisfactory self-igniting properties at temperatures as low as -76 F.

  2. Inhalation exposure of rats to asphalt fumes generated at paving temperatures alters pulmonary xenobiotic metabolism pathways without lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y C; Rengasamy, Apavoo; Frazer, Dave; Barger, Mark W; Hubbs, Ann F; Battelli, Lori; Tomblyn, Seith; Stone, Samuel; Castranova, Vince

    2003-01-01

    Asphalt fumes are complex mixtures of various organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs require bioactivation by the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system to exert toxic/carcinogenic effects. The present study was carried out to characterize the acute pulmonary inflammatory responses and the alterations of pulmonary xenobiotic pathways in rats exposed to asphalt fumes by inhalation. Rats were exposed at various doses and time periods to air or to asphalt fumes generated at paving temperatures. To assess the acute damage and inflammatory responses, differential cell counts, acellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined. Alveolar macrophage (AM) function was assessed by monitoring generation of chemiluminescence and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1. Alteration of pulmonary xenobiotic pathways was determined by monitoring the protein levels and activities of P-450 isozymes (CYP1A1 and CYP2B1), glutathioneS-transferase (GST), and NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (QR). The results show that acute asphalt fume exposure did not cause neutrophil infiltration, alter LDH activity or protein content, or affect AM function, suggesting that short-term asphalt fume exposure did not induce acute lung damage or inflammation. However, acute asphalt fume exposure significantly increased the activity and protein level of CYP1A1 whereas it markedly reduced the activity and protein level of CYP2B1 in the lung. The induction of CYP1A1 was localized in nonciliated bronchiolar epithelial (Clara) cells, alveolar septa, and endothelial cells by immunofluorescence microscopy. Cytosolic QR activity was significantly elevated after asphalt fume exposure, whereas GST activity was not affected by the exposure. This induction of CYP1A1 and QR with the concomitant down-regulation of CYP2B1 after asphalt fume exposure could alter PAH metabolism and may lead to potential

  3. A short-term test adapted to detect the genotoxic effects of environmental volatile pollutants (benzene fumes) using the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Domingues Zucchi, Tiago; Domingues Zucchi, Fernando; Poli, Paola; Soares de Melo, Itamar; Zucchi, Tania M A D

    2005-06-01

    With the recent focus on environmental problems, increasing awareness of the harmful effects of industrial and agricultural pollution has created a demand for progressively more sophisticated pollutant and toxicity detection methods. Using Aspergillus nidulans strains this work presents a new short term-test that, most importantly, enables the rapid and inexpensive detection of volatile pollutants that induce genotoxic/carcinogenic effects in animals. The main aim is to contribute to environmental health protection, and special attention is directed to monitoring the hazard posed by benzene (as a carcinogenic agent model) mainly because its ubiquitous presence often leads to severe noxious effects in humans among whom increased rates of human leukemia have been reported. To evaluate even the submutagenic effects of benzene fumes, two Aspergillus nidulans diploid strains, heterozygous for several auxotrophic mutations, were used. The DNA lesions produced stimulate mitotic recombination and homozygotization of auxotrophic recessive mutations. Conidial exposure to a saturated atmosphere of benzene fumes for 20 s was enough to increase the mitotic recombination frequencies significantly. Genetic analyses of treated diploids evidenced alterations related to mitotic recombination frequencies, gene expression, and allelic segregation rates. Altogether they reflect the potential of benzene to induce alterations in the fungal DNA, and albeit indirectly, they also respond for the genotoxic/carcinogenic harmful side effects widely connected to benzene. This is the first description of a sensitive, rapid and inexpensive test able to detect the submutagenic dose effects of volatile environmental compounds. In addition, despite concentrating on benzene the same test can be applied to many other pollutants, volatile or not. Additionally, the test can also be used to detect the antigenotoxic properties of foods and drugs. PMID:15931421

  4. Personal exposure to metal fume, NO2, and O3 among production welders and non-welders.

    PubMed

    Schoonover, Todd; Conroy, Lorraine; Lacey, Steven; Plavka, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize personal exposures to welding-related metals and gases for production welders and non-welders in a large manufacturing facility. Welding fume metals and irritant gases nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and ozone (O(3)) were sampled for thirty-eight workers. Personal exposure air samples for welding fume metals were collected on 37 mm open face cassettes and nitrogen dioxide and ozone exposure samples were collected with diffusive passive samplers. Samples were analyzed for metals using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and welding fume metal exposure concentrations were defined as the sum of welding-related metals mass per volume of air sampled. Welding fume metal exposures were highly variable among similar types of welding while NO(2) and O(3) exposure were less variable. Welding fume metal exposures were significantly higher 474 μg/m(3) for welders than non-welders 60 μg/m(3) (p=0.001). Welders were exposed to higher concentrations of NO(2) and O(3) than non-welders but the differences were not statistically significant. Welding fume metal exposure concentrations for welders performing gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) were higher than welders performing gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Non-welders experienced exposures similar to GTAW welders despite a curtain wall barrier separating welding and non-welding work areas. PMID:20823632

  5. Installation of a flow control device in an inclined air-curtain fume hood to control wake-induced exposure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Kun

    2016-08-01

    An inclined plate for flow control was installed at the lower edge of the sash of an inclined air-curtain fume hood to reduce the effects of the wake around a worker standing in front of the fume hood. Flow inside the fume hood is controlled by the inclined air-curtain and deflection plates, thereby forming a quad-vortex flow structure. Controlling the face velocity of the fume hood resulted in convex, straight, concave, and attachment flow profiles in the inclined air-curtain. We used the flow visualization and conducted a tracer gas test with a mannequin to determine the performance of two sash geometries, namely, the half-cylinder and inclined plate designs. When the half-cylinder design was used, the tracer gas test registered a high leakage concentration at Vf ≦ 57.1 fpm or less. This concentration occurred at the top of the sash opening, which was close to the breathing zone of the mannequin placed in front of the fume hood. When the inclined plate design was used, the containment was good, with concentrations of 0.002-0.004 ppm, at Vf ≦ 63.0 fpm. Results indicate that an inclined plate effectively reduces the leakage concentration induced by recirculation flow structures that form in the wake of a worker standing in front of an inclined air-curtain fume hood. PMID:26950527

  6. Reduced worker exposure and improved energy efficiency in industrial fume-hoods using an airvest

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.J.; Faulkner, D.; Fisk, W.J.

    1992-05-01

    Reduction in the breathing zone concentration of an experimentally simulated pollutant, by factors ranging from 100 to 800, was observed with the device (called an airvest). With use of the airvest by the worker, the hood face velocity can be reduced, leading to substantial energy savings in conditioning of make up air in the building. The airvest works by elimination or ventilation of the eddy that develops in front of a worker when the worker stands in the open face of a fume hood. Normally this eddy draws some of the pollutant (commonly generated near and in front of the worker) towards the worker`s breathing zone. Experiments sing a heated full-size mannequin were conducted with a full scale walk-in fume hood. Sulfur hexafluoride was used to simulate pollutant generation and exposure during a work situation. Flow visualization with smoke was also undertaken to evaluate the airvest qualitatively. 3 refs.

  7. Combustion fume structure and dynamics. Period of performance, August 16, 1990--September 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Flagan, R.C.

    1991-12-31

    The focus of this research program is on elucidating the fundamental processes that determine the particle size distribution, comparison, and agglomerate structures of coal ash fumes. The ultimate objective of this work is the development and validation of a model for the dynamics of combustion fumes, describing both the evolution of the particle size distribution and the particle morphology. The study employs model systems to address the fundamental questions and to provide rigorous validation of the models to be developed. This first phase of the project has been devoted to the development of a detailed experimental strategy that will allow agglomerates with a broad range of fractal dimensions to be studied in the laboratory.

  8. Characterization of the early pulmonary inflammatory response associated with PTFE fume exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, C. J.; Finkelstein, J. N.; Gelein, R.; Baggs, R.; Oberdorster, G.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Heating of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) has been described to release fumes containing ultrafine particles (approximately 18 nm diam). These fumes can be highly toxic in the respiratory tract inducing extensive pulmonary edema with hemorrhagic inflammation. Fischer-344 rats were exposed to PTFE fumes generated by temperatures ranging from 450 to 460 degrees C for 15 min at an exposure concentration of 5 x 10(5) particles/cm3, equivalent to approximately 50 micrograms/m3. Responses were examined 4 hr post-treatment when these rats demonstrated 60-85% neutrophils (PMNs) in their lung lavage. Increases in abundance for messages encoding the antioxidants manganese superoxide dismutase and metallothionein (MT) increased 15- and 40-fold, respectively. For messages encoding the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin 1 alpha, 1 beta, and 6 (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6), macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) increases of 5-, 5-, 10-, 40-, 40-, and 15-fold were present. Vascular endothelial growth factor, which may play a role in the integrity of the endothelial barrier, was decreased to 20% of controls. In situ sections were hybridized with 33P cRNA probes encoding IL-6, MT, surfactant protein C, and TNF alpha. Increased mRNA abundance for MT and IL-6 was expressed around all airways and interstitial regions with MT and IL-6 demonstrating similar spatial distribution. Large numbers of activated PMNs expressed IL-6, MT, and TNF alpha. Additionally, pulmonary macrophages and epithelial cells were actively involved. These observations support the notion that PTFE fumes containing ultrafine particles initiate a severe inflammatory response at low inhaled particle mass concentrations, which is suggestive of an oxidative injury. Furthermore, PMNs may actively regulate the inflammatory process through cytokine and antioxidant expression.

  9. Effects of welding fumes on nuclear air cleaning system carbon adsorber banks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.W.

    1997-08-01

    Standard Technical Specifications for nuclear air cleaning systems include requirements for surveillance tests following fire, painting, or chemical release in areas communicating with the affected system. To conservatively implement this requirement, many plants categorize welding as a chemical release process, and institute controls to ensure that welding fumes do not interact with carbon adsorbers in a filter system. After reviewing research data that indicated welding had a minimal impact on adsorber iodine removal efficiency, further testing was performed with the goal of establishing a welding threshold. It was anticipated that some quantity of weld electrodes could be determined that had a corresponding detrimental impact on iodine removal efficiency for the exposed adsorber. This value could be used to determine a conservative sampling schedule that would allow the station to perform laboratory testing to ensure system degradation did not occur without a full battery of surveillance tests. A series of tests was designed to demonstrate carbon efficiency versus cumulative welding fume exposure. Three series of tests were performed, one for each of three different types of commonly used weld electrodes. Carbon sampling was performed at baseline conditions, and every five pounds of electrode thereafter. Two different laboratory tests were performed for each sample; one in accordance with ASTM 3803/1989 at 95% relative humidity and 30 degrees C, and another using the less rigorous conditions of 70% relative humidity and 80 degrees C. Review of the test data for all three types of electrodes failed to show a significant correlation between carbon efficiency degradation and welding fume exposure. Accordingly, welding is no longer categorized as a `chemical release process` at McGuire Nuclear Station, and limits on welding fume interaction with ventilation systems have been eliminated. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The effects of fumed silica and barite on the aluminum resistance of alumina castables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, Saied; Gaubert, Christophe; Allaire, Claude

    2003-11-01

    A study of the effects of microsilica and barium sulfate as additives in high-tabular alumina castables on cold and hot modulus of rupture, porosity, thermal shock, and corrosion resistance to aluminum attack is reported in this article. This investigation underlined the importance of the quality of fumed silica on the physical and mechanical properties of refractory castables, and also confirmed the importance of celsian formation during firing in the protection of refractory against aluminum attack.

  11. Immobilization of enzymes on fumed silica nanoparticles for applications in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Juan C; Würges, Kerstin; Kramer, Martin; Pfromm, Peter H; Rezac, Mary E; Czermak, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic catalysis in nonaqueous media is considered as an attractive tool for the preparation of a variety of organic compounds of commercial interest. This approach is advantageous for numerous reasons including the enhanced stability of some substrates and products in solvents, sometimes improved selectivity of the enzyme, and reduction of unwanted water-dependent side reactions since little water is present. Due to the poor solubility of enzymes in these media, mass transfer limitations are sometimes present, leading to low apparent catalytic activity. Immobilization on solid supports has been successfully applied to overcome enzyme solubility issues by increasing the accessibility of substrates to the enzymes' active sites. We have developed a simple immobilization protocol that uses fumed silica as support. Fumed silica is an inexpensive nanostructured material with unique properties including large surface area and exceptional adsorptive affinity for organic macromolecules. Our protocol is performed in two main steps. First, the enzyme molecules are physically adsorbed on the surface of the non-porous fumed silica nanoparticles with the participation of silanol groups (Si-OH) and second, water is removed by lyophilization. The protocol has been successfully applied to both s. Carlsberg and Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB). The resulting fumed silica-based nanobiocatalysts of these two enzymes were tested for catalytic activity in hexane. The transesterification of N-acetyl-L: -phenylalanine ethyl ester was the model reaction for s. Carlsberg nanobiocatalysts. The simple esterification of geraniol and the enantioselective transesterification of (RS)-1-phenylethanol were the model reactions for CALB nanobiocatalysts. The observed catalytic activities were remarkably high and even exceeded those of commercially available preparations. PMID:21553189

  12. Exposure to welding fumes is associated with acute systemic inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Chen, J; Boyce, P; Christiani, D

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the acute systemic inflammatory response to welding fume exposure. Methods: Twenty four welders (42% smokers) and 13 non-exposed controls (23% smokers) were monitored at a welding school. Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) was assessed using cyclone samplers. Markers of systemic inflammation, including C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and white blood cell (WBC) levels, were determined in peripheral blood samples collected at baseline and after 5.3 (SD 1.0) hours of exposure. Results: The median PM2.5 concentration for welders was 1.66 mg/m3, which was significantly greater than that for controls (0.04 mg/m3). Compared to non-smokers, smokers had a significantly higher baseline WBC count, but comparable levels of CRP and fibrinogen. In non-smokers, welding fume exposure was associated with a significant increase in WBC and neutrophil counts immediately following exposure (+0.8x103/µl, 95% CI 0.1 to 1.6, and +1.0x103/µl, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.7, respectively). A significant decrease in fibrinogen levels was observed in non-smokers (–32 mg/dl, 95% CI –63 to –1). No significant changes in WBC, neutrophil, and fibrinogen levels were found in smokers. Sixteen hours after welding exposure, CRP levels were found to be significantly increased in both non-smokers and smokers (0.90 mg/l, 95% CI 0.17 to 1.64). PM2.5 concentrations were found to be significantly associated with absolute neutrophil counts in non-smokers, and CRP levels in both non-smokers and smokers. Conclusions: High levels of welding fume exposure induce acute systemic inflammation in a relatively young, healthy working population. These results also suggest that smoking may modify the effect of welding fume exposure on specific inflammatory markers. PMID:15723880

  13. Characteristics of PAHs from deep-frying and frying cooking fumes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhiliang; Li, Jing; Wu, Bobo; Hao, Xuewei; Yin, Yong; Jiang, Xi

    2015-10-01

    Cooking fumes are an important indoor source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Because indoor pollution has a more substantial impact on human health than outdoor pollution, PAHs from cooking fumes have drawn considerable attention. In this study, 16 PAHs emitted through deep-frying and frying methods using rapeseed, soybean, peanut, and olive oil were examined under a laboratory fume hood. Controlled experiments were conducted to collect gas- and particulate-phase PAHs emitted from the cooking oil fumes, and PAH concentrations were quantified via high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that deep-frying methods generate more PAHs and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) (1.3 and 10.9 times, respectively) because they consume greater volumes of edible oil and involve higher oil temperatures relative to those of frying methods. In addition, the total B[a]Peq concentration of deep-frying is 2.2-fold larger than that of frying. Regarding the four types of edible oils studied, rapeseed oil produced more PAH emission than the other three oil varieties. For all of the cooking tests, three- and four-ringed PAHs were the main PAH components regardless of the food and oil used. Concerning the PAH partition between gas and particulate phase, the gaseous compounds accounted for 59-96 % of the total. Meanwhile, the particulate fraction was richer of high molecular weight PAHs (five-six rings). Deep-frying and frying were confirmed as important sources of PAH pollution in internal environments. The results of this study provide additional insights into the polluting features of PAHs produced via cooking activities in indoor environments. PMID:26066859

  14. Evaluation of worker exposure to asphalt roofing fumes: influence of work practices and materials.

    PubMed

    Kriech, Anthony J; Osborn, Linda V; Trumbore, David C; Kurek, Joseph T; Wissel, Herbert L; Rosinski, Klaus D

    2004-02-01

    A field study was conducted on 42 asphalt-roofing workers at 7 built-up roofing sites across the United States. Sixteen out of 42 samples show levels of exposure to asphalt fumes that exceed the current American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' (ACGIH)-recommended threshold limit value of 0.5 mg/m(3) as benzene extractable inhalable particulate. Statistically, the geometric mean of all 42 worker samples was 0.27 mg/m(3) (geometric standard deviation = 3.40), the average was 0.70 mg/m(3) (standard deviation = 1.69) and the median value was 0.24 mg/m(3). The impact of work practices is discussed including the use of a novel product that uses a polymer skin to reduce fumes from built up roofing asphalt. Its use resulted in a reduction of benzene soluble matter (BSM) of >70%. Other testing measures utilized included total particulate matter, total organic matter, simulated distillation, and fluorescence analysis. Additionally, a controlled pilot study using 16 kettle-area and 16 worker samples clearly showed that when the temperature of the kettle was reduced by 28 degrees C, there was a 38-59% reduction in fume exposure and a 54% reduction in fluorescence with standard asphalts. Reduction of BSM exposures using fuming-suppressed asphalt was also confirmed during this pilot plant study (81-92%), with fluorescence lowered by 88%. Confounding agents such as roof tear-off materials were also analyzed and their contribution to worker exposure is discussed. PMID:15204883

  15. Contraction-free, fume-fixed longitudinal sections of fresh frozen muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Danny A.; Slocum, Glenn R.

    1988-01-01

    Contraction damage occurring when longitudinal frozen sections of fresh unfixed muscles are thawed on microscope slides has limited histological examination of this tissue mainly to cross sections. Longitudinally oriented sections are advantageous for investigating properties that vary along the length of the muscle fibers. A fume fixation technique has been developed for preventing contraction of thick longitudinal frozen sections. The technique is compatible with histochemical staining of enzymes.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Zinc Slag Fuming Process in Top-Submerged Lance Smelting Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Nazmul; Naser, Jamal; Brooks, Geoffrey; Reuter, Markus A.; Matusewicz, Robert W.

    2012-02-01

    Slag fuming is a reductive treatment process for molten zinciferous slags for extracting zinc in the form of metal vapor by injecting or adding a reductant source such as pulverized coal or lump coal and natural gas. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to study the zinc slag fuming process from imperial smelting furnace (ISF) slag in a top-submerged lance furnace and to investigate the details of fluid flow, reaction kinetics, and heat transfer in the furnace. The model integrates combustion phenomena and chemical reactions with the heat, mass, and momentum interfacial interaction between the phases present in the system. A commercial CFD package AVL Fire 2009.2 (AVL, Graz, Austria) coupled with a number of user-defined subroutines in FORTRAN programming language were used to develop the model. The model is based on three-dimensional (3-D) Eulerian multiphase flow approach, and it predicts the velocity and temperature field of the molten slag bath, generated turbulence, and vortex and plume shape at the lance tip. The model also predicts the mass fractions of slag and gaseous components inside the furnace. The model predicted that the percent of ZnO in the slag bath decreases linearly with time and is consistent broadly with the experimental data. The zinc fuming rate from the slag bath predicted by the model was validated through macrostep validation process against the experimental study of Waladan et al. The model results predicted that the rate of ZnO reduction is controlled by the mass transfer of ZnO from the bulk slag to slag-gas interface and rate of gas-carbon reaction for the specified simulation time studied. Although the model is based on zinc slag fuming, the basic approach could be expanded or applied for the CFD analysis of analogous systems.

  17. Composite polymer electrolytes using fumed silica fillers: synthesis, rheology and electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Saad A.; Fedkiw, Peter S.; Baker, Gregory L.

    1999-06-28

    The goal of the synthesis research was to devise routes to PEG/fumed silica/lithium salt composites that can be processed and then photochemically cross-linked to form mechanically stable electrolytes. An essential feature of the system is that the ionic conductivity and the mechanical properties must be de-coupled from each other, i.e., cross-linking of the fumed silica matrix must not cause a significant deterioration of the conductivity of the composite. As shown in Figure 2, we prepared a range of surface-modified fumed silicas and investigated their ability to form mechanically stable composite electrolytes. The groups used to modify the surface properties of the silica ranged from simple linear alkyls that render the silica hydrophobia to polyethers that promote compatibility with the electrolyte. From these materials we developed a cross-linkable system that satisfies the criteria of processibility and high-conductivity. The key material needed for the cross-linking reaction are silicas that bear surface-attached monomers. As shown schematically in Figure 3a, we prepared fumed silicas with a combination of surface groups, for example, an octyl chain with different coverages of tethered methacrylates. The length of the tether was varied, and we found that both C{sub 3} and C{sub 8} tethers gave useful composites. The functionalized silicas were combined with PEG-DM, AIBN or benzophenone (free radical initiators), LiClO{sub 4} or Li imide, and either methyl, butyl, or octyl, methacrylate to form stable clear gels. Upon irradiation with UV light, polymerization of both the tethered methacrylate and the added methacrylate took place, yielding a cross-linked rubbery composite material. Ionic conductivity measurements before and after cross-linking showed only a slight decrease (see Figure 9 later), thereby offering strong experimental evidence that the mechanical properties conferred by the silica matrix are de-coupled from the ionic conductivity of the PEG

  18. Increased levels of oxidative DNA damage attributable to cooking-oil fumes exposure among cooks.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yuebin; Cheng, Jinquan; Zhang, Zhicheng; Zhang, Renli; Zhang, Zhunzhen; Shuai, Zhihong; Wu, Tangchun

    2009-07-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that cooks are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from cooking-oil fumes. However, Emission of PAH and their carcinogenic potencies from cooking oil fumes sources have not been investigated among cooks. To investigate the urinary excretion of a marker for oxidative DNA damage, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), in different groups of cooks and different exposure groups, and to study the association between 8-OHdG and 1-hydroxypyrene(1-OHP), a biological marker for PAH exposure. Urine samples were collected from different groups of cooks (n = 86) and from unexposed controls (n = 36); all were male with similar age and smoking habits. The health status, occupational history, smoking, and alcohol consumption 24 h prior to sampling was estimated from questionnaires. The urine samples were frozen for later analyses of 8-OHdG and 1-OHP levels by high-performance liquid chromatography. Excretion in urine of 8-OHdG was similar for controls (mean 1.2micromol/mol creatinine, n = 36), and for those who had been in the kitchen with an exhaust-hood operating (mean 1.5micromol/mol creatinine, n = 45). Cooks exposed to cooking-oil fumes without exhaust-hood operation had significantly increased excretion of 8-OHdG (mean 2.3micromol/mol creatinine, n = 18), compared with controls. The urinary levels of ln 1-OHP and ln 8-OHdG were still significantly correlated in a multiple regression analysis. The results indicate that exposure to PAH or possibly other compounds in cooking-oil fumes may cause oxidative DNA damage. PMID:19225966

  19. Risk Communication Concerning Welding Fumes for the Primary Preventive Care of Welding Apprentices in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Cezar Vaz, Joana

    2015-01-01

    This study’s aim was to assess the perceptions of welding apprentices concerning welding fumes being associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and assess the implementation of risk communication as a primary prevention tool in the welding training process. This quasi-experimental, non-randomized study with before-and-after design was conducted with 84 welding apprentices in Southern Brazil. Poisson Regression analysis was used. Relative Risk was the measure used with a 95% confidence interval and 5% (p ≤ 0.05) significance level. Significant association was found between perceptions of worsened symptoms of respiratory disorders caused by welding fumes and educational level (p = 0.049), the use of goggles to protect against ultraviolet rays (p = 0.023), and access to services in private health facilities without insurance coverage (p = 0.001). Apprentices younger than 25 years old were 4.9 times more likely to perceive worsened cardiovascular symptoms caused by welding fumes after risk communication (RR = 4.91; CI 95%: 1.09 to 22.2). The conclusion is that risk communication as a primary preventive measure in continuing education processes implemented among apprentices, who are future welders, was efficacious. Thus, this study confirms that risk communication can be implemented as a primary prevention tool in welding apprenticeships. PMID:25607606

  20. Risk communication concerning welding fumes for the primary preventive care of welding apprentices in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Vaz, Joana Cezar

    2015-01-01

    This study's aim was to assess the perceptions of welding apprentices concerning welding fumes being associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and assess the implementation of risk communication as a primary prevention tool in the welding training process. This quasi-experimental, non-randomized study with before-and-after design was conducted with 84 welding apprentices in Southern Brazil. Poisson Regression analysis was used. Relative Risk was the measure used with a 95% confidence interval and 5% (p ≤ 0.05) significance level. Significant association was found between perceptions of worsened symptoms of respiratory disorders caused by welding fumes and educational level (p = 0.049), the use of goggles to protect against ultraviolet rays (p = 0.023), and access to services in private health facilities without insurance coverage (p = 0.001). Apprentices younger than 25 years old were 4.9 times more likely to perceive worsened cardiovascular symptoms caused by welding fumes after risk communication (RR = 4.91; CI 95%: 1.09 to 22.2). The conclusion is that risk communication as a primary preventive measure in continuing education processes implemented among apprentices, who are future welders, was efficacious. Thus, this study confirms that risk communication can be implemented as a primary prevention tool in welding apprenticeships. PMID:25607606

  1. Development of a field method for measuring manganese in welding fume.

    PubMed

    Dale Marcy, A; Drake, Pamela L

    2007-11-01

    Workers who perform routine welding tasks are potentially exposed to fume that may contain manganese. Manganese may cause respiratory problems and is implicated in causing the occurrence of Parkinson-like symptoms. In this study, a field colorimetric method for extracting and measuring manganese in welding fume was developed. The method uses ultrasonic extraction with an acidic hydrogen peroxide solution to extract welding fume collected on polyvinyl chloride filters. Commercially available pre-packaged reagents are used to produce a colored solution, created by a reaction of manganese(ii) with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol. Absorbance measurements are then made using a portable spectrophotometer. The method detection limit and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 5.2 microg filter(-1) and 17 microg filter(-1), respectively, with a dynamic range up to 400 microg filter(-1). When the results are above the LOQ for the colorimetric method, the manganese masses are equivalent to those measured by the International Organization for Standardization Method 15202-2, which employs a strong acid digestion and analysis using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. PMID:17968446

  2. Exposure to Cooking Oil Fumes and Oxidative Damages: A Longitudinal Study in Chinese Military Cooks

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ching-Huang; Jaakkola, Jouni J.K.; Chuang, Chien-Yi; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Lung, Shih-Chun; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Strickland, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Cooking oil fumes contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic aromatic amines, benzene, and formaldehyde which may cause oxidative damages to DNA and lipids. We assessed the relations between exposure to cooking oil fumes (COF) and subsequent oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation among military cooks and office-based soldiers. The study population, including 61 Taiwanese male military cooks and a reference group of 37 office soldiers, collected urine samples pre-shift of the first weekday and post-shift of the fifth workday. We measured airborne particulate PAHs in military kitchens and offices and concentrations of urinary 1-OHP, a biomarker of PAH exposure, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a biomarkers of oxidative DNA damage, and urinary isoprostane (Isop). Airborne particulate PAHs levels in kitchens significantly exceeded those in office areas. The concentrations of urinary 1-OHP among military cooks increased significantly after 5 days of exposure to COF. Using generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis adjusting for confounding, a change in log(8-OHdG) and log(Isop) were statistically significantly related to a unit change in log(1-OHP) (regression coefficient [β], β= 0.06, 95% CI 0.001 to 0.12) and (β= 0.07, 95% CI 0.001 to 0.13), respectively. Exposure to PAHs, or other compounds in cooking-oil fumes, may cause both oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation. PMID:22968348

  3. Electrospun Ultrafine Fiber Composites Containing Fumed Silica: From Solution Rheology to Materials with Tunable Wetting.

    PubMed

    Dufficy, Martin K; Geiger, Mackenzie T; Bonino, Christopher A; Khan, Saad A

    2015-11-17

    Fumed silica (FS) particles with hydrophobic (R805) or hydrophilic (A150) surface functionalities are incorporated in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers by electrospinning to produce mats with controlled wettability. Rheological measurements are conducted to elucidate the particle-polymer interactions and characterize the system while microscopic and analytic tools are used to examine FS location within both fibers and films to aid in the fundamental understanding of wetting behavior. Unlike traditional polymers, we find these systems to be gel-like, yet electrospinnable; the fumed silica networks break down into smaller aggregates during the electrospinning process and disperse both within and on the surface of the fibers. Composite nanofiber mats containing R805 FS exhibit an apparent contact angle over 130° and remain hydrophobic over 30 min, while similar mats with A150 display rapid surface-wetting with a static contact angle of ∼30°. Wicking experiments reveal that the water absorption properties can be further manipulated, with R805 FS-impregnated mats taking up only 8% water relative to mat weight in 15 min. In contrast, PAN fibers containing A150 FS absorb 425% of water in the same period, even more than the pure PAN fiber (371%). The vastly different responses to water demonstrate the versatility of FS in surface modification, especially for submicron fibrous mats. The role of fumed silica in controlling wettability is discussed in terms of their surface functionality, placement on nanofibers and induced surface roughness. PMID:26477547

  4. Effect of silica fume on the characterization of the geopolymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khater, Hisham M.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of silica fume (SF) addition on properties of geopolymer materials produced from alkaline activation of alumino-silicates metakaolin and waste concrete produced from demolition works has been studied through the measurement of compressive strength, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Alumino-silicate materials are coarse aggregate included waste concrete and fired kaolin (metakaolin) at 800°C for 3 h, both passing a sieve of 90 μm. Mix specimens containing silica fume were prepared at water/binder ratios in a range of 0.30 under water curing. The used activators are an equal mix of sodium hydroxide and silicate in the ratio of 3:3 wt.%. The control geopolymer mix is composed of metakaolin and waste concrete in an equal mix (50:50, wt.%). Waste concrete was partially replaced by silica fume by 1 to 10 wt.%. The results indicated that compressive strengths of geopolymer mixes incorporating SF increased up to 7% substitution and then decreased up to 10% but still higher than that of the control mix. Results indicated that compressive strengths of geopolymer mixes incorporating SF increases up to 7% substitution and then decreases up to 10% but still higher than the control mix, where 7% SF-digested calcium hydroxide (CH) crystals, decreased the orientation of CH crystals, reduced the crystal size of CH gathered at the interface, and improved the interface more effectively.

  5. Amount and distribution of fume contaminants in the lungs of an arc welder post mortem.

    PubMed Central

    Kalliomäki, P L; Sutinen, S; Kelhä, V; Lakomaa, E; Sortti, V; Sutinen, S

    1979-01-01

    This study describes various post-mortem examinations of the lungs of a shipyard arc welder. These investigations comprised morphological methods, including gross pathology and radiography, histological and ultrastructural examinations, chemical analysis of lung tissue, and sensitive magnetic measurements, which can now be used to detect magnetic contaminants, such as welding fume, in human tissue. Such methods can also show the distribution of contaminants. The amount of welding-fume contaminants was low, only 110 mg. The contaminant iron seemed to represent only 10% of the total iron chemically analysed in lung tissue. The concentration of the total iron was 4-10 times higher than that in control tissue. Contaminants tended to collect in the central areas of the lungs. Two concentration centres could be observed in each lung, one anterior and one posterior. There was slight fibrosis around pigmented areas. Histological findings were similar to those of previous studies. Transmission electron micrographs showed that enlarged lysosomes of macrophages contained electron-dense granules, 450 nm to less than 5 nm in diameter, which formed aggregates and short chains, and resembled welding-fume particles in the breathing zone. Our results show the value of studying the same material by a number of inter-related methods. Images PMID:500782

  6. Factors Affecting the Capture Efficiency of a Fume Extraction Torch for Gas Metal Arc Welding

    PubMed Central

    Bonthoux, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Welding fumes are classified as Group 2B ‘possibly carcinogenic’ and this prompts to the implementation of local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The fume extraction torch with LEV integrated into the tool is the most attractive solution but its capture efficiency is often disappointing in practice. This study assesses the main parameters affecting fume capture efficiency namely the extraction flow rate, the positioning of the suction openings on the torch, the angle of inclination of the torch to the workpiece during welding, the metal transfer modes, and the welding deposition rate. The theoretical velocity induced by suction, estimated from the extraction flow rate and the position of the suction openings, is the main parameter affecting effectiveness of the device. This is the design parameter and its value should never be <0.25 m s−1. The angle of the torch relative to the workpiece also has a great deal of influence. To improve efficiency, work station layouts need to favour positions where the torch is held with angles closer to perpendicular (<15°). Welding with high deposition rates (>1.1g s−1) and spray transfer leads to low capture efficiency if induced velocities are <0.5 m s−1. The results of the study can be used in the design of integrated on-torch extraction systems and provide information for fixing system objectives. PMID:27074798

  7. Mock-up and testing of a variable volume laboratory fume hood exhaust system

    SciTech Connect

    Vresk, J.; Hirsch, P. R.; Davis, S. A.; Myers, G. E.; Woodring, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A test of an ANL-designed variable volume system prototype used to displace an existing constant volume fume hood ventilation system in a laboratory of the Materials Science Division is described. Performance characteristics such as response, stability, repeatability and hood containment were tested and evaluated, with particular emphasis on containment, to clearly demonstrate that operator safety and the environment are not compromised. Results obtained clearly indicate the feasibility of implementing the prototype concept. The variable volume system enables reducing conditioned ventilation air to the laboratory room by at least 50%, dependent solely upon internal heat loads. Normal hood exhaust of 200 CFM with the face sash in a closed position can be provided by air used to condition building offices and corridors. In all modes of operation, i.e., fume hood face sash closed to fully open, the building differential pressure design criteria from office to corridor to laboratory to fume hood is maintained. Also, hood face velocity can be established to meet minimum requirements at any position of sash opening and test results indicate a hood containment efficiency equal to or better than the presently existing constant volume proportional by-pass system.

  8. Development and evaluation of an air-curtain fume cabinet with considerations of its aerodynamics.

    PubMed

    Huang, R F; Wu, Y D; Chen, H D; Chen, C-C; Chen, C-W; Chang, C-P; Shih, T-S

    2007-03-01

    In order to avoid the inherent aerodynamic difficulties of the conventional fume hood, an innovative design--the 'air curtain-isolated fume hood' is developed. The new hood applies a specially designed air curtain (which is generated by a narrow planar jet and a suction slot flow at low velocities) across the sash plane. The hood constructed for the study is full size and transparent for flow visualization. The aerodynamic characteristics are diagnosed by using the laser-light-sheet-assisted smoke flow visualization method. Four characteristic air-curtain flow modes are identified in the domain of jet and suction velocities when the sash remains static. Some of these characteristic flow modes have much improved flow patterns when compared with those of the conventional fume hoods. From the viewpoint of the aerodynamics and mass transport, the results indicate that the air curtain properly setup across the sash opening allows almost no sensible exchange of momentum and mass between the flowfields of the cabinet and the outside environment. Two standard sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas concentration measurement methods following the ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995 standard and the prEN14175 protocol for static test are employed to examine the contaminant leakage levels. Results of the rigorous examinations of leakage show unusually satisfactory hood performance. The leakage of the tracer gas can approach almost null (<0.001 p.p.m.) if the jet and suction velocities are properly adjusted. PMID:16857702

  9. Room ventilation and its influence on the performance of fume cupboards: A parametric numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Denev, J.A.; Durst, F.; Mohr, B.

    1997-02-01

    The three-dimensional turbulent flow in a typical chemical laboratory containing two fume cupboards and furniture is investigated numerically in order to obtain detailed information needed for the improved design of ventilating systems for such rooms. The flow inside the two fume cupboards is simulated simultaneously with the room flow, and its dependence on the flow structure in the room is shown. The flow inside the cupboards and in the vicinity of their sash openings has been found to be essentially three-dimensional. Several room parameters are varied, and a quantitative evaluation of their influence on the flow, the comfort characteristics, and the ventilation efficiency is given. Additional ceiling-mounted openings, which extract room air outside the fume cupboards, can affect the capture efficiency of the cupboards, as well as the quality of the air in the room. It has been found also that small changes in the position of the radial inlet ceiling-mounted diffuser can influence the air quality of the room and at the same time the draught risk. These effects are shown for a given room arrangement. To accommodate the complex geometry, the elliptical nature of the mathematical problem, and the use of a turbulence model, a multigrid acceleration method with 245,000 control volumes is used, allowing CPU times on a workstation to become acceptable.

  10. Kinetics of the zinc slag-Fuming Process: part II. mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, G. G.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1985-09-01

    A mathematical model of zinc slag fuming has been formulated based on the kinetic conception of the process developed in Part I of this paper. Each of the major reaction zones in the furnace — the slag bath where reduction of zinc oxide and ferric oxide takes place and the tuyere gas column where oxidation of coal and ferrous oxide occurs — have been characterized mathematically. The two zones and the water-jacketed furnace wall have been linked by overall heat and mass balances. Insufficient information is available, however, to characterize quantitatively two of the important kinetic processes occurring in the furnace: the division of coal between entrainment in the slag, combustion in the tuyere gas column and bypass; and oxygen utilization. To overcome this problem the model has been fitted to the data from eleven industrial fuming cycles. Consistent values have been obtained for these kinetic parameters over five different fuming operations indicating that the kinetic conception of the process is sound. The results indicate that about 33 pct of the injected coal is entrained in the slag, 55 pet combusts in the tuyere gas column, and 12 pct bypasses the bath completely. Oxygen utilization has been found to be high and can be correlated to bath depth.

  11. Factors Affecting the Capture Efficiency of a Fume Extraction Torch for Gas Metal Arc Welding.

    PubMed

    Bonthoux, Francis

    2016-07-01

    Welding fumes are classified as Group 2B 'possibly carcinogenic' and this prompts to the implementation of local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The fume extraction torch with LEV integrated into the tool is the most attractive solution but its capture efficiency is often disappointing in practice. This study assesses the main parameters affecting fume capture efficiency namely the extraction flow rate, the positioning of the suction openings on the torch, the angle of inclination of the torch to the workpiece during welding, the metal transfer modes, and the welding deposition rate. The theoretical velocity induced by suction, estimated from the extraction flow rate and the position of the suction openings, is the main parameter affecting effectiveness of the device. This is the design parameter and its value should never be <0.25 m s(-1) The angle of the torch relative to the workpiece also has a great deal of influence. To improve efficiency, work station layouts need to favour positions where the torch is held with angles closer to perpendicular (<15°). Welding with high deposition rates (>1.1g s(-1)) and spray transfer leads to low capture efficiency if induced velocities are <0.5 m s(-1) The results of the study can be used in the design of integrated on-torch extraction systems and provide information for fixing system objectives. PMID:27074798

  12. Development of Welding Fumes Health Index (WFHI) for Welding Workplace’s Safety and Health Assessment

    PubMed Central

    HARIRI, Azian; PAIMAN, Nuur Azreen; LEMAN, Abdul Mutalib; MD. YUSOF, Mohammad Zainal

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background This study aimed to develop an index that can rank welding workplace that associate well with possible health risk of welders. Methods Welding Fumes Health Index (WFHI) were developed based on data from case studies conducted in Plant 1 and Plant 2. Personal sampling of welding fumes to assess the concentration of metal constituents along with series of lung function tests was conducted. Fifteen metal constituents were investigated in each case study. Index values were derived from aggregation analysis of metal constituent concentration while significant lung functions were recognized through statistical analysis in each plant. Results The results showed none of the metal constituent concentration was exceeding the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for all plants. However, statistical analysis showed significant mean differences of lung functions between welders and non-welders. The index was then applied to one of the welding industry (Plant 3) for verification purpose. The developed index showed its promising ability to rank welding workplace, according to the multiple constituent concentrations of welding fumes that associates well with lung functions of the investigated welders. Conclusion There was possibility that some of the metal constituents were below the detection limit leading to ‘0’ value of sub index, thus the multiplicative form of aggregation model was not suitable for analysis. On the other hand, maximum or minimum operator forms suffer from compensation issues and were not considered in this study. PMID:25927034

  13. Moral hazard.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2009-01-01

    Civil societies set aside a common pool of resources to help those with whom chance has dealt harshly. Frequently we allow access to these common resources when bad luck is assisted by foolishness and lack of foresight. Sometimes we may even help ourselves to a few of those common assets since others are doing so and they are public goods, the cost of which is shared and has already been paid. Moral hazard is the questionable ethical practice of increasing opportunity for individual gain while shifting risk for loss to the group. Bailout is an example. What makes moral hazard so widespread and difficult to manage is that it is easier for individuals to see their advantage than it is for groups to see theirs. Runaway American healthcare costs can be explained in these terms. Cheating, overtreatment, commercialism, and other moral problems in dentistry can be traced to the interaction between opportunistic individual behavior and permissive group responses common in moral hazard. PMID:19928367

  14. Bitumen fumes: review of work on the potential risk to workers and the present knowledge on its origin.

    PubMed

    Binet, S; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, A; Brandt, H; Lafontaine, M; Castegnaro, M

    2002-12-01

    Bitumens fumes contain polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC). There is a possibility of long-term health effects following chronic exposure by inhalation or skin contamination in asphalt road pavers and highway maintenance workers. Epidemiological and experimental studies on this topic are reviewed and the possible causes of cancer discussed with a primary focus on heterocyclic polyaromatic compounds. In 2001, the results of the IARC epidemiological study confirmed an excess of lung cancer despite a lower cancer mortality. In vitro genotoxicity and mechanistic studies demonstrated a mutagenic effect of bitumen fume condensates (BFC) and some data suggested that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) analysed were not the major genotoxic compounds in bitumen fume condensates. Other compounds such as nitrogen-, sulfur- and/or oxygen-containing PAH or their alkyl substituted analogues, mutagenic in the Ames mutation assay, may be involved in the genotoxic effect of BFC. After skin painting with BFC, DNA adducts were found in skin, lung and lymphocytes of all the treated animals. Differences in the adduct patterns were also observed, but a more polar adduct was common to the three tissues and not observed in those from rats treated with coal-tar fume condensates (CTFC). Rat inhalation experiments with bitumen fumes confirmed the presence of a DNA-adduct in the lungs with the same Rf as the previous polar adduct. This adduct therefore merits further investigation as a potential biomarker in lymphocyte DNA to follow exposed workers. All the analytical data and the mechanistic data are complementary and suggest the potential role of thiophenes in the genotoxicity of bitumen fumes. Some thiophenes have lower mutagenic activity than their isosteric PAH, whereas others are very potent carcinogens. Generally, the sulfur analogues of PAH (SPAH) in bitumen fumes have a higher concentration than the PAH of similar molecular weight, whereas the SPAH in coal-tar fumes have a

  15. Global Metabolomic Profiling Reveals an Association of Metal Fume Exposure and Plasma Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiung-yu; Fan, Tianteng; Su, Li; Chen, Feng; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Welding-associated air pollutants negatively affect the health of exposed workers; however, their molecular mechanisms in causing disease remain largely unclear. Few studies have systematically investigated the systemic toxic effects of welding fumes on humans. Objectives To explore the effects of welding fumes on the plasma metabolome, and to identify biomarkers for risk assessment of welding fume exposure. Methods The two-stage, self-controlled exploratory study included 11 boilermakers from a 2011 discovery panel and 8 boilermakers from a 2012 validation panel. Plasma samples were collected pre- and post-welding fume exposure and analyzed by chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Eicosapentaenoic or docosapentaenoic acid metabolic changes post-welding were significantly associated with particulate (PM2.5) exposure (p<0.05). The combined analysis by linear mixed-effects model showed that exposure was associated with a statistically significant decline in metabolite change of eicosapentaenoic acid [(95% CI) = −0.013(−0.022∼−0.004); p = 0.005], docosapentaenoic acid n3 [(95% CI) = −0.010(−0.018∼−0.002); p = 0.017], and docosapentaenoic acid n6 [(95% CI) = −0.007(−0.013∼−0.001); p = 0.021]. Pathway analysis identified an association of the unsaturated fatty acid pathway with exposure (pStudy−2011 = 0.025; pStudy−2012 = 0.021; pCombined = 0.009). The functional network built by these fatty acids and their interactive genes contained significant enrichment of genes associated with various diseases, including neoplasms, cardiovascular diseases, and lipid metabolism disorders. Conclusions High-dose exposure of metal welding fumes decreases unsaturated fatty acids with an exposure-response relationship. This alteration in fatty acids is a potential biological mediator and biomarker for exposure-related health disorders. PMID:24143234

  16. Welding fumes from stainless steel gas metal arc processes contain multiple manganese chemical species.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean

    2010-05-01

    Fumes from a group of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes used on stainless steel were generated using three different metal transfer modes and four different shield gases. The objective was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) species in the fumes, and identify processes that are minimal generators of Mn species. The robotic welding system was operated in short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO2 and He/Ar), axial spray (AXS) mode (Ar/O2 and Ar/CO2), and pulsed axial-spray (PAXS) mode (Ar/O2). The fumes were analyzed for Mn by a sequential extraction process followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total elemental Mn, iron (Fe), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) were separately measured after aqua regia digestion and ICP-AES analysis. Soluble Mn2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Ni2+ in a simple biological buffer (phosphate-buffered saline) were determined at pH 7.2 and 5.0 after 2 h incubation at 37 C by ion chromatography. Results indicate that Mn was present in soluble form, acid-soluble form, and acid-soluble form after reduction by hydroxylamine, which represents soluble Mn0 and Mn2+ compounds, other Mn2+ compounds, and (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds, respectively. The dominant fraction was the acid-soluble Mn2+ fraction, but results varied with the process and shield gas. Soluble Mn mass percent in the fume ranged from 0.2 to 0.9%, acid-soluble Mn2+ compounds ranged from 2.6 to 9.3%, and acid plus reducing agent-soluble (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds ranged from 0.6 to 5.1%. Total Mn composition ranged from 7 to 15%. XRD results showed fumes had a crystalline content of 90-99% Fe3O4, and showed evidence of multiple Mn oxides, but overlaps and weak signals limited identification. Small amounts of the Mn2+ in the fume (<0.01 to ≈ 1% or <0.1 to ≈ 10 microg ml(-1)) and Ni2+ (<0.01 to ≈ 0.2% or <0.1 to ≈ 2 mg ml(-1)) ions were found in biological buffer media, but amounts were highly dependent on pH and the

  17. Evaluation of factors affecting the containment performance of traditional and nanomaterial fume hoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Kevin Holden

    This research was conducted to: 1) evaluate different methods for measuring containment effectiveness of a nanomaterial handling enclosure; 2) to evaluate design and operational factors which may impact containment performance for a traditional constant air volume (CAV) and nano fume using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and; 3) to assess the impact on the operator body and arm motion on nanoparticle containment of the CAV and nano fume hoods. The research approach to address these objectives starts with an evaluation of the containment effectiveness of a new nanomaterial handling enclosure using tracer gas, nanoparticle and nanoparticle handling methodologies in a real-world laboratory setting. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well-correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. However, the nanoparticle method was more sensitive than the tracer gas test showing leakage in situations not indicated by the tracer gas tests. These experiments also identified substantial leaks near the sides of the hood sides even when the tracer gas concentration in the manikin breathing zone was not elevated. This result was consistent with new research showing that sampling in the manikin breathing zone may not be adequate to describe containment of fume hood devices. The second phase of this project provides an assessment of the internal flow patterns of a nano fume hood and a traditional CAV chemical fume hood. The impacts of design and operational differences between these hoods are investigated using both experimental measurements and numerical simulations with CFD. An investigation of the airflow patterns inside the hoods showed that large scale recirculation zones develop behind the sash for both hoods. However, the design of the side airfoils of the nano hood resulted in a secondary recirculation pattern along the sides of the hood which impacts interior contaminant dispersion and potential for leakage. The

  18. Repetitive Dosing of Fumed Silica Leads to Profibrogenic Effects through Unique Structure-Activity Relationships and Biopersistence in the Lung.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Pokhrel, Suman; Ku, Justine; Liu, Xiangsheng; Wang, Meiying; Dunphy, Darren R; Li, Ruibin; Meng, Huan; Mädler, Lutz; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Nel, André E; Xia, Tian

    2016-08-23

    Contrary to the notion that the use of fumed silica in consumer products can "generally (be) regarded as safe" (GRAS), the high surface reactivity of pyrogenic silica differs from other forms of synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), including the capacity to induce membrane damage and acute proinflammatory changes in the murine lung. In addition, the chain-like structure and reactive surface silanols also allow fumed silica to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to IL-1β production. This pathway is known to be associated with subchronic inflammation and profibrogenic effects in the lung by α-quartz and carbon nanotubes. However, different from the latter materials, bolus dose instillation of 21 mg/kg fumed silica did not induce sustained IL-1β production or subchronic pulmonary effects. In contrast, the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway was continuously activated by repetitive-dose administration of 3 × 7 mg/kg fumed silica, 1 week apart. We also found that while single-dose exposure failed to induce profibrotic effects in the lung, repetitive dosing can trigger increased collagen production, even at 3 × 3 mg/kg. The change between bolus and repetitive dosing was due to a change in lung clearance, with recurrent dosing leading to fumed silica biopersistence, sustained macrophage recruitment, and activation of the NLRP3 pathway. These subchronic proinflammatory effects disappeared when less surface-reactive titanium-doped fumed silica was used for recurrent administration. All considered, these data indicate that while fumed silica may be regarded as safe for some applications, we should reconsider the GRAS label during repetitive or chronic inhalation exposure conditions. PMID:27483033

  19. Design, construction, and characterization of a novel robotic welding fume generator and inhalation exposure system for laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Antonini, James M; Afshari, Aliakbar A; Stone, Sam; Chen, Bean; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fletcher, W Gary; Goldsmith, W Travis; Vandestouwe, Kurt H; McKinney, Walter; Castranova, Vincent; Frazer, David G

    2006-04-01

    Respiratory effects observed in welders have included lung function changes, metal fume fever, bronchitis, and a possible increase in the incidence of lung cancer. Many questions remain unanswered regarding the causality and possible underlying mechanisms associated with the potential toxic effects of welding fume inhalation. The objective of the present study was to construct a completely automated, computer-controlled welding fume generation and inhalation exposure system to simulate real workplace exposures. The system comprised a programmable six-axis robotic welding arm, a water-cooled arc welding torch, and a wire feeder that supplied the wire to the torch at a programmed rate. For the initial studies, gas metal arc welding was performed using a stainless steel electrode. A flexible trunk was attached to the robotic arm of the welder and was used to collect and transport fume from the vicinity of the arc to the animal exposure chamber. Undiluted fume concentrations consistently ranged from 90-150 mg/m(3) in the animal chamber during welding. Temperature and humidity remained constant in the chamber during the welding operation. The welding particles were composed of (from highest to lowest concentration) iron, chromium, manganese, and nickel as measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Size distribution analysis indicated the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the generated particles to be approximately 0.24 microm with a geometric standard deviation (sigma(g)) of 1.39. As determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the generated aerosols were mostly arranged as chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. Characterization of the laboratory-generated welding aerosol has indicated that particle morphology, size, and chemical composition are comparable to stainless steel welding fume generated in other studies. With the development of this novel system, it will be possible to establish an animal model using

  20. Transportation of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    This report discusses the following: data and information systems for hazardous-materials; containers for hazardous-materials transportation; hazardous-materials transportation regulation; and training for hazardous-materials transportation enforcement and emergency response.

  1. 30 CFR 71.700 - Inhalation hazards; threshold limit values for gases, dust, fumes, mists, and vapors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Information Centers listed in 45 CFR 5.31. Copies of the document may be purchased from American Conference of... containing quartz, and asbestos dust) in excess of, on the basis of a time-weighted average, the...

  2. 30 CFR 71.700 - Inhalation hazards; threshold limit values for gases, dust, fumes, mists, and vapors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Information Centers listed in 45 CFR 5.31. Copies of the document may be purchased from American Conference of... containing quartz, and asbestos dust) in excess of, on the basis of a time-weighted average, the...

  3. 30 CFR 71.700 - Inhalation hazards; threshold limit values for gases, dust, fumes, mists, and vapors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Information Centers listed in 45 CFR 5.31. Copies of the document may be purchased from American Conference of... containing quartz, and asbestos dust) in excess of, on the basis of a time-weighted average, the...

  4. 30 CFR 71.700 - Inhalation hazards; threshold limit values for gases, dust, fumes, mists, and vapors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Information Centers listed in 45 CFR 5.31. Copies of the document may be purchased from American Conference of... containing quartz, and asbestos dust) in excess of, on the basis of a time-weighted average, the...

  5. 30 CFR 71.700 - Inhalation hazards; threshold limit values for gases, dust, fumes, mists, and vapors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Information Centers listed in 45 CFR 5.31. Copies of the document may be purchased from American Conference of... containing quartz, and asbestos dust) in excess of, on the basis of a time-weighted average, the...

  6. Monolithic stationary phases with incorporated fumed silica nanoparticles. Part II. Polymethacrylate-based monolithic column with "covalently" incorporated modified octadecyl fumed silica nanoparticles for reversed-phase chromatography.

    PubMed

    Aydoğan, Cemil; El Rassi, Ziad

    2016-05-01

    This study is concerned with the incorporation of surface modified fumed silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) into polymethacrylate based monolithic columns for use in reversed phase chromatography (RPC) of small solutes and proteins. First, FSNPs were modified with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) to yield the "hybrid" methacryloyl fumed silica nanoparticle (MFSNP) monomer. The resulting MFSNP was then mixed with glyceryl monomethacrylate (GMM) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) in a binary porogenic solvent composed of cyclohexanol and dodecanol, and the in situ copolymerization of MFSNP, GMM and EDMA was performed in a stainless steel column of 4.6 mm i.d. The silanol groups of the hybrid monolith thus obtained were grafted with octadecyl ligands by perfusing the hybrid monolithic column with a solution of 4% w/v of dimethyloctadecylchlorosilane (DODCS) in toluene while the column was maintained at 110°C for 6h (in a heated HPLC oven). One of the originalities of this study was to demonstrate MFSNP as a novel derivatized "hybrid monomer" in making RPC monolithic columns with surface bound octadecyl ligands. In this respect, the RPC behavior of the monolithic column with "covalently" incorporated FNSPs having surface grafted octadecyl ligands was evaluated with alkylbenzenes, aniline derivatives and phenolic compounds. The results showed that the hybrid poly(GMA-EDMA-MFSNP) having surface bound octadecyl ligands exhibited hydrophobic interactions under reversed phase elution conditions. Furthermore, six standard proteins were baseline separated on the column using a 10min linear gradient elution at increasing ACN concentration in the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0mL/min using a 10 cm×4.6mm i.d. column. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for the retention times of the tested solutes were lower than 2.1% and 2.4% under isocratic elution and gradient elution conditions, respectively. PMID:27059396

  7. Effect of silica fume on the fresh and hardened properties of fly ash-based self-compacting geopolymer concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memon, Fareed Ahmed; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil; Shafiq, Nasir

    2013-02-01

    The effect of silica fume on the fresh and hardened properties of fly ash-based self-compacting geopolymer concrete (SCGC) was investigated in this paper. The work focused on the concrete mixes with a fixed water-to-geopolymer solid (W/Gs) ratio of 0.33 by mass and a constant total binder content of 400 kg/m3. The mass fractions of silica fume that replaced fly ash in this research were 0wt%, 5wt%, 10wt%, and 15wt%. The workability-related fresh properties of SCGC were assessed through slump flow, V-funnel, and L-box test methods. Hardened concrete tests were limited to compressive, splitting tensile and flexural strengths, all of which were measured at the age of 1, 7, and 28 d after 48-h oven curing. The results indicate that the addition of silica fume as a partial replacement of fly ash results in the loss of workability; nevertheless, the mechanical properties of hardened SCGC are significantly improved by incorporating silica fume, especially up to 10wt%. Applying this percentage of silica fume results in 4.3% reduction in the slump flow; however, it increases the compressive strength by 6.9%, tensile strength by 12.8% and flexural strength by 11.5%.

  8. Effects of walk-by and sash movement on contaminant leakage of air curtain-isolated fume hood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Hong Da; Hung, Chien-Hsiung

    2007-12-01

    The effects of the walk-by motion and sash movement on the containment leakage of an air curtain-isolated fume hood were evaluated and compared with the results of a corresponding conventional fume hood. The air curtain was generated by a narrow planar jet issued from the double-layered sash and a suction slot-flow arranged on the floor of the hood just behind the doorsill. The conventional fume hood used for comparison had the major dimensions identical to the air-curtain hood. SF tracer-gas concentrations were released and measured following the prEN 14175-3:2003 protocol to examine the contaminant leakage levels. Experimental results showed that operating the air-curtain hood at the suction velocity above about 6 m/s and jet velocity about 1 m/s could provide drastically high containment performance when compared with the corresponding conventional fume hood operated at the face velocity of 0.5 m/s. The total air flow required for the air-curtain hood operated at 6 m/s suction velocity and 1 m/s jet velocity was about 20% less than that exhausted by the conventional fume hood. If the suction velocity of the air-curtain hood was increased above 8 m/s, the containment leakage during dynamic motions could be reduced to ignorable level (about 10(3) ppm). PMID:18212476

  9. Manganese accumulation in nail clippings as a biomarker of welding fume exposure and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X; Jefferson, Amy M; Roberts, Jenny R; Andrews, Ronnee N; Kashon, Michael L; Antonini, James M

    2012-01-27

    Occupational exposure to welding fumes (WF) is thought to cause Parkinson's disease (PD)-like neurological dysfunction. An apprehension that WF may accelerate the onset of PD also exists. Identifying reliable biomarkers of exposure and neurotoxicity are therefore critical for biomonitoring and neurological risk characterization of WF exposure. Manganese (Mn) in welding consumables is considered the causative factor for the neurological deficits seen in welders. Hence, we sought to determine if Mn accumulation in blood or nail clippings can be a marker for adverse exposure and neurotoxicity. To model this, rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to dissolved or suspended fume components collected from gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) or manual metal arc-hard surfacing (MMA-HS) welding. Trace element analysis revealed selective Mn accumulation in dopaminergic brain areas, striatum (STR) and midbrain (MB), following exposure to the two fumes. This caused dopaminergic abnormality as evidenced by loss of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase (Th; 25-32% decrease) and Parkinson disease (autosomal recessive, early onset) 7 (Park7; 25-46% decrease) proteins. While blood Mn was not detectable, Mn levels in nails strongly correlated with the pattern of Mn accumulation in the striatum (R(2)=0.9386) and midbrain (R(2)=0.9332). Exposure to manganese chloride (MnCl(2)) caused similar Mn accumulation in STR, MB and nail. Our findings suggest that nail Mn has the potential to be a sensitive and reliable biomarker for long-term Mn exposure and associated neurotoxicity. The non-invasive means by which nail clippings can be collected, stored, and transported with relative ease, make it an attractive surrogate for biomonitoring WF exposures in occupational settings. PMID:22085607

  10. Combustion fume structure and dynamics. Period of performance: 8/16/91--2/15/92

    SciTech Connect

    Flagan, R.C.

    1992-12-31

    During pulverized coal combustion, a fume of submicron particles is formed when minerals that have volatilized from the parent coal nucleate to form new particles. The particles thus generated are extremely small, but they grow rapidly due to Brownian coagulation. Much has been learned about these fine particles in experimental studies of the particles formed in coal combustion. Measurements of the variation of chemical composition with particle size clearly demonstrate that the particles smaller than about 0.1 {mu}m in diameter are formed from vapors while larger particles are dominated by residues from the mineral matter in the coal. Theoretical predictions of the evolution of the particle size distribution suggest that the nuclei should produce a sharp peak which may approach 0.1 {mu}m, but they are unlikely to grow much beyond that size in the limited time available in practical combustors. The focus of this research program is on elucidating the fundamental processes that determine the particle size distribution, composition, and agglomerate structures of coal ash fumes. The ultimate objective of this work is the development and validation of a model for the dynamics of combustion fumes, describing both the evolution of the particle size distribution and the particle morphology. The study employs model systems to address the fundamental questions and to provide rigorous validation of the models to be developed. This first phase of the project has been devoted to the development of a detailed experimental strategy that will allow agglomerates with a broad range of fractal dimensions to be studied in the laboratory.