Science.gov

Sample records for hazardous waste disposal

  1. The Disposal of Hazardous Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhart, Benjamin J.

    1978-01-01

    The highlights of a symposium held in October, 1977 spotlight some problems and solutions. Topics include wastes from coal technologies, radioactive wastes, and industrial and agricultural wastes. (BB)

  2. Disposing of Hazardous Waste EPA Compliance Fact Sheet: Revision 1

    E-print Network

    Wikswo, John

    that has held an acute hazardous waste must be triple rinsed using a solvent (which might be water) capableDisposing of Hazardous Waste EPA Compliance Fact Sheet: Revision 1 Vanderbilt Environmental Health WASTE COLLECTION PROGRAM VEHS has implemented a Hazardous Waste Collection Program to collect hazardous

  3. Method for disposing of hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Frederick G. (West Richland, WA); Cataldo, Dominic A. (Kennewick, WA); Cline, John F. (Prosser, WA); Skiens, W. Eugene (Richland, WA)

    1995-01-01

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl- 2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  4. Audits of hazardous waste TSDFs let generators sleep easy. [Hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, F.H.

    1990-02-01

    Because of the increasingly strict enforcement of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), generators of hazardous waste are compelled to investigate the hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility (TSDF) they use. This investigation must include an environmental and a financial audit. Simple audits may be performed by the hazardous waste generator, while more thorough ones such as those performed for groups of generators are more likely to be conducted by environmental consultants familiar with treatment, storage, and disposal techniques and the regulatory framework that guides them.

  5. QUANTIFICATION OF MUNICIPAL DISPOSAL METHODS FOR INDUSTRIALLY GENERATED HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimations of the amounts of industrial hazardous wastes being disposed of according to various methods of disposal were generated for significant portions of the five following SIC codes: 28, Chemical and Allied Products; 29, Petroleum Refining and Related Industries; 30, Rubbe...

  6. ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS AT A RCRA HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Stephen; Welling, Steven; Bell, Simon

    2003-02-27

    The use of hazardous waste disposal facilities permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (''RCRA'') to dispose of low concentration and exempt radioactive materials is a cost-effective option for government and industry waste generators. The hazardous and PCB waste disposal facility operated by US Ecology Idaho, Inc. near Grand View, Idaho provides environmentally sound disposal services to both government and private industry waste generators. The Idaho facility is a major recipient of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers FUSRAP program waste and received permit approval to receive an expanded range of radioactive materials in 2001. The site has disposed of more than 300,000 tons of radioactive materials from the federal government during the past five years. This paper presents the capabilities of the Grand View, Idaho hazardous waste facility to accept radioactive materials, site-specific acceptance criteria and performance assessment, radiological safety and environmental monitoring program information.

  7. Toward Hazardless Waste: A Guide for Safe Use and Disposal of Hazardous Household Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toteff, Sally; Zehner, Cheri

    This guide is designed to help individuals make responsible decisions about safe use and disposal of household products. It consists of eight sections dealing with: (1) hazardous chemicals in the home, how hazaradous products become hazardous waste, and whether a hazardous waste problem exists in Puget Sound; (2) which household wastes are…

  8. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Surface Disposed Wastes (Non-Soil and Debris) Regulated in the LDRS a —Comprehensive...also does not include contaminated soil and debris wastes.b The standard was revised...Disposal Restrictions for Contaminated Soil and Debris (CSD) Restricted hazardous waste...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Surface Disposed Wastes (Non-Soil and Debris) Regulated in the LDRS a —Comprehensive...also does not include contaminated soil and debris wastes.b The standard was revised...Disposal Restrictions for Contaminated Soil and Debris (CSD) Restricted hazardous waste...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Surface Disposed Wastes (Non-Soil and Debris) Regulated in the LDRS a —Comprehensive...also does not include contaminated soil and debris wastes.b The standard was revised...Disposal Restrictions for Contaminated Soil and Debris (CSD) Restricted hazardous waste...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Surface Disposed Wastes (Non-Soil and Debris) Regulated in the LDRS a —Comprehensive...also does not include contaminated soil and debris wastes.b The standard was revised...Disposal Restrictions for Contaminated Soil and Debris (CSD) Restricted hazardous waste...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes VII Appendix VII to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Pt. 268, App. VII...

  13. LINERS FOR SANITARY LANDFILLS AND CHEMICAL AND HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report lists addresses of sanitary landfills and chemical and hazardous waste disposal sites and holding ponds with some form of impermeable lining. Liners included are polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, Hypalon R, ethylene propylene diene monomer, butyl rubber, conventional ...

  14. Investigating the construction of pyramid super-structures to dispose of radioactive and hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Since the 1950`s, the United States and other countries have focused on utilizing {open_quotes}natural barriers{close_quotes} for disposing of dangerous radioactive and hazardous waste. The Waste Isolation Pilot Projects and Yucca Mountain Project seem practical as well as economical. However, the technical challenges involved in disposing of the waste have been underestimated. For example, geological waste disposal has difficulty in demonstrating reliability, guaranteeing protection against climatic changes or natural disasters (or combinations thereof), or ability to retrieve waste under adverse scenarios. Much has changed since the 1950`s. Technology has advanced dramatically in the areas of materials, science, and engineering. As a result, traditional approaches to waste disposal should be rethought, focusing instead on ways to apply technology breakthroughs to waste disposal problems. This paper proposes investigating the construction of fully retrievable waste disposal systems that resemble pyramid structures and rely totally on engineered barriers and preventive measurements to dispose and store radioactive and hazardous waste. This paper will describe problems currently faced by waste disposal systems that rely on natural barriers. Specific benefits demonstrated will detail the structures flexibility and durability in a number of areas.

  15. Waste disposal by hydrofracture and application of the technology to the management of hazardous wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Stow, S.H.; Haase, C.S.; Weeren, H.O.

    1985-01-01

    A unique disposal method, involving hydrofracturing, has been used for management of liquid low-level radioactive wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Wastes are mixed with cement and other solids and injected along bedding plane fractures into highly impermeable shale at a depth of 300 m forming a grout sheet. The process has operated successfully for 20 years and may be applicable to disposal of hazardous wastes. The cement grout represents the primary barrier for immobilization of the wastes; the hydrologically isolated injection horizon represents a secondary barrier. At ORNL work has been conducted to characterize the geology of the disposal site and to determine its relationship to the injection process. The site is structurally quite complex. Research has also been conducted on the development of methods for monitoring the extent and orientation of the grout sheets; these methods include gamma-ray logging of cased observation wells, leveling surveys of benchmarks, tiltmeter surveys, and microseismic arrays. These methods, some of which need further development, offer promise for real-time and post-injection monitoring. Initial suggestions are offered for possible application of the technology to hazardous waste management and technical and regulatory areas needing attention are addressed. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Household Hazardous Waste Disposal Project. Summary Report. Metro Toxicant Program Report No. 1A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgley, Susan M.; Galvin, David V.

    The Household Hazardous Waste Disposal Project was established as an interagency effort to reduce the level of toxicants entering the environment by developing a control plan for the safe disposal of small quantities of household chemicals. This summary report provides an overview of the aspects of this problem that were examined, and the steps…

  17. 40 CFR 264.555 - Disposal of CAMU-eligible wastes in permitted hazardous waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...an off-site permitted hazardous waste landfill, consistent with the requirements...remediation. (d) Applicable hazardous waste management requirements in this part, including...this section, for CAMU-eligible waste must be incorporated into...

  18. 40 CFR 264.555 - Disposal of CAMU-eligible wastes in permitted hazardous waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...an off-site permitted hazardous waste landfill, consistent with the requirements...remediation. (d) Applicable hazardous waste management requirements in this part, including...this section, for CAMU-eligible waste must be incorporated into...

  19. 40 CFR 264.555 - Disposal of CAMU-eligible wastes in permitted hazardous waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...an off-site permitted hazardous waste landfill, consistent with the requirements...remediation. (d) Applicable hazardous waste management requirements in this part, including...this section, for CAMU-eligible waste must be incorporated into...

  20. 40 CFR 264.555 - Disposal of CAMU-eligible wastes in permitted hazardous waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...an off-site permitted hazardous waste landfill, consistent with the requirements...remediation. (d) Applicable hazardous waste management requirements in this part, including...this section, for CAMU-eligible waste must be incorporated into...

  1. 40 CFR 264.555 - Disposal of CAMU-eligible wastes in permitted hazardous waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...an off-site permitted hazardous waste landfill, consistent with the requirements...remediation. (d) Applicable hazardous waste management requirements in this part, including...this section, for CAMU-eligible waste must be incorporated into...

  2. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-02-01

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  3. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-10-01

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  4. Preliminary Hazard Analysis for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa Harvego; Mike Lehto

    2010-05-01

    The need for remote handled low level waste (LLW) disposal capability has been identified. A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal capability for remote-handled LLW that is generated as part of the nuclear mission of the Idaho National Laboratory and from spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This document supports the conceptual design for the proposed remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization and by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW.

  5. Demonstration of ground freezing for radioactive/hazardous-waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, through the Office of Technology Development, is performing a subsurface ground-freezing demonstration at Scientific Ecology Group facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The primary goal of the demonstration is to display a technology that can be easily installed to form an impermeable barrier. This method can be used at sites of radioactive and other hazardous contaminants to prevent migration of contaminants. This technology uses, as an underground barrier, a zone of frozen soil that can be removed at a later date, after the contamination problem is remediated.

  6. Action on Hazardous Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EPA Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    U.S. EPA is gearing up to investigate about 300 hazardous waste dump sites per year that could pose an imminent health hazard. Prosecutions are expected to result from the priority effort at investigating illegal hazardous waste disposal. (RE)

  7. APPLICATION OF A HAZARD-ASSESSMENT RESEARCH STRATEGY FOR WASTE DISPOSAL AT 106-MILE OCEAN DISPOSAL SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An application of a hazard-assessment research strategy was made using waste disposal at Deepwater Dumpsite-l06 (DWD-106) as an example. The strategy involved the synthesis of results from separate exposure and effects components in order to provide a scientific basis for estimat...

  8. Using MCDA and GIS for hazardous waste landfill siting considering land scarcity for waste disposal.

    PubMed

    De Feo, Giovanni; De Gisi, Sabino

    2014-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a procedure that minimizes the wasting of space for the siting of hazardous waste landfills as part of a solid waste management system. We wanted to tackle the shortage of land for waste disposal that is a serious and growing problem in most large urban regions. The procedure combines a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) approach with a geographical information system (GIS). The GIS was utilised to obtain an initial screening in order to eliminate unsuitable areas, whereas the MCDA was developed to select the most suitable sites. The novelty of the proposed siting procedure is the introduction of a new screening phase before the macro-siting step aimed at producing a "land use map of potentially suitable areas" for the siting of solid waste facilities which simultaneously takes into consideration all plant types. The issue of obtaining sites evaluations of a specific facility was coupled with the issue of not wasting land appropriate to facilitate other types of waste management options. In the developed case study, the use of an innovative criteria weighting tool (the "Priority Scale") in combination with the Analytic Hierarchy Process was useful to easier define the priorities of the evaluation criteria in comparison with other classic methods such as the Paired Comparison Technique in combination with the Simple Additive Weighting method. PMID:25002369

  9. CUPA Self-Audit Checklist 1. Are hazardous chemical waste containers disposed of through

    E-print Network

    Ishida, Yuko

    CUPA Self-Audit Checklist 1. Are hazardous chemical waste containers disposed of through EH: This checklist must be completed annually as required by the CUPA Self-Audit Program. Retain records for at least to cis@ucdavis.edu. CUPA Self-Audit Checklist, Version 1.1 July 2014/BW Page 1 of 1 #12;

  10. Current hazardous waste management and disposal practices among small quantity generators

    SciTech Connect

    Gebrewold, F. . Dept. of Health and Safety)

    1994-09-01

    Forty-eight small businesses in Benton County, Oregon, were surveyed to assess the types of wastes they produced, quantities of wastes they generated, and disposal methods used. The waste products of the registered and the nonregistered businesses were compared by the type of disposal methods used. Results indicated that the majority (73.3%) of the registered Small Quantity Generators (SQGs) and 94.4% of the nonregistered Conditionally Exempt Generators (CEGs) produce waste oils. Among both the registered and nonregistered businesses, the median quantity of waste oil is 50 gallons per month. The majority of registered businesses returned the waste oils to the supplier, while the nonregistered sent their waste to a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility (TSDF). A substantial number of the registered and nonregistered businesses disposed of hazardous wastes by other than approved means. The findings strongly suggest that Small Quantity Generators (SQGs) and Conditionally Exempt Generators (CEGs) in Benton County do not use an environmentally responsible method of disposal.

  11. 40 CFR 257.5 - Disposal standards for owners/operators of non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 261.5. Non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that meet the requirements of... permit program for 40 CFR part 257, subpart B and 40 CFR part 258 regulated facilities. Uppermost aquifer... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR CLASSIFICATION OF SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES...

  12. 40 CFR 257.5 - Disposal standards for owners/operators of non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 261.5. Non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that meet the requirements of... permit program for 40 CFR part 257, subpart B and 40 CFR part 258 regulated facilities. Uppermost aquifer... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR CLASSIFICATION OF SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES...

  13. 40 CFR 264.555 - Disposal of CAMU-eligible wastes in permitted hazardous waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... constituents in the waste, minimizing the short-term and long-term threat posed by the waste, including the... TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Special Provisions for Cleanup § 264.555 Disposal of CAMU... meeting the requirements of RCRA 40 CFR part 268, if the conditions in paragraphs (a)(1) through (3)...

  14. 40 CFR 264.555 - Disposal of CAMU-eligible wastes in permitted hazardous waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... constituents in the waste, minimizing the short-term and long-term threat posed by the waste, including the... TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Special Provisions for Cleanup § 264.555 Disposal of CAMU... meeting the requirements of RCRA 40 CFR part 268, if the conditions in paragraphs (a)(1) through (3)...

  15. 40 CFR 264.555 - Disposal of CAMU-eligible wastes in permitted hazardous waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... constituents in the waste, minimizing the short-term and long-term threat posed by the waste, including the... TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Special Provisions for Cleanup § 264.555 Disposal of CAMU... meeting the requirements of RCRA 40 CFR part 268, if the conditions in paragraphs (a)(1) through (3)...

  16. Grout formulation for disposal of low-level and hazardous waste streams containing fluoride

    DOEpatents

    McDaniel, E.W.; Sams, T.L.; Tallent, O.K.

    1987-06-02

    A composition and related process for disposal of hazardous waste streams containing fluoride in cement-based materials is disclosed. the presence of fluoride in cement-based materials is disclosed. The presence of fluoride in waste materials acts as a set retarder and as a result, prevents cement-based grouts from setting. This problem is overcome by the present invention wherein calcium hydroxide is incorporated into the dry-solid portion of the grout mix. The calcium hydroxide renders the fluoride insoluble, allowing the grout to set up and immobilize all hazardous constituents of concern. 4 tabs.

  17. Hazardous Waste

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  18. H.R. 4984: A Bill to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to regulate the use of hazardous waste as fuel for energy recovery, the operation of cement kilns that burn hazardous waste as fuel, the disposal of cement kiln dust waste, and related activities. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, August 18, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The report H.R. 4984 is a bill to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to regulate the use of hazardous waste as fuel for energy recovery, the operation of cement kilns that burn hazardous waste as fuel, the disposal of cement kiln dust waste. The proposed legislative text is provided.

  19. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION OF RESIDUAL LIQUID ORGANICS FROM SPILLS, LEAKS, AND THE DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTES IN GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic liquids that are essentially immiscible with water migrate through the subsurface under the influence of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. These liquids originate from the improper disposal of hazardous wastes, and the spills and leaks of petroleum hydrocarbons a...

  20. Nasreya: a treatment and disposal facility for industrial hazardous waste in Alexandria, Egypt: phase I.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Adham R; Kock, Per; Nadim, Amani

    2005-04-01

    A facility for the treatment and disposal of industrial hazardous waste has been established in Alexandria, Egypt. Phase I of the facility encompassing a secure landfill and solar evaporation ponds is ready to receive waste, and Phase II encompassing physico-chemical treatment, solidification, and interim storage is underway. The facility, the Nasreya Centre, is the first of its kind in Egypt, and represents the nucleus for the integration, improvement and further expansion of different hazardous waste management practices and services in Alexandria. It has been developed within the overall legal framework of the Egyptian Law for the Environment, and is expected to improve prospects for enforcement of the regulatory requirements specified in this law. It has been developed with the overall aim of promoting the establishment of an integrated industrial hazardous waste management system in Alexandria, serving as a demonstration to be replicated elsewhere in Egypt. For Phase I, the Centre only accepts inorganic industrial wastes. In this respect, a waste acceptance policy has been developed, which is expected to be reviewed during Phase II, with an expansion of the waste types accepted. PMID:15864958

  1. The effects of hazardous waste taxes on generation and disposal of chlorinated solvent waste

    E-print Network

    Sigman, Hilary

    1992-01-01

    In 1989, 30 states levied taxes on e generation or management of hazardous waste. These taxes constitute one of the broadest applications of an emissions tax in U.S. environmental policy and provide a natural experiment ...

  2. Hazardous-waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDF)-air emission models (for microcomputers). Software

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.; Janes, D.

    1987-12-01

    Analytical models are presented for estimating air emissions from Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities (TSDF). Air-emission models were developed for aerated and nonaerated surface impoundments, land treatment facilities, landfills, and waste piles. Emission model predictions are compared to available field data. The models have been assembled into a spreadsheet (Lotus 1-2-3) that is included in the report as floppy diskette for use on microcomputers...Software Description: The software was programmed using the Lotus 1-2-3 Spreadsheet for implementation on the IBM-PC computers.

  3. Hazard Classification of the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2012-05-01

    The Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is constructing a new facility to replace remote-handled low-level radioactive waste disposal capability for INL and Naval Reactors Facility operations. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) will continue until the facility is full or closed for remediation (estimated at approximately fiscal year 2015). Development of a new onsite disposal facility is the highest ranked alternative and will provide RH-LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate RH-LLW for the foreseeable future. As a part of establishing a safety basis for facility operations, the facility will be categorized according to DOE-STD-1027-92. This classification is important in determining the scope of analyses performed in the safety basis and will also dictate operational requirements of the completed facility. This paper discusses the issues affecting hazard classification in this nuclear facility and impacts of the final hazard categorization.

  4. Waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  5. Procedure for the Recycling Material and Disposal of Waste from

    E-print Network

    Guillas, Serge

    Clinical Wastes Radioactive Wastes Laboratory Wastes of Unknown Hazard Non-Hazardous Laboratory Wastes Laboratory Recyclables Glass from Laboratories Non-Recyclable Wastes Disposal of Miscellaneous Items Procedure Radioactive Wastes see Radioactive Waste Procedure Laboratory Wastes of Unknown Hazard

  6. Hazardous-waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDF) air-emission models. Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    Analytical models are presented for estimating air emissions from hazardous-waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDF). Air-emission models were developed for aerated and nonaerated surface impoundments, land-treatment facilities, landfills, and wastepiles. Emission model predictions are compared to available field data. The report also includes emission factors for transfer, storage, and handling operations at TSDF. The models have been assembled into a spreadsheet that is included in the report as floppy diskette for use on a microcomputer. Appendices include a list of physical-chemical properties for approximately 700 compounds and a comprehensive source list of pertinent literature in addition to that cited in the report.

  7. Hazardous Waste: Cleanup and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandas, Steve; Cronin, Nancy L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses hazardous waste, waste disposal, unsafe exposure, movement of hazardous waste, and the Superfund clean-up process that consists of site discovery, site assessment, clean-up method selection, site clean up, and site maintenance. Argues that proper disposal of hazardous waste is everybody's responsibility. (JRH)

  8. Transport and transportation pathways of hazardous chemicals from solid waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, R I

    1978-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of hazardous chemicals in solid wastes on man and other organisms, it is necessary to have information about amounts of chemical present, extent of exposure, and chemical toxicity. This paper addresses the question of organism exposure by considering the major physical and biological transport pathways and the physicochemical and biochemical transformations that may occur in sediments, soils, and water. Disposal of solid wastes in both terrestrial and oceanic environments is considered. Atmospheric transport is considered for emissions from incineration of solid wastes and for wind resuspension of particulates from surface waste deposits. Solid wastes deposited in terrestrial environments are subject to leaching by surface and ground waters. Leachates may then be transported to other surface waters and drinking water aquifers through hydrologic transport. Leachates also interact with natural organic matter, clays, and microorganisms in soils and sediments. These interactions may render chemical constituents in leachates more or less mobile, possibly change chemical and physical forms, and alter their biological activity. Oceanic waste disposal practices result in migration through diffusion and ocean currents. Surface area-to-volume ratios play a major role in the initial distributions of chemicals in the aquatic environment. Sediments serve as major sources and sinks of chemical contaminants. Food chain transport in both aquatic and terrestrial environments results in the movement of hazardous chemicals from lower to higher positions in the food web. Bioconcentration is observed in both terrestrial and aquatic food chains with certain elements and synthetic organics. Bioconcentration factors tend to be higher for synthetic organics, and higher in aquatic than in terrestrial systems. Biodilution is not atypical in terrestrial environments. Synergistic and antagonistic actions are common occurrences among chemical contaminants and can be particularly important toxicity considerations in aquatic environments receiving runoff from several terrestrial sources. PMID:367772

  9. Transport and transportation pathways of hazardous chemicals from solid waste disposal.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hook, R I

    1978-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of hazardous chemicals in solid wastes on man and other organisms, it is necessary to have information about amounts of chemical present, extent of exposure, and chemical toxicity. This paper addresses the question of organism exposure by considering the major physical and biological transport pathways and the physicochemical and biochemical transformations that may occur in sediments, soils, and water. Disposal of solid wastes in both terrestrial and oceanic environments is considered. Atmospheric transport is considered for emissions from incineration of solid wastes and for wind resuspension of particulates from surface waste deposits. Solid wastes deposited in terrestrial environments are subject to leaching by surface and ground waters. Leachates may then be transported to other surface waters and drinking water aquifers through hydrologic transport. Leachates also interact with natural organic matter, clays, and microorganisms in soils and sediments. These interactions may render chemical constituents in leachates more or less mobile, possibly change chemical and physical forms, and alter their biological activity. Oceanic waste disposal practices result in migration through diffusion and ocean currents. Surface area-to-volume ratios play a major role in the initial distributions of chemicals in the aquatic environment. Sediments serve as major sources and sinks of chemical contaminants. Food chain transport in both aquatic and terrestrial environments results in the movement of hazardous chemicals from lower to higher positions in the food web. Bioconcentration is observed in both terrestrial and aquatic food chains with certain elements and synthetic organics. Bioconcentration factors tend to be higher for synthetic organics, and higher in aquatic than in terrestrial systems. Biodilution is not atypical in terrestrial environments. Synergistic and antagonistic actions are common occurrences among chemical contaminants and can be particularly important toxicity considerations in aquatic environments receiving runoff from several terrestrial sources. PMID:367772

  10. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  11. 40 CFR 257.5 - Disposal standards for owners/operators of non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 261.5. Non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that meet the requirements of... permit program for 40 CFR part 257, subpart B and 40 CFR part 258 regulated facilities. Uppermost aquifer... Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. 257.5 Section 257.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  12. 40 CFR 257.5 - Disposal standards for owners/operators of non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... defined in 40 CFR 261.5. Non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that meet the requirements of... permit program for 40 CFR part 257, subpart B and 40 CFR part 258 regulated facilities. Uppermost aquifer... Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. 257.5 Section 257.5 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...

  13. Nuclear Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.; Meyer, Philip D.; Ward, Andy L.

    2005-01-12

    Nuclear wastes are by-products of nuclear weapons production and nuclear power generation, plus residuals of radioactive materials used by industry, medicine, agriculture, and academia. Their distinctive nature and potential hazard make nuclear wastes not only the most dangerous waste ever created by mankind, but also one of the most controversial and regulated with respect to disposal. Nuclear waste issues, related to uncertainties in geologic disposal and long-term protection, combined with potential misuse by terrorist groups, have created uneasiness and fear in the general public and remain stumbling blocks for further development of a nuclear industry in a world that may soon be facing a global energy crisis.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Dates of Surface Disposed Wastes (Non-Soil and Debris) Regulated in the LDRS a ...table also does not include contaminated soil and debris wastes. bThe standard...Land Disposal Restrictions for Contaminated Soil and Debris (CSD)Restricted...

  15. U.S. EPA'S STRATEGY FOR GROUND WATER QUALITY MONITORING AT HAZARDOUS WASTE LAND DISPOSAL FACILITIES LOCATED IN KARST TERRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water monitoring of hazardous waste land disposal units by a network of wells is ineffective when located in karstic terranes. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently proposing to modify its current ground water quality monitoring requirement of one upg...

  16. 40 CFR 257.5 - Disposal standards for owners/operators of non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 261.5. Non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that meet the requirements of this section... administrative officer of the lead state agency responsible for implementing the state permit program for 40 CFR part 257, subpart B and 40 CFR part 258 regulated facilities. Uppermost aquifer means the...

  17. Hazardous Wastes from Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, John

    The management of waste materials has become more complex with the increase in human population and the development of new substances. This illustrated booklet traces the history of waste management and provides guidelines for individuals and communities in disposing of certain hazardous wastes safely. It addresses such topics as: (1) how people…

  18. Earth reencounter probabilities for aborted space disposal of hazardous nuclear waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedlander, A. L.; Feingold, H.

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative assessment is made of the long-term risk of earth reencounter and reentry associated with aborted disposal of hazardous material in the space environment. Numerical results are presented for 10 candidate disposal options covering a broad spectrum of disposal destinations and deployment propulsion systems. Based on representative models of system failure, the probability that a single payload will return and collide with earth within a period of 250,000 years is found to lie in the range .0002-.006. Proportionately smaller risk attaches to shorter time intervals. Risk-critical factors related to trajectory geometry and system reliability are identified as possible mechanisms of hazard reduction.

  19. Chemical Waste Management and Disposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armour, Margaret-Ann

    1988-01-01

    Describes simple, efficient techniques for treating hazardous chemicals so that nontoxic and nonhazardous residues are formed. Discusses general rules for management of waste chemicals from school laboratories and general techniques for the disposal of waste or surplus chemicals. Lists specific disposal reactions. (CW)

  20. REVISION AND UPDATE OF METHODOLOGY FOR ASSESSING EXPOSURE AND RISK FROM LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a result of their regulatory reform efforts, the Office of Solid Waste (OS) has recently (11/99) introduced a new open-architecture, multimedia, multi-pathway, and multi-receptor exposure and risk assessment methodology designed to support their Hazardous Waste Identification ...

  1. LAND DISPOSAL, REMEDIAL ACTION, INCINERATION AND TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYNPOSIUM (14TH) HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO, MAY 9-11, 1988

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings from ongoing and recently completed projects funded by the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). These Proceedings are organized in four sections: Session A, Hazardous Waste Land Disposal...

  2. 40 CFR 264.555 - Disposal of CAMU-eligible wastes in permitted hazardous waste landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... that he or she has chosen not to object, the facility may not receive the waste, notwithstanding 40 CFR... requirements of 40 CFR 268.7(a)(4); off-site facilities treating CAMU-eligible wastes to comply with this... meeting the requirements of RCRA 40 CFR part 268, if the conditions in paragraphs (a)(1) through (3)...

  3. Small Generator, Large Problem: Identifying and Disposing of Hazardous Waste at Two-Year Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valicenti, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite limited generation of hazardous materials, two-year colleges are required to comply with federal criteria for their identification and removal. After a random facilities inspection, the College of DuPage (Illinois) established priorities for waste removal, information dissemination, staff training, inventory, storage, and organizational…

  4. UNCERTAINTY AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSES FOR INTEGRATED HUMAN HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    While there is a high potential for exposure of humans and ecosystems to chemicals released from hazardous waste sites, the degree to which this potential is realized is often uncertain. Conceptually divided among parameter, model, and modeler uncertainties imparted during simula...

  5. Chrome-bearing hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin, C.G. )

    1993-06-01

    HSWA (Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments) established statutory deadlines for prohibition of land disposal of three categories of waste which EPA has labeled the first-third, second-third, and third-third. Effective November 8, 1986, the statute prohibits the land disposal (except by deep-well injection) of dioxin-containing hazardous wastes and solvent-containing hazardous wastes (first-third rule wastes). Effective July 8, 1987, the statue prohibits disposal (except deep-well injection) for the second-third listing of hazardous wastes, called the California list. The third-third listing of hazardous wastes includes other scheduled and newly identified wastes considered hazardous under 400 CFR, 268.12. Third-third wastes can be disposed if respective treatment standards established by EPA are met. The focus of this paper is one particular waste on the third-third list, that is, land disposal restrictions for D007 chrome waste. The 200-plus page Final Rule for third-third waste was approved by EPA May 8, 1990, and was published in the June 1, 1990, Federal Register.

  6. Household hazardous waste disposal project. Metro toxicant program report number 1a. Summary report. Final report 1981-82

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, S.M.; Galvin, D.V.

    1982-08-01

    The Household Hazardous Waste Disposal Project was an interagency effort to reduce the amount of toxicants entering the environment by developing a control plan for the safe disposal of small quantities of household chemicals. This Summary provides an overview of this problem and the steps taken to develop the control plan. The legal framework controlling the contents, labelling, and disposal of household toxic substances is reviewed in some detail. A brief examination of the contents, health effects, and environmental fate of four classes of consumer products (pesticides, paint products, household cleaners, and automotive products) is provided. The literature was reviewed for studies which document the potential for environmental contamination from disposal of these consumer products through landfilling, septic tank, or sewerage system disposal. A synopsis is provided of the surveys and pilot project that were conducted in the local Seattle metropolitan area. Finally, the elements of the regional control plan are described along with recommendations for future action. Similar programs around the country are noted and contacts provided.

  7. ANALYSIS OF GEOTHERMAL WASTES FOR HAZARDOUS COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulations governing the disposal of hazardous wastes led to an assessment for geothermal solid wastes for potentially hazardous properties. Samples were collected from three active geothermal sites in the western United States: The Geysers, Imperial Valley, and northwestern Nev...

  8. On policies to regulate long-term risks from hazardous waste disposal sites under both intergenerational equity and intragenerational equity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Zhongbin

    In recent years, it has been recognized that there is a need for a general philosophic policy to guide the regulation of societal activities that involve long-term and very long-term risks. Theses societal activities not only include the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and global warming, but also include the disposal of non-radioactive carcinogens that never decay, such as arsenic, nickel, etc. In the past, attention has been focused on nuclear wastes. However, there has been international recognition that large quantities of non-radioactive wastes are being disposed of with little consideration of their long-term risks. The objectives of this dissertation are to present the significant long-term risks posed by non-radioactive carcinogens through case studies; develop the conceptual decision framework for setting the long-term risk policy; and illustrate that certain factors, such as discount rate, can significantly influence the results of long-term risk analysis. Therefore, the proposed decision-making framework can be used to systematically study the important policy questions on long-term risk regulations, and then subsequently help the decision-maker to make informed decisions. Regulatory disparities between high-level radioactive wastes and non-radioactive wastes are summarized. Long-term risk is rarely a consideration in the regulation of disposal of non-radioactive hazardous chemicals; and when it is, the matter has been handled in a somewhat perfunctory manner. Case studies of long-term risks are conducted for five Superfund sites that are contaminated with one or more non-radioactive carcinogens. Under the same assumptions used for the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, future subsistence farmers would be exposed to significant individual risks, in some cases with lifetime fatality risk equal to unity. The important policy questions on long-term risk regulation are identified, and the conceptual decision-making framework to regulate long-term risk is presented. The results of decision tree analysis of cleanup alternatives for the Crystal Chemical site indicate that discount rate has profound impact on the results of the analysis and significant implication with regard to intergenerational equity. It is expected that other policy factors could have similar impacts. There is a need to use the proposed decision-making framework to systemically study those factors and make rational policy decisions accordingly.

  9. Coping with a community stressor: a proposed hazardous waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, K.M.

    1983-01-01

    This study examined a number of factors believed to influence community involvement. Residents of a rural community near Phoenix, Arizona, where a hazardous waste facility had been proposed to built, were interviewed at home in August 1982. Most residents were chosen at random (n = 70) while a smaller number (n = 29) were selected because of known involvement in activities regarding the hazardous waste facility. Residents who perceived the facility as a threat to their health, safety, and general well-being employed a number of coping strategies. Strategies to change or alter the source of stress, problem-focused coping, were associated with greater community involvement. Strategies to regulate one's emotional response to stress, emotion-focused coping, were associated with less community involvement. Increased self-efficacy and sense of community led to increased community involvement. Both measures indirectly influenced community involvement through different modes of coping. Self-efficacy was negatively related to emotion-focused coping while sense of community was positively related to problem-focused coping. Increased demoralization was associated with decreased self-efficacy, increased emotion-focused coping, and decreased community involvement. The results suggest that the psychologically most fragile residents are underrepresented in community activities, and that the use of high levels of emotion-focused coping may have been maladaptive.

  10. 40 CFR 257.5 - Disposal standards for owners/operators of non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...receive Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. 257.5 Section...of Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) Wastes at Non-Municipal Non-Hazardous...receive Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 257.5 - Disposal standards for owners/operators of non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...receive Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. 257.5 Section...of Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) Wastes at Non-Municipal Non-Hazardous...receive Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. (a)...

  12. 40 CFR 257.5 - Disposal standards for owners/operators of non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...receive Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. 257.5 Section...of Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) Wastes at Non-Municipal Non-Hazardous...receive Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. (a)...

  13. 40 CFR 257.5 - Disposal standards for owners/operators of non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...receive Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. 257.5 Section...of Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) Wastes at Non-Municipal Non-Hazardous...receive Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. (a)...

  14. 40 CFR 257.5 - Disposal standards for owners/operators of non-municipal non-hazardous waste disposal units that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...receive Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. 257.5 Section...of Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) Wastes at Non-Municipal Non-Hazardous...receive Conditionally Exempt Small Quantity Generator (CESQG) waste. (a)...

  15. LAND DISPOSAL: HAZARDOUS WASTE, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (7TH) HELD AT PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA ON MARCH 16-18, 1981

    EPA Science Inventory

    These proceedings are a compilation of papers presented by the symposium speakers. The technical areas covered are hazardous waste characterization, transport and fate of pollutants, hazardous waste containment, land treatment of hazardous wastes, hazardous waste treatment, uncon...

  16. Revised 09/22/2014 Page 1 UO Hazardous Waste Disposal

    E-print Network

    Cina, Jeff

    of incompatible chemical wastes · Mixing of biological, chemical, and radioactive wastes Regulated Chemical Waste materials · Genetically modified organisms or genetically modified plants Radioactive Waste -- http://ehs.uoregon.edu/radioactive-waste-pickup · Any waste containing, or contaminated with, radioactive material o Aqueous radioactive solutions o

  17. Elimination of the hazards from hazardous wastes.

    PubMed Central

    Gloyna, E F; Taylor, R D

    1978-01-01

    The "hazard" associated with a waste essentially controls the overall engineering approach to finding suitable alternatives for solving potential disposal problems. It should be recognized that all factors affecting environmental equilibrium must be considered, including product sales, process design, financing, pre- and end-of-pipe treatment, residuals management, and ultimate bioaccumulation of residuals. To meet this challenge, a systems approach to waste treatment and residuals disposal provides a logical approach, but this management concept requires a thorough understanding of the important physical and chemical aspects of the problem, as well as many social implications of the resulting decisions. Thus waste management within a plant necessarily involves process control, pretreatment and end-of-pipe treatment. Further, it follows that residuals management from a disposal point-of-view must ultimately embrace what is called the "multi-barrier concept." In essence, hazard elimination occurs in varying degrees during each phase of a properly engineered system. PMID:738249

  18. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (9TH) HELD AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY ON MAY 2-4, 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purposes of the Symposium were (1) to provide a forum for a state-of-the-art review and discussion of ongoing and recently completed research projects dealing with land disposal, incineration, and treatment of hazardous wastes; (2) to bring together people concerned with haza...

  19. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (10TH) AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY HELD ON APRIL 3-5, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tenth Annual Research Symposium on land disposal, remedial action, incineration and treatment of hazardous waste was held in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky April 3 through 5, 1984. The purpose of the Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings of ongoing and re...

  20. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (11TH) HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON APRIL 29-MAY 1, 1985

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Eleventh Annual Research Symposium on land disposal, remedial action, incineration and treatment of hazardous waste was held in Cincinnati, OH April 29 through May 1, 1985. The purpose of the Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings of ongoing and rec...

  1. LAND DISPOSAL, REMEDIAL ACTION, INCINERATION AND TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (13TH) HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON MAY 6-8, 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Thirteenth Annual Research Symposium on Land Disposal, Remedial Action, Incineration and Treatment of Hazardous Waste was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, May 6-8, 1987. The purpose of the Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings of ongoing and recently comp...

  2. PRETREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the waste applicability and performance characteristics of hazardous waste pretreatment processes. Pretreatment processes are those unit operations which must often be carried out on hazardous wastes to make them amenable to subsequent materials or energy rec...

  3. Waste Management and Disposal for Artists and Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babin, Angela; McCann, Michael

    Artists, art teachers, and students need to understand the problems associated with disposing of waste materials, some of which may be hazardous. The waste products of art projects, even if non-hazardous, also use up space in overloaded landfills. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets forth guidelines for disposing of hazardous wastes.…

  4. Vadose zone monitoring for hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    This book is a review and evaluation of vadose (unsaturated) zone monitoring. It describes the applicability of selected monitoring methods to hazardous waste disposal sites. Topics covered include: geohydrologic framework of the vadose zone; premonitoring of storage at disposal sites; premonitoring of water movement at disposal sites; active and abandoned site monitoring methods; waste source pollutant characterization; geohydrologic settings for waste disposals and conceptual vadose zone monitoring descriptions.

  5. Toxicants in Consumer Products. Household Hazardous Waste Disposal Project. Metro Toxicant Program No. 1B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgley, Susan M.

    Four general product classes (pesticides, paint products, household cleaners, and automotive products) are reviewed in this document. Each product class is described, and several aspects of the problem associated with product use or disposal are examined, including estimates of volumes used and environmental impacts. Technical data on the specific…

  6. 77 FR 50622 - Land Disposal Restrictions: Site-Specific Treatment Variance for Hazardous Selenium-Bearing Waste...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... evaluated in establishing the treatment standard (51 FR 40576, November 7, 1986) .\\1\\ For such wastes, EPA... properties and solubility curves (62 FR 26041, May 12, 1997). The current treatment standard for a waste... generated and land disposed (59 FR 47980, September 19, 1994). The Agency also stated that it believed...

  7. WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE

    E-print Network

    WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL #12;#12;PNNL-SA-69994 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax- Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

  8. Hazardous waste: cleanup and prevention

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandas, Stephen; Cronin, Nancy L.; Farrar, Frank, (artist); Serrano, Guillermo Eliezer Ávila, (translator); Yajimovich, Oscar Efraín González; Muñoz, Aurora R.; Rivera, María del C.

    1996-01-01

    Our lifestyles are supported by complex Industrial activities that produce many different chemicals and chemical wastes. The Industries that produce our clothing, cars, medicines, paper, food, fuels, steel, plastics, and electric components use and discard thousands of chemicals every year. At home we may use lawn chemicals, solvents, disinfectants, cleaners, and auto products to Improve our quality of life. A chemical that presents a threat or unreasonable risk to people or the environment Is a hazardous material. When a hazardous material can no longer be used, It becomes a hazardous waste. Hazardous wastes come from a variety of sources, from both present and past activities. Impacts to human health and the environment can result from Improper handling and disposal of hazardous waste.

  9. Hazardous-waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Background information for promulgated organic emission standards for process vents and equipment leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    Standards for the control of organic air emissions from hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDF) and waste solvent treatment facilities (WSTF) are promulgated under the authority of Section 3004(n) of the 1976 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These standards would apply to certain process vents associated with distillation and stripping equipment at WSTF (and at TSDF, if applicable) and to fugitive emissions from equipment leaks at TSDF where the waste stream (or its derivatives) contain 10 percent or more total organics. The document contains summaries of public comments received on the proposed rule (February 5, 1987), EPA responses, and a discussion of differences between the proposed and final standards.

  10. 75 FR 65482 - Approval of a Petition for Exemption From Hazardous Waste Disposal Injection Restrictions to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) has been granted to... table below: Concentration limitation at the Chemical constituent or property well head (mg/L)...

  11. 75 FR 30392 - Approval of a Petition for Exemption from Hazardous Waste Disposal Injection Restrictions to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ...of certainty, that there will be no migration of hazardous constituents out of the...the well are adequate to prevent fluid migration out of the injection zone within 10...provide additional protection from fluid migration into drinking water sources. EPA...

  12. 75 FR 30392 - Approval of a Petition for Exemption from Hazardous Waste Disposal Injection Restrictions to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... certainty, that there will be no migration of hazardous constituents out of the injection zone or into an... fluid migration out of the injection zone within 10,000 years, as required under 40 CFR part 148. The... migration into drinking water sources. EPA issued a draft decision, which described the reasons for...

  13. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  14. 40 CFR Appendix Vii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Surface Disposed Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Third wastes for which treatment standards are based on incineration June 8, 1991. 5. All soil and... Small quantity generators, CERCLA response/RCRA corrective action, initial generator's solvent-water... corrective action, initial generator's solvent-water mixtures, solvent-containing sludges and solids Nov....

  15. Energy and solid/hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the past and potential future solid and hazardous waste impacts from energy development, and summarizes the major environmental, legislation applicable to solid and hazardous waste generation and disposal. A glossary of terms and acronyms used to describe and measure solid waste impacts of energy development is included. (PSB)

  16. Peristaltic pumps for waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, G.W.

    1992-09-01

    Laboratory robots are capable of generating large volumes of hazardous liquid wastes when they are used to perform chemical analyses of metal finishing solutions. A robot at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division, generates 30 gallons of acid waste each month. This waste contains mineral acids, heavy metals, metal fluorides, and other materials. The waste must be contained in special drums that are closed to the atmosphere. The initial disposal method was to have the robot pour the waste into a collecting funnel, which contained a liquid-sensing valve to admit the waste into the drum. Spills were inevitable, splashing occurred, and the special valve often didn`t work well. The device also occupied a large amount of premium bench space. Peristaltic pumps are made to handle hazardous liquids quickly and efficiently. A variable-speed pump, equipped with a quick-loading pump head, was mounted below the robot bench near the waste barrel. The pump inlet tube was mounted above the bench within easy reach of the robot, while the outlet tube was connected directly to the barrel. During operation, the robot brings the waste liquid up to the pump inlet tube and activates the pump. When the waste has been removed, the pump stops. The procedure is quick, simple, inexpensive, safe, and reliable.

  17. Peristaltic pumps for waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, G.W.

    1992-09-01

    Laboratory robots are capable of generating large volumes of hazardous liquid wastes when they are used to perform chemical analyses of metal finishing solutions. A robot at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division, generates 30 gallons of acid waste each month. This waste contains mineral acids, heavy metals, metal fluorides, and other materials. The waste must be contained in special drums that are closed to the atmosphere. The initial disposal method was to have the robot pour the waste into a collecting funnel, which contained a liquid-sensing valve to admit the waste into the drum. Spills were inevitable, splashing occurred, and the special valve often didn't work well. The device also occupied a large amount of premium bench space. Peristaltic pumps are made to handle hazardous liquids quickly and efficiently. A variable-speed pump, equipped with a quick-loading pump head, was mounted below the robot bench near the waste barrel. The pump inlet tube was mounted above the bench within easy reach of the robot, while the outlet tube was connected directly to the barrel. During operation, the robot brings the waste liquid up to the pump inlet tube and activates the pump. When the waste has been removed, the pump stops. The procedure is quick, simple, inexpensive, safe, and reliable.

  18. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE

    E-print Network

    Winfree, Erik

    Cathode Ray Tubes and Consumer Electronic Devices 20 Lamps 21 #12;Hazardous Waste Management ReferenceHAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT REFERENCE GUIDE Prepared by Environment, Health and Safety Office@caltech.edu http://safety.caltech.edu #12;Hazardous Waste Management Reference Guide Page 2 of 36 TABLE OF CONTENTS

  19. Municipal solid wastes and their disposal.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, R

    1978-01-01

    A brief overview is given of the sources, characteristics, and toxic constituents of municipal solid wastes. Several methods are presented for handling, treating, and disposal of solid wastes. Monitoring the landfill site is necessary; there has been a trend to recognize that municipal solid wastes may be hazardous and to provide separate secure handling, treatment, and disposal for their dangerous constituents. Under current state and Federal regulations, permits are being required to assure that proper handling of conventional solid wastes and more hazardous constituents are carefully managed. PMID:738240

  20. 40 CFR 268.6 - Petitions to allow land disposal of a waste prohibited under subpart C of part 268.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hazardous waste under 40 CFR part 260 through part 271. (n) Liquid hazardous wastes containing... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS General §...

  1. 77 FR 50622 - Land Disposal Restrictions: Site-Specific Treatment Variance for Hazardous Selenium-Bearing Waste...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ...Selenium-Bearing Waste Treated by U.S. Ecology Nevada in Beatty, NV AGENCY: Environmental...Disposal Restrictions program, to U.S. Ecology Nevada in Beatty, Nevada for the treatment...This action applies only to U.S. Ecology Nevada located in Beatty, Nevada....

  2. Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (D-025): Summary of closure under Rules Governing Hazardous Waste Management in Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.E.

    1989-07-01

    On February 29, 1988, the Revised Closure Plan for Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin,'' Y/TS-390 (Reference 1) was submitted to the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for review and transmittal to the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE). The closure activities described in the closure plan have been performed. The purpose of this document is to summarize the closure activities for the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal (CRSDB). The closure of CRSDB is a final closure. The Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB), Unit D-025, was an unlined, man-made sediment disposal facility on Chestnut Ridge, south of New Hope Pond (NHP). The CRSDB was constructed during 1972--73 for the disposal of sediments hydraulically dredged from NHP. It was designed to hold approximately 30,000 cubic yards of sediments. Since 1973, the basin had been used for the periodic disposal of sediments excavated from NHP and its appurtenant structures. NHP has previously received discharges form RCRA-related waste streams. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  4. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  5. OVERVIEW OF HAZARDOUS/TOXIC WASTE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective hazardous/toxic waste disposal and safe dumpsite cleanup are two of EPA's major missions in the 1980s. Incineration has been recognized as a very efficient process to destroy the hazardous wastes generated by industry or by the dumpsite remediations. The paper provides ...

  6. INCINERATOR AND KILN CAPACITY FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimates of incinerator and cement kiln capacities for hazardous waste treatment are required to evaluate the impacts of banning land disposal of hazardous wastes. RCRA Part B permit applications were reviewed to obtain information about incinerator design capacity, utilization ...

  7. S. 1643: This Act may be cited as the International Hazardous Waste Disposal and Enforcement Act of 1991, introduced in the United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, August 2, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the Senate of the United States on August 2, 1991 to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to make improvements in the regulation of exports of hazardous and additional wastes. Separate sections of this legislation discuss the following: Prohibition of hazardous and additional waste exports and imports; Exceptions to prohibition; Requirements for exports; Requirements for imports; Operating permits; Authorities of the president; Report by the president; Enforcement strategy; Fees; and Federal enforcement.

  8. HANDBOOK ON TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE LEACHATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various treatment processes were evaluated for their applicability and effectiveness in treating leachate from hazardous waste land disposal facilities. These technologies include activated sludge treatment, air stripping, carbon adsorption, flow equalization, granular media filt...

  9. Hazardous solid waste from agriculture.

    PubMed Central

    Loehr, R C

    1978-01-01

    Large quantities of food processing, crop, forestry, and animal solid wastes are generated in the United States each year. The major components of these wastes are biodegradable. However, they also contain components such as nitrogen, human and animal pathogens, medicinals, feed additives, salts, and certain metals, that under uncontrolled conditions can be detrimental to aquatic, plant, animal, or human life. The most common method of disposal of these wastes is application to the land. Thus the major pathways for transmission of hazards are from and through the soil. Use of these wastes as animal feed also can be a pathway. While at this time there are no crises associated with hazardous materials in agricultural solid wastes, the potential for problems should not be underestimated. Manpower and financial support should be provided to obtain more detailed information in this area, esepcially to better delineate transport and dispersal and to determine and evaluate risks. PMID:367770

  10. UC Irvine Construction Related Hazardous Waste Some construction related wastes are hazardous and require special handling. Examples of such wastes

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    , and disposal facilities (TSDF) that the bidding contractor must use. The approved TSDF will vary depending Facility (TSDF) · All hazardous and non-hazardous asbestos waste must be manifested to: Azusa Land

  11. Hazardous Chemical Waste Accumulation Area Steps for Hazardous Waste Removal

    E-print Network

    Wikswo, John

    -7036) or by using electronic collection request form (VEHS website). Hazardous Waste Storage Ø Store all hazardousHazardous Chemical Waste Accumulation Area Steps for Hazardous Waste Removal: · Containerize all waste in a sealed, compatible container. · Label all waste containers with chemical waste tags provided

  12. Hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDF) regulatory impact analysis for promulgated air emission standards for tanks, surface impoundments, and containers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The document constitutes the Final Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) for the Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities; Organic Air Emission Standards for Tanks, Surface Impoundments, and Containers under Section 3004(n) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The document is composed of two parts: (1) an addendum consisting of revised chapters to the 1989 RIA (PB--90-252503); and (2) an appendix containing the 1989 RIA. The addendum consists of rewritten chapters that discuss revised analyses of control options considered for the final standards. The highlight of this addendum is a completely revamped Benefit-Cost assessment (Chapter VII).

  13. Environmental management of industrial hazardous wastes in India.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Shantanu K; Upadhyay, V P; Sridharan, U

    2006-04-01

    Hazardous wastes are considered highly toxic and therefore disposal of such wastes needs proper attention so as to reduce possible environmental hazards. Industrial growth has resulted in generation of huge volume of hazardous wastes in the country. In addition to this, hazardous wastes sometimes get imported mainly from the western countries for re-processing or recycling. Inventorisation of hazardous wastes generating units in the country is not yet completed. Scientific disposal of hazardous wastes has become a major environmental issue in India. Hazardous Wastes (Management and Handling) Rules, 1989 have been framed by the Central Government and amended in 2000 and 2003 to deal with the hazardous wastes related environmental problems that may arise in the near future. This paper gives details about the hazardous wastes management in India. Health effects of the selected hazardous substances are also discussed in the paper. PMID:17913193

  14. 40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste incinerator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hazardous waste incinerator permits... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Incinerators § 264.344 Hazardous waste incinerator permits. (a) The owner or operator of...

  15. 40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste incinerator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hazardous waste incinerator permits... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Incinerators § 264.344 Hazardous waste incinerator permits. (a) The owner or operator of...

  16. 40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste incinerator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous waste incinerator permits... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Incinerators § 264.344 Hazardous waste incinerator permits. (a) The owner or operator of...

  17. 40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste incinerator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hazardous waste incinerator permits... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Incinerators § 264.344 Hazardous waste incinerator permits. (a) The owner or operator of...

  18. Space disposal of nuclear wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, C. C.; Nixon, R. F.; Rice, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The DOE has been studying several options for nuclear waste disposal, among them space disposal, which NASA has been assessing. Attention is given to space disposal destinations noting that a circular heliocentric orbit about halfway between Earth and Venus is the reference option in space disposal studies. Discussion also covers the waste form, showing that parameters to be considered include high waste loading, high thermal conductivity, thermochemical stability, resistance to leaching, fabrication, resistance to oxidation and to thermal shock. Finally, the Space Shuttle nuclear waste disposal mission profile is presented.

  19. Hazardous waste operational plan for site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.S.

    1982-02-12

    This plan outlines the procedures and operations used at LLNL's Site 300 for the management of the hazardous waste generated. This waste consists primarily of depleted uranium (a by-product of U-235 enrichment), beryllium, small quantities of analytical chemicals, industrial type waste such as solvents, cleaning acids, photographic chemicals, etc., and explosives. This plan details the operations generating this waste, the proper handling of this material and the procedures used to treat or dispose of the hazardous waste. A considerable amount of information found in this plan was extracted from the Site 300 Safety and Operational Manual written by Site 300 Facility personnel and the Hazards Control Department.

  20. LAND DISPOSAL, REMEDIAL ACTION, INCINERATION AND TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (12TH) HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON APRIL 21-23, 1986

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings of ongoing and recently completed projects funded by the Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory (HWERL) to persons concerned with hazardous waste management. These proceedings are for Se...

  1. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  2. Laboratory Waste Disposal Manual. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, F. G., Ed.

    This manual is designed to provide laboratory personnel with information about chemical hazards and ways of disposing of chemical wastes with minimum contamination of the environment. The manual contains a reference chart section which has alphabetical listings of some 1200 chemical substances with information on the health, fire and reactivity…

  3. 40 CFR 266.206 - Standards applicable to the treatment and disposal of waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... technical standards in 40 CFR Parts 260 through 270. ... and disposal of waste military munitions. 266.206 Section 266.206 Protection of Environment... HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Military Munitions §...

  4. 40 CFR 266.206 - Standards applicable to the treatment and disposal of waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... technical standards in 40 CFR Parts 260 through 270. ... and disposal of waste military munitions. 266.206 Section 266.206 Protection of Environment... HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Military Munitions §...

  5. 40 CFR 266.206 - Standards applicable to the treatment and disposal of waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... technical standards in 40 CFR Parts 260 through 270. ... and disposal of waste military munitions. 266.206 Section 266.206 Protection of Environment... HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Military Munitions §...

  6. 40 CFR 266.206 - Standards applicable to the treatment and disposal of waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... technical standards in 40 CFR Parts 260 through 270. ... and disposal of waste military munitions. 266.206 Section 266.206 Protection of Environment... HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Military Munitions §...

  7. 40 CFR 266.206 - Standards applicable to the treatment and disposal of waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... technical standards in 40 CFR Parts 260 through 270. ... and disposal of waste military munitions. 266.206 Section 266.206 Protection of Environment... HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Military Munitions §...

  8. Developing hazardous waste programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Developing a fully operational hazardous waste regulatory system requires at least 10 to 15 years—even in countries with strong legal and bureaucratic institutions, according to a report on "The Evolution of Hazardous Waste Programs," which was funded by Resources for the Future (RFF) and the World Bank's South Asia Environment Group, and issued on June 4.The report, which compares the experiences of how four developed and four developing countries have created hazardous waste programs, indicates that hazardous waste issues usually do not become a pressing environmental issue until after countries have dealt with more direct threats to public health, such as contaminated drinking water and air pollution. The countries examined include Indonesia, Thailand, Germany, and the United States.

  9. Nuclear waste disposal in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. E.; Causey, W. E.; Galloway, W. E.; Nelson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Work on nuclear waste disposal in space conducted by the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and contractors are reported. From the aggregate studies, it is concluded that space disposal of nuclear waste is technically feasible.

  10. Special Report: Hazardous Wastes in Academic Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Howard J.

    1986-01-01

    Topics and issues related to toxic wastes in academic laboratories are addressed, pointing out that colleges/universities are making efforts to dispose of hazardous wastes safely to comply with tougher federal regulations. University sites on the Environmental Protection Agency Superfund National Priorities List, costs, and use of lab packs are…

  11. HAZARDOUS WASTE FACILITIES, NEUSE RIVER WATERSHED, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Locations of treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs). These facilities are regulated under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and must have a RCRA permit issued by the Division of Waste Management, Hazardous Waste Section to operat...

  12. Controlling hazardous waste exports: A critical appraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Valtasaari, M.; Solomon, B.

    1997-08-01

    The history of hazardous waste exports is a history of industrialization. As a nation industrializes it generates more hazardous wastes. While the correlation between degree of industrialization and production of hazardous wastes has held true to date, it is being decoupled as the increased understanding of hazardous waste prevention systems and stricter regulation begin to dampen production rates. Most hazardous wastes are produced in the European Union and the United States. The issue of hazardous wastes is also one of definitions, political responsibility, and economic prosperity. This paper provides a critical appraisal of these issues and options. All hazardous waste issues should be considered with great care as the answers will not be one dimensional. A developed country may not have the moral right to export hazardous materials to a developing country, but does the developed country have the right to deprive a developing nation of a valuable source of material and income? Is it really better to dispose of waste in a local injection well, or at an incinerator in a country badly in need of hard currency with which to buy agricultural products? Hazardous waste exports is a global problem with local solutions and as with many such problems the solutions will be neither totally just or efficient.

  13. Fate of high loads of ammonia in a pond and wetland downstream from a hazardous waste disposal site.

    PubMed

    Cutrofello, Michele; Durant, John L

    2007-07-01

    Halls Brook (eastern Massachusetts, USA) is a significant source of total dissolved ammonia (sum of NH(3) and NH(4)(+); (NH(3))(T)) to the Aberjona River, a water body listed for NH(3) impairment on the Clean Water Act section 303(d) list. We hypothesized (1) that (NH(3))(T) in Halls Brook derived from a hazardous waste site via groundwater discharging to a two-basin pond that feeds the brook; and (2) that transport of (NH(3))(T) to the Aberjona River was controlled by lacustrine and wetland processes. To test these hypotheses we measured (NH(3))(T) levels in the brook, the pond, and a wetlands directly downstream of the pond during both dry and wet weather over a ten month period. In addition, we analyzed sediment cores and nitrogen isotopes, and performed mass balance calculations. Groundwater discharge from beneath the hazardous waste site was the major source of (NH(3))(T) (20-67 kg d(-1)) and salinity to the north basin of the pond. The salty bottom waters of the north basin were anoxic on all sampling dates, and exhibited relatively stable (NH(3))(T) concentrations between 200 and 600 mg Nl(-1). These levels were >100-times higher than typical background levels, and 8-24-times above the acute effects level for (NH(3))(T) toxicity. Bottom waters from the north basin continuously spill over into the south basin contributing approximately 50% of the (NH(3))(T) load entering this basin. The remainder comes from Halls Brook, which receives (NH(3))(T) loadings from as yet unknown sources upstream. During storm events up to 50% of the mass of (NH(3))(T) was flushed from the south basin and into the wetlands. The wetlands acted as a (NH(3))(T) sink in dry weather in the growing season and a discharge-dependent (NH(3))(T) source to the Aberjona River during rainstorms. PMID:17346773

  14. INNOVATIVE THERMAL PROCESSES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT AND DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the land disposal of untreated hazardous wastes has continued to fall into disfavor in North America, increasing attention is being given to alternative hazardous waste treatment and disposal technologies. This increased attention and the public and private support resulting f...

  15. RFID technology for hazardous waste management and tracking.

    PubMed

    Namen, Anderson Amendoeira; Brasil, Felipe da Costa; Abrunhosa, Jorge José Gouveia; Abrunhosa, Glaucia Gomes Silva; Tarré, Ricardo Martinez; Marques, Flávio José Garcia

    2014-09-01

    The illegal dumping of hazardous waste is one of the most concerning occurrences related to illegal waste activities. The waste management process is quite vulnerable, especially when it comes to assuring the right destination for the delivery of the hazardous waste. The purpose of this paper is to present a new system design and prototype for applying the RFID technology so as to guarantee the correct destination for the hazardous waste delivery. The aim of this innovative approach, compared with other studies that employ the same technology to the waste disposal process, is to focus on the certification that the hazardous waste will be delivered to the right destination site and that no inappropriate disposal will occur in the transportation stage. These studies were carried out based on data collected during visits to two hazardous waste producer companies in Brazil, where the material transportation and delivery to a company in charge of the waste disposal were closely monitored. PMID:24879751

  16. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) contingency plan for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Y-12 RCRA Contingency Plan will be continually reviewed and revised if any of the following occur: the facility permit is revised, the plan is inadequate in an emergency, the procedures can be improved, the operations of the facility change in a way that alters the plan, the emergency coordinator changes, or the emergency equipment list changes. Copies of the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan are available at the Plant Shift Superintendent`s Office and the Emergency Management Office. This document serves to supplement the Y-12 Emergency Management Plan to be appropriate for all RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal units. The 90-day accumulation areas at the Y-12 Plant have a separate contingency supplement as required by RCRA and are separate from this supplement.

  17. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. ...Prohibition on Storage and Disposal of Toxic and Hazardous Materials (APR...quantity of a material used in or a waste generated or resulting from...equipment, or facilities. (2) Toxic or hazardous materials...

  18. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. ...Prohibition on Storage and Disposal of Toxic and Hazardous Materials (APR...quantity of a material used in or a waste generated or resulting from...equipment, or facilities. (2) Toxic or hazardous materials...

  19. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. ...Prohibition on Storage and Disposal of Toxic and Hazardous Materials (APR...quantity of a material used in or a waste generated or resulting from...equipment, or facilities. (2) Toxic or hazardous materials...

  20. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Prohibition on storage and disposal of toxic and hazardous materials. ...Prohibition on Storage and Disposal of Toxic and Hazardous Materials (APR...quantity of a material used in or a waste generated or resulting from...equipment, or facilities. (2) Toxic or hazardous materials...

  1. Technology transfer in hazardous waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Drucker, H.

    1989-01-01

    Hazardous waste is a growing problem in all parts of the world. Industrialized countries have had to deal with the treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes for many years. The newly industrializing countries of the world are now faced with immediate problems of waste handling. The developing nations of the world are looking at increasing quantities of hazardous waste generation as they move toward higher levels of industrialization. Available data are included on hazardous waste generation in Asia and the Pacific as a function of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Although there are many inconsistencies in the data (inconsistent hazardous waste definitions, inconsistent reporting of wastes, etc.) there is definite indication that a growing economy tends to lead toward larger quantities of hazardous waste generation. In developing countries the industrial sector is growing at a faster rate than in the industrialized countries. In 1965 industry accounted for 29% of GDP in the developing countries of the world. In 1987 this had grown to 37% of GDP. In contrast, industry accounted for 40% of GDP in 1965 in industrialized countries and dropped to 35% in 1987. This growth in industrial activity in the developing countries brings an increase in the need to handle hazardous wastes. Although hazardous wastes are ubiquitous, the control of hazardous wastes varies. The number of regulatory options used by various countries in Asia and the Pacific to control wastes are included. It is evident that the industrialized countries, with a longer history of having to deal with hazardous wastes, have found the need to use more mechanisms to control them. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Chemical Handling and Waste Disposal Issues at Liberal Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannaway, Susan P.

    1990-01-01

    Findings from a survey of 20 liberal arts colleges which did not have graduate programs in chemistry are presented. Discussed are regulations, actions taken and costs of academic laboratories regarding the disposal of hazardous waste. (CW)

  3. 76 FR 30027 - Land Disposal Restrictions: Site-Specific Treatment Variance for Hazardous Selenium-Bearing Waste...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ...Treatment Issued to Chemical Waste Management in Kettleman Hills, CA AGENCY...variance issued to Chemical Waste Management, Inc. in Kettleman Hills...Miller, Materials Recovery and Waste Management Division, Office of...

  4. RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 CHAPTER 7 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL PAGE I. Radioactive Waste Disposal ............................................................................................ 7-2 II. Radiation Control Technique #2 Instructions for Preparation of Radioactive Waste

  5. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 268 - LDR Effective Dates of Injected Prohibited Hazardous Wastes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Dates of Injected Prohibited Hazardous Wastes VIII Appendix VIII to Part 268...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS...Dates of Injected Prohibited Hazardous Wastes National Capacity LDR...

  6. 75 FR 36609 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs...CFR) those provisions of the State regulations that are authorized...the EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly...incorporating by reference the State's hazardous waste...

  7. 77 FR 3224 - New Mexico: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs...CFR) those provisions of the State regulations that are authorized...the EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly...incorporating by reference the State's hazardous waste...

  8. HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA: A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the Household hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to quantify the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm Beach County, Florida's (the county) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal soli...

  9. Optimization of Waste Disposal - 13338

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H.; Collopy, P.; Conant, J.

    2013-07-01

    From 2009 through 2011, remediation of areas of a former fuel cycle facility used for government contract work was conducted. Remediation efforts were focused on building demolition, underground pipeline removal, contaminated soil removal and removal of contaminated sediments from portions of an on-site stream. Prior to conducting the remediation field effort, planning and preparation for remediation (including strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal) was conducted during the design phase. During the remediation field effort, waste characterization and disposal practices were continuously reviewed and refined to optimize waste disposal practices. This paper discusses strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal that was employed in the design phase, and continuously reviewed and refined to optimize efficiency. (authors)

  10. HAZARD ASSESSMENT RESEARCH STRATEGY FOR OCEAN DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A decision rationale for ocean disposal based on a predictive hazard assessment research strategy is presented. he conceptual framework for hazard assessment is outlined, and its major components are identified and discussed. he strategy involves the synthesis of results from sep...

  11. PERMITTING HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication is a compilation of information presented at a seminar series designed to address the issues that affect the issuance of hazardous waste incineration permits and to improve the overall understanding of trial burn testing. pecifically, the document provides guidan...

  12. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Guloy, A.

    1992-01-28

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising.

  13. ESTIMATING LEACHATE PRODUCTION FROM CLOSED HAZARDOUS WASTE LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazardous wastes disposed of in landfills may continue to drain for several years after site closure. The report presents suitable analytical methods for predicting the flow of leachate to underdrains from closed hazardous waste landfills. Leachate sources include waste fluids as...

  14. Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition

    SciTech Connect

    Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H.; Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B.

    1991-10-01

    The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

  15. Vadose zone monitoring for hazardous waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, L.G.; Wilson, L.G.; Hoylman, E.W.

    1983-10-01

    This book describes the applicability of vadose zone monitoring techniques to hazardous waste site investigations. More than 70 different sampling and nonsampling vadose zone monitoring techniques are described in terms of their advantages and disadvantages. Physical, chemical, geologic, topographic, geohydrologic, and climatic constraints for vadose zone monitoring are quantitatively determined. Vadose zone monitoring techniques are categorized for premonitoring, active, and postclosure site assessments. Waste disposal methods are categorized for piles, landfills, impoundments, and land treatment. Conceptual vadose zone monitoring approaches are developed for specific waste disposal method categories.

  16. Characterization, minimization and disposal of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes during cleanup and rransition of the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-12-01

    This document provides an outline of waste handling practices used during the Sandia National Laboratory/California (SNL/CA), Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Cleanup and Transition project. Here we provide background information concerning the history of the TRL and the types of operations that generated the waste. Listed are applicable SNL/CA site-wide and TRL local waste handling related procedures. We describe personnel training practices and outline methods of handling and disposal of compactible and non-compactible low level waste, solidified waste water, hazardous wastes and mixed wastes. Waste minimization, reapplication and recycling practices are discussed. Finally, we provide a description of the process followed to remove the highly contaminated decontamination systems. This document is intended as both a historical record and as a reference to other facilities who may be involved in similar work.

  17. The management of household hazardous waste in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Slack, R J; Gronow, J R; Voulvoulis, N

    2009-01-01

    Waste legislation in the United Kingdom (UK) implements European Union (EU) Directives and Regulations. However, the term used to refer to hazardous waste generated in household or municipal situations, household hazardous waste (HHW), does not occur in UK, or EU, legislation. The EU's Hazardous Waste Directive and European Waste Catalogue are the principal legislation influencing HHW, although the waste categories described are difficult to interpret. Other legislation also have impacts on HHW definition and disposal, some of which will alter current HHW disposal practices, leading to a variety of potential consequences. This paper discusses the issues affecting the management of HHW in the UK, including the apparent absence of a HHW-specific regulatory structure. Policy and regulatory measures that influence HHW management before disposal and after disposal are considered, with particular emphasis placed on disposal to landfill. PMID:18423843

  18. Politics of Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, R.

    1994-01-01

    What role does public acceptance play in the siting of facilities and the selection of technologies designed to manage nuclear waste That's the question posed by Ray Kemp in The Politics of Radioactive Waste Disposal. To answer this question, Kemp assesses and compares the decision-making processes in Western Europe, Canada, and the United States.

  19. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Contracts to Dispose of Laboratory Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Kenneth E.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a sample contract for disposing of hazardous wastes in an environmentally sound, timely manner in accordance with all federal, state, and local requirements. Addresses situations where hazardous waste must be disposed of outside the laboratory and where alternate disposal methods are not feasible. (JN)

  20. E-waste hazard: The impending challenge

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Violet N.

    2008-01-01

    Electronic waste or e-waste is one of the rapidly growing problems of the world. E-waste comprises of a multitude of components, some containing toxic substances that can have an adverse impact on human health and the environment if not handled properly. In India, e-waste management assumes greater significance not only due to the generation of its own e-waste but also because of the dumping of e-waste from developed countries. This is coupled with India's lack of appropriate infrastructure and procedures for its disposal and recycling. This review article provides a concise overview of India's current e-waste scenario, namely magnitude of the problem, environmental and health hazards, current disposal and recycling operations, existing legal framework, organizations working on this issue and recommendations for action. PMID:20040981

  1. E-waste hazard: The impending challenge.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Violet N

    2008-08-01

    Electronic waste or e-waste is one of the rapidly growing problems of the world. E-waste comprises of a multitude of components, some containing toxic substances that can have an adverse impact on human health and the environment if not handled properly. In India, e-waste management assumes greater significance not only due to the generation of its own e-waste but also because of the dumping of e-waste from developed countries. This is coupled with India's lack of appropriate infrastructure and procedures for its disposal and recycling. This review article provides a concise overview of India's current e-waste scenario, namely magnitude of the problem, environmental and health hazards, current disposal and recycling operations, existing legal framework, organizations working on this issue and recommendations for action. PMID:20040981

  2. Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk Gombert

    2005-09-01

    If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being evaluated at Idaho National Laboratory and the facilities we’ve designed to evaluate options and support optimization.

  3. DEFINITION OF A HAZARDOUS WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA has promulagated regulation establishing the criteria and characteristics of hazardous waste. The criteria established include the following factors: (1) the waste is associated with an identified waste stream or contains constituents which are identified in listings in...

  4. Management of hazardous medical waste in Croatia

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, Natalija Vitale, Ksenija; Holcer, Natasa Janev; Dzakula, Aleksandar; Pavic, Tomo

    2008-07-01

    This article provides a review of hazardous medical waste production and its management in Croatia. Even though Croatian regulations define all steps in the waste management chain, implementation of those steps is one of the country's greatest issues. Improper practice is evident from the point of waste production to final disposal. The biggest producers of hazardous medical waste are hospitals that do not implement existing legislation, due to the lack of education and funds. Information on quantities, type and flow of medical waste are inadequate, as is sanitary control. We propose an integrated approach to medical waste management based on a hierarchical structure from the point of generation to its disposal. Priority is given to the reduction of the amounts and potential for harm. Where this is not possible, management includes reduction by sorting and separating, pretreatment on site, safe transportation, final treatment and sanitary disposal. Preferred methods should be the least harmful for human health and the environment. Integrated medical waste management could greatly reduce quantities and consequently financial strains. Landfilling is the predominant route of disposal in Croatia, although the authors believe that incineration is the most appropriate method. In a country such as Croatia, a number of small incinerators would be the most economical solution.

  5. USE OF SORBENT MATERIALS FOR TREATING HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Department of Defense (DoD) spends millions of dollars each year to dispose of hazardous liquid wastes from military facilities. The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) alone spent $23 million during fiscal year 1994 to dispose of64 million pounds of liquid hazardous materials. T...

  6. 76 FR 36879 - Minnesota: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ..., 1991 (56 FR 41164) Liners and Leak Detection Systems for Hazardous Waste Land Disposal Units, Checklist... Hazardous Waste; Toxicity Characteristic; Corrections, Checklist 108, July 10, 1992 (57 FR 30657) Land Disposal Restrictions for Newly Listed Wastes and Hazardous Debris, Checklist 109, August 18, 1992 (57...

  7. Hazardous-waste TSDF (treatment, storage, and disposal facilities): Fugitive particulate-matter air-emissions guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    Cowherd, C.; Englehart, P.; Muleski, G.E.; Kinsey, J.S.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide regulatory and industrial personnel with sufficient information to identify sources of contaminated fugitive PM emissions, estimate the magnitude of emissions, select viable control measures, and estimate the effectiveness of those measures in order to ensure that high risks from these facilities do not occur. The following sources are discussed in the document: paved and unpaved roads, open waste piles and staging areas, dry surface impoundments, landfills, land treatment, and waste stabilization.

  8. Improving medical waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, L.

    1994-05-01

    This article describes the use of electron-beam irradiation, steam detoxification, and microwave disinfection systems rather than incineration to rid the waste stream of medical scraps. The topics of the article include biological waste stream sources and amounts, pyrolysis and oxidation, exhaust gas cleanup, superheated steam sterilization and detoxification.

  9. GUIDE TO TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTES AT SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past fewyears, it has become increasinsly evident that land disposal of hazardous wastes is at least only a temporary solution for much of the wastes present at Superfund sites. The need for more Iong-term, permanent "treatment solutions as alternatives to land disposal ...

  10. 40 CFR 264.316 - Disposal of small containers of hazardous waste in overpacked drums (lab packs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR parts 173, 178, and 179), if those regulations specify a particular inside container for the waste... container (49 CFR parts 178 and 179) of no more than 416-liter (110 gallon) capacity and surrounded by, at a... in 40 CFR 268.42(c)(1) may use fiber drums in place of metal outer containers. Such fiber drums...

  11. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper was prepared for presentation at a joint US/Spain Seminar on Hazardous Waste Management to be held in Madrid, Spain, on May 19-22, 1986. Hazardous waste quantities produced in the United States and how they are handled/disposed of are presented. Major environmental legi...

  12. MEASUREMENTS AND MODELS FOR HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL AND MIXED WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mixed hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes are in storage at DOE sites around the United States, awaiting treatment and disposal. These hazardous chemical wastes contain many components in multiple phases, presenting very difficult handling and treatment problems. These was...

  13. A COMPARISON: ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATORS VERSUS THE 1990 TOXICS RELEASE INVENTORY AIR RELEASES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incineration is often the preferred technology for disposing of hazardous waste, and remediating Superfund sites. The effective implementation of this technology is frequently impeded by strong public opposition `to hazardous waste' incineration HWI). One of the reasons cited for...

  14. Natural hazards phenomena mitigation with respect to seismic hazards at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.

    1994-01-06

    This report provides information on the seismic hazard for design of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), a facility designed for the disposal of wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site aggregate areas. The preferred ERDF site is located south and east of 200 East and 200 West Areas. The Washington State Groundwater Protection Program (WAC 173-303-806 (4)(a)(xxi)) requires that the characteristics of local and regional hydrogeology be defined. A plan for that work has been developed (Weekes and Borghese 1993). In addition, WAC 173-303-282 provides regulatory guidance on siting a dangerous waste facility, and US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.28 requires consideration of natural phenomena hazards mitigation for DOE sites and facilities. This report provides information to evaluate the ERDF site with respect to seismic hazard. The ERDF will be a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) as defined by 40 CFR 260.10.

  15. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.12 Waste disposal. (a)(1) The following wastes shall be removed from Antarctica: (i)...

  16. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.12 Waste disposal. (a)(1) The following wastes shall be removed from Antarctica: (i)...

  17. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.12 Waste disposal. (a)(1) The following wastes shall be removed from Antarctica: (i)...

  18. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.12 Waste disposal. (a)(1) The following wastes shall be removed from Antarctica: (i)...

  19. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.12 Waste disposal. (a)(1) The following wastes shall be removed from Antarctica: (i)...

  20. 10 CFR 850.32 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Waste disposal. 850.32 Section 850.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.32 Waste disposal. (a) The...

  1. 10 CFR 850.32 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Waste disposal. 850.32 Section 850.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.32 Waste disposal. (a) The...

  2. Hazardous Wastes. Two Games for Teaching about the Problem. Environmental Communications Activities. Bulletin 703.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Cooperative Extension Service.

    Two games are presented which demonstrate the complexity of the hazardous waste problem through an introduction to the: (1) economics of waste disposal; (2) legislation surrounding waste disposal; (3) necessity to handle wastes with care; (4) damages to the environmental and human health resulting from improper disposal; (5) correct ways to…

  3. Safer Transportation and Disposal of Remote Handled Transuranic Waste - 12033

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, Vicente; Timm, Christopher M.; Fox, Jerry V.

    2012-07-01

    Since disposal of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) began in 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) has had difficulty meeting the plans and schedule for disposing this waste. PECOS Management Services, Inc. (PECOS) assessed the feasibility of proposed alternate RH-TRU mixed waste containerisation concepts that would enhance the transportation rate of RH-TRU waste to WIPP and increase the utilization of available WIPP space capacity for RH-TRU waste disposal by either replacing or augmenting current and proposed disposal methods. In addition engineering and operational analyses were conducted that addressed concerns regarding criticality, heat release, and worker exposure to radiation. The results of the analyses showed that the concept, development, and use of a concrete pipe based design for an RH-TRU waste shipping and disposal container could be potentially advantageous for disposing a substantial quantity of RHTRU waste at WIPP in the same manner as contact-handled RH waste. Additionally, this new disposal method would eliminate the hazard associated with repackaging this waste in other containers without the requirement for NRC approval for a new shipping container. (authors)

  4. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Waste disposal. 671.12 Section 671.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.12 Waste disposal. (a)(1) The following wastes shall be removed from...

  5. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Waste disposal. 671.12 Section 671.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.12 Waste disposal. (a)(1) The following wastes shall be removed from...

  6. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Waste disposal. 671.12 Section 671.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.12 Waste disposal. (a)(1) The following wastes shall be removed from...

  7. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Waste disposal. 671.12 Section 671.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.12 Waste disposal. (a)(1) The following wastes shall be removed from Antarctica: (i) Radioactive materials; (ii)...

  8. 45 CFR 671.12 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Waste disposal. 671.12 Section 671.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION WASTE REGULATION Waste Management § 671.12 Waste disposal. (a)(1) The following wastes shall be removed from...

  9. Waste Disposal in the Laboratory: Teaching Responsibility and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ralph O.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the generation, collection, and disposal of hazardous and other wastes in the chemistry laboratory. Offers suggestions related to these three areas to provide a safe teaching environment, including minimizing amounts of reagents used (and potentially wasted) by scaling down experiments. (JN)

  10. Oil field waste disposal costs at commercial disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generates millions of barrels of nonhazardous oil field wastes annually. In most cases, operators can dispose of their oil fields wastes at a lower cost on-site than off site and, thus, will choose on-site disposal. However, a significant quantity of oil field wastes are still sent to off-site commercial facilities for disposal. This paper provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in different states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and how much they charge. There appear to be two major off-site disposal trends. Numerous commercial disposal companies that handle oil field wastes exclusively are located in nine oil-and gas-producing states. They use the same disposal methods as those used for on-site disposal. In addition, the Railroad Commission of Texas has issued permits to allow several salt caverns to be used for disposal of oil field wastes. Twenty-two other oil- and gas-producing states contain few or no disposal companies dedicated to oil and gas industry waste. The only off-site commercial disposal companies available handle general industrial wastes or are sanitary landfills. In those states, operators needing to dispose of oil field wastes off-site must send them to a local landfill or out of state. The cost of off-site commercial disposal varies substantially, depending on the disposal method used, the state in which the disposal company is located, and the degree of competition in the area.

  11. Concept for Underground Disposal of Nuclear Waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Packaged waste placed in empty oil-shale mines. Concept for disposal of nuclear waste economically synergistic with earlier proposal concerning backfilling of oil-shale mines. New disposal concept superior to earlier schemes for disposal in hard-rock and salt mines because less uncertainty about ability of oil-shale mine to contain waste safely for millenium.

  12. Hazardous waste shipment data collection from DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.A.; Kirkpatrick, T.D.; Stevens, L.

    1992-12-31

    Past practices at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites for offsite release of hazardous waste are being reviewed to determine if radioactively contaminated hazardous wastes were released to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Records indicating the presence of radioactivity in waste shipped to and treated at a commercial incineration facility led to a ban on offsite hazardous waste shipments and investigation of past practices for offsite release of hazardous waste from the DOE sites. A House of Representatives Interior and Insular Affairs Committee oversight hearing on potentially contaminated waste shipments to commercial facilities concluded that the main issue was the lack of a uniform national standard to govern disposal of mixed waste.

  13. Hazardous waste shipment data collection from DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Page, L.A.; Kirkpatrick, T.D. ); Stevens, L. )

    1992-01-01

    Past practices at the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites for offsite release of hazardous waste are being reviewed to determine if radioactively contaminated hazardous wastes were released to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Records indicating the presence of radioactivity in waste shipped to and treated at a commercial incineration facility led to a ban on offsite hazardous waste shipments and investigation of past practices for offsite release of hazardous waste from the DOE sites. A House of Representatives Interior and Insular Affairs Committee oversight hearing on potentially contaminated waste shipments to commercial facilities concluded that the main issue was the lack of a uniform national standard to govern disposal of mixed waste.

  14. Hazardous healthcare waste management in the Kingdom of Bahrain

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, L.F. Ebrahim, S.A.; Al-Thukair, A.A.

    2009-08-15

    Hazardous healthcare waste has become an environmental concern for many developing countries including the Kingdom of Bahrain. There have been several significant obstacles facing the Kingdom in dealing with this issue including; limited documentation regarding generation, handling, management, and disposal of waste. This in turn hinders efforts to plan better healthcare waste management. In this paper, hazardous waste management status in the Kingdom has been investigated through an extensive survey carried out on selected public and private healthcare premises. Hazardous waste management practices including: waste generation, segregation, storage, collection, transportation, treatment, and disposal were determined. The results of this study along with key findings are discussed and summarized. In addition; several effective recommendations and improvements of hazardous waste management are suggested.

  15. [The legal basis of waste disposal].

    PubMed

    Kuntze, R

    1983-09-01

    Since 1969 environmental protection has been regarded as a high-ranking political concern. The Waste Disposal Act of 1972 laid the foundations for complete and proper disposal of all waste from the aspect of administration and planning. In 1974 three decrees were promulgted: - decree for waste transportation - decree for waste identification - decree for waste importation. In 1977 the Act was amended after a series of scandals related to poisonous refuse made tighter controls for special refuse, such as dangerous industrial waste, necessary. The Federal Government has detailed these types of waste in the Waste Specification Decree of 24th May, 1977. Included are waste materials from certain hospitals and clinics. Subsequent to the ammendment of 1977, the decree on the appointment of a factory agent for waste disposal problems was enacted (26th October 1977). This decree was intended to improve the internal facilities for waste disposal in factories. In 1982 the Parliament voted a second ammendment to the Waste Disposal Act which, among other things, provided for a certain easing in the supervision of the transportation of relatively harmless waste material. Important legal fundamentals for waste disposal are also contained in the following acts: - High-sea waste discharge Act - Waste oil Act - Carcass disposal Act. As the implementation of the Act falls under the responsibility of the Federal States, the competences and waste disposal planning are regulated in the legal provisions and decrees of the Federal States.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6649999

  16. Waste management and the land disposal restriction storage prohibition

    SciTech Connect

    1992-05-01

    RCRA Sect. 3004(j) prohibits storage of wastes that have been prohibited from land disposal, unless that storage is for the purpose of accumulating sufficient quantities of hazardous wastes to facilitate proper recovery, treatment, or disposal. This requirement was incorporated as part of the Land Disposal Restriction (LDR) regulations. Under the LDR storage prohibition, facilities may only store restricted wastes in containers and tanks. As stated in the Third LDR rule, storage of prohibited waste is only allowed in non-land based storage units since land-based storage is a form of disposal. The EPA has recognized that generators and storers of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) may find it impossible to comply with storage prohibition in cases where no available treatment capacity exists. Additionally, under the current regulatory interpretation, there is no provision that would allow for storage of wastes for which treatment capacity and capability are not available, even where capacity is legitimately being developed. Under the LDR program, restricted wastes that are disposed of, or placed into storage before an LDR effective date, are not subject to the LDR requirements. However, if such wastes are removed from a storage or disposal site after the effective date, such wastes would be subject to LDR requirements. The purpose of this information brief is to clarify what waste management practices constitute removal from storage.

  17. Focus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste

    E-print Network

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    know if your waste is hazardous? Your waste is hazardous if it is flammable, toxic, reactive and/or coFocus Sheet | Hazardous Waste Checklist How to be ready for state hazardous waste inspectors. See a hazardous waste inspection. ons, rrosive. n hemicals? ical waste. Waste-like chemicals have als Are you

  18. Comprehensive discussion on the hazardous waste management system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-19

    A comprehensive discussion on the hazardous waste management system, which is established by the US Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended, covers amendments to add new provisions applicable to the proper management of hazardous wastes identification and listing of hazardous wastes, including acetaldehyde, methanol, and xylene, as well as those from nonspecific and specific sources such as slop oil emulsion solids from oil refineries; proposal to modify the interim final list of these wastes to include 11 others, including distillation light ends and bottoms from the production of phthalic anhydride from o-xylene; standards applicable to generators and transporters of hazardous wastes; standards and interim status standards for owners and operators of hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities; and proposals to modify current rules on financial regquirements for owners and operators of hazardous waste management facilities, and on requirements for disposal of hazardous wastes by underground injection.

  19. Preventing improper disposal of healthcare facility waste containing RAM.

    PubMed

    Michel, René; Zorn, Michael J

    2004-05-01

    Non-hazardous waste management facilities, which are not authorized to receive licensable radioactive material (RAM), periodically find contaminated waste in shipments from local healthcare facilities. As a consequence, many healthcare facilities are cited each year for losing control and/or improperly disposing of RAM at unauthorized disposal sites. Healthcare radiation safety professionals must ensure that effective measures are in place at their facilities to prevent RAM from inadvertently being included with non-radioactive waste shipments. The objective of this article is to assist in developing and implementing procedures to properly monitor and dispose of waste containing RAM. This article discusses, among other topics, the installation of portal monitors containing both visual and audible alarms to screen medical waste, instruction to individuals handling medical waste and emergency response procedures. PMID:15069302

  20. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    W. Mahlon Heileson

    2006-10-01

    The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

  1. Hazard ranking systems for chemical wastes and chemical waste sites. Hazardous waste ranking systems

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Parker, F.L.; Crutcher, M.R.

    1991-12-31

    Hazardous materials and substances have always existed in the environment. Mankind has evolved to live with some degree of exposure to toxic materials. Until recently the risk has been from natural toxins or natural background radiation. While rapid technological advances over the past few decades have improved the lifestyle of our society, they have also dramatically increased the availability, volume and types of synthetic and natural hazardous materials. Many of their effects are as yet uncertain. Products and manufacturing by-products that no longer serve a useful purpose are deemed wastes. For some waste products land disposal will always be their ultimate fate. Hazardous substances are often included in the waste products. One needs to classify wastes by degree of hazard (risk). Risk (degree of probability of loss) is usually defined for risk assessment as probability of an occurrence times the consequences of the occurrence. Perhaps even more important than the definition of risk is the choice of a risk management strategy. The choice of strategy will be strongly influenced by the decision criteria used. Those decision criteria could be utility (the greatest happiness of the greatest number), rights or technology based or some combination of the three. It is necessary to make such choices about the definition of risks and criteria for management. It is clear that these are social (i.e., political) and value choices and science has little to say on this matter. This is another example of what Alvin Weinberg has named Transcience where the subject matter is scientific and technical but the choices are social, political and moral. This paper shall deal only with the scientific and technical aspects of the hazardous waste problem to create a hazardous substances classification system.

  2. Effects from past solid waste disposal practices.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L J; Daniel, D E; Abeele, W V; Ledbetter, J O; Hansen, W R

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviews documented environmental effects experience from the disposal of solid waste materials in the U.S. Selected case histories are discussed that illustrate waste migration and its actual or potential effects on human or environmental health. Principal conclusions resulting from this review were: solid waste materials do migrate beyond the geometric confines of the initial placement location; environmental effects have been experienced from disposal of municipal, agricultural, and toxic chemical wastes; and utilization of presently known science and engineering principles in sitting and operating solid waste disposal facilities would make a significant improvement in the containment capability of shallow land disposal facilities. PMID:367769

  3. 48 CFR 252.223-7006 - Prohibition on Storage, Treatment, and Disposal of Toxic or Hazardous Materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...TREATMENT, AND DISPOSAL OF TOXIC OR HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...material used in or a waste generated or resulting...equipment, or facilities. Toxic or hazardous materials...material used in or a waste generated or resulting...equipment, or facilities. Toxic or hazardous...

  4. TREATMENT OF AQUEOUS METAL AND CYANIDE BEARING HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the reauthorization of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the concurrent restrictions on land disposal of hazardous wastes, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is assessing technologies that can be substituted for, or precursors to land disposal. The ...

  5. ORNL grouting technologies for immobilizing hazardous wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, L.R.; Trauger, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    The Cement and Concrete Applications Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed versatile and inexpensive processes to solidify large quantities of hazardous liquids, sludges, and solids. By using standard off the shelf processing equipment, these batch or continuous processes are compatible with a wide range of disposal methods, such as above-ground storage, shallow-land burial, deep geological disposal, sea-bed dumping, and bulk in-situ solidification. Because of their economic advantages, these latter bulk in-situ disposal scenarios have received the most development. ORNL's experience has shown that tailored cement-based formulas can be developed which tolerate wide fluctuations in waste feed compositions and still maintain mixing properties that are compatible with standard equipment. In addition to cements, these grouts contain pozzolans, clays and other additives to control the flow properties, set-times, phase separations and impacts of waste stream fluctuation. The cements, fly ashes and other grout components are readily available in bulk quantities and the solids-blends typically cost less than $0.05 to 0.15 per waste gallon. Depending on the disposal scenario, total disposal costs (material, capital, and operating) can be as low as $0.10 to 0.50 per gallon.

  6. BIOHAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL CHART (MSU Research Laboratories)

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    BIOHAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL CHART (MSU Research Laboratories) Collect in red plastic SHARPS and CONTAMINATED solid waste: disposable plastic- ware, shoe covers, agar plate cultures, kimwipes, paper towels containers at http://www.montana.edu/wwwsrm/waste.htm OR Disinfect with an appropriate chemical disinfectant

  7. Disposal requirements for PCB waste

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic chemicals that had become widely used in industrial applications due to their practical physical and chemical properties. Historical uses of PCBs include dielectric fluids (used in utility transformers, capacitors, etc.), hydraulic fluids, and other applications requiring stable, fire-retardant materials. Due to findings that PCBs may cause adverse health effects and due to their persistence and accumulation in the environment, the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), enacted on october 11, 1976, banned the manufacture of PCBs after 1978 [Section 6(e)]. The first PCB regulations, promulgated at 40 CFR Part 761, were finalized on February 17, 1978. These PCB regulations include requirements specifying disposal methods and marking (labeling) procedures, and controlling PCB use. To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in its efforts to comply with the TSCA statute and implementing regulations, the Office of Environmental Guidance has prepared the document ``Guidance on the Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).`` That document explains the requirements specified in the statute and regulations for managing PCBs including PCB use, storage, transport, and disposal. PCB materials that are no longer in use and have been declared a waste must be disposed of according to the requirements found at 40 CFR 761.60. These requirements establish disposal options for a multitude of PCB materials including soil and debris, liquid PCBs, sludges and slurries, containers, transformers, capacitors, hydraulic machines, and other electrical equipment. This Information Brief supplements the PCB guidance document by responding to common questions concerning disposal requirements for PCBs. It is one of a series of Information Briefs pertinent to PCB management issues.

  8. A model for determining the fate of hazardous constituents in waste during in-vessel composting 

    E-print Network

    Bollineni, Prasanthi

    1994-01-01

    Composting is one of the techniques that has evolved as a safe disposal and predisposal alternative to the stringent regulations on hazardous waste disposal. The implementation of this technique needs careful evaluation ...

  9. Radioactive waste disposal in simulated peat bog repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, W.R.; Massey, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 have required state governments to be responsible for providing low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities in their respective areas. Questions are (a) is the technology sufficiently advanced to ensure that radioactive wastes can be stored for 300 to 1000 yr without entering into any uncontrolled area. (b) since actual experience does not exist for nuclear waste disposal over this time period, can the mathematical models developed be tested and verified using unequivocal data. (c) how can the public perception of the problem be addressed and the potential risk assessment of the hazards be communicated. To address the technical problems of nuclear waste disposal in the acid precipitation regions of the Northern Hemisphere, a project was initiated in 1984 to evaluate an alternative method of nuclear waste disposal that may not rely completely on engineered barriers to protect the public. Certain natural biogeochemical systems have been retaining deposited materials since the last Ice Age (12,000 to 15,000 yr). It is the authors belief that the biogeochemical system of wetlands and peat bogs may provide an example of an analogue for a nuclear waste repository system that can be tested and verified over a sufficient time period, at least for the LLW disposal problem.

  10. Hazardous waste in Mexico: Just how much is there?

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, H.

    1994-12-31

    Mexico will probably follow the same basic regulatory path that was followed in the US, but at a faster pace to achieve equivalent protection of the environment. The redefinition of hazardous waste currently underway in both US and Mexico will require more stringent controls and less latitude in the available technology for disposal or recycling. Mexico`s General Law of Ecological Equilibrium and Environmental Protection became effective March 1, 1988. It surpassed most preceding regulations and decrees regarding hazardous wastes generated in, imported to, or exported from Mexico. The law is comprehensive and unifies various environmental statutes. An earlier Presidential decree continues to regulate certain hazardous materials not considered to be hazardous wastes by the new regulations. The new hazardous waste regulations govern the following activities: management of hazardous wastes; permitting of generators and transporters; and permitting of the construction and operation of facilities for the treatment, storage, or disposal of hazardous wastes. The environmental laws which address hazardous waste issues in Mexico were enacted in 1988 and new technical regulations have recently been added. Most of these laws and regulations have been inspired by US law and environmental experience.

  11. Current legislation governing clinical waste disposal.

    PubMed

    Moritz, J M

    1995-06-01

    The paper considers UK and EC Legislation regulating clinical waste disposal. The legal definition of clinical waste is distinguished from both 'health care waste' and 'infectious waste'. Waste can be pre-treated so as to enable it to be disposed of through the normal waste stream. The legislation is looked at by reference to (i) production and storage; (ii) handling and transportation; and (iii) disposal. It is vitally important to draw up a waste management strategy. Effective segregation at source is a key factor in the waste management strategy and it will enable hospital authorities to make economic savings in waste disposal costs. The Paper considers the Duty of Care under the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and stresses the obligation on each person in the waste disposal chain to discharge the Duty. Landfilling as a method of disposal is discouraged except for waste where no possibility of infection arises. There are problems with hospital incinerators meeting modern emission standards. Requirements for licensing new incinerators are examined. The new Waste Management Licensing Regulations 1994 require applications for Waste Management Licenses to demonstrate technical and financial competence as 'fit and proper persons'. The Paper concludes by examining penalties for breach of regulatory provisions. PMID:7560993

  12. VOLATILE EMISSIONS FROM STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) and the Office of Solid Waste (OSW) are gathering information to control emissions from hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs). he EPA Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) provided t...

  13. HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION IN INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES: CEMENT AND LIME KILNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    With more liquid wastes due to be banned from land disposal facilities, expanding hazardous waste incineration capacity becomes increasingly important. At the same time, industrial plants are increasingly seeking to find new sources of lower cost fuel, specifically from the dispo...

  14. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  15. Pharmaceutical waste may be a hazardous chemical waste, controlled substance or biomedical waste. Proper classification is necessary to be in compliance with the laws regulating each waste type.

    E-print Network

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Pharmaceutical waste may be a hazardous chemical waste, controlled substance or biomedical waste Guidelines available online at www.ehs.uci.edu/programs/enviro/. Controlled Substance Pharmaceutical Waste: All controlled substance pharmaceutical waste must be disposed through EH&S. For a list of controlled

  16. 75 FR 35127 - Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Special Wastes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... Protection Agency 40 CFR Parts 257, 261, 264 et al. Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System... Solid Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Special Wastes; Disposal of Coal Combustion... system is not an ``anonymous access'' system. If you send an e-mail comment directly to the...

  17. Hazardous waste treatment facility and skid-mounted treatment systems at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Lussiez, G.W.; Zygmunt, S.J.

    1993-05-01

    To centralize treatment, storage, and staging areas for hazardous wastes, Los Alamos National Laboratory has designed a 12,000-ft{sup 2} hazardous waste treatment facility. The facility will house a treatment room for each of four kinds of wastes: nonradioactive characteristic wastes, nonradioactive listed wastes radioactive characteristic wastes, and radioactive listed wastes. The facility will be used for repacking labpacks, bulking small organic waste volumes, processing scintillation vials, treating reactives such as lithium hydride and pyrophoric uranium, treating contaminated solids such as barium sand, and treating plating wastes. The treated wastes will then be appropriately disposed of. This report describes the integral features of the hazardous waste treatment facility.

  18. 40 CFR 262.212 - Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.212 Making the...disposal facility. If an eligible academic entity makes the hazardous waste determination...subject to the terms of the eligible academic entity's hazardous waste permit...

  19. 40 CFR 262.212 - Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.212 Making the...disposal facility. If an eligible academic entity makes the hazardous waste determination...subject to the terms of the eligible academic entity's hazardous waste permit...

  20. 40 CFR 262.212 - Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.212 Making the...disposal facility. If an eligible academic entity makes the hazardous waste determination...subject to the terms of the eligible academic entity's hazardous waste permit...

  1. 40 CFR 262.212 - Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.212 Making the...disposal facility. If an eligible academic entity makes the hazardous waste determination...subject to the terms of the eligible academic entity's hazardous waste permit...

  2. 40 CFR 262.212 - Making the hazardous waste determination at an on-site interim status or permitted treatment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.212 Making the...disposal facility. If an eligible academic entity makes the hazardous waste determination...subject to the terms of the eligible academic entity's hazardous waste permit...

  3. A Comparison of Organic Emissions from Hazardous Waste Incinerators Versus the 1990 Toxics Release Inventory Air Releases

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incineration is often the preferred technology for disposing of hazardous waste and remediating Superfund sites. The effective implementation of this technology is frequently impeded by strong public opposition to hazardous waste incineration (HWI). One of the reasons cited for t...

  4. Waste disposal options report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

    1998-02-01

    Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: estimates of feed and waste volumes, compositions, and properties; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Zr calcine; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Al calcine; determination of k{sub eff} for high level waste canisters in various configurations; review of ceramic silicone foam for radioactive waste disposal; epoxides for low-level radioactive waste disposal; evaluation of several neutralization cases in processing calcine and sodium-bearing waste; background information for EFEs, dose rates, watts/canister, and PE-curies; waste disposal options assumptions; update of radiation field definition and thermal generation rates for calcine process packages of various geometries-HKP-26-97; and standard criteria of candidate repositories and environmental regulations for the treatment and disposal of ICPP radioactive mixed wastes.

  5. Potentially hazardous waste produced at home

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify the sources of waste generation household consisting of biological material and to investigate the knowledge presented by those responsible for the generation of waste in the home environment on the potential health risk human and environmental. Method It is a quantitative survey performed in Parque Capuava, Santo André (SP). The questionnaire was administered by the community employers and nursing students during the consultation with nursing supervision through interview question/answer. The exclusion criteria were patients who were not in the area served by the Basic Health Unit which covers the area of Pq Capuava. The sample was consisted of 99 persons and the data collection a questionnaire was used. Results We observed that 63.3% of people said to use disposables, with the majority (58.7%) of these use the public collection as the final destination of these materials. It was reported that 73.7% of those surveyed reported having knowledge about the risk of disease transmission. Public awareness of the importance of proper packaging and disposal of potentially hazardous household waste may contribute significantly to the preservation of human and environmental health and this procedure can be performed and supervised by professional nurses. Conclusion We suggest implementation of workshops for community health workers and the general population in order to enhance their knowledge about the storage and disposal of potentially infectious waste generated at home, thereby reducing the potential risk of disease transmission by improper management. PMID:23806043

  6. 77 FR 12497 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...FRL-9640-2] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Exclusion AGENCY: Environmental...rules relating to agency management or personnel; and...protection, Hazardous waste, Recycling,...

  7. 76 FR 55846 - Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ...RIN 2050-AG60 Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and...the regulations for hazardous waste management under the Resource Conservation...the regulations for hazardous waste management under the Resource...

  8. 76 FR 16534 - Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ...FRL-9285-7] Hazardous Waste Management System Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion AGENCY...rules relating to agency management or personnel; and...protection, Hazardous waste, Recycling,...

  9. Material Recycling and Waste Disposal Document Control

    E-print Network

    Guillas, Serge

    1 Material Recycling and Waste Disposal Procedure Document Control Document Created by 23, treatment, handling, transport and disposal of recyclable materials and residual wastes so as to maximise the opportunity and value for the recyclable materials and to minimise the quantity of residual materials

  10. The politics of nuclear-waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Tarricone, P.

    1994-03-01

    After 72 days of public hearings and testimony from more than 100 witnesses, the first commission of its kind in the US found that politics--not science and engineering--led to the selection of Martinsville, Ill. as the host site for a nuclear-waste-disposal facility. This article examines how the plan to dispose of nuclear waste in Martinsville ultimately unraveled.

  11. Disposal of liquid radioactive wastes through wells or shafts

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes disposal of liquids and, in some cases, suitable solids and/or entrapped gases, through: (1) well injection into deep permeable strata, bounded by impermeable layers; (2) grout injection into an impermeable host rock, forming fractures in which the waste solidifies; and (3) slurrying into excavated subsurface cavities. Radioactive materials are presently being disposed of worldwide using all three techniques. However, it would appear that if the techniques were verified as posing minimum hazards to the environment and suitable site-specific host rock were identified, these disposal techniques could be more widely used.

  12. 77 FR 72997 - Low-Level Waste Disposal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...RIN 3150-AI92 Low-Level Waste Disposal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...regulations that govern low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) disposal facilities...Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste,'' to require new and...

  13. 20 CFR 654.406 - Excreta and liquid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... false Excreta and liquid waste disposal. 654.406 Section...SERVICE SYSTEM Housing for Agricultural Workers Housing Standards § 654.406 Excreta and liquid waste disposal. (a) Facilities...disposal of excreta and liquid waste. Raw or treated liquid...

  14. 20 CFR 654.406 - Excreta and liquid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Excreta and liquid waste disposal. 654.406 Section...Standards § 654.406 Excreta and liquid waste disposal. (a) Facilities...maintained for effective disposal of excreta and liquid waste. Raw or treated liquid...

  15. 20 CFR 654.406 - Excreta and liquid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Excreta and liquid waste disposal. 654.406 Section...Standards § 654.406 Excreta and liquid waste disposal. (a) Facilities...maintained for effective disposal of excreta and liquid waste. Raw or treated liquid...

  16. 20 CFR 654.406 - Excreta and liquid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Excreta and liquid waste disposal. 654.406 Section...Standards § 654.406 Excreta and liquid waste disposal. (a) Facilities...maintained for effective disposal of excreta and liquid waste. Raw or treated liquid...

  17. 20 CFR 654.406 - Excreta and liquid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Excreta and liquid waste disposal. 654.406 Section...Standards § 654.406 Excreta and liquid waste disposal. (a) Facilities...maintained for effective disposal of excreta and liquid waste. Raw or treated liquid...

  18. 77 FR 14307 - Water and Waste Disposal Loans and Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ...Service 7 CFR 1777 RIN 0572-AC26 Water and Waste Disposal Loans and Grants AGENCY...pertaining to the Section 306C Water and Waste Disposal (WWD) Loans and Grants program, which provides water and waste disposal facilities and...

  19. 77 FR 43149 - Water and Waste Disposal Loans and Grants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ...CFR Part 1777 RIN 0572-AC26 Water and Waste Disposal Loans and Grants AGENCY...regulations related to the Section 306C Water and Waste Disposal (WWD) Loans and Grants Program, which provides water and waste disposal facilities and...

  20. Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Korenberg, Jacob (York, PA)

    1990-01-01

    An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

  1. Nuclear waste disposal educational forum

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-18

    In keeping with a mandate from the US Congress to provide opportunities for consumer education and information and to seek consumer input on national issues, the Department of Energy's Office of Consumer Affairs held a three-hour educational forum on the proposed nuclear waste disposal legislation. Nearly one hundred representatives of consumer, public interest, civic and environmental organizations were invited to attend. Consumer affairs professionals of utility companies across the country were also invited to attend the forum. The following six papers were presented: historical perspectives; status of legislation (Senate); status of legislation (House of Representatives); impact on the legislation on electric utilities; impact of the legislation on consumers; implementing the legislation. All six papers have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base.

  2. DISPOSABLE CANISTER WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Garrett

    2001-07-30

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide the bases for defining the preclosure limits on radioactive material releases from radioactive waste forms to be received in disposable canisters at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain. Specifically, this calculation will provide the basis for criteria to be included in a forthcoming revision of the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD) that limits releases in terms of non-isotope-specific canister release dose-equivalent source terms. These criteria will be developed for the Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) standard canister, the Multicanister Overpack (MCO), the naval spent fuel canister, the High-Level Waste (HLW) canister, the plutonium can-in-canister, and the large Multipurpose Canister (MPC). The shippers of such canisters will be required to demonstrate that they meet these criteria before the canisters are accepted at the MGR. The Quality Assurance program is applicable to this calculation. The work reported in this document is part of the analysis of DSNF and is performed using procedure AP-3.124, Calculations. The work done for this analysis was evaluated according to procedure QAP-2-0, Control of Activities, which has been superseded by AP-2.21Q, Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities. This evaluation determined that such activities are subject to the requirements of DOE/RW/0333P, Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (DOE 2000). This work is also prepared in accordance with the development plan titled Design Basis Event Analyses on DOE SNF and Plutonium Can-In-Canister Waste Forms (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and Technical Work Plan For: Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel Work Packages (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This calculation contains no electronic data applicable to any electronic data management system.

  3. Aerosol can waste disposal device

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Michael D. (Las Vegas, NV); Klapperick, Robert L. (Las Vegas, NV); Bell, Chris (Las Vegas, NV)

    1993-01-01

    Disclosed is a device for removing gases and liquid from containers. The ice punctures the bottom of a container for purposes of exhausting gases and liquid from the container without their escaping into the atmosphere. The device includes an inner cup or cylinder having a top portion with an open end for receiving a container and a bottom portion which may be fastened to a disposal or waste container in a substantially leak-proof manner. A piercing device is mounted in the lower portion of the inner cylinder for puncturing the can bottom placed in the inner cylinder. An outer cylinder having an open end and a closed end fits over the top portion of the inner cylinder in telescoping engagement. A force exerted on the closed end of the outer cylinder urges the bottom of a can in the inner cylinder into engagement with the piercing device in the bottom of the inner cylinder to form an opening in the can bottom, thereby permitting the contents of the can to enter the disposal container.

  4. Aerosol can waste disposal device

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, M.D.; Klapperick, R.L.; Bell, C.

    1993-12-21

    Disclosed is a device for removing gases and liquid from containers. The device punctures the bottom of a container for purposes of exhausting gases and liquid from the container without their escaping into the atmosphere. The device includes an inner cup or cylinder having a top portion with an open end for receiving a container and a bottom portion which may be fastened to a disposal or waste container in a substantially leak-proof manner. A piercing device is mounted in the lower portion of the inner cylinder for puncturing the can bottom placed in the inner cylinder. An outer cylinder having an open end and a closed end fits over the top portion of the inner cylinder in telescoping engagement. A force exerted on the closed end of the outer cylinder urges the bottom of a can in the inner cylinder into engagement with the piercing device in the bottom of the inner cylinder to form an opening in the can bottom, thereby permitting the contents of the can to enter the disposal container. 7 figures.

  5. 77 FR 46994 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs...CFR) those provisions of the State regulations that are authorized...the EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly...Codification Coordinator, State/Tribal Oversight...

  6. 77 FR 29275 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs...CFR) those provisions of the State regulations that are authorized...the EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly...Banks Codification Coordinator, State/Tribal Oversight...

  7. Hazard ranking systems for chemical wastes and chemical waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.D.; Parker, F.L. ); Crutcher, M.R. and Associates, Inc., Columbia, IL )

    1991-01-01

    Hazardous materials and substances have always existed in the environment. Mankind has evolved to live with some degree of exposure to toxic materials. Until recently the risk has been from natural toxins or natural background radiation. While rapid technological advances over the past few decades have improved the lifestyle of our society, they have also dramatically increased the availability, volume and types of synthetic and natural hazardous materials. Many of their effects are as yet uncertain. Products and manufacturing by-products that no longer serve a useful purpose are deemed wastes. For some waste products land disposal will always be their ultimate fate. Hazardous substances are often included in the waste products. One needs to classify wastes by degree of hazard (risk). Risk (degree of probability of loss) is usually defined for risk assessment as probability of an occurrence times the consequences of the occurrence. Perhaps even more important than the definition of risk is the choice of a risk management strategy. The choice of strategy will be strongly influenced by the decision criteria used. Those decision criteria could be utility (the greatest happiness of the greatest number), rights or technology based or some combination of the three. It is necessary to make such choices about the definition of risks and criteria for management. It is clear that these are social (i.e., political) and value choices and science has little to say on this matter. This is another example of what Alvin Weinberg has named Transcience where the subject matter is scientific and technical but the choices are social, political and moral. This paper shall deal only with the scientific and technical aspects of the hazardous waste problem to create a hazardous substances classification system.

  8. Extremely Hazardous Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    Spokane County and the Key Tronic Corporation appealed a judgement entered by the Superior court of Spokane County, Washington, upon a jury verdict awarding five plaintiffs damages, attorney's fees, and costs based on a lawsuit arising from the disposal of chemicals at the Spokane County landfill and the subsequent contamination of the plaintiffs water supply. This paper discussed the appeal.

  9. 36 CFR 13.1118 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1118... Provisions § 13.1118 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site...

  10. 36 CFR 13.1008 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1008... § 13.1008 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site may...

  11. 36 CFR 13.1008 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1008... § 13.1008 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site may...

  12. 36 CFR 13.1604 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1604... Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site may be located within...

  13. 36 CFR 13.1912 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1912....1912 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site may be...

  14. 36 CFR 13.1008 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1008... § 13.1008 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site may...

  15. 36 CFR 13.1118 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1118... Provisions § 13.1118 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site...

  16. 36 CFR 13.1118 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1118... Provisions § 13.1118 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site...

  17. 36 CFR 13.1912 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1912....1912 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site may be...

  18. 36 CFR 13.1604 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1604... Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site may be located within...

  19. 36 CFR 13.1912 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1912....1912 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site may be...

  20. 36 CFR 13.1604 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1604... Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid waste generated within the boundaries of the park area. (b) A solid waste disposal site may be located within...

  1. Radioactive waste disposal: An environmental perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    There are five general categories of radioactive waste: (1) spent nuclear fuel from nuclear reactors and high-level waste from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, (2) transuranic waste mainly from defense programs, (3) uranium mill tailings from the mining and milling of uranium ore, (4) low-level waste, and (5) naturally occurring and acclerator-produced radioactive materials. The booklet describes the different categories of waste, discusses disposal practices for each type, and describes the way they are regulated.

  2. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    T. M. Blakley; W. D. Schofield

    2007-09-10

    This final hazard categorization (FHC) document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the commitments for the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks Remediation Project. The remediation activities analyzed in this FHC are based on recommended treatment and disposal alternatives described in the Engineering Evaluation for the Remediation to the 116-C-3 Chemical Waste Tanks (BHI 2005e).

  3. UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA INFECTIOUS WASTE DISPOSAL

    E-print Network

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    (call 777-5269) which includes a red plastic bag liner. All medical waste must be packed in these lined waste box provided by EHS. All other biologically-contaminated materials, whether glass or plasticUNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA INFECTIOUS WASTE DISPOSAL Introduction All biologically

  4. 10 CFR 850.32 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.32 Waste disposal. (a) The responsible employer must control the generation of beryllium-containing waste, and beryllium... minimization principles. (b) Beryllium-containing waste, and beryllium-contaminated equipment and other...

  5. 10 CFR 850.32 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.32 Waste disposal. (a) The responsible employer must control the generation of beryllium-containing waste, and beryllium... minimization principles. (b) Beryllium-containing waste, and beryllium-contaminated equipment and other...

  6. 10 CFR 850.32 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.32 Waste disposal. (a) The responsible employer must control the generation of beryllium-containing waste, and beryllium... minimization principles. (b) Beryllium-containing waste, and beryllium-contaminated equipment and other...

  7. 10 CFR 850.32 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.32 Waste disposal. (a) The responsible employer must control the generation of beryllium-containing waste, and beryllium... minimization principles. (b) Beryllium-containing waste, and beryllium-contaminated equipment and other...

  8. 10 CFR 850.32 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.32 Waste disposal. (a) The responsible employer must control the generation of beryllium-containing waste, and beryllium... minimization principles. (b) Beryllium-containing waste, and beryllium-contaminated equipment and other...

  9. Integrating waste management with Job Hazard analysis

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-01

    The web-based Automated Job Hazard Analysis (AJHA) system is a tool designed to help capture and communicate the results of the hazard review and mitigation process for specific work activities. In Fluor Hanford's day-to-day work planning and execution process, AJHA has become the focal point for integrating Integrated Safety Management (ISM) through industrial health and safety principles; environmental safety measures; and involvement by workers, subject-matter experts and management. This paper illustrates how AJHA has become a key element in involving waste-management and environmental-control professionals in planning and executing work. To support implementing requirements for waste management and environmental compliance within the core function and guiding principles of an integrated safety management system (ISMS), Fluor Hanford has developed the a computer-based application called the 'Automated Job Hazard Analysis' (AJHA), into the work management process. This web-based software tool helps integrate the knowledge of site workers, subject-matter experts, and safety principles and requirements established in standards, and regulations. AJHA facilitates a process of work site review, hazard identification, analysis, and the determination of specific work controls. The AJHA application provides a well-organized job hazard analysis report including training and staffing requirements, prerequisite actions, notifications, and specific work controls listed for each sub-task determined for the job. AJHA lists common hazards addressed in the U.S. Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) federal codes; and State regulations such as the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Administration (WISHA). AJHA also lists extraordinary hazards that are unique to a particular industry sector, such as radiological hazards and waste management. The work-planning team evaluates the scope of work and reviews the work site to identify potential hazards. Hazards relevant to the work activity being analyzed are selected from the listing provided in AJHA. The work team can also enter one-time hazards unique to the work activity. Because AJHA is web based, it can be taken into the field during site walk-downs using wireless or cell- phone technologies. Once hazards are selected, AJHA automatically lists mandatory and optional controls, based on the referenced codes and good work practices. The hazards selected may also require that additional specific analysis be performed, focusing on the unique characteristics of the job being analyzed. For example, the physical characteristics, packaging, handling, and disposal requirements for a specific waste type. The work team then evaluates the identified hazards and related controls and adds details as needed for the specific work activity being analyzed. The selection of relevant hazards also triggers required reviews by subject-matter experts (SMEs) and the on-line completion of necessary forms and permits. The details of the hazard analysis are reviewed on line or in a work- team group setting. SME approvals are entered on-line and are published in the job hazard analysis report. (authors)

  10. Preliminary Safety Design Report for Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Solack; Carol Mason

    2012-03-01

    A new onsite, remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled low-level waste disposal for remote-handled low-level waste from the Idaho National Laboratory and for nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled low-level waste in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This preliminary safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled low-level waste disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by discussing site characteristics that impact accident analysis, by providing the facility and process information necessary to support the hazard analysis, by identifying and evaluating potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled low-level waste, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  11. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L. (Los Angeles, CA); Telles, Rodney W. (Alhambra, CA); Lubowitz, Hyman R. (Rolling Hills Estates, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  12. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L. (Los Angeles, CA); Telles, Rodney W. (Alhambra, CA); Lubowitz, Hyman R. (Rolling Hills Estates, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  13. MOVEMENT OF SELECTED METALS, ASBESTOS, AND CYANIDE IN SOIL: APPLICATIONS TO WASTE DISPOSAL PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents information on movement of selected hazardous substances in soil which can be applied to problems of selecting and operating land disposal sites for wastes containing arsenic, asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, cyanide, iron, lead, mercury, selen...

  14. NAVAJO NATION HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage represents the locations of hazardous waste sites on the Navajo Nation Indian Reservation. The point locations were delineated on 1:24,000 scale US Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps by staff from the Navajo Nation EPA, Resource Conservation & Reco...

  15. Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation: Waste Disposal In Engineered Trench #3

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L. L.; Smith, F. G. III; Flach, G. P.; Hiergesell, R. A.; Butcher, B. T.

    2013-07-29

    Because Engineered Trench #3 (ET#3) will be placed in the location previously designated for Slit Trench #12 (ST#12), Solid Waste Management (SWM) requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) determine if the ST#12 limits could be employed as surrogate disposal limits for ET#3 operations. SRNL documented in this Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation (UDQE) that the use of ST#12 limits as surrogates for the new ET#3 disposal unit will provide reasonable assurance that Department of Energy (DOE) 435.1 performance objectives and measures (USDOE, 1999) will be protected. Therefore new ET#3 inventory limits as determined by a Special Analysis (SA) are not required.

  16. Integrating Total Quality Management (TQM) and hazardous waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, N.

    1993-11-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and its subsequent amendments have had a dramatic impact on hazardous waste management for business and industry. The complexity of this law and the penalties for noncompliance have made it one of the most challenging regulatory programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The fundamentals of RCRA include ``cradle to grave`` management of hazardous waste, covering generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. The regulations also address extensive definitions and listing/identification mechanisms for hazardous waste along with a tracking system. Treatment is favored over disposal and emphasis is on ``front-end`` treatment such as waste minimization and pollution prevention. A study of large corporations such as Xerox, 3M, and Dow Chemical, as well as the public sector, has shown that well known and successful hazardous waste management programs emphasize pollution prevention and employment of techniques such as proactive environmental management, environmentally conscious manufacturing, and source reduction. Nearly all successful hazardous waste programs include some aspects of Total Quality Management, which begins with a strong commitment from top management. Hazardous waste management at the Rocky Flats Plant is further complicated by the dominance of ``mixed waste`` at the facility. The mixed waste stems from the original mission of the facility, which was production of nuclear weapons components for the Department of Energy (DOE). A Quality Assurance Program based on the criterion in DOE Order 5700.6C has been implemented at Rocky Flats. All of the elements of the Quality Assurance Program play a role in hazardous waste management. Perhaps one of the biggest waste management problems facing the Rocky Flats Plant is cleaning up contamination from a forty year mission which focused on production of nuclear weapon components.

  17. 75 FR 17332 - Idaho: Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ...Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs...CFR) those provisions of the State regulations that are authorized...the EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act,...

  18. 75 FR 45583 - New York: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ...Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs...CFR) those provisions of the State regulations that are authorized...that EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as...

  19. 76 FR 26681 - Wisconsin: Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ...Incorporation by Reference of Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Program...regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs...CFR) those provisions of the State regulations that are authorized...the EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act,...

  20. HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE CHARACTERIZATION STUDY FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY, FLORIDA - A MITE PROGRAM EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of the Household Hazardous Waste Characterization Study (the HHW Study) were to: 1) Quantity the annual household hazardous waste (HHW) tonnages disposed in Palm Beach County Florida’s (the County) residential solid waste (characterized in this study as municipal s...

  1. Application of plasma shield technology to the reduction, treatment, and disposal of hazardous organic and/or mixed wastes with actinide recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.T.; Vaughan, L.L.; Joyce, E.L. Jr.; Bieniewski, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Los Alamos research activities are currently directed at the application of the shielded hydrogen plasma torch to the direct production of actinide metals from a UF{sub 6} feedstock. Two broad classes of thermal plasma reactors are currently in widespread use: the direct current (dc) arc jet system and the radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled system. Los Alamos has improved upon the basic rf plasma tube design using the concept of a transformer. The unique feature of the Los Alamos tube is a segmented, cooled, internal radiation shield. The Los Alamos shielded plasma torch routinely achieves temperatures exceeding 10,000 K and electron densities of 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3} when operated continuously at one atmosphere of argon. These highly energetic conditions are sufficient to dissociate most chemical compounds into their constituent atoms. Based upon these characteristics, Los Alamos is currently investigating the application of the shielded plasma torch technology to the destruction of organic and mixed hazardous wastes, as well as the direct production of actinide metals from the halides and oxides, without the cogeneration of contaminated wastes. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  2. 49 CFR 171.3 - Hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... have identification numbers which must be displayed on hazardous waste manifests. See 40 CFR parts 262...: In 40 CFR part 263, the EPA sets forth requirements for the cleanup of releases of hazardous wastes. ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hazardous waste. 171.3 Section...

  3. 49 CFR 171.3 - Hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... have identification numbers which must be displayed on hazardous waste manifests. See 40 CFR parts 262...: In 40 CFR part 263, the EPA sets forth requirements for the cleanup of releases of hazardous wastes. ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous waste. 171.3 Section...

  4. 49 CFR 171.3 - Hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... have identification numbers which must be displayed on hazardous waste manifests. See 40 CFR parts 262...: In 40 CFR part 263, the EPA sets forth requirements for the cleanup of releases of hazardous wastes. ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hazardous waste. 171.3 Section...

  5. 49 CFR 171.3 - Hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... have identification numbers which must be displayed on hazardous waste manifests. See 40 CFR parts 262...: In 40 CFR part 263, the EPA sets forth requirements for the cleanup of releases of hazardous wastes. ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hazardous waste. 171.3 Section...

  6. 49 CFR 171.3 - Hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... have identification numbers which must be displayed on hazardous waste manifests. See 40 CFR parts 262...: In 40 CFR part 263, the EPA sets forth requirements for the cleanup of releases of hazardous wastes. ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hazardous waste. 171.3 Section...

  7. Low-level waste disposal - Grout issue and alternative waste form technology

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.L.; Westski, J.H. Jr.

    1993-02-01

    Based on the Record of Decision (1) for the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (HDW-EIS) (2), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to dispose of the low-level fraction of double-shell tank (DST) waste by solidifying the liquid waste as a cement-based grout placed in near-surface, reinforced, lined concrete vaults at the Hanford Site. In 1989, the Hanford Grout Disposal Program (HGDP) completed a full-scale demonstration campaign by successfully grouting 3,800 cubic meters (1 million gallons) of low radioactivity, nonhazardous, phosphate/sulfate waste (PSW), mainly decontamination solution from N Reactor. The HGDP is now preparing for restart of the facility to grout a higher level activity, mixed waste double-shell slurry feed (DSSF). This greater radionuclide and hazardous waste content has resulted in a number of issues confronting the disposal system and the program. This paper will present a brief summary of the Grout Treatment Facility`s components and features and will provide a status of the HGDP, concentrating on the major issues and challenges resulting from the higher radionuclide and hazardous content of the waste. The following major issues will be discussed: Formulation (cementitious mix) development; the Performance Assessment (PA) (3) to show compliance of the disposal system to long-term environmental protection objectives; and the impacts of grouting on waste volume projections and tank space needs.

  8. 75 FR 41121 - Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Special Wastes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... 21, 2010 (75 FR 35128). Additional information on the proposed rule can be found at http://www.epa... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 257, 261, 264, 265, 268, 271 and 302 RIN 2050-AE81 Hazardous and Solid Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Special Wastes; Disposal of Coal Combustion Residuals...

  9. 30 CFR 817.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. 817.89 Section... ACTIVITIES § 817.89 Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. (a) Noncoal mine wastes including, but not limited to... disposal of noncoal mine wastes shall be in a designated disposal site in the permit area or a...

  10. 30 CFR 817.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. 817.89 Section... ACTIVITIES § 817.89 Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. (a) Noncoal mine wastes including, but not limited to... disposal of noncoal mine wastes shall be in a designated disposal site in the permit area or a...

  11. 30 CFR 817.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. 817.89 Section... ACTIVITIES § 817.89 Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. (a) Noncoal mine wastes including, but not limited to... disposal of noncoal mine wastes shall be in a designated disposal site in the permit area or a...

  12. 30 CFR 816.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. 816.89 Section... ACTIVITIES § 816.89 Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. (a) Noncoal mine wastes including, but not limited to... disposal of noncoal mine wastes shall be in a designated disposal site in the permit area or a...

  13. 30 CFR 816.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. 816.89 Section... ACTIVITIES § 816.89 Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. (a) Noncoal mine wastes including, but not limited to... disposal of noncoal mine wastes shall be in a designated disposal site in the permit area or a...

  14. 30 CFR 816.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. 816.89 Section... ACTIVITIES § 816.89 Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. (a) Noncoal mine wastes including, but not limited to... disposal of noncoal mine wastes shall be in a designated disposal site in the permit area or a...

  15. 30 CFR 817.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. 817.89 Section... ACTIVITIES § 817.89 Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. (a) Noncoal mine wastes including, but not limited to... disposal of noncoal mine wastes shall be in a designated disposal site in the permit area or a...

  16. 30 CFR 816.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. 816.89 Section... ACTIVITIES § 816.89 Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. (a) Noncoal mine wastes including, but not limited to... disposal of noncoal mine wastes shall be in a designated disposal site in the permit area or a...

  17. 30 CFR 817.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. 817.89 Section... ACTIVITIES § 817.89 Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. (a) Noncoal mine wastes including, but not limited to... disposal of noncoal mine wastes shall be in a designated disposal site in the permit area or a...

  18. 30 CFR 816.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. 816.89 Section... ACTIVITIES § 816.89 Disposal of noncoal mine wastes. (a) Noncoal mine wastes including, but not limited to... disposal of noncoal mine wastes shall be in a designated disposal site in the permit area or a...

  19. 75 FR 58346 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ...EPA-R06-RCRA-2009-0312; SW FRL-9206-9] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste AGENCY: Environmental Protection...to exclude (or delist) certain solid wastes generated by its Longview,...

  20. 76 FR 4823 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identifying and Listing Hazardous Waste Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ...SW-FRL-9259-1] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identifying and Listing Hazardous Waste Exclusion AGENCY: Environmental...before it can manage the waste as nonhazardous in the...review by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)....

  1. 76 FR 76677 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ...FRL-9502-4] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion AGENCY...plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste; (7) the quantity of...

  2. 75 FR 57686 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ...EPA-R05-RCRA-2010-0758; FRL-9201-2] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste Amendment AGENCY: Environmental Protection...facilities to demonstrate that a specific waste from a particular generating...

  3. 75 FR 78918 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Removal of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ...FRL-9239-8] RIN 2050-AG55 Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of...to these same facilities from reduced waste management costs, by the expected shift of waste management from RCRA Subtitle C hazardous...

  4. 75 FR 61356 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ...SW-FRL-9209-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Correction AGENCY...appendix IX to part 261--Waste Excluded Under Sec...review by the Office of Management and Budget...

  5. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) disposable solid waste cask

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, B.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-20

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) evaluates and documents the ability of the Disposable Solid Waste Cask (DSWC) to meet the packaging requirements of HNF-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for the onsite transfer of special form, highway route controlled quantity, Type B fissile radioactive material. This SEP evaluates five shipments of DSWCs used for the transport and storage of Fast Flux Test Facility unirradiated fuel to the Plutonium Finishing Plant Protected Area.

  6. AIR EMISSIONS FROM THE INCINERATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States over the last ten years, concern over important disposal practices of the past has manifested itself in the passage of a series of federal and state-level hazardous waste clean-up and control statutes of unprecedented scope. he impact of these various statute...

  7. INCINERATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: A CRITICAL REVIEW UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last 15 years, concern over improper disposal practices of the past has manifested itself in the passage of a series of federal nd tate-level hazardous waste cleanup and control statutes of unprecedented scope. As a result, there has been a significant modification of wa...

  8. Children's Understandings Related to Hazardous Household Items and Waste

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandrakis, George N.

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on children's understanding of hazardous household items (HHI) and waste (HHW). Children from grades 4, 5 and 6 (n=173) participated in a questionnaire and interview research design. The results indicate that: (a) on a daily basis the children used HHI and disposed of HHW, (b) the children did not realize the danger of these…

  9. SECURING CONTAINERIZED HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH WELDED POLYETHYLENE ENCAPSULATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Full-scale encapsulation of 208-liter (55-gal) drums was studied as a means for managing corroding containers of hazardous wastes in the field and rendering them suitable for transport and safe deposit within a final disposal site such as a landfill. Polyethylene (PE) receivers w...

  10. Household Hazardous Waste and Automotive Products: A Pennsylvania Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorten, Charles V.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A significant fraction of household hazardous waste (HHW) is generated by home mechanics who use such products as motor oil, cleaners and solvents, and batteries. This survey assessed the following aspects: (1) perceptions of their health-related effects; (2) perceptions of their pollution potential; and (3) their use and disposal. (LZ)

  11. IN SITU RESTORATION TECHNIQUES FOR AQUIFERS CONTAMINATED WITH HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improper disposal of hazardous wastes is a threat to the nation's ground water supply. Methods which prevent contamination are probably the most effective techniques to protect ground water. Once contamination problems occur, there are a number of in situ techniques that can be u...

  12. MOBILITY OF TOXIC COMPOUNDS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to develop a laboratory extraction method for solid wastes that simulates concentrations of inorganic and organic constituents in leachates that result from co-disposing industrial wastes with municipal wastes in landfills (co-disposal in a land...

  13. Sources and management of hazardous waste in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K.

    1996-12-31

    Papua New Guinea (PNG) has considerable mineral wealth, especially in gold and copper. Large-scale mining takes place, and these activities are the source of most of PNG`s hazardous waste. Most people live in small farming communities throughout the region. Those living adjacent to mining areas have experienced some negative impacts from river ecosystem damage and erosion of their lands. Industry is centered mainly in urban areas and Generates waste composed of various products. Agricultural products, pesticide residues, and chemicals used for preserving timber and other forestry products also produce hazardous waste. Most municipal waste comes from domestic and commercial premises; it consists mainly of combustibles, noncombustibles, and other wastes. Hospitals generate pathogenic organisms, radioactive materials, and chemical and pharmaceutical laboratory waste. Little is known about the actual treatment of waste before disposal in PNG. Traditional low-cost waste disposal methods are usually practiced, such as use of landfills; storage in surface impoundments; and disposal in public sewers, rivers, and the sea. Indiscriminate burning of domestic waste in backyards is also commonly practiced in urban and rural areas. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Waste minimization via destruction of hazardous organics

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing technologies that are capable of destroying hazardous organics, that is, converting them basically to water and carbon dioxide. If these technologies were incorporated into the main processing operation where the waste is produced, then the volume and toxicity of the hazardous or mix hazardous waste generated would be significantly reduced. This presentation will briefly discuss some of the waste treatment technologies under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory focused on destroying hazardous organics.

  15. Toxic Overload: The Waste Disposal Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the Environmental Protection Agency as ombudsman concerning waste disposal is examined with respect to both the current options of source reduction and recycling as pollution prevention, and alternative approaches that expand upon these current options, particularly with respect to toxic and medical waste. (JJK)

  16. TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTES. PART 4. A REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT PROCESSES FOR METAL BEARING HAZARDOUS WASTE STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Congress and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) believe that treatment and recovery techniques should be given maximum priority when considering methods for managing the Nation's generated hazardous waste. A prohibition for the disposal of certain ca...

  17. Evaluation of chemical exposures in the hazardous waste industry

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, B.A.; Higgins, G.M.

    1994-12-31

    The assessment of personnel exposure to volatile solvent vapors is an important aspect in any comprehensive health and safety program. This is particularly true at Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities (TSDFs) and other industries dealing with volatile solvents. This paper presents monitoring data from seven TSDFs and exposure data from several routine small business and household activities. By examining data from a specialized business such as a TSDF along with data from more routine activities, a different perspective may be gained on the potential hazards associated with hazardous waste disposal activities.

  18. Factors affecting hazardous waste solidification/stabilization: a review.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Rachana; Chaudhary, Rubina

    2006-09-01

    Solidification/stabilization is accepted as a well-established disposal technique for hazardous waste. As a result many different types of hazardous wastes are treated with different binders. The S/S products have different property from waste and binders individually. The effectiveness of S/S process is studied by physical, chemical and microstructural methods. This paper summarizes the effect of different waste stream such as heavy metals bearing sludge, filter cake, fly ash, and slag on the properties of cement and other binders. The factors affecting strength development is studied using mix designs, including metal bearing waste alters the hydration and setting time of binders. Pore structure depends on relative quantity of the constituents, cement hydration products and their reaction products with admixtures. Carbonation and additives can lead to strength improvement in waste-binder matrix. PMID:16530943

  19. Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cirillo, R.R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K.C.; Conzelmann, G.; Carpenter, R.A.; Indriyanto, S.H.

    1994-11-01

    Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.

  20. 10 CFR 20.2005 - Disposal of specific wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposal of specific wastes. 20.2005 Section 20.2005 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Waste Disposal § 20.2005 Disposal of specific wastes. (a) A licensee may dispose of the following licensed material as if it...

  1. 10 CFR 20.2005 - Disposal of specific wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disposal of specific wastes. 20.2005 Section 20.2005 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Waste Disposal § 20.2005 Disposal of specific wastes. (a) A licensee may dispose of the following licensed material as if it...

  2. 10 CFR 20.2005 - Disposal of specific wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disposal of specific wastes. 20.2005 Section 20.2005 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Waste Disposal § 20.2005 Disposal of specific wastes. (a) A licensee may dispose of the following licensed material as if it...

  3. 10 CFR 20.2005 - Disposal of specific wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disposal of specific wastes. 20.2005 Section 20.2005 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Waste Disposal § 20.2005 Disposal of specific wastes. (a) A licensee may dispose of the following licensed material as if it...

  4. 10 CFR 20.2005 - Disposal of specific wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disposal of specific wastes. 20.2005 Section 20.2005 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Waste Disposal § 20.2005 Disposal of specific wastes. (a) A licensee may dispose of the following licensed material as if it...

  5. EVALUATION OF THE FEASIBILITY OF INCINERATING HAZARDOUS WASTE IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the search for disposal alternatives, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is evaluating the potential use of high-temperature processes for the incineration of hazardous wastes. Many kinds of waste have already been disposed of in boilers and cement kilns; this report con...

  6. APPLICATION OF A SIMPLE SHORT-TERM BIOASSAY FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF GENOTOXINS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proper disposal of hazardous wastes currently generated and clean up of waste disposal sites of the past are challenges facing regulatory agencies in the industrialized nations. he estimation of levels of toxicity is an essential step in prioritizing industrial effluents and ...

  7. 75 FR 13066 - Hazardous Waste Technical Corrections and Clarifications Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... transportation, Hazardous waste, Imports, Labeling, Packaging and containers, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements. 40 CFR Part 263 Environmental protection, Hazardous materials transportation, Hazardous Waste... and procedure, Confidential business information, Hazardous materials transportation, Hazardous...

  8. The disposal of nuclear waste in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The important problem of disposal of nuclear waste in space is addressed. A prior study proposed carrying only actinide wastes to space, but the present study assumes that all actinides and all fission products are to be carried to space. It is shown that nuclear waste in the calcine (oxide) form can be packaged in a container designed to provide thermal control, radiation shielding, mechanical containment, and an abort reentry thermal protection system. This package can be transported to orbit via the Space Shuttle. A second Space Shuttle delivers an oxygen-hydrogen orbit transfer vehicle to a rendezvous compatible orbit and the mated OTV and waste package are sent to the preferred destination. Preferred locations are either a lunar crater or a solar orbit. Shuttle traffic densities (which vary in time) are given and the safety of space disposal of wastes discussed.

  9. 75 FR 11002 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ...EPA-R04-RCRA-2008-0900; FRL-9124-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing...environment once released from the waste, plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities of waste...

  10. 75 FR 58315 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Direct Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ...FRL-9206-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities of waste...wastewater treatment plant and waste management in the RKI through...

  11. Hazardous waste management in the Texas construction industry 

    E-print Network

    Sprinkle, Donald Lee

    1991-01-01

    at improving waste management in the construction industry - in particular hazardous waste; (e) initiate further research to design solutions for hazardous-waste-management problems; and (f) implement hazardous-waste minimization and recovery practices...

  12. Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Robert C. W. (Martinez, GA)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluidtight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC (about 1" WC) higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes.

  13. Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Chang, R.C.W.

    1994-12-20

    An apparatus is described for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluid-tight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes. 1 figure.

  14. 43 CFR 3596.2 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disposal of waste. 3596.2 Section 3596.2... OPERATIONS Waste From Mining or Milling § 3596.2 Disposal of waste. The operator/lessee shall dispose of all wastes resulting from the mining, reduction, concentration or separation of mineral substances...

  15. 43 CFR 3596.2 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disposal of waste. 3596.2 Section 3596.2... OPERATIONS Waste From Mining or Milling § 3596.2 Disposal of waste. The operator/lessee shall dispose of all wastes resulting from the mining, reduction, concentration or separation of mineral substances...

  16. 43 CFR 3596.2 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disposal of waste. 3596.2 Section 3596.2... OPERATIONS Waste From Mining or Milling § 3596.2 Disposal of waste. The operator/lessee shall dispose of all wastes resulting from the mining, reduction, concentration or separation of mineral substances...

  17. 43 CFR 3596.2 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disposal of waste. 3596.2 Section 3596.2... OPERATIONS Waste From Mining or Milling § 3596.2 Disposal of waste. The operator/lessee shall dispose of all wastes resulting from the mining, reduction, concentration or separation of mineral substances...

  18. TOXICOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF REMEDIATING HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Section 121 of the amendments (1986) to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (SUPERFUND) calls for hazardous waste site remediations that will permanently and significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous substance...

  19. Locating hazardous waste facilities: The influence of NIMBY beliefs

    SciTech Connect

    Groothuis, P.A.; Miller, G. )

    1994-07-01

    The [open quote]Not-In-My-Backyard[close quote] (NIMBY) syndrome is analyzed in economic decision making. Belief statements that reflect specific NIMBY concerns are subjected to factor analysis and the structure reveals two dimensions: tolerance and avoidance. Tolerance reflects an acceptance of rational economic arguments regarding the siting of a hazardous waste facility and avoidance reflects a more personal fear-of-consequences. Analysis identifies demographic characteristics of individuals likely to exhibit these two beliefs. These beliefs also are shown to influence the acceptance of a hazardous waste disposal facility in ones neighborhood when compensation is offered.

  20. Future trends which will influence waste disposal.

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, A

    1978-01-01

    The disposal and management of solid wastes are ancient problems. The evolution of practices naturally changed as populations grew and sites for disposal became less acceptable. The central search was for easy disposal at minimum costs. The methods changed from indiscriminate dumping to sanitary landfill, feeding to swine, reduction, incineration, and various forms of re-use and recycling. Virtually all procedures have disabilities and rising costs. Many methods once abandoned are being rediscovered. Promises for so-called innovations outstrip accomplishments. Markets for salvage vary widely or disappear completely. The search for conserving materials and energy at minimum cost must go on forever. PMID:570105

  1. Hazardous solid waste from domestic wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, W M

    1978-01-01

    The treatment of liquid wastes in municipal sewage treatment plants creates significant quantities of solid residue for disposal. The potential hazard from these wastes requires that their characteristics be determined accurately to develop environmentally sound management criteria. It is readily recognized that the sludge characteristics vary with the type and degree of industrial activity within a wastewater collection system and that these characteristics play a significant role in determining whether the material has potential for beneficial reuse or if it must be directed to final disposal. This paper offers an overview of past and present practices of sewage sludge disposal, an indication of quantities produced, and experience with beneficial reuse. An estimated range of costs involved, expected environmental effects and potential for continued use is offered for each disposal or reuse system discussed. PMID:738239

  2. UNCONTROLLED/UNREGULATED HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES (FORMERLY SUPERFUND), NEUSE RIVER WATERSHED, NC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources, Divison of Waste Management, Superfund Section in cooperation with the North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis developed the digital Hazardous Substance Disposal Sites data to enhan...

  3. EVALUATION OF THE APPLICABILITY OF SUBSIDENCE MODELS TO HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has discovered a number of uncontrolled hazardous waste sites in close proximity to abandoned underground mines. Further, several Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permit applications have been received for treatment, storage, or disposal facilities located in areas wher...

  4. GEOSYNTHETIC DESIGN GUIDANCE FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE LANDFILL CELLS AND SURFACE IMPOUNDMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides guidance design procedures for the use of geosynthetic materials in hazardous waste land disposal cells. Primary geosynthetic components include flexible membrane liners (FML) used to limit the flow of leachate, and leachate collection and removal systems (LCR...

  5. Waste-to-energy: Benefits beyond waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, M.A.; Kiser, J.V.L. )

    1995-01-01

    More than 125 waste-to-energy plants operate in North America, providing dependable waste disposal for thousands of communities. But the benefits of waste-to-energy plants go beyond getting rid of the garbage. Here's a look at some of the economic, environmental, and societal benefits that waste-to-energy projects have brought to their communities. The reasons vary considerably as to why communities have selected waste-to-energy as a part of their waste management systems. Common on the lists in many communities are a variety of benefits beyond dependable waste disposal. A look at experiences in four communities reveals environmental, economic, energy, and societal benefits that the projects provide to the communities they serve.

  6. Specialized Disposal Sites for Different Reprocessing Plant Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Driscoll, Michael J.

    2007-07-01

    Once-through fuel cycles have one waste form: spent nuclear fuel (SNF). In contrast, the reprocessed SNF yields multiple wastes with different chemical, physical, and radionuclide characteristics. The different characteristics of each waste imply that there are potential cost and performance benefits to developing different disposal sites that match the disposal requirements of different waste. Disposal sites as defined herein may be located in different geologies or in a single repository containing multiple sections, each with different characteristics. The paper describes disposal options for specific wastes and the potential for a waste management system that better couples various reprocessing plant wastes with disposal facilities. (authors)

  7. The safe disposal of radioactive wastes

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, A. W.

    1956-01-01

    A comprehensive review is given of the principles and problems involved in the safe disposal of radioactive wastes. The first part is devoted to a study of the basic facts of radioactivity and of nuclear fission, the characteristics of radioisotopes, the effects of ionizing radiations, and the maximum permissible levels of radioactivity for workers and for the general public. In the second part, the author describes the different types of radioactive waste—reactor wastes and wastes arising from the use of radioisotopes in hospitals and in industry—and discusses the application of the maximum permissible levels of radioactivity to their disposal and treatment, illustrating his discussion with an account of the methods practised at the principal atomic energy establishments. PMID:13374534

  8. Hazardous Waste Management System; identification and listing of hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-12

    EPA is finalizing the listings of 80 hazardous wastes from nonspecific sources such as spent halogenated and nonhalogenated solvents and the still bottoms from the recovery of these solvents, and the centrifuge and distillation residues from toluene diisocyanate production; and from specific sources such as distillation bottoms and side cuts from the production of acetaldehyde from ethylene, and dissolved air flotation float, slop oil emulsion solids, heat exchanger bundle cleaning sludge, API separator sludge, and tank bottoms (leaded) from the petroleum refining industry. These listings, which were promulgated in interim final form on 5/19/80 become effective on 11/19/80. The listing of wastes such as distillation light ends and bottoms from the production of phthalic anhydride from o-xylene will become effective on 5/12/81. Also finalized are the toxic constituents of concern in each listed waste such as acrylonitrile and formaldehyde. Methanol and methyl isobutyl ketone have been deleted from the list of toxic constituents.

  9. THERMODYNAMIC FUNDAMENTALS USED IN HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermodynamics is the basic foundation of many engineeringpractices. nvironmental engineering is no exception, it is usingthermodynamic principles in many applications. n particular,those who are involved in the incineration of various wastes suchas hazardous and municipal wastes...

  10. Improving Tamper Detection for Hazardous Waste Security

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R. G.; Garcia, A. R. E.; Pacheco, N.; Martinez, R. K.; Martinez, D. D.; Trujillo, S. J.; Lopez, L. N.

    2003-02-26

    Since September 11, waste managers are increasingly expected to provide effective security for their hazardous wastes. Tamper-indicating seals can help. This paper discusses seals, and offers recommendations for how to choose and use them.

  11. Are hazardous wastes hazardous? The problem with environmental epidemiology

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, C.B.

    1994-12-31

    According to recent opinion polls, the American public believes that hazardous wastes constitute a serious threat to public health. In contrast, many scientists and administrators do not share this belief. In the US, more than 6 billion tons of waste are produced annually--nearly 50,000 tons per person. One recent EPA survey found that more than 40 million people live within four miles and about 4 million within one mile of a hazardous waste site. As hazardous waste sites are characterized and remediated, citizens raise concerns over health effects and receive less than conclusive answers. Why is this so? The first reason, which is the basis of this discussion, addresses the inherent difficulties in conducting environmental epidemiology studies. The intent of the report was to review current knowledge of the human health effects caused by exposure to hazardous waste sites and to suggest how to improve the scientific basis for evaluating the effects of environmental pollution on public health.

  12. Guidelines for generators of hazardous chemical waste at LBL and guidelines for generators of radioactive and mixed waste at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    In part one of this document the Governing Documents and Definitions sections provide general guidelines and regulations applying to the handling of hazardous chemical wastes. The remaining sections provide details on how you can prepare your waste properly for transport and disposal. They are correlated with the steps you must take to properly prepare your waste for pickup. The purpose of the second part of this document is to provide the acceptance criteria for the transfer of radioactive and mixed waste to LBL's Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). These guidelines describe how you, as a generator of radioactive or mixed waste, can meet LBL's acceptance criteria for radioactive and mixed waste.

  13. Project report for the commercial disposal of mixed low-level waste debris

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, G.; Balls, V.; Shea, T.; Thiesen, T.

    1994-05-01

    This report summarizes the basis for the commercial disposal of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) mixed low-level waste (MLLW) debris and the associated activities. Mixed waste is radioactive waste plus hazardous waste as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The critical factors for this project were DOE 5820.2A exemption, contracting mechanism, NEPA documentation, sampling and analysis, time limitation and transportation of waste. This report also will provide a guide or a starting place for future use of Envirocare of Utah or other private sector disposal/treatment facilities, and the lessons learned during this project.

  14. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (8TH), HELD AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY, ON MARCH 8-10, 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the symposium was (1) to provide a forum for a state-of-the-art review and discussion of on-going and recently completed research projects dealing with the managment of solid and industrial wastes; (2) to bring together people concerned with municipal solid waste m...

  15. Radioactive waste disposal in thick unsaturated zones.

    PubMed

    Winogard, I J

    1981-06-26

    Portions of the Great Basin are undergoing crustal extension and have unsaturated zones as much as 600 meters thick. These areas contain multiple natural barriers capable of isolating solidified toxic wastes from the biosphere for tens of thousands to perhaps hundreds of thousands of years. An example of the potential utilization of such arid zone environments for toxic waste isolatic is the burial of transuranic radioactive wastes at relatively shallow depths (15 to 100 meters) in Sedan Crater, Yucca Flat, Nevada. The volume of this man-made crater is several times that of the projected volume of such wastes to the year 2000. Disposal in Sedan Crater could be accomplished at a savings on the order of $0.5 billion, in comparison with current schemes for burial of such wastes in mined repositories at depths of 600 to 900 meters, and with an apparently equal likelihood of waste isolation from the biosphere. PMID:17790523

  16. 78 FR 1155 - Low-Level Waste Disposal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ...NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...3150-AI92 Low-Level Waste Disposal AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...entitled, ``Low-Level Waste Disposal'' that...

  17. 21 CFR 1250.75 - Disposal of human wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Disposal of human wastes. 1250.75 Section 1250.75...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS...Conveyances § 1250.75 Disposal of human wastes. (a) At servicing...

  18. 21 CFR 1250.75 - Disposal of human wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Disposal of human wastes. 1250.75 Section 1250.75...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS...Conveyances § 1250.75 Disposal of human wastes. (a) At servicing...

  19. 21 CFR 1250.75 - Disposal of human wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Disposal of human wastes. 1250.75 Section 1250.75...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS...Conveyances § 1250.75 Disposal of human wastes. (a) At servicing...

  20. 21 CFR 1250.75 - Disposal of human wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Disposal of human wastes. 1250.75 Section 1250.75...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS...Conveyances § 1250.75 Disposal of human wastes. (a) At servicing...

  1. 21 CFR 1250.75 - Disposal of human wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Disposal of human wastes. 1250.75 Section 1250.75...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS...Conveyances § 1250.75 Disposal of human wastes. (a) At servicing...

  2. Low level tank waste disposal study

    SciTech Connect

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-09-29

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

  3. DISPOSAL OF FLUE-GAS-CLEANING WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article describes current commercial and emerging technology for disposal of wastes from flue gas cleaning (FGC) systems for coal-fired power plants. Over 80 million metric tons/yr (dry) of coal ash and desulfurization solids are expected to be produced by the 1980's. Althoug...

  4. Space Station tethered waste disposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rupp, Charles C.

    1988-01-01

    The Shuttle Transportation System (STS) launches more payload to the Space Station than can be returned creating an accumulation of waste. Several methods of deorbiting the waste are compared including an OMV, solid rocket motors, and a tether system. The use of tethers is shown to offer the unique potential of having a net savings in STS launch requirement. Tether technology is being developed which can satisfy the deorbit requirements but additional effort is required in waste processing, packaging, and container design. The first step in developing this capability is already underway in the Small Expendable Deployer System program. A developmental flight test of a tether initiated recovery system is seen as the second step in the evolution of this capability.

  5. Optimal evaluation of infectious medical waste disposal companies using the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chao Chung

    2011-07-15

    Ever since Taiwan's National Health Insurance implemented the diagnosis-related groups payment system in January 2010, hospital income has declined. Therefore, to meet their medical waste disposal needs, hospitals seek suppliers that provide high-quality services at a low cost. The enactment of the Waste Disposal Act in 1974 had facilitated some improvement in the management of waste disposal. However, since the implementation of the National Health Insurance program, the amount of medical waste from disposable medical products has been increasing. Further, of all the hazardous waste types, the amount of infectious medical waste has increased at the fastest rate. This is because of the increase in the number of items considered as infectious waste by the Environmental Protection Administration. The present study used two important findings from previous studies to determine the critical evaluation criteria for selecting infectious medical waste disposal firms. It employed the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process to set the objective weights of the evaluation criteria and select the optimal infectious medical waste disposal firm through calculation and sorting. The aim was to propose a method of evaluation with which medical and health care institutions could objectively and systematically choose appropriate infectious medical waste disposal firms.

  6. 10 CFR 20.2108 - Records of waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... waste disposal. (a) Each licensee shall maintain records of the disposal of licensed materials made under §§ 20.2002, 20.2003, 20.2004, 20.2005, 10 CFR part 61 and disposal by burial in soil, including... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of waste disposal. 20.2108 Section 20.2108...

  7. 10 CFR 20.2108 - Records of waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... waste disposal. (a) Each licensee shall maintain records of the disposal of licensed materials made under §§ 20.2002, 20.2003, 20.2004, 20.2005, 10 CFR part 61 and disposal by burial in soil, including... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of waste disposal. 20.2108 Section 20.2108...

  8. 10 CFR 20.2108 - Records of waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... waste disposal. (a) Each licensee shall maintain records of the disposal of licensed materials made under §§ 20.2002, 20.2003, 20.2004, 20.2005, 10 CFR part 61 and disposal by burial in soil, including... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of waste disposal. 20.2108 Section 20.2108...

  9. 10 CFR 20.2108 - Records of waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... waste disposal. (a) Each licensee shall maintain records of the disposal of licensed materials made under §§ 20.2002, 20.2003, 20.2004, 20.2005, 10 CFR part 61 and disposal by burial in soil, including... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of waste disposal. 20.2108 Section 20.2108...

  10. 78 FR 46447 - Conditional Exclusions From Solid Waste and Hazardous Waste for Solvent-Contaminated Wipes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... Rates EPA Environmental Protection Agency FR Federal Register HSWA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments... respective annual market share of 88 percent for reusable wipes and 12 percent for disposable wipes (68 FR... of the Common Sense Initiative (CSI) for the printing industry (59 FR 27295). The CSI...

  11. Nuclear waste disposal: Gambling on Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, S.

    1995-05-01

    This document describes the historical aspects of nuclear energy ,nuclear weapons usage, and development of the nuclear bureaucracy in the United States, and discusses the selection and siting of Yucca Mountain, Nevada for a federal nuclear waste repository. Litigation regarding the site selection and resulting battles in the political arena and in the Nevada State Legislature are also presented. Alternative radioactive waste disposal options, risk assessments of the Yucca Mountain site, and logistics regarding the transportation and storage of nuclear waste are also presented. This document also contains an extensive bibliography.

  12. COMPILATION OF DISPOSABLE SOLID WASTE CASK EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    THIELGES, J.R.; CHASTAIN, S.A.

    2007-06-21

    The Disposable Solid Waste Cask (DSWC) is a shielded cask capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of six non-fuel core components or approximately 27 cubic feet of radioactive solid waste. Five existing DSWCs are candidates for use in storing and disposing of non-fuel core components and radioactive solid waste from the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell, ultimately shipping them to the 200 West Area disposal site for burial. A series of inspections, studies, analyses, and modifications were performed to ensure that these casks can be used to safely ship solid waste. These inspections, studies, analyses, and modifications are summarized and attached in this report. Visual inspection of the casks interiors provided information with respect to condition of the casks inner liners. Because water was allowed to enter the casks for varying lengths of time, condition of the cask liner pipe to bottom plate weld was of concern. Based on the visual inspection and a corrosion study, it was concluded that four of the five casks can be used from a corrosion standpoint. Only DSWC S/N-004 would need additional inspection and analysis to determine its usefulness. The five remaining DSWCs underwent some modification to prepare them for use. The existing cask lifting inserts were found to be corroded and deemed unusable. New lifting anchor bolts were installed to replace the existing anchors. Alternate lift lugs were fabricated for use with the new lifting anchor bolts. The cask tiedown frame was modified to facilitate adjustment of the cask tiedowns. As a result of the above mentioned inspections, studies, analysis, and modifications, four of the five existing casks can be used to store and transport waste from the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell to the disposal site for burial. The fifth cask, DSWC S/N-004, would require further inspections before it could be used.

  13. Waste isolation pilot plant disposal room model

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B.M.

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes development of the conceptual and mathematical models for the part of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository performance assessment that is concerned with what happens to the waste over long times after the repository is decommissioned. These models, collectively referred to as the {open_quotes}Disposal Room Model,{close_quotes} describe the repository closure process during which deformation of the surrounding salt consolidates the waste. First, the relationship of repository closure to demonstration of compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard (40 CFR 191 Appendix C) and how sensitive performance results are to it are examined. Next, a detailed description is provided of the elements of the disposal region, and properties selected for the salt, waste, and other potential disposal features such as backfill. Included in the discussion is an explanation of how the various models were developed over time. Other aspects of closure analysis, such as the waste flow model and method of analysis, are also described. Finally, the closure predictions used in the final performance assessment analysis for the WIPP Compliance Certification Application are summarized.

  14. 36 CFR 13.1912 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1912 Section 13.1912...Elias National Park and Preserve § 13.1912 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National...

  15. 36 CFR 13.1604 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1604 Section 13.1604...Clark National Park and Preserve § 13.1604 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National...

  16. 36 CFR 13.1008 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1008 Section 13.1008...Arctic National Park and Preserve § 13.1008 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National...

  17. 36 CFR 13.1008 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1008 Section 13.1008 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... § 13.1008 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park...

  18. 36 CFR 13.1604 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1604 Section 13.1604 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service solid...

  19. 36 CFR 13.1118 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1118 Section 13.1118 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Provisions § 13.1118 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National...

  20. 36 CFR 13.1912 - Solid waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Solid waste disposal. 13.1912 Section 13.1912 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR....1912 Solid waste disposal. (a) A solid waste disposal site may accept non-National Park Service...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.252 - Disposal of waste materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disposal of waste materials. 1926.252 Section 1926.252..., Use, and Disposal § 1926.252 Disposal of waste materials. (a) Whenever materials are dropped more than... above. (c) All scrap lumber, waste material, and rubbish shall be removed from the immediate work...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.252 - Disposal of waste materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disposal of waste materials. 1926.252 Section 1926.252..., Use, and Disposal § 1926.252 Disposal of waste materials. (a) Whenever materials are dropped more than... above. (c) All scrap lumber, waste material, and rubbish shall be removed from the immediate work...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.252 - Disposal of waste materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disposal of waste materials. 1926.252 Section 1926.252..., Use, and Disposal § 1926.252 Disposal of waste materials. (a) Whenever materials are dropped more than... above. (c) All scrap lumber, waste material, and rubbish shall be removed from the immediate work...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.252 - Disposal of waste materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disposal of waste materials. 1926.252 Section 1926.252..., Use, and Disposal § 1926.252 Disposal of waste materials. (a) Whenever materials are dropped more than... above. (c) All scrap lumber, waste material, and rubbish shall be removed from the immediate work...

  5. 49 CFR 228.327 - Waste collection and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Waste collection and disposal. 228.327 Section 228... § 228.327 Waste collection and disposal. (a) General disposal requirements. All sweepings, solid or liquid wastes, refuse, and garbage in a camp must be removed in such a manner as to avoid creating...

  6. 49 CFR 228.327 - Waste collection and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Waste collection and disposal. 228.327 Section 228... § 228.327 Waste collection and disposal. (a) General disposal requirements. All sweepings, solid or liquid wastes, refuse, and garbage in a camp must be removed in such a manner as to avoid creating...

  7. 49 CFR 228.327 - Waste collection and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Waste collection and disposal. 228.327 Section 228... § 228.327 Waste collection and disposal. (a) General disposal requirements. All sweepings, solid or liquid wastes, refuse, and garbage in a camp must be removed in such a manner as to avoid creating...

  8. Investigation of separation, treatment, and recycling options for hazardous paint blast media waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boy, J.H.; Race, T.D.; Reinbold, K.A.

    1996-02-01

    U.S. Army depot depaint operations generate over 4 million kg per year of contaminated paint blast media wastes. The objective of this work was to investigate technologies that might significantly mitigate this Army hazardous waste disposal problem. Most of the technologies investigated either failed to meet acceptable TCLP levels for hazardous metals content, or failed to meet Army disposal requirements. However, based on a review of several commercially available services, it is recommended that Army depot depaint operations consider processing hazardous blast media waste through properly regulated contractors that offer safe, effective, and economical stabilization, fixation, and recycling technologies.

  9. HANDBOOK: HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication, Volume III of the Hazardous Waste Incineration Guidance Series, contains general guidance to permit writers in reviewing hazardous waste incineration permit applications and trial burn plans. he handbook is a how-to document dealing with how incineration measure...

  10. Hazardous Waste Handling Should be Defined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steigman, Harry

    1972-01-01

    An examination of the handling, storage and disposition of hazardous wastes from municipal and industrial sources, with a plea for the development of a uniform national hazardous waste code or listing that would be acceptable and useful to all state and federal agencies. (LK)

  11. 76 FR 5110 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ...SW-FRL-9259-3] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification...Historical information on waste generation and management practices; and (2) Analytical...becomes final, Gulf West's management of the wastes covered by this...

  12. 77 FR 36447 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ...FRL-9685-6] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification...Historical information on waste generation and management practices; and (2) analytical...becomes final, ExxonMobil's management of the wastes covered by this...

  13. 77 FR 41720 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ...FRL-9699-4] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...Mail: Sharon Leitch, RCRA Waste Management and UST Section, Office of...Delivery: Sharon Leitch, RCRA Waste Management and UST Section, Office...

  14. 75 FR 16037 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Proposed Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ...SW-FRL-9131-6] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...RCRA Subtitle D landfill: The Waste Management Industrial Landfill, North...Subtitle C facility, Chemical Waste Management in Sulphur, LA 70556....

  15. 77 FR 58315 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ...FRL-9730-5] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...Historical information on waste generation and management practices; and (2) Analytical...using the ``landfill'' waste management unit (WMU) input, but...

  16. 77 FR 56558 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ...FRL-9727-2] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...CONTACT: Sharon Leitch, RCRA Waste Management and UST Section, Office of...adversely affected by common waste management practices for this...

  17. 75 FR 51671 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...SW-FRL-9191-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and...RCRA Subtitle D landfill: The Waste Management Industrial Landfill, North...Subtitle C facility, Chemical Waste Management in Sulphur, LA 70556....

  18. 75 FR 31716 - Hazardous Waste Technical Corrections and Clarifications Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ...pollution control, Hazardous waste, Insurance, Packaging...measures, Surety bonds, Water supply. 40 CFR Part 266...protection, Energy, Hazardous waste, Recycling, Reporting...transportation, Hazardous waste, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Water pollution control,...

  19. 75 FR 13066 - Hazardous Waste Technical Corrections and Clarifications Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ...pollution control, Hazardous waste, Insurance, Packaging...measures, Surety bonds, Water supply. 40 CFR Part 266...protection, Energy, Hazardous waste, Recycling, Reporting...transportation, Hazardous waste, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Water pollution control,...

  20. Greater-confinement disposal of low-level radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Gilbert, T.L.; Luner, C.; Merry-Libby, P.A.; Meshkov, N.K.; Yu, C.

    1985-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes include a broad spectrum of wastes that have different radionuclide concentrations, half-lives, and physical and chemical properties. Standard shallow-land burial practice can provide adequate protection of public health and safety for most low-level wastes, but a small volume fraction (about 1%) containing most of the activity inventory (approx.90%) requires specific measures known as ''greater-confinement disposal'' (GCD). Different site characteristics and different waste characteristics - such as high radionuclide concentrations, long radionuclide half-lives, high radionuclide mobility, and physical or chemical characteristics that present exceptional hazards - lead to different GCD facility design requirements. Facility design alternatives considered for GCD include the augered shaft, deep trench, engineered structure, hydrofracture, improved waste form, and high-integrity container. Selection of an appropriate design must also consider the interplay between basic risk limits for protection of public health and safety, performance characteristics and objectives, costs, waste-acceptance criteria, waste characteristics, and site characteristics. This paper presents an overview of the factors that must be considered in planning the application of methods proposed for providing greater confinement of low-level wastes. 27 refs.

  1. Final draft guidance for Subpart G of the Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Severn, R.R.; Leggett, N.; Neill, P.P.; Burt, R.E.; Chrisman, K.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this guidance document is to assist in implementing closure and post-closure plans. The document concentrates on the closure plans specific to six types of Treatment, Storage, or Disposal Facilities (TSDF): tanks; surface impoundments; land-treatment facilities; landfills; incinerators; and multiple-process facilities. This document clarifies the concepts, definitions, and rationale behind the requirements; identifies the major issues that affect closure and post-closure requirements; discusses site-specific factors that affect closure and post-closure plans; clarifies the role of the Regional Office in evaluating these plans; provides guidance to owners or operators who need to develop closure and post-closure plans.

  2. 40 CFR 264.231 - Special requirements for hazardous wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26, and FO27.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...materials co-disposed with these wastes; and (4) The effectiveness...impoundments managing hazardous wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26...possibility of migration of these wastes to ground water, surface water, or air so...

  3. 40 CFR 264.231 - Special requirements for hazardous wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26, and FO27.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...materials co-disposed with these wastes; and (4) The effectiveness...impoundments managing hazardous wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26...possibility of migration of these wastes to ground water, surface water, or air so...

  4. 40 CFR 264.231 - Special requirements for hazardous wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26, and FO27.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...materials co-disposed with these wastes; and (4) The effectiveness...impoundments managing hazardous wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26...possibility of migration of these wastes to ground water, surface water, or air so...

  5. 40 CFR 264.231 - Special requirements for hazardous wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26, and FO27.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...materials co-disposed with these wastes; and (4) The effectiveness...impoundments managing hazardous wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26...possibility of migration of these wastes to ground water, surface water, or air so...

  6. 40 CFR 264.231 - Special requirements for hazardous wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26, and FO27.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...materials co-disposed with these wastes; and (4) The effectiveness...impoundments managing hazardous wastes FO20, FO21, FO22, FO23, FO26...possibility of migration of these wastes to ground water, surface water, or air so...

  7. Municipal solid waste disposal in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Magrinho, Alexandre; Didelet, Filipe; Semiao, Viriato

    2006-01-01

    In recent years municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal has been one of the most important environmental problems for all of the Portuguese regions. The basic principles of MSW management in Portugal are: (1) prevention or reduction, (2) reuse, (3) recovery (e.g., recycling, incineration with heat recovery), and (4) polluter-pay principle. A brief history of legislative trends in waste management is provided herein as background for current waste management and recycling activities. The paper also presents and discusses the municipal solid waste management in Portugal and is based primarily on a national inquiry carried out in 2003 and directed to the MSW management entities. Additionally, the MSW responsibility and management structure in Portugal is presented, together with the present situation of production, collection, recycling, treatment and elimination of MSW. Results showed that 96% of MSW was collected mixed (4% was separately collected) and that 68% was disposed of in landfill, 21% was incinerated at waste-to-energy plants, 8% was treated at organic waste recovery plants and 3% was delivered to sorting. The average generation rate of MSW was 1.32 kg/capita/day. PMID:16713239

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) General Contingency Plan for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    This contingency plan provides a description of the Y-12 plant and its waste units and prescribes control procedures and emergency response procedures. It lists emergency and spill response equipment, provides information on coordination agreements with local agencies, and describes the evacuation plan and reporting requirements.

  9. Vitrification: Destroying and immobilizing hazardous wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, C.C.; Peters, R.D.; Perez, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    Researchers at the US Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have led the development of vitrification a versatile adaptable process that transforms waste solutions, slurries, moist powder and/or dry solids into a chemically durable glass form. The glass form can be safely disposed or used for other purposes, such as construction material if non-radioactive. The feed used in the process can be either combustible or non-combustible. Organic compounds are decomposed in the melters` plenum, while the inorganic residue melts into a molten glass pool. The glass produced by this process is a chemically durable material comparable to natural obsidian. Its properties typically allow it to pass the EPA Toxicity (TCLP) test as non-hazardous. To date, no glass produced by vitrification has failed the TCLP test. Vitrification is thus an ideal method of treating DOE`s mixed waste because of its ability to destroy organic compounds and bind toxic or radioactive elements. This article provides an overview of the technology.

  10. The Groundwater Geochemistry of Waste Disposal Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjerg, P. L.; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Kjeldsen, P.; Christensen, T. H.; Cozzarelli, I. M.

    2003-12-01

    Landfills of solid waste are abundant sources of groundwater pollution. The potential for generatingstrongly contaminated leachate from landfill waste is very substantial. Even for small landfills the timescale can be measured in decades or centuries. This indicates that waste dumps with no measures to control leachate entrance into the groundwater may constitute a source of groundwater contamination long after dumping has ceased. In addition to these dumps, engineered landfills with liners and leachate collection systems may also constitute a source of groundwater contamination due to inadequate design, construction, and maintenance, resulting in the leakage of leachate.Landfills may pose several environmental problems (explosion hazards, vegetation damage, dust and air emissions, etc.), but groundwater pollution by leachate is considered to be the most important one and the focus of this chapter. Landfills differ significantly depending on the waste they receive: mineral waste landfills for combustion ashes, hazardous waste landfills, specific industrial landfills serving a single industry, or municipal waste landfills receiving a mixture of municipal waste, construction, and demolition waste, waste from small industries and minor quantities of hazardous waste. The latter type of landfill (termed "old landfills" in this chapter) is very common all over the world. Municipal landfills are characterized by a high content of organic waste that affects the biogeochemical processes in the landfill body and the generation of strongly anaerobic leachate with a high content of dissolved organic carbon, salts, ammonium, and organic compounds and metals released from the waste.This chapter describes the biogeochemistry of a landfill leachate plume as it emerges from the bottom of a landfill and migrates in an aquifer. The landfill hydrology, source composition, and spreading of contaminants are described in introductory sections. The focus of this chapter is on investigating the biogeochemical processes associated with the natural attenuation of organic contaminants in a leachate plume. Studies have shown that microbial processes and geochemical conditions change over time and distance in contaminant plumes, resulting in different rates of degradation (biotic and abiotic). The availability of electron acceptors, such as iron oxides or dissolved sulfate, is an important factor for evaluating the efficacy and sustainability of natural attenuation as a remedy for leachate plumes. Understanding the complex environments developing in leachate plumes is important in assessing the risk to groundwater resources and for developing cost-effective remediation strategies.

  11. Stabilization and disposal of Argonne-West low-level mixed wastes in ceramicrete waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, D. B.; Singh, D.; Strain, R. V.; Tlustochowicz, M.; Wagh, A. S.

    1998-02-17

    The technology of room-temperature-setting phosphate ceramics or Ceramicrete{trademark} technology, developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)-East is being used to treat and dispose of low-level mixed wastes through the Department of Energy complex. During the past year, Ceramicrete{trademark} technology was implemented for field application at ANL-West. Debris wastes were treated and stabilized: (a) Hg-contaminated low-level radioactive crushed light bulbs and (b) low-level radioactive Pb-lined gloves (part of the MWIR {number_sign} AW-W002 waste stream). In addition to hazardous metals, these wastes are contaminated with low-level fission products. Initially, bench-scale waste forms with simulated and actual waste streams were fabricated by acid-base reactions between mixtures of magnesium oxide powders and an acid phosphate solution, and the wastes. Size reduction of Pb-lined plastic glove waste was accomplished by cryofractionation. The Ceramicrete{trademark} process produces dense, hard ceramic waste forms. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results showed excellent stabilization of both Hg and Pb in the waste forms. The principal advantage of this technology is that immobilization of contaminants is the result of both chemical stabilization and subsequent microencapsulation of the reaction products. Based on bench-scale studies, Ceramicrete{trademark} technology has been implemented in the fabrication of 5-gal waste forms at ANL-West. Approximately 35 kg of real waste has been treated. The TCLP is being conducted on the samples from the 5-gal waste forms. It is expected that because the waste forms pass the limits set by the EPAs Universal Treatment Standard, they will be sent to a radioactive-waste disposal facility.

  12. Conceptual Design Report: Nevada Test Site Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Project

    SciTech Connect

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-01-31

    Environmental cleanup of contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and test sites generates radioactive waste that must be disposed. Site cleanup activities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex are projected to continue through 2050. Some of this waste is mixed waste (MW), containing both hazardous and radioactive components. In addition, there is a need for MW disposal from other mission activities. The Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision designates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as a regional MW disposal site. The NTS has a facility that is permitted to dispose of onsite- and offsite-generated MW until November 30, 2010. There is not a DOE waste management facility that is currently permitted to dispose of offsite-generated MW after 2010, jeopardizing the DOE environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. A mission needs document (CD-0) has been prepared for a newly permitted MW disposal facility at the NTS that would provide the needed capability to support DOE's environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. This report presents a conceptual engineering design for a MW facility that is fully compliant with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The facility, which will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the NTS, will provide an approximately 20,000-cubic yard waste disposal capacity. The facility will be licensed by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP).

  13. ASSESSMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTES FOR GENOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors have evaluated a group of short-term bioassays to identify those that may be suitable for screening large numbers of diverse hazardous industrial wastes for genotoxicity. Fifteen wastes (and dichloromethane extracts of these wastes) from a variety of manufacturing pro...

  14. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. [Establishment of hazardous waste facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    Environmental Resources Secretary Arthur A. Davis and Commerce Secretary Raymond R. Christman have announced a joint initiative to establish commercial hazardous waste treatment and disposal facilities Pennsylvania. The state Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act, which Gov. Robert P. Casey signed into law last October, called for accelerated efforts in this regard. These included an expedited permitting process for facilities, requiring the Department of Environmental Resources (DER) to appoint a special sitting team to review permit applications, and designation of sitting coordinator within the Department of Commerce to identify potential developers of the facilities and encourage them to operate within Pennsylvania.

  15. Decontamination and disposal of PCB wastes.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, L E

    1985-01-01

    Decontamination and disposal processes for PCB wastes are reviewed. Processes are classed as incineration, chemical reaction or decontamination. Incineration technologies are not limited to the rigorous high temperature but include those where innovations in use of oxident, heat transfer and residue recycle are made. Chemical processes include the sodium processes, radiant energy processes and low temperature oxidations. Typical processing rates and associated costs are provided where possible. PMID:3928363

  16. The performance assessment process for DOE low-level waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1992-11-01

    Safety of the low-level waste disposal facilities, as well as al US DOE facilities, is a primary criterion in their design and operation. Safety of low-level waste disposal facilities is evaluated from two perspectives. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation. The safety evaluations vary from simple safety assessments to very complex safety analysis reports, depending on the degree of hazard associated with the facility operation. Operational requirements for the Department`s low-level waste disposal facilities, including long-term safety are contained in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management (1). This paper will focus on the process of conducting long-term performance analyses rather than on operational safety analysis.

  17. The performance assessment process for DOE low-level waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1992-01-01

    Safety of the low-level waste disposal facilities, as well as al US DOE facilities, is a primary criterion in their design and operation. Safety of low-level waste disposal facilities is evaluated from two perspectives. Operational safety is evaluated based on the perceived level of hazard of the operation. The safety evaluations vary from simple safety assessments to very complex safety analysis reports, depending on the degree of hazard associated with the facility operation. Operational requirements for the Department's low-level waste disposal facilities, including long-term safety are contained in DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management (1). This paper will focus on the process of conducting long-term performance analyses rather than on operational safety analysis.

  18. Selection of infectious medical waste disposal firms by using the analytic hierarchy process and sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, P.-F. Wu, C.-R. Li, Y.-T.

    2008-07-01

    While Taiwanese hospitals dispose of large amounts of medical waste to ensure sanitation and personal hygiene, doing so inefficiently creates potential environmental hazards and increases operational expenses. However, hospitals lack objective criteria to select the most appropriate waste disposal firm and evaluate its performance, instead relying on their own subjective judgment and previous experiences. Therefore, this work presents an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) method to objectively select medical waste disposal firms based on the results of interviews with experts in the field, thus reducing overhead costs and enhancing medical waste management. An appropriate weight criterion based on AHP is derived to assess the effectiveness of medical waste disposal firms. The proposed AHP-based method offers a more efficient and precise means of selecting medical waste firms than subjective assessment methods do, thus reducing the potential risks for hospitals. Analysis results indicate that the medical sector selects the most appropriate infectious medical waste disposal firm based on the following rank: matching degree, contractor's qualifications, contractor's service capability, contractor's equipment and economic factors. By providing hospitals with an effective means of evaluating medical waste disposal firms, the proposed AHP method can reduce overhead costs and enable medical waste management to understand the market demand in the health sector. Moreover, performed through use of Expert Choice software, sensitivity analysis can survey the criterion weight of the degree of influence with an alternative hierarchy.

  19. RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL PROCEDURES 1. Radioactive waste is accepted for disposal by Radiation Safety on Monday, Wednesday and

    E-print Network

    Hammack, Richard

    RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL PROCEDURES 1. Radioactive waste is accepted for disposal by Radiation are required and may be scheduled by calling 8289131. 2. Segregate and package radioactive waste according to type as described in the MCV/VCU Radiation Safety Guide. 3. Radioactive waste in red bags

  20. University of Delaware Laboratory Chemical Waste Disposal Guide ALL CHEMICAL WASTE MUST BE DISPOSED OF THROUGH THE

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    containment bin. CHEMICALLY CONTAMINATED SOLID WASTE · Place materials in a heavy duty plastic bag insideUniversity of Delaware Laboratory Chemical Waste Disposal Guide ALL CHEMICAL WASTE MUST BE DISPOSED OF THROUGH THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & SAFETY http://www.udel.edu/ HS EXAMPLES OF CHEMICAL WASTE INCLUDE

  1. TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTES. PART 3. TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR CORROSIVE HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the paper, the authors present generation and treatment information for corrosive hazardous wastes (EPA Hazardous Waste Codes D002 and K062). The authors discuss the state of the art for several treatment trains used to process specific types of corrosive waste. Treatment trai...

  2. 75 FR 51671 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... sludge from the list of hazardous wastes under 40 CFR 261.31 and 261.32 (see 70 FR 41358). EPA is... also eligible for exclusion and remain hazardous wastes until excluded. See 66 FR 27266 (May 16, 2001... Tokusen's petitioned waste. EPA applied the Delisting Risk Assessment Software (DRAS) described in 65...

  3. Regional and urban solid waste disposal. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning regional and urban solid waste disposal and recycling technology. Citations discuss methods and facilities for the treatment of municipal, industrial, household, and medical wastes. Topics include incineration, landfills, treatment of hazardous materials, composting techniques, waste utilization, and open dumps. Also discussed are pollution regulations, laws and legal aspects, facility design, and markets for composts.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  4. Regional and urban solid waste disposal. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning regional and urban solid waste disposal and recycling technology. Citations discuss methods and facilities for the treatment of municipal, industrial, household, and medical wastes. Topics include incineration, landfills, treatment of hazardous materials, composting techniques, waste utilization, and open dumps. Also discussed are pollution regulations, laws and legal aspects, facility design, and markets for composts.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  5. Regional and urban solid waste disposal. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning regional and urban solid waste disposal and recycling technology. Citations discuss methods and facilities for the treatment of municipal, industrial, household, and medical wastes. Topics include incineration, landfills, treatment of hazardous materials, composting techniques, waste utilization, and open dumps. Also discussed are pollution regulations, laws and legal aspects, facility design, and markets for composts. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. DOSE ASSESSMENTS FROM THE DISPOSAL OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTES IN RCRA-C DISPOSAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the long-term performance of the RCRA-C disposal cell and potential doses to off-site receptors is used to derive maximum radionuclide specific concentrations in the wastes that would enable these wastes to be disposed of safely using the RCRA-C disposal cell technology....

  7. Organic interference of solidified/stabilized hazardous wastes.

    PubMed

    Eaton, H C; Walsh, M B; Tittlebaum, M E; Cartledge, F K; Chalasani, D

    1987-09-01

    Liquid hazardous waste disposal in landfills is usually allowed only after solidification/stabilization. Although various procedures are commonly practiced, little is known about the mechanism(s) of the processes. A particular problem is the interference of organics. Small amounts of organics can interfere with the reaction between inorganic sludges and cementitous matrices. The present communication reports studies of the interaction between selected organic hazardous wastes and Type I Portland cement. Microscopic studies of the structural differences between cements set with water and those set with water plus organic liquids are discussed. In these studies the scanning electron microscope is used to observe samples fractured at 78K. The results provide technical background data on the ultimate stability of critical waste constituents solidified by various binding agents. PMID:24254184

  8. 41 CFR 50-204.29 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Waste disposal. 50-204.29 Section 50-204.29 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... Radiation Standards § 50-204.29 Waste disposal. No employer shall dispose of radioactive material except...

  9. 41 CFR 50-204.29 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Waste disposal. 50-204.29 Section 50-204.29 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... Radiation Standards § 50-204.29 Waste disposal. No employer shall dispose of radioactive material except...

  10. 41 CFR 50-204.29 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Waste disposal. 50-204.29 Section 50-204.29 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public... Radiation Standards § 50-204.29 Waste disposal. No employer shall dispose of radioactive material except...

  11. 41 CFR 50-204.29 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Waste disposal. 50-204.29 Section 50-204.29 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public Contracts... Radiation Standards § 50-204.29 Waste disposal. No employer shall dispose of radioactive material except...

  12. 41 CFR 50-204.29 - Waste disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Waste disposal. 50-204.29 Section 50-204.29 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to Public... Radiation Standards § 50-204.29 Waste disposal. No employer shall dispose of radioactive material except...

  13. 50 CFR 27.94 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposal of waste. 27.94 Section 27.94... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.94 Disposal of waste. (a) The littering, disposing, or dumping in any manner of garbage, refuse sewage, sludge, earth, rocks,...

  14. 50 CFR 27.94 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disposal of waste. 27.94 Section 27.94... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.94 Disposal of waste. (a) The littering, disposing, or dumping in any manner of garbage, refuse sewage, sludge, earth, rocks,...

  15. 50 CFR 27.94 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disposal of waste. 27.94 Section 27.94... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.94 Disposal of waste. (a) The littering, disposing, or dumping in any manner of garbage, refuse sewage, sludge, earth, rocks,...

  16. 50 CFR 27.94 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disposal of waste. 27.94 Section 27.94... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.94 Disposal of waste. (a) The littering, disposing, or dumping in any manner of garbage, refuse sewage, sludge, earth, rocks,...

  17. 50 CFR 27.94 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disposal of waste. 27.94 Section 27.94... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.94 Disposal of waste. (a) The littering, disposing, or dumping in any manner of garbage, refuse sewage, sludge, earth, rocks,...

  18. MOBILITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The disposal of municipal and industrial waste in landfills is a widely used waste management practice in the United States. It has become evident during the past few years that there has been serious environmental damage and possible adverse human health effects because of impro...

  19. A Program on Hazardous Waste Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kummler, Ralph H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Provides an overview of the "Hazardous Waste Management Graduate Certificate" program at Wayne State University. Describes four required courses and nine optional courses. Discusses the development of a Master program and the curriculum of the Master program. (YP)

  20. VADOSE ZONE MONITORING FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book describes the applicability of vadose zone monitoring techniques to hazardous waste site investigations. More than 70 different sampling and nonsampling vadose zone monitoring techniques are described in terms of their advantages and disadvantages. Physical, chemical, g...

  1. GEOSTATISTICAL SAMPLING DESIGNS FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter discusses field sampling design for environmental sites and hazardous waste sites with respect to random variable sampling theory, Gy's sampling theory, and geostatistical (kriging) sampling theory. The literature often presents these sampling methods as an adversari...

  2. Environmental Hazards of Nuclear Wastes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micklin, Philip P.

    1974-01-01

    Present methods for storage of radioactive wastes produced at nuclear power facilities are described. Problems arising from present waste management are discussed and potential solutions explored. (JP)

  3. 75 FR 12989 - Hazardous Waste Technical Corrections and Clarifications Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or the Agency) is taking Direct Final action on a number of technical changes that correct or clarify several parts of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste regulations that relate to hazardous waste identification, manifesting, the hazardous waste generator requirements, standards for owners and operators of hazardous waste......

  4. 40 CFR 257.3 - Criteria for classification of solid waste disposal facilities and practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Criteria for classification of solid waste disposal facilities and practices. 257...ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR CLASSIFICATION OF SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES AND PRACTICES...

  5. 50 CFR 27.94 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.94 Disposal of waste. (a) The littering, disposing, or dumping in any manner of garbage, refuse sewage, sludge, earth, rocks, or other debris on...

  6. 50 CFR 27.94 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.94 Disposal of waste. (a) The littering, disposing, or dumping in any manner of garbage, refuse sewage, sludge, earth, rocks, or other debris on...

  7. 50 CFR 27.94 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.94 Disposal of waste. (a) The littering, disposing, or dumping in any manner of garbage, refuse sewage, sludge, earth, rocks, or other debris on...

  8. 50 CFR 27.94 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.94 Disposal of waste. (a) The littering, disposing, or dumping in any manner of garbage, refuse sewage, sludge, earth, rocks, or other debris on...

  9. 50 CFR 27.94 - Disposal of waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.94 Disposal of waste. (a) The littering, disposing, or dumping in any manner of garbage, refuse sewage, sludge, earth, rocks, or other debris on...

  10. 76 FR 36480 - Hazardous Waste Manifest Printing Specifications Correction Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Subjects in 40 CFR Part 262 Environmental protection, Exports, Hazardous materials transportation... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 262 Hazardous Waste Manifest Printing Specifications Correction Rule AGENCY... proposing a minor change to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste...

  11. 30 CFR 47.53 - Alternative for hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative for hazardous waste. 47.53...EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) § 47.53 Alternative for hazardous waste....

  12. 30 CFR 47.53 - Alternative for hazardous waste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alternative for hazardous waste. 47.53...EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) § 47.53 Alternative for hazardous waste....

  13. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, Vitaly T. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Alexander V. (Moscow, RU); Filippov, Eugene A. (Moscow, RU)

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

  14. Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

    1998-05-12

    Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

  15. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-05-01

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  16. Conceptual Safety Design Report for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2010-02-01

    A new onsite, remote-handled LLW disposal facility has been identified as the highest ranked alternative for providing continued, uninterrupted remote-handled LLW disposal for remote-handled LLW from the Idaho National Laboratory and for spent nuclear fuel processing activities at the Naval Reactors Facility. Historically, this type of waste has been disposed of at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Disposal of remote-handled LLW in concrete disposal vaults at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex will continue until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual safety design report supports the design of a proposed onsite remote-handled LLW disposal facility by providing an initial nuclear facility hazard categorization, by identifying potential hazards for processes associated with onsite handling and disposal of remote-handled LLW, by evaluating consequences of postulated accidents, and by discussing the need for safety features that will become part of the facility design.

  17. Method for acid oxidation of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed organic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Pierce, Robert A. (Aiken, SC); Smith, James R. (Corrales, NM); Ramsey, William G. (Aiken, SC); Cicero-Herman, Connie A. (Aiken, SC); Bickford, Dennis F. (Folly Beach, SC)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for reducing the volume of low level radioactive and mixed waste to enable the waste to be more economically stored in a suitable repository, and for placing the waste into a form suitable for permanent disposal. The invention involves a process for preparing radioactive, hazardous, or mixed waste for storage by contacting the waste starting material containing at least one organic carbon-containing compound and at least one radioactive or hazardous waste component with nitric acid and phosphoric acid simultaneously at a contacting temperature in the range of about 140.degree. C. to about 210 .degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the organic carbon-containing compound to gaseous products, thereby producing a residual concentrated waste product containing substantially all of said radioactive or inorganic hazardous waste component; and immobilizing the residual concentrated waste product in a solid phosphate-based ceramic or glass form.

  18. A model approach to radioactive waste disposal at Sellafield

    E-print Network

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    A model approach to radioactive waste disposal at Sellafield R. 5. Haszeldine* and C. Mc of the great environmentalproblems of our age is the safe disposal of radioactive waste for geological time periods. Britain is currently investigating a potential site for underground burial of waste, near

  19. Hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Knudsen, J.K.; Calley, M.B.

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Hazardous Waste Storage Facility (HWSF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. The area surrounding HWSF, the buildings and structures at HWSF, and the processes used at HWSF are described in this report. All nonradiological hazardous materials at the HWSF were identified (radiological hazardous materials are not stored at HWSF) and screened against threshold quantities according to DOE Order 5500.3A guidance. Two of the identified hazardous materials exceeded their specified threshold quantity. This report discusses the potential release scenarios and consequences associated with an accidental release for each of the two identified hazardous materials, lead and mercury. Emergency considerations, such as emergency planning zones, emergency classes, protective actions, and emergency action levels, are also discussed based on the analysis of potential consequences. Evaluation of the potential consequences indicated that the highest emergency class for operational emergencies at the HWSF would be a Site Area Emergency.

  20. Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, Jagdish C

    2010-04-19

    TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

  1. EVALUATION OF TECHNOLOGIES FOR TREATING AQUEOUS METAL/CYANIDE BEARING HAZARDOUS WASTE (F007)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a result of recent developments in the area of hazardous waste management, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is evaluating the performance of various technologies for the treatment and/or destruction of certain wastes that are presently being disposed of in landfills an...

  2. HANDBOOK: ASSESSING THE FATE OF DEEP-WELL-INJECTED HAZARDOUS WASTE. Summaries of Recent Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook has been developed for use as a reference tool in evaluating the suitability of disposing of specific hazardous wastes in deep injection wells. sers of the document will get a better understanding of the factors that affect 1) geochemical waste-reservoir reactions o...

  3. 76 FR 72311 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is granting a petition submitted by Eastman Chemical Corporation--Texas Operations (Eastman Chemical) to exclude from hazardous waste control (or delist) a certain solid waste. This final rule responds to the petition submitted by Eastman Chemical to delist three waste streams generated from its rotary kiln incinerator (RKI). These waste streams are......

  4. 76 FR 74709 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ...EPA-R06-RCRA-2010-0066; SW FRL-9490-8] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing...environment once released from the waste, plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities of waste...

  5. 75 FR 60632 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Direct Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ...EPA-R06-RCRA-2010-0066; SW FRL-9208-7] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing...environment once released from the waste, plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities of waste...

  6. 76 FR 72311 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ...EPA-R06-RCRA-2009-0312; SW FRL-9490-9] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing...environment once released from the waste, plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities of waste...

  7. 75 FR 51678 - Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste; Final Exclusion

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...EPA-R06-RCRA-2008-0456; SW-FRL-9191-7] Hazardous Waste Management System; Identification and Listing...environment once released from the waste, plausible and specific types of management of the petitioned waste, the quantities of waste...

  8. Hazardous Educational Waste Collections in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Environmental Protection Agency, Springfield.

    This report presents the status of programs designed to manage hazardous educational waste collections in secondary schools in the state of Illinois. Laboratory wastes, expired chemicals, unstable compounds, and toxic or flammable materials are accounted for in this document. The report contains an executive summary, a review of Illinois statutes…

  9. BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS AQUEOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have been conducted with a rotating biological contractor (RBC) to evaluate the treatability of leachates from the Stringfellow and New Lyme hazardous waste sites. The leachates were transported from the waste sites to Cincinnati at the United States Environmental Protect...

  10. Composition and process for the encapsulation and stabilization of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Colombo, Peter (Patchogue, NY)

    1998-03-24

    The present invention provides a composition and process for disposal of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. The present invention preferably includes a process for multibarrier encapsulation of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes by combining substantially simultaneously dry waste powder, a non-biodegradable thermoplastic polymer and an anhydrous additive in an extruder to form a homogenous molten matrix. The molten matrix may be directed in a "clean" polyethylene liner, allowed to cool, thus forming a monolithic waste form which provides a multibarrier to the dispersion of wastes into the environment.

  11. Composition and process for the encapsulation and stabilization of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1999-07-20

    The present invention provides a composition and process for disposal of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. The present invention preferably includes a process for multibarrier encapsulation of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes by combining substantially simultaneously dry waste powder, a non-biodegradable thermoplastic polymer and an anhydrous additive in an extruder to form a homogeneous molten matrix. The molten matrix may be directed in a clean'' polyethylene liner, allowed to cool, thus forming a monolithic waste form which provides a multibarrier to the dispersion of wastes into the environment. 2 figs.

  12. Composition and process for the encapsulation and stabilization of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1998-03-24

    The present invention provides a composition and process for disposal of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. The present invention preferably includes a process for multibarrier encapsulation of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes by combining substantially simultaneously dry waste powder, a non-biodegradable thermoplastic polymer and an anhydrous additive in an extruder to form a homogeneous molten matrix. The molten matrix may be directed in a ``clean`` polyethylene liner, allowed to cool, thus forming a monolithic waste form which provides a multibarrier to the dispersion of wastes into the environment. 2 figs.

  13. Composition and process for the encapsulation and stabilization of radioactive hazardous and mixed wastes

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D. (21 Barnes Road, Wading River, NY 11792); Colombo, Peter (44 N. Pinelake Dr., Patchogue, NY 11772)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a composition and process for disposal of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. The present invention preferably includes a process for multibarrier encapsulation of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes by combining substantially simultaneously dry waste powder, a non-biodegradable thermoplastic polymer and an anhydrous additive in an extruder to form a homogenous molten matrix. The molten matrix may be directed in a "clean" polyethylene liner, allowed to cool, thus forming a monolithic waste form which provides a multibarrier to the dispersion of wastes into the environment.

  14. Composition and process for the encapsulation and stabilization of radioactive hazardous and mixed wastes

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1997-07-15

    The present invention provides a composition and process for disposal of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. The present invention preferably includes a process for multibarrier encapsulation of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes by combining substantially simultaneously dry waste powder, a non-biodegradable thermoplastic polymer and an anhydrous additive in an extruder to form a homogeneous molten matrix. The molten matrix may be directed in a ``clean`` polyethylene liner, allowed to cool, thus forming a monolithic waste form which provides a multibarrier to the dispersion of wastes into the environment. 2 figs.

  15. Composition and process for the encapsulation and stabilization of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes

    DOEpatents

    Kalb, Paul D. (Wading River, NY); Colombo, Peter (Patchogue, NY)

    1999-07-20

    The present invention provides a composition and process for disposal of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. The present invention preferably includes a process for multibarrier encapsulation of radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes by combining substantially simultaneously dry waste powder, a non-biodegradable thermoplastic polymer and an anhydrous additive in an extruder to form a homogenous molten matrix. The molten matrix may be directed in a "clean" polyethylene liner, allowed to cool, thus forming a monolithic waste form which provides a multibarrier to the dispersion of wastes into the environment.

  16. Commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.

    1995-10-01

    Why are 11 states attempting to develop new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities? Why is only on disposal facility accepting waste nationally? What is the future of waste disposal? These questions are representative of those being asked throughout the country. This paper attempts to answer these questions in terms of where we are, how we got there, and where we might be going.

  17. 40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste incinerator permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Hazardous waste incinerator permits. 264.344...PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND...

  18. 40 CFR 279.21 - Hazardous waste mixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Hazardous waste mixing. 279.21 Section...AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for...Generators § 279.21 Hazardous waste mixing. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 279.21 - Hazardous waste mixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Hazardous waste mixing. 279.21 Section...AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for...Generators § 279.21 Hazardous waste mixing. (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 279.21 - Hazardous waste mixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Hazardous waste mixing. 279.21 Section...AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for...Generators § 279.21 Hazardous waste mixing. (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 279.21 - Hazardous waste mixing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Hazardous waste mixing. 279.21 Section...AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for...Generators § 279.21 Hazardous waste mixing. (a)...

  2. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Coyne, Martin J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Fiscus, Gregory M. (McMurray, PA); Sammel, Alfred G. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1998-01-01

    A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

  3. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

    1998-10-06

    A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

  4. Challenges in disposing of anthrax waste.

    PubMed

    Lesperance, Ann M; Stein, Steve; Upton, Jaki F; Toomey, Chris

    2011-09-01

    Disasters often create large amounts of waste that must be managed as part of both immediate response and long-term recovery. While many federal, state, and local agencies have debris management plans, these plans often do not address chemical, biological, and radiological contamination. The Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstration's (IBRD) purpose was to holistically assess all aspects of an anthrax incident and assist in the development of a plan for long-term recovery. In the case of wide-area anthrax contamination and the follow-on response and recovery activities, a significant amount of material would require decontamination and disposal. Accordingly, IBRD facilitated the development of debris management plans to address contaminated waste through a series of interviews and workshops with local, state, and federal representatives. The outcome of these discussions was the identification of 3 primary topical areas that must be addressed: planning, unresolved research questions, and resolving regulatory issues. PMID:21882972

  5. Challenges in Disposing of Anthrax Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Stein, Steven L.; Upton, Jaki F.; Toomey, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    Disasters often create large amounts of waste that must be managed as part of both immediate response and long-term recovery. While many federal, state, and local agencies have debris management plans, these plans often do not address chemical, biological, and radiological contamination. The Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstration’s (IBRD) purpose was to holistically assess all aspects of an anthrax incident and assist the development of a plan for long-term recovery. In the case of wide-area anthrax contamination and the follow-on response and recovery activities, a significant amount of material will require decontamination and disposal. Accordingly, IBRD facilitated the development of debris management plans to address contaminated waste through a series of interviews and workshops with local, state, and federal representatives. The outcome of these discussion was the identification of three primary topical areas that must be addressed: 1) Planning; 2) Unresolved research questions, and resolving regulatory issues.

  6. International perspectives on hazardous waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, the International Solid Wastes and Public Cleansing Association (I.S.W.A.) approved the formation of an international working group on hazardous wastes. This book contains the edited final reports of the twelve national organisations which formed this working group. Also included is a review and assessment of various national policies and programs for waste management, together with recommendations and suggested strategies for the future.

  7. Household waste disposal in Mekelle city, Northern Ethiopia

    SciTech Connect

    Tadesse, Tewodros Ruijs, Arjan; Hagos, Fitsum

    2008-07-01

    In many cities of developing countries, such as Mekelle (Ethiopia), waste management is poor and solid wastes are dumped along roadsides and into open areas, endangering health and attracting vermin. The effects of demographic factors, economic and social status, waste and environmental attributes on household solid waste disposal are investigated using data from household survey. Household level data are then analyzed using multinomial logit estimation to determine the factors that affect household waste disposal decision making. Results show that demographic features such as age, education and household size have an insignificant impact over the choice of alternative waste disposal means, whereas the supply of waste facilities significantly affects waste disposal choice. Inadequate supply of waste containers and longer distance to these containers increase the probability of waste dumping in open areas and roadsides relative to the use of communal containers. Higher household income decreases the probability of using open areas and roadsides as waste destinations relative to communal containers. Measures to make the process of waste disposal less costly and ensuring well functioning institutional waste management would improve proper waste disposal.

  8. 40 CFR 61.149 - Standard for waste disposal for asbestos mills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for waste disposal for asbestos mills. 61.149 Section 61.149 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Asbestos § 61.149 Standard for...

  9. 40 CFR 61.149 - Standard for waste disposal for asbestos mills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for waste disposal for asbestos mills. 61.149 Section 61.149 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Asbestos § 61.149 Standard for...

  10. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal sites. 61.154 Section 61.154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for...

  11. Accepting Mixed Waste as Alternate Feed Material for Processing and Disposal at a Licensed Uranium Mill

    SciTech Connect

    Frydenland, D. C.; Hochstein, R. F.; Thompson, A. J.

    2002-02-26

    Certain categories of mixed wastes that contain recoverable amounts of natural uranium can be processed for the recovery of valuable uranium, alone or together with other metals, at licensed uranium mills, and the resulting tailings permanently disposed of as 11e.(2) byproduct material in the mill's tailings impoundment, as an alternative to treatment and/or direct disposal at a mixed waste disposal facility. This paper discusses the regulatory background applicable to hazardous wastes, mixed wastes and uranium mills and, in particular, NRC's Alternate Feed Guidance under which alternate feed materials that contain certain types of mixed wastes may be processed and disposed of at uranium mills. The paper discusses the way in which the Alternate Feed Guidance has been interpreted in the past with respect to processing mixed wastes and the significance of recent changes in NRC's interpretation of the Alternate Feed Guidance that sets the stage for a broader range of mixed waste materials to be processed as alternate feed materials. The paper also reviews the le gal rationale and policy reasons why materials that would otherwise have to be treated and/or disposed of as mixed waste, at a mixed waste disposal facility, are exempt from RCRA when reprocessed as alternate feed material at a uranium mill and become subject to the sole jurisdiction of NRC, and some of the reasons why processing mixed wastes as alternate feed materials at uranium mills is preferable to direct disposal. Finally, the paper concludes with a discussion of the specific acceptance, characterization and certification requirements applicable to alternate feed materials and mixed wastes at International Uranium (USA) Corporation's White Mesa Mill, which has been the most active uranium mill in the processing of alternate feed materials under the Alternate Feed Guidance.

  12. Property-close source separation of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment - A Swedish case study

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstad, Anna; Cour Jansen, Jes la; Aspegren, Henrik

    2011-03-15

    Through an agreement with EEE producers, Swedish municipalities are responsible for collection of hazardous waste and waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). In most Swedish municipalities, collection of these waste fractions is concentrated to waste recycling centres where households can source-separate and deposit hazardous waste and WEEE free of charge. However, the centres are often located on the outskirts of city centres and cars are needed in order to use the facilities in most cases. A full-scale experiment was performed in a residential area in southern Sweden to evaluate effects of a system for property-close source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE. After the system was introduced, results show a clear reduction in the amount of hazardous waste and WEEE disposed of incorrectly amongst residual waste or dry recyclables. The systems resulted in a source separation ratio of 70 wt% for hazardous waste and 76 wt% in the case of WEEE. Results show that households in the study area were willing to increase source separation of hazardous waste and WEEE when accessibility was improved and that this and similar collection systems can play an important role in building up increasingly sustainable solid waste management systems.

  13. Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Dominick, J

    2008-12-18

    This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

  14. 76 FR 55846 - Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Streams in Geologic Sequestration Activities AGENCY...) to conditionally exclude carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) streams that are hazardous from the definition of... Recovery Act (RCRA) to conditionally exclude carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) streams that are hazardous from...

  15. 40 CFR 194.8 - Approval process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP...process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP...Quality Assurance Programs at Waste Generator Sites. The Agency will...

  16. 40 CFR 194.8 - Approval process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP...process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP...Quality Assurance Programs at Waste Generator Sites. The Agency will...

  17. 40 CFR 194.8 - Approval process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP...process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP...Quality Assurance Programs at Waste Generator Sites. The Agency will...

  18. 40 CFR 194.8 - Approval process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP...process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP...Quality Assurance Programs at Waste Generator Sites. The Agency will...

  19. 40 CFR 194.8 - Approval process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP...process for waste shipment from waste generator sites for disposal at the WIPP...Quality Assurance Programs at Waste Generator Sites. The Agency will...

  20. 30 CFR 816.89 - Disposal of noncoal mine wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...limited to grease, lubricants, paints, flammable liquids, garbage...not degrade surface or ground water, that fires are prevented...degrade surface or underground water. Wastes shall be routinely...prevent combustion and wind-borne waste. When the disposal...