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Sample records for hcn2 hcn4 kcne1

  1. Structural Basis for the cAMP-dependent Gating in the Human HCN4 Channel

    SciTech Connect

    X Xu; Z Vysotskaya; Q Liu; L Zhou

    2011-12-31

    Hyperpolarization-activated cAMP-regulated (HCN) channels play important physiological roles in both cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Among the four HCN isoforms, HCN2 and HCN4 show high expression levels in the human heart, with HCN4 being the major cardiac isoform. The previously published crystal structure of the mouse HCN2 (mHCN2) C-terminal fragment, including the C-linker and the cyclic-nucleotide binding domain (CNBD), has provided many insights into cAMP-dependent gating in HCN channels. However, structures of other mammalian HCN channel isoforms have been lacking. Here we used a combination of approaches including structural biology, biochemistry, and electrophysiology to study cAMP-dependent gating in HCN4 channel. First we solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal fragment of human HCN4 (hHCN4) channel at 2.4 {angstrom}. Overall we observed a high similarity between mHCN2 and hHCN4 crystal structures. Functional comparison between two isoforms revealed that compared with mHCN2, the hHCN4 protein exhibited marked different contributions to channel function, such as a {approx}3-fold reduction in the response to cAMP. Guided by structural differences in the loop region between {beta}4 and {beta}5 strands, we identified residues that could partially account for the differences in response to cAMP between mHCN2 and hHCN4 proteins. Moreover, upon cAMP binding, the hHCN4 C-terminal protein exerts a much prolonged effect in channel deactivation that could have significant physiological contributions.

  2. KCNE1 divides the voltage sensor movement in KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels into two steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barro-Soria, Rene; Rebolledo, Santiago; Liin, Sara I.; Perez, Marta E.; Sampson, Kevin J.; Kass, Robert S.; Larsson, H. Peter

    2014-04-01

    The functional properties of KCNQ1 channels are highly dependent on associated KCNE-β subunits. Mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE subunits can cause congenital channelopathies, such as deafness, cardiac arrhythmias and epilepsy. The mechanism by which KCNE1-β subunits slow the kinetics of KCNQ1 channels is a matter of current controversy. Here we show that KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel activation occurs in two steps: first, mutually independent voltage sensor movements in the four KCNQ1 subunits generate the main gating charge movement and underlie the initial delay in the activation time course of KCNQ1/KCNE1 currents. Second, a slower and concerted conformational change of all four voltage sensors and the gate, which opens the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel. Our data show that KCNE1 divides the voltage sensor movement into two steps with widely different voltage dependences and kinetics. The two voltage sensor steps in KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels can be pharmacologically isolated and further separated by a disease-causing mutation.

  3. Engineering a peptide inhibitor towards the KCNQ1/KCNE1 potassium channel (IKs).

    PubMed

    Hu, Youtian; Chen, Jing; Wang, Bin; Yang, Weishan; Zhang, Chuangeng; Hu, Jun; Xie, Zili; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang; Chen, Zongyun

    2015-09-01

    The KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel (IKs) plays important roles in the physiological and pathological process of heart, but no potent peptide acting on this channel has been reported. In this work, we found that the natural scorpion venom hardly inhibited KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel currents. Based on this observation, we attempted to use three natural scorpion toxins ChTX, BmKTX and OmTx2 with two different structural folds as templates to engineer potent peptide inhibitors towards the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel. Pharmacological experiments showed that when we screen with 1μM MT2 peptide, an analog derived from BmKTX toxin, KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel currents could be effectively inhibited. Concentration-dependent experiments showed that MT2 inhibited the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel with an IC50 value of 4.6±1.9μM. The mutagenesis experiments indicated that MT2 peptide likely used Lys26 residue to interact with the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel. With MT2 as a new template, we further designed a more potent MT2-2 peptide, which selectively inhibited the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel with an IC50 of 1.51±0.62μM. Together, this work provided a much potent KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel peptide inhibitor so far, and highlighted the role of molecular strategy in developing potent peptide inhibitors for the natural toxin-insensitive orphan receptors. PMID:26188173

  4. Flavonoid Regulation of HCN2 Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Anne E.; Rosenbaum, Joel C.; Brelidze, Tinatin I.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Zagotta, William N.

    2013-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels are pacemaker channels whose currents contribute to rhythmic activity in the heart and brain. HCN channels open in response to hyperpolarizing voltages, and the binding of cAMP to their cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) facilitates channel opening. Here, we report that, like cAMP, the flavonoid fisetin potentiates HCN2 channel gating. Fisetin sped HCN2 activation and shifted the conductance-voltage relationship to more depolarizing potentials with a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 1.8 μm. When applied together, fisetin and cAMP regulated HCN2 gating in a nonadditive fashion. Fisetin did not potentiate HCN2 channels lacking their CNBD, and two independent fluorescence-based binding assays reported that fisetin bound to the purified CNBD. These data suggest that the CNBD mediates the fisetin potentiation of HCN2 channels. Moreover, binding assays suggest that fisetin and cAMP partially compete for binding to the CNBD. NMR experiments demonstrated that fisetin binds within the cAMP-binding pocket, interacting with some of the same residues as cAMP. Together, these data indicate that fisetin is a partial agonist for HCN2 channels. PMID:24085296

  5. Modification by KCNE1 variants of the hERG potassium channel response to premature stimulation and to pharmacological inhibition.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunyun; El Harchi, Aziza; Zhang, Henggui; Hancox, Jules C

    2013-11-01

    human Ether-à-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) encodes the pore-forming subunit of cardiac rapid delayed rectifier K(+) current (I Kr) channels, which play important roles in ventricular repolarization, in protecting the myocardium from unwanted premature stimuli, and in drug-induced Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). KCNE1, a small transmembrane protein, can coassemble with hERG. However, it is not known how KCNE1 variants influence the channel's response to premature stimuli or if they influence the sensitivity of hERG to pharmacological inhibition. Accordingly, whole-cell patch-clamp measurements of hERG current (I hERG) were made at 37°C from hERG channels coexpressed with either wild-type (WT) KCNE1 or with one of three KCNE1 variants (A8V, D76N, and D85N). Under both conventional voltage clamp and ventricular action potential (AP) clamp, the amplitude of I hERG was smaller for A8V, D76N, and D85N KCNE1 + hERG than for WT KCNE1 + hERG. Using paired AP commands, with the second AP waveform applied at varying time intervals following the first to mimic premature ventricular excitation, the response of I hERG carried by each KCNE1 variant was reduced compared to that with WT KCNE1 + hERG. The I hERG blocking potency of the antiarrhythmic drug quinidine was similar between WT KCNE1 and the three KCNE1 variants. However, the I hERG inhibitory potency of the antibiotic clarithromycin and of the prokinetic drug cisapride was altered by KCNE1 variants. These results demonstrate that naturally occurring KCNE1 variants can reduce the response of hERG channels to premature excitation and also alter the sensitivity of hERG channels to inhibition by some drugs linked to acquired LQTS. PMID:24400172

  6. KCNE1 and KCNE3: The yin and yang of voltage-gated K(+) channel regulation.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2016-01-15

    The human KCNE gene family comprises five genes encoding single transmembrane-spanning ion channel regulatory subunits. The primary function of KCNE subunits appears to be regulation of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, and the best-understood KCNE complexes are with the KCNQ1 Kv α subunit. Here, we review the often opposite effects of KCNE1 and KCNE3 on Kv channel biology, with an emphasis on regulation of KCNQ1. Slow-activating IKs channel complexes formed by KCNQ1 and KCNE1 are essential for human ventricular myocyte repolarization, while constitutively active KCNQ1-KCNE3 channels are important in the intestine. Inherited sequence variants in human KCNE1 and KCNE3 cause cardiac arrhythmias but by different mechanisms, and each is important for hearing in unique ways. Because of their contrasting effects on KCNQ1 function, KCNE1 and KCNE3 have proved invaluable tools in the mechanistic understanding of how channel gating can be manipulated, and each may also provide a window into novel insights and new therapeutic opportunities in K(+) channel pharmacology. Finally, findings from studies of Kcne1(-/-) and Kcne3(-/-) mouse lines serve to illustrate the complexity of KCNE biology and KCNE-linked disease states. PMID:26410412

  7. Hexachlorophene Is a Potent KCNQ1/KCNE1 Potassium Channel Activator Which Rescues LQTs Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueming; Zhu, Xuejing; Zhou, Pingzheng; Lan, Xi; Xu, Haiyan; Li, Min; Gao, Zhaobing

    2012-01-01

    The voltage-gated KCNQ1 potassium channel is expressed in cardiac tissues, and coassembly of KCNQ1 with an auxiliary KCNE1 subunit mediates a slowly activating current that accelerates the repolarization of action potential in cardiomyocytes. Mutations of KCNQ1 genes that result in reduction or loss of channel activity cause prolongation of repolarization during action potential, thereby causing long QT syndrome (LQTs). Small molecule activators of KCNQ1/KCNE1 are useful both for understanding the mechanism of the complex activity and for developing therapeutics for LQTs. In this study we report that hexachlorophene (HCP), the active component of the topical anti-infective prescription drug pHisoHex, is a KCNQ1/KCNE1 activator. HCP potently increases the current amplitude of KCNQ1/KCNE1 expressed by stabilizing the channel in an open state with an EC50 of 4.61±1.29 μM. Further studies in cardiomyocytes showed that HCP significantly shortens the action potential duration at 1 μM. In addition, HCP is capable of rescuing the loss of function of the LQTs mutants caused by either impaired activation gating or phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding affinity. Our results indicate HCP is a novel KCNQ1/KCNE1 activator and may be a useful tool compound for the development of LQTs therapeutics. PMID:23251633

  8. Probing the structural basis for differential KCNQ1 modulation by KCNE1 and KCNE2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhong; Zhang, Mei; Xu, Yu; Jiang, Min; Zankov, Dimitar P; Cui, Meng; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2012-12-01

    KCNE1 associates with KCNQ1 to increase its current amplitude and slow the activation gating process, creating the slow delayed rectifier channel that functions as a "repolarization reserve" in human heart. The transmembrane domain (TMD) of KCNE1 plays a key role in modulating KCNQ1 pore conductance and gating kinetics, and the extracellular juxtamembrane (EJM) region plays a modulatory role by interacting with the extracellular surface of KCNQ1. KCNE2 is also expressed in human heart and can associate with KCNQ1 to suppress its current amplitude and slow the deactivation gating process. KCNE1 and KCNE2 share the transmembrane topology and a high degree of sequence homology in TMD and surrounding regions. The structural basis for their distinctly different effects on KCNQ1 is not clear. To address this question, we apply cysteine (Cys) scanning mutagenesis to TMDs and EJMs of KCNE1 and KCNE2. We analyze the patterns of functional perturbation to identify high impact positions, and probe disulfide formation between engineered Cys side chains on KCNE subunits and native Cys on KCNQ1. We also use methanethiosulfonate reagents to probe the relationship between EJMs of KCNE subunits and KCNQ1. Our data suggest that the TMDs of both KCNE subunits are at about the same location but interact differently with KCNQ1. In particular, the much closer contact of KCNE2 TMD with KCNQ1, relative to that of KCNE1, is expected to impact the allosteric modulation of KCNQ1 pore conductance and may explain their differential effects on the KCNQ1 current amplitude. KCNE1 and KCNE2 also differ in the relationship between their EJMs and KCNQ1. Although the EJM of KCNE1 makes intimate contacts with KCNQ1, there appears to be a crevice between KCNQ1 and KCNE2. This putative crevice may perturb the electrical field around the voltage-sensing domain of KCNQ1, contributing to the differential effects of KCNE2 versus KCNE1 on KCNQ1 gating kinetics. PMID:23183700

  9. Abnormal repolarization dynamics in a patient with KCNE1(G38S) who presented with torsades de pointes.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Mizumaki, Koichi; Hata, Yukiko; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Risk of G38S, major KCNE1 polymorphism [KCNE1(G38S)], for long QT syndrome (LQTS) remains unclear. A 72-year-old woman was admitted with recurrent torsades de pointes (TdP). She had remarkable QT prolongation (corrected QT interval 568 ms) under conditions of hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. After correction of this electrolytic imbalance, TdP was suppressed and metoprolol was started. The QT-RR slope in 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram was steep and this enhanced bradycardia-dependent QT prolongation was similar to that in LQTS. She carried KCNE1(G38S). Patients with KCNE1(G38S) could have similar potential risk of ventricular arrhythmia as with LQTS. Analysis of QT-RR relationship could also evaluate the latent arrhythmogenicity of KCNE1(G38S). PMID:26520166

  10. Regulation of membrane KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel density by sphingomyelin synthase 1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meikui; Takemoto, Makoto; Taniguchi, Makoto; Takumi, Toru; Okazaki, Toshiro; Song, Wen-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) catalyzes the conversion of phosphatidylcholine and ceramide to sphingomyelin and diacylglycerol. We previously showed that SMS1 deficiency leads to a reduction in expression of the K(+) channel KCNQ1 in the inner ear (Lu MH, Takemoto M, Watanabe K, Luo H, Nishimura M, Yano M, Tomimoto H, Okazaki T, Oike Y, and Song WJ. J Physiol 590: 4029-4044, 2012), causing hearing loss. However, it remains unknown whether this change in expression is attributable to a cellular process or a systemic effect in the knockout animal. Here, we examined whether manipulation of SMS1 activity affects KCNQ1/KCNE1 currents in individual cells. To this end, we expressed the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel in human embryonic kidney 293T cells and evaluated the effect of SMS1 manipulations on the channel using whole cell recording. Application of tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate, a nonspecific inhibitor of SMSs, significantly reduced current density and altered channel voltage dependence. Knockdown of SMS1 by a short hairpin RNA, however, reduced current density alone. Consistent with this, overexpression of SMS1 increased the current density without changing channel properties. Furthermore, application of protein kinase D inhibitors also suppressed current density without changing channel properties; this effect was nonadditive with that of SMS1 short hairpin RNA. These results suggest that SMS1 positively regulates KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel density in a protein kinase D-dependent manner. PMID:27194473

  11. A distinct three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 inhibits Iks channels by interacting with the KCNE1 auxiliary subunit

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peibei; Wu, Fangming; Wen, Ming; Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Chenyang; Li, Yiming; He, Shufang; Zhang, Longhua; Zhang, Yun; Tian, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    KCNE1 is a single-span transmembrane auxiliary protein that modulates the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1. The KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex in cardiomyocytes exhibited slow activated potassium (Iks) currents. Recently, a novel 47-residue polypeptide toxin SSD609 was purified from Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani venom and showed Iks current inhibition. Here, chemically synthesized SSD609 was shown to exert Iks inhibition in extracted guinea pig cardiomyocytes and KCNQ1/KCNE1 current attenuation in CHO cells. The K+ current attenuation of SSD609 showed decent selectivity among different auxiliary subunits. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of SSD609 revealed a distinctive three-helix conformation that was stabilized by a new disulfide bonding pattern as well as segregated surface charge distribution. Structure-activity studies demonstrated that negatively charged Glu19 in the amphipathic extracellular helix of KCNE1 was the key residue that interacted with SSD609. The distinctive three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 is known to be the first polypeptide toxin acting on channel auxiliary subunit KCNE1, which suggests a new type of pharmacological regulation for ion channels in cardiomyocytes. PMID:26307551

  12. A Novel Trafficking-defective HCN4 Mutation is Associated with Early-Onset Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Michael L.; Sinner, Moritz F.; Dolmatova, Elena V.; Tucker, Nathan R.; McLellan, Micheal; Shea, Marisa A.; Milan, David J.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia, and a recent genome-wide association study identified HCN4 as a novel AF susceptibility locus. HCN4 encodes for the cardiac pacemaker channel and HCN4 mutations are associated with familial sinus bradycardia and AF. Objective To determine whether novel variants in the coding region of HCN4 contribute to the susceptibility for AF. Methods We sequenced the coding region of HCN4 for novel variants from 527 cases with early-onset AF from the Massachusetts General Hospital AF Study and 443 referents from the Framingham Heart Study. We used site-directed mutagenesis, cellular electrophysiology, immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy to functionally characterize novel variants. Results We found the frequency of novel coding HCN4 variants was 2-fold greater for individuals with AF (seven variants) compared to the referents (three variants). We determined that one, (p.Pro257Ser, located in the amino-terminus adjacent to the first transmembrane spanning domain) of the seven novel HCN4 variants in our AF cases did not traffick to cell membrane while the remaining six were not functionally different from wild type. Also, the three novel variants in our referents did not alter function compared to wild type. Co-expression studies showed that the p.Pro257Ser mutant channel failed to co-localize with the wild type HCN4 channel on the cell membrane. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with HCN4 haploinsufficiency as the likely mechanism for early-onset AF in the p.Pro257Ser carrier. PMID:24607718

  13. Preparation, Functional Characterization, and NMR Studies of Human KCNE1, a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Accessory Subunit Associated With Deafness and Long QT Syndrome†

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Changlin; Vanoye, Carlos G.; Kang, Congbao; Welch, Richard C.; Kim, Hak Jun; George, Alfred L.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    KCNE1, also known as minK, is a member of the KCNE family of membrane proteins that modulate the function of KCNQ1 and certain other voltage-gated potassium channels (KV). Mutations in human KCNE1 cause congenital deafness and congenital long QT syndrome, an inherited predisposition to potentially life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Although its modulation of KCNQ1 function has been extensively characterized, many questions remain regarding KCNE1's structure and location within the channel complex. In this study KCNE1 was overexpressed in E. coli and purified. Micellar solutions of the protein were then microinjected into Xenopus oocytes expressing KCNQ1 channels, followed by electrophysiological recordings to test whether recombinant KCNE1 can co-assemble with the channel. Native-like modulation of channel properties was observed following injection of KCNE1 in lysomyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (LMPG) micelles, indicating that KCNE1 is not irreversibly misfolded and that LMPG is able to act as a vehicle for delivering membrane proteins into the membranes of viable cells. 1H,15N-TROSY NMR experiments indicated that LMPG micelles are well-suited for structural studies of KCNE1, leading to assignment of its backbone resonances and to relaxation studies. The chemical shift data confirmed that KCNE1's secondary structure includes several α-helices and demonstrated that its distal C-terminus is disordered. Surprisingly, for KCNE1 in LMPG micelles there appears to be a break in α-helicity at sites 59−61, near the middle of the transmembrane segment, a feature that is accompanied by increased local backbone mobility. Given that this segment overlaps with sites 57−59, which are known to play a critical role in modulating KCNQ1 channel activation kinetics, this unusual structural feature is likely of considerable functional relevance. PMID:17892302

  14. HCN4 mutation as a molecular explanation on patients with bradycardia and non-compaction cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Millat, Gilles; Janin, Alexandre; de Tauriac, Olivier; Roux, Antoine; Dauphin, Claire

    2015-09-01

    A very recent study suggested that HCN4 mutations could be associated with sinusal bradycardia and myocardial non compaction. A French family with 3 affected sisters presenting the same clinical phenotype (sinus bradycardia in combination with non compaction cardiomyopathy (NCCM)) have benefited both from a systematic cardiovascular exploration and molecular investigations. The molecular analysis, performed by NGS sequencing, led to identify only one likely-disease causing variation: p.Gly482Arg on HCN4 gene. Our results confirm the genetic evidence for the involvement of the HCN4 mutations in the combined bradycardia-NCCM phenotype and illustrates that, in front of this combined clinical phenotype, HCN4 mutations has to be suspected. PMID:26206080

  15. Effects of Yiqi Tongyang on HCN4 Protein Phosphorylation in Damaged Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; Liu, Ruxiu; Peng, Jie; Wang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel (If) is closely associated with sinoatrial node pacing function. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in pacing function improvements of damaged sinoatrial node cells and the consequent treatment effects on sick sinus syndrome (SSS) after the use of Yiqi Tongyang. HCN4 channel protein expression and phosphorylation were measured by immunoblotting and fluorescent quantitation. After ischemia-reperfusion injury (model group), the HCN4 protein and the optical density (OD) of the phosphorylated HCN4 protein as well as intracellular PKA activity in the sinoatrial node cells decreased significantly. However, the OD values and PKA activity increased to different degrees after treatment with serum containing different doses of Yiqi Tongyang; in contrast, no significant improvement was seen in the control group compared to the model group. These findings demonstrated that the use of the traditional Chinese medicine Yiqi Tongyang could increase HCN4 protein expression and phosphorylation as well as PKA activity within sinoatrial node cells damaged by ischemia-reperfusion. The HCN4 protein is involved in the If-related ion channel. Here, we speculated that these effects could be associated with upregulation of HCN4 protein phosphorylation, which consequently improved cell automaticity, increased heart rate, and had treatment effects on SSS. PMID:27069490

  16. Individual IKs channels at the surface of mammalian cells contain two KCNE1 accessory subunits

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.; Xiong, Dazhi; Dai, Hui; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2014-01-01

    KCNE1 (E1) β-subunits assemble with KCNQ1 (Q1) voltage-gated K+ channel α-subunits to form IKslow (IKs) channels in the heart and ear. The number of E1 subunits in IKs channels has been an issue of ongoing debate. Here, we use single-molecule spectroscopy to demonstrate that surface IKs channels with human subunits contain two E1 and four Q1 subunits. This stoichiometry does not vary. Thus, IKs channels in cells with elevated levels of E1 carry no more than two E1 subunits. Cells with low levels of E1 produce IKs channels with two E1 subunits and Q1 channels with no E1 subunits—channels with one E1 do not appear to form or are restricted from surface expression. The plethora of models of cardiac function, transgenic animals, and drug screens based on variable E1 stoichiometry do not reflect physiology. PMID:24591645

  17. Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNE1 are associated with early-onset familial atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia. The potassium current IKs is essential for cardiac repolarization. Gain-of-function mutations in KV7.1, the pore-forming α-subunit of the IKs channel, have been associated with AF. We hypothesized that early-onset lone AF is associated with mutations in the IKs channel regulatory subunit KCNE1. Methods In 209 unrelated early-onset lone AF patients (< 40 years) the entire coding sequence of KCNE1 was bidirectionally sequenced. We analyzed the identified KCNE1 mutants electrophysiologically in heterologous expression systems. Results Two non-synonymous mutations G25V and G60D were found in KCNE1 that were not present in the control group (n = 432 alleles) and that have not previously been reported in any publicly available databases or in the exom variant server holding exom data from more than 10.000 alleles. Proband 1 (female, age 45, G25V) had onset of paroxysmal AF at the age of 39 years. Proband 2 (G60D) was diagnosed with lone AF at the age of 33 years. The patient has inherited the mutation from his mother, who also has AF. Both probands had no mutations in genes previously associated with AF. In heterologous expression systems, both mutants showed significant gain-of-function for IKs both with respect to steady-state current levels, kinetic parameters, and heart rate-dependent modulation. Conclusions Mutations in KV7.1 leading to gain-of-function of IKs current have previously been described in lone AF, yet this is the first time a mutation in the beta-subunit KCNE1 is associated with the disease. This finding further supports the hypothesis that increased potassium current enhances AF susceptibility. PMID:22471742

  18. BACE1 and presenilin/γ-secretase regulate proteolytic processing of KCNE1 and 2, auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Carolyn C; Kim, Young Hye; Agsten, Marianne; Huth, Tobias; Alzheimer, Christian; Kovacs, Dora M; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2013-06-01

    BACE1 and presenilin (PS)/γ-secretase play a major role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis by regulating amyloid-β peptide generation. We recently showed that these secretases also regulate the processing of voltage-gated sodium channel auxiliary β-subunits and thereby modulate membrane excitability. Here, we report that KCNE1 and KCNE2, auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated potassium channels, undergo sequential cleavage mediated by either α-secretase and PS/γ-secretase or BACE1 and PS/γ-secretase in cells. Elevated α-secretase or BACE1 activities increased C-terminal fragment (CTF) levels of KCNE1 and 2 in human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) and rat neuroblastoma (B104) cells. KCNE-CTFs were then further processed by PS/γ-secretase to KCNE intracellular domains. These KCNE cleavages were specifically blocked by chemical inhibitors of the secretases in the same cell models. We also verified our results in mouse cardiomyocytes and cultured primary neurons. Endogenous KCNE1- and KCNE2-CTF levels increased by 2- to 4-fold on PS/γ-secretase inhibition or BACE1 overexpression in these cells. Furthermore, the elevated BACE1 activity increased KCNE1 processing and shifted KCNE1/KCNQ1 channel activation curve to more positive potentials in HEK cells. KCNE1/KCNQ1 channel is a cardiac potassium channel complex, and the positive shift would lead to a decrease in membrane repolarization during cardiac action potential. Together, these results clearly showed that KCNE1 and KCNE2 cleavages are regulated by BACE1 and PS/γ-secretase activities under physiological conditions. Our results also suggest a functional role of KCNE cleavage in regulating voltage-gated potassium channels. PMID:23504710

  19. A distinct three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 inhibits I(ks) channels by interacting with the KCNE1 auxiliary subunit.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peibei; Wu, Fangming; Wen, Ming; Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Chenyang; Li, Yiming; He, Shufang; Zhang, Longhua; Zhang, Yun; Tian, Changlin

    2015-01-01

    KCNE1 is a single-span transmembrane auxiliary protein that modulates the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1. The KCNQ1/KCNE1 complex in cardiomyocytes exhibited slow activated potassium (I(ks)) currents. Recently, a novel 47-residue polypeptide toxin SSD609 was purified from Scolopendra subspinipes dehaani venom and showed I(ks) current inhibition. Here, chemically synthesized SSD609 was shown to exert I(ks) inhibition in extracted guinea pig cardiomyocytes and KCNQ1/KCNE1 current attenuation in CHO cells. The K(+) current attenuation of SSD609 showed decent selectivity among different auxiliary subunits. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of SSD609 revealed a distinctive three-helix conformation that was stabilized by a new disulfide bonding pattern as well as segregated surface charge distribution. Structure-activity studies demonstrated that negatively charged Glu19 in the amphipathic extracellular helix of KCNE1 was the key residue that interacted with SSD609. The distinctive three-helix centipede toxin SSD609 is known to be the first polypeptide toxin acting on channel auxiliary subunit KCNE1, which suggests a new type of pharmacological regulation for ion channels in cardiomyocytes. PMID:26307551

  20. Unnatural amino acid photo-crosslinking of the IKs channel complex demonstrates a KCNE1:KCNQ1 stoichiometry of up to 4:4

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Christopher I; Westhoff, Maartje; Eldstrom, Jodene; Thompson, Emely; Emes, Robert; Fedida, David

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac repolarization is determined in part by the slow delayed rectifier current (IKs), through the tetrameric voltage-gated ion channel, KCNQ1, and its β-subunit, KCNE1. The stoichiometry between α and β-subunits has been controversial with studies reporting either a strict 2 KCNE1:4 KCNQ1 or a variable ratio up to 4:4. We used IKs fusion proteins linking KCNE1 to one (EQ), two (EQQ) or four (EQQQQ) KCNQ1 subunits, to reproduce compulsory 4:4, 2:4 or 1:4 stoichiometries. Whole cell and single-channel recordings showed EQQ and EQQQQ to have increasingly hyperpolarized activation, reduced conductance, and shorter first latency of opening compared to EQ - all abolished by the addition of KCNE1. As well, using a UV-crosslinking unnatural amino acid in KCNE1, we found EQQQQ and EQQ crosslinking rates to be progressively slowed compared to KCNQ1, which demonstrates that no intrinsic mechanism limits the association of up to four β-subunits within the IKs complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11815.001 PMID:26802629

  1. BACE1 and presenilin/γ-secretase regulate proteolytic processing of KCNE1 and 2, auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Carolyn C.; Kim, Young Hye; Agsten, Marianne; Huth, Tobias; Alzheimer, Christian; Kovacs, Dora M.; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2013-01-01

    BACE1 and presenilin (PS)/γ-secretase play a major role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis by regulating amyloid-β peptide generation. We recently showed that these secretases also regulate the processing of voltage-gated sodium channel auxiliary β-subunits and thereby modulate membrane excitability. Here, we report that KCNE1 and KCNE2, auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated potassium channels, undergo sequential cleavage mediated by either α-secretase and PS/γ-secretase or BACE1 and PS/γ-secretase in cells. Elevated α-secretase or BACE1 activities increased C-terminal fragment (CTF) levels of KCNE1 and 2 in human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) and rat neuroblastoma (B104) cells. KCNE-CTFs were then further processed by PS/γ-secretase to KCNE intracellular domains. These KCNE cleavages were specifically blocked by chemical inhibitors of the secretases in the same cell models. We also verified our results in mouse cardiomyocytes and cultured primary neurons. Endogenous KCNE1- and KCNE2-CTF levels increased by 2- to 4-fold on PS/γ-secretase inhibition or BACE1 overexpression in these cells. Furthermore, the elevated BACE1 activity increased KCNE1 processing and shifted KCNE1/KCNQ1 channel activation curve to more positive potentials in HEK cells. KCNE1/KCNQ1 channel is a cardiac potassium channel complex, and the positive shift would lead to a decrease in membrane repolarization during cardiac action potential. Together, these results clearly showed that KCNE1 and KCNE2 cleavages are regulated by BACE1 and PS/γ-secretase activities under physiological conditions. Our results also suggest a functional role of KCNE cleavage in regulating voltage-gated potassium channels.—Sachse, C. C., Kim, Y. H., Agsten, M., Huth, T., Alzheimer, C., Kovacs, D. M., and Kim, D. Y. BACE1 and presenilin/γ-secretase regulate proteolytic processing of KCNE1 and 2, auxiliary subunits of voltage-gated potassium channels. PMID:23504710

  2. KCNQ1 and KCNE1 K+ Channel Components are Involved in Early Left-Right Patterning in Xenopus laevis Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Morokuma, Junji; Blackiston, Douglas; Levin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Several ion transporters have been implicated in left-right (LR) patterning. Here, we characterize a new component of the early bioelectrical circuit: the potassium channel KCNQ1 and its accessory subunit KCNE1. Having cloned the native Xenopus versions of both genes, we show that both are asymmetrically localized as maternal proteins during the first few cleavages of frog embryo development in a process dependent on microtubule and actin organization. Molecular loss-of-function using dominant negative constructs demonstrates that both gene products are required for normal LR asymmetry. We propose a model whereby these channels provide an exit path for K+ ions brought in by the H+,K+-ATPase. This physiological module thus allows the obligate but electroneutral H+,K+-ATPase to generate an asymmetric voltage gradient on the left and right sides. Our data reveal a new, bioelectrical component of the mechanisms patterning a large-scale axis in vertebrate embryogenesis. PMID:18453744

  3. The residue I257 at S4–S5 linker in KCNQ1 determines KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel sensitivity to 1-alkanols

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chang; Liu, Hao-wen; Pan, Na; Ding, Jiu-ping; Yao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aim: KCNQ1 and KCNE1 form a complex in human ventricular cardiomyocytes, which are important in maintaining a normal heart rhythm. In the present study we investigated the effects of a homologous series of 1-alkanols on KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Methods: ECG recording was made in rats injected with ethanol-containing solution (0.3 mL, ip). Human KCNQ1 channel and its auxiliary subunit KCNE1 were heterologously coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes, which were superfused with ND96 solution; 1-alkanols (ethanol, 1-butanol and 1-hexanol) were delivered through a gravity-driven perfusion device. The slow-delayed rectifier potassium currents IKs (KCNQ1/KCNE1 currents) were recorded using a two-electrode voltage clamp method. Site-directed mutations (I257A) were made in KCNQ1. Results: In ECG recordings, a low concentration of ethanol (3%, v/v) slightly increased the heart rate of rats, whereas the higher concentrations of ethanol (10%, 50%, v/v) markedly reduced it. In oocytes coexpressing KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels, ethanol, 1-butanol and 1-hexanol dose-dependently inhibited IKs currents with IC50 values of 80, 11 and 2.7 mmol/L, respectively. Furthermore, the 1-alkanols blocked the KCNQ1 channel in both open and closed states, and a four-state model could adequately explain the effects of 1-alkanols on the closed-state channel block. Moreover, the mutation of I257A at the intracellular loop between S4 and S5 in KCNQ1 greatly decreased the sensitivity to 1-alkanols; and the IC50 values of ethanol, 1-butanol and 1-hexanol were increased to 634, 414 and 7.4 mmol/L, respectively. The mutation also caused the ablation of closed-state channel block. Conclusion: These findings provide new insight into the intricate mechanisms of the blocking effects of ethanol on the KCNQ1 channel. PMID:26725740

  4. Exercise training reduces resting heart rate via downregulation of the funny channel HCN4.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Alicia; Bucchi, Annalisa; Johnsen, Anne Berit; Logantha, Sunil Jit R J; Monfredi, Oliver; Yanni, Joseph; Prehar, Sukhpal; Hart, George; Cartwright, Elizabeth; Wisloff, Ulrik; Dobryznski, Halina; DiFrancesco, Dario; Morris, Gwilym M; Boyett, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Endurance athletes exhibit sinus bradycardia, that is a slow resting heart rate, associated with a higher incidence of sinus node (pacemaker) disease and electronic pacemaker implantation. Here we show that training-induced bradycardia is not a consequence of changes in the activity of the autonomic nervous system but is caused by intrinsic electrophysiological changes in the sinus node. We demonstrate that training-induced bradycardia persists after blockade of the autonomous nervous system in vivo in mice and in vitro in the denervated sinus node. We also show that a widespread remodelling of pacemaker ion channels, notably a downregulation of HCN4 and the corresponding ionic current, If. Block of If abolishes the difference in heart rate between trained and sedentary animals in vivo and in vitro. We further observe training-induced downregulation of Tbx3 and upregulation of NRSF and miR-1 (transcriptional regulators) that explains the downregulation of HCN4. Our findings provide a molecular explanation for the potentially pathological heart rate adaptation to exercise training. PMID:24825544

  5. Ectopic automaticity induced in ventricular myocytes by transgenic overexpression of HCN2.

    PubMed

    Oshita, Kensuke; Itoh, Masayuki; Hirashima, Shingo; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Ishihara, Keiko; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kimura, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro; Ushijima, Kazuo; Takano, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCNs) are expressed in the ventricles of fetal hearts but are normally down-regulated as development progresses. In the hypertrophied heart, however, these channels are re-expressed and generate a hyperpolarization-activated, nonselective cation current (Ih), which evidence suggests may increase susceptibility to arrhythmia. To test this hypothesis, we generated and analyzed transgenic mice overexpressing HCN2 specifically in their hearts (HCN2-Tg). Under physiological conditions, HCN2-Tg mice exhibited no discernible abnormalities. After the application of isoproterenol (ISO), however, ECG recordings from HCN2-Tg mice showed intermittent atrioventricular dissociation followed by idioventricular rhythm. Consistent with this observation, 0.3 μmol/L ISO-induced spontaneous action potentials (SAPs) in 76% of HCN2-Tg ventricular myocytes. In the remaining 24%, ISO significantly depolarized the resting membrane potential (RMP), and the late repolarization phase of evoked action potentials (APs) was significantly longer than in WT myocytes. Analysis of membrane currents revealed that these differences are attributable to the Ih tail current. These findings suggest HCN2 channel activity reduces the repolarization reserve of the ventricular action potential and increases ectopic automaticity under pathological conditions such as excessive β-adrenergic stimulation. PMID:25562801

  6. BACE1 modulates gating of KCNQ1 (Kv7.1) and cardiac delayed rectifier KCNQ1/KCNE1 (IKs).

    PubMed

    Agsten, Marianne; Hessler, Sabine; Lehnert, Sandra; Volk, Tilmann; Rittger, Andrea; Hartmann, Stephanie; Raab, Christian; Kim, Doo Yeon; Groemer, Teja W; Schwake, Michael; Alzheimer, Christian; Huth, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    KCNQ1 (Kv7.1) proteins form a homotetrameric channel, which produces a voltage-dependent K(+) current. Co-assembly of KCNQ1 with the auxiliary β-subunit KCNE1 strongly up-regulates this current. In cardiac myocytes, KCNQ1/E1 complexes are thought to give rise to the delayed rectifier current IKs, which contributes to cardiac action potential repolarization. We report here that the type I membrane protein BACE1 (β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1), which is best known for its detrimental role in Alzheimer's disease, but is also, as reported here, present in cardiac myocytes, serves as a novel interaction partner of KCNQ1. Using HEK293T cells as heterologous expression system to study the electrophysiological effects of BACE1 and KCNE1 on KCNQ1 in different combinations, our main findings were the following: (1) BACE1 slowed the inactivation of KCNQ1 current producing an increased initial response to depolarizing voltage steps. (2) Activation kinetics of KCNQ1/E1 currents were significantly slowed in the presence of co-expressed BACE1. (3) BACE1 impaired reconstituted cardiac IKs when cardiac action potentials were used as voltage commands, but interestingly augmented the IKs of ATP-deprived cells, suggesting that the effect of BACE1 depends on the metabolic state of the cell. (4) The electrophysiological effects of BACE1 on KCNQ1 reported here were independent of its enzymatic activity, as they were preserved when the proteolytically inactive variant BACE1 D289N was co-transfected in lieu of BACE1 or when BACE1-expressing cells were treated with the BACE1-inhibiting compound C3. (5) Co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) supported our hypothesis that BACE1 modifies the biophysical properties of IKs by physically interacting with KCNQ1 in a β-subunit-like fashion. Strongly underscoring the functional significance of this interaction, we detected BACE1 in human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and murine cardiac tissue and observed

  7. Electric pulse current stimulation increases electrophysiological properties of If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected canine mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    FENG, YUANYUAN; LUO, SHOUMING; YANG, PAN; SONG, ZHIYUAN

    2016-01-01

    The ‘funny’ current, also known as the If current, play a crucial role in the spontaneous diastolic depolarization of sinoatrial node cells. The If current is primarily induced by the protein encoded by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (HCN4) gene. The functional If channel can be reconstructed in canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs) transfected with mouse HCN4 (mHCN4). Biomimetic studies have shown that electric pulse current stimulation (EPCS) can promote cardiogenesis in cMSCs. However, whether EPCS is able to influence the properties of the If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected cMSCs remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of EPCS on the If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected cMSCs. The cMSCs were transfected with the lentiviral vector pLentis-mHCN4-GFP. Following transfection, these cells were divided into two groups: mHCN4-transfected cMSCs (group A), and mHCN4-transfected cMSCs induced by EPCS (group B). Using a whole cell patch-clamp technique, the If current was recorded, and group A cMSCs showed significant time and voltage dependencies and sensitivity to extracellular Cs+. The half-maximal activation (V1/2) value was −101.2±4.6 mV and the time constant of activation was 324±41 msec under −160 mV. In the group B cells the If current increased obviously and activation curve moved to right. The absolute value of V1/2 increased significantly to −92.4±4.8 mV (P<0.05), and the time constant of activation diminished under the same command voltage (251±44 vs. 324±41, P<0.05). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression levels of HCN4, connexin 43 (Cx43) and Cx45 were upregulated in group B compared with group A, as determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. Transmission electron micrographs also confirmed the increased gap junctions in group B. Collectively, these results indicated that reconstructed If channels

  8. HCN2 ion channels: basic science opens up possibilities for therapeutic intervention in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tsantoulas, Christoforos; Mooney, Elizabeth R; McNaughton, Peter A

    2016-09-15

    Nociception - the ability to detect painful stimuli - is an invaluable sense that warns against present or imminent damage. In patients with chronic pain, however, this warning signal persists in the absence of any genuine threat and affects all aspects of everyday life. Neuropathic pain, a form of chronic pain caused by damage to sensory nerves themselves, is dishearteningly refractory to drugs that may work in other types of pain and is a major unmet medical need begging for novel analgesics. Hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN)-modulated ion channels are best known for their fundamental pacemaker role in the heart; here, we review data demonstrating that the HCN2 isoform acts in an analogous way as a 'pacemaker for pain', in that its activity in nociceptive neurons is critical for the maintenance of electrical activity and for the sensation of chronic pain in pathological pain states. Pharmacological block or genetic deletion of HCN2 in sensory neurons provides robust pain relief in a variety of animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, without any effect on normal sensation of acute pain. We discuss the implications of these findings for our understanding of neuropathic pain pathogenesis, and we outline possible future opportunities for the development of efficacious and safe pharmacotherapies in a range of chronic pain syndromes. PMID:27621481

  9. Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) reduces phosphorylation of tau in human neuronal cells (HCN2)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Weijiang; Albers, John J.; Vuletic, Simona

    2009-01-01

    Tau function is regulated by phosphorylation, and abnormal tau phosphorylation in neurons is one of the key processes associated with development of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies. In this study we provide evidence that phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), one of the main lipid transfer proteins in the brain, significantly reduces levels of phosphorylated tau, and increases levels of the inactive form of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) in HCN2 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) reversed the PLTP-induced increase in levels of GSK3β phosphorylated at serine 9 (pGSK3βSer9) and partially reversed the PLTP-induced reduction in tau phosphorylation. We provide evidence that the PLTP-induced changes are not due to activation of Disabled-1 (Dab1), since PLTP reduced levels of total and phosphorylated Dab1 in HCN2 cells. We have also shown that inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity of insulin receptor (IR) and/or insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) receptor (IGFR) reverses PLTP-induced increase in levels of phosphorylated Akt (pAktThr308 and pAktSer473), suggesting that PLTP-mediated activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway is dependent on IR/IGFR receptor tyrosine kinase activity. Our study suggests that PLTP may be an important modulator of signal transduction pathways in human neurons. PMID:19472218

  10. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes—A model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanani, S.; Pumir, A.; Krinsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler Reuter and in the dynamic Luo Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below ˜1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  11. Novel HCN2 Mutation Contributes to Febrile Seizures by Shifting the Channel's Kinetics in a Temperature-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuki; Shi, Xiuyu; Numata, Tomohiro; Mori, Yasuo; Inoue, Ryuji; Lossin, Christoph; Baram, Tallie Z.; Hirose, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel-mediated currents, known as Ih, are involved in the control of rhythmic activity in neuronal circuits and in determining neuronal properties including the resting membrane potential. Recent studies have shown that HCN channels play a role in seizure susceptibility and in absence and limbic epilepsy including temporal lobe epilepsy following long febrile seizures (FS). This study focused on the potential contributions of abnormalities in the HCN2 isoform and their role in FS. A novel heterozygous missense mutation in HCN2 exon 1 leading to p.S126L was identified in two unrelated patients with FS. The mutation was inherited from the mother who had suffered from FS in a pedigree. To determine the effect of this substitution we conducted whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology. We found that mutant channels had elevated sensitivity to temperature. More specifically, they displayed faster kinetics at higher temperature. Kinetic shift by change of temperature sensitivity rather than the shift of voltage dependence led to increased availability of Ih in conditions promoting FS. Responses to cyclic AMP did not differ between wildtype and mutant channels. Thus, mutant HCN2 channels cause significant cAMP-independent enhanced availability of Ih during high temperatures, which may contribute to hyperthermia-induced neuronal hyperexcitability in some individuals with FS. PMID:24324597

  12. Cocaine sensitization increases Ih current channel subunit 2 (HCN2) protein expression in structures of the Mesocorticolimbic System

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Vera, Bermary; Vázquez-Torres, Rafael; García Marrero, Hermes G.; Ramos Acevedo, Juan M.; Arencibia-Albite, Francisco; Vélez-Hernández, María E.; Miranda, Jorge D.; Jiménez-Rivera, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Alteration of the biological activity among neuronal components of the Mesocorticolimbic (MCL) system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of drug abuse. Changes in the electrophysiological properties of neurons involved in the reward circuit seem to be of utmost importance in addiction. The Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic-Nucleotide Current, Ih, is a prominent mixed cation current present in neurons. The biophysical properties of the Ih and its potential modulatory role in cell excitability depend on the expression profile of the Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channel (HCN) subunits. We investigated whether cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization, an animal model of drug addiction, elicits region-specific changes in the expression of the HCN2 channel’s subunit in the MCL system. Tissue samples from the ventral tegmental area, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and hippocampus were analyzed using Western Blot. Our findings demonstrate that cocaine treatment induced a significant increase in the expression profile of the HCN2 subunit in both, its glycosylated and non-glycosylated protein isoforms, in all areas tested. The increase in the glycosylated isoform was only observed in the ventral tegmental area. Together, these data suggest that the observed changes in MCL excitability during cocaine addiction might be associated to alterations in the subunit composition of their HCN channels. PMID:23203153

  13. Resonance assignment of the ligand-free cyclic nucleotide-binding domain from the murine ion channel HCN2.

    PubMed

    Börger, Claudia; Schünke, Sven; Lecher, Justin; Stoldt, Matthias; Winkhaus, Friederike; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Willbold, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Hyperpolarization activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels as well as cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels are essential for the regulation of cardiac cells, neuronal excitability, and signaling in sensory cells. Both classes are composed of four subunits. Each subunit comprises a transmembrane region, intracellular N- and C-termini, and a C-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Binding of cyclic nucleotides to the CNBD promotes opening of both CNG and HCN channels. In case of CNG channels, binding of cyclic nucleotides to the CNBD is sufficient to open the channel. In contrast, HCN channels open upon membrane hyperpolarization and their activity is modulated by binding of cyclic nucleotides shifting the activation potential to more positive values. Although several high-resolution structures of CNBDs from HCN and CNG channels are available, the gating mechanism for murine HCN2 channel, which leads to the opening of the channel pore, is still poorly understood. As part of a structural investigation, here, we report the complete backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the murine HCN2 CNBD with part of the C-linker. PMID:25324217

  14. Baclofen ameliorates spatial working memory impairments induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via up-regulation of HCN2 expression in the PFC in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Pan; Chen, Cheng; Lu, Yun; Fu, TianLi; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; Li, Changjun; He, Zhi; Guo, Lianjun

    2016-07-15

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes memory deficits and increases the risk of vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways. However, whether CCH causes prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent spatial working memory impairments and Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, could ameliorate the impairments is still not clear especially the mechanisms underlying the process. In this study, rats were subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) to induce CCH. Two weeks later, rats were treated with 25mg/kg Baclofen (intraperitioneal injection, i.p.) for 3 weeks. Spatial working memory was evaluated in a Morris water maze using a modified delayed matching-to-place (DMP) procedure. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to quantify the protein levels and protein localization. Our results showed that 2VO caused striking spatial working memory impairments, accompanied with a decreased HCN2 expression in PFC, but the protein levels of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5, a neuron specific protein), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), synaptophysin (SYP), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), parvalbumin (PV) and HCN1 were not distinguishably changed as compared with sham-operated rats. Baclofen treatment significantly improved the spatial working memory impairments caused by 2VO, accompanied with a reversion of 2VO-induced down-regulation of HCN2. Furthermore, there was a co-localization of HCN2 subunits and parvalbumin-positive neurons in PFC. Therefore, HCN2 may target inhibitory interneurons that is implicated in working memory processes, which may be a possible mechanism of the up-regulation of HCN2 by Baclofen treatment that reliefs spatial working memory deficits in rats with CCH. PMID:27085590

  15. Increased expression of HCN2 channel protein in L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons following axotomy of L5- and inflammation of L4-spinal nerves in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, T; Al Otaibi, M; Sathish, J; Djouhri, L

    2015-06-01

    A hallmark of peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) is chronic spontaneous pain and/or hypersensitivity to normally painful stimuli (hyperalgesia) or normally nonpainful stimuli (allodynia).This pain results partly from abnormal hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. We have previously shown, using a modified version of the lumbar 5 (L5)-spinal nerve ligation model of PNP (mSNA model involving L5-spinal nerve axotomy plus loose ligation of the lumbar 4 (L4)-spinal nerve with neuroinflammation-inducing chromic-gut), that L4 DRG neurons exhibit increased spontaneous activity, the key characteristic of neuronal hyperexcitability. The underlying ionic and molecular mechanisms of the hyperexcitability of L4 DRG neurons are incompletely understood, but could result from changes in expression and/or function of ion channels including hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which are active near the neuron's resting membrane potential, and which produce an excitatory inward current that depolarizes the membrane potential toward the threshold of action potential generation. Therefore, in the present study we used the mSNA model to investigate whether: (a) expression of HCN1-HCN3 channels is altered in L4 DRG neurons which, in the mSNA model, are essential for transmission of the evoked pain, and which contribute to chronic spontaneous pain, and (b) local (intraplantar) blockade of these HCN channels, with a specific blocker, ZD7288, attenuates chronic spontaneous pain and/or evoked pain in mSNA rats. We found 7days after mSNA: (1) a significant increase in HCN2-immunoreactivity in small (<30μm) DRG neurons (predominantly IB4-negative neurons), and in the proportion of small neurons expressing HCN2 (putative nociceptors); (2) no significant change in HCN1- or HCN3-immunoreactivity in all cell types; and (3) attenuation, with ZD7288 (100μM intraplantar), of chronic spontaneous pain behavior (spontaneous foot lifting) and mechanical

  16. Ivabradine prolongs phase 3 of cardiac repolarization and blocks the hERG1 (KCNH2) current over a concentration-range overlapping with that required to block HCN4.

    PubMed

    Lees-Miller, James P; Guo, Jiqing; Wang, Yibo; Perissinotti, Laura L; Noskov, Sergei Y; Duff, Henry J

    2015-08-01

    In Europe, ivabradine has recently been approved to treat patients with angina who have intolerance to beta blockers and/or heart failure. Ivabradine is considered to act specifically on the sinoatrial node by inhibiting the If current (the funny current) to slow automaticity. However, in vitro studies show that ivabradine prolongs phase 3 repolarization in ventricular tissue. No episodes of Torsades de Pointes have been reported in randomized clinical studies. The objective of this study is to assess whether ivabradine blocked the hERG1 current. In the present study we discovered that ivabradine prolongs action potential and blocks the hERG current over a range of concentrations overlapping with those required to block HCN4. Ivabradine produced tonic, rather than use-dependent block. The mutation Y652A significantly suppressed pharmacologic block of hERG by ivabradine. Disruption of C-type inactivation also suppressed block of hERG1 by ivabradine. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that ivabradine may access the inner cavity of the hERG1 via a lipophilic route and has a well-defined binding site in the closed state of the channel. Structural organization of the binding pockets for ivabradine is discussed. Ivabradine blocks hERG and prolongs action potential duration. Our study is potentially important because it indicates the need for active post marketing surveillance of ivabradine. Importantly, proarrhythmia of a number of other drugs has only been discovered during post marketing surveillance. PMID:25986146

  17. An LQTS6 MiRP1 Mutation Suppresses Pacemaker Current and is Associated with Sinus Bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Nawathe, Pooja A.; Kryukova, Yelena; Oren, Ronit V.; Milanesi, Raffaella; Clancy, Colleen E.; Lu, Jonathan T.; Moss, Arthur J.; DiFrancesco, Dario; Robinson, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sinus node (SN) dysfunction is observed in some Long QT syndrome (LQTS) patients, but has not been studied as a function of LQTS genotype. LQTS6 involves mutations in the hERG β-subunit MiRP1, which also interacts with hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN) channels - the molecular correlate of SN pacemaker current (If). An LQTS registry search identified a 55 year male with M54T MiRP1 mutation, history of sinus bradycardia (39–56 bpm), and prolonged QTc. Objective We tested if LQTS6 incorporates sinus bradycardia due to abnormal If. Methods We transiently co-transfected neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (to study currents in a myocyte background) with human HCN4 (hHCN4, primary SN isoform) or human HCN2 (hHCN2) and one of the following: empty vector, wildtype hMiRP1 (WT), M54T hMiRP1 (M54T). Current amplitude, voltage dependence and kinetics were measured by whole cell patch clamp. Results M54T co-expression decreased HCN4 current density by 80% compared to hHCN4 alone or with WT, and also slowed HCN4 activation at physiologically relevant voltages. Neither WT nor M54T altered HCN4 voltage dependence. A computer simulation predicts that these changes in HCN4 current would decrease rate and be additive with published effects of M54T mutation on hERG kinetics on rate. Conclusions We conclude that M54T LQTS6 mutation can cause sinus bradycardia through effects on both hERG and HCN currents. Patients with other LQTS6 mutations should be examined for SN dysfunction, and the effect on HCN current determined. PMID:23631727

  18. Altered expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels and microRNA-1 and -133 in patients with age-associated atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    LI, YAO-DONG; HONG, YI-FAN; YUSUFUAJI, YUEERGULI; TANG, BAO-PENG; ZHOU, XIAN-HUI; XU, GUO-JUN; LI, JIN-XIN; SUN, LIN; ZHANG, JIANG-HUA; XIN, QIANG; XIONG, JIAN; JI, YU-TONG; ZHANG, YU

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) cation channels mediate pacemaker currents in the atrium. The microRNA (miR) families miR-1 and miR-133 regulate the expression of multiple genes involved in myocardial function, including HCN channels. It was hypothesized that age-dependent changes in HCN2, HCN4, miR-1 and miR-133 expression may contribute to age-associated atrial fibrillation, and therefore the correlation between expression levels, among adult (≤65 years) and aged patients (≥65 years), and sinus rhythm was determined. Right atrial appendage samples were collected from 60 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analyses were performed in order to determine target RNA and protein expression levels. Compared with aged patients with sinus rhythm, aged patients with atrial fibrillation exhibited significantly higher HCN2 and HCN4 channel mRNA and protein expression levels (P<0.05), but significantly lower expression levels of miR-1 and miR-133 (P<0.05). In addition, aged patients with sinus rhythm exhibited significantly higher expression levels of HCN2 and HCN4 channel mRNA and protein (P<0.05), but significantly lower expression levels of miR-1 and -133 (P<0.05), compared with those of adult patients with sinus rhythm. Expression levels of HCN2 and HCN4 increased with age, and a greater increase was identified in patients with age-associated atrial fibrillation compared with that in those with aged sinus rhythm. These electrophysiological changes may contribute to the induction of ectopic premature beats that trigger atrial fibrillation. PMID:26005035

  19. Structure and Energetics of Allosteric Regulation of HCN2 Ion Channels by Cyclic Nucleotides*

    PubMed Central

    DeBerg, Hannah A.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Flynn, Galen E.; Zagotta, William N.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels play an important role in regulating electrical activity in the heart and brain. They are gated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a conserved, intracellular cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD), which is connected to the channel pore by a C-linker region. Binding of cyclic nucleotides increases the rate and extent of channel activation and shifts it to less hyperpolarized voltages. We probed the allosteric mechanism of different cyclic nucleotides on the CNBD and on channel gating. Electrophysiology experiments showed that cAMP, cGMP, and cCMP were effective agonists of the channel and produced similar increases in the extent of channel activation. In contrast, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on the isolated CNBD indicated that the induced conformational changes and the degrees of stabilization of the active conformation differed for the three cyclic nucleotides. We explain these results with a model where different allosteric mechanisms in the CNBD all converge to have the same effect on the C-linker and render all three cyclic nucleotides similarly potent activators of the channel. PMID:26559974

  20. Structure and Energetics of Allosteric Regulation of HCN2 Ion Channels by Cyclic Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    DeBerg, Hannah A; Brzovic, Peter S; Flynn, Galen E; Zagotta, William N; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels play an important role in regulating electrical activity in the heart and brain. They are gated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a conserved, intracellular cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD), which is connected to the channel pore by a C-linker region. Binding of cyclic nucleotides increases the rate and extent of channel activation and shifts it to less hyperpolarized voltages. We probed the allosteric mechanism of different cyclic nucleotides on the CNBD and on channel gating. Electrophysiology experiments showed that cAMP, cGMP, and cCMP were effective agonists of the channel and produced similar increases in the extent of channel activation. In contrast, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on the isolated CNBD indicated that the induced conformational changes and the degrees of stabilization of the active conformation differed for the three cyclic nucleotides. We explain these results with a model where different allosteric mechanisms in the CNBD all converge to have the same effect on the C-linker and render all three cyclic nucleotides similarly potent activators of the channel. PMID:26559974

  1. Shortening and intracellular Ca2+ in ventricular myocytes and expression of genes encoding cardiac muscle proteins in early onset type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Salem, K A; Adrian, T E; Qureshi, M A; Parekh, K; Oz, M; Howarth, F C

    2012-12-01

    There has been a spectacular rise in the global prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular complications are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Contractile dysfunction, associated with disturbances in excitation-contraction coupling, has been widely demonstrated in the diabetic heart. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of cardiac muscle genes that are involved in the process of excitation-contraction coupling in the hearts of early onset (8-10 weeks of age) type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats. Gene expression was assessed in ventricular muscle with real-time RT-PCR; shortening and intracellular Ca(2+) were measured in ventricular myocytes with video edge detection and fluorescence photometry, respectively. The general characteristics of the GK rats included elevated fasting and non-fasting blood glucose and blood glucose at 120 min following a glucose challenge. Expression of genes encoding cardiac muscle proteins (Myh6/7, Mybpc3, Myl1/3, Actc1, Tnni3, Tnn2, Tpm1/2/4 and Dbi) and intercellular proteins (Gja1/4/5/7, Dsp and Cav1/3) were unaltered in GK ventricle compared with control ventricle. The expression of genes encoding some membrane pumps and exchange proteins was unaltered (Atp1a1/2, Atp1b1 and Slc8a1), whilst others were either upregulated (Atp1a3, relative expression 2.61 ± 0.69 versus 0.84 ± 0.23) or downregulated (Slc9a1, 0.62 ± 0.07 versus 1.08 ± 0.08) in GK ventricle compared with control ventricle. The expression of genes encoding some calcium (Cacna1c/1g, Cacna2d1/2d2 and Cacnb1/b2), sodium (Scn5a) and potassium channels (Kcna3/5, Kcnj3/5/8/11/12, Kchip2, Kcnab1, Kcnb1, Kcnd1/2/3, Kcne1/4, Kcnq1, Kcng2, Kcnh2, Kcnk3 and Kcnn2) were unaltered, whilst others were either upregulated (Cacna1h, 0.95 ± 0.16 versus 0.47 ± 0.09; Scn1b, 1.84 ± 0.16 versus 1.11 ± 0.11; and Hcn2, 1.55 ± 0.15 versus 1.03 ± 0.08) or downregulated (Hcn4, 0.16 ± 0.03 versus 0.37 ± 0.08; Kcna2, 0.35 ± 0

  2. Isoform dependent regulation of human HCN channels by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Oliver; D’Avanzo, Nazzareno

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol has been shown to regulate numerous ion channels. HCN channels represent the molecular correlate of If or Ih in sinoatrial node (SAN) and neuronal cells. Previous studies have implicated a role for cholesterol in the regulation of rabbit HCN4 channels with effects on pacing in the rabbit SAN. Using electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, we examined the effect of cholesterol modulation on human HCN1, HCN2 and HCN4 isoforms. Patch-clamp experiments uncovered isoform specific differences in the effect of cholesterol on gating kinetics upon depletion by MβCD or mevastatin or enrichment using MβCD/cholesterol. Most dramatically cholesterol had isoform specific effects on mode-shifting, which has been suggested to play a key role in stabilizing firing rate and preventing arrhythmic firing in SAN cells and neurons. Mode-shifting in HCN1 channels was insensitive to cholesterol manipulation, while HCN2 and HCN4 were strongly affected. Trafficking of each isoform to the plasma membrane was also affected by cholesterol modulation differentially between isoforms, however, each isoform remained localized in lipid raft domains after cholesterol depletion. These effects may contribute to the side effects of cholesterol reducing therapies including disrupted heart rhythm and neuropathic pain, as well as the susceptibility of sinus dysfunction in patients with elevated cholesterol. PMID:26404789

  3. Decreased expression of hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 3 in Hirschsprung’s disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Anne Marie; Coyle, David; Puri, Prem

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine if hyperpolarisation-activated nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels exist in human colon, and to investigate the expression of HCN channels in Hirschsprung’s disease. METHODS: We investigated HCN1, HCN2, HCN3 and HCN4 protein expression in pull-through specimens from patients with Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR, n = 10) using the proximal-most ganglionic segment and distal-most aganglionic segment, as well as in healthy control specimens obtained at the time of sigmoid colostomy closure in children who had undergone anorectoplasty for imperforate anus (n = 10). Fluorescent immunohistochemistry was performed to assess protein distribution, which was then visualized using confocal microscopy. RESULTS: No HCN1 channel expression was observed in any of the tissues studied. Both HCN2 and HCN4 proteins were found to be equally expressed in the aganglionic and ganglionic bowel in HSCR and controls. HCN3 channel expression was found to be markedly decreased in the aganglionic colon vs ganglionic colon and controls. HCN2-4 channels were seen to be expressed within neurons of the myenteric and submucosal plexus of the ganglionic bowel and normal controls, and also co-localised to interstitial cells of Cajal in all tissues studied. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate HCN channel expression in human colon for the first time. Reduced HCN3 expression in aganglionic bowel suggests its potential role in HSCR pathophysiology. PMID:25987789

  4. Control of heart rate by cAMP sensitivity of HCN channels

    PubMed Central

    Alig, Jacqueline; Marger, Laurine; Mesirca, Pietro; Ehmke, Heimo; Mangoni, Matteo E.; Isbrandt, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    “Pacemaker” f-channels mediating the hyperpolarization-activated nonselective cation current If are directly regulated by cAMP. Accordingly, the activity of f-channels increases when cellular cAMP levels are elevated (e.g., during sympathetic stimulation) and decreases when they are reduced (e.g., during vagal stimulation). Although these biophysical properties seem to make f-channels ideal molecular targets for heart rate regulation by the autonomic nervous system, the exact contribution of the major If-mediating cardiac isoforms HCN2 and HCN4 to sinoatrial node (SAN) function remains highly controversial. To directly investigate the role of cAMP-dependent regulation of hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide activated (HCN) channels in SAN activity, we generated mice with heart-specific and inducible expression of a human HCN4 mutation (573X) that abolishes the cAMP-dependent regulation of HCN channels. We found that hHCN4–573X expression causes elimination of the cAMP sensitivity of If and decreases the maximum firing rates of SAN pacemaker cells. In conscious mice, hHCN4–573X expression leads to a marked reduction in heart rate at rest and during exercise. Despite the complete loss of cAMP sensitivity of If, the relative extent of SAN cell frequency and heart rate regulation are preserved. Our data demonstrate that cAMP-mediated regulation of If determines basal and maximal heart rates but does not play an indispensable role in heart rate adaptation during physical activity. Our data also reveal the pathophysiologic mechanism of hHCN4–573X–linked SAN dysfunction in humans. PMID:19570998

  5. Expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel isoforms in a canine model of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    HE, WEI; ZHANG, JIAN; GAN, TIANYI; XU, GUOJUN; TANG, BAOPENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the mRNA and protein expression levels of atrial hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel isoforms in the left atrial muscle of dogs with multiple organ failure. A total of 14 beagle dogs with multiple organ failure, including seven cases with sinus rhythm and seven cases with atrial fibrillation (AF), underwent surgery to remove a sample of left atrial appendage tissue. The expression levels of a number of HCN channel subtypes were subsequently measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of HCN2 and HCN4 increased significantly in the AF group when compared with the sinus rhythm group. However, expression of the HCN1 isoform was not detected. Therefore, increased expression levels of HCN2 and HCN4 may be important molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AF, which were associated with differences in patients with valvular heart disease. PMID:27347074

  6. Mechanotransduction and hyperpolarization-activated currents contribute to spontaneous activity in mouse vestibular ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Geoffrey C; Risner-Janiczek, Jessica R; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2014-04-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-sensitive current, Ih, is present in vestibular hair cells and vestibular ganglion neurons, and is required for normal balance function. We sought to identify the molecular correlates and functional relevance of Ih in vestibular ganglion neurons. Ih is carried by channels consisting of homo- or heteromeric assemblies of four protein subunits from the Hcn gene family. The relative expression of Hcn1-4 mRNA was examined using a quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) screen. Hcn2 was the most highly expressed subunit in vestibular neuron cell bodies. Immunolocalization of HCN2 revealed robust expression in cell bodies of all vestibular ganglion neurons. To characterize Ih in vestibular neuron cell bodies and at hair cell-afferent synapses, we developed an intact, ex vivo preparation. We found robust physiological expression of Ih in 89% of cell bodies and 100% of calyx terminals. Ih was significantly larger in calyx terminals than in cell bodies; however, other biophysical characteristics were similar. Ih was absent in calyces lacking Hcn1 and Hcn2, but small Ih was still present in cell bodies, which suggests expression of an additional subunit, perhaps Hcn4. To determine the contributions of hair cell mechanotransduction and Ih to the firing patterns of calyx terminals, we recorded action potentials in current-clamp mode. Mechanotransduction currents were modulated by hair bundle defection and application of calcium chelators to disrupt tip links. Ih activity was modulated using ZD7288 and cAMP. We found that both hair cell transduction and Ih contribute to the rate and regularity of spontaneous action potentials in the vestibular afferent neurons. We propose that modulation of Ih in vestibular ganglion neurons may provide a mechanism for modulation of spontaneous activity in the vestibular periphery. PMID:24638995

  7. Distinct perinatal features of the hyperpolarization-activated non-selective cation current Ih in the rat cortical plate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background During neocortical development, multiple voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels are differentially expressed in neurons thereby shaping their intrinsic electrical properties. One of these voltage-gated ion channels, the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel and its current Ih, is an important regulator of neuronal excitability. Thus far, studies on an early Ih appearance in rodent neocortex are missing or conflicting. Therefore, we focused our study on perinatal neocortical Ih and its properties. Results In the perinatal rat neocortex we observed a rapid increase in the number of neurons exhibiting Ih. Perinatal Ih had unique properties: first, a pronounced cAMP sensitivity resulting in a marked shift of the voltage sufficient for half-maximum activation of the current towards depolarized voltages and second, an up to 10 times slower deactivation at physiological membrane potentials when compared to the one at postnatal day 30. The combination of these features was sufficient to suppress membrane resonance in our in silico and in vitro experiments. Although all four HCN subunits were present on the mRNA level we only detected HCN4, HCN3 and HCN1 on the protein level at P0. HCN1 protein at P0, however, appeared incompletely processed. At P30 glycosilated HCN1 and HCN2 dominated. By in silico simulations and heterologous co-expression experiments of a ‘slow’ and a ‘fast’ Ih conducting HCN channel subunit in HEK293 cells, we mimicked most characteristics of the native current, pointing to a functional combination of subunit homo- or heteromeres. Conclusion Taken together, these data indicate a HCN subunit shift initiated in the first 24 hours after birth and implicate a prominent perinatal role of the phylogenetically older HCN3 and/or HCN4 subunits in the developing neocortex. PMID:22694806

  8. Functional contributions of HCN channels in the primary auditory neurons of the mouse inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye-Hyun; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2013-09-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih, is carried by members of the Hcn channel family and contributes to resting potential and firing properties in excitable cells of various systems, including the auditory system. Ih has been identified in spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs); however, its molecular correlates and their functional contributions have not been well characterized. To investigate the molecular composition of the channels that carry Ih in SGNs, we examined Hcn mRNA harvested from spiral ganglia of neonatal and adult mice using quantitative RT-PCR. The data indicate expression of Hcn1, Hcn2, and Hcn4 subunits in SGNs, with Hcn1 being the most highly expressed at both stages. To investigate the functional contributions of HCN subunits, we used the whole-cell, tight-seal technique to record from wild-type SGNs and those deficient in Hcn1, Hcn2, or both. We found that HCN1 is the most prominent subunit contributing to Ih in SGNs. Deletion of Hcn1 resulted in reduced conductance (Gh), slower activation kinetics (τfast), and hyperpolarized half-activation (V1/2) potentials. We demonstrate that Ih contributes to SGN function with depolarized resting potentials, depolarized sag and rebound potentials, accelerated rebound spikes after hyperpolarization, and minimized jitter in spike latency for small depolarizing stimuli. Auditory brainstem responses of Hcn1-deficient mice showed longer latencies, suggesting that HCN1-mediated Ih is critical for synchronized spike timing in SGNs. Together, our data indicate that Ih contributes to SGN membrane properties and plays a role in temporal aspects of signal transmission between the cochlea and the brain, which are critical for normal auditory function. PMID:23980193

  9. Genetic Analysis of Arrhythmogenic Diseases in the Era of NGS: The Complexity of Clinical Decision-Making in Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Allegue, Catarina; Coll, Mònica; Mates, Jesus; Campuzano, Oscar; Iglesias, Anna; Sobrino, Beatriz; Brion, Maria; Amigo, Jorge; Carracedo, Angel; Brugada, Pedro; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of next-generation sequencing enables a rapid analysis of many genes associated with sudden cardiac death in diseases like Brugada Syndrome. Genetic variation is identified and associated with 30–35% of cases of Brugada Syndrome, with nearly 20–25% attributable to variants in SCN5A, meaning many cases remain undiagnosed genetically. To evaluate the role of genetic variants in arrhythmogenic diseases and the utility of next-generation sequencing, we applied this technology to resequence 28 main genes associated with arrhythmogenic disorders. Materials and Methods A cohort of 45 clinically diagnosed Brugada Syndrome patients classified as SCN5A-negative was analyzed using next generation sequencing. Twenty-eight genes were resequenced: AKAP9, ANK2, CACNA1C, CACNB2, CASQ2, CAV3, DSC2, DSG2, DSP, GPD1L, HCN4, JUP, KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNE3, KCNH2, KCNJ2, KCNJ5, KCNQ1, NOS1AP, PKP2, RYR2, SCN1B, SCN3B, SCN4B, SCN5A, SNTA1, and TMEM43. A total of 85 clinically evaluated relatives were also genetically analyzed to ascertain familial segregation. Results and Discussion Twenty-two patients carried 30 rare genetic variants in 12 genes, only 4 of which were previously associated with Brugada Syndrome. Neither insertion/deletion nor copy number variation were detected. We identified genetic variants in novel candidate genes potentially associated to Brugada Syndrome. These include: 4 genetic variations in AKAP9 including a de novo genetic variation in 3 positive cases; 5 genetic variations in ANK2 detected in 4 cases; variations in KCNJ2 together with CASQ2 in 1 case; genetic variations in RYR2, including a de novo genetic variation and desmosomal proteins encoding genes including DSG2, DSP and JUP, detected in 3 of the cases. Larger gene panels or whole exome sequencing should be considered to identify novel genes associated to Brugada Syndrome. However, application of approaches such as whole exome sequencing would difficult the interpretation for clinical

  10. Dynamic subunit stoichiometry confers a progressive continuum of pharmacological sensitivity by KCNQ potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haibo; Lin, Zhihong; Mattmann, Margrith E.; Zou, Beiyan; Terrenoire, Cecile; Zhang, Hongkang; Wu, Meng; McManus, Owen B.; Kass, Robert S.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Li, Min

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated KCNQ1 (Kv7.1) potassium channels are expressed abundantly in heart but they are also found in multiple other tissues. Differential coassembly with single transmembrane KCNE beta subunits in different cell types gives rise to a variety of biophysical properties, hence endowing distinct physiological roles for KCNQ1–KCNEx complexes. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes result in diseases in brain, heart, and the respiratory system. In addition to complexities arising from existence of five KCNE subunits, KCNE1 to KCNE5, recent studies in heterologous systems suggest unorthodox stoichiometric dynamics in subunit assembly is dependent on KCNE expression levels. The resultant KCNQ1–KCNE channel complexes may have a range of zero to two or even up to four KCNE subunits coassembling per KCNQ1 tetramer. These findings underscore the need to assess the selectivity of small-molecule KCNQ1 modulators on these different assemblies. Here we report a unique small-molecule gating modulator, ML277, that potentiates both homomultimeric KCNQ1 channels and unsaturated heteromultimeric (KCNQ1)4(KCNE1)n (n < 4) channels. Progressive increase of KCNE1 or KCNE3 expression reduces efficacy of ML277 and eventually abolishes ML277-mediated augmentation. In cardiomyocytes, the slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium current, or IKs, is believed to be a heteromultimeric combination of KCNQ1 and KCNE1, but it is not entirely clear whether IKs is mediated by KCNE-saturated KCNQ1 channels or by channels with intermediate stoichiometries. We found ML277 effectively augments IKs current of cultured human cardiomyocytes and shortens action potential duration. These data indicate that unsaturated heteromultimeric (KCNQ1)4(KCNE1)n channels are present as components of IKs and are pharmacologically distinct from KCNE-saturated KCNQ1–KCNE1 channels. PMID:23650380

  11. Probing Binding Sites and Mechanisms of Action of an IKs Activator by Computations and Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu; Wang, Yuhong; Zhang, Mei; Jiang, Min; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Wassenaar, Tsjerk; Tseng, Gea-Ny

    2015-01-01

    The slow delayed rectifier (IKs) channel is composed of the KCNQ1 channel and KCNE1 auxiliary subunit, and functions to repolarize action potentials in the human heart. IKs activators may provide therapeutic efficacy for treating long QT syndromes. Here, we show that a new KCNQ1 activator, ML277, can enhance IKs amplitude in adult guinea pig and canine ventricular myocytes. We probe its binding site and mechanism of action by computational analysis based on our recently reported KCNQ1 and KCNQ1/KCNE1 3D models, followed by experimental validation. Results from a pocket analysis and docking exercise suggest that ML277 binds to a side pocket in KCNQ1 and the KCNE1-free side pocket of KCNQ1/KCNE1. Molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations based on the most favorable channel/ML277 docking configurations reveal a well-defined ML277 binding space surrounded by the S2-S3 loop and S4-S5 helix on the intracellular side, and by S4–S6 transmembrane helices on the lateral sides. A detailed analysis of MD trajectories suggests two mechanisms of ML277 action. First, ML277 restricts the conformational dynamics of the KCNQ1 pore, optimizing K+ ion coordination in the selectivity filter and increasing current amplitudes. Second, ML277 binding induces global motions in the channel, including regions critical for KCNQ1 gating transitions. We conclude that ML277 activates IKs by binding to an intersubunit space and allosterically influencing pore conductance and gating transitions. KCNE1 association protects KCNQ1 from an arrhythmogenic (constitutive current-inducing) effect of ML277, but does not preclude its current-enhancing effect. PMID:25564853

  12. PP2 prevents isoproterenol stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianying; Lin, Yen-Chang; Hileman, Stan; Martin, Karen H; Hull, Robert; Yu, Han-Gang

    2015-02-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated the potential risks of cardiac arrhythmias (such as prolonged QT interval) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy. We report here that a widely used selective inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinases, PP2, can inhibit and prevent isoproterenol stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity. In dissected rat sinus node, PP2 inhibited and prevented isoproterenol stimulation of spontaneous beating rate. In isolated sinus node myocytes, PP2 suppressed the hyperpolarization-activated "funny" current (If) by negatively shifting the activation curve and decelerating activation kinetics, associated with decreased cell surface expression and reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated channel 4 (HCN4) channel proteins. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells overexpressing recombinant human HCN4 channels, PP2 reversed isoproterenol stimulation of HCN4 and inhibited HCN4-573x, a cAMP-insensitive human HCN4 mutant. Isoprotenrenol had little effects on HCN4-573x. These results demonstrated that inhibition of presumably tyrosine Src kinase activity in heart by PP2 decreased and prevented the potential β-adrenergic stimulation of cardiac pacemaker activity. These effects are mediated, at least partially, by a cAMP-independent attenuation of channel activity and cell surface expression of HCN4, the key channel protein that controls the heart rate. PMID:25658311

  13. Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) regulates oxygen-dependent expression of voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels and tissue kallikrein during human trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanmin; Kumar, Premlata; Mendelson, Carole R

    2013-06-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) serves a critical O2-dependent regulatory role in the differentiation of human cytotrophoblasts to syncytiotrophoblast. In this study, we investigated expression of genes encoding tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and voltage-gated K(+) channels (KV7) during differentiation of human trophoblasts in culture and the roles of ERRγ and O2 tension in their regulation. Expression of KLK1 and the KV7 channel subunits, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5, increased during differentiation of cultured human trophoblast cells in a 20% O2 environment. Notably, together with ERRγ, expression of KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5 was markedly reduced when cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment (2% O2). Moreover, upon transduction of trophoblast cells with short hairpin RNAs for endogenous ERRγ, KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, and KCNE3 expression was significantly decreased. Promoter and site-directed mutagenesis studies in transfected cells identified putative ERRγ response elements within the KLK1 and KCNE1 5'-flanking regions required for ERRγ-stimulated transcriptional activity. Binding of endogenous ERRγ to these ERRγ response elements increased during trophoblast differentiation in culture and was inhibited by hypoxia. The KV7 blocker linopirdine reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and aggregation of cultured human trophoblasts, suggesting a possible role of KV7 channels in cell fusion and differentiation. Illumina gene expression arrays of cultured human trophoblast cells revealed several genes upregulated during syncytiotrophoblast differentiation and downregulated upon ERRγ knockdown involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and synthesis of steroid and peptide hormones required for placental development and function. Collectively, these findings suggest that ERRγ mediates O2-dependent expression of genes involved in human trophoblast differentiation, function, and vascular homeostasis. PMID:23584901

  14. Estrogen-Related Receptor γ (ERRγ) Regulates Oxygen-Dependent Expression of Voltage-gated Potassium (K+) Channels and Tissue Kallikrein during Human Trophoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanmin; Kumar, Premlata

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) serves a critical O2-dependent regulatory role in the differentiation of human cytotrophoblasts to syncytiotrophoblast. In this study, we investigated expression of genes encoding tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and voltage-gated K+ channels (KV7) during differentiation of human trophoblasts in culture and the roles of ERRγ and O2 tension in their regulation. Expression of KLK1 and the KV7 channel subunits, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5, increased during differentiation of cultured human trophoblast cells in a 20% O2 environment. Notably, together with ERRγ, expression of KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5 was markedly reduced when cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment (2% O2). Moreover, upon transduction of trophoblast cells with short hairpin RNAs for endogenous ERRγ, KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, and KCNE3 expression was significantly decreased. Promoter and site-directed mutagenesis studies in transfected cells identified putative ERRγ response elements within the KLK1 and KCNE1 5′-flanking regions required for ERRγ-stimulated transcriptional activity. Binding of endogenous ERRγ to these ERRγ response elements increased during trophoblast differentiation in culture and was inhibited by hypoxia. The KV7 blocker linopirdine reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and aggregation of cultured human trophoblasts, suggesting a possible role of KV7 channels in cell fusion and differentiation. Illumina gene expression arrays of cultured human trophoblast cells revealed several genes upregulated during syncytiotrophoblast differentiation and downregulated upon ERRγ knockdown involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and synthesis of steroid and peptide hormones required for placental development and function. Collectively, these findings suggest that ERRγ mediates O2-dependent expression of genes involved in human trophoblast differentiation, function, and vascular homeostasis. PMID:23584901

  15. Development of electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy to probe the secondary structure of recombinant membrane proteins in a lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongfu; Sahu, Indra D; Gibson, Kaylee R; Muhammad, Nefertiti B; Bali, Avnika P; Comer, Raven G; Liu, Lishan; Craig, Andrew F; Mccarrick, Robert M; Dabney-Smith, Carole; Sanders, Charles R; Lorigan, Gary A

    2015-11-01

    Membrane proteins conduct many important biological functions essential to the survival of organisms. However, due to their inherent hydrophobic nature, it is very difficult to obtain structural information on membrane-bound proteins using traditional biophysical techniques. We are developing a new approach to probe the secondary structure of membrane proteins using the pulsed EPR technique of Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Spectroscopy. This method has been successfully applied to model peptides made synthetically. However, in order for this ESEEM technique to be widely applicable to larger membrane protein systems with no size limitations, protein samples with deuterated residues need to be prepared via protein expression methods. For the first time, this study shows that the ESEEM approach can be used to probe the local secondary structure of a (2) H-labeled d8 -Val overexpressed membrane protein in a membrane mimetic environment. The membrane-bound human KCNE1 protein was used with a known solution NMR structure to demonstrate the applicability of this methodology. Three different α-helical regions of KCNE1 were probed: the extracellular domain (Val21), transmembrane domain (Val50), and cytoplasmic domain (Val95). These results indicated α-helical structures in all three segments, consistent with the micelle structure of KCNE1. Furthermore, KCNE1 was incorporated into a lipid bilayer and the secondary structure of the transmembrane domain (Val50) was shown to be α-helical in a more native-like environment. This study extends the application of this ESEEM approach to much larger membrane protein systems that are difficult to study with X-ray crystallography and/or NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26355804

  16. KCNQ1 channel modulation by KCNE proteins via the voltage-sensing domain

    PubMed Central

    Nakajo, Koichi; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    The gating of the KCNQ1 potassium channel is drastically regulated by auxiliary subunit KCNE proteins. KCNE1, for example, slows the activation kinetics of KCNQ1 by two orders of magnitude. Like other voltage-gated ion channels, the opening of KCNQ1 is regulated by the voltage-sensing domain (VSD; S1–S4 segments). Although it has been known that KCNE proteins interact with KCNQ1 via the pore domain, some recent reports suggest that the VSD movement may be altered by KCNE. The altered VSD movement of KCNQ1 by KCNE proteins has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis, the scanning cysteine accessibility method (SCAM), voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) and gating charge measurements. These accumulated data support the idea that KCNE proteins interact with the VSDs of KCNQ1 and modulate the gating of the KCNQ1 channel. In this review, we will summarize recent findings and current views of the KCNQ1 modulation by KCNE via the VSD. In this context, we discuss our recent findings that KCNE1 may alter physical interactions between the S4 segment (VSD) and the S5 segment (pore domain) of KCNQ1. Based on these findings from ourselves and others, we propose a hypothetical mechanism for how KCNE1 binding alters the VSD movement and the gating of the channel. PMID:25603957

  17. KCNQ1 channel modulation by KCNE proteins via the voltage-sensing domain.

    PubMed

    Nakajo, Koichi; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2015-06-15

    The gating of the KCNQ1 potassium channel is drastically regulated by auxiliary subunit KCNE proteins. KCNE1, for example, slows the activation kinetics of KCNQ1 by two orders of magnitude. Like other voltage-gated ion channels, the opening of KCNQ1 is regulated by the voltage-sensing domain (VSD; S1-S4 segments). Although it has been known that KCNE proteins interact with KCNQ1 via the pore domain, some recent reports suggest that the VSD movement may be altered by KCNE. The altered VSD movement of KCNQ1 by KCNE proteins has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis, the scanning cysteine accessibility method (SCAM), voltage clamp fluorometry (VCF) and gating charge measurements. These accumulated data support the idea that KCNE proteins interact with the VSDs of KCNQ1 and modulate the gating of the KCNQ1 channel. In this review, we will summarize recent findings and current views of the KCNQ1 modulation by KCNE via the VSD. In this context, we discuss our recent findings that KCNE1 may alter physical interactions between the S4 segment (VSD) and the S5 segment (pore domain) of KCNQ1. Based on these findings from ourselves and others, we propose a hypothetical mechanism for how KCNE1 binding alters the VSD movement and the gating of the channel. PMID:25603957

  18. The KCNE genes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The gene family KCNE1-5, which encode modulating β-subunits of several repolarising K+-ion channels, has been associated with genetic cardiac diseases such as long QT syndrome, atrial fibrillation and Brugada syndrome. The minK peptide, encoded by KCNE1, is attached to the Z-disc of the sarcomere as well as the T-tubules of the sarcolemma. It has been suggested that minK forms part of an "electro-mechanical feed-back" which links cardiomyocyte stretching to changes in ion channel function. We examined whether mutations in KCNE genes were associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic disease associated with an improper hypertrophic response. Results The coding regions of KCNE1, KCNE2, KCNE3, KCNE4, and KCNE5 were examined, by direct DNA sequencing, in a cohort of 93 unrelated HCM probands and 188 blood donor controls. Fifteen genetic variants, four previously unknown, were identified in the HCM probands. Eight variants were non-synonymous and one was located in the 3'UTR-region of KCNE4. No disease-causing mutations were found and no significant difference in the frequency of genetic variants was found between HCM probands and controls. Two variants of likely functional significance were found in controls only. Conclusions Mutations in KCNE genes are not a common cause of HCM and polymorphisms in these genes do not seem to be associated with a propensity to develop arrhythmia PMID:21967835

  19. Differential distribution of voltage-gated channels in myelinated and unmyelinated baroreceptor afferents.

    PubMed

    Schild, John H; Kunze, Diana L

    2012-12-24

    hallmark of myelinated baroreceptors. Interestingly, HCN2 and HCN4 expression levels are comparable in both fiber types. Collectively, such apportion of VGC constrains the neural coding of myelinated A-type baroreceptors to low threshold, high frequency, high fidelity discharge but with a limited capacity for neuromodulation of afferent bandwidth. Unmyelinated C-type baroreceptors require greater depolarizing forces for spike initiation and have a low frequency discharge profile that is often poorly correlated with the physiological stimulus. But the complement of VGC in C-type neurons provides far greater capacity for neuromodulation of cell excitability than can be obtained from A-type baroreceptors. PMID:23146622

  20. In vitro characterization of HCN channel kinetics and frequency dependence in myocytes predicts biological pacemaker functionality.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Bucchi, Annalisa; Oren, Ronit V; Kryukova, Yelena; Dun, Wen; Clancy, Colleen E; Robinson, Richard B

    2009-04-01

    The pacemaker current, mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, contributes to the initiation and regulation of cardiac rhythm. Previous experiments creating HCN-based biological pacemakers in vivo found that an engineered HCN2/HCN1 chimeric channel (HCN212) resulted in significantly faster rates than HCN2, interrupted by 1-5 s pauses. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences in HCN212 and HCN2 in vivo functionality as biological pacemakers, we studied newborn rat ventricular myocytes over-expressing either HCN2 or HCN212 channels. The HCN2- and HCN212-over-expressing myocytes manifest similar voltage dependence, current density and sensitivity to saturating cAMP concentrations, but HCN212 has faster activation/deactivation kinetics. Compared with HCN2, myocytes expressing HCN212 exhibit a faster spontaneous rate and greater incidence of irregular rhythms (i.e. periods of rapid spontaneous rate followed by pauses). To explore these rhythm differences further, we imposed consecutive pacing and found that activation kinetics of the two channels are slower at faster pacing frequencies. As a result, time-dependent HCN current flowing during diastole decreases for both constructs during a train of stimuli at a rapid frequency, with the effect more pronounced for HCN2. In addition, the slower deactivation kinetics of HCN2 contributes to more pronounced instantaneous current at a slower frequency. As a result of the frequency dependence of both instantaneous and time-dependent current, HCN2 exhibits more robust negative feedback than HCN212, contributing to the maintenance of a stable pacing rhythm. These results illustrate the benefit of screening HCN constructs in spontaneously active myocyte cultures and may provide the basis for future optimization of HCN-based biological pacemakers. PMID:19171659

  1. The Short Stature Homeobox 2 (Shox2)-bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) Pathway Regulates Dorsal Mesenchymal Protrusion Development and Its Temporary Function as a Pacemaker during Cardiogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng; Yu, Diankun; Ye, Wenduo; Liu, Chao; Gu, Shuping; Sinsheimer, Nathan R.; Song, Zhongchen; Li, Xihai; Chen, Chun; Song, Yingnan; Wang, Shusheng; Schrader, Laura; Chen, YiPing

    2015-01-01

    The atrioventricular (AV) junction plays a critical role in chamber septation and transmission of cardiac conduction pulses. It consists of structures that develop from embryonic dorsal mesenchymal protrusion (DMP) and the embryonic AV canal. Despite extensive studies on AV junction development, the genetic regulation of DMP development remains poorly understood. In this study we present evidence that Shox2 is expressed in the developing DMP. Intriguingly, this Shox2-expressing domain possesses a pacemaker-specific genetic profile including Hcn4 and Tbx3. This genetic profile leads to nodal-like electrophysiological properties, which is gradually silenced as the AV node becomes matured. Phenotypic analyses of Shox2−/− mice revealed a hypoplastic and defectively differentiated DMP, likely attributed to increased apoptosis, accompanied by dramatically reduced expression of Bmp4 and Hcn4, ectopic activation of Cx40, and an aberrant pattern of action potentials. Interestingly, conditional deletion of Bmp4 or inhibition of BMP signaling by overexpression of Noggin using a Shox2-Cre allele led to a similar DMP hypoplasia and down-regulation of Hcn4, whereas activation of a transgenic Bmp4 allele in Shox2−/− background attenuated DMP defects. Moreover, the lack of Hcn4 expression in the DMP of mice carrying Smad4 conditional deletion and direct binding of pSmad1/5/8 to the Hcn4 regulatory region further confirm the Shox2-BMP genetic cascade in the regulation of DMP development. Our results reveal that Shox2 regulates DMP fate and development by controlling BMP signaling through the Smad-dependent pathway to drive tissue growth and to induce Hcn4 expression and suggest a temporal pacemaking function for the DMP during early cardiogenesis. PMID:25488669

  2. KCNQ1 subdomains involved in KCNE modulation revealed by an invertebrate KCNQ1 orthologue

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Atsuo; Okamura, Yasushi; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    KCNQ1 channels are voltage-gated potassium channels that are widely expressed in various non-neuronal tissues, such as the heart, pancreas, and intestine. KCNE proteins are known as the auxiliary subunits for KCNQ1 channels. The effects and functions of the different KCNE proteins on KCNQ1 modulation are various; the KCNQ1–KCNE1 ion channel complex produces a slowly activating potassium channel that is crucial for heartbeat regulation, while the KCNE3 protein makes KCNQ1 channels constitutively active, which is important for K+ and Cl− transport in the intestine. The mechanisms by which KCNE proteins modulate KCNQ1 channels have long been studied and discussed; however, it is not well understood how different KCNE proteins exert considerably different effects on KCNQ1 channels. Here, we approached this point by taking advantage of the recently isolated Ci-KCNQ1, a KCNQ1 homologue from marine invertebrate Ciona intestinalis. We found that Ci-KCNQ1 alone could be expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and produced a voltage-dependent potassium current, but that Ci-KCNQ1 was not properly modulated by KCNE1 and totally unaffected by coexpression of KCNE3. By making chimeras of Ci-KCNQ1 and human KCNQ1, we determined several amino acid residues located in the pore region of human KCNQ1 involved in KCNE1 modulation. Interestingly, though, these amino acid residues of the pore region are not important for KCNE3 modulation, and we subsequently found that the S1 segment plays an important role in making KCNQ1 channels constitutively active by KCNE3. Our findings indicate that different KCNE proteins use different domains of KCNQ1 channels, and that may explain why different KCNE proteins give quite different outcomes by forming a complex with KCNQ1 channels. PMID:22042987

  3. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channel Function and Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Human cardiomyocytes express 3 distinct types of delayed rectifier potassium channels. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels conduct the rapidly activating current IKr; KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels conduct the slowly activating current IKs; and Kv1.5 channels conduct an ultrarapid activating current IKur. Here the authors provide a general overview of the mechanistic and structural basis of ion selectivity, gating, and pharmacology of the 3 types of cardiac delayed rectifier potassium ion channels. Most blockers bind to S6 residues that line the central cavity of the channel, whereas activators interact with the channel at 4 symmetric binding sites outside the cavity. PMID:27261821

  4. Submillimeter ALMA Observations of the Dense Gas in the Type-1 Active Nucleus of NGC 1097 and NGC 7469 for a Robust Energy Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the 100 pc scale views of the dense molecular gas in the central kpc regions of nearby galaxies hosting a type-1 active galactic nucleus (AGN), NGC 1097 and NGC 7469, traced by HCN(4-3), HCO+(4-3), CS(7-6), and CO(3-2) lines, based on our ALMA cycle 0 and 1 observations. We supplemented our observations with data from literature and found enhanced ratios of HCN(4-3)/HCO+(4-3) and HCN(4-3)/CS(7-6) in AGNs, compared to starburst galaxies, which can be used as a new diagnostic method of galactic energy sources. Although several mechanisms can lead to different line ratios, our non-LTE analysis using multi-J interferometric data of NGC 1097 revealed a high [HCN]/[HCO+] abundance ratio in the nucleus. Interestingly, the HCN(4-3)/HCO+(4-3) line ratio in NGC 7469 is just as half as that in NGC 1097, although AGN luminosity of NGC 7469 is ˜ 1000 times higher than that of NGC 1097. We interpret these results qualitatively in the framework of high temperature chemistry and a receding XDR model.

  5. Polyunsaturated fatty acid analogs act antiarrhythmically on the cardiac IKs channel

    PubMed Central

    Liin, Sara I.; Silverå Ejneby, Malin; Barro-Soria, Rene; Skarsfeldt, Mark Alexander; Larsson, Johan E.; Starck Härlin, Frida; Parkkari, Teija; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Schmitt, Nicole; Larsson, H. Peter; Elinder, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) affect cardiac excitability. Kv7.1 and the β-subunit KCNE1 form the cardiac IKs channel that is central for cardiac repolarization. In this study, we explore the prospects of PUFAs as IKs channel modulators. We report that PUFAs open Kv7.1 via an electrostatic mechanism. Both the polyunsaturated acyl tail and the negatively charged carboxyl head group are required for PUFAs to open Kv7.1. We further show that KCNE1 coexpression abolishes the PUFA effect on Kv7.1 by promoting PUFA protonation. PUFA analogs with a decreased pKa value, to preserve their negative charge at neutral pH, restore the sensitivity to open IKs channels. PUFA analogs with a positively charged head group inhibit IKs channels. These different PUFA analogs could be developed into drugs to treat cardiac arrhythmias. In support of this possibility, we show that PUFA analogs act antiarrhythmically in embryonic rat cardiomyocytes and in isolated perfused hearts from guinea pig. PMID:25901329

  6. Colocalization of HCN Channel Subunits in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Greenberg, Kenneth P.; Krempely, Kalen S.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The current-passing pore of mammalian hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ("HCN") channels is formed by subunit isoforms denoted HCN1-4. In various brain areas, antibodies directed against multiple isoforms bind to single neurons and the current ("Ih") passed during hyperpolarizations differs from that of heterologously expressed homomeric channels. By contrast, retinal rod, cone, and bipolar cells appear to use homomeric HCN channels. Here, we assess the generality of this pattern by examining HCN1 and HCN4 immunoreactivity in rat retinal ganglion cells, measuring Ih in dissociated cells, and testing whether HCN1 and HCN4 protein coimmunoprecipitate. Nearly half of the ganglion cells in whole-mounted retinae bound antibodies against both isoforms. Consistent with colocalization and physical association, 8-bromo-cAMP shifted the voltage-sensitivity of Ih less than that of HCN4 channels and more than that of HCN1 channels, and HCN1 coimmunoprecipitated with HCN4 from membrane fraction proteins. Lastly, the immunopositive somata ranged in diameter from the smallest to the largest in rat retina, the dendrites of immunopositive cells arborized at various levels of the inner plexiform layer and over fields of different diameters, and Ih activated with similar kinetics and proportions of fast and slow components in small, medium, and large somata. These results show that different HCN subunits colocalize in single retinal ganglion cells, identify a subunit that can reconcile native Ih properties with the previously reported presence of HCN4 in these cells, and indicate that Ih is biophysically similar in morphologically diverse retinal ganglion cells and differs from Ih in rods, cones, and bipolar cells. PMID:21456027

  7. Identification of methylated genes in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma xenografts using global demethylation and methylation microarray screening

    PubMed Central

    LING, SHIZHANG; RETTIG, ELENI M.; TAN, MARIETTA; CHANG, XIAOFEI; WANG, ZHIMING; BRAIT, MARIANA; BISHOP, JUSTIN A.; FERTIG, ELANA J.; CONSIDINE, MICHAEL; WICK, MICHAEL J.; HA, PATRICK K.

    2016-01-01

    Salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare head and neck malignancy without molecular biomarkers that can be used to predict the chemotherapeutic response or prognosis of ACC. The regulation of gene expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) through DNA promoter methylation may play a role in the carcinogenesis of ACC. To identify differentially methylated genes in ACC, a global demethylating agent, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-AZA) was utilized to unmask putative TSG silencing in ACC xenograft models in mice. Fresh xenografts were passaged, implanted in triplicate in mice that were treated with 5-AZA daily for 28 days. These xenografts were then evaluated for genome-wide DNA methylation patterns using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip array. Validation of the 32 candidate genes was performed by bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq) in a separate cohort of 6 ACC primary tumors and 6 normal control salivary gland tissues. Hypermethylation was identified in the HCN2 gene promoter in all 6 control tissues, but hypomethylation was found in all 6 ACC tumor tissues. Quantitative validation of HCN2 promoter methylation level in the region detected by BS-seq was performed in a larger cohort of primary tumors (n=32) confirming significant HCN2 hypomethylation in ACCs compared with normal samples (n=10; P=0.04). HCN2 immunohistochemical staining was performed on an ACC tissue microarray. HCN2 staining intensity and H-score, but not percentage of the positively stained cells, were significantly stronger in normal tissues than those of ACC tissues. With our novel screening and sequencing methods, we identified several gene candidates that were methylated. The most significant of these genes, HCN2, was actually hypomethylated in tumors. However, promoter methylation status does not appear to be a major determinant of HCN2 expression in normal and ACC tissues. HCN2 hypomethylation is a biomarker of ACC and may play an important role in the

  8. Sudden cardiac arrest during anesthesia in a 30-month-old boy with syndactyly: a case of genetically proven Timothy syndrome.

    PubMed

    An, Hyo Soon; Choi, Eun Young; Kwon, Bo Sang; Kim, Gi Beom; Bae, Eun Jung; Noh, Chung Il; Choi, Jung Yun; Park, Sung Sup

    2013-05-01

    Timothy syndrome, long QT syndrome type 8, is highly malignant with ventricular tachyarrhythmia. A 30-month-old boy had sudden cardiac arrest during anesthesia induction before plastic surgery for bilateral cutaneous syndactyly. After successful resuscitation, prolonged QT interval (QTc, 0.58-0.60 sec) and T-wave alternans were found in his electrocardiogram. Starting β-blocker to prevent further tachycardia and collapse event, then there were no more arrhythmic events. The genes KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1 and 2, and SCN5A were negative for long QT syndrome. The mutation p.Gly406Arg was confirmed in CACNA1C, which maintains L-type calcium channel depolarization in the heart and other systems. PMID:23678275

  9. Chemical Derivatization and Purification of Peptide-Toxins for Probing Ion Channel Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhengmao; Kobertz, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels function as multi-protein complexes made up of ion-conducting α-subunits and regulatory β-subunits. To detect, identify, and quantitate the regulatory β-subunits in functioning K+ channel complexes, we have chemically-derivatized peptide-toxins that specifically react with strategically-placed cysteine residues in the channel complex. Two protein labeling approaches have been developed to derivatize the peptide-toxin, charybdotoxin, with hydrophilic and hydrophobic bismaleimides, and other molecular probes. Using these cysteine-reactive peptide-toxins, we have specifically targeted KCNQ1-KCNE1 K+ channel complexes expressed in both Xenopus oocytes and mammalian cells. The modular design of the reagents should permit this approach to be applied to the many ion channel complexes involved in electrical excitability as well as salt and water homoeostasis. PMID:23494369

  10. Molecular genetic analysis of six Dutch families with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Entius, M.M.; Groenewegen, A.; Pronk, A.; van der Smagt, J.J; Loh, P.; Hauer, R.N.; Derksen, R.; van Gelder, I.C.; Lok, D.J.A.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia, is characterised by rapid and irregular contraction of the atrium. The risk of AF increases with age and AF increases the risk of various heart disorders, stroke and mortality. AF can occur in a sporadic or familial form. The underlying mechanism leading to AF is not well known but genetic analysis can increase our insight into the molecular pathways in AF. Detailed information on the molecular mechanisms of a disorder increase options for diagnosis and treatment. Recently, a gain-of-function mutation in exon of the KCNQ1 gene located on chromosome 11 was identified in a large Chinese AF family. KCNQ1 associates with KCNE1 or KCNE2 (both located on chromosome 21) to form cardiac potassium channels. Subsequent analysis of Chinese families showed a KCNE2 mutation in two families. Other genetic studies show linkage to chromosome 6 and 10, indicating genetic heterogeneity. A number of studies have shown that altered expression of the atrial connexin40 protein is a risk factor for AF. Connexin genes encode gap-junction proteins that are important in cardiac conduction and for normal wave propagation. Objectives/methods In this study we analysed the role of KCNQ1, KCNE1 coding region and Cx40 promoter region in six Dutch AF families by sequence analysis. Conclusion No mutations were found in these genes. The absence of mutations indicates genetic heterogeneity in familial AF; however, further research is needed. Candidate genes are being sequenced, linkage analysis in a large family will be performed and additional AF families will be collected. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696507

  11. Drosophila KCNQ channel displays evolutionarily conserved electrophysiology and pharmacology with mammalian KCNQ channels.

    PubMed

    Cavaliere, Sonia; Hodge, James J L

    2011-01-01

    Of the five human KCNQ (Kv7) channels, KCNQ1 with auxiliary subunit KCNE1 mediates the native cardiac I(Ks) current with mutations causing short and long QT cardiac arrhythmias. KCNQ4 mutations cause deafness. KCNQ2/3 channels form the native M-current controlling excitability of most neurons, with mutations causing benign neonatal febrile convulsions. Drosophila contains a single KCNQ (dKCNQ) that appears to serve alone the functions of all the duplicated mammalian neuronal and cardiac KCNQ channels sharing roughly 50-60% amino acid identity therefore offering a route to investigate these channels. Current information about the functional properties of dKCNQ is lacking therefore we have investigated these properties here. Using whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology we compare the biophysical and pharmacological properties of dKCNQ with the mammalian neuronal and cardiac KCNQ channels expressed in HEK cells. We show that Drosophila KCNQ (dKCNQ) is a slowly activating and slowly-deactivating K(+) current open at sub-threshold potentials that has similar properties to neuronal KCNQ2/3 with some features of the cardiac KCNQ1/KCNE1 accompanied by conserved sensitivity to a number of clinically relevant KCNQ blockers (chromanol 293B, XE991, linopirdine) and opener (zinc pyrithione). We also investigate the molecular basis of the differential selectivity of KCNQ channels to the opener retigabine and show a single amino acid substitution (M217W) can confer sensitivity to dKCNQ. We show dKCNQ has similar electrophysiological and pharmacological properties as the mammalian KCNQ channels, allowing future study of physiological and pathological roles of KCNQ in Drosophila and whole organism screening for new modulators of KCNQ channelopathies. PMID:21915266

  12. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Path for the Reaction of Singlet Methylene with N2: The Role of Singlet Methylene in Prompt NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    We report calculations of the minimum energy pathways connecting CH2 + N2 to diazomethane and diazirine, for the rearrangement of diazirine to diazomethane, for the dissociation of diazirine to HCN2+H, and of diazomethane to CH2N+N. The calculations use Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and Internally Contracted Configuration Interaction (ICCI) to determine the energetics. The calculations suggest a potential new source of prompt NO from the reaction CH2 with N2 to give diazirine, and subsequent reaction of diazirine with hydrogen abstracters to form doublet HCN2, which leads to HCN+N(S-4) on the previously studied CH+N2 surface. The calculations also predict accurate 0 K heats of formation of 77.7 kcal/mol and 68.0 kcal/mol for diazirine and diazomethane, respectively.

  13. Characterization of the Minimum Energy Path for the Reaction of Singlet Methylene with N2: The Role of Singlet Methylene in Prompt NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1995-01-01

    We report calculations of the minimum energy pathways connecting (1)CH2+N2 to diazomethane and diazirine, for the rearrangement of diazirine to diazomethane, for the dissociation of diazirine to HCN2+H, and of diazomethane to CH2N+N. The calculations use complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) derivative methods to characterize the stationary points and internally contracted configuration interaction (ICCI) to determine the energetics. The calculations suggest a potential new source of prompt NO from the reaction of (1)CH2 with N2 to give diazirine, and subsequent reaction of diazirine with hydrogen abstracters to form doublet HCN2, which leads to HCN+N(S-4) on the previously studied CH+N2 Surface. The calculations also predict accurate 0 K heats of formation of 77.7 kcal/mol and 68.0 kcal/mol for diazirine and diazomethane, respectively.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Arp 220 HCN and HCO+ data cubes (Martin+,

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S.; Aalto, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E.; Muller, S.; Henkel, C.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Aladro, R.; Costagliola, F.; Harada, N.; Krips, M.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Muhle, S.; van der Werf, P.; Viti, S.

    2016-03-01

    The observations were carried out with ALMA in its Cycle 1 as part of a spectral line survey of Arp 220 (Martin et al., in preparation). In this paper we report the measurements covering HCN and HCO+ in their J=3-2 (261.152GHz and 262.794GHz) and J=4-3 (348.194GHz and 350.383GHz) transitions, as well as the corresponding v2=1 transitions of HCN. (2 data files).

  15. β1-Adrenergic blocker bisoprolol reverses down-regulated ion channels in sinoatrial node of heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuan; Zhang, Junbo; Xi, Yutao; Wu, Geru; Han, Ke; Huang, Xin; Ma, Aiqun; Wang, Tingzhong

    2016-06-01

    Bisoprolol, an antagonist of β1-adrenergic receptors, is effective in reducing the morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). It has been found that HF is accompanied with dysfunction of the sinoatrial node (SAN). However, whether bisoprolol reverses the decreased SAN function in HF and how the relevant ion channels in SAN change were relatively less studied. SAN function and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of sodium channels and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel subunits were assessed in sham-operated rats, abdominal arterio-venous shunt (volume overload)-induced HF rats, and bisoprolol- treated HF rats. SAN cells of rats were isolated by laser capture microdissection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to quantify mRNA expression of sodium channels and HCN channel subunits in SAN. Intrinsic heart rate declined and sinus node recovery time prolonged in HF rats, indicating the suppressed SAN function, which could be improved by bisoprolol treatment. Nav1.1, Nav1.6, and HCN4 mRNA expressions were reduced in SAN in HF rats compared with that in control rats. Treatment with bisoprolol could reverse both the SAN function and the Nav1.1, Nav1.6, and HCN4 mRNA expression partially. These data indicated that bisoprolol is effective in HF treatment partially due to improved SAN function by reversing the down-regulation of sodium channels (Nav1.1 and Nav1.6) and HCN channel (HCN4) subunits in SAN in failing hearts. PMID:26995749

  16. Ion channel-kinase TRPM7 is required for maintaining cardiac automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Rajan; Mesirca, Pietro; Van den Boogert, Marjolein; Rosen, Jonathan; Mably, John; Mangoni, Matteo E.; Clapham, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Sick sinus syndrome and atrioventricular block are common clinical problems, often necessitating permanent pacemaker placement, yet the pathophysiology of these conditions remains poorly understood. Here we show that Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 (TRPM7), a divalent-permeant channel-kinase of unknown function, is highly expressed in embryonic myocardium and sinoatrial node (SAN) and is required for cardiac automaticity in these specialized tissues. TRPM7 disruption in vitro, in cultured embryonic cardiomyocytes, significantly reduces spontaneous Ca2+ transient firing rates and is associated with robust down-regulation of Hcn4, Cav3.1, and SERCA2a mRNA. TRPM7 knockdown in zebrafish, global murine cardiac Trpm7 deletion (KOαMHC-Cre), and tamoxifen-inducible SAN restricted Trpm7 deletion (KOHCN4-CreERT2) disrupts cardiac automaticity in vivo. Telemetered and sedated KOαMHC-Cre and KOHCN4-CreERT2 mice show episodes of sinus pauses and atrioventricular block. Isolated SAN from KOαMHC-Cre mice exhibit diminished Ca2+ transient firing rates with a blunted diastolic increase in Ca2+. Action potential firing rates are diminished owing to slower diastolic depolarization. Accordingly, Hcn4 mRNA and the pacemaker current, If, are diminished in SAN from both KOαMHC-Cre and KOHCN4-CreERT2 mice. Moreover, heart rates of KOαMHC-Cre mice are less sensitive to the selective If blocker ivabradine, and acute application of the recently identified TRPM7 blocker FTY720 has no effect on action potential firing rates of wild-type SAN cells. We conclude that TRPM7 influences diastolic membrane depolarization and automaticity in SAN indirectly via regulation of Hcn4 expression. PMID:23878236

  17. The sinus venosus myocardium contributes to the atrioventricular canal: potential role during atrioventricular node development?

    PubMed Central

    Kelder, Tim P; Vicente-Steijn, Rebecca; Harryvan, Tom J; Kosmidis, Georgios; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Poelmann, Rob E; Schalij, Martin J; DeRuiter, Marco C; Jongbloed, Monique RM

    2015-01-01

    The presence of distinct electrophysiological pathways within the atrioventricular node (AVN) is a prerequisite for atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia to occur. In this study, the different cell contributions that may account for the anatomical and functional heterogeneity of the AVN were investigated. To study the temporal development of the AVN, the expression pattern of ISL1, expressed in cardiac progenitor cells, was studied in sequential stages performing co-staining with myocardial markers (TNNI2 and NKX2-5) and HCN4 (cardiac conduction system marker). An ISL1+/TNNI2+/HCN4+ continuity between the myocardium of the sinus venosus and atrioventricular canal was identified in the region of the putative AVN, which showed a pacemaker-like phenotype based on single cell patch-clamp experiments. Furthermore, qPCR analysis showed that even during early development, different cell populations can be identified in the region of the putative AVN. Fate mapping was performed by in ovo vital dye microinjection. Embryos were harvested and analysed 24 and 48 hrs post-injection. These experiments showed incorporation of sinus venosus myocardium in the posterior region of the atrioventricular canal. The myocardium of the sinus venosus contributes to the atrioventricular canal. It is postulated that the myocardium of the sinus venosus contributes to nodal extensions or transitional cells of the AVN since these cells are located in the posterior region of the AVN. This finding may help to understand the origin of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia. PMID:25752780

  18. Cardiac arrhythmia induced by genetic silencing of “funny” (f) channels is rescued by GIRK4 inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Mesirca, Pietro; Alig, Jacqueline; Torrente, Angelo G.; Müller, Jana Christina; Marger, Laurine; Rollin, Anne; Marquilly, Claire; Vincent, Anne; Dubel, Stefan; Bidaud, Isabelle; Fernandez, Anne; Seniuk, Anika; Engeland, Birgit; Singh, Jasmin; Miquerol, Lucile; Ehmke, Heimo; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Nargeot, Joel; Wickman, Kevin; Isbrandt, Dirk; Mangoni, Matteo E.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying cardiac automaticity are still incompletely understood and controversial. Here we report the complete conditional and time-controlled silencing of the "funny" current (If) by expression of a dominant-negative, non-conductive HCN4-channel subunit (hHCN4-AYA). Heart-specific If silencing caused altered [Ca2+]i release and Ca2+ handling in the sinoatrial node, impaired pacemaker activity, and symptoms reminiscent of severe human disease of pacemaking. The effects of If silencing critically depended on the activity of the autonomic nervous system. We were able to rescue the failure of impulse generation and conduction by additional genetic deletion of cardiac muscarinic G-protein-activated (GIRK4) channels in If-deficient mice without impairing heartbeat regulation. Our study establishes the role of f-channels in cardiac automaticity and indicates that arrhythmia related to HCN loss-of-function may be managed by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of GIRK4 channels, thus offering a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of heart rhythm diseases. PMID:25144323

  19. VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN AROUND AFGL 2591: A PROBE OF PROTOSTELLAR STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Veach, Todd J.; Groppi, Christopher E.; Hedden, Abigail

    2013-03-10

    Vibrationally excited molecules with submillimeter rotational transitions are potentially excellent probes of physical conditions near protostars. This study uses observations of the v = 1 and v = 2 ro-vibrational modes of HCN (4-3) to probe this environment. The presence or absence and relative strengths of these ro-vibrational lines probe the gas excitation mechanism and physical conditions in warm, dense material associated with protostellar disks. We present pilot observations from the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope and follow-up observations from the Submillimeter Array. All vibrationally excited HCN (4-3) v = 0, v = 1, and v = 2 lines were observed. The existence of the three v = 2 lines at approximately equal intensity imply collisional excitation with a density of greater than (10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) and a temperature of >1000 K for the emitting gas. This warm, high-density material should directly trace structures formed in the protostellar envelope and disk environment. Further, the line shapes of the v = 2 emission may suggest a Keplerian disk. This Letter demonstrates the utility of this technique which is of particular interest due to the recent inauguration of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array.

  20. The sinus venosus myocardium contributes to the atrioventricular canal: potential role during atrioventricular node development?

    PubMed

    Kelder, Tim P; Vicente-Steijn, Rebecca; Harryvan, Tom J; Kosmidis, Georgios; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Poelmann, Rob E; Schalij, Martin J; DeRuiter, Marco C; Jongbloed, Monique R M

    2015-06-01

    The presence of distinct electrophysiological pathways within the atrioventricular node (AVN) is a prerequisite for atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia to occur. In this study, the different cell contributions that may account for the anatomical and functional heterogeneity of the AVN were investigated. To study the temporal development of the AVN, the expression pattern of ISL1, expressed in cardiac progenitor cells, was studied in sequential stages performing co-staining with myocardial markers (TNNI2 and NKX2-5) and HCN4 (cardiac conduction system marker). An ISL1+/TNNI2+/HCN4+ continuity between the myocardium of the sinus venosus and atrioventricular canal was identified in the region of the putative AVN, which showed a pacemaker-like phenotype based on single cell patch-clamp experiments. Furthermore, qPCR analysis showed that even during early development, different cell populations can be identified in the region of the putative AVN. Fate mapping was performed by in ovo vital dye microinjection. Embryos were harvested and analysed 24 and 48 hrs post-injection. These experiments showed incorporation of sinus venosus myocardium in the posterior region of the atrioventricular canal. The myocardium of the sinus venosus contributes to the atrioventricular canal. It is postulated that the myocardium of the sinus venosus contributes to nodal extensions or transitional cells of the AVN since these cells are located in the posterior region of the AVN. This finding may help to understand the origin of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia. PMID:25752780

  1. Altered Gene Expression by Low-Dose Arsenic Exposure in Humans and Cultured Cardiomyocytes: Assessment by Real-Time PCR Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Jinyao; Xia, Yajuan; Wade, Timothy J.; DeMarini, David M.; Davidson, Mercy; Mumford, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure results in higher risk of skin, lung, and bladder cancer, as well as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on expression of selected genes in the blood lymphocytes from 159 people exposed chronically to arsenic in their drinking water using a novel RT-PCR TaqMan low-density array (TLDA). We found that expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which activates both inflammation and NF-κB-dependent survival pathways, was strongly associated with water and urinary arsenic levels. Expression of KCNA5, which encodes a potassium ion channel protein, was positively associated with water and toe nail arsenic levels. Expression of 2 and 11 genes were positively associated with nail and urinary arsenic, respectively. Because arsenic exposure has been reported to be associated with long QT intervals and vascular disease in humans, we also used this TLDA for analysis of gene expression in human cardiomyocytes exposed to arsenic in vitro. Expression of the ion-channel genes CACNA1, KCNH2, KCNQ1 and KCNE1 were down-regulated by 1-μM arsenic. Alteration of some common pathways, including those involved in oxidative stress, inflammatory signaling, and ion-channel function, may underlay the seemingly disparate array of arsenic-associated diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. PMID:21776218

  2. Altered gene expression by low-dose arsenic exposure in humans and cultured cardiomyocytes: assessment by real-time PCR arrays.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jinyao; Xia, Yajuan; Wade, Timothy J; DeMarini, David M; Davidson, Mercy; Mumford, Judy

    2011-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure results in higher risk of skin, lung, and bladder cancer, as well as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on expression of selected genes in the blood lymphocytes from 159 people exposed chronically to arsenic in their drinking water using a novel RT-PCR TaqMan low-density array (TLDA). We found that expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which activates both inflammation and NF-κB-dependent survival pathways, was strongly associated with water and urinary arsenic levels. Expression of KCNA5, which encodes a potassium ion channel protein, was positively associated with water and toe nail arsenic levels. Expression of 2 and 11 genes were positively associated with nail and urinary arsenic, respectively. Because arsenic exposure has been reported to be associated with long QT intervals and vascular disease in humans, we also used this TLDA for analysis of gene expression in human cardiomyocytes exposed to arsenic in vitro. Expression of the ion-channel genes CACNA1, KCNH2, KCNQ1 and KCNE1 were down-regulated by 1-μM arsenic. Alteration of some common pathways, including those involved in oxidative stress, inflammatory signaling, and ion-channel function, may underlay the seemingly disparate array of arsenic-associated diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. PMID:21776218

  3. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy in a Patient With a Rare Loss‐of‐Function KCNQ1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qinmei; Cao, Qing; Zhou, Qiongqiong; Xie, Jinyan; Shen, Yang; Wan, Rong; Yu, Jianhua; Yan, Sujuan; Marian, Ali J.; Hong, Kui

    2015-01-01

    Background Ventricular tachycardia (VT) is a common manifestation of advanced cardiomyopathies. In a subset of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, VT is the initial and the cardinal manifestation of the disease. The molecular genetic basis of this subset of dilated cardiomyopathy is largely unknown. Methods and Results We identified 10 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy who presented with VT and sequenced 14 common causal genes for cardiomyopathies and arrhythmias. Functional studies included cellular patch clamp, confocal microscopy, and immunoblotting. We identified nonsynonymous variants in 4 patients, including a rare missense p.R397Q mutation in the KCNQ1 gene in a 60‐year‐old man who presented with incessant VT and had mild cardiac dysfunction. The p.R397Q mutation was absent in an ethnically matched control group, affected a conserved amino acid, and was predicted by multiple algorithms to be pathogenic. Co‐expression of the mutant KCNQ1 with its partner unit KCNE1 was associated with reduced tail current density of slowly activating delayed rectifier K+ current (IKs). The mutation reduced membrane localization of the protein. Conclusions Dilated cardiomyopathy with an initial presentation of VT may be a forme fruste of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in genes encoding the ion channels. The findings implicate KCNQ1 as a possible causal gene for arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25616976

  4. Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 in the regulation of renal and extrarenal potassium transport.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Vallon, Volker

    2012-02-01

    Serum- and glucocorticoid inducible-kinase 1 (SGK1) is an early gene transcriptionally upregulated by cell stress such as cell shrinkage and hypoxia and several hormones including gluco- and mineralocorticoids. It is activated by insulin and growth factors. SGK1 is a powerful regulator of a wide variety of channels and transporters. The present review describes the role of SGK1 in the regulation of potassium (K(+)) channels, K(+) transporters and K(+) homeostasis. SGK1-regulated K(+) channels include renal outer medullary K+ channel, Kv1.3, Kv1.5, KCNE1/KCNQ1, KCNQ4 and, via regulation of calcium (Ca(2+)) entry, Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels. SGK1-sensitive transporters include sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 and sodium/potassium-adenosine triphosphatase. SGK1-dependent regulation of K(+) channels and K(+) transport contributes to the stimulation of renal K(+) excretion following high K(+) intake, to insulin-induced cellular K(+) uptake and hypokalemia, to inhibition of insulin release by glucocorticoids, to stimulation of mast cell degranulation and gastric acid secretion, and to cardiac repolarization. Thus, SGK1 has a profound effect on K(+) homeostasis and on a multitude of K(+)-sensitive cellular functions. PMID:22038256

  5. Voltage-Dependent Gating: Novel Insights from KCNQ1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Gating of voltage-dependent cation channels involves three general molecular processes: voltage sensor activation, sensor-pore coupling, and pore opening. KCNQ1 is a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel whose distinctive properties have provided novel insights on fundamental principles of voltage-dependent gating. 1) Similar to other Kv channels, KCNQ1 voltage sensor activation undergoes two resolvable steps; but, unique to KCNQ1, the pore opens at both the intermediate and activated state of voltage sensor activation. The voltage sensor-pore coupling differs in the intermediate-open and the activated-open states, resulting in changes of open pore properties during voltage sensor activation. 2) The voltage sensor-pore coupling and pore opening require the membrane lipid PIP2 and intracellular ATP, respectively, as cofactors, thus voltage-dependent gating is dependent on multiple stimuli, including the binding of intracellular signaling molecules. These mechanisms underlie the extraordinary KCNE1 subunit modification of the KCNQ1 channel and have significant physiological implications. PMID:26745405

  6. Ginsenosides may enhance the functionality of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Young; Ku, Jun Beom; Liu, Hung Ching; Ku, Seung-Yup; Kim, Seok Hyun; Choi, Young Min

    2014-10-01

    Various chemicals have been reported to induce the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into cardiomyocytes (CMs), however, their contributions to the functionality of hESC-derived CMs are still limited. In this study, we evaluated the effects of red ginseng extract (RGE), ginsenoside-Rb1 (gRb1, panaxadiol), and ginsenoside-Re (gRe, panaxatriol) on the differentiation of hESCs and the functionality of derived CMs. Undifferentiated hESCs were treated with 0.25 mg/mL RGE, 10 μmol/L gRb1, or 10 μmol/L gRe for 48 hours at the differentiation induction (early stage) or maturation (late stage) period. The expression of mesodermal and cardiac transcription factor genes was upregulated in the ginsenoside-treated groups from early stage. The expression of cardiac sarcomeric genes was significantly upregulated at the late stage. The gRb1- and gRe-treated groups upregulated the expression of potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E member 1 (KCNE1) and the gRe-treated group showed a longer beating duration compared to the control. Taken together, ginsenosides may enhance the functionality of hESC-derived CMs in vitro. PMID:24615935

  7. Genotype–phenotype correlation in long QT syndrome families

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Sameera Fatima; Ali, Altaf; Venkateshwari, Ananthapur; Rao, Hygriv; Jayakrishnan, M.P.; Narasimhan, Calambur; Shenthar, Jayaprakash; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Nallari, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in clinical manifestations is a well-known feature in Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). The extent of this phenomenon became evident in families wherein both symptomatic and asymptomatic family members are reported. The study hence warrants genetic testing and/or screening of family members of LQTS probands for risk stratification and prediction. Of the 46 families screened, 18 probands revealed novel variations/compound heterozygosity in the gene/s screened. Families 1–4 revealed probands carrying novel variations in KCNQ1 gene along with compound heterozygosity of risk genotypes of the SCN5A, KCNE1 and NPPA gene/s polymorphisms screened. It was also observed that families- 5, 6 and 7 were typical cases of “anticipation” in which both mother and child were diagnosed with congenital LQTS (cLQTS). Families- 16 and 17 represented aLQTS probands with variations in IKs and INa encoding genes. First degree relatives (FDRs) carrying the same haplotype as the proband were also identified which may help in predictive testing and management of LQTS. Most of the probands exhibiting a family history were found to be genetic compounds which clearly points to the role of cardiac genes and their modifiers in a recessive fashion in LQTS manifestation.

  8. LQTS gene LOVD database.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Moss, Arthur; Cong, Peikuan; Pan, Min; Chang, Bingxi; Zheng, Liangrong; Fang, Quan; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer; Lin, Changsong; Li, Zhongxiang; Wei, Junfang; Zeng, Qiang; Qi, Ming

    2010-11-01

    The Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders that predisposes young individuals to ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. LQTS is mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of cardiac ion channels (KCNQ1, KCNH2,SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2). Many other genes involved in LQTS have been described recently(KCNJ2, AKAP9, ANK2, CACNA1C, SCNA4B, SNTA1, and CAV3). We created an online database(http://www.genomed.org/LOVD/introduction.html) that provides information on variants in LQTS-associated genes. As of February 2010, the database contains 1738 unique variants in 12 genes. A total of 950 variants are considered pathogenic, 265 are possible pathogenic, 131 are unknown/unclassified, and 292 have no known pathogenicity. In addition to these mutations collected from published literature, we also submitted information on gene variants, including one possible novel pathogenic mutation in the KCNH2 splice site found in ten Chinese families with documented arrhythmias. The remote user is able to search the data and is encouraged to submit new mutations into the database. The LQTS database will become a powerful tool for both researchers and clinicians. PMID:20809527

  9. Structure and stoichiometry of an accessory subunit TRIP8b interaction with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels

    PubMed Central

    Bankston, John R.; Camp, Stacey S.; DiMaio, Frank; Lewis, Alan S.; Chetkovich, Dane M.; Zagotta, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels operate in intact tissues as part of large macromolecular complexes that can include cytoskeletal proteins, scaffolding proteins, signaling molecules, and a litany of other molecules. The proteins that make up these complexes can influence the trafficking, localization, and biophysical properties of the channel. TRIP8b (tetratricopetide repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting protein) is a recently discovered accessory subunit of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels that contributes to the substantial dendritic localization of HCN channels in many types of neurons. TRIP8b interacts with the carboxyl-terminal region of HCN channels and regulates their cell-surface expression level and cyclic nucleotide dependence. Here we examine the molecular determinants of TRIP8b binding to HCN2 channels. Using a single-molecule fluorescence bleaching method, we found that TRIP8b and HCN2 form an obligate 4:4 complex in intact channels. Fluorescence-detection size-exclusion chromatography and fluorescence anisotropy allowed us to confirm that two different domains in the carboxyl-terminal portion of TRIP8b—the tetratricopepide repeat region and the TRIP8b conserved region—interact with two different regions of the HCN carboxyl-terminal region: the carboxyl-terminal three amino acids (SNL) and the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, respectively. And finally, using X-ray crystallography, we determined the atomic structure of the tetratricopepide region of TRIP8b in complex with a peptide of the carboxy-terminus of HCN2. Together, these experiments begin to uncover the mechanism for TRIP8b binding and regulation of HCN channels. PMID:22550182

  10. Distinct Populations of HCN Pacemaker Channels Produce Voltage-dependent and Voltage-independent Currents

    PubMed Central

    Proenza, Catherine; Yellen, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated HCN pacemaker channels are critical for the generation of spontaneous activity and the regulation of excitability in the heart and in many types of neurons. These channels produce both a voltage-dependent current (Ih) and a voltage-independent current (Iinst or VIC). In this study, we explored the molecular basis of the voltage-independent current. We found that for the spHCN isoform, VIC averaged ∼4% of the maximum HCN conductance that could be activated by hyperpolarization. Cyclic AMP increased the voltage-independent current in spHCN to ∼8% of maximum. In HCN2, VIC was ∼2% of the maximal current, and was little affected by cAMP. VIC in both spHCN and HCN2 was blocked rapidly both by ZD7288 (an HCN channel blocker that is thought to bind in the conduction pore) and by application of Cd2+ to channels containing an introduced cysteine in the pore (spHCN-464C or HCN2-436C). These results suggest that VIC flows through the main conduction pathway, down the central axis of the protein. We suspected that VIC simply represented a nonzero limiting open probability for HCN channels at positive voltages. Surprisingly, we found instead that the spHCN channels carrying VIC were not in rapid equilibrium with the channels carrying the voltage-dependent current, because they could be blocked independently; a single application of blocker at a depolarized potential essentially eliminated VIC with little change in Ih. Thus, VIC appears to be produced by a distinct population of HCN channels. This voltage-independent current could contribute significantly to the role of HCN channels in neurons and myocytes; VIC flowing through the channels at physiological potentials would tend to promote excitability by accelerating both depolarization and repolarization. PMID:16446506

  11. Deuterium in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp): detection of DCN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, R.; Owen, T. C.; Jewitt, D. C.; Matthews, H. E.; Senay, M.; Biver, N.; Bockel e-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Gautier, D.

    1998-01-01

    Deuterated hydrogen cyanide (DCN) was detected in a comet, C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), with the use of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The inferred deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio in hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is (D/H)HCN = (2.3 +/- 0.4) x 10(-3). This ratio is higher than the D/H ratio found in cometary water and supports the interstellar origin of cometary ices. The observed values of D/H in water and HCN imply a kinetic temperature >/=30 +/- 10 K in the fragment of interstellar cloud that formed the solar system.

  12. Deuterium in comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp): detection of DCN.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Owen, T C; Jewitt, D C; Matthews, H E; Senay, M; Biver, N; Bockel e-Morvan, D; Crovisier, J; Gautier, D

    1998-03-13

    Deuterated hydrogen cyanide (DCN) was detected in a comet, C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp), with the use of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The inferred deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio in hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is (D/H)HCN = (2.3 +/- 0.4) x 10(-3). This ratio is higher than the D/H ratio found in cometary water and supports the interstellar origin of cometary ices. The observed values of D/H in water and HCN imply a kinetic temperature >/=30 +/- 10 K in the fragment of interstellar cloud that formed the solar system. PMID:9497286

  13. Mapping the structure and conformational movements of proteins with transition metal ion FRET

    PubMed Central

    Taraska, Justin W.; Puljung, Michael C.; Olivier, Nelson B.; Flynn, Galen E.; Zagotta, William N.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Visualizing conformational dynamics in proteins has been difficult, and the atomic-scale motions responsible for the behavior of most allosteric proteins are unknown. Here, we report that FRET between a small fluorescent dye and a nickel ion bound to a di-histidine motif can be used to monitor small structural rearrangements in proteins. This method provides several key advantages over classical FRET including the ability to measure the dynamics of close range interactions, the use of small probes with short linkers, a low orientation dependence, and the ability to add and remove unique tunable acceptors. We used this ‘transition metal ion FRET’ approach along with x-ray crystallography to determine the structural changes of the gating-ring of the mouse hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channel HCN2. Binding of cAMP to the isolated carboxyl-terminal region of HCN2 caused a structural rearrangement involving a movement of the C-helix towards the β-roll of the cAMP-binding domain and a movement of the F′ helix of the C-linker, along with a stabilization of the secondary structure of the helices. Our results suggest a general model for the conformational switch in the cyclic nucleotide-binding site of cyclic nucleotide-regulated ion channels. PMID:19525958

  14. Low affinity block of native and cloned hyperpolarization-activated Ih channels by Ba2+ ions.

    PubMed

    van Welie, Ingrid; Wadman, Wytse J; van Hooft, Johannes A

    2005-01-10

    Ba2+ is commonly used to discriminate two classes of ion currents. The classical inward-rectifying K+ current, I(Kir), is blocked by low millimolar concentrations of Ba2+, whereas the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, I(h), is assumed not to be sensitive to Ba2+. Here we investigated the effects of Ba2+ on I(h) currents recorded from rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, and on cloned I(h) channels composed of either HCN1 or HCN2 subunits transiently expressed in Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) 293 cells. The results show that low millimolar concentrations of Ba2+ reduce the maximal I(h) conductance (IC50 approximately 3-5 mM) in both CA1 pyramidal neurons and in HEK 293 cells without specificity for HCN1 or HCN2 subunits. In addition, Ba2+ decreases the rate of activation and increases the rate of deactivation of I(h) currents. Neither the half-maximal voltage of activation, V(h), nor the reversal potential of the I(h) channels were affected by Ba2+. The combined results suggest that B2+, at concentrations commonly used to block I(Kir) currents, also reduces the conductance of I(h) channels without subunit specificity, and affects the kinetics of I(h) channel gating. PMID:15659289

  15. Detection of HCN in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lellouch, Emmanuel; Gurwell, Mark; Butler, Bryan; Moullet, Arielle; Moreno, Raphael; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Biver, Nicolas; Fouchet, Thierry; Lis, Darek; Stern, Alan; Young, Leslie; Young, Eliot; Weaver, Hal; Boissier, Jeremie; Stansberry, John

    2015-11-01

    We report on the first detection of hydrogen cyanide in Pluto's atmosphere, obtained with the ALMA interferometer. ALMA observations of the HCN(4-3) line at 354.505 GHz were conducted on June 12.2 and June 13.15, 2015 at ~0.3" spatial resolution, separating Pluto from Charon, with a 234 kHz spectral sampling. The HCN line was detected on both dates, with a ~100 mJy contrast and a ~0.75 MHz FWHM linewidth. The narrow linewidth and the absence of Lorentzian wings indicate that most of the HCN resides in Pluto's upper atmosphere. As on Titan, HCN is an expected photochemical product in a N2-CH4 atmosphere. Data interpretation in terms of the HCN abundance/vertical distribution and comparison with photochemical models will be presented.

  16. Submillimeter-HCN Diagram for Energy Diagnostics in the Centers of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Takuma; Kohno, Kotaro; Aalto, Susanne; Espada, Daniel; Fathi, Kambiz; Harada, Nanase; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Krips, Melanie; Martín, Sergio; Matsushita, Satoki; Meier, David S.; Nakai, Naomasa; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Schinnerer, Eva; Sheth, Kartik; Terashima, Yuichi; Turner, Jean L.

    2016-02-01

    Compiling data from literature and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array archive, we show enhanced HCN(4-3)/HCO+(4-3) and/or HCN(4-3)/CS(7-6) integrated intensity ratios in circumnuclear molecular gas around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) compared to those in starburst (SB) galaxies (submillimeter HCN enhancement). The number of sample galaxies is significantly increased from our previous work. We expect that this feature could potentially be an extinction-free energy diagnostic tool of nuclear regions of galaxies. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelings of the above molecular emission lines involving both collisional and radiative excitation, as well as a photon trapping effect, were conducted to investigate the cause of the high line ratios in AGNs. As a result, we found that enhanced abundance ratios of HCN to HCO+ and HCN to CS in AGNs as compared to SB galaxies by a factor of a few to even ≳10 are a plausible explanation for the submillimeter HCN enhancement. However, a counterargument of a systematically higher gas density in AGNs than in SB galaxies can also be a plausible scenario. Although we cannot fully distinguish these two scenarios at this moment owing to an insufficient amount of multi-transition, multi-species data, the former scenario is indicative of abnormal chemical composition in AGNs. Regarding the actual mechanism to realize the composition, we suggest that it is difficult with conventional gas-phase X-ray-dominated region ionization models to reproduce the observed high line ratios. We might have to take into account other mechanisms such as neutral-neutral reactions that are efficiently activated in high-temperature environments and/or mechanically heated regions to further understand the high line ratios in AGNs.

  17. Ginseng Gintonin Activates the Human Cardiac Delayed Rectifier K+ Channel: Involvement of Ca2+/Calmodulin Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun-Hye; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Jung, Seok-Won; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Shin, Ho-Chul; Lee, Jun-Hee; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Rhim, Hyewhon; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Ha, Tal soo; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Cho, Hana; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2014-01-01

    Gintonin, a novel, ginseng-derived G protein-coupled lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand, elicits [Ca2+]i transients in neuronal and non-neuronal cells via pertussis toxin-sensitive and pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins. The slowly activating delayed rectifier K+ (IKs) channel is a cardiac K+ channel composed of KCNQ1 and KCNE1 subunits. The C terminus of the KCNQ1 channel protein has two calmodulin-binding sites that are involved in regulating IKs channels. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of gintonin-mediated activation of human IKs channel activity by expressing human IKs channels in Xenopus oocytes. We found that gintonin enhances IKs channel currents in concentration- and voltage-dependent manners. The EC50 for the IKs channel was 0.05 ± 0.01 μg/ml. Gintonin-mediated activation of the IKs channels was blocked by an LPA1/3 receptor antagonist, an active phospholipase C inhibitor, an IP3 receptor antagonist, and the calcium chelator BAPTA. Gintonin-mediated activation of both the IKs channel was also blocked by the calmodulin (CaM) blocker calmidazolium. Mutations in the KCNQ1 [Ca2+]i/CaM-binding IQ motif sites (S373P, W392R, or R539W)blocked the action of gintonin on IKs channel. However, gintonin had no effect on hERG K+ channel activity. These results show that gintonin-mediated enhancement of IKs channel currents is achieved through binding of the [Ca2+]i/CaM complex to the C terminus of KCNQ1 subunit. PMID:25234465

  18. [To the mechanisms of antiarrhythmic action of Allapinine].

    PubMed

    Vakhitova, Iu V; Farafontova, E I; Khisamutdinova, R Iu; Iunusov, V M; Cypasheva, I P; Iunusov, M S

    2013-01-01

    Allapinine (lappaconitine hydrobromide) is a drug for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, it shows IC class antiarrhythmics properties. Its action mechanism is associated with blockade of Na(+)-channels with subsequent inhibition of the depolarization rate and, consequently, of the slowing and reducing the excitability of the cardiac conduction system. At the moment, it is not established, what factors are associated with side effects of Allapinine, and therefore it seems important to study the molecular mechanisms of its action. The target genes were identified in a rat model of aconitine-induced arrhythmia using a commercial kit "Rat Neuroscience Ion Channels & Transporters RT2 Profiler PCR Array" (SABioscienses). Comparison of the expression of 84 genes in the experimental (aconitine arrhythmias/Allapinine) and control (aconitine arrhythmias/saline) animals revealed changes in the mRNA level of 18 genes. It has been shown an increase in mRNA levels of genes encoding various types of K(+)-channels (kcna6, kcnj1, kcnj4, kcnq2, kcnq4), Ca(2+)-channel (cacna 1g), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (slc 18a3). Decrease in the mRNA level was observed for genes encoding the Na(+)-channel (scn8a), K(+)-channels (kcne 1, kcns 1), membrane transporters (atp4a, slc6a9). Taken together, it appears that the effect of Allapinine on aconitine--induced arrhythmias is due to modulation of genes encoding Na(+)-, K(+)-, Ca(2+)-channels, conducting ionic currents (I(Na), I(to), I(Ks), I(K1), I(CaT)), which are involved in the formation of different phases of the action potential. The effect of the drug on the mRNA levels of genes encoding the acetylcholine and glycine transporters, suggesting the participation of these neurotransmitters in the mechanisms of anti-arrhythmic properties of the Allapinine. PMID:23844512

  19. Extracellular potassium inhibits Kv7.1 potassium channels by stabilizing an inactivated state.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anders Peter; Steffensen, Annette Buur; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2011-08-17

    Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) channels are regulators of several physiological processes including vasodilatation, repolarization of cardiomyocytes, and control of secretory processes. A number of Kv7.1 pore mutants are sensitive to extracellular potassium. We hypothesized that extracellular potassium also modulates wild-type Kv7.1 channels. The Kv7.1 currents were measured in Xenopus laevis oocytes at different concentrations of extracellular potassium (1-50 mM). As extracellular potassium was elevated, Kv7.1 currents were reduced significantly more than expected from theoretical calculations based on the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz flux equation. Potassium inhibited the steady-state current with an IC(50) of 6.0 ± 0.2 mM. Analysis of tail-currents showed that potassium increased the fraction of channels in the inactivated state. Similarly, the recovery from inactivation was slowed by potassium, suggesting that extracellular potassium stabilizes an inactivated state in Kv7.1 channels. The effect of extracellular potassium was absent in noninactivating Kv7.1/KCNE1 and Kv7.1/KCNE3 channels, further supporting a stabilized inactivated state as the underlying mechanism. Interestingly, coexpression of Kv7.1 with KCNE2 did not attenuate the inhibition by potassium. In a number of other Kv channels, including Kv1.5, Kv4.3, and Kv7.2-5 channels, currents were only minimally reduced by an increase in extracellular potassium as expected. These results show that extracellular potassium modulates Kv7.1 channels and suggests that physiological changes in potassium concentrations may directly control the function of Kv7.1 channels. This may represent a novel regulatory mechanism of excitability and of potassium transport in tissues expressing Kv7.1 channels. PMID:21843472

  20. Genetic analysis, in silico prediction, and family segregation in long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riuró, Helena; Campuzano, Oscar; Berne, Paola; Arbelo, Elena; Iglesias, Anna; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Coll-Vidal, Mònica; Partemi, Sara; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Picó, Ferran; Allegue, Catarina; Oliva, Antonio; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Castro-Urda, Víctor; Fernández-Lozano, Ignacio; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep; Scornik, Fabiana S; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The heritable cardiovascular disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiogram, carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. We sought to add new data to the existing knowledge of genetic mutations contributing to LQTS to both expand our understanding of its genetic basis and assess the value of genetic testing in clinical decision-making. Direct sequencing of the five major contributing genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2, was performed in a cohort of 115 non-related LQTS patients. Pathogenicity of the variants was analyzed using family segregation, allele frequency from public databases, conservation analysis, and Condel and Provean in silico predictors. Phenotype-genotype correlations were analyzed statistically. Sequencing identified 36 previously described and 18 novel mutations. In 51.3% of the index cases, mutations were found, mostly in KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A; 5.2% of cases had multiple mutations. Pathogenicity analysis revealed 39 mutations as likely pathogenic, 12 as VUS, and 3 as non-pathogenic. Clinical analysis revealed that 75.6% of patients with QTc≥500 ms were genetically confirmed. Our results support the use of genetic testing of KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A as part of the diagnosis of LQTS and to help identify relatives at risk of SCD. Further, the genetic tools appear more valuable as disease severity increases. However, the identification of genetic variations in the clinical investigation of single patients using bioinformatic tools can produce erroneous conclusions regarding pathogenicity. Therefore segregation studies are key to determining causality. PMID:24667783

  1. Simulating the Distance Distribution between Spin-Labels Attached to Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    EPR/DEER spectroscopy is playing an increasingly important role in the characterization of the conformational states of proteins. In this study, force field parameters for the bifunctional spin-label (RX) used in EPR/DEER are parametrized and tested with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The dihedral angles connecting the Cα atom of the backbone to the nitroxide ring moiety of the RX spin-label attached to i and i + 4 positions in a polyalanine α-helix agree very well with those observed in the X-ray crystallography. Both RXi,i+4 and RXi,i+3 are more rigid than the monofunctional spin-label (R1) commonly used in EPR/DEER, while RXi,i+4 is more rigid and causes less distortion in a protein backbone than RXi,i+3. Simplified dummy spin-label models with a single effective particle representing the RXi,i+3 and RXi,i+4 are also developed and parametrized from the all-atom simulations. MD simulations with dummy spin-labels (MDDS) provide distance distributions that can be directly compared to distance distributions obtained from EPR/DEER to rapidly assess if a hypothetical three-dimensional (3D) structural model is consistent with experiment. The dummy spin-labels can also be used in the restrained-ensemble MD (re-MD) simulations to carry out structural refinement of 3D models. Applications of this methodology to T4 lysozyme, KCNE1, and LeuT are shown to provide important insights about their conformational dynamics. PMID:25645890

  2. Cardiac Channel Molecular Autopsy: Insights From 173 Consecutive Cases of Autopsy-Negative Sudden Unexplained Death Referred for Postmortem Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Tester, David J.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Will, Melissa L.; Haglund, Carla M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To perform long QT syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia cardiac channel postmortem genetic testing (molecular autopsy) for a large cohort of cases of autopsy-negative sudden unexplained death (SUD). Methods From September 1, 1998, through October 31, 2010, 173 cases of SUD (106 males; mean ± SD age, 18.4±12.9 years; age range, 1-69 years; 89% white) were referred by medical examiners or coroners for a cardiac channel molecular autopsy. Using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and DNA sequencing, a comprehensive mutational analysis of the long QT syndrome susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) and a targeted analysis of the catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia type 1–associated gene (RYR2) were conducted. Results Overall, 45 putative pathogenic mutations absent in 400 to 700 controls were identified in 45 autopsy-negative SUD cases (26.0%). Females had a higher yield (26/67 [38.8%]) than males (19/106 [17.9%]; P<.005). Among SUD cases with exercise-induced death, the yield trended higher among the 1- to 10-year-olds (8/12 [66.7%]) compared with the 11- to 20-year-olds (4/27 [14.8%]; P=.002). In contrast, for those who died during a period of sleep, the 11- to 20-year-olds had a higher yield (9/25 [36.0%]) than the 1- to 10-year-olds (1/24 [4.2%]; P=.01). Conclusion Cardiac channel molecular autopsy should be considered in the evaluation of autopsy-negative SUD. Several interesting genotype-phenotype observations may provide insight into the expected yields of postmortem genetic testing for SUD and assist in selecting cases with the greatest potential for mutation discovery and directing genetic testing efforts. PMID:22677073

  3. SKF-96365 blocks human ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Lei; Chen, Kui-Hao; Sun, Hai-Ying; Jin, Man-Wen; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-02-01

    SKF-96365 is a TRPC channel antagonist commonly used to characterize the potential functions of TRPC channels in different systems, which was recently reported to induce QTc prolongation on ECG by inhibiting TRPC channels. The present study investigates whether the blockade of cardiac repolarization currents would be involved in the increase of QTc interval. Cardiac repolarization currents were recorded in HEK 293 cells stably expressing human ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium (hERG or hKv11.1) channels, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1 channels (IKs) or hKir2.1 channels and cardiac action potentials were recorded in guinea pig ventricular myocytes using a whole-cell patch technique. The potential effect of SKF-96365 on QT interval was evaluated in ex vivo guinea pig hearts. It was found that SKF-96365 inhibited hERG current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50, 3.4μM). The hERG mutants S631A in the pore helix and F656V of the S6 region reduced the inhibitory sensitivity with IC50s of 27.4μM and 11.0μM, suggesting a channel pore blocker. In addition, this compound inhibited IKs and hKir2.1currents with IC50s of 10.8 and 8.7μM. SKF-96365 (10μM) significantly prolonged ventricular APD90 in guinea pig ventricular myocytes and QTc interval in ex vivo guinea pig hearts. These results indicate that the TRPC channel antagonist SKF-96365 exerts blocking effects on hERG, IKs, and hKir2.1 channels. Prolongation of ventricular APD and QT interval is related to the inhibition of multiple repolarization potassium currents, especially hERG channels. PMID:26689773

  4. Recessive cardiac phenotypes in induced pluripotent stem cell models of Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome: disease mechanisms and pharmacological rescue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; D'Aniello, Cristina; Verkerk, Arie O; Wrobel, Eva; Frank, Stefan; Ward-van Oostwaard, Dorien; Piccini, Ilaria; Freund, Christian; Rao, Jyoti; Seebohm, Guiscard; Atsma, Douwe E; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Mummery, Christine L; Greber, Boris; Bellin, Milena

    2014-12-16

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) is one of the most severe life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Patients display delayed cardiac repolarization, associated high risk of sudden death due to ventricular tachycardia, and congenital bilateral deafness. In contrast to the autosomal dominant forms of long QT syndrome, JLNS is a recessive trait, resulting from homozygous (or compound heterozygous) mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE1. These genes encode the α and β subunits, respectively, of the ion channel conducting the slow component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current, IKs. We used complementary approaches, reprogramming patient cells and genetic engineering, to generate human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) models of JLNS, covering splice site (c.478-2A>T) and missense (c.1781G>A) mutations, the two major classes of JLNS-causing defects in KCNQ1. Electrophysiological comparison of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) from homozygous JLNS, heterozygous, and wild-type lines recapitulated the typical and severe features of JLNS, including pronounced action and field potential prolongation and severe reduction or absence of IKs. We show that this phenotype had distinct underlying molecular mechanisms in the two sets of cell lines: the previously unidentified c.478-2A>T mutation was amorphic and gave rise to a strictly recessive phenotype in JLNS-CMs, whereas the missense c.1781G>A lesion caused a gene dosage-dependent channel reduction at the cell membrane. Moreover, adrenergic stimulation caused action potential prolongation specifically in JLNS-CMs. Furthermore, sensitivity to proarrhythmic drugs was strongly enhanced in JLNS-CMs but could be pharmacologically corrected. Our data provide mechanistic insight into distinct classes of JLNS-causing mutations and demonstrate the potential of hiPSC-CMs in drug evaluation. PMID:25453094

  5. Genetic analysis, in silico prediction, and family segregation in long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Riuró, Helena; Campuzano, Oscar; Berne, Paola; Arbelo, Elena; Iglesias, Anna; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Coll-Vidal, Mònica; Partemi, Sara; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Picó, Ferran; Allegue, Catarina; Oliva, Antonio; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Castro-Urda, Víctor; Fernández-Lozano, Ignacio; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep; Scornik, Fabiana S; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The heritable cardiovascular disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiogram, carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. We sought to add new data to the existing knowledge of genetic mutations contributing to LQTS to both expand our understanding of its genetic basis and assess the value of genetic testing in clinical decision-making. Direct sequencing of the five major contributing genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2, was performed in a cohort of 115 non-related LQTS patients. Pathogenicity of the variants was analyzed using family segregation, allele frequency from public databases, conservation analysis, and Condel and Provean in silico predictors. Phenotype-genotype correlations were analyzed statistically. Sequencing identified 36 previously described and 18 novel mutations. In 51.3% of the index cases, mutations were found, mostly in KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A; 5.2% of cases had multiple mutations. Pathogenicity analysis revealed 39 mutations as likely pathogenic, 12 as VUS, and 3 as non-pathogenic. Clinical analysis revealed that 75.6% of patients with QTc≥500 ms were genetically confirmed. Our results support the use of genetic testing of KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A as part of the diagnosis of LQTS and to help identify relatives at risk of SCD. Further, the genetic tools appear more valuable as disease severity increases. However, the identification of genetic variations in the clinical investigation of single patients using bioinformatic tools can produce erroneous conclusions regarding pathogenicity. Therefore segregation studies are key to determining causality. PMID:24667783

  6. Regulation of the Kv2.1 potassium channel by MinK and MiRP1

    PubMed Central

    McCrossan, Zoe A.; Roepke, Torsten K.; Lewis, Anthony; Panaghie, Gianina; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    Kv2.1 is a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel α subunit expressed in mammalian heart and brain. MinK-related peptides (MiRPs), encoded by KCNE genes, are single transmembrane domain ancillary subunits that form complexes with Kv channel α subunits to modify their function. Mutations in human MinK (KCNE1) and MiRP1 (KCNE2) are associated with inherited and acquired forms of long QT syndrome (LQTS). Here, co-immunoprecipitations from rat heart tissue suggested that both MinK and MiRP1 form native cardiac complexes with Kv2.1. In whole-cell voltage clamp studies of subunits expressed in CHO cells, rat MinK and MiRP1 reduced Kv2.1 current density 3- and 2-fold respectively, slowed Kv2.1 activation (at +60 mV) 2- and 3-fold respectively, and each slowed Kv2.1 deactivation <2-fold. Human MinK slowed Kv2.1 activation 25%, while human MiRP1 slowed Kv2.1 activation and deactivation 2-fold. Inherited mutations in human MinK and MiRP1, previously associated with LQTS, were also evaluated. D76N-MinK and S74L-MinK reduced Kv2.1 current density (3-fold and 40%, respectively) and slowed deactivation (60 and 80%, respectively). Compared to wild-type human MiRP1-Kv2.1 complexes, channels formed with M54T- or I57T-MiRP1 showed greatly slowed activation (10-fold and 5-fold, respectively). The data broaden the potential roles of MinK and MiRP1 in cardiac physiology and support the possibility that inherited mutations in either subunit could contribute to cardiac arrhythmia by multiple mechanisms. PMID:19219384

  7. Functional and molecular evidence for Kv7 channel subtypes in human detrusor from patients with and without bladder outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Svalø, Julie; Sheykhzade, Majid; Nordling, Jørgen; Matras, Christina; Bouchelouche, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether Kv7 channels and their ancillary β-subunits, KCNE, are functionally expressed in the human urinary bladder. Kv7 channels were examined at the molecular level and by functional studies using RT-qPCR and myography, respectively. We found mRNA expression of KCNQ1, KCNQ3-KCNQ5 and KCNE1-5 in the human urinary bladder from patients with normal bladder function (n = 7) and in patients with bladder outflow obstruction (n = 3). Interestingly, a 3.4-fold up-regulation of KCNQ1 was observed in the latter. The Kv7 channel subtype selective modulators, ML277 (activator of Kv7.1 channels, 10 μM) and ML213 (activator of Kv7.2, Kv7.4, Kv7.4/7.5 and Kv7.5 channels, 10 μM), reduced the tone of 1 μM carbachol pre-constricted bladder strips. XE991 (blocker of Kv7.1-7.5 channels, 10 μM) had opposing effects as it increased contractions achieved with 20 mM KPSS. Furthermore, we investigated if there is interplay between Kv7 channels and β-adrenoceptors. Using cumulative additions of isoprenaline (β-adrenoceptor agonist) and forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator) in combination with the Kv7 channel activator and blocker, retigabine and XE991, we did not find interplay between Kv7 channels and β-adrenoceptors in the human urinary bladder. The performed gene expression analysis combined with the organ bath studies imply that compounds that activate Kv7 channels could be useful for treatment of overactive bladder syndrome. PMID:25692982

  8. Structural mechanism for the regulation of HCN ion channels by the accessory protein TRIP8b

    PubMed Central

    DeBerg, Hannah A.; Bankston, John R.; Rosenbaum, Joel C.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Zagotta, William N.; Stoll, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels underlie the cationic Ih current present in many neurons. The direct binding of cAMP to HCN channels increases the rate and extent of channel opening and results in a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation. TRIP8b is an accessory protein that regulates the cell surface expression and dendritic localization of HCN channels and reduces the cyclic nucleotide dependence of these channels. Here we use electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to show that TRIP8b binds to the apo state of the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) of HCN2 channels without changing the overall domain structure. With EPR and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we locate TRIP8b relative to the HCN channel and identify the binding interface on the CNBD. These data provide a structural framework for understanding how TRIP8b regulates the cyclic nucleotide dependence of HCN channels. PMID:25800552

  9. Involvement of HCN Channel in Muscarinic Inhibitory Action on Tonic Firing of Dorsolateral Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Haitao; Ma, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Zheng, Jianquan; Wang, Liyun; Wei, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is the most prominent nucleus in the basal ganglia and plays an important role in motor movement regulation. The cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in striatum are involved in the motion regulation by releasing acetylcholine (ACh) and modulating the output of striatal projection neurons. Here, we report that muscarinic ACh receptor (M receptor) agonists, ACh and Oxotremorine (OXO-M), decreased the firing frequency of ChIs by blocking the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Scopolamine (SCO), a nonselective antagonist of M receptors, abolished the inhibition. OXO-M exerted its function by activating the Gi/o cAMP signaling cascade. The single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (scRT-PCR) revealed that all the five subtypes of M receptors and four subtypes of HCN channels were expressed on ChIs. Among them, M2 receptors and HCN2 channels were the most dominant ones and expressed in every single studied cholinergic interneuron (ChI).Our results suggest that ACh regulates not only the output of striatal projection neurons, but also the firing activity of ChIs themselves by activating presynaptic M receptors in the dorsal striatum. The activation of M2 receptors and blockage of HCN2 channels may play an important role in ACh inhibition on the excitability of ChIs. This finding adds a new G-protein coupled receptor mediated regulation on ChIs and provides a cellular mechanism for control of cholinergic activity and ACh release in the dorsal striatum. PMID:27047336

  10. VOLTAGE-DEPENDENT OPENING OF HCN CHANNELS: FACILITATION OR INHIBITION BY THE PHYTOESTROGEN, GENISTEIN, IS DETERMINED BY THE ACTIVATION STATUS OF THE CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDE GATING RING

    PubMed Central

    Rozario, Anjali. O.; Turbendian, Harma K.; Fogle, Keri J.; Olivier, Nelson B.; Tibbs, Gareth R.

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the mechanistic bases and physiological importance of cAMP regulation of HCN channels has exploited an arginine to glutamate mutation in the nucleotide-binding fold, an approach critically dependent on the mutation selectively lowering the channel’s nucleotide affinity. In apparent conflict with this, in intact Xenopus oocytes, HCN and HCN-RE channels exhibit qualitatively and quantitatively distinct responses to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein – the estrogenic isoflavonoid strongly depolarizes the activation midpoint of HCN1-R538E, but not HCN1 channels (+9.8 mV ± 0.9 versus +2.2 mV ± 0.6) and hyperpolarizes gating of HCN2 (−4.8 mV ± 1.0) but depolarizes gating of HCN2-R591E (+13.2 mV ± 2.1). However, excised patch recording, X-ray crystallography and modeling reveal this is not due to either a fundamental effect of the mutation on channel gating per se or of genistein acting as a mutation-sensitive partial agonist at the cAMP site. Rather, we find that genistein equivalently moves both HCN and HCN-RE channels closer to the open state (rendering the channels inherently easier to open but at a cost of decreasing the coupling energy of cAMP) and that the anomaly reflects a balance of these energetic effects with the isoform specific inhibition of activation by the nucleotide gating ring and relief of this by endogenous cAMP. These findings have specific implications with regard to findings based on HCN-RE channels and kinase antagonists and general implications with respect to interpretation of drug effects in mutant channel backgrounds. PMID:19524546

  11. Involvement of HCN Channel in Muscarinic Inhibitory Action on Tonic Firing of Dorsolateral Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yan, Haitao; Ma, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Shuzhuo; Zheng, Jianquan; Wang, Liyun; Wei, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is the most prominent nucleus in the basal ganglia and plays an important role in motor movement regulation. The cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in striatum are involved in the motion regulation by releasing acetylcholine (ACh) and modulating the output of striatal projection neurons. Here, we report that muscarinic ACh receptor (M receptor) agonists, ACh and Oxotremorine (OXO-M), decreased the firing frequency of ChIs by blocking the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Scopolamine (SCO), a nonselective antagonist of M receptors, abolished the inhibition. OXO-M exerted its function by activating the Gi/o cAMP signaling cascade. The single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (scRT-PCR) revealed that all the five subtypes of M receptors and four subtypes of HCN channels were expressed on ChIs. Among them, M2 receptors and HCN2 channels were the most dominant ones and expressed in every single studied cholinergic interneuron (ChI).Our results suggest that ACh regulates not only the output of striatal projection neurons, but also the firing activity of ChIs themselves by activating presynaptic M receptors in the dorsal striatum. The activation of M2 receptors and blockage of HCN2 channels may play an important role in ACh inhibition on the excitability of ChIs. This finding adds a new G-protein coupled receptor mediated regulation on ChIs and provides a cellular mechanism for control of cholinergic activity and ACh release in the dorsal striatum. PMID:27047336

  12. Significant Association Between CAV1 Variant rs3807989 on 7p31 and Atrial Fibrillation in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Chuchu; Wang, Xiaojing; Xu, Chengqi; Wu, Manman; Wang, Pengxia; Tu, Xin; Wang, Qing K

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in European ancestry populations revealed several genomic loci for atrial fibrillation (AF). We previously replicated the 4q25 locus (PITX2) and 16q22 locus (ZFHX3) in the Chinese population, but not the KCNN3 locus on 1q21. With single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3807989 in CAV1 encoding caveolin-1, however, controversial results were reported in 2 Chinese replication studies. Methods and Results Six remaining AF genetic loci from GWAS, including rs3807989/CAV1, rs593479/PRRX1, rs6479562/C9orf3, rs10824026/SYNPO2L, rs1152591/SYNE2, and rs7164883/HCN4, were analyzed in a Chinese Han population with 941 cases and 562 controls. Only rs3807989 showed significant association with AF (Padj=4.77×10−5), and the finding was replicated in 2 other independent populations with 709 cases and 2175 controls, 463 cases and 644 controls, and the combined population with a total of 2113 cases and 3381 controls (Padj=2.20×10−9; odds ratio [OR]=1.34 for major allele G). Meta-analysis, together with data from previous reports in Chinese and Japanese populations, also showed a significant association between rs3807989 and AF (P=3.40×10−4; OR=1.24 for allele G). We also found that rs3807989 showed a significant association with lone AF in 3 independent populations and in the combined population (Padj=3.85×10−8; OR=1.43 for major allele G). Conclusions The data in this study revealed a significant association between rs3807989 and AF in the Chinese Han population. Together with the findings that caveolin-1 interacts with potassium channels Kir2.1, KCNH2, and HCN4 and sodium channels Nav1.5 and Nav1.8, CAV1 becomes a strong candidate susceptibility gene for AF across different ethnic populations. This study is the first to show a significant association between rs3807989 and lone AF. PMID:25953654

  13. Impact of Ancillary Subunits on Ventricular Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.; Xu, Xianghua; Roepke, Torsten K.

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels generate the outward K+ ion currents that constitute the primary force in ventricular repolarization. Kv channels comprise tetramers of pore-forming α subunits and, in probably the majority of cases in vivo, ancillary or β subunits that help define the properties of the Kv current generated. Ancillary subunits can be broadly categorized as cytoplasmic or transmembrane, and can modify Kv channel trafficking, conductance, gating, ion selectivity, regulation and pharmacology. Because of their often profound effects on Kv channel function, studies of the molecular correlates of ventricular repolarization must take into account ancillary subunits as well as α subunits. Cytoplasmic ancillary subunits include the Kvβ subunits, which regulate a range of Kv channels and may link channel gating to redox potential; and the KChIPs, which appear most often associated with Kv4 subfamily channels that generate the ventricular Ito current. Transmembrane ancillary subunits include the MinK-related proteins (MiRPs) encoded by KCNE genes, which modulate members of most Kv α subunit subfamilies; and the putative 12-transmembrane domain KCR1 protein which modulates hERG. In some cases, such as the ventricular IKs channel complex, it is well-established that the KCNQ1 α subunit must co-assemble with the MinK (KCNE1) single transmembrane domain ancillary subunit for recapitulation of the characteristic, unusually slowly-activating IKs current. In other cases it is not so clear-cut, and in particular the roles of the other MinK-related proteins (MiRPs 1–4) in regulating cardiac Kv channels such as KCNQ1 and hERG in vivo are under debate. MiRP1 alters hERG function and pharmacology, and inherited MiRP1 mutations are associated with inherited and acquired arrhythmias, but controversy exists over the native role of MiRP1 in regulating hERG (and therefore ventricular IKr) in vivo. Some ancillary subunits may exhibit varied expression to shape

  14. Congenital long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Celano, Giuseppe; Dagradi, Federica; Schwartz, Peter J

    2008-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary cardiac disease characterized by a prolongation of the QT interval at basal ECG and by a high risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. Disease prevalence is estimated at close to 1 in 2,500 live births. The two cardinal manifestations of LQTS are syncopal episodes, that may lead to cardiac arrest and sudden cardiac death, and electrocardiographic abnormalities, including prolongation of the QT interval and T wave abnormalities. The genetic basis of the disease was identified in the mid-nineties and all the LQTS genes identified so far encode cardiac ion channel subunits or proteins involved in modulating ionic currents. Mutations in these genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1, KCNE2, CACNA1c, CAV3, SCN5A, SCN4B) cause the disease by prolonging the duration of the action potential. The most prevalent LQTS variant (LQT1) is caused by mutations in the KCNQ1 gene, with approximately half of the genotyped patients carrying KCNQ1 mutations. Given the characteristic features of LQTS, the typical cases present no diagnostic difficulties for physicians aware of the disease. However, borderline cases are more complex and require the evaluation of various electrocardiographic, clinical, and familial findings, as proposed in specific diagnostic criteria. Additionally, molecular screening is now part of the diagnostic process. Treatment should always begin with β-blockers, unless there are valid contraindications. If the patient has one more syncope despite a full dose β-blockade, left cardiac sympathetic denervation (LCSD) should be performed without hesitation and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy should be considered with the final decision being based on the individual patient characteristics (age, sex, clinical history, genetic subgroup including mutation-specific features in some cases, presence of ECG signs – including 24-hour Holter recordings – indicating high electrical instability). The prognosis of the

  15. A BIPOLAR OUTFLOW FROM THE MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR CORE W51e2-E

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Hui; Han, J. L.; Zhao Junhui E-mail: hil@nao.cas.c

    2010-08-01

    We present high-resolution images of the bipolar outflow from W51e2, which are produced from the Submillimeter Array archival data observed for CO(3-2) and HCN(4-3) lines with angular resolutions of 0.''8 x 0.''6 and 0.''3 x 0.''2, respectively. The images show that the powerful outflow originates from the protostellar core W51e2-E rather than from the ultracompact H II region W51e2-W. The kinematic timescale of the outflow from W51e2-E is about 1000 yr, younger than the age ({approx}5000 yr) of the ultracompact H II region W51e2-W. A large mass-loss rate of {approx}1 x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and a high mechanical power of 120 L{sub sun} are inferred, suggesting that an O star or a cluster of B stars are forming in W51e2-E. The observed outflow activity along with the inferred large accretion rate indicates that at present W51e2-E is in a rapid phase of star formation.

  16. Innervation of sinoatrial nodal cells in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Inokaitis, Hermanas; Pauziene, Neringa; Rysevaite-Kyguoliene, Kristina; Pauza, Dainius H

    2016-05-01

    In spite of the fact that the rabbit is being widely used as a laboratory animal in experimental neurocardiology, neural control of SAN cells in the rabbit heart has been insufficiently examined thus far. This study analyzes the distribution of SAN cells and their innervation pattern employing fluorescent immunohistochemistry on rabbit whole mount atrial preparations. A dense network of adrenergic (positive for TH), cholinergic (positive for ChAT), nitrergic (positive for nNOS) and possibly sensory (positive for SP) NFs together with numerous neuronal somata were identified on the RRCV where the main mass of SAN cells positive for HCN4 were distributed as well. In general, the area occupied by SAN cells comprised nearly the entire RRCV and possessed a three to four times denser network of NFs compared with adjacent atrial walls. Adrenergic NFs predominated noticeably in-between SAN cells. Solitary neuronal somata or somata gathered into small clusters were positive solely for ChAT or nNOS, respectively or simultaneously for both neuronal markers (ChAT and nNOS). Neuronal somata positive for nNOS were more frequent than those positive for ChAT. In conclusion, findings of the present study demonstrate a dense and complex ganglionated neural network of both autonomic and sensory NFs, closely related to SAN cells which spread widely on the RRCV and extend as sleeves of these cells toward the walls of the rabbit RA. PMID:27045595

  17. Cardiac sodium channel regulator MOG1 regulates cardiac morphogenesis and rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juan; Wang, Longfei; Zuo, Mengxia; Wang, Xiaojing; Ahmed, Abu Shufian Ishtiaq; Chen, Qiuyun; Wang, Qing K.

    2016-01-01

    MOG1 was initially identified as a protein that interacts with the small GTPase Ran involved in transport of macromolecules into and out of the nucleus. In addition, we have established that MOG1 interacts with the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5 and regulates cell surface trafficking of Nav1.5. Here we used zebrafish as a model system to study the in vivo physiological role of MOG1. Knockdown of mog1 expression in zebrafish embryos significantly decreased the heart rate (HR). Consistently, the HR increases in embryos with over-expression of human MOG1. Compared with wild type MOG1 or control EGFP, mutant MOG1 with mutation E83D associated with Brugada syndrome significantly decreases the HR. Interestingly, knockdown of mog1 resulted in abnormal cardiac looping during embryogenesis. Mechanistically, knockdown of mog1 decreases expression of hcn4 involved in the regulation of the HR, and reduces expression of nkx2.5, gata4 and hand2 involved in cardiac morphogenesis. These data for the first time revealed a novel role that MOG1, a nucleocytoplasmic transport protein, plays in cardiac physiology and development. PMID:26903377

  18. THE DISCOVERY OF THE YOUNGEST MOLECULAR OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTELLAR CORE, MMS-6/OMC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2012-01-20

    We present subarcsecond resolution HCN (4-3) and CO (3-2) observations made with the Submillimeter Array, toward an extremely young intermediate-mass protostellar core, MMS 6-main, located in the Orion Molecular Cloud 3 region (OMC-3). We have successfully imaged a compact molecular outflow lobe ( Almost-Equal-To 1000 AU) associated with MMS 6-main, which is also the smallest molecular outflow ever found in the intermediate-mass protostellar cores. The dynamical timescale of this outflow is estimated to be {<=}100 yr. The line width dramatically increases downstream at the end of the molecular outflow ({Delta}v {approx} 25 km s{sup -1}) and clearly shows the bow-shock-type velocity structure. The estimated outflow mass ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun }) and outflow size are approximately two to four orders and one to three orders of magnitude smaller, respectively, while the outflow force ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} km s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) is similar, compared to the other molecular outflows studied in OMC-2/3. These results show that MMS 6-main is a protostellar core at the earliest evolutionary stage, most likely shortly after the second core formation.

  19. Star formation efficiency in the outer filaments of Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomé, Q.; Salomé, P.; Combes, F.; Hamer, S.; Heywood, I.

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the northern filaments of Centaurus A (at a distance of ˜ 20 kpc from the galaxy center) based on FUV (GALEX), FIR (Herschel) and CO (SEST and ALMA) emission. We also searched for HCN and HCO^+ (ATCA) and observed optical emission lines (VLT/MUSE) in different places of the filament. An upper limit of the dense gas of L'_{HCN}<4.8× 10^3 K.km.s^{-1}.pc^2 at 3σ leads to a dense-to-molecular gas fraction <23% in this region. We compared the CO masses with the SFR estimates and found very long depletion times (11 Gyr on 730 pc scales) and a large scatter in the KS-relation with a standard conversion factor. Applying a metallicity correction to the CO/H_2 conversion factor would lead to even more massive clouds with higher depletion times. Using ALMA archive data, we found 3 unresolved CO(2-1) clumps of size <37× 21 pc and masses around 10^4 M_⊙. The 3 clumps show resolved line profiles (Δ v˜ 10 km.s^{-1}) and are all three dynamically clearly separated by ˜ 10-20 km.s^{-1}. We derived a virial parameter α_{vir}˜ 10-16 which indicates that the clumps are not gravitationally bound and input of energy likely inhibits star formation.

  20. Caveolae, Ion Channels and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Balijepalli, Ravi C.; Kamp, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Caveolae are specialized membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids which are present in multiple cell types including cardiomyocytes. Along with the essential scaffolding protein caveolin-3, a number of different ion channels and transporters have been localized to caveolae in the heart including L-type Ca2+ channels (Cav1.2), Na+ channels (Nav1.5), pacemaker channels (HCN4), Na+/Ca2+ exchnager (NCX1) and others. Closely associated with these channels are specific macromolecular signaling complexes that provide highly localized regulation of the channels. Mutations in the caveolin-3 gene (CAV3) have been linked with the congenital long QT syndrome (LQT9), and mutations in caveolar-localized ion channels may contribute to other inherited arrhythmias. Changes in the caveolar microdomain in acquired heart disease may also lead to dysregulation and dysfunction of ion channels, altering the risk of arrhythmias in conditions such as heart failure. This review highlights the existing evidence identifying and characterizing ion channels localized to caveolae in cardiomyocytes and their role in arrhythmogenesis. PMID:19351512

  1. Diffuse and Dense Gas in Nearby Luminous Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, T.; Iono, D.; Ueda, J.; Yun, M. S.; Nakanishi, K.; Imanishi, M.; Hagiwara, Y.; Kaneko, H.; Komugi, S.; Espada, D.; Motohara, K.; Sugai, H.; Yamashita, T.; Tateuchi, K.; Lee, M.; Michiyama, T.; Kawabe, R.

    2015-12-01

    We present high resolution (0".2 - 2."0) ALMA cycle 2 observations of the IR-bright mid-stage merger VV 114 (band 3), the minor merger NGC 1614 (band 3/6), and the early-stage merger NGC 3110 (band 3), which are supplemented with the cycle 0 observations of VV 114 (band 3/7) and NGC 1614 (band 7/9). These observations include the CO (1-0), CO (2-1), 13CO (1-0), 13CO (2-1), CO (3-2), CO (6-5), HCN (4-3), and HCO+ (4-3) emission as well as continuum emission. We find that VV 114 has a multi-phase ISM (e.g., extended CO arms [˜ 10 kpc], a 13CO filament [˜ 6 kpc], and compact HCN sources [< 200 pc]), while NGC 1614 shows a rotating molecular ring with the radius of 240 pc, which is detected in the all molecular lines above. NGC 3110 shows two asymmetric molecular spiral arms and a strong bar. The CN (1-0), C18O (2-1), CS (2-1), and CH3OH (2-1) emission are also detected. Diagnosing detected lines using line intensity ratios, we suggest that an AGN, starbursts, and shocks are important drivers of the chemistry of VV 114, while merger and bar-induced starburst activities dominate the chemistry of NGC 1614 and NGC 3110, respectively.

  2. ALMA FOLLOWS STREAMING OF DENSE GAS DOWN TO 40 pc FROM THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE IN NGC 1097

    SciTech Connect

    Fathi, Kambiz; Pinol-Ferrer, Nuria; Lundgren, Andreas A.; Wiklind, Tommy; Kohno, Kotaro; Izumi, Takuma; Martin, Sergio; Espada, Daniel; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Krips, Melanie; Matsushita, Satoki; Meier, David S.; Nakai, Naomasa; Sheth, Kartik; Turner, Jean; Van de Ven, Glenn

    2013-06-20

    We present a kinematic analysis of the dense molecular gas in the central 200 pc of the nearby galaxy NGC 1097, based on Cycle 0 observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We use the HCN(4-3) line to trace the densest interstellar molecular gas (n{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}), and quantify its kinematics, and estimate an inflow rate for the molecular gas. We find a striking similarity between the ALMA kinematic data and the analytic spiral inflow model that we have previously constructed based on ionized gas velocity fields on larger scales. We are able to follow dense gas streaming down to 40 pc distance from the supermassive black hole in this Seyfert 1 galaxy. In order to fulfill marginal stability, we deduce that the dense gas is confined to a very thin disk, and we derive a dense gas inflow rate of 0.09 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} at 40 pc radius. Combined with previous values from the H{alpha} and CO gas, we calculate a combined molecular and ionized gas inflow rate of {approx}0.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} at 40 pc distance from the central supermassive black hole of NGC 1097.

  3. Mechanism of H2 histamine receptor dependent modulation of body temperature and neuronal activity in the medial preoptic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin V.; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Sethi, Jasmine

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is involved in the central control of arousal, circadian rhythms and metabolism. The preoptic area, a region that contains thermoregulatory neurons is the main locus of histamine modulation of body temperature. Here we report that in mice histamine activates H2 subtype receptors in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPON) and induces hyperthermia. We also found that a population of glutamatergic MPON neurons express H2 receptors and are excited by histamine or H2 specific agonists. The agonists decreased the input resistance of the neuron and increased the depolarizing “sag” observed during hyperpolarizing current injections. Furthermore, at −60 mV holding potential activation of H2 receptors induced an inward current that was blocked by ZD7288, a specific blocker of the hyperpolarization activated cationic current (Ih). Indeed, activation of H2 receptors resulted in increased Ih amplitude in response to hyperpolarizing voltage steps and a depolarizing shift in its voltage-dependent activation. The neurons excited by H2 specific agonism expressed the HCN1 and HCN2 channel subunits. Our data indicate that at the level of the MPON histamine influences thermoregulation by increasing the firing rate of glutamatergic neurons that express H2 receptors. PMID:22366077

  4. Mechanism of H₂ histamine receptor dependent modulation of body temperature and neuronal activity in the medial preoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Sethi, Jasmine

    2012-08-01

    Histamine is involved in the central control of arousal, circadian rhythms and metabolism. The preoptic area, a region that contains thermoregulatory neurons is the main locus of histamine modulation of body temperature. Here we report that in mice, histamine activates H(2) subtype receptors in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPON) and induces hyperthermia. We also found that a population of glutamatergic MPON neurons express H(2) receptors and are excited by histamine or H(2) specific agonists. The agonists decreased the input resistance of the neuron and increased the depolarizing "sag" observed during hyperpolarizing current injections. Furthermore, at -60 mV holding potential, activation of H(2) receptors induced an inward current that was blocked by ZD7288, a specific blocker of the hyperpolarization activated cationic current (I(h)). Indeed, activation of H(2) receptors resulted in increased I(h) amplitude in response to hyperpolarizing voltage steps and a depolarizing shift in its voltage-dependent activation. The neurons excited by H(2) specific agonism expressed the HCN1 and HCN2 channel subunits. Our data indicate that at the level of the MPON histamine influences thermoregulation by increasing the firing rate of glutamatergic neurons that express H(2) receptors. PMID:22366077

  5. GATING OF HCN CHANNELS BY CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDES: RESIDUE CONTACTS THAT UNDERLIE LIGAND BINDING, SELECTIVITY AND EFFICACY

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Siegelbaum, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cyclic nucleotides regulate the activity of various proteins by interacting with a conserved cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Although X-ray crystallographic studies have revealed the structures of several CNBDs, the residues responsible for generating the high efficacy with which ligand binding leads to protein activation remain unknown. Here we combine molecular dynamics simulations with mutagenesis to identify ligand contacts important for the regulation of the hyperpolarization-activated HCN2 channel by cyclic nucleotides. Surprisingly, out of seven residues that make strong contacts with ligand, only R632 in the C-helix of the CNBD is essential for high ligand efficacy, due to its selective stabilization of cNMP binding to the open state of the channel. Principle component analysis suggests that a local movement of the C-helix upon ligand binding propagates through the CNBD of one subunit to the C-linker of a neighboring subunit to apply force to the gate of the channel. PMID:17562313

  6. Beneficial effects of novel antagonists of GHRH in different models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jaszberenyi, Miklos; Rick, Ferenc G; Szalontay, Luca; Block, Norman L; Zarandi, Marta; Cai, Ren-Zhi; Schally, Andrew V

    2012-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent debilitating disorder of the central nervous system. Neuroendocrine mechanisms appear to play an important role in this insidiously developing disease. In the present study, the effects of a recently developed growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonist (MIA-690) were evaluated in vivo observing the behavior of genetically modified "Alzheimer's" 5XFAD mice in a Morris water maze (MWM). The effects of the antagonist were also evaluated in vitro using HCN2 human cortical cell cultures treated with amyloid-β1-42. In vivo, the indices of cognitive performance (latency, cumulative index etc.) were followed up for 6 months. In vitro, the formation of reactive oxygen species, markers of inflammatory and neurohormonal signaling were measured by fluorescent detection, PCR, and ELISA. Accumulation of amyloid-β1-42 rafts and τ filaments in necropsied brain samples was verified with the help of ELISA. In the MWM experiments, MIA-690 decreased escape latency, and, in the brain samples, it inhibited the concentration of amyloid-β1-42 and τ filaments. In cell cultures, the GHRH analog showed anti-oxidative and neuro-protective properties and inhibited the GHRH-growth hormone-insulin like growth factor axis. Our data strongly suggest the merit of further studies with GHRH analogs in models of Alzheimer's disease and in elementary clinical trials. PMID:23211425

  7. Functional Characterization of Cnidarian HCN Channels Points to an Early Evolution of Ih

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emma C.; Layden, Michael J.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Simpson, Eboni; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    HCN channels play a unique role in bilaterian physiology as the only hyperpolarization-gated cation channels. Their voltage-gating is regulated by cyclic nucleotides and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Activation of HCN channels provides the depolarizing current in response to hyperpolarization that is critical for intrinsic rhythmicity in neurons and the sinoatrial node. Additionally, HCN channels regulate dendritic excitability in a wide variety of neurons. Little is known about the early functional evolution of HCN channels, but the presence of HCN sequences in basal metazoan phyla and choanoflagellates, a protozoan sister group to the metazoans, indicate that the gene family predates metazoan emergence. We functionally characterized two HCN channel orthologs from Nematostella vectensis (Cnidaria, Anthozoa) to determine which properties of HCN channels were established prior to the emergence of bilaterians. We find Nematostella HCN channels share all the major functional features of bilaterian HCNs, including reversed voltage-dependence, activation by cAMP and PIP2, and block by extracellular Cs+. Thus bilaterian-like HCN channels were already present in the common parahoxozoan ancestor of bilaterians and cnidarians, at a time when the functional diversity of voltage-gated K+ channels was rapidly expanding. NvHCN1 and NvHCN2 are expressed broadly in planulae and in both the endoderm and ectoderm of juvenile polyps. PMID:26555239

  8. Encapsulation of Formaldehyde and Hydrogen Cyanide in an Open-Cage Fullerene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Shian; Kuo, Ting-Shen; Yeh, Wen-Yann

    2016-06-20

    Reaction of C63 NO2 (Ph)2 (Py) (1) with o-phenylenediamine and pyridine produces a mixture of C63 H4 NO2 (Ph)2 (Py)(N2 C6 H4 ) (2) and H2 O@2. Compound 2 is a new open-cage fullerene containing a 20-membered heterocyclic orifice, which has been fully characterized by NMR spectroscopy, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. The elliptical orifice of 2 spans 7.45 Å along the major axis and 5.62 Å along the minor axis, which is large enough to trap water and small organic molecules. Thus, heating a mixture of 2 and H2 O@2 with hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde in chlorobenzene affords HCN@2 and H2 CO@2, respectively. The (1) H NMR spectroscopy reveals substantial upfield shifts for the endohedral species (δ=-1.30 to -11.30 ppm), owing to the strong shielding effect of the fullerene cage. PMID:27123778

  9. Reduced Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Contributes to Enhanced Intrinsic Excitability in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons from PrP−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Stemkowski, Patrick L.; Gandini, Maria A.; Black, Stefanie A.; Zhang, Zizhen; Souza, Ivana A.; Chen, Lina; Zamponi, Gerald W.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of cellular prion protein (PrPC) has been linked to increased neuronal excitability and synaptic activity in the hippocampus. We have previously shown that synaptic activity in hippocampi of PrP-null mice is increased due to enhanced N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function. Here, we focused on the effect of PRNP gene knock-out (KO) on intrinsic neuronal excitability, and in particular, the underlying ionic mechanism in hippocampal neurons cultured from P0 mouse pups. We found that the absence of PrPC profoundly affected the firing properties of cultured hippocampal neurons in the presence of synaptic blockers. The membrane impedance was greater in PrP-null neurons, and this difference was abolished by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker ZD7288 (100 μM). HCN channel activity appeared to be functionally regulated by PrPC. The amplitude of voltage sag, a characteristic of activating HCN channel current (Ih), was decreased in null mice. Moreover, Ih peak current was reduced, along with a hyperpolarizing shift in activation gating and slower kinetics. However, neither HCN1 nor HCN2 formed a biochemical complex with PrPC. These results suggest that the absence of PrP downregulates the activity of HCN channels through activation of a cell signaling pathway rather than through direct interactions. This in turn contributes to an increase in membrane impedance to potentiate neuronal excitability. PMID:27047338

  10. Functional Characterization of Cnidarian HCN Channels Points to an Early Evolution of Ih.

    PubMed

    Baker, Emma C; Layden, Michael J; van Rossum, Damian B; Kamel, Bishoy; Medina, Monica; Simpson, Eboni; Jegla, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    HCN channels play a unique role in bilaterian physiology as the only hyperpolarization-gated cation channels. Their voltage-gating is regulated by cyclic nucleotides and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Activation of HCN channels provides the depolarizing current in response to hyperpolarization that is critical for intrinsic rhythmicity in neurons and the sinoatrial node. Additionally, HCN channels regulate dendritic excitability in a wide variety of neurons. Little is known about the early functional evolution of HCN channels, but the presence of HCN sequences in basal metazoan phyla and choanoflagellates, a protozoan sister group to the metazoans, indicate that the gene family predates metazoan emergence. We functionally characterized two HCN channel orthologs from Nematostella vectensis (Cnidaria, Anthozoa) to determine which properties of HCN channels were established prior to the emergence of bilaterians. We find Nematostella HCN channels share all the major functional features of bilaterian HCNs, including reversed voltage-dependence, activation by cAMP and PIP2, and block by extracellular Cs+. Thus bilaterian-like HCN channels were already present in the common parahoxozoan ancestor of bilaterians and cnidarians, at a time when the functional diversity of voltage-gated K+ channels was rapidly expanding. NvHCN1 and NvHCN2 are expressed broadly in planulae and in both the endoderm and ectoderm of juvenile polyps. PMID:26555239

  11. Bringing the light to high throughput screening: use of optogenetic tools for the development of recombinant cellular assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agus, Viviana; Di Silvio, Alberto; Rolland, Jean Francois; Mondini, Anna; Tremolada, Sara; Montag, Katharina; Scarabottolo, Lia; Redaelli, Loredana; Lohmer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The use of light-activated proteins represents a powerful tool to control biological processes with high spatial and temporal precision. These so called "optogenetic" technologies have been successfully validated in many recombinant systems, and have been widely applied to the study of cellular mechanisms in intact tissues or behaving animals; to do that, complex, high-intensity, often home-made instrumentations were developed to achieve the optimal power and precision of light stimulation. In our study we sought to determine if this optical modulation can be obtained also in a miniaturized format, such as a 384-well plate, using the instrumentations normally dedicated to fluorescence analysis in High Throughput Screening (HTS) activities, such as for example the FLIPR (Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader) instrument. We successfully generated optogenetic assays for the study of different ion channel targets: the CaV1.3 calcium channel was modulated by the light-activated Channelrhodopsin-2, the HCN2 cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channel was modulated by the light activated bPAC adenylyl cyclase, and finally the genetically encoded voltage indicator ArcLight was efficiently used to measure potassium, sodium or chloride channel activity. Our results showed that stable, robust and miniaturized cellular assays can be developed using different optogenetic tools, and efficiently modulated by the FLIPR instrument LEDs in a 384-well format. The spatial and temporal resolution delivered by this technology might enormously advantage the early stages of drug discovery, leading to the identification of more physiological and effective drug molecules.

  12. PLTP is present in the nucleus, and its nuclear export is CRM1-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Vuletic, Simona; Dong, Weijiang; Wolfbauer, Gertrud; Day, Joseph R.; Albers, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), one of the key lipid transfer proteins in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, is nearly ubiquitously expressed in cells and tissues. Functions of secreted PLTP have been extensively studied. However, very little is known about potential intracellular PLTP functions. In the current study, we provide evidence for PLTP localization in the nucleus of cells that constitutively express PLTP (human neuroblastoma cells, SK-N-SH; and human cortical neurons, HCN2) and in cells transfected with human PLTP (Chinese hamster ovary and baby hamster kidney cells). Furthermore, we have shown that incubation of these cells with leptomycin B (LMB), a specific inhibitor of nuclear export mediated by chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1), leads to intranuclear accumulation of PLTP, suggesting that PLTP nuclear export is CRM1-dependent. We also provide evidence for entry of secreted PLTP into the cell and its translocation to the nucleus, and show that intranuclear PLTP is active in phospholipid transfer. These findings suggest that PLTP is involved in novel intracellular functions. PMID:19321130

  13. Patch-clamp fluorometry-based channel counting to determine HCN channel conductance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Xie, Changan; Grant, Khade; Su, Zhuocheng; Gao, Weihua; Liu, Qinglian; Zhou, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Counting ion channels on cell membranes is of fundamental importance for the study of channel biophysics. Channel counting has thus far been tackled by classical approaches, such as radioactive labeling of ion channels with blockers, gating current measurements, and nonstationary noise analysis. Here, we develop a counting method based on patch-clamp fluorometry (PCF), which enables simultaneous electrical and optical recordings, and apply it to EGFP-tagged, hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-regulated (HCN) channels. We use a well-characterized and homologous cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel to establish the relationship between macroscopic fluorescence intensity and the total number of channels. Subsequently, based on our estimate of the total number of HCN channels, we determine the single-channel conductance of HCN1 and HCN2 to be 0.46 and 1.71 pS, respectively. Such a small conductance would present a technical challenge for traditional electrophysiology. This PCF-based technique provides an alternative method for counting particles on cell membranes, which could be applied to biophysical studies of other membrane proteins. PMID:27353446

  14. Discharge source coupled to a deceleration unit for anion beam generation: Application to H2- photodetachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnev, V.; Ureña, A. González

    2013-12-01

    A cathode discharge source coupled to a deceleration unit for anion beam generation is described. The discharge source, made of stainless steel or duralumin electrodes and Macor insulators, is attached to the exit nozzle valve plate at one end, and to an Einzel lens to the other end. Subsequently, a cylindrical retardation unit is attached to the Einzel lens to decelerate the ions in order to optimize the laser beam interaction time required for spectroscopic investigations. The compact device is able to produce beam intensities of the order of 2 × 1012 anions/cm2 s and 20 μrad of angular divergence with kinetic energies ranging from 30 to 120 eV. Using distinct gas mixtures for the supersonic expansion together with a linear time-of-flight spectrometer, anions of great relevance in molecular astrophysics like, for example, H2-, C3H-, C2-, C2H-, HCN2-, CO2-, CO2H-, C4-, C4H-, C5H4-, C5H6-, C7N-, and C10N- were produced. Finally, in order to demonstrate the capability of the experimental technique the photodetachment cross-section of the metastable H2-, predominantly in the (v = 0, J = 26) state, was measured following laser excitation at λexc = 565 nm obtaining a value of σph = 0.04 Å. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that this anion cross-section has been measured.

  15. Electron Irradiation of Kuiper Belt Surface Ices: Ternary N2-CH4-CO Mixtures as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I.

    2012-10-01

    The space weathering of icy Kuiper Belt Objects was investigated in this case study by exposing methane (CH4) and carbon monoxide (CO) doped nitrogen (N2) ices at 10 K to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. Online and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the radiation-induced chemical processing of these ices. Along with isocyanic acid (HNCO), the products could be mainly derived from those formed in irradiated binary ices of the N2-CH4 and CO-CH4 systems: nitrogen-bearing products were found in the form of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), diazomethane (CH2N2), and its radical fragment (HCN2); oxygen-bearing products were of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), formyl radical (HCO), and formaldehyde (H2CO). As in the pure ices, the methyl radical (CH3) and ethane (C2H6) were also detected, as were carbon dioxide (CO2) and the azide radical (N3). Based on the temporal evolution of the newly formed products, kinetic reaction schemes were then developed to fit the temporal profiles of the newly formed species, resulting in numerical sets of rate constants. The current study highlights important constraints on the preferential formation of isocyanic acid (HNCO) over hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), thus guiding the astrobiological and chemical evolution of those distant bodies.

  16. Bima Array Detections of HCN in Comets Linear (C/2002 T7) and Neat (C/2001 Q4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedel, D. N.; Remijan, A.; Snyder, L. E.; AHearn, M. F.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; dePater, Imke; Dickel, H. R.; Forster, J. R.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    We present interferometric detections of HCN in comets LINEAR (C/2002 T7) and NEAT (C/2001 Q4) with the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) Array in its D-configuration cross-correlation mode. We detected the HCN J = 1 - 0 emission line in both comets. With a 25".4 x 20".3 synthesized beam around Comet LINEAR, we found a total beam averaged HCN column density (assuming a rotation temperature of 146 K) of < N(sub T) > = 2.1(11)x 10(sup 13) cm(exp -2), and a HCN production rate of Q(HCN)=2.8(15)x 10(sup 27) s(exp -1). With a 21".3 x 17".5 synthesized beam around Comet NEAT, we found a total beam averaged HCN column density (assuming a rotation temperature of 107 K) of < N(sub T) > = 5.7(30) x 10(sup l2) cm(exp -2), and a HCN production rate of Q(HCN)=8.3(44) x 10(sup 26) s(exp -l) giving a production rate of HCN relative to H2O of approximately 0.09(5)%. The production rates relative to H2O and spatial extent of HCN are similar to previous comet observations.

  17. The effects of acupuncture on bladder interstitial cells of cajal excitability in rats with overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qi-Fan; Hou, Yuen-Hao; Hou, Wen-Guang; Lin, Zhi-Xian; Tang, Kang-Min; Chen, Yue-Lai

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture treatment has an effect on patients with an overactive bladder, but the mechanism of its action remains to be clarified. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of acupuncture on bladder overactivity, and the excitability of interstitial cells of Cajal of the bladder in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction. Electroacupuncture (continuous wave, 30 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to stimulate the Ciliao point (BL32) and the Huiyang point (BL35) of rats for 20 min, 3 days. Results showed that acupuncture suppressed detrusor unstable contraction frequency and decreased detrusor maximum pressure in the bladder filling period. Compared with the normal control rats, HCN2 mRNA and protein expression within the bladder were upregulated and were reversed by electroacupuncture in overactive bladder rats as determined by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, in-vitro cell-cultured OAB rats bladder interstitial cells of Cajal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration were higher than normal control rats, which were lowered after acupuncture treatment. These findings suggest that acupuncture stimulation can suppress bladder overactivity, and regulate the excitability of bladder interstitial cells of Cajal in treatment of overactive bladder myogenic mechanism. PMID:24194780

  18. Spatiotemporal stability of neonatal rat cardiomyocyte monolayers spontaneous activity is dependent on the culture substrate.

    PubMed

    Boudreau-Béland, Jonathan; Duverger, James Elber; Petitjean, Estelle; Maguy, Ange; Ledoux, Jonathan; Comtois, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In native conditions, cardiac cells must continuously comply with diverse stimuli necessitating a perpetual adaptation. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is commonly used in cell culture to study cellular response to changes in the mechanical environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of using PDMS substrates on the properties of spontaneous activity of cardiomyocyte monolayer cultures. We compared PDMS to the gold standard normally used in culture: a glass substrate. Although mean frequency of spontaneous activity remained unaltered, incidence of reentrant activity was significantly higher in samples cultured on glass compared to PDMS substrates. Higher spatial and temporal instability of the spontaneous rate activation was found when cardiomyocytes were cultured on PDMS, and correlated with decreased connexin-43 and increased CaV3.1 and HCN2 mRNA levels. Compared to cultures on glass, cultures on PDMS were associated with the strongest response to isoproterenol and acetylcholine. These results reveal the importance of carefully selecting the culture substrate for studies involving mechanical stimulation, especially for tissue engineering or pharmacological high-throughput screening of cardiac tissue analog. PMID:26035822

  19. Spatiotemporal Stability of Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocyte Monolayers Spontaneous Activity Is Dependent on the Culture Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau-Béland, Jonathan; Duverger, James Elber; Petitjean, Estelle; Maguy, Ange; Ledoux, Jonathan; Comtois, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In native conditions, cardiac cells must continuously comply with diverse stimuli necessitating a perpetual adaptation. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is commonly used in cell culture to study cellular response to changes in the mechanical environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of using PDMS substrates on the properties of spontaneous activity of cardiomyocyte monolayer cultures. We compared PDMS to the gold standard normally used in culture: a glass substrate. Although mean frequency of spontaneous activity remained unaltered, incidence of reentrant activity was significantly higher in samples cultured on glass compared to PDMS substrates. Higher spatial and temporal instability of the spontaneous rate activation was found when cardiomyocytes were cultured on PDMS, and correlated with decreased connexin-43 and increased CaV3.1 and HCN2 mRNA levels. Compared to cultures on glass, cultures on PDMS were associated with the strongest response to isoproterenol and acetylcholine. These results reveal the importance of carefully selecting the culture substrate for studies involving mechanical stimulation, especially for tissue engineering or pharmacological high-throughput screening of cardiac tissue analog. PMID:26035822

  20. Peculiar Near-nucleus Outgassing of Comet 17P/Holmes during its 2007 Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chunhua; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Jewitt, David; Gurwell, Mark A.; Wilner, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We present high angular resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the outbursting Jupiter family comet 17P/Holmes on 2007 October 26-29, achieving a spatial resolution of 2.''5, or ~3000 km at the comet distance. The observations resulted in detections of the rotational lines CO 3-2, HCN 4-3, H13CN 4-3, CS 7-6, H2CO 31, 2-21, 1, H2S 22, 0-21, 1, and multiple CH3OH lines, along with the associated dust continuum at 221 and 349 GHz. The continuum has a spectral index of 2.7 ± 0.3, slightly steeper than blackbody emission from large dust particles. From the imaging data, we identify two components in the molecular emission. One component is characterized by a relatively broad line width (~1 km s-1 FWHM) exhibiting a symmetric outgassing pattern with respect to the nucleus position. The second component has a narrower line width (<0.5 km s-1 FWHM) with the line center redshifted by 0.1-0.2 km s-1 (cometocentric frame), and shows a velocity shift across the nucleus position with the position angle gradually changing from 66° to 30° within the four days of observations. We determine distinctly different CO/HCN ratios for each of the components. For the broad-line component we find CO/HCN < 7, while in the narrow-line component, CO/HCN = 40 ± 5. We hypothesize that the narrow-line component originates from the ice grain halo found in near-nucleus photometry, believed to be created by sublimating recently released ice grains around the nucleus during the outburst. In this interpretation, the high CO/HCN ratio of this component reflects the more pristine volatile composition of nucleus material released in the outburst.

  1. Autonomic Nervous Dysfunction in Hamsters Infected with West Nile Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Siddharthan, Venkatraman; Hall, Jeffery O.; Morrey, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical studies and case reports clearly document that West Nile virus (WNV) can cause respiratory and gastrointestinal (GI) complications. Other functions controlled by the autonomic nervous system may also be directly affected by WNV, such as bladder and cardiac functions. To investigate how WNV can cause autonomic dysfunctions, we focused on the cardiac and GI dysfunctions of rodents infected with WNV. Infected hamsters had distension of the stomach and intestines at day 9 after viral challenge. GI motility was detected by a dye retention assay; phenol red dye was retained more in the stomachs of infected hamsters as compared to sham-infected hamsters. The amplitudes of electromygraphs (EMGs) of intestinal muscles were significantly reduced. Myenteric neurons that innervate the intestines, in addition to neurons in the brain stem, were identified to be infected with WNV. These data suggest that infected neurons controlling autonomic function were the cause of GI dysfunction in WNV-infected hamsters. Using radiotelemetry to record electrocardiograms and to measure heart rate variability (HRV), a well-accepted readout for autonomic function, we determined that HRV and autonomic function were suppressed in WNV-infected hamsters. Cardiac histopathology was observed at day 9 only in the right atrium, which was coincident with WNV staining. A subset of WNV infected cells was identified among cells with hyperplarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated potassium channel 4 (HCN4) as a marker for cells in the sinoatrial (SA) and atrioventricular (AV) nodes. The unique contribution of this study is the discovery that WNV infection of hamsters can lead to autonomic dysfunction as determined by reduced HRV and reduced EMG amplitudes of the GI tract. These data may model autonomic dysfunction of the human West Nile neurological disease. PMID:21573009

  2. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  3. Ab initio chemical kinetics for H + NCN: prediction of NCN heat of formation and reaction product branching via doublet and quartet surfaces.

    PubMed

    Teng, Wen-Shuang; Moskaleva, Lyudmila V; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lin, M C

    2013-07-18

    The reaction of NCN with H atoms has been investigated by ab initio MO and RRKM theory calculations. The mechanisms for formation of major products on the doublet and quartet potential energy surfaces have been predicted at the CCSD(T) level of theory with the complete basis set limit. In addition, the heat of formation for NCN predicted at this rigorous level and those from five isogyric reactions are in close agreement with the best value based on the isodesmic process, (3)CCO + N2 = (3)NCN + CO, 109.4 kcal/mol, which lies within the two existing experimental values. The rate constants for the three possible reaction channels, H + NCN → CH + N2 (k(P1)), HCN + (4)N (k(QP1)), and HNC + (4)N (k(QP2)), have been calculated in the temperature range 298-3000 K. The results show that k(P1) is significantly higher than k(QP1) and k(QP2) and that the total rate constant agrees well with available experimental values in the whole temperature range studied. The kinetics of the reverse CH + N2 reaction has also been revisited at the CCSD(T)/CBS level; the predicted total rate constants at 760 Torr Ar pressure can be represented by kr = 4.01 × 10(-15) T(0.90) exp(-17.42 kcal mol(-1)/RT) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at T = 800-4000 K. The result agrees closely with the most recent experimental data and the best theoretical result of Harding et al. (J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 522) as well as that of Moskaleva and Lin (Proc. Combust. Inst. 2000, 28, 2393) evaluated with a steady-state approximation after a coding error correction made in this study. PMID:23755876

  4. Three-Dimensional Adult Cardiac Extracellular Matrix Promotes Maturation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Fong, Ashley H; Romero-López, Mónica; Heylman, Christopher M; Keating, Mark; Tran, David; Sobrino, Agua; Tran, Anh Q; Pham, Hiep H; Fimbres, Cristhian; Gershon, Paul D; Botvinick, Elliot L; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W

    2016-08-01

    Pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) have great potential in the development of new therapies for cardiovascular disease. In particular, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may prove especially advantageous due to their pluripotency, their self-renewal potential, and their ability to create patient-specific cell lines. Unfortunately, pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs are immature, with characteristics more closely resembling fetal CMs than adult CMs, and this immaturity has limited their use in drug screening and cell-based therapies. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences cellular behavior and maturation, as does the geometry of the environment-two-dimensional (2D) versus three-dimensional (3D). We therefore tested the hypothesis that native cardiac ECM and 3D cultures might enhance the maturation of iPSC-derived CMs in vitro. We demonstrate that maturation of iPSC-derived CMs was enhanced when cells were seeded into a 3D cardiac ECM scaffold, compared with 2D culture. 3D cardiac ECM promoted increased expression of calcium-handling genes, Junctin, CaV1.2, NCX1, HCN4, SERCA2a, Triadin, and CASQ2. Consistent with this, we find that iPSC-derived CMs in 3D adult cardiac ECM show increased calcium signaling (amplitude) and kinetics (maximum upstroke and downstroke) compared with cells in 2D. Cells in 3D culture were also more responsive to caffeine, likely reflecting an increased availability of calcium in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Taken together, these studies provide novel strategies for maturing iPSC-derived CMs that may have applications in drug screening and transplantation therapies to treat heart disease. PMID:27392582

  5. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Michael V; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A; Tran, Christine K; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies <1% for family studies. The results identified LMNA c.357-2A>G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency. PMID:27182706

  6. ALMA Multi-line Observations of the IR-bright Merger VV 114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Toshiki; Iono, Daisuke; Yun, Min S.; Ueda, Junko; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Sugai, Hajime; Espada, Daniel; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Motohara, Kentaro; Hagiwara, Yosiaki; Tateuchi, Ken; Lee, Minju; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2015-04-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array cycle 0 observations of the molecular gas and dust in the IR-bright mid-stage merger VV 114 obtained at 160-800 pc resolution. The main aim of this study is to investigate the distribution and kinematics of the cold/warm gas and to quantify the spatial variation of the excitation conditions across the two merging disks. The data contain 10 molecular lines, including the first detection of extranuclear CH3OH emission in interacting galaxies, as well as continuum emission. We map the 12CO(3-2)/12CO(1-0) and the 12CO(1-0)/13CO(1-0) line ratio at 800 pc resolution (in the units of K km s-1), and find that these ratios vary from 0.2-0.8 and 5-50, respectively. Conversely, the 200 pc resolution HCN(4-3)/HCO+(4-3) line ratio shows low values (<0.5) at a filament across the disks except for the unresolved eastern nucleus which is three times higher (1.34 ± 0.09). We conclude from our observations and a radiative transfer analysis that the molecular gas in the VV 114 system consists of five components with different physical and chemical conditions, i.e., (1) dust-enshrouded nuclear starbursts and/or active galactic nuclei, (2) widespread star-forming dense gas, (3) merger-induced shocked gas, (4) quiescent tenuous gas arms without star formation, and (5) H2 gas mass of (3.8 ± 0.7) × 107 {{M}⊙ } (assuming a conversion factor of αCO = 0.8 {{M}⊙ } {{(K km {{s}-1} p{{c}2})}-1}) at the tip of the southern tidal arm, as a potential site of tidal dwarf galaxy formation.

  7. A common Shox2-Nkx2-5 antagonistic mechanism primes the pacemaker cell fate in the pulmonary vein myocardium and sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenduo; Wang, Jun; Song, Yingnan; Yu, Diankun; Sun, Cheng; Liu, Chao; Chen, Fading; Zhang, Yanding; Wang, Fen; Harvey, Richard P; Schrader, Laura; Martin, James F; Chen, YiPing

    2015-07-15

    In humans, atrial fibrillation is often triggered by ectopic pacemaking activity in the myocardium sleeves of the pulmonary vein (PV) and systemic venous return. The genetic programs that abnormally reinforce pacemaker properties at these sites and how this relates to normal sinoatrial node (SAN) development remain uncharacterized. It was noted previously that Nkx2-5, which is expressed in the PV myocardium and reinforces a chamber-like myocardial identity in the PV, is lacking in the SAN. Here we present evidence that in mice Shox2 antagonizes the transcriptional output of Nkx2-5 in the PV myocardium and in a functional Nkx2-5(+) domain within the SAN to determine cell fate. Shox2 deletion in the Nkx2-5(+) domain of the SAN caused sick sinus syndrome, associated with the loss of the pacemaker program. Explanted Shox2(+) cells from the embryonic PV myocardium exhibited pacemaker characteristics including node-like electrophysiological properties and the capability to pace surrounding Shox2(-) cells. Shox2 deletion led to Hcn4 ablation in the developing PV myocardium. Nkx2-5 hypomorphism rescued the requirement for Shox2 for the expression of genes essential for SAN development in Shox2 mutants. Similarly, the pacemaker-like phenotype induced in the PV myocardium in Nkx2-5 hypomorphs reverted back to a working myocardial phenotype when Shox2 was simultaneously deleted. A similar mechanism is also adopted in differentiated embryoid bodies. We found that Shox2 interacts with Nkx2-5 directly, and discovered a substantial genome-wide co-occupancy of Shox2, Nkx2-5 and Tbx5, further supporting a pivotal role for Shox2 in the core myogenic program orchestrating venous pole and pacemaker development. PMID:26138475

  8. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qiong; Hu, Hao; Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  9. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Michael V.; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A.; Tran, Christine K.; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A.; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies <1% for family studies. The results identified LMNA c.357-2A>G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency. PMID:27182706

  10. The Early ALMA View of the FU Ori Outburst System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, A. S.; Corder, S. A.; Dent, W. R. D.; Andrews, S. M.; Eisner, J. A.; Cieza, L. A.

    2015-10-01

    We have obtained ALMA Band 7 observations of the FU Ori outburst system at a 0.″6 × 0.″5 resolution to measure the link between the inner disk instability and the outer disk through submillimeter continuum and molecular line observations. Our observations detect continuum emission that can be well-modeled by two unresolved sources located at the position of each binary component. The interferometric observations recover the entire flux reported in previous single-dish studies, ruling out the presence of a large envelope. Assuming that the dust is optically thin, we derive disk dust masses of 2 × 10‑4 M⊙ and 8× {10}-5 M⊙ for the north and south components, respectively. We place limits on the disks’ radii of r < 45 AU. We report the detection of molecular emission from 12CO(3-2), HCO+(4-3), and from HCN(4-3). The 12CO appears widespread across the two binary components and is slightly more extended than the continuum emission. The denser gas tracer HCO+ peaks close to the position of the southern binary component, while HCN appears to be peaked at the position of the northern component. This suggests that the southern binary component is embedded in denser molecular material, consistent with previous studies that indicate a heavily reddened object. At this angular resolution, any interaction between the two unresolved disk components cannot be disentangled. Higher-resolution images are vital for understanding the process of star formation via rapid accretion FU Ori-type episodes.

  11. Functional roles of Cav1.3, Cav3.1 and HCN channels in automaticity of mouse atrioventricular cells

    PubMed Central

    Marger, Laurine; Mesirca, Pietro; Alig, Jacqueline; Torrente, Angelo; Dubel, Stefan; Engeland, Birgit; Kanani, Sandra; Fontanaud, Pierre; Striessnig, Jörg; Shin, Hee-Sup; Isbrandt, Dirk; Ehmke, Heimo; Nargeot, Joël

    2011-01-01

    The atrioventricular node controls cardiac impulse conduction and generates pacemaker activity in case of failure of the sino-atrial node. Understanding the mechanisms of atrioventricular automaticity is important for managing human pathologies of heart rate and conduction. However, the physiology of atrioventricular automaticity is still poorly understood. We have investigated the role of three key ion channel-mediated pacemaker mechanisms namely, Cav1.3, Cav3.1 and HCN channels in automaticity of atrioventricular node cells (AVNCs). We studied atrioventricular conduction and pacemaking of AVNCs in wild-type mice and mice lacking Cav3.1 (Cav3.1−/−), Cav1.3 (Cav1.3−/−), channels or both (Cav1.3−/−/Cav3.1−/−). The role of HCN channels in the modulation of atrioventricular cells pacemaking was studied by conditional expression of dominant-negative HCN4 channels lacking cAMP sensitivity. Inactivation of Cav3.1 channels impaired AVNCs pacemaker activity by favoring sporadic block of automaticity leading to cellular arrhythmia. Furthermore, Cav3.1 channels were critical for AVNCs to reach high pacemaking rates under isoproterenol. Unexpectedly, Cav1.3 channels were required for spontaneous automaticity, because Cav1.3−/− and Cav1.3−/−/Cav3.1−/− AVNCs were completely silent under physiological conditions. Abolition of the cAMP sensitivity of HCN channels reduced automaticity under basal conditions, but maximal rates of AVNCs could be restored to that of control mice by isoproterenol. In conclusion, while Cav1.3 channels are required for automaticity, Cav3.1 channels are important for maximal pacing rates of mouse AVNCs. HCN channels are important for basal AVNCs automaticity but do not appear to be determinant for β-adrenergic regulation. PMID:21406960

  12. ION AND NEUTRAL MOLECULES IN THE W43-MM1(G30.79 FIR 10) INFALLING CLUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes, Paulo C.

    2011-12-20

    The high-mass star-forming clump W43-MM1 has been mapped in N{sub 2}H{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), C{sup 18}O(3 {yields} 2), SiO(8 {yields} 7), and in a single pointing in DCO{sup +}(5 {yields} 4) toward the center of the clump. Column densities from these observations as well as previous HCO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), HCN(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CN(4 {yields} 3), and CS(7 {yields} 6) data have been derived using the RADEX code; results later have been used to derive chemical abundances at selected points in the MM1 main axis. We compare with chemical models to estimate an evolutionary age of 10{sup 4} years for a remarkable warm hot core inside MM1. We also proposed that the dust temperature derived from the spectral energy distribution fitting in MM1 is not representative of the gas temperature deep inside the clump because dust emission may have become optically thick. By deriving a deuterium fractionation of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, we estimate an electron fraction of X(e) = 6.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}. Thus, the coupling between the neutral gas and the magnetic field is estimated by computing the ambipolar diffusion Reynolds number R{sub m} = 18 and the wave coupling number W = 110. Considering that the infalling speed is slightly supersonic (M = 1.1) but sub-Alfvenic, we conclude that the MM1 clump has recently been or is in the process of decoupling the field from the neutral fluid. Thus, the MM1 clump appears to be in an intermediate stage of evolution in which a hot core has developed while the envelope is still infalling and not fully decoupled from the ambient magnetic field.

  13. Characterization of the role of HCN channels in β3-adrenoceptor mediated rat bladder relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Mahendra; Yoshimura, Naoki; Smith, Phillip P.; Chancellor, Michael; Tyagi, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Objective The second messenger cAMP is involved in both β3 adrenoceptor (β3-AR) mediated detrusor relaxation and the kinetics of Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Here we characterized the effect HCN channel activation and possible interaction with β3-AR in bladder. Materials and Methods Bladder tissues from Sprague-Dawley rats and Human organ donors were obtained for studying species-specific expression of HCN channels by real-time qPCR and Western Blot. Effect of β3-agonist on rat bladder strips (0.5 × 0.5 × 7 mm in size) was studied during activation and blockade of HCN channels by Lamotrigine and ZD7288, respectively. Results Expression of all four genes encoding for HCN channels (HCN1-4) was detected separately in bladder mucosa and detrusor from human and rat bladders. Species based differences were evident from relatively higher expression of HCN4 isoform in human bladder and that of HCN1 in rat bladder. Western blot confirmed the findings at mRNA level. Cumulative application β3-AR agonist CL316,243 produced a concentration dependent decrease in resting tension of rat bladder strips expressed as integral of mechanical activity. Pre-incubation of HCN channel blocker ZD 7288 opposed the relaxant effect of CL316,243, whereas co-administration of lamotrigine with CL316,243 at equal molar concentrations caused an additive decrease in resting tension. Cumulative addition of ZD7288 and lamotrigine in absence of CL316,243 showed opposing effects on detrusor contractility. Conclusions Species-specific differences were noted in expression of HCN channels in bladder. Opposing effects ZD7288 and Lamotrigine in the action of β3-AR agonist demonstrate possible functional interaction of HCN channels and β3-AR in detrusor contractility. PMID:26709376

  14. Downregulation of the renal outer medullary K(+) channel ROMK by the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Siraskar, Balasaheb; Huang, Dan Yang; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Siraskar, Gulab; Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Kucherenko, Yulia; Almilaji, Ahmad; Devanathan, Vasudharani; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Föller, Michael; Munoz, Carlos; Lang, Florian

    2013-02-01

    The 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (AMPK) is stimulated by energy depletion, increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) activity, oxidative stress, and nitric oxide. AMPK participates in the regulation of the epithelial Na(+) channel ENaC and the voltage-gated K(+) channel KCNE1/KCNQ1. It is partially effective by decreasing PIP(2) formation through the PI3K pathway. The present study explored whether AMPK regulates the renal outer medullary K(+) channel ROMK. To this end, cRNA encoding ROMK was injected into Xenopus oocytes with and without additional injection of constitutively active AMPK(γR70Q) (AMPK(α1)-HA+AMPK(β1)-Flag+AMPKγ1(R70Q)), or of inactive AMPK(αK45R) (AMPK(α1K45R)+AMPK(β1)-Flag+AMPK(γ1)-HA), and the current determined utilizing two-electrode voltage-clamp and single channel patch clamp. ROMK protein abundance was measured utilizing chemiluminescence in Xenopus oocytes and western blot in whole kidney tissue. Moreover, renal Na(+) and K(+) excretion were determined in AMPK(α1)-deficient mice (ampk ( -/- )) and wild-type mice (ampk ( +/+ )) prior to and following an acute K(+) load (111 mM KCl, 30 mM NaHCO(3), 4.7 mM NaCl, and 2.25 g/dl BSA) at a rate of 500 μl/h. As a result, coexpression of AMPK(γR70Q) but not of AMPK(αK45R) significantly decreased the current in ROMK1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Injection of phosphatidylinositol PI((4,5))P(2) significantly increased the current in ROMK1-expressing Xenopus oocytes, an effect reversed in the presence of AMPK(γR70Q). Under control conditions, no significant differences between ampk ( -/- ) and ampk ( +/+ ) mice were observed in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinary flow rate, serum aldosterone, plasma Na(+), and K(+) concentrations as well as absolute and fractional Na(+) and K(+) excretion. Following an acute K(+) load, GFR, urinary flow rate, serum aldosterone, plasma Na(+), and K(+) concentration were again similar in both genotypes, but renal absolute

  15. Environmental manipulations early in development alter seizure activity, Ih and HCN1 protein expression later in life.

    PubMed

    Schridde, Ulrich; Strauss, Ulf; Bräuer, Anja U; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2006-06-01

    Although absence epilepsy has a genetic origin, evidence from an animal model (Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk; WAG/Rij) suggests that seizures are sensitive to environmental manipulations. Here, we show that manipulations of the early rearing environment (neonatal handling, maternal deprivation) of WAG/Rij rats leads to a pronounced decrease in seizure activity later in life. Recent observations link seizure activity in WAG/Rij rats to the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) in the somatosensory cortex, the site of seizure generation. Therefore, we investigated whether the alterations in seizure activity between rats reared differently might be correlated with changes in Ih and its channel subunits hyperpolarization-activated cation channel HCN1, 2 and 4. Whole-cell recordings from layer 5 pyramidal neurons, in situ hybridization and Western blot of the somatosensory cortex revealed an increase in Ih and HCN1 in neonatal handled and maternal deprived, compared to control rats. The increase was specific to HCN1 protein expression and did not involve HCN2/4 protein expression, or mRNA expression of any of the subunits (HCN1, 2, 4). Our findings provide the first evidence that relatively mild changes in the neonatal environment have a long-term impact of absence seizures, Ih and HCN1, and suggest that an increase of Ih and HCN1 is associated with absence seizure reduction. Our findings shed new light on the role of Ih and HCN in brain functioning and development and demonstrate that genetically determined absence seizures are quite sensitive for early interventions. PMID:16820024

  16. Fetal heart extract facilitates the differentiation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells into heart muscle precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Pham, Truc Le-Buu; Nguyen, Tam Thanh; Van Bui, Anh; Nguyen, My Thu; Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-08-01

    Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) are a promising stem cell source with the potential to modulate the immune system as well as the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. In previous publications, UCB-MSCs have been successfully differentiated into cardiomyocytes. This study aimed to improve the efficacy of differentiation of UCB-MSCs into cardiomyocytes by combining 5-azacytidine (Aza) with mouse fetal heart extract (HE) in the induction medium. UCB-MSCs were isolated from umbilical cord blood according to a published protocol. Murine fetal hearts were used to produce fetal HE using a rapid freeze-thaw procedure. MSCs at the 3rd to 5th passage were differentiated into cardiomyocytes in two kinds of induction medium: complete culture medium plus Aza (Aza group) and complete culture medium plus Aza and fetal HE (Aza + HE group). The results showed that the cells in both kinds of induction medium exhibited the phenotype of cardiomyocytes. At the transcriptional level, the cells expressed a number of cardiac muscle-specific genes such as Nkx2.5, Gata 4, Mef2c, HCN2, hBNP, α-Ca, cTnT, Desmin, and β-MHC on day 27 in the Aza group and on day 18 in the Aza + HE group. At the translational level, sarcomic α-actin was expressed on day 27 in the Aza group and day 18 in the Aza + HE group. Although they expressed specific genes and proteins of cardiac muscle cells, the induced cells in both groups did not contract and beat spontaneously. These properties are similar to properties of heart muscle precursor cells in vivo. These results demonstrated that the fetal HE facilitates the differentiation process of human UCB-MSCs into heart muscle precursor cells. PMID:25377264

  17. Microtubule disrupting chemotherapeutics result in enhanced proteasome-mediated degradation and disappearance of tubulin in neural cells

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Lyn M.; Sackett, Dan L.; Poruchynsky, Marianne S.; Fojo, Tito

    2010-01-01

    We sought to examine the effects of microtubule targeting agents (MTAs) on neural cells to better understand the problem of neurotoxicity, their principal side effect, and to possibly develop a model of clinical toxicity. Studies showed that microtubule-depolymerizing agents (MDAs) not only disassembled microtubules in neural HCN2 cells but also led to rapid disappearance of tubulin and that this was specific for MDAs. Tubulin levels fell to 20% as early as 8 hours after adding vincristine and to 1–30% (mean, 9.8 ± 7.6%; median of 7%) after 100 nM VCR for 24 hours. This disappearance was reversible. An increase in both glu-terminated and acetylated tubulin, markers of stable tubulin, preceded re-accumulation of soluble tubulin, suggesting a priority for stabilizing tubulin first as microtubules, prior to replenishing the soluble pool. Similar results were demonstrated with other MDAs. Furthermore, microtubule reassembly did not arise from a central focus but instead appeared to involve dispersed nucleation, as evidenced by the appearance of small stable microtubule stubs throughout the cytoplasm. In contrast, experiments with four non-neural “normal” cell lines and four cancer cell lines resulted in microtubule de-stabilization but only modest tubulin degradation. Evidence for proteasome-mediated degradation was obtained by demonstrating that adding a proteasome inhibitor prior to vincristine prevented tubulin disappearance. In summary, MDAs lead to rapid disappearance of tubulin in neural but not other normal cells or cancer cells. These results underscore the fine control that occurs in neural cells and may further our understanding of neurotoxicity following MDAs. PMID:20587529

  18. Long Wavelength Observations of Thermal Emission from Pluto and Charon with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Bryan J.; Gurwell, Mark; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Moullet, Arielle; Moreno, Raphael; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Biver, Nicolas; Fouchet, Thierry; Lis, Darek; Stern, Alan; Young, Leslie; Young, Eliot; Weaver, Hal; Boissier, Jeremie; Stansberry, John

    2015-11-01

    Long wavelength observations of Pluto can determine atmospheric temperatures, abundances, and vertical distributions for those molecules that have transitions at these wavelengths. In addition, observations of both Pluto and Charon can elucidate their surface and subsurface temperatures and surface compositions (and distribution, with enough resolution). We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe the CO and HCN in the atmosphere of Pluto, and to observe thermal emission from the two bodies, where the resolution is enough to separate them (but not enough to resolve each individually). We report here on the thermal emission observations, and separately at this meeting on the CO [1] and HCN [2] observations. We observed the Pluto/Charon system with ALMA on June 12 and 13, 2015, at a wavelength of ~0.86 mm. Both days provide separate observations of the thermal emission from Pluto and Charon. We find a preliminary value of the brightness temperature of the two bodies of 35 K and 46 K with variation of less than 1 K between the two days and SNR of > 300 for Pluto and > 100 for Charon. This is similar to previous observations of the separate thermal emission of the two bodies with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) [3] and Very Large Array (VLA) [4]. We will discuss the implications of these measured brightness temperatures and the apparent lack of significant variation between the two days (longitudes).[1] Gurwell et al., this meeting. [2] Lellouch et al., this meeting. [3] Gurwell & Butler, BAAS 37, 2005. [4] Butler et al. BAAS 43, 2010.

  19. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C.; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4) in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current) in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation, and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials, and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic, and physiopathological

  20. A Termolecular Reaction Mechanism for Nitrogen Incorporation in Aerosol Produced by Far UV Irradiation of CH4-N2 Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Trainer, M. G.; Jimenez, J. L.; Yung, Y. L.; Toon, O. B.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Results from the Aerosol Collector and Pyrolyser located onboard the Huygens lander reveal the presence of carbon and nitrogen in Titan's aerosols. Nitrogen incorporation is thought to be initiated by energy sources strong enough to break the N-N triple bond of molecular nitrogen (9.8eV). Such energy sources include extreme UV photons (λ <120 nm) and electrons from Saturn's magnetosphere. Less energetic photons in the far UV (120-200 nm) penetrate to the stratosphere of Titan and are only expected to affect hydrocarbon photochemistry there. However, recent results from our laboratory indicate a surprising amount of nitrogen incorporation- up to 16% by mass- in Titan aerosol analog produced by photochemistry initiated by far UV irradiation of CH4/N2 mixtures. The termolecular reaction CH + N2 + M --> HCN2 has been proposed to account for this observation. Here, we test this hypothesis by using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the mass loading and chemical composition of aerosol produced at a range of pressures from roughly 0.1 to 1 atm. Even though these gas mixtures spanned an order of magnitude in pressure, they experienced the same residence time in the photochemical chamber and had the same methane optical depth. We report a 150% increase in aerosol mass loading across the range of pressures studied, indicating that the mechanism controlling the total mass produced depends on pressure. We also report an overall increase with pressure in the ratio of nitrogen-bearing organic species to hydrocarbon-only species. These observations support the hypothesis that the termolecular reaction above is responsible for the incorporation of nitrogen into Titan aerosol analog produced from CH4/N2 gas mixtures irradiated in the far UV. These findings have implications for our understanding of the evolution of Titan's atmosphere, and the atmospheric synthesis of biologically relevant N-containing molecules.

  1. Structure, dynamics and implied gating mechanism of a human cyclic nucleotide-gated channel.

    PubMed

    Gofman, Yana; Schärfe, Charlotta; Marks, Debora S; Haliloglu, Turkan; Ben-Tal, Nir

    2014-12-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels are nonselective cation channels, essential for visual and olfactory sensory transduction. Although the channels include voltage-sensor domains (VSDs), their conductance is thought to be independent of the membrane potential, and their gating regulated by cytosolic cyclic nucleotide-binding domains. Mutations in these channels result in severe, degenerative retinal diseases, which remain untreatable. The lack of structural information on CNG channels has prevented mechanistic understanding of disease-causing mutations, precluded structure-based drug design, and hampered in silico investigation of the gating mechanism. To address this, we built a 3D model of the cone tetrameric CNG channel, based on homology to two distinct templates with known structures: the transmembrane (TM) domain of a bacterial channel, and the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the mouse HCN2 channel. Since the TM-domain template had low sequence-similarity to the TM domains of the CNG channels, and to reconcile conflicts between the two templates, we developed a novel, hybrid approach, combining homology modeling with evolutionary coupling constraints. Next, we used elastic network analysis of the model structure to investigate global motions of the channel and to elucidate its gating mechanism. We found the following: (i) In the main mode of motion, the TM and cytosolic domains counter-rotated around the membrane normal. We related this motion to gating, a proposition that is supported by previous experimental data, and by comparison to the known gating mechanism of the bacterial KirBac channel. (ii) The VSDs could facilitate gating (supplementing the pore gate), explaining their presence in such 'voltage-insensitive' channels. (iii) Our elastic network model analysis of the CNGA3 channel supports a modular model of allosteric gating, according to which protein domains are quasi-independent: they can move independently, but are coupled to each

  2. Kynurenic acid and zaprinast induce analgesia by modulating HCN channels through GPR35 activation.

    PubMed

    Resta, Francesco; Masi, Alessio; Sili, Maria; Laurino, Annunziatina; Moroni, Flavio; Mannaioni, Guido

    2016-09-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels have a key role in the control of cellular excitability. HCN2, a subgroup of the HCN family channels, are heavily expressed in small dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and their activation seems to be important in the determination of pain intensity. Intracellular elevation of cAMP levels activates HCN-mediated current (Ih) and small DRG neurons excitability. GPR35, a Gi/o coupled receptor, is highly expressed in small DRG neurons, and we hypothesized that its activation, mediated by endogenous or exogenous ligands, could lead to pain control trough a reduction of Ih current. Patch clamp recordings were carried out in primary cultures of rat DRG neurons and the effects of GPR35 activation on Ih current and neuronal excitability were studied in control conditions and after adenylate cyclase activation with either forskolin or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). We found that both kynurenic acid (KYNA) and zaprinast, the endogenous and synthetic GPR35 agonist respectively, were able to antagonize the forskolin-induced depolarization of resting membrane potential by reducing Ih-mediated depolarization. Similar results were obtained when PGE2 was used to activate adenylate cyclase and to increase Ih current and the overall neuronal excitability. Finally, we tested the analgesic effect of both GPR35 agonists in an in vivo model of PGE2-induced thermal hyperalgesia. In accord with the hypothesis, both KYNA and zaprinast showed a dose dependent analgesic effect. In conclusion, GPR35 activation leads to a reduced excitability of small DRG neurons in vitro and causes a dose-dependent analgesia in vivo. GPR35 agonists, by reducing adenylate cyclase activity and inhibiting Ih in DRG neurons may represent a promising new group of analgesic drugs. PMID:27131920

  3. Methamphetamine blunts Ca(2+) currents and excitatory synaptic transmission through D1/5 receptor-mediated mechanisms in the mouse medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    González, Betina; Rivero-Echeto, Celeste; Muñiz, Javier A; Cadet, Jean Lud; García-Rill, Edgar; Urbano, Francisco J; Bisagno, Verónica

    2016-05-01

    Psychostimulant addiction is associated with dysfunctions in frontal cortex. Previous data demonstrated that repeated exposure to methamphetamine (METH) can alter prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent functions. Here, we show that withdrawal from repetitive non-contingent METH administration (7 days, 1 mg/kg) depressed voltage-dependent calcium currents (ICa ) and increased hyperpolarization-activated cation current (IH ) amplitude and the paired-pulse ratio of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in deep-layer pyramidal mPFC neurons. Most of these effects were blocked by systemic co-administration of the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0.5 and 0.05 mg/kg). In vitro METH (i.e. bath-applied to slices from naïve-treated animals) was able to emulate its systemic effects on ICa and evoked EPSCs paired-pulse ratio. We also provide evidence of altered mRNA expression of (1) voltage-gated calcium channels P/Q-type Cacna1a (Cav 2.1), N-type Cacna1b (Cav 2.2), T-type Cav 3.1 Cacna1g, Cav 3.2 Cacna1h, Cav 3.3 Cacna1i and the auxiliary subunit Cacna2d1 (α2δ1); (2) hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels Hcn1 and Hcn2; and (3) glutamate receptors subunits AMPA-type Gria1, NMDA-type Grin1 and metabotropic Grm1 in the mouse mPFC after repeated METH treatment. Moreover, we show that some of these changes in mRNA expression were sensitive D1/5 receptor blockade. Altogether, these altered mechanisms affecting synaptic physiology and transcriptional regulation may underlie PFC functional alterations that could lead to PFC impairments observed in METH-addicted individuals. PMID:25871318

  4. STAR-FORMING CLOUD COMPLEXES IN THE CENTRAL MOLECULAR ZONE OF NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kazushi; Matsushita, Satoki; Mao, Rui-Qing; Peck, Alison B.; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Wiedner, Martina C.

    2011-07-01

    We report 350 and 230 GHz observations of molecular gas and dust in the starburst nucleus of NGC 253 at 20-40 pc (1''-2'') resolution. The data contain CO(3-2), HCN(4-3), CO(2-1), {sup 13}CO(2-1), C{sup 18}O(2-1), and continuum at 0.87 mm and 1.3 mm toward the central kiloparsec. The CO(2-1) size of the galaxy's central molecular zone (CMZ) is measured to be about 300 pcx100 pc at the half-maximum of intensity. Five clumps of dense and warm gas stand out in the CMZ at arcsecond resolution, and they are associated with compact radio sources due to recent massive star formation. They contribute one-third of the CO emission in the central 300 pc and have {sup 12}CO peak brightness temperatures around 50 K, molecular gas column densities on the order of 10{sup 4} M{sub sun} pc{sup -2}, gas masses on the order of 10{sup 7} M{sub sun} in the size scale of 20 pc, volume-averaged gas densities of n{sub H{sub 2}} {approx} 4000 cm{sup -3}, and high HCN-to-CO ratios suggestive of higher fractions of dense gas than in the surrounding environment. It is suggested that these are natal molecular cloud complexes of massive star formation. The CMZ of NGC 253 is also compared with that of our Galaxy in CO(2-1) at the same 20 pc resolution. Their overall gas distributions are strikingly similar. The five molecular cloud complexes appear to be akin to such molecular complexes as Sgr A, Sgr B2, Sgr C, and the l = 1.{sup 0}3 cloud in the Galactic center. On the other hand, the starburst CMZ in NGC 253 has higher temperatures and higher surface (and presumably volume) densities than its non-starburst cousin.

  5. PECULIAR NEAR-NUCLEUS OUTGASSING OF COMET 17P/HOLMES DURING ITS 2007 OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Chunhua; Gurwell, Mark A.; Wilner, David J.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Jewitt, David

    2015-01-20

    We present high angular resolution Submillimeter Array observations of the outbursting Jupiter family comet 17P/Holmes on 2007 October 26-29, achieving a spatial resolution of 2.''5, or ∼3000 km at the comet distance. The observations resulted in detections of the rotational lines CO 3-2, HCN 4-3, H{sup 13}CN 4-3, CS 7-6, H{sub 2}CO 3{sub 1,} {sub 2}-2{sub 1,} {sub 1}, H{sub 2}S 2{sub 2,} {sub 0}-2{sub 1,} {sub 1}, and multiple CH{sub 3}OH lines, along with the associated dust continuum at 221 and 349 GHz. The continuum has a spectral index of 2.7 ± 0.3, slightly steeper than blackbody emission from large dust particles. From the imaging data, we identify two components in the molecular emission. One component is characterized by a relatively broad line width (∼1 km s{sup –1} FWHM) exhibiting a symmetric outgassing pattern with respect to the nucleus position. The second component has a narrower line width (<0.5 km s{sup –1} FWHM) with the line center redshifted by 0.1-0.2 km s{sup –1} (cometocentric frame), and shows a velocity shift across the nucleus position with the position angle gradually changing from 66° to 30° within the four days of observations. We determine distinctly different CO/HCN ratios for each of the components. For the broad-line component we find CO/HCN < 7, while in the narrow-line component, CO/HCN = 40 ± 5. We hypothesize that the narrow-line component originates from the ice grain halo found in near-nucleus photometry, believed to be created by sublimating recently released ice grains around the nucleus during the outburst. In this interpretation, the high CO/HCN ratio of this component reflects the more pristine volatile composition of nucleus material released in the outburst.

  6. hERG Potassium Channel Blockade by the HCN Channel Inhibitor Bradycardic Agent Ivabradine

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Dario; Brack, Kieran E.; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Mitcheson, John S.; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Ng, G. André; Hancox, Jules C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ivabradine is a specific bradycardic agent used in coronary artery disease and heart failure, lowering heart rate through inhibition of sinoatrial nodal HCN‐channels. This study investigated the propensity of ivabradine to interact with KCNH2‐encoded human Ether‐à‐go‐go–Related Gene (hERG) potassium channels, which strongly influence ventricular repolarization and susceptibility to torsades de pointes arrhythmia. Methods and Results Patch clamp recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from hERG expressing cells at 37°C. IhERG was inhibited with an IC50 of 2.07 μmol/L for the hERG 1a isoform and 3.31 μmol/L for coexpressed hERG 1a/1b. The voltage and time‐dependent characteristics of IhERG block were consistent with preferential gated‐state‐dependent channel block. Inhibition was partially attenuated by the N588K inactivation‐mutant and the S624A pore‐helix mutant and was strongly reduced by the Y652A and F656A S6 helix mutants. In docking simulations to a MthK‐based homology model of hERG, the 2 aromatic rings of the drug could form multiple π‐π interactions with the aromatic side chains of both Y652 and F656. In monophasic action potential (MAP) recordings from guinea‐pig Langendorff‐perfused hearts, ivabradine delayed ventricular repolarization and produced a steepening of the MAPD90 restitution curve. Conclusions Ivabradine prolongs ventricular repolarization and alters electrical restitution properties at concentrations relevant to the upper therapeutic range. In absolute terms ivabradine does not discriminate between hERG and HCN channels: it inhibits IhERG with similar potency to that reported for native If and HCN channels, with S6 binding determinants resembling those observed for HCN4. These findings may have important implications both clinically and for future bradycardic drug design. PMID:25911606

  7. Changes in the expression of ion channels, connexins and Ca2+-handling proteins in the sino-atrial node during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Allah, Eman Abd; Tellez, James O; Yanni, Joseph; Nelson, Thomas; Monfredi, Oliver; Boyett, Mark R; Dobrzynski, Halina

    2011-04-01

    There are important postnatal changes in the sino-atrial node (SAN), the pacemaker of the heart. Compared with the neonate, the adult has a slower intrinsic heart rate and a longer SAN action potential. These changes may be due to differences in ion channel expression. Consequently, we investigated postnatal developmental changes in the expression of ion channels and Ca(2+)-handling proteins in the SAN to see whether this is indeed the case. Using quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we investigated the expression of ion channels, Ca(2+)-handling proteins and connexins in the SAN from neonatal (2-7 days of age) and adult (∼6 months of age) New Zealand White rabbits. The spontaneous beating rate of adult SAN preparations was 21% slower than that of neonatal preparations. During postnatal development, quantitative PCR revealed a significant decline in the SAN of the following mRNAs: HCN4 (major isoform responsible for I(f)), Na(V)1.5 (responsible for I(Na)), Ca(V)1.3 (in part responsible for I(Ca,L)) and NCX1 (responsible for inward I(NaCa)). These declines could be responsible for the slowing of the pacemaker during postnatal development. There was a significant decline during development in mRNA for delayed rectifier K(+) channel subunits (K(V)1.5, responsible for I(K,ur), K(V)LQT1 and minK, responsible for I(K,s), and ERG, responsible for I(K,r)) and this could explain the prolongation of the action potential. In situ hybridization confirmed the changes observed by quantitative PCR. In addition, immunohistochemistry revealed hypertrophy of nodal cells during postnatal development. Moreover, there were complex changes in the expression of Ca(2+)-handling proteins with age. In summary, there are significant postnatal changes in the expression of ion channels and Ca(2+)-handling proteins in the SAN that could explain the established changes in heart rate and action potential duration that occur during normal development. PMID:21278078

  8. The Puzzle of HCN in Comets: Is it both a Product and a Primary Species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Paganini, Lucas; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide has long been regarded as a primary volatile in comets, stemming from its presence in dense molecular cloud cores and its supposed storage in the cometary nucleus. Here, we examine the observational evidence for and against that hypothesis, and argue that HCN may also result from near-nucleus chemical reactions in the coma. The distinction (product vs. primary species) is important for multiple reasons: 1. HCN is often used as a proxy for water when the dominant species (H2O) is not available for simultaneous measurement, as at radio wavelengths. 2. HCN is one of the few volatile carriers of nitrogen accessible to remote sensing. If HCN is mainly a product species, its precursor becomes the more important metric for compiling a taxonomic classification based on nitrogen chemistry. 3. The stereoisomer HNC is now confirmed as a product species. Could reaction of a primary precursor (X-CN) with a hydrocarbon co-produce both HNC and HCN? 4. The production rate for CN greatly exceeds that of HCN in some comets, demonstrating the presence of another (more important) precursor of CN. Several puzzling lines of evidence raise issues about the origin of HCN: a. The production rates of HCN measured through rotational (radio) and vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy agree in some comets - in others the infrared rate exceeds the radio rate substantially. b. With its strong dipole moment and H-bonding character, HCN should be linked more strongly in the nuclear ice to other molecules with similar properties (H2O, CH3OH), but instead its spatial release in some comets seems strongly coupled to volatiles that lack a dipole moment and thus do not form H-bonds (methane, ethane). c. The nucleus-centered rotational temperatures measured for H2O and other species (C2H6, CH3OH) usually agree within error, but those for HCN are often slightly smaller. d. In comet ISON, ALMA maps of HCN and the dust continuum show a slight displacement 80 km) in the centroids. We will

  9. SPATIALLY RESOLVING SUBSTRUCTURES WITHIN THE MASSIVE ENVELOPE AROUND AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTAR: MMS 6/OMC-3

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Saigo, Kazuya; Tomida, Kengo

    2012-06-10

    With the Submillimeter Array, the brightest (sub)millimeter continuum source in the Orion Molecular Cloud-2/3 region, MMS 6, has been observed in the 850 {mu}m continuum emission with approximately 10 times better angular resolution than previous studies ( Almost-Equal-To 0.''3, Almost-Equal-To 120 AU at Orion). The deconvolved size, the mass, and the column density of MMS 6-main are estimated to be 0.''32 Multiplication-Sign 0.''29 (132 AU Multiplication-Sign 120 AU), 0.29 M{sub Sun }, and 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} cm{sup -2}, respectively. The estimated extremely high mean number density, 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, suggests that MMS 6-main is likely optically thick at 850 {mu}m. We compare our observational data with three theoretical core models: prestellar core, protostellar core + disk-like structure, and first adiabatic core. These comparisons clearly show that the observational data cannot be modeled as a simple prestellar core with a gas temperature of 20 K. A self-luminous source is necessary to explain the observed flux density in the (sub)millimeter wavelengths. Our recent detection of a very compact and energetic outflow in the CO (3-2) and HCN (4-3) lines supports the presence of a protostar. We suggest that MMS 6 is one of the first cases of an intermediate-mass protostellar core at an extremely young stage. In addition to the MMS 6-main peak, we have also spatially resolved a number of spiky structures and sub-clumps, distributed over the central 1000 AU. The masses of these sub-clumps are estimated to be 0.066-0.073 M{sub Sun }, which are on the order of brown dwarf masses. Higher angular resolution and higher sensitivity observations with ALMA and EVLA will reveal the origin and nature of these structures such as whether they are originated from fragmentations, spiral arms, or inhomogeneity within the disk-like structures/envelope.

  10. A bifunctional sea anemone peptide with Kunitz type protease and potassium channel inhibiting properties.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Billen, Bert; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Debaveye, Sarah; Béress, László; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-07-01

    Sea anemone venom is a known source of interesting bioactive compounds, including peptide toxins which are invaluable tools for studying structure and function of voltage-gated potassium channels. APEKTx1 is a novel peptide isolated from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima, containing 63 amino acids cross-linked by 3 disulfide bridges. Sequence alignment reveals that APEKTx1 is a new member of the type 2 sea anemone peptides targeting voltage-gated potassium channels (K(V)s), which also include the kalicludines from Anemonia sulcata. Similar to the kalicludines, APEKTx1 shares structural homology with both the basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), a very potent Kunitz-type protease inhibitor, and dendrotoxins which are powerful blockers of voltage-gated potassium channels. In this study, APEKTx1 has been subjected to a screening on a wide range of 23 ion channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes: 13 cloned voltage-gated potassium channels (K(V)1.1-K(V)1.6, K(V)1.1 triple mutant, K(V)2.1, K(V)3.1, K(V)4.2, K(V)4.3, hERG, the insect channel Shaker IR), 2 cloned hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-sensitive cation non-selective channels (HCN1 and HCN2) and 8 cloned voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)1.2-Na(V)1.8 and the insect channel DmNa(V)1). Our data show that APEKTx1 selectively blocks K(V)1.1 channels in a very potent manner with an IC(50) value of 0.9nM. Furthermore, we compared the trypsin inhibitory activity of this toxin with BPTI. APEKTx1 inhibits trypsin with a dissociation constant of 124nM. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that APEKTx1 has the unique feature to combine the dual functionality of a potent and selective blocker of K(V)1.1 channels with that of a competitive inhibitor of trypsin. PMID:21477583

  11. Deep-space glycine formation via Strecker-type reactions activated by ice water dust mantles. A computational approach.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona; Ugliengo, Piero

    2010-01-01

    A Strecker-type synthesis of glycine by reacting NH(3), H(2)C=O and HCN in presence of ice water (H(2)O-ice) as a catalyst has been theoretically studied at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level within a cluster approach in order to mimic reactions occurring in the interstellar and circumstellar medium (ICM). Results indicate that, despite the exoergonic character of the considered reactions occurring at the H(2)O-ice surface, the kinetics are slow due to relatively high electronic energy barriers (ΔU(0)(≠)=15-45 kcal mol(-1)). Reactions occurring within H(2)O-ice cavities, in which ice bulk effects have been modeled by assuming a dielectric continuum (ε=78), show energy barriers low enough to allow NH(2)CH(2)OH formation but not NH=CH2 (ΔU(0)(≠)= 2 and 21 kcal mol(-1), respectively) thus hindering the NH(2)CH(2)CN formation, i.e. the precursor of glycine, through Strecker channels. Moreover, hydrolysis of NH(2)CH(2)CN to give glycine is characterized by high electronic energy barriers (ΔU(0)(≠)=27-34 kcal mol(-1)) and cannot readily occur at cryogenic temperatures. Nevertheless, the facts that NH=CH(2) formation can readily be achieved through the radical-radical HCN+2H - NH−−>CH2 reaction [D. E. Woon, Astrophys. J., 2002, 571, L177-L180], and that present results indicate that the Strecker step of NH=CH(2)+HCN−−>NH(2)CH(2)CN exhibits a relative low energy barrier (ΔU(0)(≠)=8–9 kcal mol(-1)), suggest that a combination of these two mechanisms allows for the formation of NH(2)CH(2)CN in the ICM. These results strengthen the thesis that NH(2)CH(2)CN could have been formed and protected by icy dust particles, and then delivered through micro-bombardments onto the early Earth, leading to glycine formation upon contact with the primordial ocean. PMID:20358044

  12. Functional expression of the hyperpolarization-activated, non-selective cation current If in immortalized HL-1 cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sartiani, Laura; Bochet, Pascal; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Mugelli, Alessandro; Fischmeister, Rodolphe

    2002-01-01

    HL-1 cells are adult mouse atrial myocytes induced to proliferate indefinitely by SV40 large T antigen. These cells beat spontaneously when confluent and express several adult cardiac cell markers including the outward delayed rectifier K+ channel. Here, we examined the presence of a hyperpolarization-activated If current in HL-1 cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on isolated cells enzymatically dissociated from the culture at confluence. Cell membrane capacitance (Cm) ranged from 5 to 53 pF. If was detected in about 30 % of the cells and its occurrence was independent of the stage of the culture. If maximal slope conductance was 89.7 ± 0.4 pS pF−1 (n = 10). If current in HL-1 cells showed typical characteristics of native cardiac If current: activation threshold between −50 and −60 mV, half-maximal activation potential of −83.1 ± 0.7 mV (n = 50), reversal potential at −20.8 ± 1.5 mV (n = 10), time-dependent activation by hyperpolarization and blockade by 4 mm Cs+. In half of the cells tested, activation of adenylyl cyclase by the forskolin analogue L858051 (20 μm) induced both a ≈6 mV positive shift of the half-activation potential and a ≈37 % increase in the fully activated If current. RT-PCR analysis of the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) expressed in HL-1 cells demonstrated major contributions of HCN1 and HCN2 channel isoforms to If current. Cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations in spontaneously beating HL-1 cells were measured in Fluo-3 AM-loaded cells using a fast-scanning confocal microscope. The oscillation frequency ranged from 1.3 to 5 Hz and the spontaneous activity was stopped in the presence of 4 mm Cs+. Action potentials from HL-1 cells had a triangular shape, with an overshoot at +15 mV and a maximal diastolic potential of −69 mV, i.e. more negative than the threshold potential for If activation. In conclusion, HL-1 cells display a hyperpolarization-activated If current which might

  13. Postsynaptic mechanisms underlying the excitatory action of histamine on medial vestibular nucleus neurons in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Yu, Lei; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Peng, Shi-Yu; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Anti-histaminergic drugs have been widely used in the clinical treatment of vestibular disorders and most studies concentrate on their presynaptic actions. The present study investigated the postsynaptic effect of histamine on medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons and the underlying mechanisms. Experimental Approach Histamine-induced postsynaptic actions on MVN neurons and the corresponding receptor and ionic mechanisms were detected by whole-cell patch-clamp recordings on rat brain slices. The distribution of postsynaptic histamine H1, H2 and H4 receptors was mapped by double and single immunostaining. Furthermore, the expression of mRNAs for H1, H2 and H4 receptors and for subtypes of Na+–Ca2+ exchangers (NCXs) and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels was assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Key Results A marked postsynaptic excitatory effect, co-mediated by histamine H1 and H2 receptors, was involved in the histamine-induced depolarization of MVN neurons. Postsynaptic H1 and H2 rather than H4 receptors were co-localized in the same MVN neurons. NCXs contributed to the inward current mediated by H1 receptors, whereas HCN channels were responsible for excitation induced by activation of H2 receptors. Moreover, NCX1 and NCX3 rather than NCX2, and HCN1 rather than HCN2-4 mRNAs, were abundantly expressed in MVN. Conclusion and Implications NCXs coupled to H1 receptors and HCN channels linked to H2 receptors co-mediate the strong postsynaptic excitatory action of histamine on MVN neurons. These results highlight an active role of postsynaptic mechanisms in the modulation by central histaminergic systems of vestibular functions and suggest potential targets for clinical treatment of vestibular disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23713466

  14. Cyclometalated ruthenium(II) complexes as efficient redox mediators in peroxidase catalysis.

    PubMed

    Alpeeva, Inna S; Soukharev, Valentin S; Alexandrova, Larissa; Shilova, Nadezhda V; Bovin, Nicolai V; Csöregi, Elisabeth; Ryabov, Alexander D; Sakharov, Ivan Yu

    2003-07-01

    Cyclometalated ruthenium(II) complexes, [Ru(II)(C~N)(N~N)(2)]PF(6) [HC~N=2-phenylpyridine (Hphpy) or 2-(4'-tolyl)pyridine; N~N=2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, or 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine], are rapidly oxidized by H(2)O(2) catalyzed by plant peroxidases to the corresponding Ru(III) species. The commercial isoenzyme C of horseradish peroxidase (HRP-C) and two recently purified peroxidases from sweet potato (SPP) and royal palm tree (RPTP) have been used. The most favorable conditions for the oxidation have been evaluated by varying the pH, buffer, and H(2)O(2) concentrations and the apparent second-order rate constants ( k(app)) have been measured. All the complexes studied are oxidized by HRP-C at similar rates and the rate constants k(app) are identical to those known for the best substrates of HRP-C (10(6)-10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Both cationic (HRP-C) and anionic (SPP and RPTP) peroxidases show similar catalytic efficiency in the oxidation of the Ru(II) complexes. The mediating capacity of the complexes has been evaluated using the SPP-catalyzed co-oxidation of [Ru(II)(phpy)(bpy)(2)]PF(6) and catechol as a poor peroxidase substrate as an example. The rate of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of catechol increases more than 10000-fold in the presence of the ruthenium complex. A simple routine for calculating the rate constant k(c) for the oxidation of catechol by the Ru(III) complex generated enzymatically from [Ru(II)(phpy)(bpy)(2)](+) is proposed. It is based on the accepted mechanism of peroxidase catalysis and involves spectrophotometric measurements of the limiting Ru(II) concentration at different concentrations of catechol. The calculated k(c) value of 0.75 M(-1) s(-1) shows that the cyclometalated Ru(II) complexes are efficient mediators in peroxidase catalysis. PMID:12774217

  15. Functional expression of the hyperpolarization-activated, non-selective cation current I(f) in immortalized HL-1 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sartiani, Laura; Bochet, Pascal; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Mugelli, Alessandro; Fischmeister, Rodolphe

    2002-11-15

    HL-1 cells are adult mouse atrial myocytes induced to proliferate indefinitely by SV40 large T antigen. These cells beat spontaneously when confluent and express several adult cardiac cell markers including the outward delayed rectifier K(+) channel. Here, we examined the presence of a hyperpolarization-activated I(f) current in HL-1 cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on isolated cells enzymatically dissociated from the culture at confluence. Cell membrane capacitance (C(m)) ranged from 5 to 53 pF. I(f) was detected in about 30% of the cells and its occurrence was independent of the stage of the culture. I(f) maximal slope conductance was 89.7 +/- 0.4 pS pF(-1) (n = 10). I(f) current in HL-1 cells showed typical characteristics of native cardiac I(f) current: activation threshold between -50 and -60 mV, half-maximal activation potential of -83.1 +/- 0.7 mV (n = 50), reversal potential at -20.8 +/- 1.5 mV (n = 10), time-dependent activation by hyperpolarization and blockade by 4 mM Cs(+). In half of the cells tested, activation of adenylyl cyclase by the forskolin analogue L858051 (20 microM) induced both an approximately 6 mV positive shift of the half-activation potential and an approximately 37 % increase in the fully activated I(f) current. RT-PCR analysis of the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) expressed in HL-1 cells demonstrated major contributions of HCN1 and HCN2 channel isoforms to I(f) current. Cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations in spontaneously beating HL-1 cells were measured in Fluo-3 AM-loaded cells using a fast-scanning confocal microscope. The oscillation frequency ranged from 1.3 to 5 Hz and the spontaneous activity was stopped in the presence of 4 mM Cs(+). Action potentials from HL-1 cells had a triangular shape, with an overshoot at +15 mV and a maximal diastolic potential of -69 mV, i.e. more negative than the threshold potential for I(f) activation. In conclusion, HL-1 cells display a

  16. NATURE OF W51e2: MASSIVE CORES AT DIFFERENT PHASES OF STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Hui; Han, J. L.; Zhao Junhui E-mail: hjl@nao.cas.c

    2010-02-10

    We present high-resolution continuum images of the W51e2 complex processed from archival data of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) at 0.85 and 1.3 mm and the Very Large Array at 7 and 13 mm. We also made line images and profiles of W51e2 for three hydrogen radio recombination lines (RRLs; H26alpha, H53alpha, and H66alpha) and absorption of two molecular lines of HCN(4-3) and CO(2-1). At least four distinct continuum components have been detected in the 3'' region of W51e2 from the SMA continuum images at 0.85 and 1.3 mm with resolutions of 0.''3 x 0.''2 and 1.''4 x 0.''7, respectively. The west component, W51e2-W, coincides with the ultracompact H II region reported from previous radio observations. The H26alpha line observation reveals an unresolved hyper-compact ionized core (<0.''06 or <310 AU) with a high electron temperature of 1.2 x 10{sup 4} K, with the corresponding emission measure EM>7 x 10{sup 10} pc cm{sup -6} and the electron density N{sub e} >7 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}. The inferred Lyman continuum flux implies that the H II region W51e2-W requires a newly formed massive star, an O8 star or a cluster of B-type stars, to maintain the ionization. W51e2-E, the brightest component at 0.85 mm, is located 0.''9 east from the hyper-compact ionized core. It has a total mass of {approx}140 M{sub sun} according to our spectral energy distribution analysis and a large infall rate of >1.3 x 10{sup -3} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} inferred from the absorption of HCN. W51e2-E appears to be the accretion center in W51e2. Given the fact that no free-free emission and no RRLs have been detected, the massive core of W51e2-E appears to host one or more growing massive proto-stars. Located 2'' northwest from W51e2-E, W51e2-NW is detected in the continuum emission at 0.85 and 1.3 mm. No continuum emission has been detected at lambda>= 7 mm. Along with the maser activities previously observed, our analysis suggests that W51e2-NW is at an earlier phase of star formation. W51e2-N is

  17. Dry Sources of Plume Emissions on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.

    2009-12-01

    Salt-bearing icy particles [1], inorganic gases [2] and organic species [2,3] emitted from Enceladus could originate in the heterogeneous icy shell that captured oceanic water and primordial solids earlier in history. A major trapping could have occurred during sinking of a dense (1.6 g/cm3) primordial rock-ice crust [4] into an early salt-, gas- and organic-bearing ocean [5]. The lack of spectral and geological signs for rocky components at the surface is consistent with the submergence of primordial crust that has not been affected by initial water-rock differentiation. The sinking could have been triggered by impacts and/or volume changes in the interior. A rapid submergence could have caused vigorous boiling and freezing of oceanic water that appeared at the surface. The low temperature of submerged crust, and cooling of surface waters may have limited major melting of sunken rock-ice blocks. Some primary spices (e.g. HCN [2]), if released from sunken rock-ice debris, could have been re-captured in ice, which limited their chemical interactions. After formation of a thin icy shell, diking events and impacts caused further trapping of salty oceanic water in multiple disrupted areas, as occurred on Europa. Condensed and soluble organic compounds, and at least some CO2, N2, CH4 and light hydrocarbons released via oceanic degassing were trapped as well. The concentration of salts in rapidly frozen oceanic water reflected oceanic composition, and the salt/water ratio in Na-rich E-ring particles [1] may represent salinity of the early ocean. In fact, the salinity inferred from the composition of salt-rich particles (4-20 g/kg H2O [1]) and salt composition matches models for the early ocean [5]. The Na-poor E-ring particles [1] may originate from a middle part of the icy shell that formed through slow downward freezing and expelling impurities into solution. The dominance of Na-poor E-ring icy grains (~93%, [1]) implies a low volume of salty ice that represents

  18. Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during plasma synthesis of Titan's aerosols analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuga, M.; Carrasco, N.; Marty, B.; Marrocchi, Y.; Bernard, S.; Rigaudier, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission recently provided measurements of the abundance of nitrogen isotopes in Titan's atmosphere. The 14N/15N ratio in the two most abundant N-bearing molecules in Titan's atmosphere was found to be 183×5 for N2 [1] and 56×8 for HCN [2]. Those two molecules are greatly enriched in the heavier isotope 15N compared to our terrestrial atmosphere and Titan's HCN is about three times richer in 15N than its potential photochemical precursor N2. This implies an important fractionation process in the HCN production chain, which is tentatively attributed to an isotopic selectivity of the photodissociation of N2 in Titan's ionosphere [3-4]. The organic aerosols, forming the Titan's orange characteristic haze layers, also contain large amounts of nitrogen [5], and thus represent a third important nitrogen reservoir in Titan's atmosphere. These organic aerosols are presumably produced in the upper atmosphere by chemical reactions between N2 and CH4 induced by solar radiation and electron bombardment from Saturn's magnetosphere. As HCN is a possible precursor for aerosol polymerization [6-7], the 15N enrichment observed in HCN may be linked to the polymerization process. Unfortunately, no data exists on the isotopic nitrogen abundance in Titan's aerosols, and this question remains open. To address this issue, laboratory aerosols analogues have been produced in a N2-CH4 plasma and their nitrogen isotopic composition have been investigated. In this study, the experimental aerosols, called " tholins ", have been synthetized in the PAMPRE reactor (LATMOS, France). This setup is dedicated to simulate chemical processes occurring in Titan's atmosphere and consists in an RF plasma discharge initiated in a N2-CH4 gas mixture at room temperature [8-9]. For our purpose, tholins were produced at different initial CH4 percentages (1, 2, 5, 10%), representative of the variation of the CH4 concentration in Titan's atmosphere. 15N/14N ratio of the N2 gas used in the

  19. Mechanistic Studies of Planetary Haze Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Raea Kay

    2015-10-01

    Planetary atmospheres can be thought of as global-scale reactors capable of synthesizing large, complex molecules from small gases such as methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrogen (N2). The atmosphere of Titan, the largest moon of Saturn covered by a thick organic haze, contains trace amounts (2%) of CH4 in an atmosphere of N2 at a surface pressure of 1.5 bar. This is similar to the Earth's Archaean atmosphere, which possibly contained trace amounts of CH4 and CO2 (˜1,000 ppmv each) in an N2 -dominant atmosphere before the rise of biogenic oxygen. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric chemistry on Titan and the early Earth have shown that these atmospheres are capable of generating biologically-relevant molecules that condense to form particles which can then settle to the surface of the planetary body, possibly providing the molecules required for the emergence of life. The work presented here examines the mechanisms by which FUV photochemistry initiates incorporation of N atoms into Titan aerosol analogs, and C atoms into early Earth aerosol analogs. Results from the Aerosol Collector and Pyrolyser onboard the Huygens lander reveal the presence of nitrogen in Titan's aerosols. This nitrogen incorporation is thought to occur primarily by extreme-UV photons or energetic electrons. However, recent results from our laboratory indicate a surprising amount of nitrogen incorporation- up to 16% by mass- in Titan aerosol analogs produced by photochemistry initiated by FUV irradiation of CH4/N 2 mixtures. The termolecular reaction CH+N2 +M → HCN2 has been proposed to account for this observation. Here, we test this hypothesis by using a high- resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the mass loading and chemical composition of aerosol produced at a range of pressures from roughly 0.1 to 1 atm. We report a 10-fold increase in aerosol mass loading across the range of pressures studied, indicating that the mechanism