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Sample records for hdac histone deacetylase

  1. Histone deacetylases (HDACs): characterization of the classical HDAC family.

    PubMed Central

    de Ruijter, Annemieke J M; van Gennip, Albert H; Caron, Huib N; Kemp, Stephan; van Kuilenburg, André B P

    2003-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes occurs within a chromatin setting, and is strongly influenced by the post-translational modification of histones, the building blocks of chromatin, such as methylation, phosphorylation and acetylation. Acetylation is probably the best understood of these modifications: hyperacetylation leads to an increase in the expression of particular genes, and hypoacetylation has the opposite effect. Many studies have identified several large, multisubunit enzyme complexes that are responsible for the targeted deacetylation of histones. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of the structure, function and tissue distribution of members of the classical histone deacetylase (HDAC) family, in order to gain insight into the regulation of gene expression through HDAC activity. SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) data show that HDACs are generally expressed in almost all tissues investigated. Surprisingly, no major differences were observed between the expression pattern in normal and malignant tissues. However, significant variation in HDAC expression was observed within tissue types. HDAC inhibitors have been shown to induce specific changes in gene expression and to influence a variety of other processes, including growth arrest, differentiation, cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis. This challenging field has generated many fascinating results which will ultimately lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of gene transcription as a whole. PMID:12429021

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitors selectively suppress expression of HDAC7.

    PubMed

    Dokmanovic, Milos; Perez, Gisela; Xu, Weisheng; Ngo, Lang; Clarke, Cathy; Parmigiani, Raphael B; Marks, Paul A

    2007-09-01

    There are 18 histone deacetylases (HDAC) generally divided into four classes based on homology to yeast HDACs. HDACs have many protein substrates in addition to histones that are involved in regulation of gene expression, cell proliferation, and cell death. Inhibition of HDACs can cause accumulation of acetylated forms of these proteins, thus altering their function. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), such as the hydroxamic acid-based vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid), inhibit the zinc-containing classes I, II, and IV, but not the NAD(+)-dependent class III, enzymes. HDACis are a group of novel anticancer agents. Vorinostat is the first HDACi approved for clinical use in the treatment of the cancer cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Factors affecting expression of HDACs are not well understood. This study focuses on the effect of the HDACi vorinostat on the expression of class I and class II HDACs. We found that vorinostat selectively down-regulates HDAC7 with little or no effect on the expression of other class I or class II HDACs. Fourteen cell lines were examined, including normal, immortalized, genetically transformed, and human cancer-derived cell lines. Down-regulation of HDAC7 by vorinostat is more pronounced in transformed cells sensitive to inhibitor-induced cell death than in normal cells or cancer cells resistant to induced cell death. Modulation of HDAC7 levels by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown or by HDAC7 overexpression is associated with growth arrest but without detectable changes in acetylation of histones or p21 gene expression. Selective down-regulation of HDAC7 protein may serve as a marker of response of tumors to HDACi. PMID:17876049

  3. Light-Controlled Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors: Towards Photopharmacological Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Wiktor; Ourailidou, Maria E; Velema, Willem A; Dekker, Frank J; Feringa, Ben L

    2015-11-01

    Cancer treatment suffers from limitations that have a major impact on the patient's quality of life and survival. In the case of chemotherapy, the systemic distribution of cytotoxic drugs reduces their efficacy and causes severe side effects due to nonselective toxicity. Photopharmacology allows a novel approach to address these problems because it employs external, local activation of chemotherapeutic agents by using light. The development of photoswitchable histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as potential antitumor agents is reported herein. Analogues of the clinically used chemotherapeutic agents vorinostat, panobinostat, and belinostat were designed with a photoswitchable azobenzene moiety incorporated into their structure. The most promising compound exhibits high inhibitory potency in the thermodynamically less stable cis form and a significantly lower activity for the trans form, both in terms of HDAC activity and proliferation of HeLa cells. This approach offers a clear prospect towards local photoactivation of HDAC inhibition to avoid severe side effects in chemotherapy. PMID:26418117

  4. Loss of histone deacetylase Hdac1 disrupts metabolic processes in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Turgeon, Naomie; Boisvert, François-Michel; Boudreau, François; Asselin, Claude

    2015-09-14

    By using acetyl-CoA as a substrate, acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases regulate protein acetylation by adding or removing an acetyl group on lysines. Nuclear-located Hdac1 is a regulator of intestinal homeostasis. We have previously shown that Hdac1 define specific intestinal epithelial cell basal and inflammatory-dependent gene expression patterns and control cell proliferation. We show here that Hdac1 depletion in cellulo leads to increased histone acetylation after metabolic stresses, and to metabolic disturbances resulting in impaired responses to oxidative stresses, AMPK kinase activation and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, nuclear Hdac1 may control intestinal epithelial cell metabolism by regulating the supply of acetyl groups. PMID:26297832

  5. Human HDAC7 Harbors a Class IIa Histone Deacetylase-specific Zinc Binding Motif and Cryptic Deacetylase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, Anja; Min, Jinrong; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Schapira, Matthieu; Shuen, Michael; Loppnau, Peter; Mazitschek, Ralph; Kwiatkowski, Nick P.; Lewis, Timothy A.; Maglathin, Rebecca L.; McLean, Thomas H.; Bochkarev, Alexey; Plotnikov, Alexander N.; Vedadi, Masoud; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2010-10-18

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are protein deacetylases that play a role in repression of gene transcription and are emerging targets in cancer therapy. Here, we characterize the structure and enzymatic activity of the catalytic domain of human HDAC7 (cdHDAC7). Although HDAC7 normally exists as part of a multiprotein complex, we show that cdHDAC7 has a low level of deacetylase activity which can be inhibited by known HDAC inhibitors. The crystal structures of human cdHDAC7 and its complexes with two hydroxamate inhibitors are the first structures of the catalytic domain of class IIa HDACs and demonstrate significant differences with previously reported class I and class IIb-like HDAC structures. We show that cdHDAC7 has an additional class IIa HDAC-specific zinc binding motif adjacent to the active site which is likely to participate in substrate recognition and protein-protein interaction and may provide a site for modulation of activity. Furthermore, a different active site topology results in modified catalytic properties and in an enlarged active site pocket. Our studies provide mechanistic insights into class IIa HDACs and facilitate the design of specific modulators.

  6. The Role of Dietary Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) Inhibitors in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Shalome A.; Barnett, Matthew P. G.

    2014-01-01

    Modification of the histone proteins associated with DNA is an important process in the epigenetic regulation of DNA structure and function. There are several known modifications to histones, including methylation, acetylation, and phosphorylation, and a range of factors influence each of these. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) remove the acetyl group from lysine residues within a range of proteins, including transcription factors and histones. Whilst this means that their influence on cellular processes is more complex and far-reaching than histone modifications alone, their predominant function appears to relate to histones; through deacetylation of lysine residues they can influence expression of genes encoded by DNA linked to the histone molecule. HDAC inhibitors in turn regulate the activity of HDACs, and have been widely used as therapeutics in psychiatry and neurology, in which a number of adverse outcomes are associated with aberrant HDAC function. More recently, dietary HDAC inhibitors have been shown to have a regulatory effect similar to that of pharmacological HDAC inhibitors without the possible side-effects. Here, we discuss a number of dietary HDAC inhibitors, and how they may have therapeutic potential in the context of a whole food. PMID:25322459

  7. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) as a novel therapeutic target in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Jiro; Suzuki, Rikio; Mazitschek, Ralph; Gorgun, Gullu; Ghosh, Balaram; Cirstea, Diana; Hu, Yiguo; Mimura, Naoya; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Cottini, Francesca; Jakubikova, Jana; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Richardson, Paul G.; Hideshima, Teru; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) represent novel molecular targets for the treatment of various types of cancers, including multiple myeloma (MM). Many HDAC inhibitors have already shown remarkable anti-tumor activities in the preclinical setting; however, their clinical utility is limited due to unfavorable toxicities associated with their broad range HDAC inhibitory effects. Isoform-selective HDAC inhibition may allow for MM cytotoxicity without attendant side effects. In this study, we demonstrated that HDAC3 knockdown and a small molecule HDAC3 inhibitor BG45 trigger significant MM cell growth inhibition via apoptosis, evidenced by caspase and PARP cleavage. Importantly, HDAC3 inhibition downregulates phosphorylation (tyrosine 705 and serine 727) of STAT3. Neither IL-6 nor bone marrow stromal cells overcome this inhibitory effect of HDAC3 inhibition on p-STAT3 and MM cell growth. Moreover, HDAC3 inhibition also triggers hyperacetylation of STAT3, suggesting crosstalk signaling between phosphorylation and acetylation of STAT3. Importantly, inhibition of HDAC3, but not HDAC1 or HDAC2, significantly enhances bortezomib-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, we confirm that BG45 alone and in combination with bortezomib trigger significant tumor growth inhibition in vivo in a murine xenograft model of human MM. Our results indicate that HDAC3 represents a promising therapeutic target, and validate a prototype novel HDAC3 inhibitor BG45 in MM. PMID:23913134

  8. Cloning and characterization of a novel human histone deacetylase, HDAC8.

    PubMed Central

    Buggy, J J; Sideris, M L; Mak, P; Lorimer, D D; McIntosh, B; Clark, J M

    2000-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a growing family of enzymes implicated in transcriptional regulation by affecting the acetylation state of core histones in the nucleus of cells. HDACs are known to have key roles in the regulation of cell proliferation [Brehm, Miska, McCance, Reid, Bannister and Kouzarides (1998) Nature (London) 391, 597-600], and aberrant recruitment of an HDAC complex has been shown to be a key step in the mechanism of cell transformation in acute promyelocytic leukaemia [Grignani, De Matteis, Nervi, Tomassoni, Gelmetti, Cioce, Fanelli, Ruthardt, Ferrara, Zamir et al. (1998) Nature (London) 391, 815-818; Lin, Nagy, Inoue, Shao, Miller and Evans (1998), Nature (London) 391, 811-814]. Here we present the complete nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone, termed HDAC8, that encodes a protein product with similarity to the RPD3 class (I) of HDACs. The predicted 377-residue HDAC8 product contains a shorter C-terminal extension relative to other members of its class. After expression in two cell systems, immunopurified HDAC8 is shown to possess trichostatin A- and sodium butyrate-inhibitable HDAC activity on histone H4 peptide substrates as well as on core histones. Expression profiling reveals the expression of HDAC8 to various degrees in every tissue tested and also in several tumour lines. Mutation of two adjacent histidine residues within the predicted active site severely decreases activity, confirming these residues as important for HDAC8 enzyme activity. Finally, linkage analysis after radiation hybrid mapping has localized HDAC8 to chromosomal position Xq21.2-Xq21.3. These results confirm HDAC8 as a new member of the HDAC family. PMID:10926844

  9. Synthesis of sulfonamides and evaluation of their histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seikwan; Moon, Hyung-In; Son, Il-Hong; Jung, Jae-Chul; Avery, Mitchell A

    2007-01-01

    A simple synthesis of sulfonamides 4-22 as novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors is described. The key synthetic strategies involve N-sulfonylation of L-proline benzyl ester hydrochloride (2) and coupling reaction of N-sulfonyl chloride 3 with amines in high yields. It was found that several compounds showed good cellular potency with the most potent compound 20 exhibiting an IC50 = 2.8 microM in vitro. PMID:17873846

  10. In Vivo Imaging of Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) in the Central Nervous System and Major Peripheral Organs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic enzymes are now targeted to treat the underlying gene expression dysregulation that contribute to disease pathogenesis. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have shown broad potential in treatments against cancer and emerging data supports their targeting in the context of cardiovascular disease and central nervous system dysfunction. Development of a molecular agent for non-invasive imaging to elucidate the distribution and functional roles of HDACs in humans will accelerate medical research and drug discovery in this domain. Herein, we describe the synthesis and validation of an HDAC imaging agent, [11C]6. Our imaging results demonstrate that this probe has high specificity, good selectivity, and appropriate kinetics and distribution for imaging HDACs in the brain, heart, kidney, pancreas, and spleen. Our findings support the translational potential for [11C]6 for human epigenetic imaging. PMID:25203558

  11. The role of class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) on gluconeogenesis in liver

    SciTech Connect

    Oiso, Hiroshi; Furukawa, Noboru; Suefuji, Mihoshi; Shimoda, Seiya; Ito, Akihiro; Furumai, Ryohei; Nakagawa, Junichi; Yoshida, Minoru; Nishino, Norikazu; Araki, Eiichi

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} A novel class I HDAC inhibitor decreased hepatic PEPCK mRNA and gluconeogenesis. {yields} Inhibition of HDAC decreased PEPCK by reducing HNF4{alpha} expression and FoxO1 activity. {yields} siRNA knockdown of HDAC1 in HepG2 cells reduced the expression of PEPCK and HNF4{alpha}. {yields} Inhibition of class I HDAC improves glucose homeostasis in HFD mice. -- Abstract: Hepatic gluconeogenesis is crucial for glucose homeostasis. Although sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is implicated in the regulation of gluconeogenesis in the liver, the effects of other histone deacetylases (HDAC) on gluconeogenesis are unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the role of class I HDACs in hepatic gluconeogenesis. In HepG2 cells and the liver of mice, the expressions of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) were significantly decreased by treatment with a newly designed class I HDAC inhibitor, Ky-2. SiRNA knockdown of HDAC1 expression, but not of HDAC2 or HDAC3, in HepG2 cells decreased PEPCK and HNF4{alpha} expression. In HepG2 cells, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and forkhead box O 1 (FoxO1) was increased by Ky-2. Pyruvate tolerance tests in Ky-2-treated high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed mice showed a marked reduction in blood glucose compared with vehicle-treated HFD mice. These data suggest that class I HDACs increase HNF4{alpha} protein expression and the transcriptional activity of FoxO1, followed by the induction of PEPCK mRNA expression and gluconeogenesis in liver.

  12. Histone Deacetylase HDAC8 Promotes Insulin Resistance and ?-Catenin Activation in NAFLD-Associated Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Wong, Vincent W S; Wong, Grace L H; Yang, Weiqin; Sun, Hanyong; Shen, Jiayun; Tong, Joanna H M; Go, Minnie Y Y; Cheung, Yue S; Lai, Paul B S; Zhou, Mingyan; Xu, Gang; Huang, Tim H M; Yu, Jun; To, Ka F; Cheng, Alfred S L; Chan, Henry L Y

    2015-11-15

    The growing epidemic of obesity, which causes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the more severe phenotype nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), has paralleled the increasing incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Accumulating evidence demonstrates that overnutrition and metabolic pathways can trigger modifications of DNA and histones via deregulation of chromatin modifiers, resulting in aberrant transcriptional activity. However, the epigenetic regulation of HCC development in NAFLD remains obscure. Here, we uncover key epigenetic regulators using both dietary and genetic obesity-promoted HCC models through quantitative expression profiling and characterize the oncogenic activities of histone deacetylase HDAC8 in NAFLD-associated hepatocarcinogenesis. HDAC8 is directly upregulated by the lipogenic transcription factor SREBP-1 where they are coexpressed in dietary obesity models of NASH and HCC. Lentiviral-mediated HDAC8 attenuation in vivo reversed insulin resistance and reduced NAFLD-associated tumorigenicity. HDAC8 modulation by genetic and pharmacologic approaches inhibited p53/p21-mediated apoptosis and G2-M phase cell-cycle arrest and stimulated ?-catenin-dependent cell proliferation. Mechanistically, HDAC8 physically interacted with the chromatin modifier EZH2 to concordantly repress Wnt antagonists via histone H4 deacetylation and H3 lysine 27 trimethylation. In human NAFLD-associated HCC, levels of SREBP-1, HDAC8, EZH2, H4 deacetylation, H3K27me3, and active ?-catenin were all correlated positively in tumors compared with nontumor tissues. Overall, our findings show how HDAC8 drives NAFLD-associated hepatocarcinogenesis, offering a novel epigenetic target to prevent or treat HCC in obese patients. Cancer Res; 75(22); 4803-16. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26383163

  13. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) deacetylates survivin for its nuclear export in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Riolo, Matthew T; Cooper, Zachary A; Holloway, Michael P; Cheng, Yan; Bianchi, Cesario; Yakirevich, Evgeny; Ma, Li; Chin, Y Eugene; Altura, Rachel A

    2012-03-30

    Survivin is an oncogenic protein that is highly expressed in breast cancer and has a dual function that is dependent on its subcellular localization. In the cytosol, survivin blocks programmed cell death by inactivating caspase proteins; however, in the nucleus it facilitates cell division by regulating chromosomal movement and cytokinesis. In prior work, we showed that survivin is acetylated by CREB-binding protein (CBP), which restricts its localization to the nuclear compartment and thereby inhibits its anti-apoptotic function. Here, we identify histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) as responsible for abrogating CBP-mediated survivin acetylation in the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. HDAC6 directly binds survivin, an interaction that is enhanced by CBP. In quiescent breast cancer cells in culture and in malignant tissue sections from ER+ breast tumors, HDAC6 localizes to a perinuclear region of the cell, undergoing transport to the nucleus following CBP activation where it then deacetylates survivin. Genetically modified mouse embryonic fibroblasts that lack mhdac6 localize survivin predominantly to the nuclear compartment, whereas wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts localize survivin to distinct cytoplasmic structures. Together, these data imply that HDAC6 deacetylates survivin to regulate its nuclear export, a feature that may provide a novel target for patients with ER+ breast cancer. PMID:22334690

  14. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of saccharin-based N-hydroxybenzamides as histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huansheng; Han, Leiqiang; Hou, Xuben; Dun, Yanyan; Wang, Lei; Gong, Xiaowei; Fang, Hao

    2015-09-01

    We report the development of a novel series of saccharin-based N-hydroxybenzamides as histone deacetylases inhibitors. Among them, 6 j exhibited potent HDACs inhibitory activity against Hela nuclear extract. Further biological evaluation found 6 i showed similar antiproliferative activities in vitro compared with the approved SAHA. PMID:26216016

  15. Design and synthesis of novel and highly-active pan-histone deacetylase (pan-HDAC) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tashima, Toshihiko; Murata, Hiroaki; Kodama, Hidehiko

    2014-07-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitions are known to elicit anticancer effects. We designed and synthesized several HDAC inhibitors. Among these compounds, compound 40 exhibited a more than 10-fold stronger inhibitory activity compared with that of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) against each human HDAC isozyme in vitro (IC50 values of 40: HDAC1, 0.0038?M; HDAC2, 0.0082?M; HDAC3, 0.015?M; HDAC8, 0.0060?M; HDAC4, 0.058?M; HDAC9, 0.0052?M; HDAC6, 0.058?M). The dose of the administered HDAC inhibitors that contain hydroxamic acid as the zinc-binding group may be reduced by 40. Because the carbostyril subunit is a time-tested structural component of drugs and biologically active compounds, 40 most likely exhibits good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET). Thus, compound 40 is expected to be a promising therapeutic agent or chemical tool for the investigation of life process. PMID:24864038

  16. Valproic Acid as a Potential Inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum Histone Deacetylase 1 (PfHDAC1): An in Silico Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elbadawi, Mohamed A. Abdallah; Awadalla, Mohamed Khalid Alhaj; Abdel Hamid, Muzamil Mahdi; Mohamed, Magdi Awadalla; Awad, Talal Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A new Plasmodium falciparum histone deacetylase1 (PfHDAC1) homology model was built based on the highest sequence identity available template human histone deacetylase 2 structure. The generated model was carefully evaluated for stereochemical accuracy, folding correctness and overall structure quality. All evaluations were acceptable and consistent. Docking a group of hydroxamic acid histone deacetylase inhibitors and valproic acid has shown binding poses that agree well with inhibitor-bound histone deacetylase-solved structural interactions. Docking affinity dG scores were in agreement with available experimental binding affinities. Further, enzyme-ligand complex stability and reliability were investigated by running 5-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations. Thorough analysis of the simulation trajectories has shown that enzyme-ligand complexes were stable during the simulation period. Interestingly, the calculated theoretical binding energies of the docked hydroxamic acid inhibitors have shown that the model can discriminate between strong and weaker inhibitors and agrees well with the experimental affinities reported in the literature. The model and the docking methodology can be used in screening virtual libraries for PfHDAC1 inhibitors, since the docking scores have ranked ligands in accordance with experimental binding affinities. Valproic acid calculated theoretical binding energy suggests that it may inhibit PfHDAC1. PMID:25679451

  17. The histone deacetylase HDAC3 is essential for Purkinje cell function, potentially complicating the use of HDAC inhibitors in SCA1

    PubMed Central

    Venkatraman, Anand; Hu, Yuan-Shih; Didonna, Alessandro; Cvetanovic, Marija; Krbanjevic, Aleksandar; Bilesimo, Patrice; Opal, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an incurable neurodegenerative disease caused by a pathogenic glutamine repeat expansion in the protein ataxin-1 (ATXN1). One likely mechanism mediating pathogenesis is excessive transcriptional repression induced by the expanded ATXN-1. Because ATXN1 binds HDAC3, a Class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) that we have found to be required for ATXN1-induced transcriptional repression, we tested whether genetically depleting HDAC3 improves the phenotype of the SCA1 knock-in mouse (SCA1154Q/2Q), the most physiologically relevant model of SCA1. Given that HDAC3 null mice are embryonic lethal, we used for our analyses a combination of HDAC3 haploinsufficient and Purkinje cell (PC)-specific HDAC3 null mice. Although deleting a single allele of HDAC3 in the context of SCA1 was insufficient to improve cerebellar and cognitive deficits of the disease, a complete loss of PC HDAC3 was highly deleterious both behaviorally, with mice showing early onset ataxia, and pathologically, with progressive histologic evidence of degeneration. Inhibition of HDAC3 may yet have a role in SCA1 therapy, but our study provides cautionary evidence that this approach could produce untoward effects. Indeed, the neurotoxic consequences of HDAC3 depletion could prove relevant, wherever pharmacologic inhibition of HDAC3 is being contemplated, in disorders ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration. PMID:24594842

  18. Snail Mediates E-Cadherin Repression by the Recruitment of the Sin3A/Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1)/HDAC2 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Peinado, Hector; Ballestar, Esteban; Esteller, Manel; Cano, Amparo

    2004-01-01

    The transcription factor Snail has been described as a direct repressor of E-cadherin expression during development and carcinogenesis; however, the specific mechanisms involved in this process remain largely unknown. Here we show that mammalian Snail requires histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity to repress E-cadherin promoter and that treatment with trichostatin A (TSA) is sufficient to block the repressor effect of Snail. Moreover, overexpression of Snail is correlated with deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 at the E-cadherin promoter, and TSA treatment in Snail-expressing cells reverses the acetylation status of histones. Additionally, we demonstrate that Snail interacts in vivo with the E-cadherin promoter and recruits HDAC activity. Most importantly, we demonstrate an interaction between Snail, histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC2, and the corepressor mSin3A. This interaction is dependent on the SNAG domain of Snail, indicating that the Snail transcription factor mediates the repression by recruitment of chromatin-modifying activities, forming a multimolecular complex to repress E-cadherin expression. Our results establish a direct causal relationship between Snail-dependent repression of E-cadherin and the modification of chromatin at its promoter. PMID:14673164

  19. Insights into the Recruitment of Class IIa Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) to the SMRT/NCoR Transcriptional Repression Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Gregg M.; Watson, Peter J.; Fairall, Louise; Jamieson, Andrew G.; Schwabe, John W. R.

    2015-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases repress transcription of target genes. However, their mechanism of action is poorly understood because they exhibit very low levels of deacetylase activity. The class IIa HDACs are associated with the SMRT/NCoR repression complexes and this may, at least in part, account for their repressive activity. However, the molecular mechanism of recruitment to co-repressor proteins has yet to be established. Here we show that a repeated peptide motif present in both SMRT and NCoR is sufficient to mediate specific interaction, with micromolar affinity, with all the class IIa HDACs (HDACs 4, 5, 7, and 9). Mutations in the consensus motif abrogate binding. Mutational analysis of HDAC4 suggests that the peptide interacts in the vicinity of the active site of the enzyme and requires the “closed” conformation of the zinc-binding loop on the surface of the enzyme. Together these findings represent the first insights into the molecular mechanism of recruitment of class IIa HDACs to the SMRT/NCoR repression complexes. PMID:26055705

  20. Preclinical antitumor activity of ST7612AA1: a new oral thiol-based histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, Ferdinando Maria; De Santis, Rita; Gaudio, Eugenio; Kwee, Ivo; Rinaldi, Andrea; Pace, Silvia; Carollo, Valeria; Giannini, Giuseppe; Bertoni, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    ST7612AA1 (property of Sigma-Tau), a thioacetate-? (?-lactam amide) derivative, is a potent, second generation, oral pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi). Aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of ST7612AA1 in solid and haematological tumors, and to characterize its mechanism of action. In vitro, ST7612AA1 potently inhibited different class I and class II HDACs, leading to restore the balance of both histone and non-histone protein acetylation. In vivo, it induced significant anti-tumor effects in xenograft models of lung, colon, breast and ovarian carcinomas, leukemia and lymphoma. This was likely due to the modulation of different HDAC substrates and induction of transcriptional changes with respect to several genes involved in key processes, such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage checkpoints, immune response, cell adhesion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PK analysis confirmed the pro-drug nature of ST7612AA1, which is rapidly absorbed and converted to ST7464AA1 after a single oral dose in mice. ST7612AA1 was selected from a novel generation of oral HDAC inhibitors. Its high efficacy correlated with its potent and selective inhibitory activity of HDAC and was combined with a favorable pharmacodynamics profile. These aspects support a clinical development of ST7612AA1 towards a broad spectrum of human solid and haematologic malignancies. PMID:25671299

  1. A New Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, MHY219, Inhibits the Migration of Human Prostate Cancer Cells via HDAC1.

    PubMed

    De, Umasankar; Kundu, Soma; Patra, Nabanita; Ahn, Mee Young; Ahn, Ji Hae; Son, Ji Yeon; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hyung Ryoung; Lee, Byung Mu; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2015-09-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are considered novel agents for cancer chemotherapy. We previously investigated MHY219, a new HDAC inhibitor, and its potent anticancer activity in human prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated MHY219 molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of prostate cancer cell migration. Similar to suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA), MHY219 inhibited HDAC1 enzyme activity in a dose-dependent manner. MHY219 cytotoxicity was higher in LNCaP (IC50=0.67 ?M) than in DU145 cells (IC50=1.10 ?M) and PC3 cells (IC50=5.60 ?M) after 48 h of treatment. MHY219 significantly inhibited the HDAC1 protein levels in LNCaP and DU145 cells at high concentrations. However, inhibitory effects of MHY219 on HDAC proteins levels varied based on the cell type. MHY219 significantly inhibited LNCaP and DU145 cells migration by down-regulation of matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) and MMP-2 and induction of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). These results suggest that MHY219 may potentially be used as an anticancer agent to block cancer cell migration through the repression of MMP-1 and MMP-2, which is related to the reduction of HDAC1. PMID:26336583

  2. Ketamine produces antidepressant-like effects through phosphorylation-dependent nuclear export of histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Miyeon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Wang, Sung Eun; Ko, Seung Yeon; Song, Mihee; Choi, June-Seek; Kim, Yong-Seok; Duman, Ronald S; Son, Hyeon

    2015-12-22

    Ketamine produces rapid antidepressant-like effects in animal assays for depression, although the molecular mechanisms underlying these behavioral actions remain incomplete. Here, we demonstrate that ketamine rapidly stimulates histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) phosphorylation and nuclear export in rat hippocampal neurons through calcium/calmodulin kinase II- and protein kinase D-dependent pathways. Consequently, ketamine enhanced the transcriptional activity of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), which leads to regulation of MEF2 target genes. Transfection of a HDAC5 phosphorylation-defective mutant (Ser259/Ser498 replaced by Ala259/Ala498, HDAC5-S/A), resulted in resistance to ketamine-induced nuclear export, suppression of ketamine-mediated MEF2 transcriptional activity, and decreased expression of MEF2 target genes. Behaviorally, viral-mediated hippocampal knockdown of HDAC5 blocked or occluded the antidepressant effects of ketamine both in unstressed and stressed animals. Taken together, our results reveal a novel role of HDAC5 in the actions of ketamine and suggest that HDAC5 could be a potential mechanism contributing to the therapeutic actions of ketamine. PMID:26647181

  3. A New Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, MHY219, Inhibits the Migration of Human Prostate Cancer Cells via HDAC1

    PubMed Central

    De, Umasankar; Kundu, Soma; Patra, Nabanita; Ahn, Mee Young; Ahn, Ji Hae; Son, Ji Yeon; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hyung Ryoung; Lee, Byung Mu; Kim, Hyung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are considered novel agents for cancer chemotherapy. We previously investigated MHY219, a new HDAC inhibitor, and its potent anticancer activity in human prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated MHY219 molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of prostate cancer cell migration. Similar to suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA), MHY219 inhibited HDAC1 enzyme activity in a dose-dependent manner. MHY219 cytotoxicity was higher in LNCaP (IC50=0.67 ?M) than in DU145 cells (IC50=1.10 ?M) and PC3 cells (IC50=5.60 ?M) after 48 h of treatment. MHY219 significantly inhibited the HDAC1 protein levels in LNCaP and DU145 cells at high concentrations. However, inhibitory effects of MHY219 on HDAC proteins levels varied based on the cell type. MHY219 significantly inhibited LNCaP and DU145 cells migration by down-regulation of matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) and MMP-2 and induction of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). These results suggest that MHY219 may potentially be used as an anticancer agent to block cancer cell migration through the repression of MMP-1 and MMP-2, which is related to the reduction of HDAC1. PMID:26336583

  4. Effect of a new immunosuppressant histon deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor FR276457 in a rat cardiac transplant model.

    PubMed

    Kinugasa, Fumitaka; Yamada, Toshiko; Noto, Takahisa; Matsuoka, Hideaki; Mori, Hiroaki; Sudo, Yuji; Mutoh, Seitaro

    2008-09-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a known modulator of gene transcription, and the immunosuppressive activity of HDAC inhibitors has been demonstrated in recent several reports. In this study, the HDAC inhibitor FR276457, a hydroxamic derivative, was found to have a similar inhibitory effect on all mammalian HDACs tested, but no isozyme selectivity. Both FR276457 and tacrolimus exerted an immunosuppressive effect on in vitro rat splenocyte proliferation stimulated with Concanavalin A. Next, the effect of FR276457 on allograft rejection when administered either as a monotherapy or in combination with tacrolimus was investigated in a rat heterotopic cardiac transplant model. Orally administered FR276457 prolonged the median survival times (MST) of the transplanted grafts in the vehicle group from 6 d to 17 or 21 d at doses of 20 or 40 mg/kg, respectively. Histopathological analysis showed the structures of the myocardium were not affected, but interstitial cellular infiltration could not be suppressed completely. Tacrolimus (0.032 mg/kg) prolonged allograft MST to 16 d. FR276457, when combined with tacrolimus, prevented allograft rejection at a dose lower than that of the monotherapy. The combination dose prolonged the MST in the groups treated with 10 and 20 mg/kg to >28 d, and cellular infiltration was suppressed completely. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the oral administration of HDAC inhibitor FR276457 can prevent allograft rejection as a monotherapy, and has additive or synergistic effects when combined with tacrolimus. PMID:18758066

  5. Restoring histone deacetylase activity by waste product release. A view from molecular mechanics simulations with mammalian HDAC8.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    HDAC8 is a Zn(II) -based, single-peptide mammalian histone deacetylase that is localized mainly in the cytoskeleton of smooth muscle cells, thus regulating muscle contractility. HDACs are also widely involved in cellular processes, ranging from cell differentiation to proliferation, senescence, and apoptosis; in particular, protecting a telomerase activator from ubiquitin-mediated degradation. How HDACs can eliminate the hydrolytic reaction products, in order that the process of deacetylation of the acetyllysine moiety of histones can take place again, has long been debated in the scientific literature, without reaching any firm conclusion, however. This question is the subject of the present work, carried out along a theoretical line that is capable of describing the whole pathway followed by the acetate product (ACT). A model was built here on the crystal data for the Y306F-mutated HDAC8 complex with a diacetylated peptide of the p53-tumor-suppressor class. That was followed by manually hydrolyzing the acetylated moiety bound to Zn(II) and discharging the monoacetylated peptide product (MAP). The latter was replaced by a H2 O molecule bound to Zn(II) , while ACT was left free in the reaction cage. This Zn(II) cluster was DFT-parameterized for the ff99SB force field without any further bias. As the result of random-acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulations, egress of ACT from the reaction cage toward the aqueous environment can follow three pathways. Two of them utilize the channel for peptide (or histone) uptake and are preferred, if ACT leaves the reaction center before MAP (or the deacetylated histone). The third pathway, developing along the internal channel, is available to ACT even if MAP is still in place. PMID:25879496

  6. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of potent and selective class IIa histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors as a potential therapy for Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Bürli, Roland W; Luckhurst, Christopher A; Aziz, Omar; Matthews, Kim L; Yates, Dawn; Lyons, Kathy A; Beconi, Maria; McAllister, George; Breccia, Perla; Stott, Andrew J; Penrose, Stephen D; Wall, Michael; Lamers, Marieke; Leonard, Philip; Müller, Ilka; Richardson, Christine M; Jarvis, Rebecca; Stones, Liz; Hughes, Samantha; Wishart, Grant; Haughan, Alan F; O'Connell, Catherine; Mead, Tania; McNeil, Hannah; Vann, Julie; Mangette, John; Maillard, Michel; Beaumont, Vahri; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Dominguez, Celia

    2013-12-27

    Inhibition of class IIa histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes have been suggested as a therapeutic strategy for a number of diseases, including Huntington's disease. Catalytic-site small molecule inhibitors of the class IIa HDAC4, -5, -7, and -9 were developed. These trisubstituted diarylcyclopropanehydroxamic acids were designed to exploit a lower pocket that is characteristic for the class IIa HDACs, not present in other HDAC classes. Selected inhibitors were cocrystallized with the catalytic domain of human HDAC4. We describe the first HDAC4 catalytic domain crystal structure in a "closed-loop" form, which in our view represents the biologically relevant conformation. We have demonstrated that these molecules can differentiate class IIa HDACs from class I and class IIb subtypes. They exhibited pharmacokinetic properties that should enable the assessment of their therapeutic benefit in both peripheral and CNS disorders. These selective inhibitors provide a means for evaluating potential efficacy in preclinical models in vivo. PMID:24261862

  7. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid reduces ethanol consumption and ethanol-conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Al Ameri, Mouza; Al Mansouri, Shamma; Al Maamari, Alyazia; Bahi, Amine

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms such as chromatin modification (specifically histone acetylation) may play a crucial role in the development of addictive behavior. However, little is known about the role of epigenetic modifications in the rewarding properties of ethanol. In the current study, we studied the effects of systemic injection of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA) on ethanol consumption and ethanol-elicited conditioned place preference (CPP). The effect of VPA (300 mg/kg) on voluntary ethanol intake and preference was assessed using continuous two-bottle choice procedure with escalating concentrations of alcohol (2.5-20% v/v escalating over 4 weeks). Taste sensitivity was studies using saccharin (sweet; 0.03% and 0.06%) and quinine (bitter; 20 µM and 40 µM) tastants solutions. Ethanol conditioned reward was investigated using an unbiased CPP model. Blood ethanol concentration (BEC) was also measured. Compared to vehicle, VPA-injected rats displayed significantly lower preference and consumption of ethanol in a two-bottle choice paradigm, with no significant difference observed with saccharin and quinine. More importantly, 0.5 g/kg ethanol-induced-CPP acquisition was blocked following VPA administration. Finally, vehicle- and VPA-treated mice had similar BECs. Taken together, our results implicated HDAC inhibition in the behavioral and reinforcement-related effects of alcohol and raise the question of whether specific drugs that target HDAC could potentially help to tackle alcoholism in humans. PMID:25108044

  8. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors Preserve White Matter Structure and Function During Ischemia by Conserving ATP and Reducing Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Baltan, Selva; Murphy, Sean P.; Danilov, Camelia A.; Bachleda, Amelia; Morrison, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of white matter (WM) injury to stroke pathology has been underestimated in experimental animal models and this may have contributed to the failure to translate potential therapeutics into the stroke clinic. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are neuroprotective and also promote neurogenesis. These properties make them ideal candidates for stroke therapy. In a pure WM tract (isolated mouse optic nerve) we show that pan- and Class I specific HDAC inhibitors, administered before or after a period of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), promote functional recovery of axons and preserve WM cellular architecture. This protection correlates with the up-regulation of an astrocyte glutamate transporter, delayed and reduced glutamate accumulation during OGD, preservation of axonal mitochondria and oligodendrocytes, and maintenance of ATP levels. Interestingly, the expression of HDACs 1, 2 and 3 is localized to astrocytes, suggesting that changes in glial cell gene transcription and/or protein acetylation may confer protection to axons. Our findings suggest that a therapeutic opportunity exists for the use of HDAC inhibitors, targeting mitochondrial energy regulation and excitotoxicity in ischemic WM injury. PMID:21411642

  9. Novel inhibitors of human histone deacetylase (HDAC) identified by QSAR modeling of known inhibitors, virtual screening, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Wang, Xiang S; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Butler, Kyle V; Kozikowski, Alan P; Jung, Mira; Tropsha, Alexander

    2009-02-01

    Inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACIs) have emerged as a new class of drugs for the treatment of human cancers and other diseases because of their effects on cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this study we have developed several quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for 59 chemically diverse histone deacetylase class 1 (HDAC1) inhibitors. The variable selection k nearest neighbor (kNN) and support vector machines (SVM) QSAR modeling approaches using both MolconnZ and MOE chemical descriptors generated from two-dimensional rendering of compounds as chemical graphs have been employed. We have relied on a rigorous model development workflow including the division of the data set into training, test, and external sets and extensive internal and external validation. Highly predictive QSAR models were generated with leave-one-out cross-validated (LOO-CV) q2 and external R2 values as high as 0.80 and 0.87, respectively, using the kNN/MolconnZ approach and 0.93 and 0.87, respectively, using the SVM/MolconnZ approach. All validated QSAR models were employed concurrently for virtual screening (VS) of an in-house compound collection including 9.5 million molecules compiled from the ZINC7.0 database, the World Drug Index (WDI) database, the ASINEX Synergy libraries, and other commercial databases. VS resulted in 45 structurally unique consensus hits that were considered novel putative HDAC1 inhibitors. These computational hits had several novel structural features that were not present in the original data set. Four computational hits with novel scaffolds were tested experimentally, and three of them were confirmed active against HDAC1, with IC50 values for the most active compound of 1.00 microM. The fourth compound was later identified to be a selective inhibitor of HDAC6, a Class II HDAC. Moreover, two of the confirmed hits are marketed drugs, which could potentially facilitate their further development as anticancer agents. This study illustrates the power of the combined QSAR-VS method as a general approach for the effective identification of structurally novel bioactive compounds. PMID:19182860

  10. HDAC8 Substrates: Histones and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Noah A.; Pitcairn, Carol Ann; Fierke, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    The lysine deacetylase family of enzymes (HDACs) was first demonstrated to catalyze deacetylation of acetyllysine residues on histones. In subsequent years, HDACs have been shown to recognize a large pool of acetylated non-histone proteins as substrates. Recently, thousands of acetylated proteins have been discovered, yet in most cases, the HDAC that catalyzes deacetylation in vivo has not been identified. This gap has created the need for better in vivo, in vitro, and in silico approaches for determining HDAC substrates. While HDAC8 is the best kinetically and structurally characterized HDAC, few efficient substrates have yet been substantiated in vivo. In this review we delineate factors that may be important for determining HDAC8 substrate recognition and catalytic activity, including structure, complex formation, and post-translational modifications. This summary provides insight into the challenges of identifying in vivo substrates for HDAC8, and provides a good vantage point for understanding the variables important for predicting HDAC substrate recognition. PMID:23175386

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhong, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a vast family of enzymes involved in chromatin remodeling and have crucial roles in numerous biological processes, largely through their repressive influence on transcription. In addition to modifying histones, HDACs also target many other non-histone protein substrates to regulate gene expression. Recently, HDACs have gained growing attention as HDAC-inhibiting compounds are being developed as promising cancer therapeutics. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to induce differentiation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis in a variety of transformed cell lines. In this review, we mainly discuss how HDACi may elicit a therapeutic response to human cancers through different cell death pathways, in particular, apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:24898083

  12. Histone deacetylase 3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Travis; Seiler, Caroline; Wolny, Marcin; Hughes, Ruth; Watson, Peter; Schwabe, John; Grigg, Ronald; Peckham, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), a member of the Class I subfamily of HDACs, is found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Its roles in the nucleus have been well characterized, but its cytoplasmic roles are still not elucidated fully. We found that blocking HDAC3 activity using MI192, a compound specific for HDAC3, modulated tubulin acetylation in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3. A brief 1 h treatment of PC3 cells with MI192 significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation and ablated the dynamic behaviour of microtubules in live cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of HDAC3 in PC3 cells, significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation, and overexpression reduced it. However, the active HDAC3–silencing mediator of retinoic and thyroid receptors (SMRT)–deacetylase-activating domain (DAD) complex did not directly deacetylate tubulin in vitro. These data suggest that HDAC3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation. PMID:26450925

  13. Histone deacetylase 3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation.

    PubMed

    Bacon, Travis; Seiler, Caroline; Wolny, Marcin; Hughes, Ruth; Watson, Peter; Schwabe, John; Grigg, Ronald; Peckham, Michelle

    2015-12-15

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), a member of the Class I subfamily of HDACs, is found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Its roles in the nucleus have been well characterized, but its cytoplasmic roles are still not elucidated fully. We found that blocking HDAC3 activity using MI192, a compound specific for HDAC3, modulated tubulin acetylation in the human prostate cancer cell line PC3. A brief 1 h treatment of PC3 cells with MI192 significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation and ablated the dynamic behaviour of microtubules in live cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of HDAC3 in PC3 cells, significantly increased levels of tubulin acetylation, and overexpression reduced it. However, the active HDAC3-silencing mediator of retinoic and thyroid receptors (SMRT)-deacetylase-activating domain (DAD) complex did not directly deacetylate tubulin in vitro. These data suggest that HDAC3 indirectly modulates tubulin acetylation. PMID:26450925

  14. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa histone deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina; Petrini, Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra

    2015-04-01

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin-myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. PMID:25511694

  15. Inhibitors of NAD+ dependent histone deacetylases (sirtuins).

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Robert C; Sippl, Wolfgang; Jung, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that deacetylate acetyl lysines in histones and various non-histone proteins. Three classes of histone deacetylases have been described in humans: class I, II and IV were shown to be zinc dependent amidohydrolases and eleven subtypes are known today (HDAC1-11). Class III enzymes depend in their catalysis on NAD+ with the subsequent formation of nicotinamide and O acetyl-ADP ribose. Based on the homology to the yeast histone deacetylase Sir2p the NAD+-dependent deacetylases have been termed sirtuins and seven members (SIRT1-7) have been described in humans. Whereas class I and II HDACs have been identified as valid anticancer targets and clinical studies of their inhibitors as new anticancer agents are under way much less is known about the consequences of class III histone deacetylase inhibition. Sirtuins have been linked to ageing and overexpression of sirtuins leads to a prolonged lifespan in yeast. Lately, sirtuin activity has been tied to the pathogenesis of HIV, cancer and neurodegenerative disease. In the last two years several reports of new sirtuin inhibitors have emerged. Additionally, sirtuin activators have been identified and have been implicated as potential drugs for the amelioration of metabolic diseases. Thus, the field of sirtuin biology can be investigated with these new tools which will allow in turn to assess the therapeutic potential of those compounds. We will present an overview over sirtuins and their available inhibitors and activators. PMID:18336301

  16. CD1d induction in solid tumor cells by histone deacetylase inhibitors through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and activation of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Lin, Pei-Jie; Chen, Ching-Chow

    2012-04-01

    CD1d is a MHC class-like molecule that presents glycolipids to natural killer T (NKT) cells, then regulates innate and adaptive immunity. The regulation of CD1d gene expression in solid tumors is still largely unknown. Gene expression can be epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation and histone acetylation. We found that histone deacetylase inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), induced CD1d gene expression in human (A549 and NCI-H292) and mouse (TC-1 and B16/F0) cancer cells. Simultaneous knockdown of HDAC1 and 2 induced CD1d gene expression. Sp1 inhibitor mitramycin A (MTM) blocked TSA- and SAHA-induced CD1d mRNA expression and Sp1 luciferase activity. Co-transfection of GAL4-Sp1 and Fc-luciferase reporters demonstrated that TSA and SAHA induced Sp1 luciferase reporter activity by enhancing Sp1 transactivation activity. The binding of Sp1 to CD1d promoter and histone H3 acetylation on Sp1 sites were increased by TSA and SAHA. These results indicate that TSA and SAHA could up-regulate CD1d expression in tumor cells through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and activation of Sp1. PMID:22419072

  17. Hybrids from Farnesylthiosalicylic Acid and Hydroxamic Acid as Dual Ras-Related Signaling and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Yong; Wang, Xuemin; Wang, Chenniu; Xu, Chenjun; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yihua; Zhang, Yanan

    2015-06-01

    A novel series of hybrids was designed and synthesized by combining key elements from farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS) and hydroxamic acid. Several 3,7,11-trimethyldodeca-2,6,10-trien-1-yl) thio)benzamide derivatives, particularly those with branched and linear aliphatic linkers between the hydroxamic zinc binding group (ZBG) and the benzamide core, not only displayed significant antitumor activities against six human cancer cells but also exhibited histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitory effects in vitro. Among them, N-(4-(hydroxyamino)-4-oxobutyl)-2-(((2E,6E)-3,7,11-trimethyldodeca-2,6, 10-trien-1-yl)thio)benzamide (8 d) was the most potent, with IC50 values of 4.9-7.6 ?M; these activities are eight- to sixteen-fold more potent than FTS and comparable to that of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). Derivative 8 d induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase, inhibited the acetylation of histone H3 and ?-tubulin, and blocked Ras-related signaling pathways in a dose-dependent manner. The improved tumor growth inhibition and cell-cycle arrest in vitro might result from the dual inhibition. These findings suggest dual inhibitors of Ras-related signaling pathway and HDAC hold promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25882299

  18. Histone and Non-Histone Targets of Dietary Deacetylase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunah; Bisson, William H; Löhr, Christiane V; Williams, David E; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H; Rajendran, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation is an important, reversible post-translational modification affecting histone and non-histone proteins with critical roles in gene transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Key regulatory enzymes include histone deacetylase (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs). Overexpressed HDACs have been identified in many human cancers, resulting in repressed chromatin states that interfere with vital tumor suppressor functions. Inhibition of HDAC activity has been pursued as a mechanism for re-activating repressed genes in cancers, with some HDAC inhibitors showing promise in the clinical setting. Dietary compounds and their metabolites also have been shown to modulate HDAC activity or expression. Out of this body of research, attention increasingly has shifted towards non-histone targets of HDACs and HATs, such as transcriptions factors, hormone receptors, DNA repair proteins, and cytoskeletal components. These aspects are covered in present review, along with the possible clinical significance. Where such data are available, examples are cited from the literature of studies with short chain fatty acids, polyphenols, isoflavones, indoles, organosulfur compounds, organoselenium compounds, sesquiterpene lactones, isoflavones, and various miscellaneous agents. By virtue of their effects on both histone and non-histone proteins, dietary chemopreventive agents modulate the cellular acetylome in ways that are only now becoming apparent. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms will likely enhance the potential to more effectively combat diseases harboring altered epigenetic landscapes and dysregulated protein signaling. PMID:26303421

  19. Selective Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Anticancer Activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Nan; Luo, Ying; Wang, Ying; Liao, Chenzhong; Ye, Wen-Cai; Jiang, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs), which can be used to kill cancer cells through inhibiting histone deacetylase activity or altering the structure of chromatin, have emerged as efficacious agents in the treatment of cancer. With SAHA, FK228, belinostat and panobinostat approved by the FDA, displaying satisfying activity in both haematological and solid tumors of various tissues, efforts to create selective HDACIs have been attracted attention over the past several years. Herein, we mainly review the progress of selective HDAC inhibitors including class-selective and isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26268343

  20. Histone deacetylase turnover and recovery in sulforaphane-treated colon cancer cells: competing actions of 14-3-3 and Pin1 in HDAC3/SMRT corepressor complex dissociation/reassembly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are currently undergoing clinical evaluation as anti-cancer agents. Dietary constituents share certain properties of HDAC inhibitor drugs, including the ability to induce global histone acetylation, turn-on epigenetically-silenced genes, and trigger cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or differentiation in cancer cells. One such example is sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate derived from the glucosinolate precursor glucoraphanin, which is abundant in broccoli. Here, we examined the time-course and reversibility of SFN-induced HDAC changes in human colon cancer cells. Results Cells underwent progressive G2/M arrest over the period 6-72 h after SFN treatment, during which time HDAC activity increased in the vehicle-treated controls but not in SFN-treated cells. There was a time-dependent loss of class I and selected class II HDAC proteins, with HDAC3 depletion detected ahead of other HDACs. Mechanism studies revealed no apparent effect of calpain, proteasome, protease or caspase inhibitors, but HDAC3 was rescued by cycloheximide or actinomycin D treatment. Among the protein partners implicated in the HDAC3 turnover mechanism, silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) was phosphorylated in the nucleus within 6 h of SFN treatment, as was HDAC3 itself. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed SFN-induced dissociation of HDAC3/SMRT complexes coinciding with increased binding of HDAC3 to 14-3-3 and peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase 1 (Pin1). Pin1 knockdown blocked the SFN-induced loss of HDAC3. Finally, SFN treatment for 6 or 24 h followed by SFN removal from the culture media led to complete recovery of HDAC activity and HDAC protein expression, during which time cells were released from G2/M arrest. Conclusion The current investigation supports a model in which protein kinase CK2 phosphorylates SMRT and HDAC3 in the nucleus, resulting in dissociation of the corepressor complex and enhanced binding of HDAC3 to 14-3-3 or Pin1. In the cytoplasm, release of HDAC3 from 14-3-3 followed by nuclear import is postulated to compete with a Pin1 pathway that directs HDAC3 for degradation. The latter pathway predominates in colon cancer cells exposed continuously to SFN, whereas the former pathway is likely to be favored when SFN has been removed within 24 h, allowing recovery from cell cycle arrest. PMID:21624135

  1. Dendritic cell development requires histone deacetylase activity

    PubMed Central

    Chauvistré, Heike; Küstermann, Caroline; Rehage, Nina; Klisch, Theresa; Mitzka, Saskia; Felker, Piritta; Rose-John, Stefan; Zenke, Martin; Seré, Kristin M

    2014-01-01

    DCs develop from multipotent progenitors (MPPs), which commit into DC-restricted common dendritic cell progenitors (CDPs). CDPs further differentiate into classical DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Here, we studied the impact of histone acetylation on DC development in C57BL/6 mice by interfering with histone acetylation and deacetylation, employing histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. We observed that commitment of MPPs into CDPs was attenuated by HDAC inhibition and that pDC development was specifically blocked. Gene expression profiling revealed that HDAC inhibition prevents establishment of a DC-specific gene expression repertoire. Importantly, protein levels of the core DC transcription factor PU.1 were reduced in HDAC inhibitor-treated cells and consequently PU.1 recruitment at PU.1 target genes Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3), interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8), and PU.1 itself was impaired. Thus, our results demonstrate that attenuation of PU.1 expression by HDAC inhibition causes reduced expression of key DC regulators, which results in attenuation of DC development. We propose that chromatin modifiers, such as HDACs, are required for establishing a DC gene network, where Flt3/STAT3 signaling drives PU.1 and IRF8 expression and DC development. Taken together, our study identifies HDACs as critical regulators of DC lineage commitment and development. PMID:24810486

  2. Histone deacetylases in memory and cognition.

    PubMed

    Penney, Jay; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 30 years, lysine acetylation of histone and nonhistone proteins has become established as a key modulator of gene expression regulating numerous aspects of cell biology. Neuronal growth and plasticity are no exception; roles for lysine acetylation and deacetylation in brain function and dysfunction continue to be uncovered. Transcriptional programs coupling synaptic activity to changes in gene expression are critical to the plasticity mechanisms underlying higher brain functions. These transcriptional programs can be modulated by changes in histone acetylation, and in many cases, transcription factors and histone-modifying enzymes are recruited together to plasticity-associated genes. Lysine acetylation, catalyzed by lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), generally promotes cognitive performance, whereas the opposing process, catalyzed by histone lysine deacetylases (HDACs), appears to negatively regulate cognition in multiple brain regions. Consistently, mutation or deregulation of different KATs or HDACs contributes to neurological dysfunction and neurodegeneration. HDAC inhibitors have shown promise as a treatment to combat the cognitive decline associated with aging and neurodegenerative disease, as well as to ameliorate the symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, among others. In this review, we discuss the evidence for the roles of HDACs in cognitive function as well as in neurological disorders and disease. In particular, we focus on HDAC2, which plays a central role in coupling lysine acetylation to synaptic plasticity and mediates many of the effects of HDAC inhibition in cognition and disease. PMID:25492968

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: molecular mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Xu, W S; Parmigiani, R B; Marks, P A

    2007-08-13

    This review focuses on the mechanisms of action of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACi), a group of recently discovered 'targeted' anticancer agents. There are 18 HDACs, which are generally divided into four classes, based on sequence homology to yeast counterparts. Classical HDACi such as the hydroxamic acid-based vorinostat (also known as SAHA and Zolinza) inhibits classes I, II and IV, but not the NAD+-dependent class III enzymes. In clinical trials, vorinostat has activity against hematologic and solid cancers at doses well tolerated by patients. In addition to histones, HDACs have many other protein substrates involved in regulation of gene expression, cell proliferation and cell death. Inhibition of HDACs causes accumulation of acetylated forms of these proteins, altering their function. Thus, HDACs are more properly called 'lysine deacetylases.' HDACi induces different phenotypes in various transformed cells, including growth arrest, activation of the extrinsic and/or intrinsic apoptotic pathways, autophagic cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced cell death, mitotic cell death and senescence. In comparison, normal cells are relatively more resistant to HDACi-induced cell death. The plurality of mechanisms of HDACi-induced cell death reflects both the multiple substrates of HDACs and the heterogeneous patterns of molecular alterations present in different cancer cells. PMID:17694093

  4. Design, synthesis and preliminary bioactivity evaluations of substituted quinoline hydroxamic acid derivatives as novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hou, Xuben; Fu, Huansheng; Pan, Xiaole; Xu, Wenfang; Tang, Weiping; Fang, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Inhibition of HDACs activity has become a promising therapeutic strategy in clinical practice to reverse the abnormal epigenetic states of cancer and other diseases. Therefore, HDAC inhibitors become a relatively new class of anti-cancer agent. In the present study, we reported the design and synthesis of a series of novel HDAC inhibitors using various substituted quinoline rings as the cap group. In vitro studies showed that some compounds have good inhibitory activities against HDACs and potent antiproliferative activities in some tumor cell lines. Especially, compound 9w (IC50=85 nM), exhibited better inhibitory effect compared with SAHA (IC50=161 nM). PMID:26149591

  5. Histone deacetylase: a target for antiproliferative and antiprotozoal agents.

    PubMed

    Meinke, P T; Liberator, P

    2001-02-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) are enzymes that influence transcription by selectively deacetylating or acetylating the eta-amino groups of lysines located near the amino termini of core histone proteins. It is well-established that in transcriptionally active chromatin, histones generally are hyperacetylated and, conversely, hypoacetylated histones are coincident with silenced chromatin. Revived interest in these enzymatic pathways and how they modulate eukaryotic transcription has led to the identification of multiple cofactors whose complex interplay with HDAC affects gene expression. Concurrent with these discoveries, screening of natural product sources yielded new small molecules that were subsequently identified as potent inhibitors of HDAC. While predominantly identified using antiproliferative assays, the biological activity of these new HDAC inhibitors also encompasses significant antiprotozoal, antifungal, phytotoxic and antiviral applications. These newly discovered HDAC inhibitors served as lead structures for the development of improved derivatives including related reagents with considerable potential as tools to further elucidate the mechanism of transcriptional regulation. PMID:11172676

  6. The microRNA miR-22 inhibits the histone deacetylase HDAC4 to promote TH17 cell-dependent emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wen; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Yang, Tianshu; Samuel, Errol L G; Marcano, Daniela C; Sikkema, William K A; Tour, James M; Rodriguez, Antony; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B

    2015-11-01

    Smoking-related emphysema is a chronic inflammatory disease driven by the TH17 subset of helper T cells through molecular mechanisms that remain obscure. Here we explored the role of the microRNA miR-22 in emphysema. We found that miR-22 was upregulated in lung myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) of smokers with emphysema and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of mice exposed to smoke or nanoparticulate carbon black (nCB) through a mechanism that involved the transcription factor NF-?B. Mice deficient in miR-22, but not wild-type mice, showed attenuated TH17 responses and failed to develop emphysema after exposure to smoke or nCB. We further found that miR-22 controlled the activation of APCs and TH17 responses through the activation of AP-1 transcription factor complexes and the histone deacetylase HDAC4. Thus, miR-22 is a critical regulator of both emphysema and TH17 responses. PMID:26437241

  7. Histone deacetylases and cardiovascular cell lineage commitment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun-Yao; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wen; Zeng, Ling-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), which include all diseases of the heart and circulation system, are the leading cause of deaths on the globally. During the development of CVDs, choric inflammatory, lipid metabolism disorder and endothelial dysfunction are widely recognized risk factors. Recently, the new treatment for CVDs that designed to regenerate the damaged myocardium and injured vascular endothelium and improve recovery by the use of stem cells, attracts more and more public attention. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of enzymes that remove acetyl groups from lysine residues of histone proteins allowing the histones to wrap the DNA more tightly and commonly known as epigenetic regulators of gene transcription. HDACs play indispensable roles in nearly all biological processes, such as transcriptional regulation, cell cycle progression and developmental events, and have originally shown to be involved in cancer and neurological diseases. HDACs are also found to play crucial roles in cardiovascular diseases by modulating vascular cell homeostasis (e.g., proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of both ECs and SMCs). This review focuses on the roles of different members of HDACs and HDAC inhibitor on stem cell/ progenitor cell differentiation toward vascular cell lineages (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and Cardiomyocytes) and its potential therapeutics. PMID:26131315

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and epigenetic regulation in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Markozashvili, Diana; Ribrag, Vincent; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2015-12-01

    A vast majority of lymphomas and leukaemias are results of translocations. These translocations produce various genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to oncogenesis. This opens an opportunity to use a relatively new class of anti-cancer agents, inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACi) to target lymphoid malignancies. Surprisingly, the rational basis for treatment of lymphomas with HDACi is far from clear, although some positive results have been obtained. Here we analyze the effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on lymphoid malignancies. PMID:26423245

  9. Post-Training Intrahippocampal Inhibition of Class I Histone Deacetylases Enhances Long-Term Object-Location Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, Joshua D.; Florian, Cedrick; Abel, Ted

    2011-01-01

    Long-term memory formation involves covalent modification of the histone proteins that package DNA. Reducing histone acetylation by mutating histone acetyltransferases impairs long-term memory, and enhancing histone acetylation by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs) improves long-term memory. Previous studies using HDAC inhibitors to enhance…

  10. [DNA methyltransferase inhibitors * histone deacetylase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Jiro; Furukawa, Yusuke

    2014-06-01

    Epigenetics is a cell intrinsic mechanism to maintain genomic integrity by modifying chromatin architecture independently of changes in heritable DNA sequences namely genetic code. Chromatin is composed of nucleosome cores, in which DNA(147bp) is wrapped around a core histone octamer(two each of histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4), arranged in a "beads-on-a-string array" with linker histones and non-histone nuclear proteins. The chromatin structure could be altered by chemical modifications of DNA and histones, including methylation and acetylation, without affecting genetic codes. In mammals, DNA methylation is mediated via DNA methyltransferases (Dnmt) at CpG dinucleotides. Histones are modified by numerous enzymes, such as histone acetyltransferases (HATs), deacetylases (HDACs), methyltransferases and demethylases, in spatio-temporarily distinct manners. These modifications could alter chromatin structures to regulate a wide variety of biological processes such as gene expression, cell cycle progression and DNA repair. Given the biological importance of epigenetic modifications, it is easy to speculate that the abnormalities of chromatin modifying enzymes and reader proteins underlie several human diseases such as cancer, inflammation and metabolic disorders. Because epigenetic states are reversible and could be modified in response to extrinsic signals, including small molecular compounds, an increased understanding of their molecular framework would allow us to treat pathological conditions caused by epigenetic alterations. Indeed, Dnmt inhibitors and HDAC inhibitors have already applied to the treatment of hematological malignancies with considerable success. PMID:25016817

  11. Trans-regulation of Histone Deacetylase Activities through Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yi; Jian, Wei; Stavreva, Diana; Fu, Xueqi; Hager, Gordon; Bungert, Jörg; Huang, Suming; Qiu, Yi

    2009-01-01

    HDAC1 and -2 are highly conserved enzymes and often coexist in the same coregulator complexes. Understanding the regulation of histone deacetylase activities is extremely important because these enzymes play key roles in epigenetic regulation in normal and cancer cells. We previously showed that HDAC1 is required for glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription activation and that its activity is regulated through acetylation by p300 during the induction cycle. Here, we showed that HDAC2 is also required for glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene activation. HDAC2, however, is regulated through a different mechanism from that of HDAC1. HDAC2 is not acetylated by p300, although 5 of 6 acetylated lysine residues in HDAC1 are also present in HDAC2. More importantly, the activity of HDAC2 is inhibited by acetylated HDAC1. Additionally, we showed that acetylated HDAC1 can trans-regulate HDAC2 through heterodimerization. Thus, this study uncovered fundamental differences between HDAC1 and HDAC2. It also unveiled a new mechanism of collaborative regulation by HDAC1/2 containing coregulator complexes. PMID:19822520

  12. Lymphocyte Chemotaxis Is Regulated by Histone Deacetylase 6, Independently of Its Deacetylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cabrero, J. Román; Serrador, Juan M.; Barreiro, Olga; Mittelbrunn, María; Naranjo-Suárez, Salvador; Martín-Cófreces, Noa; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Mazitschek, Ralph; Bradner, James E.; Ávila, Jesús; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the role of HDAC6, a type II histone deacetylase with tubulin deacetylase activity, in lymphocyte polarity, motility, and transmigration was explored. HDAC6 was localized at dynamic subcellular structures as leading lamellipodia and the uropod in migrating T-cells. However, HDAC6 activity did not appear to be involved in the polarity of migrating lymphocytes. Overexpression of HDAC6 in freshly isolated lymphocytes and T-cell lines increased the lymphocyte migration mediated by chemokines and their transendothelial migration under shear flow. Accordingly, the knockdown of HDAC6 expression in T-cells diminished their chemotactic capability. Additional experiments with HDAC6 inhibitors (trichostatin, tubacin), other structural related molecules (niltubacin, MAZ-1391), and HDAC6 dead mutants showed that the deacetylase activity of HDAC6 was not involved in the modulatory effect of this molecule on cell migration. Our results indicate that HDAC6 has an important role in the chemotaxis of T-lymphocytes, which is independent of its tubulin deacetylase activity. PMID:16738306

  13. Histone Deacetylase: Therapeutic Targets in Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Daly, Conor; Yin, Jun; Kennedy, Breandán N

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies report that retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) valproic acid (VPA) present with improved visual fields and delayed vision loss. However, other studies report poor efficacy and safety of HDACi in other cohorts of retinal degeneration patients. Furthermore, the molecular mechanisms by which HDACi can improve visual function is unknown, albeit HDACi can attenuate pro-apoptotic stimuli and induce expression of neuroprotective factors. Thus, further analysis of HDACi is warranted in pre-clinical models of retinal degeneration including zebrafish. Analysis of HDAC expression in developing zebrafish reveals diverse temporal expression patterns during development and maturation of visual function. PMID:26427446

  14. Histone deacetylases in fungi: novel members, new facts.

    PubMed

    Trojer, Patrick; Brandtner, Eva M; Brosch, Gerald; Loidl, Peter; Galehr, Johannes; Linzmaier, Roland; Haas, Hubertus; Mair, Karin; Tribus, Martin; Graessle, Stefan

    2003-07-15

    Acetylation is the most prominent modification on core histones that strongly affects nuclear processes such as DNA replication, DNA repair and transcription. Enzymes responsible for the dynamic equilibrium of histone acetylation are histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). In this paper we describe the identification of novel HDACs from the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans and the maize pathogen Cochliobolus carbonum. Two of the enzymes are homologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HOS3, an enzyme that has not been identified outside of the established yeast systems until now. One of these homologs, HosB, showed intrinsic HDAC activity and remarkable resistance against HDAC inhibitors like trichostatin A (TSA) when recombinant expressed in an Escherichia coli host system. Phylo genetic analysis revealed that HosB, together with other fungal HOS3 orthologs, is a member of a separate group within the classical HDACs. Immunological investigations with partially purified HDAC activities of Aspergillus showed that all classical enzymes are part of high molecular weight complexes and that a TSA sensitive class 2 HDAC constitutes the major part of total HDAC activity of the fungus. However, further biochemical analysis also revealed an NAD(+)-dependent activity that could be separated from the other activities by different types of chromatography and obviously represents an enzyme of the sirtuin class. PMID:12853613

  15. Histone Deacetylase 5 Limits Cocaine Reward through cAMP-Induced Nuclear Import

    E-print Network

    Taniguchi, Makoto

    Chromatin remodeling by histone deacetylases (HDACs) is a key mechanism regulating behavioral adaptations to cocaine use. We report here that cocaine and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling induce the transient ...

  16. Potent stimulation of gene expression by histone deacetylase inhibitors on transiently transfected DNA.

    PubMed

    Nan, Xinsheng; Hyndman, Laura; Agbi, Nike; Porteous, David J; Boyd, A Christopher

    2004-11-01

    Transcription activity of chromatin is associated with histone acetylation which is regulated by recruitment of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases (HDAC) to specific chromatin regions. We have tested how expression of a transfected or stably introduced gene correlates with histone acetylation. Our results demonstrate that expression of transiently transfected green fluorescence protein (GFP) genes is significantly enhanced by HDAC inhibitors. Although HDAC treatment did not induce noticeable changes in the chromatin structure of genomic DNA, chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that more transiently transfected DNA is assembled into chromatin containing acetylated histones in HDAC inhibitor treated cells when compared to untreated cells. For stably integrated GFP, the expression response to HDAC inhibitors varies between independent stable cell lines. However, there was no difference in histone acetylation associated with the integrated transgene between HDAC inhibitor responsive and non-responsive cells. Furthermore, the overall enhancement of transgene expression by HDAC inhibitors was not as pronounced as in transiently transfected cells. PMID:15465025

  17. The SUMO E3 ligase RanBP2 promotes modification of the HDAC4 deacetylase

    PubMed Central

    Kirsh, Olivier; Seeler, Jacob-S.; Pichler, Andrea; Gast, Andreas; Müller, Stefan; Miska, Eric; Mathieu, Marion; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Kouzarides, Tony; Melchior, Frauke; Dejean, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional repression mediated through histone deacetylation is a critical component of eukaryotic gene regulation. Here we demonstrate that the class II histone deacetylase HDAC4 is covalently modified by the ubiquitin-related SUMO-1 modifier. A sumoylation-deficient point mutant (HDAC4-K559R) shows a slightly impaired ability to repress transcription as well as reduced histone deacetylase activity. The ability of HDAC4 to self-aggregate is a prerequisite for proper sumoylation in vivo. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) signalling, which induces nuclear export, abrogates SUMO-1 modification of HDAC4. Moreover, the modification depends on the presence of an intact nuclear localization signal and is catalysed by the nuclear pore complex (NPC) RanBP2 protein, a factor newly identified as a SUMO E3 ligase. These findings suggest that sumoylation of HDAC4 takes place at the NPC and is coupled to its nuclear import. Finally, modification experiments indicate that the MEF2-interacting transcription repressor (MITR) as well as HDAC1 and -6 are similarly SUMO modified, indicating that sumoylation may be an important regulatory mechanism for the control of transcriptional repression mediated by both class I and II HDACs. PMID:12032081

  18. Histone deacetylase 6 negatively regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Inhwa; Lee, Eunju; Jeon, Seon-A; Yu, Je-Wook

    2015-11-27

    Emerging reports demonstrate that deregulated NLRP3 inflammasome activation is implicated in a variety of inflammatory and metabolic disorders, but the molecular mechanism underlying NLRP3 inflammasome regulation remains uncertain. Here, we present evidence that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) inhibits the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome through its direct association with NLRP3. ShRNA-mediated knockdown of HDAC6 in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) showed a significant increase in caspase-1 activation and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1?) secretion in response to NLRP3-activating stimulations, but not to absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2)-activating stimulation. In addition, knockdown of HDAC6 in BMDMs enhanced the oligomerization of ASC upon LPS/nigericin stimulation. The augmented NLRP3 inflammasome activation seen in HDAC6-knockdown BMDMs is independent of the deacetylase activity of HDAC6. Instead, HDAC6 directly associates with NLRP3 through its ubiquitin-binding domain. Moreover, PR619 treatment (deubiquitinase inhibitor) resulted in the elevation in the interaction of NLRP3 with HDAC6 and the decrease in NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation. Taken together, our results indicate that HDAC6 negatively regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation through its interaction to ubiquitinated NLRP3. PMID:26471297

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Preserve Function in Aging Axons

    PubMed Central

    Baltan, Selva

    2012-01-01

    Aging increases the vulnerability of aging white matter to ischemic injury. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors preserve young adult white matter structure and function during ischemia by conserving ATP and reducing excitotoxicity. In isolated optic nerve from 12 month old mice, deprived of oxygen and glucose, we show that pan- and Class I specific HDAC inhibitors promote functional recovery of axons. This protection correlates with preservation of axonal mitochondria. The cellular expression of HDAC 3, in the central nervous system (CNS) and HDAC 2 in optic nerve considerably changed with age expanding to more cytoplasmic domains from nuclear compartments suggesting that changes in glial cell protein acetylation may confer protection to aging axons. Our results indicate manipulation of HDAC activities in glial cells may have a universal potential for stroke therapy across age groups. PMID:23050648

  20. Treatment of chronic kidney diseases with histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy, and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in pre-clinical models. PMID:25972812

  1. The functional interactome landscape of the human histone deacetylase family

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Preeti; Greco, Todd M; Guise, Amanda J; Luo, Yang; Yu, Fang; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Cristea, Ileana M

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a diverse family of essential transcriptional regulatory enzymes, that function through the spatial and temporal recruitment of protein complexes. As the composition and regulation of HDAC complexes are only partially characterized, we built the first global protein interaction network for all 11 human HDACs in T cells. Integrating fluorescence microscopy, immunoaffinity purifications, quantitative mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics, we identified over 200 unreported interactions for both well-characterized and lesser-studied HDACs, a subset of which were validated by orthogonal approaches. We establish HDAC11 as a member of the survival of motor neuron complex and pinpoint a functional role in mRNA splicing. We designed a complementary label-free and metabolic-labeling mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy for profiling interaction stability among different HDAC classes, revealing that HDAC1 interactions within chromatin-remodeling complexes are largely stable, while transcription factors preferentially exist in rapid equilibrium. Overall, this study represents a valuable resource for investigating HDAC functions in health and disease, encompassing emerging themes of HDAC regulation in cell cycle and RNA processing and a deeper functional understanding of HDAC complex stability. PMID:23752268

  2. Histone deacetylase 1 regulates tissue destruction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hawtree, Sarah; Muthana, Munitta; Wilkinson, J Mark; Akil, Mohammed; Wilson, Anthony G

    2015-10-01

    Emerging evidence implicates epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we have investigated the role of histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes in RA synovial fibroblasts (RASFs), a key cellular mediator of cartilage and bone destruction and determined effects of HDAC1 inhibition on both RASF phenotype in vitro, and joint inflammation and damage in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Expression of HDACs 1-11 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) was compared between RASFs and osteoarthritic synovial fibroblast (OASFs) using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. HDAC1 expression in RASFs was inhibited using small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology to assess effects on invasiveness, migration, proliferation and apoptosis. Effects of HDAC1 knockdown (KD) on the transcriptome were assessed using gene microarrays. The effects of siRNA-mediated HDAC(KD) on clinical scores, tissue inflammation and damage were assessed on CIA up to 47 days following immunization. Expression of HDAC1 was significantly higher in RASFs than OASFs. HDAC1(KD) resulted in reduced proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro and transcriptome profiling revealed effects on expression of genes regulating proliferation migration and inflammation. Furthermore, inhibition of HDAC1 in CIA resulted in reduced joint swelling, cartilage and bone damage and lower tumor necrosis factor in joint tissue. These results implicate HDAC1 as an important mediator of tissue damage in RA and support the potential therapeutic utility of inhibitors of this enzyme. PMID:26152200

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibition decreases preference without affecting aversion for nicotine.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Veronica; Host, Lionel; Zwiller, Jean; Bernabeu, Ramon

    2011-02-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms have recently been shown to be involved in the long-term effects of drugs of abuse. A well described epigenetic mechanism modulating transcriptional activity consists in the binding to DNA of methyl-CpG binding proteins, such as MeCP2, recruiting histone deacetylases (HDACs). Nicotine causes long-term changes in the brain, but little is known concerning the mechanisms involved in nicotine-preference. Using a nicotine-conditioned place preference protocol, we demonstrate here that the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate was able to dramatically reduce the preference for nicotine, without altering the aversive properties of the drug. We measured immunohistochemically the acetylation of lysine-9 of histone H3, and the expression of phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein, HDAC2 and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 in the striatum and prefrontal cortex of rats displaying nicotine-preference or aversion and treated with phenylbutyrate. We show that, at the dose administered, the inhibitor was effective in inhibiting HDAC activity. The data suggest that phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein participates in the establishment of conditioned place preference, but not in the reduction of nicotine-preference in response to phenylbutyrate. Moreover, striatal expression of HDAC2 in response to phenylbutyrate mirrored the behavioral effects of the inhibitor, suggesting that HDAC2 is involved in promoting synaptic plasticity underlying the preference for nicotine. PMID:21166804

  4. Interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) and ISG15-linked proteins can associate with members of the selective autophagic process, histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and SQSTM1/p62.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Nguyen, Tran; Goins, William F; Chiocca, Ennio Antonio

    2015-01-16

    The ubiquitin-like interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) and its specific E1, E2, and E3 enzymes are transcriptionally induced by type I IFNs. ISG15 conjugates newly synthesized proteins. ISG15 linkage to proteins appears to be an important downstream IFN signaling event that discriminates cellular and pathogenic proteins synthesized during IFN stimulation from existing proteins. This eliminates potentially pathogenic proteins as the cell attempts to return to normal homeostasis after IFN "stressed" conditions. However, the molecular events that occur in this process are not well known. Here, we show that the C-terminal LRLRGG of ISG15 interacts with the binder of ubiquitin zinc finger (BUZ) domain of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). Because HDAC6 is involved in the autophagic clearance of ubiquitinated aggregates during which SQSTM1/p62 plays a major role as a cargo adapter, we also were able to confirm that p62 binds to ISG15 protein and its conjugated proteins upon forced expression. Both HDAC6 and p62 co-localized with ISG15 in an insoluble fraction of the cytosol, and this co-localization was magnified by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. In addition, ISG15 was degraded via the lysosome. Overexpression of ISG15, which leads to an increased conjugation level of the cellular proteome, enhanced autophagic degradation independently of IFN signaling transduction. These results thus indicate that ISG15 conjugation marks proteins for interaction with HDAC6 and p62 upon forced stressful conditions likely as a step toward autophagic clearance. PMID:25429107

  5. Histone deacetylase 5 regulates the inflammatory response of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Poralla, Lukas; Stroh, Thorsten; Erben, Ulrike; Sittig, Marie; Liebig, Sven; Siegmund, Britta; Glauben, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Modifying the chromatin structure and interacting with non-histone proteins, histone deacetylases (HDAC) are involved in vital cellular processes at different levels. We here specifically investigated the direct effects of HDAC5 in macrophage activation in response to bacterial or cytokine stimuli. Using murine and human macrophage cell lines, we studied the expression profile and the immunological function of HDAC5 at transcription and protein level in over-expression as well as RNA interference experiments. Toll-like receptor-mediated stimulation of murine RAW264.7 cells significantly reduced HDAC5 mRNA within 7 hrs but presented baseline levels after 24 hrs, a mechanism that was also found for Interferon-? treatment. If treated with lipopolysaccharide, RAW264.7 cells transfected for over-expression only of full-length but not of mutant HDAC5, significantly elevated secretion of tumour necrosis factor ? and of the monocyte chemotactic protein-1. These effects were accompanied by increased nuclear factor-?B activity. Accordingly, knock down of HDAC5-mRNA expression using specific siRNA significantly reduced the production of these cytokines in RAW264.7 or human U937 cells. Taken together, our results suggest a strong regulatory function of HDAC5 in the pro-inflammatory response of macrophages. PMID:26059794

  6. Targeting Histone Deacetylases: A Novel Approach in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sorabh; Taliyan, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of movement disorders is increasing day by day. Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder. In general, the clinical manifestations of PD result from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. Although the exact underlying mechanisms leading to neural cell death in this disease remains unknown, the genetic causes are often established. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly evident that chromatin acetylation status can be impaired during the neurological disease conditions. The acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins are carried out by opposing actions of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), respectively. In the recent past, studies with HDAC inhibitors result in beneficial effects in both in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Various clinical trials have also been initiated to investigate the possible therapeutic potential of HDAC inhibitors in patients suffering from PD. The possible mechanisms assigned for these neuroprotective actions of HDAC inhibitors involve transcriptional activation of neuronal survival genes and maintenance of histone acetylation homeostasis, both of which have been shown to be dysregulated in PD. In this review, the authors have discussed the putative role of HDAC inhibitors in PD and associated abnormalities and suggest new directions for future research in PD. PMID:25694842

  7. Histone Deacetylases in Skeletal Development and Bone Mass Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    The skeleton is a multifunctional and regenerative organ. Dynamic activities within the bone microenvironment necessitate and instigate rapid and temporal changes in gene expression within the cells (osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes) responsible for skeletal maintenance. Regulation of gene expression is controlled, in part, by histone deacetylases (Hdacs), which are intracellular enzymes that directly affect chromatin structure and transcription factor activity. Key roles for several Hdacs in bone development and biology have been elucidated though in vitro and in vivo models. Recent findings suggest that clinical usage of small molecule Hdac inhibitors for conditions like epilepsy, bipolar disorder, cancer, and a multitude of other ailments may have unintended effects on bone cell populations. Here we review the progress that has been made in the last decade in understanding how Hdacs contribute to bone development and maintenance. PMID:21185361

  8. A Role for Histone Deacetylases in the Cellular and Behavioral Mechanisms Underlying Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahgoub, Melissa; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of chromatin remodeling enzymes that restrict access of transcription factors to the DNA, thereby repressing gene expression. In contrast, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) relax the chromatin structure allowing for an active chromatin state and promoting gene transcription. Accumulating data have…

  9. Aurora B-dependent Regulation of Class IIa Histone Deacetylases by Mitotic Nuclear Localization Signal Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Amanda J.; Greco, Todd M.; Zhang, Irene Y.; Yu, Fang; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2012-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs 4/5/7/9) are transcriptional regulators with critical roles in cardiac disease and cancer. HDAC inhibitors are promising anticancer agents, and although they are known to disrupt mitotic progression, the underlying mechanisms of mitotic regulation by HDACs are not fully understood. Here we provide the first identification of histone deacetylases as substrates of Aurora B kinase (AurB). Our study identifies class IIa HDACs as a novel family of AurB targets and provides the first evidence that HDACs are temporally and spatially regulated by phosphorylation during the cell cycle. We define the precise site of AurB-mediated phosphorylation as a conserved serine within the nuclear localization signals of HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC9 at Ser265, Ser278, and Ser242, respectively. We establish that AurB interacts with these HDACs in vivo, and that this association increases upon disruption of 14-3-3 binding. We observe colocalization of endogenous, phosphorylated HDACs with AurB at the mitotic midzone in late anaphase and the midbody during cytokinesis, complemented by a reduction in HDAC interactions with components of the nuclear corepressor complex. We propose that AurB-dependent phosphorylation of HDACs induces sequestration within a phosphorylation gradient at the midzone, maintaining separation from re-forming nuclei and contributing to transcriptional control. PMID:22865920

  10. Histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases in B- and T-cell development, physiology and malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Haery, Leila; Thompson, Ryan C.; Gilmore, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of B and T cells from hematopoietic precursors and the regulation of the functions of these immune cells are complex processes that involve highly regulated signaling pathways and transcriptional control. The signaling pathways and gene expression patterns that give rise to these developmental processes are coordinated, in part, by two opposing classes of broad-based enzymatic regulators: histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HATs and HDACs can modulate gene transcription by altering histone acetylation to modify chromatin structure, and by regulating the activity of non-histone substrates, including an array of immune-cell transcription factors. In addition to their role in normal B and T cells, dysregulation of HAT and HDAC activity is associated with a variety of B- and T-cell malignancies. In this review, we describe the roles of HATs and HDACs in normal B- and T-cell physiology, describe mutations and dysregulation of HATs and HDACs that are implicated lymphoma and leukemia, and discuss HAT and HDAC inhibitors that have been explored as treatment options for leukemias and lymphomas. PMID:26124919

  11. Non-sirtuin histone deacetylases in the control of cardiac aging.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Bradley S; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2015-06-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze the removal of acetyl-groups from lysine residues within nucelosomal histone tails and thousands of non-histone proteins. The 18 mammalian HDACs are grouped into four classes. Classes I, II and IV HDACs employ zinc as a co-factor for catalytic activity, while class III HDACs (also known as sirtuins) require NAD+ for enzymatic function. Small molecule inhibitors of zinc-dependent HDACs are efficacious in multiple pre-clinical models of pressure overload and ischemic cardiomyopathy, reducing pathological hypertrophy and fibrosis, and improving contractile function. Emerging data have revealed numerous mechanisms by which HDAC inhibitors benefit the heart, including suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation, inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, and enhancement of cardiac protein aggregate clearance and autophagic flux. Here, we summarize recent findings with zinc-dependent HDACs and HDAC inhibitors in the heart, focusing on newly described functions for distinct HDAC isoforms (e.g. HDAC2, HDAC3 and HDAC6). Potential for pharmacological HDAC inhibition as a means of treating age-related cardiac dysfunction is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: CV Aging. PMID:25791169

  12. Cloning, expression, and biochemical characterization of a new histone deacetylase-like protein from Thermus caldophilus GK24

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young Mi; Kim, You Sun; Kim, Dooil; Lee, Dae Sil; Kwon, Ho Jeong . E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr

    2007-09-14

    Histone deactylases (HDACs) are members of an ancient enzyme family found in eukaryotes as well as in prokaryotes such as archaebacteria and eubacteria. We here report a new histone deacetylase (Tca HDAC) that was cloned from the genomic library of Thermus caldophilus GK24 based on homology analysis with human histone deacetylase1 (HDAC1). The gene contains an open reading frame encoding 375 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 42,188 Da and the deduced amino acid sequence of Tca HDAC showed a 31% homology to human HDAC1. The Tca HDAC gene was over-expressed in Escherichia coli using a Glutathione-S transferase (GST) fusion vector (pGEX-4T-1) and the purified protein showed a deacetylase activity toward the fluorogenic substrate for HDAC. Moreover, the enzyme activity was inhibited by trichostatin A, a specific HDAC inhibitor, in a dose-dependent manner. Optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme was found to be approximately 70 {sup o}C and 7.0, respectively. In addition, zinc ion is required for catalytic activity of the enzyme. Together, these data demonstrate that Tca HDAC is a new histone deacetylase-like enzyme from T. caldophilus GK24 and will be a useful tool for deciphering the role of HDAC in the prokaryote and development of new biochemical reactions.

  13. The Metabolic Regulator Histone Deacetylase 9 Contributes to Glucose Homeostasis Abnormality Induced by Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jizheng; Wang, Ning; Dong, Mei; Guo, Min; Zhao, Yang; Zhuo, Zhiyong; Zhang, Chao; Chi, Xiumei; Pan, Yu; Jiang, Jing; Tang, Hong; Niu, Junqi; Yang, Dongliang; Li, Zhong; Han, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Chen, Xinwen

    2015-12-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), such as HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC7, provide critical mechanisms for regulating glucose homeostasis. Here we report that HDAC9, another class IIa HDAC, regulates hepatic gluconeogenesis via deacetylation of a Forkhead box O (FoxO) family transcription factor, FoxO1, together with HDAC3. Specifically, HDAC9 expression can be strongly induced upon hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HCV-induced HDAC9 upregulation enhances gluconeogenesis by promoting the expression of gluconeogenic genes, including phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase, indicating a major role for HDAC9 in the development of HCV-associated exaggerated gluconeogenic responses. Moreover, HDAC9 expression levels and gluconeogenic activities were elevated in livers from HCV-infected patients and persistent HCV-infected mice, emphasizing the clinical relevance of these results. Our results suggest HDAC9 is involved in glucose metabolism, HCV-induced abnormal glucose homeostasis, and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26420860

  14. Histone Acetylation and CREB Binding Protein Are Required for Neuronal Resistance against Ischemic Injury

    E-print Network

    Yildirim, Ferah

    Epigenetic transcriptional regulation by histone acetylation depends on the balance between histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and deacetylase activities (HDAC). Inhibition of HDAC activity provides neuroprotection, indicating ...

  15. Expression of histone deacetylases 1, 2 and 3 in urothelial bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are known to be associated with an overexpression in different types of cancer such as colon and prostate cancer. In this study we aimed to evaluate the protein expression of class I HDACs in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Methods A tissue microarray containing 348 tissuesamples from 174 patients with a primary urothelial carcinoma of the bladder was immunohistochemically stained for HDAC 1, 2 and 3. Intensity of staining was evaluated and the association with clinico-pathological features and prognosis was assessed. Results High HDAC expression levels were found in 40 to 60% of all investigated urothelial carcinomas (HDAC-1: 40%, HDAC-2: 42%, HDAC-3: 59%). HDAC-1 and HDAC-2 were significantly associated with higher tumour grades. Although all three markers could not predict progression in univariate analyses, high HDAC-1 expression was associated with a trend toward poorer prognosis. Patients with high-grade tumours and high expression levels of HDAC-1 were more likely to progress compared to all other patients (p?HDAC-1 and HDAC-2. High grade tumours in combination with high expression of HDAC-1 showed a worse prognosis than the other tumours. The high expression levels of HDACs observed particularly in high grade urothelial bladder cancer clearly warrant subsequent studies on the potential use of HDAC inhibitors as a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:24624923

  16. Computational design of a time-dependent histone deacetylase 2 selective inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingwei; Li, Min; Chen, Nanhao; Wang, Shenglong; Luo, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Yingkai; Wu, Ruibo

    2015-03-20

    Development of isoform-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors is of great biological and medical interest. Among 11 zinc-dependent HDAC isoforms, it is particularly challenging to achieve isoform inhibition selectivity between HDAC1 and HDAC2 due to their very high structural similarities. In this work, by developing and applying a novel de novo reaction-mechanism-based inhibitor design strategy to exploit the reactivity difference, we have discovered the first HDAC2-selective inhibitor, ?-hydroxymethyl chalcone. Our bioassay experiments show that this new compound has a unique time-dependent selective inhibition on HDAC2, leading to about 20-fold isoform-selectivity against HDAC1. Furthermore, our ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations, a state-of-the-art approach to study reactions in biological systems, have elucidated how the ?-hydroxymethyl chalcone can achieve the distinct time-dependent inhibition toward HDAC2. PMID:25546141

  17. Histone Deacetylase 3 Is Required for T Cell Maturation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Fan-Chi; Belmonte, Paul J; Constans, Megan M; Chen, Meibo W; McWilliams, Douglas C; Hiebert, Scott W; Shapiro, Virginia Smith

    2015-08-15

    Recent thymic emigrants are newly generated T cells that need to undergo postthymic maturation to gain functional competency and enter the long-lived naive T cell pool. The mechanism of T cell maturation remains incompletely understood. Previously, we demonstrated that the transcriptional repressor NKAP is required for T cell maturation. Because NKAP associates with histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3), we examined whether HDAC3 is also required for T cell maturation. Although thymic populations are similar in CD4-cre HDAC3 conditional knockout mice compared with wild-type mice, the peripheral numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are dramatically decreased. In the periphery, the majority of HDAC3-deficient naive T cells are recent thymic emigrants, indicating a block in T cell maturation. CD55 upregulation during T cell maturation is substantially decreased in HDAC3-deficient T cells. Consistent with a block in functional maturation, HDAC3-deficient peripheral T cells have a defect in TNF licensing after TCR/CD28 stimulation. CD4-cre HDAC3 conditional knockout mice do not have a defect in intrathymic migration, thymic egress, T cell survival, or homeostasis. In the periphery, similar to immature NKAP-deficient peripheral T cells, HDAC3-deficient peripheral T cells were bound by IgM and complement proteins, leading to the elimination of these cells. In addition, HDAC3-deficient T cells display decreases in the sialic acid modifications on the cell surface that recruit natural IgM to initiate the classical complement pathway. Therefore, HDAC3 is required for T cell maturation. PMID:26163592

  18. Functional characterization of Candida albicans Hos2 histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, G; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Dhatchana Moorthy, Nachiappan; Gopalaswamy, Radha; Narayanan, Shridhar

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a mucosal commensal organism capable of causing superficial (oral and vaginal thrush) infections in immune normal hosts, but is a major pathogen causing systemic and mucosal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Azoles have been very effective anti-fungal agents and the mainstay in treating opportunistic mold and yeast infections. Azole resistant strains have emerged compromising the utility of this class of drugs. It has been shown that azole resistance can be reversed by the co-administration of a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suggesting that resistance is mediated by epigenetic mechanisms possibly involving Hos2, a fungal deacetylase. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of  HOS2 (High Osmolarity  Sensitive) , a gene coding for fungal histone deacetylase from  C. albicans. Inhibition studies showed that Hos2 is susceptible to pan inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), but is not inhibited by class I inhibitors such as MS-275. This  in  vitro enzymatic assay, which is amenable to high throughput could be used for screening potent fungal Hos2 inhibitors that could be a potential anti-fungal adjuvant. Purified Hos2 protein consistently deacetylated tubulins, rather than histones from TSA-treated cells. Hos2 has been reported to be a putative NAD+ dependent histone deacetylase, a feature of sirtuins. We assayed for sirtuin activation with resveratrol and purified Hos2 protein and did not find any sirtuin activity. PMID:25110576

  19. Ex Vivo Response to Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors of the HIV Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) Derived from HIV-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hao K.; Gray, Lachlan R.; Wightman, Fiona; Ellenberg, Paula; Khoury, Gabriela; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Mota, Talia M.; Wesselingh, Steve; Gorry, Paul R.; Cameron, Paul U.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) can induce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transcription from the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR). However, ex vivo and in vivo responses to HDACi are variable and the activity of HDACi in cells other than T-cells have not been well characterised. Here, we developed a novel assay to determine the activity of HDACi on patient-derived HIV LTRs in different cell types. HIV LTRs from integrated virus were amplified using triple-nested Alu-PCR from total memory CD4+ T-cells (CD45RO+) isolated from HIV-infected patients prior to and following suppressive antiretroviral therapy. NL4-3 or patient-derived HIV LTRs were cloned into the chromatin forming episomal vector pCEP4, and the effect of HDACi investigated in the astrocyte and epithelial cell lines SVG and HeLa, respectively. There were no significant differences in the sequence of the HIV LTRs isolated from CD4+ T-cells prior to and after 18 months of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). We found that in both cell lines, the HDACi panobinostat, trichostatin A, vorinostat and entinostat activated patient-derived HIV LTRs to similar levels seen with NL4-3 and all patient derived isolates had similar sensitivity to maximum HDACi stimulation. We observed a marked difference in the maximum fold induction of luciferase by HDACi in HeLa and SVG, suggesting that the effect of HDACi may be influenced by the cellular environment. Finally, we observed significant synergy in activation of the LTR with vorinostat and the viral protein Tat. Together, our results suggest that the LTR sequence of integrated virus is not a major determinant of a functional response to an HDACi. PMID:25409334

  20. Disruption of I?B Kinase (IKK)-mediated RelA Serine 536 Phosphorylation Sensitizes Human Multiple Myeloma Cells to Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors*

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yun; Chen, Shuang; Wang, Li; Pei, Xin-Yan; Funk, Vanessa L.; Kramer, Lora B.; Dent, Paul; Grant, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of RelA play an important role in regulation of NF-?B activation. We previously demonstrated that in malignant hematopoietic cells, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) induced RelA hyperacetylation and NF-?B activation, attenuating lethality. We now present evidence that I?B kinase (IKK) ?-mediated RelA Ser-536 phosphorylation plays a significant functional role in promoting RelA acetylation, inducing NF-?B activation, and limiting HDACI lethality in human multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Immunoblot profiling revealed that although basal RelA phosphorylation varied in MM cells, Ser-536 phosphorylation correlated with IKK activity. Exposure to the pan-HDACIs vorinostat or LBH-589 induced phosphorylation of IKK?/? (Ser-180/Ser-181) and RelA (Ser-536) in MM cells, including cells expressing an I?B? “super-repressor,” accompanied by increased RelA nuclear translocation, acetylation, DNA binding, and transactivation activity. These events were substantially blocked by either pan-IKK or IKK?-selective inhibitors, resulting in marked apoptosis. Consistent with these events, inhibitory peptides targeting either the NF-?B essential modulator (NEMO) binding domain for IKK complex formation or RelA phosphorylation sites also significantly increased HDACI lethality. Moreover, IKK? knockdown by shRNA prevented Ser-536 phosphorylation and significantly enhanced HDACI susceptibility. Finally, introduction of a nonphosphorylatable RelA mutant S536A, which failed to undergo acetylation in response to HDACIs, impaired NF-?B activation and increased cell death. These findings indicate that HDACIs induce Ser-536 phosphorylation of the NF-?B subunit RelA through an IKK?-dependent mechanism, an action that is functionally involved in activation of the cytoprotective NF-?B signaling cascade primarily through facilitation of RelA acetylation rather than nuclear translocation. PMID:21816815

  1. Histone Deacetylases in Bone Development and Skeletal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Elizabeth W; Carpio, Lomeli R; van Wijnen, Andre J; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2015-10-01

    Histone deacetylases (Hdacs) are conserved enzymes that remove acetyl groups from lysine side chains in histones and other proteins. Eleven of the 18 Hdacs encoded by the human and mouse genomes depend on Zn(2+) for enzymatic activity, while the other 7, the sirtuins (Sirts), require NAD2(+). Collectively, Hdacs and Sirts regulate numerous cellular and mitochondrial processes including gene transcription, DNA repair, protein stability, cytoskeletal dynamics, and signaling pathways to affect both development and aging. Of clinical relevance, Hdacs inhibitors are United States Food and Drug Administration-approved cancer therapeutics and are candidate therapies for other common diseases including arthritis, diabetes, epilepsy, heart disease, HIV infection, neurodegeneration, and numerous aging-related disorders. Hdacs and Sirts influence skeletal development, maintenance of mineral density and bone strength by affecting intramembranous and endochondral ossification, as well as bone resorption. With few exceptions, inhibition of Hdac or Sirt activity though either loss-of-function mutations or prolonged chemical inhibition has negative and/or toxic effects on skeletal development and bone mineral density. Specifically, Hdac/Sirt suppression causes abnormalities in physiological development such as craniofacial dimorphisms, short stature, and bone fragility that are associated with several human syndromes or diseases. In contrast, activation of Sirts may protect the skeleton from aging and immobilization-related bone loss. This knowledge may prolong healthspan and prevent adverse events caused by epigenetic therapies that are entering the clinical realm at an unprecedented rate. In this review, we summarize the general properties of Hdacs/Sirts and the research that has revealed their essential functions in bone forming cells (e.g., osteoblasts and chondrocytes) and bone resorbing osteoclasts. Finally, we offer predictions on future research in this area and the utility of this knowledge for orthopedic applications and bone tissue engineering. PMID:26378079

  2. Requirement of a novel splicing variant of human histone deacetylase 6 for TGF-{beta}1-mediated gene activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Yan; Nguyen, Hong T.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Cao, Subing; Li, Cui; Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hunan 41008 ; Hu, Jiyao; Guo, Xinyue; Burow, Matthew E.; Shan, Bin

    2010-02-19

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) belongs to the family of class IIb HDACs and predominantly deacetylates non-histone proteins in the cytoplasm via the C-terminal deacetylase domain of its two tandem deacetylase domains. HDAC6 modulates fundamental cellular processes via deacetylation of {alpha}-tubulin, cortactin, molecular chaperones, and other peptides. Our previous study indicates that HDAC6 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells. In the current study, we identify a novel splicing variant of human HDAC6, hHDAC6p114. The hHDAC6p114 mRNA arises from incomplete splicing and encodes a truncated isoform of the hHDAC6p114 protein of 114 kDa when compared to the major isoform hHDAC6p131. The hHDAC6p114 protein lacks the first 152 amino acids from N-terminus in the hHDAC6p131 protein, which harbors a nuclear export signal peptide and 76 amino acids of the N-terminal deacetylase domain. hHDAC6p114 is intact in its deacetylase activity against {alpha}-tubulin. The expression hHDAC6p114 is elevated in a MCF-7 derivative that exhibits an EMT-like phenotype. Moreover, hHDAC6p114 is required for TGF-{beta}1-activated gene expression associated with EMT in A549 cells. Taken together, our results implicate that expression and function of hHDAC6p114 is differentially regulated when compared to hHDAC6p131.

  3. Histone deacetylase 7 promotes Toll-like receptor 4-dependent proinflammatory gene expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shakespear, Melanie R; Hohenhaus, Daniel M; Kelly, Greg M; Kamal, Nabilah A; Gupta, Praveer; Labzin, Larisa I; Schroder, Kate; Garceau, Valerie; Barbero, Sheila; Iyer, Abishek; Hume, David A; Reid, Robert C; Irvine, Katharine M; Fairlie, David P; Sweet, Matthew J

    2013-08-30

    Broad-spectrum inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) constrain Toll-like receptor (TLR)-inducible production of key proinflammatory mediators. Here we investigated HDAC-dependent inflammatory responses in mouse macrophages. Of the classical Hdacs, Hdac7 was expressed at elevated levels in inflammatory macrophages (thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages) as compared with bone marrow-derived macrophages and the RAW264 cell line. Overexpression of a specific, alternatively spliced isoform of Hdac7 lacking the N-terminal 22 amino acids (Hdac7-u), but not the Refseq Hdac7 (Hdac7-s), promoted LPS-inducible expression of Hdac-dependent genes (Edn1, Il-12p40, and Il-6) in RAW264 cells. A novel class IIa-selective HDAC inhibitor reduced recombinant human HDAC7 enzyme activity as well as TLR-induced production of inflammatory mediators in thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages. Both LPS and Hdac7-u up-regulated the activity of the Edn1 promoter in an HDAC-dependent fashion in RAW264 cells. A hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1 binding site in this promoter was required for HDAC-dependent TLR-inducible promoter activity and for Hdac7- and HIF-1?-mediated trans-activation. Coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that both Hdac7-u and Hdac7-s interacted with HIF-1?, whereas only Hdac7-s interacted with the transcriptional repressor CtBP1. Thus, Hdac7-u positively regulates HIF-1?-dependent TLR signaling in macrophages, whereas an interaction with CtBP1 likely prevents Hdac7-s from exerting this effect. Hdac7 may represent a potential inflammatory disease target. PMID:23853092

  4. Development of a histone deacetylase 6 inhibitor and its biological effects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Mahendran, Adaickapillai; Yao, Yuanshan; Ngo, Lang; Venta-Perez, Gisela; Choy, Megan L; Kim, Nathaniel; Ham, Won-Seok; Breslow, Ronald; Marks, Paul A

    2013-09-24

    Development of isoform-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors is important in elucidating the function of individual HDAC enzymes and their potential as therapeutic agents. Among the eleven zinc-dependent HDACs in humans, HDAC6 is structurally and functionally unique. Here, we show that a hydroxamic acid-based small-molecule N-hydroxy-4-(2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)(phenyl)amino]-2-oxoethyl)benzamide (HPOB) selectively inhibits HDAC6 catalytic activity in vivo and in vitro. HPOB causes growth inhibition of normal and transformed cells but does not induce cell death. HPOB enhances the effectiveness of DNA-damaging anticancer drugs in transformed cells but not normal cells. HPOB does not block the ubiquitin-binding activity of HDAC6. The HDAC6-selective inhibitor HPOB has therapeutic potential in combination therapy to enhance the potency of anticancer drugs. PMID:24023063

  5. Recent Advances in Computer-Assisted Structure-Based Identification and Design of Histone Deacetylases Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Shagun; Kumar, Vikash; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant epigenetic control is a common phenomenon in tumour progression. The epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation, histone modification and nucleosome remodelling are involved in the regulation of many biological processes, alteration in which can result into tumourogenesis. Histone acetylation is often associated with gene expression; however deacetylated histones generally results in gene suppression. This whole reversible process is mediated by Histone acetyltranferase and Histone deacetylases (HDACs) respectively. HDACs perform the deacetylation of histones in nucleosomes, which intervenes changes in chromatin remodelling, prompting regulation of gene expression. HDACs likewise direct the acetylation status of various other non-histone substrates that includes oncogenes and tumour silencing proteins. As HDAC inhibition induces various tumour cells to enter apoptosis and consequently cell cycle arrest therefore, a large number of HDAC inhibitors have been reported to develop as a new class of anti-cancer agents. Apart from the two existing FDA approved HDAC inhibitors- Varinostat and Depsipetide, recently a new drug Farydak has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of multiple myeloma which thus validated the use of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. Also, several other HDAC inhibitors are undergoing clinical trials. Here, we have reviewed the current status of structure based computational studies that has helped to rationalize the successful identification of HDAC inhibitors. The objective of the present review is to provide an overview of contribution of structure-based computational studies that have helped in identifying HDAC inhibitors with an emphasis on the perspectives of its insight, current status, advances and future opportunities as well as the evolving efforts to characterize the structural dynamics of HDACs. PMID:26303428

  6. Analysis of class I and II histone deacetylase gene expression in human leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Maddipoti, Sirisha; Quesada, Andres; Bohannan, Zachary; Cabrero Calvo, Monica; Colla, Simona; Wei, Yue; Estecio, Marcos; Wierda, William; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are well-characterized anti-leukemia agents and HDAC gene expression deregulation has been reported in various types of cancers. This study sought to characterize HDAC gene expression patterns in several types of leukemia. To do so, a systematic study was performed of the mRNA expression of all drug-targetable HDACs for which reagents were available. This was done by real-time PCR in 24 leukemia cell lines and 39 leukemia patients, which included AML, MDS and CLL patients, some of whom received HDAC inhibitor treatment. Among the samples analyzed, there was no discernible pattern in HDAC expression. HDAC expression was generally increased in CLL patients, except for HDAC2 and HDAC4. HDAC expression was also generally increased in VPA-treated MOLT4 cells. However, this increased expression was not seen in AML patients treated with vorinostat. In summary, increased HDAC expression was noted in CLL patients in general, but the HDAC expression patterns in myeloid malignancies appear to be heterogeneous, which implies that the role of HDACs in leukemia may be related to global expression or protein function rather than specific expression patterns. PMID:25944469

  7. Effect of histone deacetylase inhibitor JNJ-26481585 in pain.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Kathryn E; Manners, Melissa T; Quershi, Rehman A; Tian, Yuzhen; Gao, Ruby; Hu, Huijuan; Barrett, James E; Sacan, Ahmet; Ajit, Seena K

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can alleviate inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We investigated the effects of JNJ-26481585, a pan-HDAC inhibitor on basal mechanical sensitivity. Unlike previous reports for HDAC inhibitors, JNJ-26481585 induced mechanical hypersensitivity in mice. This effect was reversible with gabapentin. Voltage-dependent calcium channel subunit alpha-2/delta-1, one of the putative targets for gabapentin, was upregulated in the spinal cord from JNJ-26481585-treated mice. Transcriptional profiling of spinal cord from JNJ-26481585-treated mice showed significant alterations in pathways involved in axon guidance, suggesting overlap in mechanisms underlying neurotoxicity caused by other known chemotherapeutic agents. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the development of pain, RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells were treated with JNJ-26481585. There was a dose- and time-dependent activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and interleukin-1? increase. Thus, alterations in the axon guidance pathway, increase in voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha(2)delta-1 subunit, and the induction of proinflammatory mediators by JNJ-26481585 could all contribute to increased mechanical sensitivity. Our data indicate that the effect of HDAC inhibitors may be unique to the compound studied and highlights the potential to develop chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy with the use of a pan-HDAC inhibitor for cancer treatment, and this pain may be alleviated by gabapentin. PMID:25085711

  8. Systemic or Intrahippocampal Delivery of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Facilitates Fear Extinction

    E-print Network

    Wood, Marcelo A.

    Systemic or Intrahippocampal Delivery of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Facilitates Fear Extinction and hippocampus-dependent memory. Little is known about the effects of HDAC inhibitors on extinction, a learning-min) contextual extinction session causes context-evoked fear to decrease to levels observed

  9. A monoclonal antibody specific for prophase phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 1: a readout for early mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Segré, Chiara V; Senese, Silvia; Loponte, Sara; Santaguida, Stefano; Soffientini, Paolo; Grigorean, Gabriela; Cinquanta, Mario; Ossolengo, Giuseppe; Seiser, Christian; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are modification enzymes that regulate a plethora of biological processes. HDAC1, a crucial epigenetic modifier, is deregulated in cancer and subjected to a variety of post-translational modifications. Here, we describe the generation of a new monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes a novel highly dynamic prophase phosphorylation of serine 406-HDAC1, providing a powerful tool for detecting early mitotic cells. PMID:26467746

  10. gp-91 mediates histone deacetylase inhibition-induced cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ting C; Zhang, Ling X; Cheng, Guangmao; Liu, Jun T

    2010-01-01

    We have recently shown that the inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDAC) protects the heart against ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. The mechanism by which HDAC inhibition induces cardioprotection remains unknown. We sought to investigate whether the genetic disruption of gp-91, a subunit of NADPH-oxidase, would mitigate cardioprotection of HDAC inhibition. Wild-type and gp-91?/? mice were treated with a potent inhibitor of HDACs, trichostatin A (TSA, 0.1mg/kg, i.p.). Twenty-four hours later, the perfused hearts were subjected to 30 min of ischemia and 30 min of reperfusion. HDAC inhibition in wild-type mice produced marked improvements in ventricular functional recovery and the reduction of infarct size. TSA-induced cardioprotection was eliminated with genetic deletion of gp91. Notably, Western blot and immunostaining displayed a significant increase in gp-91 in myocardium following HDAC inhibition, which resulted in a mildly subsequent increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The pretreatment of H9c2 cardiomyoblasts with TSA (50 nmol/L) decreased cell necrosis and increased viability in response to simulated ischemia (SI), which was abrogated by the transfection of cells with gp-91 siRNA, but not by scrambled siRNA. Furthermore, treatment of PLB-985 gp91+/+cells with TSA increased the resistance to SI, which also diminished with genetic disruption of gp91 in gp91phox-deficient PLB-985 cells. TSA treatment inhibited the increased active caspase-3 in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts and PLB-985 gp91+/+cells exposed to SI, which were prevented by knockdown of gp-91 by siRNA. These results suggest that a cascade consisting of gp-91 and HDAC inhibition plays an essential role in orchestrating the cardioprotective effect. PMID:20433879

  11. RBP1 Recruits Both Histone Deacetylase-Dependent and -Independent Repression Activities to Retinoblastoma Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Albert; Lee, Joseph M.; Yang, Wen-Ming; DeCaprio, James A.; Kaelin, William G.; Seto, Edward; Branton, Philip E.

    1999-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor family proteins block cell proliferation in part by repressing certain E2F-specific promoters. Both histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent and -independent repression activities are associated with the RB “pocket.” The mechanism by which these two repression functions occupy the pocket is unknown. A known RB-binding protein, RBP1, was previously found by our group to be an active corepressor which, if overexpressed, represses E2F-mediated transcription via its association with the pocket. We show here that RBP1 contains two repression domains, one of which binds all three known HDACs and represses them in an HDAC-dependent manner while the other domain functions independently of the HDACs. Thus, RB family members repress transcription by recruiting RBP1 to the pocket. RBP1, in turn, serves as a bridging molecule to recruit HDACs and, in addition, provides a second HDAC-independent repression function. PMID:10490602

  12. 14-3-3 regulates the nuclear import of class IIa histone deacetylases

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, Tomonori G.; Miyazaki, Masaya; Hoshino, Hideto; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horinouchi, Sueharu; Yoshida, Minoru

    2008-12-19

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) form complexes with a class of transcriptional repressors in the nucleus. While screening for compounds that could block the association of HDAC4 with the BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor Bach2, we discovered that phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced the cytoplasmic retention of HDAC4 mutants lacking a nuclear export signal (NES). Although PMA treatment and PKD overexpression has been proposed to facilitate the nuclear export of class IIa HDACs by creating 14-3-3 binding sites containing phosphoserines, our experiments using HDAC mutants demonstrated that PMA greatly reduces nuclear import. PMA treatment repressed the NLS activity in a manner dependent on 14-3-3 binding. These results suggest that nuclear HDAC4 is not tethered in the nucleus, but instead shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Phosphorylation-induced 14-3-3 binding biases the balance of nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling toward the cytoplasm by inhibiting nuclear import.

  13. Targeting histone deacetylases: perspectives for epigenetic-based therapy in cardio-cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Ying; Qin, Wen; Yi, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Although the pathogenesis of cardio-cerebrovascular disease (CCVD) is multifactorial, an increasing number of experimental and clinical studies have highlighted the importance of histone deacetylase (HDAC)-mediated epigenetic processes in the development of cardio-cerebrovascular injury. HDACs are a family of enzymes to balance the acetylation activities of histone acetyltransferases on chromatin remodeling and play essential roles in regulating gene transcription. To date, 18 mammalian HDACs are identified and grouped into four classes based on similarity to yeast orthologs. The zinc-dependent HDAC family currently consists of 11 members divided into three classes (class I, II, and IV) on the basis of structure, sequence homology, and domain organization. In comparison, class III HDACs (also known as the sirtuins) are composed of a family of NAD+-dependent protein-modifying enzymes related to the Sir2 gene. HDAC inhibitors are a group of compounds that block HDAC activities typically by binding to the zinc-containing catalytic domain of HDACs and have displayed anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects in the cardio-cerebrovascular system. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about classifications, functions of HDACs and their roles and regulatory mechanisms in the cardio-cerebrovascular system. Pharmacological targeting of HDAC-mediated epigenetic processes may open new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of CCVD. PMID:25870619

  14. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: A suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L.; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena . E-mail: elena.menegola@unimi.it

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor {alpha} = 0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor {beta} = 0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  15. Novel Histone Deacetylase Class IIa Selective Substrate Radiotracers for PET Imaging of Epigenetic Regulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bonomi, Robin; Mukhopadhyay, Uday; Shavrin, Aleksandr; Yeh, Hsien-Hsien; Majhi, Anjoy; Dewage, Sajeewa W.; Najjar, Amer; Lu, Xin; Cisneros, G. Andrés; Tong, William P.; Alauddin, Mian M.; Liu, Ren-Shuan; Mangner, Thomas J.; Turkman, Nashaat; Gelovani, Juri G.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC’s) became increasingly important targets for therapy of various diseases, resulting in a pressing need to develop HDAC class- and isoform-selective inhibitors. Class IIa deacetylases possess only minimal deacetylase activity against acetylated histones, but have several other client proteins as substrates through which they participate in epigenetic regulation. Herein, we report the radiosyntheses of the second generation of HDAC class IIa–specific radiotracers: 6-(di-fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide (DFAHA) and 6-(tri-fluoroacetamido)-1-hexanoicanilide ([18F]-TFAHA). The selectivity of these radiotracer substrates to HDAC class IIa enzymes was assessed in vitro, in a panel of recombinant HDACs, and in vivo using PET/CT imaging in rats. [18F]TFAHA showed significantly higher selectivity for HDAC class IIa enzymes, as compared to [18F]DFAHA and previously reported [18F]FAHA. PET imaging with [18F]TFAHA can be used to visualize and quantify spatial distribution and magnitude of HDAC class IIa expression-activity in different organs and tissues in vivo. Furthermore, PET imaging with [18F]TFAHA may advance the understanding of HDACs class IIa mediated epigenetic regulation of normal and pathophysiological processes, and facilitate the development of novel HDAC class IIa-specific inhibitors for therapy of different diseases. PMID:26244761

  16. Design, synthesis and preliminary bioactivity studies of 1,2-dihydrobenzo[d]isothiazol-3-one-1,1-dioxide hydroxamic acid derivatives as novel histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Han, Leiqiang; Wang, Lei; Hou, Xuben; Fu, Huansheng; Song, Weiguo; Tang, Weiping; Fang, Hao

    2014-03-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a clinically validated target for antitumor therapy. In order to increase HDAC inhibition and efficiency, we developed a novel series of saccharin hydroxamic acids as potent HDAC inhibitors. Among them, compounds 11e, 11m, 11p exhibited similar or better HDACs inhibitory activity compared with the approved drug SAHA. Further biological evaluation indicated that compound 11m had potent antiproliferative activities against MDA-MB-231 and PC-3. PMID:24525003

  17. Expression of Histone Deacetylases in Cellular Compartments of the Mouse Brain and the Effects of Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Bachleda, Amelia; Morrison, Richard S.; Murphy, Sean P.

    2011-01-01

    Drugs that inhibit specific histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities have enormous potential in preventing the consequences of acute injury to the nervous system and in allaying neurodegeneration. However, very little is known about the expression pattern of the HDACs in the central nervous system (CNS). Identifying the cell types that express HDACs in the CNS is important for determining therapeutic targets for HDAC inhibitors and evaluating potential side effects. We characterized the cellular expression of HDACs 1–3, and HDACs 4 and 6, in the adult mouse brain in the cingulate cortex, parietal cortex, dentate gyrus, and CA1 regions of the hippocampus and subcortical white matter. Expression of class I HDACs showed a cell-and region-specific pattern. Transient focal ischemia induced by temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion, or global ischemia induced by in vitro oxygen–glucose deprivation, altered the extent of HDAC expression in a region- and cell-specific manner. The pan-HDAC inhibitor, SAHA, reduced ischemia-induced alterations in HDACs. The results suggest that in addition to promoting epigenetic changes in transcriptional activity in the nucleus of neurons and glia, HDACs may also have non-transcriptional actions in axons and the distant processes of glial cells and may significantly modulate the response to injury in a cell- and region-specific manner. PMID:21966324

  18. Emerging roles for histone deacetylases in pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular remodeling (2013 Grover Conference series)

    PubMed Central

    Cavasin, Maria A.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reversible lysine acetylation has emerged as a critical mechanism for controlling the function of nucleosomal histones as well as diverse nonhistone proteins. Acetyl groups are conjugated to lysine residues in proteins by histone acetyltransferases and removed by histone deacetylases (HDACs), which are also commonly referred to as lysine deacetylases. Over the past decade, many studies have shown that HDACs play crucial roles in the control of left ventricular (LV) cardiac remodeling in response to stress. Small molecule HDAC inhibitors block pathological hypertrophy and fibrosis and improve cardiac function in various preclinical models of LV failure. Only recently have HDACs been studied in the context of right ventricular (RV) failure, which commonly occurs in patients who experience pulmonary hypertension (PH). Here, we review recent findings with HDAC inhibitors in models of PH and RV remodeling, propose next steps for this newly uncovered area of research, and highlight potential for isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of PH and RV failure. PMID:25992271

  19. Kinetics and thermodynamics of metal-binding to histone deacetylase 8.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungchul; Pithadia, Amit S; Fierke, Carol A

    2015-03-01

    Histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) was originally classified as a Zn(II)-dependent deacetylase on the basis of Zn(II)-dependent HDAC8 activity in vitro and illumination of a Zn(II) bound to the active site. However, in vitro measurements demonstrated that HDAC8 has higher activity with a bound Fe(II) than Zn(II), although Fe(II)-HDAC8 rapidly loses activity under aerobic conditions. These data suggest that in the cell HDAC8 could be activated by either Zn(II) or Fe(II). Here we detail the kinetics, thermodynamics, and selectivity of Zn(II) and Fe(II) binding to HDAC8. To this end, we have developed a fluorescence anisotropy assay using fluorescein-labeled suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (fl-SAHA). fl-SAHA binds specifically to metal-bound HDAC8 with affinities comparable to SAHA. To measure the metal affinity of HDAC, metal binding was coupled to fl-SAHA and assayed from the observed change in anisotropy. The metal KD values for HDAC8 are significantly different, ranging from picomolar to micromolar for Zn(II) and Fe(II), respectively. Unexpectedly, the Fe(II) and Zn(II) dissociation rate constants from HDAC8 are comparable, koff ?0.0006 s(-1), suggesting that the apparent association rate constant for Fe(II) is slow (?3 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). Furthermore, monovalent cations (K(+) or Na(+)) that bind to HDAC8 decrease the dissociation rate constant of Zn(II) by ?100-fold for K(+) and ?10-fold for Na(+), suggesting a possible mechanism for regulating metal exchange in vivo. The HDAC8 metal affinities are comparable to the readily exchangeable Zn(II) and Fe(II) concentrations in cells, consistent with either or both metal cofactors activating HDAC8. PMID:25516458

  20. Toward isozyme-selective inhibitors of histone deacetylase as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ononye, Sophia N; van Heyst, Michael; Falcone, Eric M; Anderson, Amy C; Wright, Dennis L

    2013-01-01

    Since post-translational modifications of proteins are key mechanisms for controlling cellular function, targeting the machinery involved in these modifications offers new opportunities for the development of therapeutic agents. The histone deacetylases (HDACs) represent an important family of enzymes that are involved in controlling the acetylation state of key lysine residues in histones and other proteins. The development of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of several diseases, most notably cancer, has proceeded rapidly. Recent attention has turned towards the development of isozyme-specific inhibitors that will provide selective targeting. It is believed that the ability to target-specific HDACs rather than all family members will lead to superior therapeutics with better efficacy and lower toxicity. A review of recent patents shows that researchers are targeting a wide range of isozymes and that key advances in the structural biology of HDACs are providing important design information. PMID:24163736

  1. Reduced Histone Deacetylase 7 Activity Restores Function to Misfolded CFTR in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hutt, Darren M.; Herman, David; Rodrigues, Ana P. C.; Noel, Sabrina; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Matteson, Jeanne; Hoch, Ben; Kellner, Wendy; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Schmidt, Andre; Thomas, Philip J.; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Skach, William R.; Gentzsch, Martina; Riordan, John R.; Sorscher, Eric J.; Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Frizzell, Raymond A.; Manning, Gerard; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Balch, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical modulation of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity by HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) is an increasingly important approach to modify the etiology of human disease. Loss-of-function diseases arise as a consequence of protein misfolding and degradation leading to system failures. The ?F508 mutation in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) results in the absence of the cell surface chloride channel and a loss of airway hydration, leading to premature lung failure and reduced lifespan responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). We now show that the HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) restores surface channel activity in human primary airway epithelia to levels that are 28% of wild-type CFTR. Biological silencing of all known class I and II HDACs reveals that HDAC7 plays a central role in restoration of ?F508 function. We suggest that the tunable capacity of HDACs can be manipulated by chemical biology to counter the onset of CF and other human misfolding disorders. PMID:19966789

  2. The potential use of histone deacetylase inhibitors in the treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Fuchikami, Manabu; Yamamoto, Shigeto; Morinobu, Shigeru; Okada, Satoshi; Yamawaki, Yosuke; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2016-01-01

    Numerous preclinical studies demonstrate that changes in gene expression in the brain occur in animal models of depression using exposure to stress, such as social defeat and leaned helplessness, and that repeated administration of antidepressants ameliorates these stress-induced changes in gene expression. These findings suggest that alteration in gene transcription in the central nervous system in response to stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Recent advances in epigenetics have led to the realization that chromatin remodeling mediated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) is closely involved in the regulation of gene transcription. In this context, we first review several preclinical studies demonstrating the antidepressant-like efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. We then suggest the efficacy of HDAC inhibitors in treatment-resistant depression based on the mechanism of action of HDAC. Finally, we discuss the possibility of using HDAC inhibitors in patients with treatment-resistant depression. PMID:25818247

  3. Development of N-Hydroxycinnamamide-Based Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with an Indole-Containing Cap Group

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A novel series of histone deacetylase inhibitors combining N-hydroxycinnamamide bioactive fragment and indole bioactive fragment was designed and synthesized. Several compounds (17c, 17g, 17h, 17j, and 17k) exhibited comparable, even superior, total HDACs inhibitory activity and in vitro antiproliferative activities relative to the approved drug SAHA. A representative compound 17a with moderate HDACs inhibition was progressed to isoform selectivity profile, Western blot analysis, and in vivo antitumor assay. Although HDACs isoform selectivity of 17a was similar to that of SAHA, our Western blot results indicated that intracellular effects of 17a at 1 ?M were class I selective. It was noteworthy that the effect on histone H4 acetylation of SAHA decreased with time, while the effect on histone H4 acetylation of 17a was maintained and even increased. Most importantly, compound 17a exhibited promising in vivo antitumor activity in a U937 xenograft model. PMID:23493449

  4. Histone Deacetylases Inhibitors in the Treatment of Retinal Degenerative Diseases: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xufeng; Du, Wei; Pang, Ji-jing

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are one of the important refractory ophthalmic diseases, featured with apoptosis of photoreceptor cells. Histone acetylation and deacetylation can regulate chromosome assembly, gene transcription, and posttranslational modification, which are regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), respectively. The histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) have the ability to cause hyperacetylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, resulting in a variety of effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, anti-inflammation, and anti-apoptosis. Several HDACis have been approved for clinical trials to treat cancer. Studies have shown that HDACis have neuroprotective effects in nervous system damage. In this paper, we will summarize the neuroprotective effects of common HDACis in retinal degenerative diseases and make a prospect to the applications of HDACis in the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases in the future. PMID:26137316

  5. HDACiDB: a database for histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Kasi; Sangeetha, Shanmugasamy; Ranjitha, Shanmugasamy; Vimala, Antony; Al-Sohaibani, Saleh; Rameshkumar, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    An histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor database (HDACiDB) was constructed to enable rapid access to data relevant to the development of epigenetic modulators (HDAC inhibitors [HDACi]), helping bring precision cancer medicine a step closer. Thousands of HDACi targeting HDACs are in various stages of development and are being tested in clinical trials as monotherapy and in combination with other cancer agents. Despite the abundance of HDACi, information resources are limited. Tools for in silico experiments on specific HDACi prediction, for designing and analyzing the generated data, as well as custom-made specific tools and interactive databases, are needed. We have developed an HDACiDB that is a composite collection of HDACi and currently comprises 1,445 chemical compounds, including 419 natural and 1,026 synthetic ones having the potential to inhibit histone deacetylation. Most importantly, it will allow application of Lipinski’s rule of five drug-likeness and other physicochemical property-based screening of the inhibitors. It also provides easy access to information on their source of origin, molecular properties, drug likeness, as well as bioavailability with relevant references cited. Being the first comprehensive database on HDACi that contains all known natural and synthetic HDACi, the HDACiDB may help to improve our knowledge concerning the mechanisms of actions of available HDACi and enable us to selectively target individual HDAC isoforms and establish a new paradigm for intelligent epigenetic cancer drug design. The database is freely available on the http://hdacidb.bioinfo.au-kbc.org.in/hdacidb/website. PMID:25945037

  6. HDACiDB: a database for histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kasi; Sangeetha, Shanmugasamy; Ranjitha, Shanmugasamy; Vimala, Antony; Al-Sohaibani, Saleh; Rameshkumar, Gopal

    2015-01-01

    An histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor database (HDACiDB) was constructed to enable rapid access to data relevant to the development of epigenetic modulators (HDAC inhibitors [HDACi]), helping bring precision cancer medicine a step closer. Thousands of HDACi targeting HDACs are in various stages of development and are being tested in clinical trials as monotherapy and in combination with other cancer agents. Despite the abundance of HDACi, information resources are limited. Tools for in silico experiments on specific HDACi prediction, for designing and analyzing the generated data, as well as custom-made specific tools and interactive databases, are needed. We have developed an HDACiDB that is a composite collection of HDACi and currently comprises 1,445 chemical compounds, including 419 natural and 1,026 synthetic ones having the potential to inhibit histone deacetylation. Most importantly, it will allow application of Lipinski's rule of five drug-likeness and other physicochemical property-based screening of the inhibitors. It also provides easy access to information on their source of origin, molecular properties, drug likeness, as well as bioavailability with relevant references cited. Being the first comprehensive database on HDACi that contains all known natural and synthetic HDACi, the HDACiDB may help to improve our knowledge concerning the mechanisms of actions of available HDACi and enable us to selectively target individual HDAC isoforms and establish a new paradigm for intelligent epigenetic cancer drug design. The database is freely available on the http://hdacidb.bioinfo.au-kbc.org.in/hdacidb/website. PMID:25945037

  7. Design and synthesis of orally bioavailable aminopyrrolidinone histone deacetylase 6 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xianfeng; Chen, Wenming; Qiu, Zongxing; Guo, Lei; Zhu, Wei; Li, Wentao; Wang, Zhanguo; Zhang, Weixing; Zhang, Zhenshan; Rong, Yiping; Zhang, Meifang; Yu, Lingjie; Zhong, Sheng; Zhao, Rong; Wu, Xihan; Wong, Jason C; Tang, Guozhi

    2015-03-26

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) removes the acetyl group from lysine residues in a number of non-histone substrates and plays important roles in microtubule dynamics and chaperone activities. There is growing interest in identifying HDAC6-selective inhibitors as chemical biology tools and ultimately as new therapeutic agents. Herein we report the design, synthesis, and phenotypic screening of a novel class of 3-aminopyrrolidinone-based hydroxamic acids as HDAC6 inhibitors. In particular, the ?-methyl-substituted enantiomer 33 (3-S) showed significant in-cell tubulin acetylation (Tub-Ac) with an EC50 of 0.30 ?M but limited impact on p21 levels at various concentrations. In enzyme inhibition assays, 33 demonstrated high selectivity for HDAC6 with an IC50 of 0.017 ?M and selectivity indexes of 10 against HDAC8 and over 4000 against HDAC1-3 isoforms. Moreover, 33 has suitable drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics properties compared with other hydroxamic acid-based HDAC inhibitors, warranting further biological studies and development as a selective HDAC6 inhibitor. PMID:25734520

  8. Histone Deacetylases Positively Regulate Transcription through the Elongation Machinery.

    PubMed

    Greer, Celeste B; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Kim, Yoon Jung; Xie, Peng; Zhang, Michael Q; Park, In-Hyun; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2015-11-17

    Transcription elongation regulates the expression of many genes, including oncogenes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACIs) block elongation, suggesting that HDACs are involved in gene activation. To understand this, we analyzed nascent transcription and elongation factor binding genome-wide after perturbation of elongation with small molecule inhibitors. We found that HDACI-mediated repression requires heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) activity. HDACIs promote the association of RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) and negative elongation factor (NELF), a complex stabilized by HSP90, at the same genomic sites. Additionally, HDACIs redistribute bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4), a key elongation factor involved in enhancer activity. BRD4 binds to newly acetylated sites, and its occupancy at promoters and enhancers is reduced. Furthermore, HDACIs reduce enhancer activity, as measured by enhancer RNA production. Therefore, HDACs are required for limiting acetylation in gene bodies and intergenic regions. This facilitates the binding of elongation factors to properly acetylated promoters and enhancers for efficient elongation. PMID:26549458

  9. 3,3?-Diindolylmethane, but not indole-3-carbinol, inhibits histone deacetylase activity in prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, Laura M.; Yu, Tian-Wei; Sokolowski, Elizabeth I.; Williams, David E.; Dashwood, Roderick H.; Ho, Emily; School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, Oregon State University, 103 Milam Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331

    2012-09-15

    Increased consumption of cruciferous vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of developing prostate cancer. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and 3,3?-diindolylmethane (DIM) are phytochemicals derived from cruciferous vegetables that have shown promise in inhibiting prostate cancer in experimental models. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition is an emerging target for cancer prevention and therapy. We sought to examine the effects of I3C and DIM on HDACs in human prostate cancer cell lines: androgen insensitive PC-3 cells and androgen sensitive LNCaP cells. I3C modestly inhibited HDAC activity in LNCaP cells by 25% but no inhibition of HDAC activity was detected in PC-3 cells. In contrast, DIM significantly inhibited HDAC activity in both cell lines by as much as 66%. Decreases in HDAC activity correlated with increased expression of p21, a known target of HDAC inhibitors. DIM treatment caused a significant decrease in the expression of HDAC2 protein in both cancer cell lines but no significant change in the protein levels of HDAC1, HDAC3, HDAC4, HDAC6 or HDAC8 was detected. Taken together, these results show that inhibition of HDAC activity by DIM may contribute to the phytochemicals' anti-proliferative effects in the prostate. The ability of DIM to target aberrant epigenetic patterns, in addition to its effects on detoxification of carcinogens, may make it an effective chemopreventive agent by targeting multiple stages of prostate carcinogenesis. -- Highlights: ? DIM inhibits HDAC activity and decreases HDAC2 expression in prostate cancer cells. ? DIM is significantly more effective than I3C at inhibiting HDAC activity. ? I3C has no effect on HDAC protein expression. ? Inhibition of HDAC activity by DIM is associated with increased p21 expression. ? HDAC inhibition may be a novel epigenetic mechanism for cancer prevention with DIM.

  10. Histone Deacetylase 3 Coordinates Deacetylase-independent Epigenetic Silencing of Transforming Growth Factor-?1 (TGF-?1) to Orchestrate Second Heart Field Development.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Sara L; Janardhan, Harish P; Trivedi, Chinmay M

    2015-11-01

    About two-thirds of human congenital heart disease involves second heart field-derived structures. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone deacetylases (HDACs), regulate the epigenome; however, their functions within the second heart field remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) orchestrates epigenetic silencing of Tgf-?1, a causative factor in congenital heart disease pathogenesis, in a deacetylase-independent manner to regulate development of second heart field-derived structures. In murine embryos lacking HDAC3 in the second heart field, increased TGF-?1 bioavailability is associated with ascending aortic dilatation, outflow tract malrotation, overriding aorta, double outlet right ventricle, aberrant semilunar valve development, bicuspid aortic valve, ventricular septal defects, and embryonic lethality. Activation of TGF-? signaling causes aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and altered extracellular matrix homeostasis in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves, and pharmacological inhibition of TGF-? rescues these defects. HDAC3 recruits components of the PRC2 complex, methyltransferase EZH2, EED, and SUZ12, to the NCOR complex to enrich trimethylation of Lys-27 on histone H3 at the Tgf-?1 regulatory region and thereby maintains epigenetic silencing of Tgf-?1 specifically within the second heart field-derived mesenchyme. Wild-type HDAC3 or catalytically inactive HDAC3 expression rescues aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and epigenetic silencing of Tgf-?1 in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves. These findings reveal that epigenetic dysregulation within the second heart field is a predisposing factor for congenital heart disease. PMID:26420484

  11. Histone Deacetylase 10 Regulates DNA Mismatch Repair and May Involve the Deacetylation of MutS Homolog 2.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Rangasudhagar; Li, Yixuan; Xiang, Shengyan; Yuan, Fenghua; Yuan, Zhigang; Telles, Elphine; Fang, Jia; Coppola, Domenico; Shibata, David; Lane, William S; Zhang, Yanbin; Zhang, Xiaohong; Seto, Edward

    2015-09-11

    MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) is an essential DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein. It interacts with MSH6 or MSH3 to form the MutS? or MutS? complex, respectively, which recognize base-base mispairs and insertions/deletions and initiate the repair process. Mutation or dysregulation of MSH2 causes genomic instability that can lead to cancer. MSH2 is acetylated at its C terminus, and histone deacetylase (HDAC6) deacetylates MSH2. However, whether other regions of MSH2 can be acetylated and whether other histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are involved in MSH2 deacetylation/acetylation is unknown. Here, we report that MSH2 can be acetylated at Lys-73 near the N terminus. Lys-73 is highly conserved across many species. Although several Class I and II HDACs interact with MSH2, HDAC10 is the major enzyme that deacetylates MSH2 at Lys-73. Histone acetyltransferase HBO1 might acetylate this residue. HDAC10 overexpression in HeLa cells stimulates cellular DNA MMR activity, whereas HDAC10 knockdown decreases DNA MMR activity. Thus, our study identifies an HDAC10-mediated regulatory mechanism controlling the DNA mismatch repair function of MSH2. PMID:26221039

  12. Histone deacetylase-4 is required during early cranial neural crest development for generation of the zebrafish palatal skeleton

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylase-4 (Hdac4) is a class II histone deacetylase that inhibits the activity of transcription factors. In humans, HDAC4 deficiency is associated with non-syndromic oral clefts and brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR) with craniofacial abnormalities. Results We identify hdac4 in zebrafish and characterize its function in craniofacial morphogenesis. The gene is present as a single copy, and the deduced Hdac4 protein sequence shares all known functional domains with human HDAC4. The zebrafish hdac4 transcript is widely present in migratory cranial neural crest (CNC) cells of the embryo, including populations migrating around the eye, which previously have been shown to contribute to the formation of the palatal skeleton of the early larva. Embryos injected with hdac4 morpholinos (MO) have reduced or absent CNC populations that normally migrate medial to the eye. CNC-derived palatal precursor cells do not recover at the post-migratory stage, and subsequently we found that defects in the developing cartilaginous palatal skeleton correlate with reduction or absence of early CNC cells. Palatal skeletal defects prominently include a shortened, clefted, or missing ethmoid plate, and are associated with a shortening of the face of young larvae. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Hdac4 is a regulator of CNC-derived palatal skeletal precursors during early embryogenesis. Cleft palate resulting from HDAC4 mutations in human patients may result from defects in a homologous CNC progenitor cell population. PMID:22676467

  13. Silencing histone deacetylase-specific isoforms enhances expression of pluripotency genes in bovine fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Staszkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Power, Rachel A; Harkins, Lettie L; Barnes, Christian W; Strickler, Karen L; Rim, Jong S; Bondioli, Kenneth R; Eilersten, Kenneth J

    2013-10-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) catalyze deacetylation of histones that results in altered transcriptional activity. Inhibitors of HDACs have been shown to induce transcriptional changes that contribute positively to reprogramming somatic cells either by nuclear transfer or inducing a pluripotent state. However, the exact molecular mechanisms whereby HDAC inhibitors function and the specificity of the HDAC isoforms in cell reprogramming are not yet fully understood. Herein, we report the ability of individual isoform-specific HDACs to modulate endogenous expression of pluripotency-associated genes in bovine somatic cells. This in vitro study showed that a transient selective depletion of HDACs resulted in elevated mRNA levels of Oct-4, Sox2, and Nanog. In particular, we found that inhibition of specific HDAC isoforms using small interfering (si) RNA significantly increased expression of Nanog, a key factor required for totipotency induced by somatic cell nuclear transfer and for maintaining pluripotency in embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. Our study suggests that this gene might be the most susceptible to HDAC activity inhibition. Moreover, a regulatory role of the class III HDAC, SIRT3, on an Oct4-Sox2-Nanog transcriptional network was revealed. We observed the upregulation of pluripotency-related genes by depletion of SIRT3. SIRT3 is localized to mitochondria and is associated with energy metabolism processes, suggesting metabolic changes may be linked to reprogramming in bovine fibroblasts. In conclusion, we show that targeting selective HDACs can potentially be useful to enhance reprogramming and that sirtuins may play a pivotal role in somatic cell reprogramming by upregulating an Oct4-Sox2-Nanog transcriptional network. Dedifferentiating donor somatic cells by upregulating developmentally important genes through specific knockdown of epigenetic targets, in particular HDACs, may provide a path to improving livestock cloning and the in vitro production of pluripotent cells. PMID:24020699

  14. Hydroxamic acid based histone deacetylase inhibitors with confirmed activity against the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Giuseppe; Battistuzzi, Gianfranco; Vignola, Davide

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a key role in regulating gene transcription, in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, by enzymes that control the acetylation and deacetylation of histones. In particular, inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDAC-Is) have been shown effective in controlling the development of many parasites, such as the plasmodium of malaria. Here we report the results of a study aimed at evaluating antiparasitic effect of two classes of HDAC-Is bearing different zinc binding group (hydroxamic acid vs thiol). The study showed that only the hydroxamic acid based HDAC inhibitors were active, with Plasmodium falciparum being the most sensitive parasite, having from low double-digit to single-digit nanomolar range in vitro activities. Among three derivatives evaluated also in vivo, ST8086AA1 (8) effectively inhibited 88% of the development of Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:25563890

  15. Design, synthesis and evaluation of antiestrogen and histone deacetylase inhibitor molecular hybrids.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Sanchez, Rodrigo; Cotnoir-White, David; Kulpa, Justyna; Jutras, Isabel; Pottel, Joshua; Moitessier, Nicolas; Mader, Sylvie; Gleason, James L

    2015-12-15

    The combination of antiestrogens and histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) has been found to be antiproliferative in breast cancer models. We designed and synthesized hybrid structures which combined structural features of the pure antiestrogen ICI-164,384 and HDACi's SAHA and entinostat in a single bifunctional molecule. The hybrids retained antiestrogenic and HDACi activity and, in the case of benzamide hybrids, were selective for Class I HDAC3 over Class II HDAC6. The hybrids possessed low micromolar to high nanomolar activity against both ER+ MCF-7 and ER- MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell models. PMID:26613635

  16. Investigation on the ZBG-functionality of phenyl-4-yl-acrylohydroxamic acid derivatives as histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Musso, Loana; Cincinelli, Raffaella; Zuco, Valentina; Zunino, Franco; Nurisso, Alessandra; Cuendet, Muriel; Giannini, Giuseppe; Vesci, Loredana; Pisano, Claudio; Dallavalle, Sabrina

    2015-10-15

    A series of alternative Zn-binding groups were explored in the design of phenyl-4-yl-acrylohydroxamic acid derivatives as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors. Most of the synthesized compounds were less effective than the parent hydroxamic acid. However, the profile of activity shown by the analog bearing a hydroxyurea head group, makes this derivative promising for further investigation. PMID:26376355

  17. Histone Deacetylase 1 Can Repress Transcription by Binding to Sp1

    PubMed Central

    Doetzlhofer, Angelika; Rotheneder, Hans; Lagger, Gerda; Koranda, Manfred; Kurtev, Vladislav; Brosch, Gerald; Wintersberger, Erhard; Seiser, Christian

    1999-01-01

    The members of the Sp1 transcription factor family can act as both negative and positive regulators of gene expression. Here we show that Sp1 can be a target for histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1)-mediated transcriptional repression. The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A activates the chromosomally integrated murine thymidine kinase promoter in an Sp1-dependent manner. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments with Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts and 293 cells demonstrate that Sp1 and HDAC1 can be part of the same complex. The interaction between Sp1 and HDAC1 is direct and requires the carboxy-terminal domain of Sp1. Previously we have shown that the C terminus of Sp1 is necessary for the interaction with the transcription factor E2F1 (J. Karlseder, H. Rotheneder, and E. Wintersberger, Mol. Cell. Biol. 16:1659–1667, 1996). Coexpression of E2F1 interferes with HDAC1 binding to Sp1 and abolishes Sp1-mediated transcriptional repression. Our results indicate that one component of Sp1-dependent gene regulation involves competition between the transcriptional repressor HDAC1 and the transactivating factor E2F1. PMID:10409740

  18. Role of histone deacetylases in pancreas: Implications for pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Klieser, Eckhard; Swierczynski, Stefan; Mayr, Christian; Schmidt, Johanna; Neureiter, Daniel; Kiesslich, Tobias; Illig, Romana

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, our knowledge of the pathogenesis in acute and chronic pancreatitis (AP/CP) as well as in pancreatic cancerogenesis has significantly diversified. Nevertheless, the medicinal therapeutic options are still limited and therapeutic success and patient outcome are poor. Epigenetic deregulation of gene expression is known to contribute to development and progression of AP and CP as well as of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, the selective inhibition of aberrantly active epigenetic regulators can be an effective option for future therapies. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that remove an acetyl group from histone tails, thereby causing chromatin compaction and repression of transcription. In this review we present an overview of the currently available literature addressing the role of HDACs in the pancreas and in pancreatic diseases. In pancreatic cancerogenesis, HDACs play a role in the important process of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and, hypoxia-inducible-factor-1-angiogenesis. Finally, we focus on HDACs as potential therapeutic targets by summarizing currently available histone deacetylase inhibitors. PMID:26691388

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitor attenuates neurotoxicity of clioquinol in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Takao; Asakura, Kunihiko; Hikichi, Chika; Ishikawa, Tomomasa; Murai, Rie; Hirota, Seiko; Murate, Ken-Ichiro; Kizawa, Madoko; Ueda, Akihiro; Ito, Shinji; Mutoh, Tatsuro

    2015-05-01

    Clioquinol is considered to be a causative agent of subacute myelo-optico neuropathy (SMON), although the pathogenesis of SMON is yet to be elucidated. We have previously shown that clioquinol inhibits nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced Trk autophosphorylation in PC12 cells transformed with human Trk cDNA. To explore the further mechanism of neuronal damage by clioquinol, we evaluated the acetylation status of histones in PC12 cells. Clioquinol reduced the level of histone acetylation, and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor Trichostatin A upregulated acetylated histones and prevented the neuronal cell damage caused by clioquinol. In addition, treatment with HDAC inhibitor decreased neurite retraction and restored the inhibition of NGF-induced Trk autophosphorylation by clioquinol. Thus, clioquinol induced neuronal cell death via deacetylation of histones, and HDAC inhibitor alleviates the neurotoxicity of clioquinol. Clioquinol is now used as a potential medicine for malignancies and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, HDAC inhibitors can be used as a candidate medicine for the prevention of its side effects on neuronal cells. PMID:25758465

  20. Isolation and characterization of an osmotic stress and ABA induced histone deacetylase in Arachis hygogaea

    PubMed Central

    Su, Liang-Chen; Deng, Bin; Liu, Shuai; Li, Li-Mei; Hu, Bo; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Li, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Histone acetylation, which together with histone methylation regulates gene activity in response to stress, is an important epigenetic modification. There is an increasing research focus on histone acetylation in crops, but there is no information to date in peanut (Arachis hypogaea). We showed that osmotic stress and ABA affect the acetylation of histone H3 loci in peanut seedlings by immunoblotting experiments. Using RNA-seq data for peanut, we found a RPD3/HDA1-like superfamily histone deacetylase (HDAC), termed AhHDA1, whose gene is up-regulated by PEG-induced water limitation and ABA signaling. We isolated and characterized AhHDA1 from A. hypogaea, showing that AhHDA1 is very similar to an Arabidopsis HDAC (AtHDA6) and, in recombinant form, possesses HDAC activity. To understand whether and how osmotic stress and ABA mediate the peanut stress response by epigenetics, the expression of AhHDA1 and stress-responsive genes following treatment with PEG, ABA, and the specific HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) were analyzed. AhHDA1 transcript levels were enhanced by all three treatments, as was expression of peanut transcription factor genes, indicating that AhHDA1 might be involved in the epigenetic regulation of stress resistance genes that comprise the responses to osmotic stress and ABA. PMID:26217363

  1. Activation of insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling mediates resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Su-Chan; Min, Hye-Young; Park, Kwan Hee; Hyun, Seung Yeob; Kwon, So Jung; Choi, Sun Phil; Kim, Woo-Young; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-06-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are considered promising targets in the treatment of hematologic malignancies and several types of solid tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the efficacy of HDAC inhibitors in solid tumors is marginal, and the mechanisms underlying resistance to HDAC inhibitors are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) signaling in resistance to HDAC inhibitors in NSCLC. Using MTT and soft-agar colony formation assays, we selected NSCLC cell lines that exhibited intrinsic resistance to vorinostat. Treatment with vorinostat activated IGF-1R signaling in vorinostat-resistant but not vorinostat-sensitive NSCLC cells. Other HDAC inhibitors, including trichostatin A, sodium butyrate, and depsipeptide, also activated IGF-1R signaling in vorinostat-resistant NSCLC cells. Blockade of IGF-1R signaling via IGF-1R monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or through knockdown of IGF-1R via RNA interference sensitized vorinostat-resistant cells to HDAC inhibition. Finally, IGF-1R mAbs sensitized xenograft tumors of vorinostat-resistant cells to vorinostat treatment in vivo. These findings suggest that IGF-1R activation is generally involved in resistance to HDAC inhibitors and that targeting IGF-1R is an effective strategy for overcoming resistance to HDAC inhibitors in NSCLC. PMID:25721083

  2. Histone deacetylase classes I and II regulate Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye Jin; DeCotiis, Jennifer; Giron, Mario; Palmeri, Diana; Lukac, David M

    2014-01-01

    In primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells infected with latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the promoter of the viral lytic switch gene, Rta, is organized into bivalent chromatin, similar to cellular developmental switch genes. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACis) reactivate latent KSHV and dramatically remodel the viral genome topology and chromatin architecture. However, reactivation is not uniform across a population of infected cells. We sought to identify an HDACi cocktail that would uniformly reactivate KSHV and reveal the regulatory HDACs. Using HDACis with various specificities, we found that class I HDACis were sufficient to reactivate the virus but differed in potency. Valproic acid (VPA) was the most effective HDACi, inducing lytic cycle gene expression in 75% of cells, while trichostatin A (TSA) induced less widespread lytic gene expression and inhibited VPA-stimulated reactivation. VPA was only slightly superior to TSA in inducing histone acetylation of Rta's promoter, but only VPA induced significant production of infectious virus, suggesting that HDAC regulation after Rta expression has a dramatic effect on reactivation progression. Ectopic HDACs 1, 3, and 6 inhibited TPA-stimulated KSHV reactivation. Surprisingly, ectopic HDACs 1 and 6 stimulated reactivation independently, suggesting that the stoichiometries of HDAC complexes are critical for the switch. Tubacin, a specific inhibitor of the ubiquitin-binding, proautophagic HDAC6, also inhibited VPA-stimulated reactivation. Immunofluorescence indicated that HDAC6 is expressed diffusely throughout latently infected cells, but its expression level and nuclear localization is increased during reactivation. Overall, our data suggest that inhibition of HDAC classes I and IIa and maintenance of HDAC6 (IIb) activity are required for optimal KSHV reactivation. PMID:24227836

  3. The role dietary of bioactive compounds on the regulation of histone acetylases and deacetylases: a review.

    PubMed

    Vahid, F; Zand, H; Nosrat-Mirshekarlou, E; Najafi, R; Hekmatdoost, A

    2015-05-10

    Nutrigenomics is an area of epigenomics that explores and defines the rapidly evolving field of diet-genome interactions. Lifestyle and diet can significantly influence epigenetic mechanisms, which cause heritable changes in gene expression without changes in DNA sequence. Nutrient-dependent epigenetic variations can significantly affect genome stability, mRNA and protein expression, and metabolic changes, which in turn influence food absorption and the activity of its constituents. Dietary bioactive compounds can affect epigenetic alterations, which are accumulated over time and are shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Histone acetylation is an epigenetic modification mediated by histone acetyl transferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) critically involved in regulating affinity binding between the histones and DNA backbone. The HDAC-mediated increase in histone affinity to DNA causes DNA condensation, preventing transcription, whereas HAT-acetylated chromatin is transcriptionally active. HDAC and HAT activities are reported to be associated with signal transduction, cell growth and death, as well as with the pathogenesis of various diseases. The aim of this review was to evaluate the role of diet and dietary bioactive compounds on the regulation of HATs and HDACs in epigenetic diseases. Dietary bioactive compounds such as genistein, phenylisothiocyanate, curcumin, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and epigallocatechin-3-gallate can regulate HDAC and HAT activities and acetylation of histones and non-histone chromatin proteins, and their health benefits are thought to be attributed to these epigenetic mechanisms. The intake of dietary compounds that regulate epigenetic modifications can provide significant health effects and may prevent various pathological processes involved in the development of cancer and other life-threatening diseases. PMID:25701602

  4. The antiparasitic clioquinol induces apoptosis in leukemia and myeloma cells by inhibiting histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Biyin; Li, Jie; Zhu, Jingyu; Shen, Mingyun; Han, Kunkun; Zhang, Zubin; Yu, Yang; Wang, Yali; Wu, Depei; Chen, Suning; Sun, Aining; Tang, Xiaowen; Zhao, Yun; Qiao, Chunhua; Hou, Tingjun; Mao, Xinliang

    2013-11-22

    The antiparasitic clioquinol (CQ) represents a class of novel anticancer drugs by interfering with proteasome activity. In the present study, we found that CQ induced blood cancer cell apoptosis by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs). CQ accumulated the acetylation levels of several key proteins including histone H3 (H3), p53, HSP90, and ?-tubulin. In the mechanistic study, CQ was found to down-regulate HDAC1, -3, -4, and -5 in both myeloma and leukemia cells. Computer modeling analysis revealed that CQ was well docked into the active pocket of the enzyme, where the oxygen and nitrogen atoms in CQ formed stable coordinate bonds with the zinc ion, and the hydroxyl group from CQ formed an effective hydrogen bond with Asp-267. Moreover, co-treatment with CQ and zinc/copper chloride led to decreased Ac-H3. Furthermore, CQ inhibited the activity of Class I and IIa HDACs in the cell-free assays, demonstrating that CQ interfered with HDAC activity. By inhibiting HDAC activity, CQ induced expression of p21, p27, and p53, cell cycle arrest at G1 phase, and cell apoptosis. This study suggested that the HDAC enzymes are targets of CQ, which provided a novel insight into the molecular mechanism of CQ in the treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:24114842

  5. Histone deacetylase 8 is deregulated in urothelial cancer but not a target for efficient treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that class-I histone deacetylase (HDAC) 8 mRNA is upregulated in urothelial cancer tissues and urothelial cancer cell lines compared to benign controls. Using urothelial cancer cell lines we evaluated whether specific targeting of HDAC8 might be a therapeutic option in bladder cancer treatment. Methods We conducted siRNA-mediated knockdown and specific pharmacological inhibition of HDAC8 with the three different inhibitors compound 2, compound 5, and compound 6 in several urothelial carcinoma cell lines with distinct HDAC8 expression profiles. Levels of HDAC and marker proteins were determined by western blot analysis and mRNA levels were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Cellular effects of HDAC8 suppression were analyzed by ATP assay, flow cytometry, colony forming assay and migration assay. Results Efficient siRNA-mediated knockdown of HDAC8 reduced proliferation up to 45%. The HDAC8 specific inhibitors compound 5 and compound 6 significantly reduced viability of all urothelial cancer cell lines (IC50 9 – 21 ?M). Flow cytometry revealed only a slight increase in the sub-G1 fraction indicating a limited induction of apoptosis. Expression of thymidylate synthase was partly reduced; PARP-cleavage was not detected. The influence of the pharmacological inhibition on clonogenic growth and migration show a cell line- and inhibitor-dependent reduction with the strongest effects after treatment with compound 5 and compound 6. Conclusions Deregulation of HDAC8 is frequent in urothelial cancer, but neither specific pharmacological inhibition nor siRNA-mediated knockdown of HDAC8 impaired viability of urothelial cancer cell lines in a therapeutic useful manner. Accordingly, HDAC8 on its own is not a promising drug target in bladder cancer. PMID:25011684

  6. Nuclear import of histone deacetylase 5 by requisite nuclear localization signal phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Todd M; Yu, Fang; Guise, Amanda J; Cristea, Ileana M

    2011-02-01

    Histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5), a class IIa deacetylase, is a prominent regulator of cellular and epigenetic processes that underlie the progression of human disease, ranging from cardiac hypertrophy to cancer. Although it is established that phosphorylation mediates 14-3-3 protein binding and provides the essential link between HDAC5 nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and transcriptional repression, thus far only four phospho-acceptor sites have been functionally characterized. Here, using a combinatorial proteomics approach and phosphomutant screening, we present the first evidence that HDAC5 has at least 17 in vivo phosphorylation sites within functional domains, including Ser278 and Ser279 within the nuclear localization signal (NLS), Ser1108 within the nuclear export signal, and Ser755 in deacetylase domain. Global and targeted MS/MS analyses of NLS peptides demonstrated the presence of single (Ser278 and Ser279) and double (Ser278/Ser279) phosphorylations. The double S278/279A mutation showed reduced association with HDAC3, slightly decreased deacetylation activity, and significantly increased cytoplasmic localization compared with wild type HDAC5, whereas the S278A and S1108A phosphomutants were not altered. Live cell imaging revealed a deficiency in nuclear import of S278/279A HDAC5. Phosphomutant stable cell lines confirmed the cellular redistribution of NLS mutants and revealed a more pronounced cytoplasmic localization for the single S279A mutant. Proteomic analysis of immunoisolated S278/279A, S279A, and S259/498A mutants linked altered cellular localization to changes in protein interactions. S278/279A and S279A HDAC5 showed reduced association with the NCoR-HDAC3 nuclear corepressor complex as well as protein kinase D enzymes, which were potentiated in the S259/498A mutant. These results provide the first link between phosphorylation outside the known 14-3-3 sites and downstream changes in protein interactions. Together these studies identify Ser279 as a critical phosphorylation within the NLS involved in the nuclear import of HDAC5, providing a regulatory point in nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling that may be conserved in other class IIa HDACs-HDAC4 and HDAC9. PMID:21081666

  7. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs.

    PubMed

    Eisses, John F; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R; Orabi, Abrahim I; Javed, Tanveer A; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A; Lowe, Mark E; Monga, Satdarshan P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations-that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury-we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained ?-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury. PMID:26476347

  8. Down-Regulation of Deacetylase HDAC6 Inhibits the Melanoma Cell Line A375.S2 Growth through ROS-Dependent Mitochondrial Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jun; Lei, Yun; An, Gai-li; He, Li

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) plays critical roles in many cellular processes related to cancer. However, its biological roles in the development of melanoma remain unexplored. Our aim was to investigate whether HDAC6 has a biological role in human melanoma development and to understand its underlying mechanism. In the present study, HDAC6 expression was up-regulated in melanoma tissues and cell lines. Knockdown of HDAC6 significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation ability of A375.S2 cells, promoted cell arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. Additionally, western blotting assay showed that HDAC6 silencing suppressed Bcl-2 level and enhanced Bax level, then activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, and further activated the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytoplasm, finally induced cell apoptosis involving the mitochondrial pathway. Knockdown of HDAC6 triggered a significant generation of ROS and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Furthermore, ROS inhibitor, NAC reduced HDAC6 siRNA-induced ROS production, and blocked HDAC6 siRNA-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. NAC also significantly blocked HDAC6 siRNA-induced mtDNA copy number decrease and mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation imbalance. In conclusion, the results showed that knockdown of HDAC6 induced apoptosis in human melanoma A375.S2 cells through a ROS-dependent mitochondrial pathway. PMID:25774669

  9. Dephosphorylation and Caspase Processing Generate Distinct Nuclear Pools of Histone Deacetylase 4? †

    PubMed Central

    Paroni, Gabriela; Fontanini, Alessandra; Cernotta, Nadia; Foti, Carmela; Gupta, Mahesh P.; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Fasino, Dario; Brancolini, Claudio

    2007-01-01

    From the nucleus, histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) regulates a variety of cellular processes, including growth, differentiation, and survival, by orchestrating transcriptional changes. Extracellular signals control its repressive influence mostly through regulating its nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling. In particular, specific posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation and caspase-mediated proteolytic processing operate on HDAC4 to promote its nuclear accumulation or export. To understand the signaling properties of this deacetylase, we investigated its cell death-promoting activity and the transcriptional repression potential of different mutants that accumulate in the nucleus. Here we show that, compared to that of other nuclear forms of HDAC4, a caspase-generated nuclear fragment exhibits a stronger cell death-promoting activity coupled with increased repressive effect on Runx2- or SRF-dependent transcription. However, this mutant displays reduced repressive action on MEF2C-driven transcription. Photobleaching experiments and quantitative analysis of the raw data, based on a two-binding-state compartmental model, demonstrate the existence of two nuclear pools of HDAC4 with different chromatin-binding properties. The caspase-generated fragment is weakly bound to chromatin, whereas an HDAC4 mutant defective in 14-3-3 binding or the wild-type HDAC5 protein forms a more stable complex. The tightly bound species show an impaired ability to induce cell death and repress Runx2- or SRF-dependent transcription less efficiently. We propose that, through specific posttranslation modifications, extracellular signals control two distinct nuclear pools of HDAC4 to differentially dictate cell death and differentiation. These two nuclear pools of HDAC4 are characterized by different repression potentials and divergent dynamics of chromatin interaction. PMID:17636017

  10. Structure-based optimization of phenylbutyrate-derived histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiang; Wang, Da-Sheng; Chen, Chang-Shi; Hu, Yuan-Dong; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2005-08-25

    Previously, we developed a strategy to develop a novel class of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors by tethering short-chain fatty acids with Zn(2+)-chelating motifs, which led to N-hydroxy-4-(4-phenylbutyryl-amino)benzamide (HTPB), a hydroxamate-tethered phenylbutyrate derivative with sub-micromolar potency in inhibiting HDAC activity and cancer cell proliferation. In this study, we carried out structure-based optimization of HTPB by using the framework generated by the structure of histone deacetylase-like protein (HDLP)-trichostatin A (TSA) complexes. Docking of HTPB into the HDLP binding domain suggested that the hydrophobic microenvironment encompassed by Phe-198 and Phe-200 could be exploited for structural optimization. This premise was corroborated by the greater potency of (S)-(+)-N-hydroxy-4-(3-methyl-2-phenylbutyrylamino)-benzamide [(S)-11] (IC(50) in HDAC inhibition, 16 nM), of which the isopropyl moiety was favorable in interacting with this hydrophobic motif. (S)-11 at concentrations as low as 0.1 microM was effective in causing histone hyperacetylation and p21(WAF/CIP1) overexpression and suppressing proliferation in cancer cells. PMID:16107152

  11. Decreased histone deacetylase 2 impairs Nrf2 activation by oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado, Nicolas; Thimmulappa, Rajesh; Thomas, Catherine M.R.; Fenwick, Peter S.; Chana, Kirandeep K.; Donnelly, Louise E.; Biswal, Shyam; Ito, Kazuhiro; Barnes, Peter J.

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Nrf2 anti-oxidant function is impaired when HDAC activity is inhibited. {yields} HDAC inhibition decreases Nrf2 protein stability. {yields} HDAC2 is involved in reduced Nrf2 stability and both correlate in COPD samples. {yields} HDAC inhibition increases Nrf2 acetylation. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a crucial role in cellular defence against oxidative stress by inducing the expression of multiple anti-oxidant genes. However, where high levels of oxidative stress are observed, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), Nrf2 activity is reduced, although the molecular mechanism for this defect is uncertain. Here, we show that down-regulation of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 2 causes Nrf2 instability, resulting in reduced anti-oxidant gene expression and increase sensitivity to oxidative stress. Although Nrf2 protein was clearly stabilized after hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) stimulation in a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS2B), Nrf2 stability was decreased and Nrf2 acetylation increased in the presence of an HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA). TSA also reduced Nrf2-regulated heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in these cells, and this was confirmed in acute cigarette-smoke exposed mice in vivo. HDAC2 knock-down by RNA interference resulted in reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced Nrf2 protein stability and activity in BEAS2B cells, whereas HDAC1 knockdown had no effect. Furthermore, monocyte-derived macrophages obtained from healthy volunteers (non-smokers and smokers) and COPD patients showed a significant correlation between HDAC2 expression and Nrf2 expression (r = 0.92, p < 0.0001). Thus, reduced HDAC2 activity in COPD may account for increased Nrf2 acetylation, reduced Nrf2 stability and impaired anti oxidant defences.

  12. Evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) as therapeutic leads for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT).

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Angela K; Guiguemde, W Armand; Guy, R Kiplin

    2015-08-15

    Two of the histone deacetylases, TbDAC1 and TbDAC3, have been reported to be essential genes in trypanosomes. Therefore, we tested the activity of a panel of human histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) for their ability to block proliferation of Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among the HDACi's, the hydroxamic acid derivatives panobinostat and belinostat exhibited potency that appeared to make them viable candidates for development due to their reported pharmacokinetic characteristics. However, cellular pharmacodynamic analysis demonstrated that these drugs were unable to kill cultured parasites at exposures seen in patients at their tolerated doses and additionally failed to show any synergistic effects in combination with pentamidine, suramin, melarsoprol, or nifurtimox. Analysis of the potency of the entire HDACi panel revealed no correlations between potency against any human HDAC isoform and inhibition of T. brucei proliferation, suggesting that the trypanosome histone deacetylases possess a unique specificity. These studies confirmed that HDAC inhibitors have potential as leads against human African trypanosomiasis but that none of the current clinical candidates can be directly repurposed. Therefore, development of HDACi's with appropriate specificity and potency may be a viable route to a new class of anti-trypanosomal drugs. PMID:25637120

  13. The role of butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor in diabetes mellitus: experimental evidence for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sabbir; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in diabetes mellitus (DM), ?-cell reprogramming and its complications is an emerging concept. Recent evidence suggests that there is a link between DM and histone deacetylases (HDACs), because HDAC inhibitors promote ?-cell differentiation, proliferation, function and improve insulin resistance. Moreover, gut microbes and diet-derived products can alter the host epigenome. Furthermore, butyrate and butyrate-producing microbes are decreased in DM. Butyrate is a short-chain fatty acid produced from the fermentation of dietary fibers by microbiota and has been proven as an HDAC inhibitor. The present review provides a pragmatic interpretation of chromatin-dependent and independent complex signaling/mechanisms of butyrate for the treatment of Type 1 and Type 2 DM, with an emphasis on the promising strategies for its drugability and therapeutic implication. PMID:26111036

  14. Tropolones As Lead-Like Natural Products: The Development of Potent and Selective Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Natural products have long been recognized as a rich source of potent therapeutics but further development is often limited by high structural complexity and high molecular weight. In contrast, at the core of the thujaplicins is a lead-like tropolone scaffold characterized by relatively low molecular weight, ample sites for diversification, and metal-binding functionality poised for targeting a range of metalloenzyme drug targets. Here, we describe the development of this underutilized scaffold for the discovery of tropolone derivatives that function as isozyme-selective inhibitors of the validated anticancer drug target, histone deacetylase (HDAC). Several monosubstituted tropolones display remarkable levels of selectivity for HDAC2 and potently inhibit the growth of T-cell lymphocyte cell lines. The tropolones represent a new chemotype of isozyme-selective HDAC inhibitors. PMID:24900743

  15. A novel histone deacetylase 1 and 2 isoform-specific inhibitor alleviates experimental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Choong, Chi-Jing; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Hayakawa, Hideki; Yasuda, Toru; Baba, Kousuke; Hirata, Yoshiyuki; Uesato, Shinichi; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    With increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and histone hypoacetylation being implicated in neurodegeneration, HDAC inhibitors have been reported to have considerable therapeutic potential. Yet, existing inhibitors lack specificity and may show substantial adverse effect. In this study, we identified a novel HDAC1/2 isoform-specific inhibitor, K560, with protective effects against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))- and/or 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced neuronal death in both in vitro and in vivo Parkinson's disease model. K560 attenuated cell death induced by MPP(+) in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells through the sustained expression of an antiapoptotic protein, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP). Inhibition of XIAP expression by locked nucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides abolished the protective effect of K560. Inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, reduced p53 phosphorylation, and down-regulation of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis on K560 treatment were also observed. Furthermore, pre- and post-oral administration of K560 to mice prevented MPTP-induced loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra, suggesting that selective inhibition of HDAC1 and HDAC2 by K560 may pave the way to new strategies for Parkinson's disease treatment. PMID:26545632

  16. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Trichostatin A Promotes Totipotency in the Male Gametophyte[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Soriano, Mercedes; Cordewener, Jan; Muiño, Jose M.; Riksen, Tjitske; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki; Angenent, Gerco C.; Boutilier, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The haploid male gametophyte, the pollen grain, is a terminally differentiated structure whose function ends at fertilization. Plant breeding and propagation widely use haploid embryo production from in vitro–cultured male gametophytes, but this technique remains poorly understood at the mechanistic level. Here, we show that histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the switch to haploid embryogenesis. Blocking HDAC activity with trichostatin A (TSA) in cultured male gametophytes of Brassica napus leads to a large increase in the proportion of cells that switch from pollen to embryogenic growth. Embryogenic growth is enhanced by, but not dependent on, the high-temperature stress that is normally used to induce haploid embryogenesis in B. napus. The male gametophyte of Arabidopsis thaliana, which is recalcitrant to haploid embryo development in culture, also forms embryogenic cell clusters after TSA treatment. Genetic analysis suggests that the HDAC protein HDA17 plays a role in this process. TSA treatment of male gametophytes is associated with the hyperacetylation of histones H3 and H4. We propose that the totipotency of the male gametophyte is kept in check by an HDAC-dependent mechanism and that the stress treatments used to induce haploid embryo development in culture impinge on this HDAC-dependent pathway. PMID:24464291

  17. A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Chidamide induces apoptosis of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lin; Chen, Baoan; Qin, Shukui; Li, Suyi; He, Xiangming; Qiu, Shaomin; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Hong

    2010-02-05

    Many studies have demonstrated that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce various tumor cells to undergo apoptosis, and such inhibitors have been used in different clinical trials against different human cancers. In this study, we designed and synthesized a novel HDAC inhibitor, Chidamide. We showed that Chidamide was able to increase the acetylation levels of histone H3 and to inhibit the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Ras signaling pathways, which resulted in arresting colon cancer cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle and promoting apoptosis. As a result, the proliferation of colon cancer cells was suppressed in vitro. Our data support the potential application of Chidamide as an anticancer agent in treating colon cancer. Future studies are needed to demonstrate its in vivo efficacy.

  18. Protein kinase D1 mediates class IIa histone deacetylase phosphorylation and nuclear extrusion in intestinal epithelial cells: role in mitogenic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sinnett-Smith, James; Ni, Yang; Wang, Jia; Ming, Ming; Young, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    We examined whether class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a role in mitogenic signaling mediated by protein kinase D1 (PKD1) in IEC-18 intestinal epithelial cells. Our results show that class IIa HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC7 are prominently expressed in these cells. Stimulation with ANG II, a potent mitogen for IEC-18 cells, induced a striking increase in phosphorylation of HDAC4 at Ser246 and Ser632, HDAC5 at Ser259 and Ser498, and HDAC7 at Ser155. Treatment with the PKD family inhibitors kb NB 142-70 and CRT0066101 or small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of PKD1 prevented ANG II-induced phosphorylation of HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC7. A variety of PKD1 activators in IEC-18 cells, including vasopressin, lysophosphatidic acid, and phorbol esters, also induced HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC7 phosphorylation. Using endogenously and ectopically expressed HDAC5, we show that PKD1-mediated phosphorylation of HDAC5 induces its nuclear extrusion into the cytoplasm. In contrast, HDAC5 with Ser259 and Ser498 mutated to Ala was localized to the nucleus in unstimulated and stimulated cells. Treatment of IEC-18 cells with specific inhibitors of class IIa HDACs, including MC1568 and TMP269, prevented cell cycle progression, DNA synthesis, and proliferation induced in response to G protein-coupled receptor/PKD1 activation. The PKD1-class IIa HDAC axis also functions in intestinal epithelial cells in vivo, since an increase in phosphorylation of HDAC4/5 and HDAC7 was demonstrated in lysates of crypt cells from PKD1 transgenic mice compared with matched nontransgenic littermates. Collectively, our results reveal a PKD1-class IIa HDAC axis in intestinal epithelial cells leading to mitogenic signaling. PMID:24647541

  19. HISTONE DEACETYLASE 9 represses seedling traits in Arabidopsis thaliana dry seeds.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Martijn; Zöll, Christian; Wang, Zhi; Philipp, Christina; Carles, Annaick; Li, Yong; Kornet, Noortje G; Liu, Yongxiu; Soppe, Wim J J

    2014-11-01

    Plant life is characterized by major phase changes. We studied the role of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in the transition from seed to seedling in Arabidopsis. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC stimulated germination of freshly harvested seeds. Subsequent analysis revealed that histone deacetylase 9 (hda9) mutant alleles displayed reduced seed dormancy and faster germination than wild-type plants. Transcriptome meta-analysis comparisons between the hda9 dry seed transcriptome and published datasets demonstrated that transcripts of genes that are induced during imbibition in wild-type prematurely accumulated in hda9-1 dry seeds. This included several genes associated with photosynthesis and photoautotrophic growth such as RuBisCO and RuBisCO activase (RCA). Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated enhanced histone acetylation levels at their loci in young hda9-1 seedlings. Our observations suggest that HDA9 negatively influences germination and is involved in the suppression of seedling traits in dry seeds, probably by transcriptional repression via histone deacetylation. Accordingly, HDA9 transcript is abundant in dry seeds and becomes reduced during imbibition in wild-type seeds. The proposed function of HDA9 is opposite to that of its homologous genes HDA6 and HDA19, which have been reported to repress embryonic properties in germinated seedlings. PMID:25146719

  20. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Trichostatin A Ameliorated Endotoxin-Induced Neuroinflammation and Cognitive Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Hung, Shih-Kai; Chen, Yeong-Chang; Wei, Tsui-Shan; Sun, Ding-Ping; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Yeh, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Excessive production of cytokines by microglia may cause cognitive dysfunction and long-lasting behavioral changes. Activating the peripheral innate immune system stimulates cytokine secretion in the central nervous system, which modulates cognitive function. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) modulate cytokine synthesis and release. Trichostatin A (TSA), an HDAC inhibitor, is documented to be anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective. We investigated whether TSA reduces lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction. ICR mice were first intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with vehicle or TSA (0.3?mg/kg). One hour later, they were injected (i.p.) with saline or Escherichia coli LPS (1?mg/kg). We analyzed the food and water intake, body weight loss, and sucrose preference of the injected mice and then determined the microglia activation and inflammatory cytokine expression in the brains of LPS-treated mice and LPS-treated BV-2 microglial cells. In the TSA-pretreated mice, microglial activation was lower, anhedonia did not occur, and LPS-induced cognitive dysfunction (anorexia, weight loss, and social withdrawal) was attenuated. Moreover, mRNA expression of HDAC2, HDAC5, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), TNF-?, MCP-1, and IL-1? in the brain of LPS-challenged mice and in the LPS-treated BV-2 microglial cells was lower. TSA diminished LPS-induced inflammatory responses in the mouse brain and modulated the cytokine-associated changes in cognitive function, which might be specifically related to reducing HDAC2 and HDAC5 expression. PMID:26273133

  1. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Trichostatin A Ameliorated Endotoxin-Induced Neuroinflammation and Cognitive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Hung, Shih-Kai; Chen, Yeong-Chang; Wei, Tsui-Shan; Sun, Ding-Ping; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Yeh, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Excessive production of cytokines by microglia may cause cognitive dysfunction and long-lasting behavioral changes. Activating the peripheral innate immune system stimulates cytokine secretion in the central nervous system, which modulates cognitive function. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) modulate cytokine synthesis and release. Trichostatin A (TSA), an HDAC inhibitor, is documented to be anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective. We investigated whether TSA reduces lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced neuroinflammation and cognitive dysfunction. ICR mice were first intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with vehicle or TSA (0.3?mg/kg). One hour later, they were injected (i.p.) with saline or Escherichia coli LPS (1?mg/kg). We analyzed the food and water intake, body weight loss, and sucrose preference of the injected mice and then determined the microglia activation and inflammatory cytokine expression in the brains of LPS-treated mice and LPS-treated BV-2 microglial cells. In the TSA-pretreated mice, microglial activation was lower, anhedonia did not occur, and LPS-induced cognitive dysfunction (anorexia, weight loss, and social withdrawal) was attenuated. Moreover, mRNA expression of HDAC2, HDAC5, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), TNF-?, MCP-1, and IL-1? in the brain of LPS-challenged mice and in the LPS-treated BV-2 microglial cells was lower. TSA diminished LPS-induced inflammatory responses in the mouse brain and modulated the cytokine-associated changes in cognitive function, which might be specifically related to reducing HDAC2 and HDAC5 expression. PMID:26273133

  2. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Antagonize Distinct Pathways to Suppress Tumorigenesis of Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Vleeshouwer-Neumann, Terra; Phelps, Michael; Bammler, Theo K.; MacDonald, James W.; Jenkins, Isaac; Chen, Eleanor Y.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is the most common soft tissue cancer in children. The prognosis of patients with relapsed or metastatic disease remains poor. ERMS genomes show few recurrent mutations, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms such as epigenetic regulation might play a major role in driving ERMS tumor biology. In this study, we have demonstrated the diverse roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the pathogenesis of ERMS by characterizing effects of HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; also known as vorinostat) in vitro and in vivo. TSA and SAHA suppress ERMS tumor growth and progression by inducing myogenic differentiation as well as reducing the self-renewal and migratory capacity of ERMS cells. Differential expression profiling and pathway analysis revealed downregulation of key oncogenic pathways upon HDAC inhibitor treatment. By gain-of-function, loss-of-function, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies, we show that Notch1- and EphrinB1-mediated pathways are regulated by HDACs to inhibit differentiation and enhance migratory capacity of ERMS cells, respectively. Our study demonstrates that aberrant HDAC activity plays a major role in ERMS pathogenesis. Druggable targets in the molecular pathways affected by HDAC inhibitors represent novel therapeutic options for ERMS patients. PMID:26636678

  3. Histone deacetylase inhibition reduces hypothyroidism-induced neurodevelopmental defects in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen; Mohan, Vishwa; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Chagtoo, Megha; Godbole, Madan M

    2015-11-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) through its receptor (TR?/?) influences spatio-temporal regulation of its target gene repertoire during brain development. Though hypothyroidism in WT rodent models of perinatal hypothyroidism severely impairs neurodevelopment, its effect on TR?/? knockout mice is less severe. An explanation to this paradox is attributed to a possible repressive action of unliganded TRs during development. Since unliganded TRs suppress gene expression through the recruitment of histone deacetylase (HDACs) via co-repressor complexes, we tested whether pharmacological inhibition of HDACs may prevent the effects of hypothyroidism on brain development. Using valproate, an HDAC inhibitor, we show that HDAC inhibition significantly blocks the deleterious effects of hypothyroidism on rat cerebellum, evident by recovery of TH target genes like Bdnf, Pcp2 and Mbp as well as improved dendritic structure of cerebellar Purkinje neurons. Together with this, HDAC inhibition also rescues hypothyroidism-induced motor and cognitive defects. This study therefore provides an insight into the role of HDACs in TH insufficiency during neurodevelopment and their inhibition as a possible therapeutics for treatment. PMID:26427529

  4. Structures of Metal-Substituted Human Histone Deacetylase 8 Provide Mechanistic Inferences on Biological Function†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Daniel P.; Gattis, Samuel G.; Fierke, Carol A.; Christianson, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The metal-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) adopt an ?/? protein fold first identified in rat liver arginase. Despite insignificant overall amino acid sequence identity, these enzymes share a strictly conserved metal-binding site with divergent metal specificity and stoichiometry. HDAC8, originally thought to be a Zn2+-metallohydrolase, exhibits increased activity with Co2+ and Fe2+ cofactors based on kcat/KM (Gantt, S. L., Gattis, S. G. & Fierke, C. A. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 6170–6178). Here, we report the first X-ray crystal structures of metallo-substituted HDAC8: Co2+-HDAC8, D101L Co2+-HDAC8, D101L Mn2+-HDAC8, and D101L Fe2+-HDAC8, each complexed with the inhibitor M344. Metal content of protein samples in solution is confirmed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For the crystalline enzymes, peaks in Bijvoet difference Fourier maps calculated from X-ray diffraction data collected near the respective elemental absorption edges confirm metal substitution. Additional solution studies confirm incorporation of Cu2+; Fe3+ and Ni2+ do not bind under conditions tested. The metal dependence of the substrate KM values and the Ki values of hydroxamate inhibitors that chelate the active site metal are consistent with substrate-metal coordination in the precatalytic Michaelis complex that enhances catalysis. Additionally, although HDAC8 binds Zn2+ nearly 106-fold more tightly than Fe2+, the affinities for both metal ions are comparable to the readily exchangeable metal concentrations estimated in living cells, suggesting that HDAC8 could bind either or both Fe2+ or Zn2+ in vivo. PMID:20545365

  5. The Effects of Class-Specific Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors on the Development of Limbs During Organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Paradis, France-Hélène; Hales, Barbara F

    2015-11-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a major role in chromatin remodeling, gene regulation, and cellular signaling. While the role of each class of HDAC during normal development is unclear, several HDAC inhibitors are embryotoxic; the mechanisms leading to the teratogenicity of HDAC inhibitors are not known. Here, we investigated the effects of class-specific HDAC inhibitors on the development of organogenesis-stage murine limbs. Timed-pregnant COL2A1-ECFP, COL10A1-mCherry, and COL1A1-YFP CD1 reporter mice were euthanized on gestation day 12; embryonic forelimbs were excised and cultured in vitro for 1, 3, and 6 days in the presence or absence of MS275 (a class I HDAC inhibitor), MC1568 (a class III HDAC inhibitor), Sirtinol (a class II HDAC inhibitor), or valproic acid, our positive control. Fluorescently tagged COL2A1, COL10A1, and COL1A1 served as markers of the differentiation of proliferative chondrocytes, hypertrophic chondrocytes, and osteoblasts, respectively. MS275 and valproic acid caused a reduction in expression of all three markers, suggesting effects on both chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. MC1568 had no effect on chondrocyte markers and mildly inhibited COL1A1 expression at 6 days. Sirtinol had no effect on COL2A1 expression or chondrocyte differentiation 1 day following exposure; however, it caused a drastic regression in limb cartilage and reduced the expression of all three differentiation markers to nearly undetectable levels at 6 days. MS275 and Sirtinol caused a 2.2- and 2.7-fold increase, respectively, in cleaved-caspase 3, a marker of apoptosis, suggesting embryotoxicity. These data demonstrate that inhibition of class I or III HDACs causes severe developmental toxicity and is highly teratogenic. PMID:26251326

  6. Active, phosphorylated fingolimod inhibits histone deacetylases and facilitates fear extinction memory

    PubMed Central

    Hait, Nitai C; Wise, Laura E; Allegood, Jeremy C; O’Brien, Megan; Avni, Dorit; Reeves, Thomas M; Knapp, Pamela E; Lu, Junyan; Luo, Cheng; Miles, Michael F; Milstien, Sheldon; Lichtman, Aron H; Spiegel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    FTY720 (fingolimod), an FDA-approved drug for treatment of multiple sclerosis, has beneficial effects in the CNS that are not yet well understood, independent of its effects on immune cell trafficking. We show that FTY720 enters the nucleus, where it is phosphorylated by sphingosine kinase 2 (SphK2), and that nuclear FTY720-P binds and inhibits class I histone deacetylases (HDACs), enhancing specific histone acetylations. FTY720 is also phosphorylated in mice and accumulates in the brain, including the hippocampus, inhibits HDACs and enhances histone acetylation and gene expression programs associated with memory and learning, and rescues memory deficits independently of its immunosuppressive actions. Sphk2?/? mice have lower levels of hippocampal sphingosine-1-phosphate, an endogenous HDAC inhibitor, and reduced histone acetylation, and display deficits in spatial memory and impaired contextual fear extinction. Thus, sphingosine-1-phosphate and SphK2 play specific roles in memory functions and FTY720 may be a useful adjuvant therapy to facilitate extinction of aversive memories. PMID:24859201

  7. Pure curcumin increases the expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 in myeloproliferative neoplasms through suppressing class I histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-qi; Yu, Kang; Yan, Qing-xian; Xing, Chong-yun; Chen, Yi; Yan, Zhuang; Shi, Yi-fen; Zhao, Ke-wen; Gao, Shen-meng

    2013-07-01

    Suppressors of cytokine signaling, SOCS1 and SOCS3, are important negative regulators of Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling, which is constitutively activated in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and leukemia. Curcumin has been shown to possess anticancer activity through different mechanisms. However, whether curcumin can regulate the expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 is still unknown. Here, we found that curcumin elevated the expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3 via triggering acetylation of histone in the regions of SOCS1 and SOCS3 promoter in K562 and HEL cells. As a novel histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitor, curcumin inhibited HDAC enzyme activities and decreased the levels of HDAC1, 3 and 8 but not HDAC2. Knockdown of HDAC8 by small interfering RNA markedly elevated the expression of SOCS1 and SOCS3. Moreover, ectopic expression of HDAC8 decreased the levels of SOCS1 and SOCS3. Thus, HDAC8 plays an important role in the modulation of SOCS1 and SOCS3 by curcumin. Also, trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of HDACs, increased the levels of SOCS1 and SOCS3. Furthermore, curcumin increased the transcript levels of SOCS1 and SOCS3 and significantly inhibited the clonogenic activity of hematopoietic progenitors from patients with MPNs. Finally, curcumin markedly inhibited HDAC activities and decreased HDAC8 levels in primary MPN cells. Taken together, our data uncover a regulatory mechanism of SOCS1 and SOCS3 through inhibition of HDAC activity (especially HDAC8) by curcumin. Thus, being a relative non-toxic agent, curcumin may offer a therapeutic advantage in the clinical treatment for MPNs. PMID:23430957

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitor-polymer conjugate nanoparticles for acid-responsive drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Denis, Iza; el Bahhaj, Fatima; Collette, Floraine; Delatouche, Régis; Gueugnon, Fabien; Pouliquen, Daniel; Pichavant, Loic; Héroguez, Valérie; Grégoire, Marc; Bertrand, Philippe; Blanquart, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    We report the synthesis of acid-responsive polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of a polymer-histone deacetylase inhibitor conjugate. An innovative aspect of this drug delivery particle lies in the NP conjugation of a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, CI-994 (Tacedinaline), introduced with a clickable acid-responsive prodrug during monomer synthesis, prior to polymerization. Another novelty lies in the selected norbornene (NB)-polyethylene oxide (PEO) macromonomer allowing standardization of the polymerization process by Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) and functionalization through azide-alkyne click chemistry. Herein we demonstrate that the synthesized polymer gave 300 nm core-shell spherical nanoparticles with low dispersity (0.04), high water dispersability thanks to the PEO shell and well controlled HDAC inhibitor prodrug loading. Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) assay in living cells and viability experiments demonstrated efficient cellular internalization without additional chemistry, drug release inside cells with restoration of the HDAC inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Such NPs should minimize drug release in vivo during blood circulation and trigger intracellular delivery after endocytosis, holding promises for improved efficacy of this class of epigenetic inhibitors. This standardized synthesis paves the way for multifunctional nanoparticles synthesis. PMID:25827403

  9. Role of HDAC1 in senescence, aging, and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Willis-Martinez, Danielle; Richards, Hunter W.; Timchenko, Nikolai A.; Medrano, Estela E.

    2009-01-01

    HDAC1 is a member of the class I of histone deacetylases that also includes HDAC2, ?3 and ?8. Although HDAC1 has been mostly studied in the context of cancer, recent evidence strongly suggests that it plays critical roles in cellular senescence, aging of the liver, myelination, and adult neurogenesis. Here we review such roles and discuss the entangled relationships between HDAC1 with histone acetyltransferases and other HDACs including SIRT1. PMID:19818845

  10. Acetylation of core histones in response to HDAC inhibitors is diminished in mitotic HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Patzlaff, Jason S.; Terrenoire, Edith; Turner, Bryan M.; Earnshaw, William C.; Paulson, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a key modification that regulates chromatin accessibility. Here we show that treatment with butyrate or other histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors does not induce histone hyperacetylation in metaphase-arrested HeLa cells. When compared to similarly treated interphase cells, acetylation levels are significantly decreased in all four core histones and at all individual sites examined. However, the extent of the decrease varies, ranging from only slight reduction at H3K23 and H4K12 to no acetylation at H3K27 and barely detectable acetylation at H4K16. Our results show that the bulk effect is not due to increased or butyrate-insensitive HDAC activity, though these factors may play a role with some individual sites. We conclude that the lack of histone acetylation during mitosis is primarily due to changes in histone acetyltransferases (HATs) or changes in chromatin. The effects of protein phosphatase inhibitors on histone acetylation in cell lysates suggest that the reduced ability of histones to become acetylated in mitotic cells depends on protein phosphorylation. PMID:20452346

  11. Manipulation of B-cell responses with histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Waibel, Michaela; Christiansen, Ailsa J; Hibbs, Margaret L; Shortt, Jake; Jones, Sarah A; Simpson, Ian; Light, Amanda; O'Donnell, Kristy; Morand, Eric F; Tarlinton, David M; Johnstone, Ricky W; Hawkins, Edwin D

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are approved for treating certain haematological malignancies, however, recent evidence also illustrates they are modulators of the immune system. In experimental models, HDACi are particularly potent against malignancies originating from the B-lymphocyte lineage. Here we examine the ability of this class of compounds to modify both protective and autoimmune antibody responses. In vitro, HDACi affect B-cell proliferation, survival and differentiation in an HDAC-class-dependent manner. Strikingly, treatment of lupus-prone Mrl/lpr mice with the HDACi panobinostat significantly reduces autoreactive plasma-cell numbers, autoantibodies and nephritis, while other immune parameters remain largely unaffected. Immunized control mice treated with panobinostat or the clinically approved HDACi vorinostat have significantly impaired primary antibody responses, but these treatments surprisingly spare circulating memory B cells. These studies indicate that panobinostat is a potential therapy for B-cell-driven autoimmune conditions and HDACi do not induce major long-term detrimental effects on B-cell memory. PMID:25913720

  12. Histone deacetylase 4 increases progressive epithelial ovarian cancer cells via repression of p21 on fibrillar collagen matrices.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu-Fei; Wei, Ai-Min; Kou, Qing; Zhu, Qiao-Ying; Zhang, Lei

    2016-02-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4 is an emerging target in cancer therapeutics, but little is known about the function of HDAC4 in gynecologic malignancies. Therefore we investigated the mechanism of HDAC4 promoting the proliferation of epithelial ovarian cancer cells (OV). In this study, we observed that the proliferation of cells with HDAC4 inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) treatment was markedly decreased, Further, we showed that epithelial ovarian cancer tissues with stage III/IV had higher HDAC4 expression, compared to that with stage I/II. We examined first that the HDAC4 expression was increased in response to fibrillar collagen matrices. In addition, we found that HDAC4 was retained in the nucleus by regulation of PP1?, which regulated HDAC4 cellular fraction via phosphorylation of HDAC4. In addition, we found that HDAC4 bound to Sp1 in epithelial ovarian cancer cells. Finally, ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR3 was evaluated via gain/loss-of-function of HDAC4 by either overexpression of HDCA4 or knock-down of HDAC4 with shRNA. We examined both protein and mRNA of p21 by western blotting and qPCR. We performed analysis of colony formation in matrigel and migration by ECIS. Our results suggest that the accumulation of HDAC4 induced by fibrillar collagen matrices in the nucleus via co-localization of PP1?, leads to repression of the mRNA/protein of p21 and in turn promotes the proliferation and migration of epithelial ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26572940

  13. Inhibition of histone deacetylases enhances the function of serotoninergic neurons in organotypic raphe slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Nozomi; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Nishitani, Naoya; Yamashiro, Mayumi; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2015-04-23

    Inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) is a promising approach for the treatment of mood disorders. However, the effects of HDAC inhibition on the serotonin (5-HT) system, a common target for psychiatric disorders, are poorly understood. Here, we show that a broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA), enhances the function of 5-HT neurons in organotypic raphe slice cultures. Sustained treatment with TSA (1?M) for 2 or 4 days significantly increased the 5-HT tissue content and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) expression, which were accompanied by hyper-acetylation of histone H3 in the promoter region of the TPH2 gene. TSA treatment for 4 days increased the extracellular 5-HT level, which was significantly suppressed in the presence of the selective AMPA receptor (AMPAR) antagonist NBQX. Moreover, the expression of both the AMPAR subunit GluA2 and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II ? (CaMKII?) mRNAs were significantly increased by TSA treatment. Co-treatment with the CaMKII inhibitors KN-62 and KN-93 prevented the TSA-induced increase in 5-HT release, but had no effect on the increases in 5-HT tissue content. These results suggest that inhibition of HDACs increases 5-HT synthesis and release by epigenetic mechanisms, and that 5-HT release is mediated by the enhancement of AMPAR-mediated excitatory inputs and CaMKII signaling. PMID:25796177

  14. Transcriptome screening and verification of genes related to metabolism affected by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jihong, Cao; Weiting, Liao; Cheng, Wo; Guorong, Xu; Huanxin, Xu; Pinglong, Li; Ye, Tao; Peng, Wang; Jiari, Lin; Lianrui, Deng

    2015-09-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are responsible for catalyzing the deacetylation of histones, which closely related to many biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In recent years, HDAC inhibitors (HADCIs), with the anti-tumor potential, have been hot-spots of drug screening. Although the latest studies suggested that HDAC2 might influence the metabolism, the mechanism of HDACIs in metabolic regulation is still unclear. Here, we integrated the gene expression profiling of HDACIs (TSA and SAHA) in hepatocellular carcinoma cell (HepG2). The results showed 380 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 35 KEGG pathways enriched by DEGs in TSA-treatment group. Most of DEGs (177/380) and KEGG pathways (23/35) from TSA-treatment groups were confirmed by SAHA-treatment. About half of KEGG pathways (9/23) were related to metabolism ,and nearly one third of common DEGs (66/177) were involved in metabolic process. Moreover, HDAC2 siRNA experiment verified the effect of HDACIs on metabolic genes, suggesting that HDACIs potentially present a practical value to prevent tumor and other metabolism-related diseases. PMID:26399531

  15. An apicomplexan ankyrin-repeat histone deacetylase with relatives in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Rider, S. Dean; Zhu, Guan

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a member of the Apicomplexa that lacks a plastid and associated nuclear-encoded genes, which has hampered its use in evolutionary comparisons with algae and eliminated a pool of potentially useful drug targets. Here we show that apicomplexan parasites possess an unusual family of class II histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins with orthologues that are present in other chromalveolates and primitive algae. A striking feature of these HDAC proteins is the presence of ankyrin repeats in the amino-terminus that appear to be required for enzyme activity. In vitro and in vivo analyses of the C. parvum orthologue indicate that this subclass of chromatin-remodelling proteins is targeted by the anti-cancer drug suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and that these proteins are most likely involved in the essential process of H4 histone deacetylation that coincides with DNA replication. We propose that members of this novel class of histone deacetylase can serve as promising new targets for treatments against debilitating diseases such as cryptosporidosis, toxoplasmosis and malaria. PMID:19136004

  16. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum proliferation in vitro by double-stranded RNA directed against malaria histone deacetylase

    SciTech Connect

    Sriwilaijaroen, N.; Boonma, S.; Attasart, P.; Pothikasikorn, J.; Panyim, S.; Noonpakdee, W.

    2009-04-03

    Acetylation and deacetylation of histones play important roles in transcription regulation, cell cycle progression and development events. The steady state status of histone acetylation is controlled by a dynamic equilibrium between competing histone acetylase and deacetylase (HDAC). We have used long PfHDAC-1 double-stranded (ds)RNA to interfere with its cognate mRNA expression and determined the effect on malaria parasite growth and development. Chloroquine- and pyrimethamine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum K1 strain was exposed to 1-25 {mu}g of dsRNA/ml of culture for 48 h and growth was determined by [{sup 3}H]-hypoxanthine incorporation and microscopic examination. Parasite culture treated with 10 {mu}g/ml pfHDAC-1 dsRNA exhibited 47% growth inhibition when compared with either untreated control or culture treated with an unrelated dsRNA. PfHDAC-1 dsRNA specifically blocked maturation of trophozoite to schizont stages and decreased PfHDAC-1 transcript 44% in treated trophozoites. These results indicate the potential of HDAC-1 as a target for development of novel antimalarials.

  17. Structural Basis of the Antiproliferative Activity of Largazole a Depsipeptide Inhibitor of the Histone Deacetylases

    SciTech Connect

    K Cole; D Dowling; M Boone; A Phillips; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    Largazole is a macrocyclic depsipeptide originally isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Symploca sp., which is indigenous to the warm, blue-green waters of Key Largo, Florida (whence largazole derives its name). Largazole contains an unusual thiazoline-thiazole ring system that rigidifies its macrocyclic skeleton, and it also contains a lipophilic thioester side chain. Hydrolysis of the thioester in vivo yields largazole thiol, which exhibits remarkable antiproliferative effects and is believed to be the most potent inhibitor of the metal-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, the 2.14 {angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the HDAC8-largazole thiol complex is the first of an HDAC complexed with a macrocyclic inhibitor and reveals that ideal thiolate-zinc coordination geometry is the key chemical feature responsible for its exceptional affinity and biological activity. Notably, the core structure of largazole is conserved in romidepsin, a depsipeptide natural product formulated as the drug Istodax recently approved for cancer chemotherapy. Accordingly, the structure of the HDAC8-largazole thiol complex is the first to illustrate the mode of action of a new class of therapeutically important HDAC inhibitors.

  18. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity.

    PubMed

    Herr, Michael J; Longhurst, Celia M; Baker, Benjamin; Homayouni, Ramin; Speich, Henry E; Kotha, Jayaprakash; Jennings, Lisa K

    2014-05-16

    Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9-Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity. PMID:24747564

  19. The tobacco smoke component acrolein induces glucocorticoid resistant gene expression via inhibition of histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Randall, Matthew J; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bouwman, Freek G; Vliet, Albert van der; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of cigarette smoke-related death worldwide. Acrolein, a crucial reactive electrophile found in cigarette smoke mimics many of the toxic effects of cigarette smoke-exposure in the lung. In macrophages, cigarette smoke is known to hinder histone deacetylases (HDACs), glucocorticoid-regulated enzymes that play an important role in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistant inflammation, a common feature of COPD. Thus, we hypothesize that acrolein plays a role in COPD-associated glucocorticoid resistance. To examine the role of acrolein on glucocorticoid resistance, U937 monocytes, differentiated with PMA to macrophage-like cells were treated with acrolein for 0.5h followed by stimulation with hydrocortisone for 8h, or treated simultaneously with LPS and hydrocortisone for 8h without acrolein. GSH and nuclear HDAC activity were measured, or gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Acrolein-mediated TNF? gene expression was not suppressed by hydrocortisone whereas LPS-induced TNF? expression was suppressed. Acrolein also significantly inhibited nuclear HDAC activity in macrophage-like cells. Incubation of recombinant HDAC2 with acrolein led to the formation of an HDAC2-acrolein adduct identified by mass spectrometry. Therefore, these results suggest that acrolein-induced inflammatory gene expression is resistant to suppression by the endogenous glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone. PMID:26481333

  20. Epigenetic Control of Macrophage Shape Transition towards an Atypical Elongated Phenotype by Histone Deacetylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cabanel, Mariana; Brand, Camila; Oliveira-Nunes, Maria Cecilia; Cabral-Piccin, Mariela Pires; Lopes, Marcela Freitas; Brito, Jose Marques; de Oliveira, Felipe Leite

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory chronic pathologies are complex processes characterized by an imbalance between the resolution of the inflammatory phase and the establishment of tissue repair. The main players in these inflammatory pathologies are bone marrow derived monocytes (BMDMs). However, how monocyte differentiation is modulated to give rise to specific macrophage subpopulations (M1 or M2) that may either maintain the chronic inflammatory process or lead to wound healing is still unclear. Considering that inhibitors of Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) have an anti-inflammatory activity, we asked whether this enzyme would play a role on monocyte differentiation into M1 or M2 phenotype and in the cell shape transition that follows. We then induced murine bone marrow progenitors into monocyte/macrophage differentiation pathway using media containing GM-CSF and the HDAC blocker, Trichostatin A (TSA). We found that the pharmacological inhibition of HDAC activity led to a shape transition from the typical macrophage pancake-like shape into an elongated morphology, which was correlated to a mixed M1/M2 profile of cytokine and chemokine secretion. Our results present, for the first time, that HDAC activity acts as a regulator of macrophage differentiation in the absence of lymphocyte stimuli. We propose that HDAC activity down regulates macrophage plasticity favoring the pro-inflammatory phenotype. PMID:26196676

  1. Loop Interactions and Dynamics Tune the Enzymatic Activity of the Human Histone Deacetylase 8

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The human histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8) is a key hydrolase in gene regulation and has been identified as a drug target for the treatment of several cancers. Previously the HDAC8 enzyme has been extensively studied using biochemical techniques, X-ray crystallography, and computational methods. Those investigations have yielded detailed information about the active site and have demonstrated that the substrate entrance surface is highly dynamic. Yet it has remained unclear how the dynamics of the entrance surface tune and influence the catalytic activity of HDAC8. Using long time scale all atom molecular dynamics simulations we have found a mechanism whereby the interactions and dynamics of two loops tune the configuration of functionally important residues of HDAC8 and could therefore influence the activity of the enzyme. We subsequently investigated this hypothesis using a well-established fluorescence activity assay and a noninvasive real-time progression assay, where deacetylation of a p53 based peptide was observed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our work delivers detailed insight into the dynamic loop network of HDAC8 and provides an explanation for a number of experimental observations. PMID:24171457

  2. Hybrids from 4-anilinoquinazoline and hydroxamic acid as dual inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fan-Wei; Wu, Ting-Ting; Ren, Zi-Wei; Xue, Jia-Yu; Shi, Lei

    2015-11-15

    A series of hybrids derived from 4-anilinoquinazoline and hydroxamic acid were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as dual inhibitors of vascular endothelia growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) tyrosine kinase and histone deacetylase (HDAC). Most of these compounds exhibited potent HDAC inhibition and moderate VEGFR-2 inhibition. Among them, compound 6l exhibited the most potent inhibitory activities against VEGFR-2 (IC50=84nM) and HDAC (IC50=2.8nM). It also showed the most potent antiproliferative ability against MCF-7, a human breast cancer line, with IC50 of 1.2?M. Docking simulation supported the initial pharmacophoric hypothesis and suggested a common mode of interaction of compound 6l at the active binding sites of VEGFR-2 and HDAC. PMID:26475519

  3. Exploring inhibitor release pathways in histone deacetylases using random acceleration molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kalyaanamoorthy, Subha; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2012-02-27

    Molecular channel exploration perseveres to be the prominent solution for eliciting structure and accessibility of active site and other internal spaces of macromolecules. The volume and silhouette characterization of these channels provides answers for the issues of substrate access and ligand swapping between the obscured active site and the exterior of the protein. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are metal-dependent enzymes that are involved in the cell growth, cell cycle regulation, and progression, and their deregulations have been linked with different types of cancers. Hence HDACs, especially the class I family, are widely recognized as the important cancer targets, and the characterizations of their structures and functions have been of special interest in cancer drug discovery. The class I HDACs are known to possess two different protein channels, an 11 Å and a 14 Å (named channels A and B1, respectively), of which the former is a ligand or substrate occupying tunnel that leads to the buried active site zinc ion and the latter is speculated to be involved in product release. In this work, we have carried out random acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulations coupled with the classical molecular dynamics to explore the release of the ligand, N-(2-aminophenyl) benzamide (LLX) from the active sites of the recently solved X-ray crystal structure of HDAC2 and the computationally modeled HDAC1 proteins. The RAMD simulations identified significant structural and dynamic features of the HDAC channels, especially the key 'gate-keeping' amino acid residues that control these channels and the ligand release events. Further, this study identified a novel and unique channel B2, a subchannel from channel B1, in the HDAC1 protein structure. The roles of water molecules in the LLX release from the HDAC1 and HDAC2 enzymes are also discussed. Such structural and dynamic properties of the HDAC protein channels that govern the ligand escape reactions will provide further mechanistic insights into the HDAC enzymes, which, in the long run, have a potential to bring new ideas for developing more promising HDAC inhibitors as well as extend our atomic level understandings on their mechanisms of action. PMID:22263580

  4. Exploration of Novel Inhibitors for Class I Histone Deacetylase Isoforms by QSAR Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation Assays

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Zainab; Afzal, Noreen; Rashid, Sajid

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) are metal-dependent enzymes and considered as important targets for cell functioning. Particularly, higher expression of class I HDACs is common in the onset of multiple malignancies which results in deregulation of many target genes involved in cell growth, differentiation and survival. Although substantial attempts have been made to control the irregular functioning of HDACs by employing various inhibitors with high sensitivity towards transformed cells, limited success has been achieved in epigenetic cancer therapy. Here in this study, we used ligand-based pharmacophore and 2-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) modeling approaches for targeting class I HDAC isoforms. Pharmacophore models were generated by taking into account the known IC50 values and experimental energy scores with extensive validations. The QSAR model having an external R2 value of 0.93 was employed for virtual screening of compound libraries. 10 potential lead compounds (C1-C10) were short-listed having strong binding affinities for HDACs, out of which 2 compounds (C8 and C9) were able to interact with all members of class I HDACs. The potential binding modes of HDAC2 and HDAC8 to C8 were explored through molecular dynamics simulations. Overall, bioactivity and ligand efficiency (binding energy/non-hydrogen atoms) profiles suggested that proposed hits may be more effective inhibitors for cancer therapy. PMID:26431201

  5. Plant Polyphenols and Oxidative Metabolites of the Herbal Alkenylbenzene Methyleugenol Suppress Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Isabel Anna Maria; Chen, Chen; Lüske, Claudia; Cartus, Alexander Thomas; Esselen, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer development in humans. The inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and the disruption of the HDAC complex have been recognized as a potent strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated whether selected plant constituents affect HDAC activity or HDAC1 protein status in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. The polyphenols (?)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and genistein (GEN) as well as two oxidative methyleugenol (ME) metabolites were shown to inhibit HDAC activity in intact HT29 cells. Concomitantly, a significant decrease of the HDAC1 protein level was observed after incubation with EGCG and GEN, whereas the investigated ME metabolites did not affect HDAC1 protein status. In conclusion, dietary compounds were found to possess promising HDAC-inhibitory properties, contributing to epigenetic alterations in colon tumor cells, which should be taken into account in further risk/benefit assessments of polyphenols and alkenylbenzenes. PMID:23476753

  6. The histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA acts in synergism with fenretinide and doxorubicin to control growth of rhabdoid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhabdoid tumors are highly aggressive malignancies affecting infants and very young children. In many instances these tumors are resistant to conventional type chemotherapy necessitating alternative approaches. Methods Proliferation assays (MTT), apoptosis (propidium iodide/annexin V) and cell cycle analysis (DAPI), RNA expression microarrays and western blots were used to identify synergism of the HDAC (histone deacetylase) inhibitor SAHA with fenretinide, tamoxifen and doxorubicin in rhabdoidtumor cell lines. Results HDAC1 and HDAC2 are overexpressed in primary rhabdoid tumors and rhabdoid tumor cell lines. Targeting HDACs in rhabdoid tumors induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. On the other hand HDAC inhibition induces deregulated gene programs (MYCC-, RB program and the stem cell program) in rhabdoid tumors. These programs are in general associated with cell cycle progression. Targeting these activated pro-proliferative genes by combined approaches of HDAC-inhibitors plus fenretinide, which inhibits cyclinD1, exhibit strong synergistic effects on induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, HDAC inhibition sensitizes rhabdoid tumor cell lines to cell death induced by chemotherapy. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that HDAC inhibitor treatment in combination with fenretinide or conventional chemotherapy is a promising tool for the treatment of chemoresistant rhabdoid tumors. PMID:23764045

  7. Regulation of STAT3 by histone deacetylase-3 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, M; Han, JJ; Stenson, M; Wellik, L; Witzig, TE

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with an activated B-cell (ABC) gene-expression profile has been shown to have a poorer prognosis compared with tumors with a germinal center B-cell type. ABC cell lines have constitutive activation of STAT3; however, the mechanisms regulating STAT3 signaling in lymphoma are unknown. In studies of class-I histone deacetylase (HDAC) expression, we found overexpression of HDAC3 in phospho STAT3-positive DLBCL and the HDAC3 was found to be complexed with STAT3. Inhibition of HDAC activity by panobinostat (LBH589) increased p300-mediated STAT3Lys685 acetylation with increased nuclear export of STAT3 to the cytoplasm. HDAC inhibition abolished STAT3Tyr705 phosphorylation with minimal effect on STAT3Ser727 and JAK2 tyrosine activity. pSTAT3Tyr705-positive DLBCLs were more sensitive to HDAC inhibition with LBH589 compared with pSTAT3Tyr705-negative DLBCLs. This cytotoxicity was associated with downregulation of the direct STAT3 target Mcl-1. HDAC3 knockdown upregulated STAT3Lys685 acetylation but prevented STAT3Tyr705 phosphorylation and inhibited survival of pSTAT3-positive DLBCL cells. These studies provide the rationale for targeting STAT3-positive DLBCL tumors with HDAC inhibitors. PMID:22116549

  8. Image-guided synthesis reveals potent blood-brain barrier permeable histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Jun; Kang, Yeona; Muench, Lisa; Reid, Alicia; Caesar, Shannon; Jean, Logan; Wagner, Florence; Holson, Edward; Haggarty, Stephen J; Weiss, Philipp; King, Payton; Carter, Pauline; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S; Hooker, Jacob M; Kim, Sung Won

    2014-07-16

    Recent studies have revealed that several histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, which are used to study/treat brain diseases, show low blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. In addition to low HDAC potency and selectivity observed, poor brain penetrance may account for the high doses needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Here we report the development and evaluation of highly potent and blood-brain barrier permeable HDAC inhibitors for CNS applications based on an image-guided approach involving the parallel synthesis and radiolabeling of a series of compounds based on the benzamide HDAC inhibitor, MS-275 as a template. BBB penetration was optimized by rapid carbon-11 labeling and PET imaging in the baboon model and using the imaging derived data on BBB penetration from each compound to feed back into the design process. A total of 17 compounds were evaluated, revealing molecules with both high binding affinity and BBB permeability. A key element conferring BBB penetration in this benzamide series was a basic benzylic amine. These derivatives exhibited 1-100 nM inhibitory activity against recombinant human HDAC1 and HDAC2. Three of the carbon-11 labeled aminomethyl benzamide derivatives showed high BBB penetration (?0.015%ID/cc) and regional binding heterogeneity in the brain (high in thalamus and cerebellum). Taken together this approach has afforded a strategy and a predictive model for developing highly potent and BBB permeable HDAC inhibitors for CNS applications and for the discovery of novel candidate molecules for small molecule probes and drugs. PMID:24780082

  9. Impairment of liver regeneration by the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid in mice*

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Qi; Yang, Rui-na; Ye, Feng; Wang, Yu-jia; Wu, Qiong; Li, Li; Bu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective: Liver regeneration is a complex process regulated by a group of genetic and epigenetic factors. A variety of genetic factors have been reported, whereas few investigations have focused on epigenetic regulation during liver regeneration. In the present study, valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, was used to investigate the effect of HDAC on liver regeneration. Methods: VPA was administered via intraperitoneal injection to 2/3 partially hepatectomized mice to detect hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. The mice were sacrificed, and their liver tissues were harvested at sequential time points from 0 to 168 h after treatment. DNA synthesis was detected via a BrdU assay, and cell proliferation was tested using Ki-67. The expressions of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), and CDK4 were detected by Western blot analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay was used to examine the recruitment of HDACs to the target promoter regions and the expression of the target gene was detected by Western blot. Results: Immunohistochemical analysis showed that cells positive for BrdU and Ki-67 decreased, and the peak of BrdU was delayed in the VPA-administered mice. Consistently, cyclin D1 expression was also delayed. We identified B-myc as a target gene of HDACs by complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray. The expression of B-myc increased in the VPA-administered mice after hepatectomy (PH). The ChIP assay confirmed the presence of HDACs at the B-myc promoter. Conclusions: HDAC activities are essential for liver regeneration. Inhibiting HDAC activities delays liver regeneration and induces liver cell cycle arrest, thereby causing an anti-proliferative effect on liver regeneration. PMID:22949360

  10. Growth attenuation is associated with histone deacetylase 10-induced autophagy in the liver.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Galit; Shtaif, Biana; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2016-01-01

    Our previous data suggested that the histone deacetylase (HDAC) SIRT1 is involved in mediating the effect of nutrition on growth. The aim of the present research was to study the mechanism by which additional HDACs may be involved in nutrition-induced linear growth. The in vivo studies were performed in young male Sprague-Dawley rats that were either fed ad libitum (AL) or subjected to 10days of 40% food restriction (RES) and then refed (CU). For in vitro studies, Huh7 hepatoma cells were used. Food restriction led to significant reduction in liver weight, concomitant with increased autophagy (i.e., a decrease in the level of P62 and an increase in the expression level of Ambra1 and Atg16L2 genes in the RES group). At the same time, we found that the level of HDAC10 was significantly increased. Overexpression of HDAC10 in Huh7 hepatoma cells led to reduced cell viability and increased autophagy as shown by increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. An increase in the level of HDAC10 was also obtained when mTOR was inhibited by Rapamycin. siRNA directed against HDAC10 abolished the effect of Rapamycin on cell viability and Ambra1 and Atg16L2 increased expression. These results suggest that increased levels of HDAC10 may mediate the effect of malnutrition on growth attenuation and autophagy. Deciphering the role of epigenetic regulation in the nutrition-growth connection may pave the way for the development of new forms of treatment for children with growth disorders. PMID:26462881

  11. Sirtuins (histone deacetylases III) in the cellular response to DNA damage--facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Kruszewski, Marcin; Szumiel, Irena

    2005-11-21

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) are an important member of a group of enzymes that modify chromatin conformation. Homologues of the yeast gene SIR2 in mammalian cells code type III histone deacetylases (HDAC III, sirtuins), dependent on NAD(+) and inhibited by nicotinamide. In yeast cells, Sir2 participates in repression of transcriptional activity and in DNA double strand break repair. It is assumed that certain sirtuins may play a similar role in mammalian cells, by modifying chromatin structure and thus, altering the accessibility of the damaged sites for repair enzymes. A relation between poly(ADP-ribosylation) and sirtuin function in cells with damaged DNA has been also postulated. Interconnections between NAD(+) metabolism, poly(ADP-ribosylation), DNA repair and gene expression should allow to modulate the cellular response to agents that damage DNA. Preliminary results, reviewed in this paper indicate that such possibility exists. We propose a hypothetical mechanism of sirtuin participation in DSB repair. It is based on the assumption that activation of PARP at the sites of DNA strand breaks leads to a local increase in nicotinamide concentration. Nicotinamide then inhibits sirtuins exactly at the site of DNA strand break. At present, however, there are no data directly confirming the effect of sirtuin inhibition on DSB repair processes in mammalian cells. Nevertheless, a connection between the acetylation status of histones and repair of DNA breaks has recently been found, indicating that all HDAC classes may modulate DNA repair processes. In addition, sirtuins exert an anti-apoptotic action in various cell types. Hence, it is possible to sensitise cells to apoptosis-inducing agents by sirtuin inhibitors. PMID:16084131

  12. Honokiol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via inhibiting class I histone deacetylases in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Ying; Ye, Hai-Ge; Chen, Chi-Qi; Yin, Li-Hui; Wu, Jian-Bo; He, Li-Cai; Gao, Shen-Meng

    2015-02-01

    Honokiol, a constituent of Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to possess potent anti-cancer activity through targeting multiple signaling pathways in numerous malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be defined. Here, we report that honokiol effectively decreased enzyme activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and reduced the protein expression of class I HDACs in leukemic cells. Moreover, treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented honokiol-induced degradation of class I HDACs. Importantly, honokiol increased the levels of p21/waf1 and Bax via triggering acetylation of histone in the regions of p21/waf1 and Bax promoter. Honokiol induced apoptosis, decreased activity of HDACs, and significantly inhibited the clonogenic activity of hematopoietic progenitors in bone marrow mononuclear cells from patients with AML. However, honokiol did not decrease the activity of HDACs and induce apoptosis in normal hematopoietic progenitors from unbilicial cord blood. Finally, honokiol dramatically reduced tumorigenicity in a xenograft leukemia model. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that honokiol has anti-leukemia activity through inhibiting HDACs. Thus, being a relative non-toxic agent, honokiol may serve as a novel natural agent for cancer prevention and therapy in leukemia. PMID:25187418

  13. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases 1 and 6 Enhances Cytarabine-Induced Apoptosis in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuelian; Xie, Chengzhi; Edwards, Holly; Zhou, Hui; Buck, Steven A.; Ge, Yubin

    2011-01-01

    Background Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a challenging disease to treat even with intensified cytarabine-based chemotherapy. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) have been reported to be promising therapeutic targets for treating AML. However, HDAC family members that are involved in chemotherapy sensitivities remain unknown. In this study, we sought to identify members of the HDAC family that are involved in cytarabine sensitivities, and to select the optimal HDACI that is most efficacious when combined with cytarabine for treating children with AML. Methodology Expression profiles of classes I, II, and IV HDACs in 4 pediatric AML cell lines were determined by Western blotting. Inhibition of class I HDACs by different HDACIs was measured post immnunoprecipitation. Individual down-regulation of HDACs in pediatric AML cells was performed with lentiviral shRNA. The effects of cytarabine and HDACIs on apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry analysis. Results Treatments with structurally diverse HDACIs and HDAC shRNA knockdown experiments revealed that down-regulation of both HDACs 1 and 6 is critical in enhancing cytarabine-induced apoptosis in pediatric AML, at least partly mediated by Bim. However, down-regulation of HDAC2 may negatively impact cytarabine sensitivities in the disease. At clinically achievable concentrations, HDACIs that simultaneously inhibited both HDACs 1 and 6 showed the best anti-leukemic activities and significantly enhanced cytarabine-induced apoptosis. Conclusion Our results further confirm that HDACs are bona fide therapeutic targets for treating pediatric AML and suggest that pan-HDACIs may be more beneficial than isoform-specific drugs. PMID:21359182

  14. Inhibition of histone deacetylases facilitates extinction and attenuates reinstatement of nicotine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Castino, Matthew R; Cornish, Jennifer L; Clemens, Kelly J

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin remodelling is integral to the formation of long-term memories. Recent evidence suggests that histone modification may play a role in the persistence of memories associated with drug use. The present series of experiments aimed to examine the effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition on the extinction and reinstatement of nicotine self-administration. Rats were trained to intravenously self-administer nicotine for 12 days on a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. In Experiment 1, responding was then extinguished through removal of nicotine and response-contingent cues. After each extinction session, the HDAC inhibitor, sodium butyrate (NaB), was administered immediately, or six hours after each session. In Experiment 2, response-contingent cues remained available across extinction to increase rates of responding during this phase, and NaB was administered immediately after the session. Finally, in Experiment 3, the effect of NaB treatment on extinction of responding for sucrose pellets was assessed. Across all experiments reinstatement to the cue and/or the reward itself was then tested. In the first experiment, treatment with NaB significantly attenuated nicotine and nicotine + cue reinstatement when administered immediately, but not six hours after each extinction session. When administered after cue-extinction (Expt. 2), NaB treatment specifically facilitated the rate of extinction across sessions, indicating that HDAC inhibition enhanced consolidation of the extinction memory. In contrast, there was no effect of NaB on the extinction and reinstatement of sucrose-seeking (Expt. 3), indicating that the observed effects are specific to a drug context. These results provide the first demonstration that HDAC inhibition facilitates the extinction of responding for an intravenously self-administered drug of abuse and further highlight the potential of HDAC inhibitors in the treatment of drug addiction. PMID:25880762

  15. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA)-Induced Dynamics of a Human Histone Deacetylase Protein Interaction Network*

    PubMed Central

    Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Smith, Karen T.; Groppe, Brad D.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Saraf, Anita; Egidy, Rhonda; Peak, Allison; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Workman, Jerry L.; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are targets for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an HDAC inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. To obtain a better mechanistic understanding of the Sin3/HDAC complex in cancer, we extended its protein–protein interaction network and identified a mutually exclusive pair within the complex. We then assessed the effects of SAHA on the disruption of the complex network through six homologous baits. SAHA perturbs multiple protein interactions and therefore compromises the composition of large parts of the Sin3/HDAC network. A comparison of the effect of SAHA treatment on gene expression in breast cancer cells to a knockdown of the ING2 subunit indicated that a portion of the anticancer effects of SAHA may be attributed to the disruption of ING2's association with the complex. Our dynamic protein interaction network resource provides novel insights into the molecular mechanism of SAHA action and demonstrates the potential for drugs to rewire networks. PMID:25073741

  16. Rational combination treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hideshima, T; Cottini, F; Ohguchi, H; Jakubikova, J; Gorgun, G; Mimura, N; Tai, Y-T; Munshi, N C; Richardson, P G; Anderson, K C

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) thalidomide, lenalidomide (Len) and pomalidomide trigger anti-tumor activities in multiple myeloma (MM) by targetting cereblon and thereby impacting IZF1/3, c-Myc and IRF4. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) also downregulate c-Myc. We therefore determined whether IMiDs with HDACi trigger significant MM cell growth inhibition by inhibiting or downregulating c-Myc. Combination treatment of Len with non-selective HDACi suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid or class-I HDAC-selective inhibitor MS275 induces synergic cytotoxicity, associated with downregulation of c-Myc. Unexpectedly, we observed that decreased levels of cereblon (CRBN), a primary target protein of IMiDs, was triggered by these agents. Indeed, sequential treatment of MM cells with MS275 followed by Len shows less efficacy than simultaneous treatment with this combination. Importantly ACY1215, an HDAC6 inhibitor with minimal effects on class-I HDACs, together with Len induces synergistic MM cytotoxicity without alteration of CRBN expression. Our results showed that only modest class-I HDAC inhibition is able to induce synergistic MM cytotoxicity in combination with Len. These studies may provide the framework for utilizing HDACi in combination with Len to both avoid CRBN downregulation and enhance anti-MM activities. PMID:25978432

  17. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes

    PubMed Central

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Ismael; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I.

    2015-01-01

    Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis. PMID:26317403

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibition with trichostatin A does not reverse severe angioproliferative pulmonary hypertension in rats (2013 Grover Conference series).

    PubMed

    De Raaf, Michiel Alexander; Hussaini, Aysar Al; Gomez-Arroyo, Jose; Kraskaukas, Donatas; Farkas, Daniela; Happé, Chris; Voelkel, Norbert F; Bogaard, Harm Jan

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rapidly progressive and devastating disease characterized by remodeling of lung vessels, increased pulmonary vascular resistance, and eventually right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. Because histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are agents hampering tumor growth and cardiac hypertrophy, they have been attributed a therapeutic potential for patients with PAH. Outcomes of studies evaluating the use of HDAC inhibitors in models of PAH and right ventricular pressure overload have been equivocal, however. Here we describe the levels of HDAC activity in the lungs and hearts of rats with pulmonary hypertension and right heart hypertrophy or failure, experimentally induced by monocrotaline (MCT), the combined exposure to the VEGF-R inhibitor SU5416 and hypoxia (SuHx), and pulmonary artery banding (PAB). We show that HDAC activity levels are reduced in the lungs of rat with experimentally induced hypertension, whereas activity levels are increased in the hypertrophic hearts. In contrast to what was previously found in the MCT model, the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A had no effect on pulmonary vascular remodeling in the SuHx model. When our results and those in the published literature are taken together, it is suggested that the effects of HDAC inhibitors in humans with PAH and associated RV failure are, at best, unpredictable. Significant progress can perhaps be made by using more specific HDAC inhibitors, but before clinical tests in human PAH can be undertaken, careful preclinical studies are required to determine potential cardiotoxicity. PMID:25006442

  19. Transcriptional Repression of Histone Deacetylase 3 by the Histone Demethylase KDM2A Is Coupled to Tumorigenicity of Lung Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Shilpa S.; Alam, Hunain; Li, Na; Wagner, Klaus W.; Chung, Jimyung; Ahn, Yeo Won; Lee, Min Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated expression of histone methyltransferases and demethylases is an emerging epigenetic mechanism underlying cancer development and metastasis. We recently showed that the histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) demethylase KDM2A (also called FBXL11 and JHDM1A) is necessary for tumorigenic and metastatic capabilities of KDM2A-overexpressing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Here, we report that KDM2A transcriptionally represses the histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) gene by removing methyl groups from dimethylated H3K36 at the HDAC3 promoter in KDM2A-overexpressing NSCLC cells. KDM2A depletion reduced expression levels of cell cycle-associated genes (e.g. CDK6) and cell invasion-related genes (e.g. NANOS1); these levels were rescued by ectopic expression of KDM2A but not its catalytic mutant. These genes were occupied and down-regulated by HDAC3. HDAC3 knockdown significantly recovered the proliferation and invasiveness of KDM2A-depleted NSCLC cells as well as the levels of CDK6 and NANOS1 expression in these cells. Similar to their previously reported functions in other cell types, CDK6 and NANOS1 were required for the proliferation and invasion, respectively, of KDM2A-overexpressing NSCLC cells. In a mouse xenograft model, HDAC3 depletion substantially restored the tumorigenic ability of KDM2A knockdown cells. These findings reveal a novel cancer-epigenetic pathway in which the antagonistic effect of KDM2A on HDAC3 expression releases cell cycle-associated genes and cell invasion-related genes from HDAC3 repression and indicate the importance of this pathway for tumorigenicity and invasiveness of KDM2A-overexpressing NSCLC cells. PMID:24482232

  20. Histone deacetylase inhibitors in castration-resistant prostate cancer: molecular mechanism of action and recent clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Dharam; Vashistha, Vishal; Isharwal, Sudhir; Sediqe, Soud A.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Historically, androgen-deprivation therapy has been the cornerstone for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, nearly majority patients with prostate cancer transition to the refractory state of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Newer therapeutic agents are needed for treating these CRPC patients that are unresponsive to androgen deprivation and/or chemotherapy. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of enzymes limits the expression of genomic regions by improving binding between histones and the DNA backbone. Modulating the role of HDAC enzymes can alter the cell’s regulation of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, thereby regulating potential neoplastic proliferation. As a result, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are now being evaluated for CRPC or chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer due to their effects on the expression of the androgen receptor gene. In this paper, we review the molecular mechanism and functional target molecules of different HDACi as applicable to CRPC as well as describe recent and current clinical trials involving HDACi in prostate cancer. To date, four HDAC classes comprising 18 isoenzymes have been identified. Recent clinical trials of vorinostat, romidepsin, and panobinostat have provided cautious optimism towards improved outcomes using these novel therapeutic agents for CPRC patients. Nevertheless, no phase III trial has been conducted to cement one of these drugs as an adjunct to androgen-deprivation therapy. Consequently, further investigation is necessary to delineate the benefits and drawbacks of these medications. PMID:26622323

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitors in castration-resistant prostate cancer: molecular mechanism of action and recent clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Dharam; Vashistha, Vishal; Isharwal, Sudhir; Sediqe, Soud A; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2015-12-01

    Historically, androgen-deprivation therapy has been the cornerstone for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. Unfortunately, nearly majority patients with prostate cancer transition to the refractory state of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Newer therapeutic agents are needed for treating these CRPC patients that are unresponsive to androgen deprivation and/or chemotherapy. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of enzymes limits the expression of genomic regions by improving binding between histones and the DNA backbone. Modulating the role of HDAC enzymes can alter the cell's regulation of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, thereby regulating potential neoplastic proliferation. As a result, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are now being evaluated for CRPC or chemotherapy-resistant prostate cancer due to their effects on the expression of the androgen receptor gene. In this paper, we review the molecular mechanism and functional target molecules of different HDACi as applicable to CRPC as well as describe recent and current clinical trials involving HDACi in prostate cancer. To date, four HDAC classes comprising 18 isoenzymes have been identified. Recent clinical trials of vorinostat, romidepsin, and panobinostat have provided cautious optimism towards improved outcomes using these novel therapeutic agents for CPRC patients. Nevertheless, no phase III trial has been conducted to cement one of these drugs as an adjunct to androgen-deprivation therapy. Consequently, further investigation is necessary to delineate the benefits and drawbacks of these medications. PMID:26622323

  2. Epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylase: therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ian F; Dexter, David T

    2013-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder affecting more than 4million people worldwide. The primary motor symptoms of the disease are due to degeneration of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons. Dopamine replacement therapies have therefore revolutionised disease management by partially controlling these symptoms. However these drugs can produce debilitating side effects when used long term and do not protect degenerating neurons against death. Recent evidence has highlighted a pathological imbalance in PD between the acetylation and deacetylation of the histone proteins around which deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is coiled, in favour of excessive histone deacetylation. This mechanism of adding/removing acetyl groups to histone lysine residues is one of many epigenetic regulatory processes which control the expression of genes, many of which will be essential for neuronal survival. Hence, such epigenetic modifications may have a pathogenic role in PD. It has therefore been hypothesised that if this pathological imbalance can be corrected with the use of histone deacetylase inhibiting agents then neurodegeneration observed in PD can be ameliorated. This article will review the current literature with regard to epigenetic changes in PD and the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) in PD: examining the evidence of the neuroprotective effects of numerous HDACIs in cellular and animal models of Parkinsonian cell death. Ultimately answering the question: does epigenetic targeting of histone deacetylases hold therapeutic potential in PD? PMID:23711791

  3. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Activate Tristetraprolin Expression through Induction of Early Growth Response Protein 1 (EGR1) in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Cyril; Sanduja, Sandhya; Blanco, Fernando F.; Hu, Liangyan; Dixon, Dan A.

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) promotes rapid decay of mRNAs bearing 3' UTR AU-rich elements (ARE). In many cancer types, loss of TTP expression is observed allowing for stabilization of ARE-mRNAs and their pathologic overexpression. Here we demonstrate that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (Trichostatin A, SAHA and sodium butyrate) promote TTP expression in colorectal cancer cells (HCA-7, HCT-116, Moser and SW480 cells) and cervix carcinoma cells (HeLa). We found that HDAC inhibitors-induced TTP expression, promote the decay of COX-2 mRNA, and inhibit cancer cell proliferation. HDAC inhibitors were found to promote TTP transcription through activation of the transcription factor Early Growth Response protein 1 (EGR1). Altogether, our findings indicate that loss of TTP in tumors occurs through silencing of EGR1 and suggests a therapeutic approach to rescue TTP expression in colorectal cancer. PMID:26343742

  4. Mitochondrial Apoptosis and FAK Signaling Disruption by a Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, HTPB, in Antitumor and Antimetastatic Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Wei, Tzu-Tang; Tang, Yen-An; Huang, Sin-Ming; Wen, Wei-Ling; Chen, Mei-Yu; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Salunke, Santosh B.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Lin, Pinpin; Chen, Chien-Tien; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Background Compound targeting histone deacetylase (HDAC) represents a new era in molecular cancer therapeutics. However, effective HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of solid tumors remain to be developed. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we propose a novel HDAC inhibitor, N-Hydroxy-4-(4-phenylbutyryl-amino) benzamide (HTPB), as a potential chemotherapeutic drug for solid tumors. The HDAC inhibition of HTPB was confirmed using HDAC activity assay. The antiproliferative and anti-migratory mechanisms of HTPB were investigated by cell proliferation, flow cytometry, DNA ladder, caspase activity, Rho activity, F-actin polymerization, and gelatin-zymography for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Mice with tumor xenograft and experimental metastasis model were used to evaluate effects on tumor growth and metastasis. Our results indicated that HTPB was a pan-HDAC inhibitor in suppressing cell viability specifically of lung cancer cells but not of the normal lung cells. Upon HTPB treatment, cell cycle arrest was induced and subsequently led to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. HTPB disrupted F-actin dynamics via downregulating RhoA activity. Moreover, HTPB inhibited activity of MMP2 and MMP9, reduced integrin-?1/focal adhesion complex formation and decreased pericellular poly-fibronectin assemblies. Finally, intraperitoneal injection or oral administration of HTPB efficiently inhibited A549 xenograft tumor growth in vivo without side effects. HTPB delayed lung metastasis of 4T1 mouse breast cancer cells. Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins, induction of apoptotic-related proteins and de-phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase were confirmed in treated mice. Conclusions/Significance These results suggested that intrinsic apoptotic pathway may involve in anti-tumor growth effects of HTPB in lung cancer cells. HTPB significantly suppresses tumor metastasis partly through inhibition of integrin-?1/FAK/MMP/RhoA/F-actin pathways. We have provided convincing preclinical evidence that HTPB is a potent HDAC targeted inhibitor and is thus a promising candidate for lung cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22279574

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitors decrease reelin promoter methylation in vitro

    E-print Network

    Champagne, Frances A.

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors decrease reelin promoter methylation in vitro Colin P. Mitchell that induce reelin mRNA expression in vitro on the methylation status of the human reelin promoter in neural drugs reduced the methylation profile of the reelin promoter relative to untreated cells

  6. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi) Cause the Selective Depletion of Bromodomain Containing Proteins (BCPs)*

    PubMed Central

    Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Iskar, Murat; Parca, Luca; Singer, Stephan; Bork, Peer; Ori, Alessandro; Beck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) and acetyltransferases control the epigenetic regulation of gene expression through modification of histone marks. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are small molecules that interfere with histone tail modification, thus altering chromatin structure and epigenetically controlled pathways. They promote apoptosis in proliferating cells and are promising anticancer drugs. While some HDACi have already been approved for therapy and others are in different phases of clinical trials, the exact mechanism of action of this drug class remains elusive. Previous studies have shown that HDACis cause massive changes in chromatin structure but only moderate changes in gene expression. To what extent these changes manifest at the protein level has never been investigated on a proteome-wide scale. Here, we have studied HDACi-treated cells by large-scale mass spectrometry based proteomics. We show that HDACi treatment affects primarily the nuclear proteome and induces a selective decrease of bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs), the main readers of acetylated histone marks. By combining time-resolved proteome and transcriptome profiling, we show that BCPs are affected at the protein level as early as 12 h after HDACi treatment and that their abundance is regulated by a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Using gene silencing, we demonstrate that the decreased abundance of BCPs is sufficient to mediate important transcriptional changes induced by HDACi. Our data reveal a new aspect of the mechanism of action of HDACi that is mediated by an interplay between histone acetylation and the abundance of BCPs. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001660 and NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus with identifier GSE64689. PMID:25755299

  7. Zn2+-chelating motif-tethered short-chain fatty acids as a novel class of histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiang; Yang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Chang-Shi; Davis, Melanie; Byrd, John C; Etherton, Mark R; Umar, Asad; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2004-01-15

    Among various classes of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, short-chain fatty acids exhibit the least potency, with IC(50) in the millimolar range. We rationalized that this weak potency was, in part, attributable to their inability to access the zinc cation in the HDAC active-site pocket, which is pivotal to the deacetylation catalysis. We thus explored the structural optimization of valproate, butyrate, phenylacetate, and phenylbutyrate by coupling them with Zn(2+)-chelating motifs (hydroxamic acid and o-phenylenediamine) through aromatic omega-amino acid linkers. This strategy has led to a novel class of Zn(2+)-chelating, motif-tethered, short-chain fatty acids that exhibited varying degrees of HDAC inhibitory potency. One hydroxamate-tethered phenylbutyrate compound, N-hydroxy-4-(4-phenylbutyrylamino)benzamide (HTPB), displayed nanomolar potency in inhibiting HDAC activity. Exposure of several cancer cell lines to HTPB at the submicromolar level showed reduced cell proliferation accompanied by histone hyperacetylation and elevated p21(WAF/CIP1) expression, which are hallmark features associated with intracellular HDAC inhibition. PMID:14711316

  8. An ERG (ets-related gene)-associated histone methyltransferase interacts with histone deacetylases 1/2 and transcription co-repressors mSin3A/B.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Mei, Qi; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Matsui, Yoshito; Blackburn, Michael L; Benedetti, Daniel; Krumm, Anton A; Taborsky, Gerald J; Chansky, Howard A

    2003-01-01

    Covalent modifications of histone tails play important roles in gene transcription and silencing. We recently identified an ERG ( ets -related gene)-associated protein with a SET (suppressor of variegation, enhancer of zest and trithorax) domain (ESET) that was found to have the activity of a histone H3-specific methyltransferase. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of ESET with other chromatin remodelling factors. We show that ESET histone methyltransferase associates with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC2, and that ESET also interacts with the transcription co-repressors mSin3A and mSin3B. Deletion analysis of ESET reveals that an N-terminal region containing a tudor domain is responsible for interaction with mSin3A/B and association with HDAC1/2, and that truncation of ESET enhances its binding to mSin3. When bound to a promoter, ESET represses the transcription of a downstream luciferase reporter gene. This repression by ESET is independent of its histone methyltransferase activity, but correlates with its binding to the mSin3 co-repressors. In addition, the repression can be partially reversed by treatment with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A. Taken together, these data suggest that ESET histone methyltransferase can form a large, multi-protein complex(es) with mSin3A/B co-repressors and HDAC1/2 that participates in multiple pathways of transcriptional repression. PMID:12398767

  9. Damaged DNA-binding protein down-regulates epigenetic mark H3K56Ac through histone deacetylase 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qianzheng; Battu, Aruna; Ray, Alo; Wani, Gulzar; Qian, Jiang; He, Jinshan; Wang, Qi-en; Wani, Altaf A

    2015-06-01

    Acetylated histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56Ac) is one of the reversible histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) responsive to DNA damage. We previously described a biphasic decrease and increase of epigenetic mark H3K56Ac in response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced DNA damage. Here, we report a new function of UV damaged DNA-binding protein (DDB) in deacetylation of H3K56Ac through specific histone deacetylases (HDACs). We show that simultaneous depletion of HDAC1/2 compromises the deacetylation of H3K56Ac, while depletion of HDAC1 or HDAC2 alone has no effect on H3K56Ac. The H3K56Ac deacetylation does not require functional nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors XPA and XPC, but depends on the function of upstream factors DDB1 and DDB2. UVR enhances the association of DDB2 with HDAC1 and, enforced DDB2 expression leads to translocation of HDAC1 to UVR-damaged chromatin. HDAC1 and HDAC2 are recruited to UVR-induced DNA damage spots, which are visualized by anti-XPC immunofluorescence. Dual HDAC1/2 depletion decreases XPC ubiquitination, but does not affect the recruitment of DDB2 to DNA damage. By contrast, the local accumulation of ?H2AX at UVR-induced DNA damage spots was compromised upon HDAC1 as well as dual HDAC1/2 depletions. Additionally, UVR-induced ATM activation decreased in H12899 cells expressing H3K56Ac-mimicing H3K56Q. These results revealed a novel role of DDB in H3K56Ac deacetylation during early step of NER and the existence of active functional cross-talk between DDB-mediated damage recognition and H3K56Ac deacetylation. PMID:26255936

  10. mTOR kinase inhibitors synergize with histone deacetylase inhibitors to kill B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Beagle, Brandon R; Nguyen, Duc M; Mallya, Sharmila; Tang, Sarah S; Lu, Mengrou; Zeng, Zhihong; Konopleva, Marina; Vo, Thanh-Trang; Fruman, David A

    2015-02-10

    High activity of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is associated with poor prognosis in pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), suggesting that inhibiting mTOR might be clinically useful. However, emerging data indicate that mTOR inhibitors are most effective when combined with other target agents. One strategy is to combine with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, since B-ALL is often characterized by epigenetic changes that silence the expression of pro-apoptotic factors. Here we tested combinations of mTOR and pan-HDAC inhibitors on B-ALL cells, including both Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) and non-Ph cell lines. We found that mTOR kinase inhibitors (TOR-KIs) synergize with HDAC inhibitors to cause apoptosis in B-ALL cells and the effect is greater when compared to rapamycin plus HDAC inhibitors. The combination of TOR-KIs with the clinically approved HDAC inhibitor vorinostat increased apoptosis in primary pediatric B-ALL cells in vitro. Mechanistically, TOR-KI and HDAC inhibitor combinations increased expression of pro-death genes, including targets of the Forkhead Box O (FOXO) transcription factors, and increased sensitivity to apoptotic triggers at the mitochondria. These findings suggest that targeting epigenetic factors can unmask the cytotoxic potential of TOR-KIs towards B-ALL cells. PMID:25576920

  11. Discovery of 1-hydroxypyridine-2-thiones as selective histone deacetylase inhibitors and their potential application for treating leukemia.

    PubMed

    Muthyala, Ramaiah; Shin, Woo Shik; Xie, Jiashu; Sham, Yuk Yin

    2015-10-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) is a validated target for pursuing anticancer agents. However, obtaining a selective inhibitor against a given HDAC member remains a significant challenge. We report here the use of 1-hydroxypyridine-2-thione (1HPT) as a key pharmacophore for zinc-binding can result in highly selective HDAC inhibitors. 1HPT-6-carboxylic acid exhibits selective inhibition of HDAC6 with an IC50 of 150 nM that corresponds to a remarkable 0.9 ligand efficiency. Two analogs with simple amino acids shows nearly 600-fold selectivity among the eleven zinc-dependent HDACs. At low micromolar concentration these compounds inhibit the growth of HDAC8-overexpressing chronic myelogenous leukemia cells and specific form of acute myelogenous leukemia cells. Their potential mode of binding was examined by molecular docking and their stability was assessed in mouse and human plasma. Together the results suggest 1HPT analogs exhibit promising therapeutic potential for further development as anticancer agents to treat leukemia. PMID:26264503

  12. Curcumin and hydroxamate-derivative (PCI-34058) interfere with histone deacetylase I catalytic core Asp-His charge relay system: atomistic simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Omotuyi, I O; Abiodun, M O; Komolafe, K; Ejelonu, O C; Olusanya, O

    2015-05-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are representative targets for the natural and synthetic chemicals used to transform cells to confer antitumor properties. In the current study, curcumin and hydroxamate-derivative PCI-34058-bound HDAC1 were subjected to atomistic simulation. The results support the view that fitting of curcumin and PCI-34058 within the HDAC1 pocket depends on extensive interactions between the aromatic moieties of the inhibitors and the extensive network of aromatic amino acid side chains lining the pocket of HDAC1. The interaction forces a local perturbation of the coiled structures connecting the pocket residues resulting in ligand-induced tightening of the pocket. In addition to the competitive occupancy of the histone-acetyl-lysine binding pocket by the inhibitors, interference with the in-pocket aspartate-histidine (ASP-HIS) charge relay system was also observed in inhibitor-bound HDAC1 systems. In conclusion, curcumin and PCI-34058-mediated ligand-dependent HDAC1 tunnel closure interferes negatively with the ASP-HIS charge relay system in HDAC1. Future design of HDAC inhibitors may benefit from optimizing competitive interaction with the ligand site and interference with the charge relay system. PMID:25860111

  13. Structure of Prokaryotic Polyamine Deacetylase Reveals Evolutionary Functional Relationships with Eukaryotic Histone Deacetylases

    SciTech Connect

    P Lombardi; H Angell; D Whittington; E Flynn; K Rajashankar; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    Polyamines are a ubiquitous class of polycationic small molecules that can influence gene expression by binding to nucleic acids. Reversible polyamine acetylation regulates nucleic acid binding and is required for normal cell cycle progression and proliferation. Here, we report the structures of Mycoplana ramosa acetylpolyamine amidohydrolase (APAH) complexed with a transition state analogue and a hydroxamate inhibitor and an inactive mutant complexed with two acetylpolyamine substrates. The structure of APAH is the first of a histone deacetylase-like oligomer and reveals that an 18-residue insert in the L2 loop promotes dimerization and the formation of an 18 {angstrom} long 'L'-shaped active site tunnel at the dimer interface, accessible only to narrow and flexible substrates. The importance of dimerization for polyamine deacetylase function leads to the suggestion that a comparable dimeric or double-domain histone deacetylase could catalyze polyamine deacetylation reactions in eukaryotes.

  14. Increased Histone Deacetylase Activity Involved in the Suppressed Invasion of Cancer Cells Survived from ALA-Mediated Photodynamic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Tzu; Tsai, Yi-Jane; Lee, Ming-Jen; Chen, Chin-Tin

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have found that cancer cells survived from 5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) have abnormal mitochondrial function and suppressed cellular invasiveness. Here we report that both the mRNA expression level and enzymatic activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) were elevated in the PDT-derived variants with dysfunctional mitochondria. The activated HDAC deacetylated histone H3 and further resulted in the reduced migration and invasion, which correlated with the reduced expression of the invasion-related genes, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), paternally expressed gene 1 (PEG1), and miR-355, the intronic miRNA. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we further demonstrate the reduced amount of acetylated histone H3 on the promoter regions of MMP9 and PEG1, supporting the down-regulation of these two genes in PDT-derived variants. These results indicate that HDAC activation induced by mitochondrial dysfunction could modulate the cellular invasiveness and its related gene expression. This argument was further verified in the 51-10 cybrid cells with the 4977 bp mtDNA deletion and A375 ?0 cells with depleted mitochondria. These results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction might suppress tumor invasion through modulating histone acetylation. PMID:26473836

  15. Gene expression profiling in response to the histone deacetylase inhibitor BL1521 in neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ruijter, Annemieke J.M. de; Kemp, Stephan . E-mail: a.b.vankuilenburg@amc.uva.nl

    2005-10-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood tumor with a poor survival in advanced stage disease despite intensive chemotherapeutic regimes. The new histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor BL1521 has shown promising results in neuroblastoma. Inhibition of HDAC resulted in a decrease in proliferation and metabolic activity, induction of apoptosis and differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. In order to elucidate the mechanism mediating the effects of BL1521 on neuroblastoma cells, we investigated the gene expression profile of an MYCN single copy (SKNAS) and an MYCN amplified (IMR32) neuroblastoma cell line after treatment with BL1521 using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide array U133A. An altered expression of 255 genes was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines. The majority of these genes were involved in gene expression, cellular metabolism, and cell signaling. We observed changes in the expression of vital genes belonging to the cell cycle (cyclin D1 and CDK4) and apoptosis (BNIP3, BID, and BCL2) pathway in response to BL1521. The expression of 37 genes was altered by both BL1521 and Trichostatin A, which could indicate a common gene set regulated by different HDAC inhibitors. BL1521 treatment changed the expression of a number of MYCN-associated genes. Several genes in the Wnt and the Delta/Notch pathways were changed in response to BL1521 treatment, suggesting that BL1521 is able to induce the differentiation of neuroblastoma cells into a more mature phenotype.

  16. Design, synthesis, and antitumor evaluation of histone deacetylase inhibitors with l-phenylglycine scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yingjie; Li, Xiaoguang; Hou, Jinning; Huang, Yongxue; Xu, Wenfang

    2015-01-01

    In our previous research, a novel series of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors with l-phenylglycine scaffold were designed and synthesized, among which amides D3 and D7 and ureido D18 were far superior to the positive control (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid [SAHA]) in HDAC inhibition, but were only comparable to SAHA in antiproliferation on tumor cell lines. Herein, further structural derivation of lead compounds D3, D7, and D18 was carried out to improve their cellular activities. Most of our newly synthesized compounds exhibited more potent HDAC inhibitory activities than the positive control SAHA, and several derivatives were even better than their parent compounds. However, compared with SAHA and our lead compounds, only secondary amine series compounds exhibited improved antiproliferative activities, likely due to their appropriate topological polar surface area values and cell permeabilities. In a human histiocytic lymphoma (U937) xenograft model, the most potent secondary amine 9d exhibited similar in vivo antitumor activity to that of SAHA. PMID:26504374

  17. Histone Deacetylases Exert Class-Specific Roles in Conditioning the Brain and Heart Against Acute Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Aune, Sverre E.; Herr, Daniel J.; Kutz, Craig J.; Menick, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury comprises a significant portion of morbidity and mortality from heart and brain diseases worldwide. This enduring clinical problem has inspired myriad reports in the scientific literature of experimental interventions seeking to elucidate the pathology of IR injury. Elective cardiac surgery presents perhaps the most viable scenario for protecting the heart and brain from IR injury due to the opportunity to condition the organs prior to insult. The physiological parameters for the preconditioning of vital organs prior to insult through mechanical and pharmacological maneuvers have been heavily examined. These investigations have revealed new insights into how preconditioning alters cellular responses to IR injury. However, the promise of preconditioning remains unfulfilled at the clinical level, and research seeking to implicate cell signals essential to this protection continues. Recent discoveries in molecular biology have revealed that gene expression can be controlled through posttranslational modifications, without altering the chemical structure of the genetic code. In this scenario, gene expression is repressed by enzymes that cause chromatin compaction through catalytic removal of acetyl moieties from lysine residues on histones. These enzymes, called histone deacetylases (HDACs), can be inhibited pharmacologically, leading to the de-repression of protective genes. The discovery that HDACs can also alter the function of non-histone proteins through posttranslational deacetylation has expanded the potential impact of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of human disease. HDAC inhibitors have been applied in a very small number of experimental models of IR. However, the scientific literature contains an increasing number of reports demonstrating that HDACs converge on preconditioning signals in the cell. This review will describe the influence of HDACs on major preconditioning signaling pathways in the heart and brain. PMID:26175715

  18. Redirection of Epithelial Immune Responses by Short-Chain Fatty Acids through Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, May Young; de Zoete, Marcel R.; van Putten, Jos P. M.; Strijbis, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are products of microbial fermentation that are important for intestinal epithelial health. Here, we describe that SCFAs have rapid and reversible effects on toll-like receptor (TLR) responses in epithelial cells. Incubation of HEK293 or HeLa epithelial cells with the SCFAs butyrate or propionate at physiological concentrations enhanced NF-?B activation induced by TLR5, TLR2/1, TLR4, and TLR9 agonists. NF-?B activation in response to tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?) was also increased by SCFAs. Comparative transcript analysis of HT-29 colon epithelial cells revealed that SCFAs enhanced TLR5-induced transcription of TNF? but dampened or even abolished the TLR5-mediated induction of IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1. SCFAs are known inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Butyrate or propionate caused a rapid increase in histone acetylation in epithelial cells, similar to the small molecule HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). TSA also mimicked the effects of SCFAs on TLR–NF-?B responses. This study shows that bacterial SCFAs rapidly alter the epigenetic state of host cells resulting in redirection of the innate immune response and selective reprograming of cytokine/chemokine expression. PMID:26579129

  19. Gallic Acid Decreases Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion Through Histone Acetyltransferase/Histone Deacetylase Regulation in High Glucose-Induced Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooje; Lee, Sang Yeol; Son, Young-Jin; Yun, Jung-Mi

    2015-07-01

    Hyperglycemia contributes to diabetes and several diabetes-related complications. Gallic acid is a polyhydroxy phenolic compound found in various natural products. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanism of gallic acid on proinflammatory cytokine secretion in high glucose-induced human monocytes (THP-1 cells). THP-1 cells were cultured under normoglycemic or hyperglycemic conditions, in the absence or presence of gallic acid. Hyperglycemic conditions significantly induced histone acetylation, nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) activation, and proinflammatory cytokine release from THP-1 cells, whereas gallic acid suppressed NF-?B activity and cytokine release. It also significantly reduced CREB-binding protein/p300 (CBP/p300, a NF-?B coactivator) gene expression, acetylation levels, and CBP/p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. In addition, histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) expression was significantly induced. These results suggest that gallic acid inhibits hyperglycemic-induced cytokine production in monocytes through epigenetic changes involving NF-?B. Therefore, gallic acid may have potential for the treatment and prevention of diabetes and its complications. PMID:25807193

  20. Histone deacetylase 3 represses p15{sup INK4b} and p21{sup WAF1/cip1} transcription by interacting with Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Weifeng; Tan Dapeng; Wang Xiuli; Han Songyan; Tan Jiang; Zhao Yanmei; Lu Jun . E-mail: ycsuo@nenu.edu.cn; Huang Baiqu

    2006-01-06

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) has been implicated to play roles in governing cell proliferation. Here we demonstrated that the overexpression of HDAC3 repressed transcription of p15{sup INK4b} and p21{sup WAF1/cip1} genes in 293T cells, and that the recruitment of HDAC3 to the promoter regions of these genes was critical to this repression. We also showed that HDAC3 repressed GAL4-Sp1 transcriptional activity, and that Sp1 was co-immunoprecipitated with FLAG-tagged HDAC3. We conclude that HDAC3 can repress p15{sup INK4b} and p21{sup WAF1/cip1} transcription by interacting with Sp1. Furthermore, knockdown of HDAC3 by RNAi up-regulated the transcriptional expression of p15{sup INK4b}, but not that of p21{sup WAF1/cip1}, implicating the different roles of HDAC3 in repression of p15{sup INK4b} and p21{sup WAF1/cip1} transcription. Data from this study indicate that the inhibition of p15{sup INK4b} and p21{sup WAF1/cip1} may be one of the mechanisms by which HDAC3 participates in cell cycle regulation and oncogenesis.

  1. Developing a Novel Indolocarbazole as Histone Deacetylases Inhibitor against Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjing; Lv, Maomin; Zhao, Xiong; Zhang, Jingang

    2015-01-01

    A novel indolocarbazole (named as ZW2-1) possessing HDAC inhibition activity was synthesized and evaluated against human leukemia cell lines HL-60 and NB4. ZW2-1 performed anti-population growth effect which was in a concentration-dependent manner (2–12??M) by inducing both apoptosis and autophagy in cells. The compound also caused differentiation of HL-60 and NB4 cells as shown by increasing expression of CD11b, CD14, and CD38 at moderate concentration (4??M). At relatively high concentration (8??M), ZW2-1 significantly decreased intracellular histone deacetylase 1 level which was also observed. All the results indicated that ZW2-1 could be a novel antileukemia lead capable of simultaneously inducing apoptosis, autophagy, and differentiation. PMID:26649226

  2. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Seiko; Division of Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental University ; Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Oral Biology Research Center, Kyushu Dental University ; Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Nishino, Norikazu; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Oral Biology Research Center, Kyushu Dental University

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  3. A Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Exhibits Antitumor Activity via Apoptosis Induction, F-Actin Disruption and Gene Acetylation in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yen-An; Wen, Wei-Ling; Chang, Jer-Wei; Wei, Tzi-Tang; Tan, Yi-Hung Carol; Salunke, Santosh; Chen, Chien-Tien; Chen, Ching-Shih; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide, yet the therapeutic strategy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is limitedly effective. In addition, validated histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors for the treatment of solid tumors remain to be developed. Here, we propose a novel HDAC inhibitor, OSU-HDAC-44, as a chemotherapeutic drug for NSCLC. Methodology/Principal Findings The cytotoxicity effect of OSU-HDAC-44 was examined in three human NSCLC cell lines including A549 (p53 wild-type), H1299 (p53 null), and CL1-1 (p53 mutant). The antiproliferatative mechanisms of OSU-HDAC-44 were investigated by flow cytometric cell cycle analysis, apoptosis assays and genome-wide chromatin-immunoprecipitation-on-chip (ChIP-on-chip) analysis. Mice with established A549 tumor xenograft were treated with OSU-HDAC-44 or vehicle control and were used to evaluate effects on tumor growth, cytokinesis inhibition and apoptosis. OSU-HDAC-44 was a pan-HDAC inhibitor and exhibits 3–4 times more effectiveness than suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in suppressing cell viability in various NSCLC cell lines. Upon OSU-HDAC-44 treatment, cytokinesis was inhibited and subsequently led to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. The cytokinesis inhibition resulted from OSU-HDAC-44-mediated degradation of mitosis and cytokinesis regulators Auroroa B and survivin. The deregulation of F-actin dynamics induced by OSU-HDAC-44 was associated with reduction in RhoA activity resulting from srGAP1 induction. ChIP-on-chip analysis revealed that OSU-HDAC-44 induced chromatin loosening and facilitated transcription of genes involved in crucial signaling pathways such as apoptosis, axon guidance and protein ubiquitination. Finally, OSU-HDAC-44 efficiently inhibited A549 xenograft tumor growth and induced acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins and apoptosis in vivo. Conclusions/Significance OSU-HDAC-44 significantly suppresses tumor growth via induction of cytokinesis defect and intrinsic apoptosis in preclinical models of NSCLC. Our data provide compelling evidence that OSU-HDAC-44 is a potent HDAC targeted inhibitor and can be tested for NSCLC chemotherapy. PMID:20856855

  4. Dual targeting of retinoid X receptor and histone deacetylase with DW22 as a novel antitumor approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihui; Chen, Guoliang; Chen, Kang; Ren, Yong; Li, Huahuan; Jiang, Xiaorui; Jia, Lina; Fu, Shiyuan; Li, Yi; Liu, Xinwei; Wang, Shuang; Yang, Jingyu; Wu, Chunfu

    2015-01-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) and Histone deacetylase (HDAC) are considered important targets for cancer therapy due to their crucial roles in genetic or epigenetic regulations of cancer development and progression. Here, we evaluated the potential of dual targeting of RXR and HDAC using DW22 as a novel therapeutic approach to cancer treatment. We found that the co-expression of RXR-? and HDAC1 was frequently appeared in lung cancer and breast cancer tissues and cell lines. RXR was activated by DW22 in RXR? and HDAC1 overexpressed A549 and MDA-MB-435 cell lines. Meanwhile, DW22 inhibited the activity of HDAC by decreasing its expression in A549 and MDA-MB-435 cell lines, but not in RXR? and HDAC1 deficient cell lines. Moreover, DW22 suppressed cell growth, induced cell differentiation, prompted cell apoptosis and arrested cell cycle in A549, MDA-MB-435 or HL60 cell lines. Treatment human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) with DW22 suppressed migration, invasion and tube formation through decreasing VEGF expression. The up-regulation of Ac-H3 and p21, and down-regulation of VEGF caused by DW22 was markedly attenuated by silencing of HDAC1. Furthermore, knockdown of RXR? by siRNA completely blocked DW22-induced cell differentiation, but partially attenuated DW22-caused inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of cell apoptosis, and suppression of cell migration, invasion and tube formation. Moreover, intravenous administration of DW22 significantly retarded tumor growth of A549 and MDA-MB-435 xenograft mice models, and induced no substantial weight loss and gross toxicity. In addition, DW22 also reduced cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and induced cell apoptosis in vivo. Collectively, our data demonstrates that dual targeting of RXR and HDAC using DW22 possesses pleiotropic antitumor activities both in vitro and in vivo, providing a novel therapeutic approach for cancer treatment. PMID:25762635

  5. Clinical Toxicities of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Srividya; Bates, Susan E.; Wright, John J.; Espinoza-Delgado, Igor; Piekarz, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    The HDAC inhibitors are a new family of antineoplastic agents. Since the entry of these agents into our therapeutic armamentarium, there has been increasing interest in their use. Although this family comprises chemical compounds from unrelated chemical classes that have different HDAC isoform specificities, they surprisingly have very similar toxicity profiles. In contrast, the observed toxicity profile is somewhat different from that of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents and from other epigenetic agents. While some of the side effects may be familiar to the oncologist, others are less commonly seen. As some patients remain on therapy for a prolonged period of time, the long-term sequelae need to be characterized. In addition, since preclinical models suggest promising activity when used in combination with other antineoplastic agents, combination trials are being pursued. It will thus be important to distinguish the relative toxicity attributed to these agents and be alert to the exacerbation of toxicities observed in single agent studies. Notably, few of the agents in this class have completed phase 2 testing. Consequently, more clinical experience is needed to determine the relative frequency of the observed side effects, and to identify and develop approaches to mitigate potential clinical sequelae.

  6. Class I histone deacetylase inhibitors inhibit the retention of BRCA1 and 53BP1 at the site of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takayo; Wu, Wenwen; Okada, Maiko; Maeda, Ichiro; Kojima, Yasuyuki; Hayami, Ryosuke; Miyoshi, Yasuo; Tsugawa, Ko-ichiro; Ohta, Tomohiko

    2015-08-01

    BRCA1 and 53BP1 antagonistically regulate homology-directed repair (HDR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor trichostatin A directly inhibits the retention of 53BP1 at DSB sites by acetylating histone H4 (H4ac), which interferes with 53BP1 binding to dimethylated histone H4 Lys20 (H4K20me2). Conversely, we recently found that the retention of the BRCA1/BARD1 complex is also affected by another methylated histone residue, H3K9me2, which can be suppressed by the histone lysine methyltransferase (HKMT) inhibitor UNC0638. Here, we investigate the effects of the class I HDAC inhibitors MS-275 and FK228 compared to UNC0638 on histone modifications and the DNA damage response. In addition to H4ac, the HDAC inhibitors induce H3K9ac and inhibit H3K9me2 at doses that do not affect the expression levels of DNA repair genes. By contrast, UNC0638 selectively inhibits H3K9me2 without affecting the levels of H3K9ac, H3K56ac or H4ac. Reflecting their effects on histone modifications, the HDAC inhibitors inhibit ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) formation of BRCA1 and BARD1 as well as 53BP1 and RIF1, whereas UNC0638 suppresses IRIF formation of BRCA1 and BARD1 but not 53BP1 and RIF1. Although HDAC inhibitors suppressed HDR, they did not cooperate with the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib to block cancer cell growth, possibly due to simultaneous suppression of NHEJ pathway components. Collectively, these results suggest the mechanism by that HDAC inhibitors inhibit both the HDR and NHEJ pathways, whereas HKMT inhibitor inhibits only the HDR pathway; this finding may affect the chemosensitizing effects of the inhibitors. PMID:26053117

  7. Class I histone deacetylase inhibitors inhibit the retention of BRCA1 and 53BP1 at the site of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Takayo; Wu, Wenwen; Okada, Maiko; Maeda, Ichiro; Kojima, Yasuyuki; Hayami, Ryosuke; Miyoshi, Yasuo; Tsugawa, Ko-ichiro; Ohta, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1 and 53BP1 antagonistically regulate homology-directed repair (HDR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor trichostatin A directly inhibits the retention of 53BP1 at DSB sites by acetylating histone H4 (H4ac), which interferes with 53BP1 binding to dimethylated histone H4 Lys20 (H4K20me2). Conversely, we recently found that the retention of the BRCA1/BARD1 complex is also affected by another methylated histone residue, H3K9me2, which can be suppressed by the histone lysine methyltransferase (HKMT) inhibitor UNC0638. Here, we investigate the effects of the class I HDAC inhibitors MS-275 and FK228 compared to UNC0638 on histone modifications and the DNA damage response. In addition to H4ac, the HDAC inhibitors induce H3K9ac and inhibit H3K9me2 at doses that do not affect the expression levels of DNA repair genes. By contrast, UNC0638 selectively inhibits H3K9me2 without affecting the levels of H3K9ac, H3K56ac or H4ac. Reflecting their effects on histone modifications, the HDAC inhibitors inhibit ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) formation of BRCA1 and BARD1 as well as 53BP1 and RIF1, whereas UNC0638 suppresses IRIF formation of BRCA1 and BARD1 but not 53BP1 and RIF1. Although HDAC inhibitors suppressed HDR, they did not cooperate with the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib to block cancer cell growth, possibly due to simultaneous suppression of NHEJ pathway components. Collectively, these results suggest the mechanism by that HDAC inhibitors inhibit both the HDR and NHEJ pathways, whereas HKMT inhibitor inhibits only the HDR pathway; this finding may affect the chemosensitizing effects of the inhibitors. PMID:26053117

  8. A histone deacetylase inhibitor improves hypothyroidism caused by a TR?1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Jeong Won; Willingham, Mark C.; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the thyroid hormone receptor ? gene (THRA) cause hypothyroidism in patients with growth and developmental retardation, and skeletal dysplasia. Genetic evidence indicates that the dominant negative activity of TR?1 mutants underlies pathological manifestations. Using a mouse model of hypothyroidism caused by a dominant negative TR?1PV mutant and its derived mouse model harboring a mutated nuclear receptor corepressor (NCOR1?ID) (Thra1PV/+Ncor1?ID/?ID mice), we recently showed that aberrant release of TR?1 mutants from the NCOR1 repressor complex mediates dominant negative actions of TR?1 mutants in vivo. We tested the hypothesis that deacetylation of nucleosomal histones associated with aberrant recruitment of corepressors by TR?1 mutants underlies pathological phenotypic expression. We treated Thra1PV/+and Thra1PV/+Ncor1?ID/?ID mice with a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxyamic acid (SAHA). SAHA significantly ameliorated the impaired growth, bone development and adipogenesis of Thra1PV/+ mice. In Thra1PV/+Ncor1?ID/?ID mice, SAHA improved these abnormalities even further. We focused our molecular analyses on how SAHA improved the impaired adipogenesis leading to the lean phenotype. We found that SAHA reverted the impaired adipogenesis by de-repressing the expression of the two master regulators of adipogenesis, C/ebp? and Ppar?, as well as other adipogenic genes at both the mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses indicated SAHA increased the extent of acetylation of nucleosomal H4K5 and H3 to re-activate adipogenic genes to reverting adipogenesis. Thus, HDAC confers in vivo aberrant actions of TR?1 mutants. Importantly, for the first time, the present studies show that HDAC inhibitors are clearly beneficial for hypothyroidism and could be therapeutics for treatment. PMID:24381310

  9. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases Permits Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Secretion of Bioactive IL-1? via a Caspase-1-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Stammler, Dominik; Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Menz, Sarah; Frick, Julia S; Sweet, Matthew J; Shakespear, Melanie R; Jantsch, Jonathan; Siegert, Isabel; Wölfle, Sabine; Langer, Julian D; Oehme, Ina; Schaefer, Liliana; Fischer, Andre; Knievel, Judith; Heeg, Klaus; Dalpke, Alexander H; Bode, Konrad A

    2015-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACi) are clinically approved anticancer drugs that have important immune-modulatory properties. We report the surprising finding that HDACi promote LPS-induced IL-1? processing and secretion in human and murine dendritic cells and murine macrophages. HDACi/LPS-induced IL-1? maturation and secretion kinetics differed completely from those observed upon inflammasome activation. Moreover, this pathway of IL-1? secretion was dependent on caspase-8 but was independent of the inflammasome components NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a carboxyl-terminal caspase-recruitment domain, and caspase-1. Genetic studies excluded HDAC6 and HDAC10 as relevant HDAC targets in this pathway, whereas pharmacological inhibitor studies implicated the involvement of HDAC11. Treatment of mice with HDACi in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model resulted in a strong increase in intestinal IL-1?, confirming that this pathway is also operative in vivo. Thus, in addition to the conventional inflammasome-dependent IL-1? cleavage pathway, dendritic cells and macrophages are capable of generating, secreting, and processing bioactive IL-1? by a novel, caspase-8-dependent mechanism. Given the widespread interest in the therapeutic targeting of IL-1?, as well as the use of HDACi for anti-inflammatory applications, these findings have substantial clinical implications. PMID:26519528

  10. Effect of the immunosuppressant histone deacetylase inhibitor FR276457 in a canine renal transplant model.

    PubMed

    Kinugasa, Fumitaka; Nagatomi, Itsuo; Nakanishi, Tomonori; Noto, Takahisa; Mori, Hiroaki; Matsuoka, Hideaki; Sudo, Yuji; Mutoh, Seitaro

    2009-09-01

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor FR276457, a hydroxamic derivative, was identified during chemical library screening and was found to exhibit potent inhibitory effects on the activity of mammalian HDACs. It has been shown that FR276457 exhibited marked immunosuppressive effects in a rat heterotopic cardiac transplant model. To predict clinical efficacy of FR276457, we investigated the inhibitory effect of the proliferation of Jurkat cells in vitro and immunosuppressive effect of orally administered FR276457 on allograft rejection as a monotherapy or in combination with tacrolimus (0.04 mg/kg) injected intramuscularly (i.m.) in a canine renal transplant model. Animal survival, the plasma creatinine level, and histopathology were evaluated. FR276457 inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat cells probably by targeting activity of NF-kappaB. FR276457 prolonged the median survival time (MST) of transplanted grafts from 11.5 days (untreated group) to 29.0 days (FR276457-treated group). FR276457 administered 1 mg/kg twice a day in combination with tacrolimus prevented allograft rejection. In addition, a dose of 1.5 mg/kg twice a day or 5.0 mg/kg once a day prolonged the MST from 18 days (control group) to >73 or >90 days, respectively. Histopathological analysis showed that FR276457 suppressed the score for mononuclear cell infiltration and vasculitis. In conclusion, the HDAC inhibitor FR276457 inhibited the proliferation of T cell line established from human in vitro. And more, FR276457 clinically prolonged allograft survival when administered as a monotherapy, and had additive or synergistic effects when combined with tacrolimus with the canine renal transplant model. These results showed HDAC inhibitor is a promising biological target for treatment in transplant field. PMID:19409992

  11. Effect of histone deacetylase inhibitors trichostatin A and valproic acid on hair cell regeneration in zebrafish lateral line neuromasts

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingzi; Cai, Chengfu; Tang, Dongmei; Sun, Shan; Li, Huawei

    2014-01-01

    In humans, auditory hair cells are not replaced when injured. Thus, cochlear hair cell loss causes progressive and permanent hearing loss. Conversely, non-mammalian vertebrates are capable of regenerating lost sensory hair cells. The zebrafish lateral line has numerous qualities that make it well-suited for studying hair cell development and regeneration. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity has been shown to have an important role in regenerative processes in vertebrates, but its function in hair cell regeneration in vivo is not fully understood. Here, we have examined the role of HDAC activity in hair cell regeneration in the zebrafish lateral line. We eliminated lateral line hair cells of 5-day post-fertilization larvae using neomycin and then treated the larvae with HDAC inhibitors. To assess hair cell regeneration, we used 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation in zebrafish larvae to label mitotic cells after hair cell loss. We found that pharmacological inhibition of HDACs using trichostatin A (TSA) or valproic acid (VPA) increased histone acetylation in the regenerated neuromasts following neomycin-induced damage. We also showed that treatment with TSA or VPA decreased the number of supporting cells and regenerated hair cells in response to hair cell damage. Additionally, BrdU immunostaining and western blot analysis showed that TSA or VPA treatment caused a significant decrease in the percentage of S-phase cells and induced p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 expression, both of which are likely to explain the decrease in the amount of newly regenerated hair cells in treated embryos. Finally, we showed that HDAC inhibitors induced no observable cell death in neuromasts as measured by cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HDAC activity has an important role in the regeneration of hair cells in the lateral line. PMID:25431550

  12. Novel Bioactive Hybrid Compound Dual Targeting Estrogen Receptor and Histone Deacetylase for the Treatment of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chu; Li, Changhao; Zhang, Silong; Hu, Zhiye; Wu, Jun; Dong, Chune; Huang, Jian; Zhou, Hai-Bing

    2015-06-11

    A strategy to develop chemotherapeutic agents by combining several active groups into a single molecule as a conjugate that can modulate multiple cellular pathways may produce compounds having higher efficacy compared to that of single-target drugs. In this article, we describe the synthesis and evaluation of an array of dual-acting ER and histone deacetylase inhibitors. These novel hybrid compounds combine an indirect antagonism structure motif of ER (OBHS, oxabicycloheptene sulfonate) with the HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). These OBHS-HDACi conjugates exhibited good ER binding affinity and excellent ER? antagonistic activity, and they also exhibited potent inhibitory activities against HDACs. Compared with the approved drug tamoxifen, these conjugates exhibited higher antitumor potency in ER?-positive breast cancer cells (MCF-7). Moreover, these conjugates not only showed selective anticancer activity that was more potent against MCF-7 cells than DU 145 (prostate cancer), but they had no toxicity toward normal cells. PMID:25993269

  13. CAMKII-conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 2 potentiates acute methamphetamine-induced expression of immediate early genes in the mouse nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Oscar V.; McCoy, Michael T.; Ladenheim, Bruce; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Brannock, Christie; Tulloch, Ingrid; Krasnova, Irina N.; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) produces increases in the expression of immediate early genes (IEGs) and of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc). Here, we tested whether HDAC2 deletion influenced the effects of METH on IEG expression in the NAc. Microarray analyses showed no baseline differences in IEG expression between wild-type (WT) and HDAC2 knockout (KO) mice. Quantitative-PCR analysis shows that an acute METH injection produced time-dependent increases in mRNA levels of several IEGs in both genotypes. Interestingly, HDAC2KO mice displayed greater METH-induced increases in Egr1 and Egr2 mRNA levels measured at one hour post-injection. The levels of Fosb, Fra2, Egr1, and Egr3 mRNAs stayed elevated in the HDAC2KO mice 2 hours after the METH injection whereas these mRNAs had normalized in the WT mice. In WT mice, METH caused increased HDAC2 recruitment to the promoters some IEGs at 2 hours post injection. METH-induced prolonged increases in Fosb, Fra2, Egr1, and Egr3 mRNA levels in HDAC2KO mice were associated with increased enrichment of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) on the promoters of these genes. Based on our observations, we hypothesize that HDAC2 may regulate the expression of these genes, in part, by prolonging the actions of pCREB in the mouse NAc. PMID:26300473

  14. Activation of Mir-29a in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells Modulates Its Profibrogenic Phenotype through Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases 4

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Huang, Li-Tung; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Kuo, Kuang-Che; Yang, Ya-Ling; Wang, Feng-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that microRNA-29 (miR-29) is significantly decreased in liver fibrosis and that its downregulation influences the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). In addition, inhibition of the activity of histone deacetylases 4 (HDAC4) has been shown to strongly reduce HSC activation in the context of liver fibrosis. Objectives In this study, we examined whether miR-29a was involved in the regulation of HDAC4 and modulation of the profibrogenic phenotype in HSCs. Methods We employed miR-29a transgenic mice (miR-29aTg mice) and wild-type littermates to clarify the role of miR-29a in cholestatic liver fibrosis, using the bile duct-ligation (BDL) mouse model. Primary HSCs from both mice were treated with a miR-29a mimic and antisense inhibitor in order to analyze changes in profibrogenic gene expression and HSC activation using real-time quantitative RT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining, western blotting, and cell proliferation and migration assays. Results After BDL, overexpression of miR-29a decreased collagen-1?1, HDAC4 and activated HSC markers of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in miR-29aTg mice compared to wild-type littermates. Overexpression of miR-29a and HDAC4 RNA-interference decreased the expression of fibrotic genes, HDAC4 signaling, and HSC migration and proliferation. In contrast, knockdown of miR-29a with an antisense inhibitor increased HDAC4 function, restored HSC migration, and accelerated HSC proliferation. Conclusions Our results indicate that miR-29a ameliorates cholestatic liver fibrosis after BDL, at least partially, by modulating the profibrogenic phenotype of HSCs through inhibition of HDAC4 function. PMID:26305546

  15. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylase Activity Aggravates Coxsackievirus B3-Induced Myocarditis by Promoting Viral Replication and Myocardial Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; He, Xiran

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viral myocarditis, which is most prevalently caused by coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), is a serious clinical condition characterized by excessive myocardial inflammation. Recent studies suggest that regulation of protein acetylation levels by inhibiting histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity modulates inflammatory response and shows promise as a therapy for several inflammatory diseases. However, the role of HDAC activity in viral myocarditis is still not fully understood. Here, we aim to investigate the role of HDAC activity in viral myocarditis and its underlying mechanism. CVB3-infected BALB/c mice were treated with the HDAC inhibitor (HDACI) suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) or trichostatin A (TSA). We found inhibition of HDAC activity aggravated rather than ameliorated the severity of CVB3-induced myocarditis, which was contrary to our expectations. The aggravated myocarditis by HDACI treatment seemed not to be caused by an elevated inflammatory response but by the increased CVB3 replication. Further, it was revealed that the increased CVB3 replication was closely associated with the HDACI-enhanced autophagosome formation. Inhibition of autophagosome formation by wortmannin or ATG5 short hairpin RNA dramatically suppressed the HDACI-increased CVB3 replication. The increased viral replication subsequently elevated CVB3-induced myocardial apoptosis. Conversely, inhibition of CVB3 replication and ensuing myocardial apoptosis by the antiviral drug ribavirin significantly reversed the HDACI-aggravated viral myocarditis. In conclusion, we elucidate that the inhibition of HDAC activity increases CVB3 replication and ensuing myocardial apoptosis, resulting in aggravated viral myocarditis. Possible adverse consequences of administering HDACI should be considered in patients infected (or coinfected) with CVB3. IMPORTANCE Viral myocarditis, which is most prevalently caused by CVB3, is characterized by excessive myocardial inflammation. Inhibition of HDAC activity was originally identified as a powerful anti-cancer therapeutic strategy and was recently found to be implicated in the regulation of inflammatory response. HDACI has been demonstrated to be efficacious in animal models of several inflammatory diseases. Thus, we hypothesize that inhibition of HDAC activity also protects against CVB3-induced viral myocarditis. Surprisingly, we found inhibition of HDAC activity enhanced myocardial autophagosome formation, which led to the elevated CVB3 viral replication and ensuing increased myocardial apoptosis. Viral myocarditis was eventually aggravated rather than ameliorated by HDAC inhibition. In conclusion, we elucidate the role of HDAC activity in viral myocarditis. Moreover, given the importance of HDACI in preclinical and clinical treatments, the possible unfavorable effect of HDACI should be carefully evaluated in patients infected with viruses, including CVB3. PMID:26269170

  16. Histone deacetylase inhibition by sodium valproate regulates polarization of macrophage subsets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenming; Li, Ang; Leng, Ye; Li, Yuan; Kang, Jiuhong

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that change of macrophage phenotype (M1/M2) is associated with autoimmune diseases. Sodium valproate (VPA) is a class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which has immunomodulatory function in graft-versus-host disease. However, its impact on macrophage polarization has not been defined. We evaluated the effects of VPA on both mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 and primary mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs). Exposure to VPA significantly repressed the production of interleukin 12 (IL-12), and tumor necrosis factor ? by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage activation, in contrast, promoted IL-10 expression. VPA also affected the costimulatory molecule expression on LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 and BMMs (downregulation of CD40 and CD80, and upregulation of CD86). Specifically, VPA inhibited macrophage-mediated T helper 1 (Th1) effector but enhanced Th2 effector cell activation. Together, our preclinical study demonstrates that VPA significantly affects the phenotype and function of macrophage, indicating an important role of HDAC activity in immune regulation and inflammation. It also provides a rationale to evaluate VPA activity for the treatment of macrophage dysfunction-associated diseases. PMID:22054065

  17. The Class I HDAC Inhibitor RGFP963 Enhances Consolidation of Cued Fear Extinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Mallory E.; Xia, Bing; Carreiro, Samantha; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence indicates that broad, nonspecific histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition enhances learning and memory, however, the contribution of the various HDACs to specific forms of learning is incompletely understood. Here, we show that the Class I HDAC inhibitor, RGFP963, enhances consolidation of cued fear extinction. However, RGFP966, a strong…

  18. Inhibition of class I histone deacetylases by romidepsin potently induces Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle and mediates enhanced cell death with ganciclovir.

    PubMed

    Hui, Kwai Fung; Cheung, Arthur Kwok Leung; Choi, Chung King; Yeung, Po Ling; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Lung, Maria Li; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chiang, Alan Kwok Shing

    2016-01-01

    Pan-histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, which inhibit 11 HDAC isoforms, are widely used to induce Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle in EBV-associated cancers in vitro and in clinical trials. Here, we hypothesized that inhibition of one or several specific HDAC isoforms by selective HDAC inhibitors could potently induce EBV lytic cycle in EBV-associated malignancies such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and gastric carcinoma (GC). We found that inhibition of class I HDACs, particularly HDAC-1, -2 and -3, was sufficient to induce EBV lytic cycle in NPC and GC cells in vitro and in vivo. Among a panel of selective HDAC inhibitors, the FDA-approved HDAC inhibitor romidepsin was found to be the most potent lytic inducer, which could activate EBV lytic cycle at ?0.5 to 5 nM (versus ?800 nM achievable concentration in patients' plasma) in more than 75% of cells. Upregulation of p21(WAF1) , which is negatively regulated by class I HDACs, was observed before the induction of EBV lytic cycle. The upregulation of p21(WAF1) and induction of lytic cycle were abrogated by a specific inhibitor of PKC-? but not the inhibitors of PI3K, MEK, p38 MAPK, JNK or ATM pathways. Interestingly, inhibition of HDAC-1, -2 and -3 by romidepsin or shRNA knockdown could confer susceptibility of EBV-positive epithelial cells to the treatment with ganciclovir (GCV). In conclusion, we demonstrated that inhibition of class I HDACs by romidepsin could potently induce EBV lytic cycle and mediate enhanced cell death with GCV, suggesting potential application of romidepsin for the treatment of EBV-associated cancers. PMID:26205347

  19. Human Cytomegalovirus pUL97 Regulates the Viral Major Immediate Early Promoter by Phosphorylation-Mediated Disruption of Histone Deacetylase 1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Tarin M.; Reitsma, Justin M.; Mirza, Shama P.

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common agent of congenital infection and causes severe disease in immunocompromised patients. Current approved therapies focus on inhibiting viral DNA replication. The HCMV kinase pUL97 contributes to multiple stages of viral infection including DNA replication, controlling the cell cycle, and virion maturation. Our studies demonstrate that pUL97 also functions by influencing immediate early (IE) gene expression during the initial stages of infection. Inhibition of kinase activity using the antiviral compound maribavir or deletion of the UL97 gene resulted in decreased expression of viral immediate early genes during infection. Expression of pUL97 was sufficient to transactivate IE1 gene expression from the viral genome, which was dependent on viral kinase activity. We observed that pUL97 associates with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1). HDAC1 is a transcriptional corepressor that acts to silence expression of viral genes. We observed that inhibition or deletion of pUL97 kinase resulted in increased HDAC1 and decreased histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation associating with the viral major immediate early (MIE) promoter. IE expression during pUL97 inhibition or deletion was rescued following inhibition of deacetylase activity. HDAC1 associates with chromatin by protein-protein interactions. Expression of active but not inactive pUL97 kinase decreased HDAC1 interaction with the transcriptional repressor protein DAXX. Finally, using mass spectrometry, we found that HDAC1 is uniquely phosphorylated upon expression of pUL97. Our results support the conclusion that HCMV pUL97 kinase regulates viral immediate early gene expression by phosphorylation-mediated disruption of HDAC1 binding to the MIE promoter. PMID:23616659

  20. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Inhibit Rhabdomyosarcoma by Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Targeting of Specificity Protein Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Erik; Crose, Lisa; Linardic, Corinne M; Safe, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    The two major types of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are predominantly diagnosed in children, namely embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar (ARMS) RMS, and patients are treated with cytotoxic drugs, which results in multiple toxic side effects later in life. Therefore, development of innovative chemotherapeutic strategies is imperative, and a recent genomic analysis suggested the potential efficacy of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducing agents. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of the potent histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, panobinostat and vorinostat, as agents that inhibit RMS tumor growth in vivo, induce apoptosis, and inhibit invasion of RD and Rh30 RMS cell lines. These effects are due to epigenetic repression of cMyc, which leads to decreased expression of cMyc-regulated miRs-17, -20a, and -27a; upregulation of ZBTB4, ZBTB10, and ZBTB34; and subsequent downregulation of Sp transcription factors. We also show that inhibition of RMS cell growth, survival and invasion, and repression of Sp transcription factors by the HDAC inhibitors are independent of histone acetylation but reversible after cotreatment with the antioxidant glutathione. These results show a novel ROS-dependent mechanism of antineoplastic activity for panobinostat and vorinostat that lies outside of their canonical HDAC-inhibitory activity and demonstrates the potential clinical utility for treating RMS patients with ROS-inducing agents. PMID:26162688

  1. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Computer-Aided Drug Designing of New Derivatives of Hyperactive Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song; Huang, Weibin; Li, Xiaonan; Yang, Zhicheng; Feng, Binghong

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel series of compounds based on suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) had been designed as potential histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis). Molecular docking studies indicated that our derivatives had better fitting in the binding sites of HDAC8 than SAHA. Compounds 1-5 were synthesized through the synthetic routes. In biological test, compounds also showed good inhibitory activity in HDAC enzyme assay and more potent growth inhibition in human glioma cell lines (MGR2, U251, and U373). A representative compound, N3F, exhibited better inhibitory effect (HDAC, IC50  = 0.1187 ?m; U251, IC50  = 0.8949 ?m) and lower toxicity for human normal cells (LO2, IC50  = 172.5 ?m and MRC5, IC50  = 213.6 ?m) compared with SAHA (HDAC, IC50  = 0.8717 ?m; U251, IC50  = 8.938 ?m; LO2, IC50  = 86.52 ?m and MRC5, IC50  = 81.02 ?m). In addition, N3F obviously increased Beclin-1 and Caspase-3 and 9 as well as inhibited Bcl-2 in U251 cells. All of our results indicated that these SAHA cap derivatives could serve as potential lead compounds for further optimization. In addition, N3F and N2E both displayed promising profile as antitumor candidates for the treatment of human glioma. PMID:25763653

  2. Targeted inhibition of histone deacetylases and hedgehog signaling suppress tumor growth and homologous recombination in aerodigestive cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Stephen G; Park, Hyunsil; Pandita, Raj K; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pandita, Tej K; Schwartz, David L; Yordy, John S

    2015-01-01

    Standard combined modality therapies for aerodigestive tract malignancies have suboptimal outcomes, and targeting cancer-specific molecular pathways in combination with radiation could improve the therapeutic ratio. Dysregulation of epigenetic modulators such as histone deacetylases (HDACs), and developmental morphogens such as the hedgehog (HH) pathway have been implicated in aerodigestive tumor progression and metastasis. We hypothesized that simultaneous targeting of HDACs and the HH-pathway mediator Smoothened (Smo) represents an opportunity to overcome therapeutic resistance in these cancers. We evaluated the effects of the HDAC inhibitor SAHA and Smo inhibitor GDC-0449 with radiation in multiple aerodigestive cancer cell lines. Isobologram analyses showed that SAHA and GDC-0449 synergistically suppressed cancer cell proliferation in vitro. SAHA and GDC-0449 cooperatively enhanced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest which was associated with up-regulation of p21waf. GDC-0449 prevented SAHA-induced up-regulation of Gli-1 and Gli-2. Both Smo and Ptc-1 expression was cooperatively suppressed by SAHA and GDC-0449. The combination of SAHA and GDC-0449 induced radiation sensitization with 2 Gy as determined by colony formation assays and cytogenetic analyses, which correlated with higher residual ?-H2AX and 53BP1 foci. In mouse tumor xenografts of the SqCC/Y1 cell line, SAHA and GDC-0449 delayed tumor growth longer and prolonged survival more than either agent alone. In summary, we have identified synergistic effect of HDAC and HH signaling for radiosensitization to improve therapeutic outcomes for aerodigestive malignancies. PMID:26101701

  3. Radiosensitizing Effect of a Phenylbutyrate-Derived Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yen-Shen; Chou, Chia-Hung; Tzen, Kai-Yuan; Gao, Ming; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kulp, Samuel K.; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is integrated into the multimodal treatment of localized hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) refractory to conventional treatment. Tumor control remains unsatisfactory and the sublethal effect associates with secondary spread. The use of an effective molecularly targeted agent in combination with radiotherapy is a potential therapeutic approach. Our aim was to assess the effect of combining a phenylbutyrate-derived histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, AR-42, with radiotherapy in in vitro and in vivo models of human HCC. Methods and Materials: Human HCC cell lines (Huh-7 and PLC-5) were used to evaluate the in vitro synergism of combining AR-42 with irradiation. Flow cytometry analyzed the cell cycle changes, whereas Western blot investigated the protein expressions after the combined treatment. Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice bearing ectopic and orthotopic HCC xenografts were treated with AR-42 and/or radiotherapy for the in vivo response. Results: AR-42 significantly enhanced radiation-induced cell death by the inhibition of the DNA end-binding activity of Ku70, a highly versatile regulatory protein for DNA repair, telomere maintenance, and apoptosis. In ectopic xenografts of Huh-7 and PLC-5, pretreatment with AR-42 significantly enhanced the tumor-suppressive effect of radiotherapy by 48% and 66%, respectively. A similar combinatorial effect of AR-42 (10 and 25 mg/kg) and radiotherapy was observed in Huh-7 orthotopic model of tumor growth by 52% and 82%, respectively. This tumor suppression was associated with inhibition of intratumoral Ku70 activity as well as reductions in markers of HDAC activity and proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Conclusion: AR-42 is a potent, orally bioavailable inhibitor of HDAC with therapeutic value as a radiosensitizer of HCC.

  4. Histone Deacetylases Inhibit IFN-?-Inducible Gene Expression in Mouse Trophoblast Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jason C.; Holtz, Renae; Murphy, Shawn P.

    2015-01-01

    Trophoblast cells are the first cells to differentiate from the developing mammalian embryo, and they subsequently form the blastocyst-derived component of the placenta. IFN-? plays critical roles in activating innate and adaptive immunity, as well as apoptosis. In mice, IFN-? is produced in the pregnant uterus, and is essential for formation of the decidual layer of the placenta and remodeling of the uterine vasculature. Responses of mouse trophoblast cells to IFN-? appear to be selective, for IFN-? activates MHC class I expression and enhances phagocytosis, but fails to activate either MHC class II expression or apoptosis in these cells. To investigate the molecular basis for the selective IFN-? responsiveness of mouse trophoblast cells, IFN-?-inducible gene expression was examined in the trophoblast cell lines SM9 and M-11, trophoblast stem cells, and trophoblast stem cell-derived giant cells. IFN-?-inducible expression of multiple genes, including IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), was significantly reduced in trophoblast cells compared with fibroblast cells. Decreased IRF-1 mRNA expression in trophoblast cells was due to a reduced rate of IRF-1 transcription relative to fibroblast cells. However, no impairment of STAT-1 tyrosine phosphorylation or DNA-binding capacity was observed in IFN-?-treated mouse trophoblast cells. Importantly, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors significantly enhanced IFN-?-inducible gene expression in trophoblast cells, but not fibroblasts. Our collective studies demonstrate that IFN-?-inducible gene expression is repressed in mouse trophoblast cells by HDACs. We propose that HDAC-mediated inhibition of IFN-?-inducible gene expression in mouse trophoblast cells may contribute to successful pregnancy by preventing activation of IFN-? responses that might otherwise facilitate the destruction of the placenta. PMID:19414784

  5. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition via RGFP966 Releases the Brakes on Sensory Cortical Plasticity and the Specificity of Memory Formation.

    PubMed

    Bieszczad, Kasia M; Bechay, Kiro; Rusche, James R; Jacques, Vincent; Kudugunti, Shashi; Miao, Wenyan; Weinberger, Norman M; McGaugh, James L; Wood, Marcelo A

    2015-09-23

    Research over the past decade indicates a novel role for epigenetic mechanisms in memory formation. Of particular interest is chromatin modification by histone deacetylases (HDACs), which, in general, negatively regulate transcription. HDAC deletion or inhibition facilitates transcription during memory consolidation and enhances long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and long-term memory. A key open question remains: How does blocking HDAC activity lead to memory enhancements? To address this question, we tested whether a normal function of HDACs is to gate information processing during memory formation. We used a class I HDAC inhibitor, RGFP966 (C21H19FN4O), to test the role of HDAC inhibition for information processing in an auditory memory model of learning-induced cortical plasticity. HDAC inhibition may act beyond memory enhancement per se to instead regulate information in ways that lead to encoding more vivid sensory details into memory. Indeed, we found that RGFP966 controls memory induction for acoustic details of sound-to-reward learning. Rats treated with RGFP966 while learning to associate sound with reward had stronger memory and additional information encoded into memory for highly specific features of sounds associated with reward. Moreover, behavioral effects occurred with unusually specific plasticity in primary auditory cortex (A1). Class I HDAC inhibition appears to engage A1 plasticity that enables additional acoustic features to become encoded in memory. Thus, epigenetic mechanisms act to regulate sensory cortical plasticity, which offers an information processing mechanism for gating what and how much is encoded to produce exceptionally persistent and vivid memories. Significance statement: Here we provide evidence of an epigenetic mechanism for information processing. The study reveals that a class I HDAC inhibitor (Malvaez et al., 2013; Rumbaugh et al., 2015; RGFP966, chemical formula C21H19FN4O) alters the formation of auditory memory by enabling more acoustic information to become encoded into memory. Moreover, RGFP966 appears to affect cortical plasticity: the primary auditory cortex reorganized in a manner that was unusually "tuned-in" to the specific sound cues and acoustic features that were related to reward and subsequently remembered. We propose that HDACs control "informational capture" at a systems level for what and how much information is encoded by gating sensory cortical plasticity that underlies the sensory richness of newly formed memories. PMID:26400942

  6. Association between histone deacetylases and the loss of cochlear hair cells: Role of the former in noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Ting; Wang, Jie; Wang, Ye; Chen, Fu-Quan

    2015-08-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most frequent disabilities in industrialized countries. It has been demonstrated that hair cell loss in the auditory end organ may account for the majority of ear pathological conditions. Previous studies have indicated that histone deacetylases (HDACs) play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases, including hearing impairment, in older persons. Thus, we hypothesized that the inhibition of HDACs would prevent hair cell loss and, consequently, NIHL. In the present study, a CBA/J mouse model of NIHL was established. Following an injection with the HDAC inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), the expression levels of HDAC1, HDAC4 and acetyl-histone H3 (Lys9) (H3-AcK9) were measured. The number of hair cells was quantified and their morphology was observed. The results revealed that 1 h following exposure to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, there was a significant increase in HDAC1 and HDAC4 expression, and a marked decrease in the H3-AcK9 protein levels, as shown by western blot analysis. Pre-treatment with SAHA significantly inhibited these effects. Two weeks following exposure to noise, the mice exhibited significant hearing impairment and an obvious loss in the number of outer hair cells. An abnormal cell morphology with cilia damage was also observed. Pre-treatment with SAHA markedly attenuated these noise-induced effects. Taken together, the findings of our study suggest that HDAC expression is associated with outer hair cell function and plays a significant role in NIHL. Our data indicate that SAHA may be a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of NIHL. PMID:26046130

  7. R306465 is a novel potent inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases with broad-spectrum antitumoral activity against solid and haematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Arts, J; Angibaud, P; Mariën, A; Floren, W; Janssens, B; King, P; van Dun, J; Janssen, L; Geerts, T; Tuman, R W; Johnson, D L; Andries, L; Jung, M; Janicot, M; van Emelen, K

    2007-01-01

    R306465 is a novel hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor with broad-spectrum antitumour activity against solid and haematological malignancies in preclinical models. R306465 was found to be a potent inhibitor of HDAC1 and -8 (class I) in vitro. It rapidly induced histone 3 (H3) acetylation and strongly upregulated expression of p21waf1,cip1, a downstream component of HDAC1 signalling, in A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells. R306465 showed class I HDAC isotype selectivity as evidenced by poor inhibition of HDAC6 (class IIb) confirmed by the absence of downregulation of Hsp90 chaperone c-raf protein expression and tubulin acetylation. This distinguished it from other HDAC inhibitors currently in clinical development that were either more potent towards HDAC6 (e.g. vorinostat) or had a broader HDAC inhibition spectrum (e.g. panobinostat). R306465 potently inhibited cell proliferation of all main solid tumour indications, including ovarian, lung, colon, breast and prostate cancer cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 30 to 300?nM. Haematological cell lines, including acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic lymphoblastic leukaemia, chronic myeloid leukaemia, lymphoma and myeloma, were potently inhibited at a similar concentration range. R306465 induced apoptosis and inhibited angiogenesis in cell-based assays and had potent oral in vivo antitumoral activity in xenograft models. Once-daily oral administration of R306465 at well-tolerated doses inhibited the growth of A2780 ovarian, H460 lung and HCT116 colon carcinomas in immunodeficient mice. The high activity of R306465 in cell-based assays and in vivo after oral administration makes R306465 a promising novel antitumoral agent with potential applicability in a broad spectrum of human malignancies. PMID:18000499

  8. Early-life stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity and anxiety behavior is reversed by histone deacetylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Moloney, R D; Stilling, R M; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-12-01

    Stressful life events, especially in childhood, can have detrimental effects on health and are associated with a host of psychiatric and gastrointestinal disorders including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Early-life stress can be recapitulated in animals using the maternal separation (MS) model, exhibiting many key phenotypic outcomes including visceral hypersensitivity and anxiety-like behaviors. The molecular mechanisms of MS are unclear, but recent studies point to a role for epigenetics. Histone acetylation is a key epigenetic mark that is altered in numerous stress-related disease states. Here, we investigated the role of histone acetylation in early-life stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Interestingly, increased number of pain behaviors and reduced threshold of visceral sensation were associated with alterations in histone acetylation in the lumbosacral spinal cord, a key region in visceral pain processing. Moreover, we also investigated whether the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), could reverse early-life stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity and stress-induced fecal pellet output in the MS model. Significantly, SAHA reversed both of these parameters. Taken together, these data describe, for the first time, a key role of histone acetylation in the pathophysiology of early-life stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in a well-established model of IBS. These findings will inform new research aimed at the development of novel pharmaceutical approaches targeting the epigenetic machinery for novel anti-IBS drugs. PMID:26403543

  9. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor BML-210 Influences Gene and Protein Expression in Human Promyelocytic Leukemia NB4 Cells via Epigenetic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Borutinskait?, Veronika; Navakauskien?, R?ta

    2015-01-01

    Today, cancer is understood as an epigenetic as well as genetic disease. The main epigenetic hallmarks of the cancer cell are DNA methylation and histone modifications. Proteins such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) that cause modifications of histones and other proteins can be targets for novel anticancer agents. Recently, interest in compounds that can inhibit HDACs increased, and now there are many HDACs inhibitors (HDACIs) available with different chemical structures, biological and biochemical properties; hopefully some of them will succeed, probably in combination with other agents, in cancer therapies. In our study we focused on the novel HDACI–BML-210. We found that BML-210 (N-phenyl-N?-(2-Aminophenyl)hexamethylenediamide) inhibits the growth of NB4 cells in dose- and time-dependent manner. In this study we also examined how expression and activity of HDACs are affected after leukemia cell treatment with BML-210. Using a mass spectrometry method we identified proteins that changed expression after treatment with BML-210. We prepared RT-PCR analysis of these genes and the results correlated with proteomic data. Based on these and other findings from our group, we suggest that HDACIs, like BML-210, can be promising anticancer agents in promyelocytic leukemia treatment. PMID:26287160

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress natural killer cell cytolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ogbomo, Henry; Michaelis, Martin; Kreuter, Jörg; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2007-04-01

    Treatment of transformed cells from leukemia or solid tumors with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) was shown to increase their sensitivity to NK cell lysis. In this study, treatment of IL-2-activated NK cells with HDACi including suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and valproic acid was studied. Both drugs at therapeutic concentrations inhibited NK cell cytotoxicity on human leukemic cells. This inhibition was associated with decreased expression and function of NK cell activating receptors NKp46 and NKp30 as well as impaired granule exocytosis. NFkappaB activation in IL-2-activated NK cells was inhibited by both HDACi. Pharmacologic inhibition of NFkappaB activity resulted in similar effects on NK cell activity like those observed for HDACi. These results demonstrate for the first time that HDACi prevent NK cytotoxicity by downregulation of NK cell activating receptors probably through the inhibition of NFkappaB activation. PMID:17349632

  11. The effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors on heterochromatin: implications for anticancer therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Angela; Roche, Danièle; Bickmore, Wendy A.; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2005-01-01

    Histone acetylation regulates many chromosome functions, such as gene expression and chromosome segregation. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) induce growth arrest, differentiation and apoptosis of cancer cells ex vivo, as well as in vivo in tumour-bearing animal models, and are now undergoing clinical trials as anti-tumour agents. However, little attention has been paid to how HDACIs function in these biological settings and why different cells respond in different ways. Here, we discuss the consequences of inhibiting histone deacetylases in cycling versus non-cycling cells, in light of the dynamics of histone acetylation patterns with a specific emphasis on heterochromatic regions of the genome. PMID:15940285

  12. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Impair the Elimination of HIV-Infected Cells by Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes

    E-print Network

    Jones, Richard Bradley

    Resting memory CD4[superscript +] T-cells harboring latent HIV proviruses represent a critical barrier to viral eradication. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), such as suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA), romidepsin, ...

  13. A Systematic Assessment of Radiation Dose Enhancement by 5-Aza-2'-Deoxycytidine and Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schutter, Harlinde de; Kimpe, Marlies; Isebaert, Sofie; Nuyts, Sandra

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Investigations of epigenetic drugs have shown that radiotherapy can be successfully combined with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC-Is) for the treatment of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Whether the reversal of epigenetic silencing by demethylating agents with or without HDAC-Is can also act as radiosensitizing remains unclear. This study therefore aimed to investigate whether 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) alone or in combination with the HDAC-Is trichostatin A, LBH589, or MGCD0103 could radiosensitize HNSCC tumor cell lines. Methods and Materials: Histone acetylation status and expression of epigenetically silenced genes at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels were assessed as measures of drug effectiveness in six HNSCC cell lines. Based on their colony-forming capacity, colony assays were performed in four of six cell lines to evaluate the radiosensitizing potential of DAC with or without HDAC-Is. Additional assays of cell survival, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and DNA damage were performed. Results: Radiosensitization was observed in two HNSCC cell lines treated with noncytotoxic doses of DAC with or without HDAC-Is before irradiation. The radiosensitizing doses induced histone hyperacetylation and reversal of gene silencing to variable extents and increased radiation-induced cell-cycle arrest. Conclusions: A role for low-dose DAC with or without HDAC-Is as radiosensitizers in HNSCC seems promising and is supportive of future clinical use, especially for combinations of DAC with LBH589 or MGCD0103, although the mechanisms by which they work will require further study.

  14. Transcriptional repression by wild-type p53 utilizes histone deacetylases, mediated by interaction with mSin3a

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Maureen; Ahn, Jaimo; Walker, Kristen K.; Hoffman, William H.; Evans, Ronald M.; Levine, Arnold J.; George, Donna L.

    1999-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the p53 tumor suppressor protein not only can function to activate gene transcription but also to repress the expression of specific genes. Although recent studies have implicated the transcriptional repression function of p53 in the pathway of apoptosis, the molecular basis of this activity remains poorly understood. This study takes a first step toward elucidating this mechanism. We report that trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs), abrogates the ability of p53 to repress the transcription of two genes that it negatively regulates, Map4 and stathmin. Consistent with this finding, we report that p53 physically associates in vivo with HDACs. This interaction is not direct but, rather, is mediated by the corepressor mSin3a. Both wild-type p53 and mSin3a, but not mutant p53, can be found bound to the Map4 promoter at times when this promoter preferentially associates with deacetylated histones in vivo. Significantly, inhibition of p53-mediated transcriptional repression with TSA markedly inhibits apoptosis induction by p53. These data offer the first mechanistic insights for p53-mediated transcriptional repression and underscore the importance of this activity for apoptosis induction by this protein. PMID:10521394

  15. Glucose Metabolism as a Target of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wardell, Suzanne E.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Wieman, Heather L.; Frigo, Daniel E.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Newgard, Christopher B.; McDonnell, Donald P.

    2009-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACI) is generally attributed to their ability to alter gene expression secondary to their effects on the acetylation status of transcription factors and histones. However, because HDACIs exhibit similar transcriptional effects in most cells, the molecular basis for their therapeutic selectivity toward malignant cells is largely unknown. In this study, we report that HDACI, of distinct chemotypes, quantitatively inhibit glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1)-mediated glucose transport into multiple myeloma cells through both down-regulation of GLUT1 and inhibition of hexokinase 1 (HXK1) enzymatic activity. Unexpectedly, however, this inhibition of glucose utilization is accompanied by an increase in amino acid catabolism with no increase in fatty acid oxidation. Our findings suggest that an HDACI-induced change in carbon source preference could contribute to the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs by creating a pattern of fuel utilization that is incompatible with rapid tumor growth and survival. Furthermore, these results, which implicate glucose metabolism as a target of HDACI, suggest that caution should be exercised in attributing effects of this class of drug to primary alterations in gene transcription. PMID:19106193

  16. Effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor ITF2357 in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bodar, Evelien J; Simon, Anna; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2011-01-01

    We explored the effects of the oral histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor ITF2357 in patients with autoinflammatory syndrome. In this prospective open-label pilot study, eight patients were enrolled; one patient with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), three patients with hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) and four patients with Schnitzler syndrome were closely followed during 90 d of ITF2357 treatment. Three patients with Schnitzler syndrome and one TRAPS patient experienced a partial remission. In four patients, there was no effect. In HIDS patients, there was a tendency toward a higher attack frequency and increasing attack severity. In two patients (one TRAPS and one HIDS), we observed a decrease of acute-phase response without signs of clinical improvement. One patient with Schnitzler syndrome showed a partial response despite an ongoing acute-phase response. In conclusion, ITF2357 monotherapy was able to induce partial response only in patients with Schnitzler syndrome and no response in patients with HIDS. PMID:21274502

  17. Histone deacetylase 3 expression correlates with vasculogenic mimicry through the phosphoinositide3-kinase / ERK–MMP–laminin5?2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Ji-Hui; Li, Shun; Li, Lin-Lin; Huang, Min; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Liu, Yang; Yang, Yuan-Tao; Ding, Rui; Ke, Yi-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) refers to the process by which highly aggressive tumor cells mimic endothelial cells to form vessel-like structures that aid in supplying enough nutrients to rapidly growing tumors. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the expression and activity of numerous molecules involved in cancer initiation and progression. Notably, HDAC3 is overexpressed in the majority of carcinomas. However, thus far, no data are available to support the role of HDAC3 in VM. In this study, we subjected glioma specimens to immunohistochemical and histochemical double-staining methods and found that VM and HDAC3 expression were related to the pathological grade of gliomas. The presence of VM correlated with HDAC3 expression in glioma tissues. The formation of tubular structures, as determined by the tube formation assay to evaluate VM, was impaired in U87MG cells when transfected by siRNA or treated with an HDAC3 inhibitor. Importantly, the expression of VM-related molecules such as MMP-2/14 and laminin5?2 was also affected when HDAC3 expression was altered. Furthermore, U87MG cells were treated with a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor or/and ERK inhibitor and found that the PI3K and ERK signaling pathways play key roles in VM; whereas, in VM, the two signaling pathways did not act upstream or downstream from each other. Taken together, our findings showed that HDAC3 contributed to VM in gliomas, possibly through the PI3K/ERK–MMPs–laminin5?2 signaling pathway, which could potentially be a novel therapeutic target for gliomas. PMID:25940092

  18. The promise and perils of HDAC inhibitors in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Didonna, Alessandro; Opal, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) represent emerging therapeutic targets in the context of neurodegeneration. Indeed, pharmacologic inhibition of HDACs activity in the nervous system has shown beneficial effects in several preclinical models of neurological disorders. However, the translation of such therapeutic approach to clinics has been only marginally successful, mainly due to our still limited knowledge about HDACs physiological role particularly in neurons. Here, we review the potential benefits along with the risks of targeting HDACs in light of what we currently know about HDAC activity in the brain. PMID:25642438

  19. The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A induces neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells via the epigenetically regulated expression of the nur77 gene.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Takuma; Maruoka, Hiroki; Kawa, Hiromichi; Yamazoe, Ryosuke; Fujiki, Daichi; Shimoke, Koji; Ikeuchi, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors induce histone acetylation and gene expression by changing local chromatin structures. They can thereby influence various cells to proliferate or differentiate. It has been reported that trichostatin A (TSA) or valproic acid (VPA) can induce the neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic neural stem cells and rat cerebellar granule cells. It is unclear however which gene is responsible for the neuronal differentiation induced by HDAC inhibitors. In this study, we investigated the contribution of immediate early gene (IEG) nur77 to the neuronal differentiation induced by TSA. We report that TSA induces neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, and C646, an inhibitor of HAT (histone acetyl transferase) (p300), prevents TSA-induced neurite formation. The acetylation of the Lys14 residue of histone H3, and mRNA and protein expression of nur77 gene were found to be stimulated after treatment with TSA, but not in the presence of C646. A knock-down of nur77 inhibits the neurite outgrowth induced by TSA. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of nur77 significantly elicits neurite formation in PC12 cells. These results suggest that the expression of nur77, which is up-regulated via the TSA-induced acetylation of Lys14 on histone H3, is essential for the neuronal differentiation in TSA-induced PC12 cells. PMID:25128386

  20. Genetic deletion of the Histone Deacetylase 6 exacerbates selected behavioral deficits in the R6/1 mouse model for Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ragot, Alienor; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Vincent, Jean; Delage, Pauline; Zhang, Hongyu; Allinquant, Bernadette; Leinekugel, Xavier; Fischer, André; Cho, Yoon H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The inhibition of the Histone Deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) increases tubulin acetylation, thus stimulating intracellular vesicle trafficking and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release, that is, cellular processes markedly reduced in Huntington’s disease (HD). Methods We therefore tested that reducing HDAC6 levels by genetic manipulation would attenuate early cognitive and behavioral deficits in R6/1 mice, a mouse model which develops progressive HD-related phenotypes. Results In contrast to our initial hypothesis, the genetic deletion of HDAC6 did not reduce the weight loss or the deficits in cognitive abilities and nest-building behavior shown by R6/1 mice, and even worsened their social impairments, hypolocomotion in the Y-maze, and reduced ultrasonic vocalizations. Conclusions These results weaken the validity of HDAC6 reduction as a possible therapeutic strategy for HD. The data are discussed in terms of additional cellular consequences and anatomical specificity of HDAC6 that could explain these unexpected effects. PMID:26445700

  1. Histone deacetylase 3 inhibition re-establishes synaptic tagging and capture in aging through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mahima; Shivarama Shetty, Mahesh; Arumugam, Thiruma Valavan; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with impaired plasticity and memory. Altered epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in the impairment of memory with advanced aging. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is an important negative regulator of memory. However, the role of HDAC3 in aged neural networks is not well established. Late long-term potentiation (late-LTP), a cellular correlate of memory and its associative mechanisms such as synaptic tagging and capture (STC) were studied in the CA1 area of hippocampal slices from 82-84 week old rats. Our findings demonstrate that aging is associated with deficits in the magnitude of LTP and impaired STC. Inhibition of HDAC3 augments the late-LTP and re-establishes STC. The augmentation of late-LTP and restoration of STC is mediated by the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF?B) pathway. We provide evidence for the promotion of associative plasticity in aged neural networks by HDAC3 inhibition and hence propose HDAC3 and NF?B as the possible therapeutic targets for treating age -related cognitive decline. PMID:26577291

  2. Histone deacetylase 3 inhibition re-establishes synaptic tagging and capture in aging through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mahima; Shivarama Shetty, Mahesh; Arumugam, Thiruma Valavan; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with impaired plasticity and memory. Altered epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in the impairment of memory with advanced aging. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is an important negative regulator of memory. However, the role of HDAC3 in aged neural networks is not well established. Late long-term potentiation (late-LTP), a cellular correlate of memory and its associative mechanisms such as synaptic tagging and capture (STC) were studied in the CA1 area of hippocampal slices from 82–84 week old rats. Our findings demonstrate that aging is associated with deficits in the magnitude of LTP and impaired STC. Inhibition of HDAC3 augments the late-LTP and re-establishes STC. The augmentation of late-LTP and restoration of STC is mediated by the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF?B) pathway. We provide evidence for the promotion of associative plasticity in aged neural networks by HDAC3 inhibition and hence propose HDAC3 and NF?B as the possible therapeutic targets for treating age -related cognitive decline. PMID:26577291

  3. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bhupesh Sharma, P.M.

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in As induced VaD.

  4. Attenuation of Choroidal Neovascularization by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Nymph; He, Shikun; Spee, Christine K.; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Hinton, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is a blinding complication of age-related macular degeneration that manifests as the growth of immature choroidal blood vessels through Bruch’s membrane, where they can leak fluid or hemorrhage under the retina. Here, we demonstrate that the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) can down-regulate the pro-angiogenic hypoxia-inducible factor-1? and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and up-regulate the anti-angiogenic and neuro-protective pigment epithelium derived factor in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Most strikingly, TSA markedly down-regulates the expression of VEGF receptor-2 in human vascular endothelial cells and, thus, can knock down pro-angiogenic cell signaling. Additionally, TSA suppresses CNV-associated wound healing response and RPE epithelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation. In the laser-induced model of CNV using C57Bl/6 mice, systemic administration of TSA significantly reduces fluorescein leakage and the size of CNV lesions at post—laser days 7 and 14 as well as the immunohistochemical expression of VEGF, VEGFR2, and smooth muscle actin in CNV lesions at post-laser day 7. This report suggests that TSA, and possibly HDACi’s in general, should be further evaluated for their therapeutic potential for the treatment of CNV. PMID:25807249

  5. Autophagy induction by histone deacetylase inhibitors inhibits HIV type 1.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Grant R; Bruckman, Rachel S; Chu, Yen-Lin; Spector, Stephen A

    2015-02-20

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being evaluated in a "shock-and-kill" therapeutic approach to reverse human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) latency from CD4(+) T cells. Using this approach, HDACi have induced HIV RNA synthesis in latently infected cells from some patients. The hope is that the increase in viral production will lead to killing of the infected cell either by the virus itself or by the patient's immune system, a "sterilizing cure." Although administered within the context of combination antiretroviral therapy, the infection of bystander cells remains a concern. In this study, we investigated the effect of HDACi (belinostat, givinostat, panobinostat, romidepsin, and vorinostat) on the productive infection of macrophages. We demonstrate that the HDACi tested do not alter the initial susceptibility of macrophages to HIV infection. However, we demonstrate that HDACi decrease HIV release from macrophages in a dose-dependent manner (belinostat < givinostat < vorinostat < panobinostat < romidepsin) via degradation of intracellular HIV through the canonical autophagy pathway. This mechanism involves unc-51-like autophagy-activating kinase 1 (ULK1) and the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin and requires the formation of autophagosomes and their maturation into autolysosomes in the absence of increased cell death. These data provide further evidence in support of a role for autophagy in the control of HIV infection and suggest that careful consideration of off-target effects will be essential if HDACi are to be a component of a multipronged approach to eliminate latently infected cells. PMID:25540204

  6. Histone deacetylases inhibitors effects on Cryptococcus neoformans major virulence phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fabiana As; Derengowski, Lorena S; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J

    2015-08-18

    Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypical changes during host infection in order to promote persistence and survival. Studies have demonstrated that such adaptations require alterations in gene transcription networks by distinct mechanisms. Drugs such as the histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) Sodium Butyrate (NaBut) and Trichostatin A (TSA) can alter the chromatin conformation and have been used to modulate epigenetic states in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. In this work, we have studied the effect of NaBut and TSA on the expression of C. neoformans major virulence phenotypes and on the survival rate of an animal model infected with drugs-treated yeasts. Both drugs affected fungal growth at 37°C more intensely than at 30°C; nonetheless, drugs did not affect cell viability at the concentrations we studied. HDACi also provoked the reduction of the fungal capsule expansion. Phospholipases enzyme activity decreased; mating process and melanin synthesis were also affected by both inhibitors. NaBut led to an increase in the population of cells in G2/M. Treated yeast cells, which were washed in order to remove the drugs from the culture medium prior to the inoculation in the Galleria mellonela infection model, did not cause significant difference at the host survival curve when compared to non-treated cells. Overall, NaBut effects on the impairment of C. neoformans main virulence factors were more intense and stable than the TSA effects. PMID:26103530

  7. HDAC1 and HDAC2 collectively regulate intestinal stem cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zimberlin, Cheryl D; Lancini, Cesare; Sno, Rachel; Rosekrans, Sanne L; McLean, Chelsea M; Vlaming, Hanneke; van den Brink, Gijs R; Bots, Michael; Medema, Jan Paul; Dannenberg, Jan-Hermen

    2015-05-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are posttranslational modifiers that deacetylate proteins. Despite their crucial role in numerous biological processes, the use of broad-range HDAC inhibitors (HDACi), has shown clinical efficacy. However, undesired side effects highlight the necessity to better understand the biology of different HDACs and target the relevant HDACs. Using a novel mouse model, in which HDAC1 and HDAC2 can be simultaneously deleted in the intestine of adult mice, we show that the simultaneous deletion of HDAC1 and HDAC2 leads to a rapid loss of intestinal homeostasis. Importantly, this deletion cannot be sustained, and 8 days after initial ablation, stem cells that have escaped HDAC1 or HDAC2 deletion swiftly repopulate the intestinal lining. In vitro ablation of HDAC1 and HDAC2 using intestinal organoid cultures resulted in a down-regulation of multiple intestinal stem cell markers and functional loss of clonogenic capacity. Importantly, treatment of wild-type organoids with class I-specific HDACi MS-275 also induced a similar loss of stemness, providing a possible rationale for the gastrointestinal side effects often observed in HDACi-treated patients. In conclusion, these data show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 have a redundant function and are essential to maintain intestinal homeostasis. PMID:25648995

  8. Regulation of MyD88 aggregation and the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway by sequestosome 1 and histone deacetylase 6.

    PubMed

    Into, Takeshi; Inomata, Megumi; Niida, Shumpei; Murakami, Yukitaka; Shibata, Ken-ichiro

    2010-11-12

    MyD88 is an essential adaptor molecule for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor. MyD88 is thought to be present as condensed forms or aggregated structures in the cytoplasm, although the reason has not yet been clear. Here, we show that endogenous MyD88 is present as small speckle-like condensed structures, formation of which depends on MyD88 dimerization. In addition, formation of large aggregated structures is related to cytoplasmic accumulation of sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1; also known as p62) and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), which are involved in accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins. A gene knockdown study revealed that SQSTM1 and HDAC6 were required for MyD88 aggregation and exhibited a suppressive effect on TLR ligand-induced expression of IL-6 and NOS2 in RAW264.7 cells. SQSTM1 and HDAC6 were partially involved in suppression of several TLR4-mediated signaling events, including activation of p38 and JNK, but they hardly affected degradation of I?B? (inhibitor of nuclear factor ?B). Biochemical induction of MyD88 oligomerization induced recruitment of SQSTM1 and HDAC6 to the MyD88-TRAF6 signaling complex. Repression of SQSTM1 and HDAC6 enhanced formation of the MyD88-TRAF6 complex and conversely decreased interaction of the ubiquitin-specific negative regulator CYLD with the complex. Furthermore, ubiquitin-binding regions on SQSTM1 and HDAC6 were essential for MyD88 aggregation but were not required for interaction with the MyD88 complex. Thus, our study reveals not only that SQSTM1 and HDAC6 are important determinants of aggregated localization of MyD88 but also that MyD88 activates a machinery of polyubiquitinated protein accumulation that has a modulatory effect on MyD88-dependent signal transduction. PMID:20837465

  9. Brainstem brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling is required for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced pain relief.

    PubMed

    Tao, Wenjuan; Chen, Quan; Wang, Lu; Zhou, Wenjie; Wang, Yunping; Zhang, Zhi

    2015-06-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that persistent pain can epigenetically suppress the transcription of Gad2 [encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65)] and consequently impair the inhibitory function of GABAergic synapses in central pain-modulating neurons. This contributes to the development of persistent pain sensitization. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increased GAD65 activity considerably, restored GABA synaptic function, and rendered sensitized pain behavior less pronounced. However, the molecular mechanisms by which HDAC regulates GABAergic transmission through GAD65 under pain conditions are unknown. This work showed that HDAC inhibitor-induced increases in colocalization of GAD65 and synaptic protein synapsin I on the presynaptic axon terminals of the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) were blocked by a TrkB receptor antagonist K252a [(9S,10R,12R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-hexahydro-10-hydroxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolo[1,2,3-fg:3',2',1'-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-i][1,6]benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid methyl ester], indicating that BDNF-TrkB signaling may be required in GAD65 modulation of GABA synaptic function. At the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promoter, HDAC inhibitors induced significant increases in H3 hyperacetylation, consistent with the increase in BDNF mRNA and total proteins. Although exogenous BDNF facilitated GABA miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents and GAD65 accumulation in NRM neuronal synapses in normal rats, it failed to do so in animals subjected to persistent inflammation. In addition, blockade of the TrkB receptor with K252a has no effect on miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents and synaptic GAD65 accumulation under normal conditions. In addition, the analgesic effects of HDAC inhibitors on behavior were blocked by NRM infusion of K252a. These findings suggest that BDNF-TrkB signaling is required for drugs that reverse the epigenetic effects of chronic pain at the gene level, such as HDAC inhibitors. PMID:25852071

  10. Role of histone deacetylase activity in the developing lateral line neuromast of zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    He, Yingzi; Mei, Honglin; Yu, Huiqian; Sun, Shan; Ni, Wenli; Li, Huawei

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases are involved in many biological processes and have roles in regulating cell behaviors such as cell cycle entry, cell proliferation and apoptosis. However, the effect of histone deacetylases on the development of hair cells (HCs) has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined the influence of histone deacetylases on the early development of neuromasts in the lateral line of zebrafish. Hair cell development was evaluated by fluorescent immunostaining in the absence or presence of histone deacetylase inhibitors. Our results suggested that pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases with inhibitors, including trichostatin A, valproic acid and MS-275, reduced the numbers of both HCs and supporting cells in neuromasts. We also found that the treatment of zebrafish larvae with inhibitors caused accumulation of histone acetylation and suppressed proliferation of neuromast cells. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of both p21 and p27 mRNA was increased following trichostatin A treatment and the increase in p53 mRNA was modest under the same conditions. However, the expression of p53 mRNA was significantly increased by treatment with a high concentration of trichostatin A. A high concentration of trichostatin A also led to increased cell death in neuromasts as detected in a TUNEL assay. Moreover, the nuclei of most of these pyknotic cells were immunohistochemically positive for cleaved caspase-3. These results suggest that histone deacetylase activity is involved in lateral line development in the zebrafish and might have a role in neuromast formation by altering cell proliferation through the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. PMID:24810423

  11. Combined inhibition of BET family proteins and histone deacetylases as a potential epigenetics-based therapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Pawel K; Herner, Alexander; Mello, Stephano S; Wirth, Matthias; Hausmann, Simone; Sánchez-Rivera, Francisco J; Lofgren, Shane M; Kuschma, Timo; Hahn, Stephan A; Vangala, Deepak; Trajkovic-Arsic, Marija; Gupta, Aayush; Heid, Irina; Noël, Peter B; Braren, Rickmer; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Sipos, Bence; Sayles, Leanne C; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Heßmann, Elisabeth; Ellenrieder, Volker; Esposito, Irene; Jacks, Tyler; Bradner, James E; Khatri, Purvesh; Sweet-Cordero, E Alejandro; Attardi, Laura D; Schmid, Roland M; Schneider, Guenter; Sage, Julien; Siveke, Jens T

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal human cancers and shows resistance to any therapeutic strategy used. Here we tested small-molecule inhibitors targeting chromatin regulators as possible therapeutic agents in PDAC. We show that JQ1, an inhibitor of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of proteins, suppresses PDAC development in mice by inhibiting both MYC activity and inflammatory signals. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor SAHA synergizes with JQ1 to augment cell death and more potently suppress advanced PDAC. Finally, using a CRISPR-Cas9-based method for gene editing directly in the mouse adult pancreas, we show that de-repression of p57 (also known as KIP2 or CDKN1C) upon combined BET and HDAC inhibition is required for the induction of combination therapy-induced cell death in PDAC. SAHA is approved for human use, and molecules similar to JQ1 are being tested in clinical trials. Thus, these studies identify a promising epigenetic-based therapeutic strategy that may be rapidly implemented in fatal human tumors. PMID:26390243

  12. HDAC1 and HDAC2 independently predict mortality in hepatocellular carcinoma by a competing risk regression model in a Southeast Asian population.

    PubMed

    Ler, Ser Yeng; Leung, Carol Ho Wing; Khin, Lay Wai; Lu, Guo-Dong; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Hartman, Mikael; Iau, Philip Tsau Choong; Yap, Celestial T; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes involved in transcriptional repression. We aimed to examine the significance of HDAC1 and HDAC2 gene expression in the prediction of recurrence and survival in 156 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) among a South East Asian population who underwent curative surgical resection in Singapore. We found that HDAC1 and HDAC2 were upregulated in the majority of HCC tissues. The presence of HDAC1 in tumor tissues was correlated with poor tumor differentiation. Notably, HDAC1 expression in adjacent non-tumor hepatic tissues was correlated with the presence of satellite nodules and multiple lesions, suggesting that HDAC1 upregulation within the field of HCC may contribute to tumor spread. Using competing risk regression analysis, we found that increased cancer-specific mortality was significantly associated with HDAC2 expression. Mortality was also increased with high HDAC1 expression. In the liver cancer cell lines, HEP3B, HEPG2, PLC5, and a colorectal cancer cell line, HCT116, the combined knockdown of HDAC1 and HDAC2 increased cell death and reduced cell proliferation as well as colony formation. In contrast, knockdown of either HDAC1 or HDAC2 alone had minimal effects on cell death and proliferation. Taken together, our study suggests that both HDAC1 and HDAC2 exert pro-survival effects in HCC cells, and the combination of isoform-specific HDAC inhibitors against both HDACs may be effective in targeting HCC to reduce mortality. PMID:26352599

  13. HDAC9 promotes glioblastoma growth via TAZ-mediated EGFR pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Wu, Yanan; Wang, Mei; Sun, Zhongfeng; Zou, Jiahua; Zhang, Yundong; Cui, Hongjuan

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 9 (HDAC9), a member of class II HDACs, regulates a wide variety of normal and abnormal physiological functions. We found that HDAC9 is over-expressed in prognostically poor glioblastoma patients. Knockdown HDAC9 decreased proliferation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. HDAC9 accelerated cell cycle in part by potentiating the EGFR signaling pathway. Also, HDAC9 interacted with TAZ, a key downstream effector of Hippo pathway. Knockdown of HDAC9 decreased the expression of TAZ. We found that overexpressed TAZ in HDAC9-knockdown cells abrogated the effects induced by HDAC9 silencing both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that HDAC9 promotes tumor formation of glioblastoma via TAZ-mediated EGFR pathway activation, and provide the evidence for promising target for the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:25760078

  14. Selective class I histone deacetylase inhibitors suppress persistent spontaneous nociception and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of bee venom-induced inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Yang, Yan; Wang, Yan; Yang, Fei; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Li, Zhen; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-25

    To confirm whether class I histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are effective in relief of peripheral inflammatory pain, the effects of two selective inhibitors, MS-275 and MGCD0103, were studied in rats inflamed by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of bee venom (BV). The BV test is characterized by displaying both persistent spontaneous nociception (PSN) and primary hypersensitivity. Intrathecal (i.t.) pre-treatment of either MS-275 or MGCD0103 with a single dose of 60 nmol/20 ?L resulted in profound suppression of both PSN and primary thermal hypersensitivity but without significant influence upon the primary mechanical hypersensitivity and mirror-image thermal hypersensitivity. Moreover, the up-regulation of both HDAC1 and HDAC2 induced by s.c. BV injection was completely suppressed by i.t. pre-treatment of MS-275. The present results provide with another new line of evidence showing involvement of epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure by HDAC1/2-mediated histone hypoacetylation in the BV-induced PSN and thermal hypersensitivity and demonstrate the beneficial effects of class I HDACIs in prevention of peripheral inflammatory pain from occurring. PMID:26490061

  15. Histone Deacetylase 3 Is Required for Efficient T Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Kristy R; Zhao, Yue; Klus, Nicholas J; Kaiser, Jonathan F; Gordy, Laura E; Joyce, Sebastian; Hiebert, Scott W; Summers, Alyssa R

    2015-11-15

    Hdac3 is a key target for Hdac inhibitors that are efficacious in cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Moreover, the regulation of chromatin structure is critical as thymocytes transition from an immature cell with open chromatin to a mature T cell with tightly condensed chromatin. To define the phenotypes controlled by Hdac3 during T cell development, we conditionally deleted Hdac3 using the Lck-Cre transgene. This strategy inactivated Hdac3 in the double-negative stages of thymocyte development and caused a significant impairment at the CD8 immature single-positive (ISP) stage and the CD4/CD8 double-positive stage, with few mature CD4(+) or CD8(+) single-positive cells being produced. When Hdac3(-/-) mice were crossed with Bcl-xL-, Bcl2-, or TCR?-expressing transgenic mice, a modest level of complementation was found. However, when the null mice were crossed with mice expressing a fully rearranged T cell receptor ?? transgene, normal levels of CD4 single-positive cells were produced. Thus, Hdac3 is required for the efficient transit from double-negative stage 4 through positive selection. PMID:26324326

  16. Histone deacetylase 6–mediated selective autophagy regulates COPD-associated cilia dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Hilaire C.; Cloonan, Suzanne M.; Bhashyam, Abhiram R.; Haspel, Jeffery A.; Singh, Anju; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah; Cervo, Morgan; Yao, Hongwei; Chung, Anna L.; Mizumura, Kenji; An, Chang Hyeok; Shan, Bin; Franks, Jonathan M.; Haley, Kathleen J.; Owen, Caroline A.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Washko, George R.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.; Rahman, Irfan; Kim, Hong Pyo; Mahmood, Ashfaq; Biswal, Shyam S.; Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Augustine M.K.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) involves aberrant airway inflammatory responses to cigarette smoke (CS) that are associated with epithelial cell dysfunction, cilia shortening, and mucociliary clearance disruption. Exposure to CS reduced cilia length and induced autophagy in vivo and in differentiated mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs). Autophagy-impaired (Becn1+/– or Map1lc3B–/–) mice and MTECs resisted CS-induced cilia shortening. Furthermore, CS increased the autophagic turnover of ciliary proteins, indicating that autophagy may regulate cilia homeostasis. We identified cytosolic deacetylase HDAC6 as a critical regulator of autophagy-mediated cilia shortening during CS exposure. Mice bearing an X chromosome deletion of Hdac6 (Hdac6–/Y) and MTECs from these mice had reduced autophagy and were protected from CS-induced cilia shortening. Autophagy-impaired Becn1–/–, Map1lc3B–/–, and Hdac6–/Y mice or mice injected with an HDAC6 inhibitor were protected from CS-induced mucociliary clearance (MCC) disruption. MCC was preserved in mice given the chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid, but was disrupted in mice lacking the transcription factor NRF2, suggesting that oxidative stress and altered proteostasis contribute to the disruption of MCC. Analysis of human COPD specimens revealed epigenetic deregulation of HDAC6 by hypomethylation and increased protein expression in the airways. We conclude that an autophagy-dependent pathway regulates cilia length during CS exposure and has potential as a therapeutic target for COPD. PMID:24200693

  17. MutS? and histone deacetylase complexes promote expansions of trinucleotide repeats in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Anne-Marie M.; Frizzell, Aisling; Healy, Evan; Lahue, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansions cause at least 17 heritable neurological diseases, including Huntington’s disease. Expansions are thought to arise from abnormal processing of TNR DNA by specific trans-acting proteins. For example, the DNA repair complex MutS? (MSH2–MSH3 heterodimer) is required in mice for on-going expansions of long, disease-causing alleles. A distinctive feature of TNR expansions is a threshold effect, a narrow range of repeat units (?30–40 in humans) at which mutation frequency rises dramatically and disease can initiate. The goal of this study was to identify factors that promote expansion of threshold-length CTG•CAG repeats in a human astrocytic cell line. siRNA knockdown of the MutS? subunits MSH2 or MSH3 impeded expansions of threshold-length repeats, while knockdown of the MutS? subunit MSH6 had no effect. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that MutS?, but not MutS?, was enriched at the TNR. These findings imply a direct role for MutS? in promoting expansion of threshold-length CTG•CAG tracts. We identified the class II deacetylase HDAC5 as a novel promoting factor for expansions, joining the class I deacetylase HDAC3 that was previously identified. Double knockdowns were consistent with the possibility that MutS?, HDAC3 and HDAC5 act through a common pathway to promote expansions of threshold-length TNRs. PMID:22941650

  18. Regulation of Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier-1, Nuclear Receptor Coreceptor, Histone Deacetylase 3, and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-? in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bodles-Brakhop, Angela M.; Yao-Borengasser, Aiwei; Zhu, Beibei; Starnes, Catherine P.; McGehee, Robert E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.; Kern, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPAR?), the histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3)–nuclear receptor coreceptor (NCoR) complex (a corepressor of transcription used by PPAR?), and small ubiquitin-like modifier-1 (SUMO-1) (a posttranslational modifier of PPAR?) in human adipose tissue and both adipocyte and macrophage cell lines. The objective was to determine whether there were alterations in the human adipose tissue gene expression levels of PPAR?, HDAC3, NCoR, and SUMO-1 associated either with obesity or with treatment of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) subjects with insulin-sensitizing medications. Methods We obtained subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies from 86 subjects with a wide range of body mass index (BMI) and insulin sensitivity (SI). Additionally, adipose tissue biopsies were obtained from a randomized subgroup of IGT subjects before and after 10 weeks of treatment with either pioglitazone or metformin. Results The adipose mRNA levels of PPAR?, NCoR, HDAC3, and SUMO-1 correlated strongly with each other (P<0.0001); however, SUMO-1, NCoR, and HDAC3 gene expression were not significantly associated with BMI or SI. Pioglitazone increased SUMO-1 expression by 23% (P<0.002) in adipose tissue and an adipocyte cell line (P<0.05), but not in macrophages. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of SUMO-1 decreased PPAR?, HDAC3, and NCoR in THP-1 cells and increased tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) induction in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Conclusions These results suggest that the coordinate regulation of SUMO-1, PPAR?1/2, HDAC3, and NCoR may be more tightly controlled in macrophages than in adipocytes in human adipose and that these modulators of PPAR? activity may be particularly important in the negative regulation of macrophage-mediated adipose inflammation by pioglitazone. PMID:22651256

  19. An intrinsically disordered region of methyl-CpG binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) recruits the histone deacetylase core of the NuRD complex

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Megha A.; Webb, Heather D.; Sinanan, Leander M.; Scarsdale, J. Neel; Walavalkar, Ninad M.; Ginder, Gordon D.; Williams, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The MBD2-NuRD (Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase) complex is an epigenetic reader of DNA methylation that regulates genes involved in normal development and neoplastic diseases. To delineate the architecture and functional interactions of the MBD2-NuRD complex, we previously solved the structures of MBD2 bound to methylated DNA and a coiled-coil interaction between MBD2 and p66? that recruits the CHD4 nucleosome remodeling protein to the complex. The work presented here identifies novel structural and functional features of a previously uncharacterized domain of MBD2 (MBD2IDR). Biophysical analyses show that the MBD2IDR is an intrinsically disordered region (IDR). However, despite this inherent disorder, MBD2IDR increases the overall binding affinity of MBD2 for methylated DNA. MBD2IDR also recruits the histone deacetylase core components (RbAp48, HDAC2 and MTA2) of NuRD through a critical contact region requiring two contiguous amino acid residues, Arg286 and Leu287. Mutating these residues abrogates interaction of MBD2 with the histone deacetylase core and impairs the ability of MBD2 to repress the methylated tumor suppressor gene PRSS8 in MDA-MB-435 breast cancer cells. These findings expand our knowledge of the multi-dimensional interactions of the MBD2-NuRD complex that govern its function. PMID:25753662

  20. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Romidepsin Induces HIV Expression in CD4 T Cells from Patients on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy at Concentrations Achieved by Clinical Dosing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Datsen George; Chiang, Vicki; Fyne, Elizabeth; Balakrishnan, Mini; Barnes, Tiffany; Graupe, Michael; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Irrinki, Alivelu; Murry, Jeffrey P.; Stepan, George; Stray, Kirsten M.; Tsai, Angela; Yu, Helen; Spindler, Jonathan; Kearney, Mary; Spina, Celsa A.; McMahon, Deborah; Lalezari, Jacob; Sloan, Derek; Mellors, John; Geleziunas, Romas; Cihlar, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Persistent latent reservoir of replication-competent proviruses in memory CD4 T cells is a major obstacle to curing HIV infection. Pharmacological activation of HIV expression in latently infected cells is being explored as one of the strategies to deplete the latent HIV reservoir. In this study, we characterized the ability of romidepsin (RMD), a histone deacetylase inhibitor approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphomas, to activate the expression of latent HIV. In an in vitro T-cell model of HIV latency, RMD was the most potent inducer of HIV (EC50?=?4.5 nM) compared with vorinostat (VOR; EC50?=?3,950 nM) and other histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors in clinical development including panobinostat (PNB; EC50?=?10 nM). The HIV induction potencies of RMD, VOR, and PNB paralleled their inhibitory activities against multiple human HDAC isoenzymes. In both resting and memory CD4 T cells isolated from HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), a 4-hour exposure to 40 nM RMD induced a mean 6-fold increase in intracellular HIV RNA levels, whereas a 24-hour treatment with 1 µM VOR resulted in 2- to 3-fold increases. RMD-induced intracellular HIV RNA expression persisted for 48 hours and correlated with sustained inhibition of cell-associated HDAC activity. By comparison, the induction of HIV RNA by VOR and PNB was transient and diminished after 24 hours. RMD also increased levels of extracellular HIV RNA and virions from both memory and resting CD4 T-cell cultures. The activation of HIV expression was observed at RMD concentrations below the drug plasma levels achieved by doses used in patients treated for T-cell lymphomas. In conclusion, RMD induces HIV expression ex vivo at concentrations that can be achieved clinically, indicating that the drug may reactivate latent HIV in patients on suppressive cART. PMID:24722454

  1. A functional interaction between the histone deacetylase Rpd3 and the corepressor Groucho in Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoqing; Fernandez, Joseph; Mische, Sheenah; Courey, Albert J.

    1999-01-01

    The Drosophila gene groucho (gro) encodes a transcriptional corepressor that has critical roles in many development processes. In an effort to illuminate the mechanism of Gro-mediated repression, we have employed Gro as an affinity reagent to purify Gro-binding proteins from embryonic nuclear extracts. One of these proteins was found to be the histone deacetylase Rpd3. Protein–protein interaction assays suggest that Gro and Rpd3 form a complex in vivo and that they interact directly via the glycine/proline rich (GP) domain in Gro. Cell culture assays demonstrate that Rpd3 potentiates repression by the GP domain. Furthermore, experiments employing a histone deacetylase inhibitor, as well as a catalytically inactive form of Rpd3, imply that histone deacetylase activity is required for efficient Gro-mediated repression. Finally, mutations in gro and rpd3 have synergistic effects on embryonic lethality and pattern formation. These findings support the view that Gro mediates repression, at least in part, by the direct recruitment of the histone deacetylase Rpd3 to the template, where it can modulate local chromatin structure. They also provide evidence for a specific role of Rpd3 in early development. PMID:10485845

  2. Molecular Modeling Study on Tunnel Behavior in Different Histone Deacetylase Isoforms

    E-print Network

    Lee, Keun Woo

    Molecular Modeling Study on Tunnel Behavior in Different Histone Deacetylase Isoforms cancers as these enzymes directly involved in the epigenetic regulation of genes. However the development tunnel-like active site. In this study, using molecular dynamics simulation we have analyzed the behavior

  3. A phosphorescent rhenium(I) histone deacetylase inhibitor: mitochondrial targeting and paraptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Lin, Yan-Nan; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-05-14

    In this report, we designed a histone deacetylase-targeted phosphorescent Re(I) complex ReLMito. Colocalization studies suggested that ReLMito could specially localize to mitochondria. We also demonstrated that ReLMito could induce paraptosis in cancer cells. These features endowed the complex with potential to induce and monitor mitochondrial morphological changes during the paraptosis simultaneously. PMID:25882790

  4. Quantitative analysis of histone modifications: formaldehyde is a source of pathological n(6)-formyllysine that is refractory to histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Edrissi, Bahar; Taghizadeh, Koli; Dedon, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant protein modifications play an important role in the pathophysiology of many human diseases, in terms of both dysfunction of physiological modifications and the formation of pathological modifications by reaction of proteins with endogenous electrophiles. Recent studies have identified a chemical homolog of lysine acetylation, N(6)-formyllysine, as an abundant modification of histone and chromatin proteins, one possible source of which is the reaction of lysine with 3'-formylphosphate residues from DNA oxidation. Using a new liquid chromatography-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify all N(6)-methyl-, -acetyl- and -formyl-lysine modifications, we now report that endogenous formaldehyde is a major source of N(6)-formyllysine and that this adduct is widespread among cellular proteins in all compartments. N(6)-formyllysine was evenly distributed among different classes of histone proteins from human TK6 cells at 1-4 modifications per 10(4) lysines, which contrasted strongly with lysine acetylation and mono-, di-, and tri-methylation levels of 1.5-380, 5-870, 0-1400, and 0-390 per 10(4) lysines, respectively. While isotope labeling studies revealed that lysine demethylation is not a source of N(6)-formyllysine in histones, formaldehyde exposure was observed to cause a dose-dependent increase in N(6)-formyllysine, with use of [(13)C,(2)H2]-formaldehyde revealing unchanged levels of adducts derived from endogenous sources. Inhibitors of class I and class II histone deacetylases did not affect the levels of N(6)-formyllysine in TK6 cells, and the class III histone deacetylase, SIRT1, had minimal activity (<10%) with a peptide substrate containing the formyl adduct. These data suggest that N(6)-formyllysine is refractory to removal by histone deacetylases, which supports the idea that this abundant protein modification could interfere with normal regulation of gene expression if it arises at conserved sites of physiological protein secondary modification. PMID:23468656

  5. Quantitative Analysis of Histone Modifications: Formaldehyde Is a Source of Pathological N6-Formyllysine That Is Refractory to Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Edrissi, Bahar; Taghizadeh, Koli; Dedon, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant protein modifications play an important role in the pathophysiology of many human diseases, in terms of both dysfunction of physiological modifications and the formation of pathological modifications by reaction of proteins with endogenous electrophiles. Recent studies have identified a chemical homolog of lysine acetylation, N6-formyllysine, as an abundant modification of histone and chromatin proteins, one possible source of which is the reaction of lysine with 3?-formylphosphate residues from DNA oxidation. Using a new liquid chromatography-coupled to tandem mass spectrometry method to quantify all N6-methyl-, -acetyl- and -formyl-lysine modifications, we now report that endogenous formaldehyde is a major source of N6-formyllysine and that this adduct is widespread among cellular proteins in all compartments. N6-formyllysine was evenly distributed among different classes of histone proteins from human TK6 cells at 1–4 modifications per 104 lysines, which contrasted strongly with lysine acetylation and mono-, di-, and tri-methylation levels of 1.5-380, 5-870, 0-1400, and 0-390 per 104 lysines, respectively. While isotope labeling studies revealed that lysine demethylation is not a source of N6-formyllysine in histones, formaldehyde exposure was observed to cause a dose-dependent increase in N6-formyllysine, with use of [13C,2H2]-formaldehyde revealing unchanged levels of adducts derived from endogenous sources. Inhibitors of class I and class II histone deacetylases did not affect the levels of N6-formyllysine in TK6 cells, and the class III histone deacetylase, SIRT1, had minimal activity (<10%) with a peptide substrate containing the formyl adduct. These data suggest that N6-formyllysine is refractory to removal by histone deacetylases, which supports the idea that this abundant protein modification could interfere with normal regulation of gene expression if it arises at conserved sites of physiological protein secondary modification. PMID:23468656

  6. Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the therapeutic efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 in human tumor xenograft models

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Toshiaki; Ozaki, Kei-ichi; Fujio, Kohsuke; Kajikawa, Shu-hei; Uesato, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Kazushi; Tanimura, Susumu; Koji, Takehiko; Kohno, Michiaki; Proubase Technology Inc., Kanagawa 211-0063; Kyoto University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto 606-8501

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Blockade of the ERK pathway enhances the anticancer efficacy of HDAC inhibitors. •MEK inhibitors sensitize human tumor xenografts to HDAC inhibitor cytotoxicity. •Such the enhanced efficacy is achieved by a transient blockade of the ERK pathway. •This drug combination provides a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. -- Abstract: The ERK pathway is up-regulated in various human cancers and represents a prime target for mechanism-based approaches to cancer treatment. Specific blockade of the ERK pathway alone induces mostly cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects, however, resulting in a limited therapeutic efficacy of the ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitors. We previously showed that MEK inhibitors markedly enhance the ability of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to induce apoptosis in tumor cells with constitutive ERK pathway activation in vitro. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of such drug combinations, we administered the MEK inhibitor PD184352 or AZD6244 together with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 in nude mice harboring HT-29 or H1650 xenografts. Co-administration of the MEK inhibitor markedly sensitized the human xenografts to MS-275 cytotoxicity. A dose of MS-275 that alone showed only moderate cytotoxicity thus suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts almost completely as well as induced a marked reduction in tumor cellularity when administered with PD184352 or AZD6244. The combination of the two types of inhibitor also induced marked oxidative stress, which appeared to result in DNA damage and massive cell death, specifically in the tumor xenografts. The enhanced therapeutic efficacy of the drug combination was achieved by a relatively transient blockade of the ERK pathway. Administration of both MEK and HDAC inhibitors represents a promising chemotherapeutic strategy with improved safety for cancer patients.

  7. The STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 reverses the resistance of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to histone deacetylase inhibitors induced by interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kang; Fang, Xiao-sheng; Feng, Li-li; Jiang, Yu-jie; Zhou, Xiang-xiang; Liu, Xin; Li, Pei-pei; Chen, Na; Ding, Mei; Wang, Na; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xin

    2015-04-10

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine produced by a variety of cell types, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, lymphocytes, and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Levels of IL-6 are increased in serum of CLL patients and correlated with adverse clinical features and short survival. In our study, we observed that IL-6 induced the resistance of CLL cells to pan-histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors vorinostat (SAHA) and panobinostat (LBH589). Furthermore, low concentrations of SAHA and LBH589 enhanced the activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway induced by IL-6 in CLL cells. All of these effects were blocked by the STAT3-selective inhibitor, WP1066. Meanwhile, WP1066 decreased the expressions of Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL protein induced by IL-6 with or without low concentrations of HDAC inhibitors. Co-culture of CLL cells with BMSCs could also facilitate the activation of STAT3 and protected CLL cells from apoptosis when treated with HDAC inhibitors, and this cytoprotection was reversed by WP1066. The present study indicated that IL-6 or co-culture with BMSCs prevented HDAC inhibitor-induced apoptosis of CLL cells. This prevention was mediated by activation of the STAT3 signaling pathway. Moreover, WP1066 reversed the resistance of CLL cells to SAHA and LBH589 induced by either IL-6 or co-culture with BMSCs. Our findings suggest that targeting the STAT3 pathway may be a novel way to improve the efficacy of the HDAC inhibitor in CLL patients by overcoming antiapoptotic signaling of the microenvironment. PMID:25636517

  8. Dioxin silences gonadotropin expression in perinatal pups by inducing histone deacetylases: a new insight into the mechanism for the imprinting of sexual immaturity by dioxin.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomoki; Fujii, Misaki; Taura, Junki; Ishii, Yuji; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2012-05-25

    Maternal exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) causes the impairment of reproduction and development in the pups. Our previous studies have revealed that maternal treatment with TCDD attenuates the fetal production of pituitary gonadotropins (luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone) at gestational day (GD) 20, leading to the impairment of sexual behavior in adulthood. However, the mechanism underlying such a reduction has remained unknown until now. When pregnant rats at GD15 were given an oral dose of TCDD (1 ?g/kg), the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins was reduced between GD20 and postnatal days (PND) 2. In accordance with this, the pituitary expression of gonadotropin ?-subunit and serum gonadotropin were also attenuated from GD20 to PND0 in a pup-specific fashion. To identify the target genes linked to a fetal reduction in gonadotropin ?-subunit, we performed a DNA microarray analysis using the fetal pituitary and its regulatory organ, the hypothalamus. The results obtained showed that TCDD induced histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the fetal pituitary. In support with this, TCDD markedly deacetylated histones H3 and H4 twined around the promoter of the fetal LH? gene. This effect was fetus- and LH?-specific, and this was not observed in the maternal pituitary or for other pituitary hormone genes. Finally, an LH? reduction caused by TCDD was completely restored by maternal co-treatment with valproic acid, an HDAC inhibitor. These results strongly suggest that the increased deacetylation of histone owing to HDAC induction plays a critical role in the TCDD-induced reduction in LH? in the fetal pituitary. PMID:22493514

  9. Dissecting the Mechanism of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Enhance the Activity of Zinc Finger Nucleases Delivered by Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Alok V.; Stein, Libby; Ho, Michelle; Hoban, Megan D.; Hollis, Roger P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) have been of limited success in the delivery of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) to human cells, due to low expression. A reason for reduced gene expression has been proposed to involve the epigenetic silencing of vector genomes, carried out primarily by histone deacetylases (HDACs). In this study, we tested valproic acid (VPA), a known HDAC inhibitor (HDACi), for its ability to increase transgene expression from IDLVs, especially in the context of ZFN delivery. Using ZFNs targeting the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene in K562 cells, we demonstrated that treatment with VPA enhanced ZFN expression by up to 3-fold, resulting in improved allelic disruption at the ADA locus. Furthermore, three other U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved HDACis (vorinostat, givinostat, and trichostatin-A) exhibited a similar effect on the activity of ZFN-IDLVs in K562 cells. In primary human CD34+ cells, VPA- and vorinostat-treated cells showed higher levels of expression of both green fluorescent protein (GFP) as well as ZFNs from IDLVs. A major mechanism for the effects of HDAC inhibitors on improving expression was from their modulation of the cell cycle, and the influence of heterochromatinization was determined to be a lesser contributing factor. PMID:24568341

  10. Histone deacetylase 2 and N-Myc reduce p53 protein phosphorylation at serine 46 by repressing gene transcription of tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Jeyran; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Norris, Murray D.; Liu, Bing; Haber, Michelle; Tee, Andrew E.; Carrier, Alice; Biankin, Andrew V.; London, Wendy B.; Marshall, Glenn M.; Lock, Richard B.; Liu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Myc oncoproteins and histone deacetylases (HDACs) exert oncogenic effects by modulating gene transcription. Paradoxically, N-Myc induces p53 gene expression. Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1) phosphorylates p53 protein at serine 46, leading to enhanced p53 activity, transcriptional activation of p53 target genes and programmed cell death. Here we aimed to identify the mechanism through which N-Myc overexpressing p53 wild-type neuroblastoma cells acquired resistance to apoptosis. TP53INP1 was found to be one of the genes most significantly repressed by HDAC2 and N-Myc according to Affymetrix microarray gene expression datasets. HDAC2 and N-Myc reduced TP53INP1 gene expression by direct binding to the TP53INP1 gene promoter, leading to transcriptional repression of TP53INP1, p53 protein de-phosphorylation at serine 46, neuroblastoma cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, low levels of TP53INP1 expression in human neuroblastoma tissues correlated with high levels of N-Myc expression and poor patient outcome, and the BET bromodomain inhibitors JQ1 and I-BET151 reduced N-Myc expression and reactivated TP53INP1 expression in neuroblastoma cells. These findings identify TP53INP1 repression as an important co-factor for N-Myc oncogenesis, and provide further evidence for the potential application of BET bromodomain inhibitors in the therapy of N-Myc-induced neuroblastoma. PMID:24952595

  11. A selective histone deacetylase-6 inhibitor improves BDNF trafficking in hippocampal neurons from Mecp2 knockout mice: implications for Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the transcriptional modulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). One of the most prominent gene targets of MeCP2 is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), a potent modulator of activity-dependent synaptic development, function and plasticity. Dysfunctional BDNF signaling has been demonstrated in several pathophysiological mechanisms of RTT disease progression. To evaluate whether the dynamics of BDNF trafficking is affected by Mecp2 deletion, we analyzed movements of BDNF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in cultured hippocampal neurons by time-lapse fluorescence imaging. We found that both anterograde and retrograde vesicular trafficking of BDNF-YFP are significantly impaired in Mecp2 knockout hippocampal neurons. Selective inhibitors of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) show neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases and stimulate microtubule-dependent vesicular trafficking of BDNF-containing dense core vesicles. Here, we show that the selective HDAC6 inhibitor Tubastatin-A increased the velocity of BDNF-YFP vesicles in Mecp2 knockout neurons in both directions by increasing ?–tubulin acetylation. Tubastatin-A also restored activity-dependent BDNF release from Mecp2 knockout neurons to levels comparable to those shown by wildtype neurons. These findings demonstrate that a selective HDAC6 inhibitor is a potential pharmacological strategy to reverse cellular and synaptic impairments in RTT resulting from impaired BDNF signaling. PMID:24639629

  12. Prenatal Ethanol Exposure Causes Glucose Intolerance with Increased Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Histone Deacetylases in Adult Rat Offspring: Reversal by Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xing-Hai; Nguyen, Hoa K.; Nyomba, B. L. Grégoire

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure results in increased glucose production in adult rat offspring and this may involve modulation of protein acetylation by cellular stress. We used adult male offspring of dams given ethanol during gestation days 1–7 (early), 8–14 (mid) and 15–21 (late) compared with those from control dams. A group of ethanol offspring was treated with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) for 3 weeks. We determined gluconeogenesis, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose-6-phosphatase, hepatic free radicals, histone deacetylases (HDAC), acetylated foxo1, acetylated PEPCK, and C/EBP homologous protein as a marker of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Prenatal ethanol during either of the 3 weeks of pregnancy increased gluconeogenesis, gluconeogenic genes, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses, sirtuin-2 and HDAC3, 4, 5, and 7 in adult offspring. Conversely, prenatal ethanol reduced acetylation of foxo1 and PEPCK. Treatment of adult ethanol offspring with TUDCA reversed all these abnormalities. Thus, prenatal exposure of rats to ethanol results in long lasting oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses explaining increased expression of gluconeogenic genes and HDAC proteins which, by deacetylating foxo1 and PEPCK, contribute to increased gluconeogenesis. These anomalies occurred regardless of the time of ethanol exposure during pregnancy, including early embryogenesis. As these anomalies were reversed by treatment of the adult offspring with TUDCA, this compound has therapeutic potentials in the treatment of glucose intolerance associated with prenatal ethanol exposure. PMID:23544086

  13. Prenatal ethanol exposure causes glucose intolerance with increased hepatic gluconeogenesis and histone deacetylases in adult rat offspring: reversal by tauroursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xing-Hai; Nguyen, Hoa K; Nyomba, B L Grégoire

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure results in increased glucose production in adult rat offspring and this may involve modulation of protein acetylation by cellular stress. We used adult male offspring of dams given ethanol during gestation days 1-7 (early), 8-14 (mid) and 15-21 (late) compared with those from control dams. A group of ethanol offspring was treated with tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) for 3 weeks. We determined gluconeogenesis, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose-6-phosphatase, hepatic free radicals, histone deacetylases (HDAC), acetylated foxo1, acetylated PEPCK, and C/EBP homologous protein as a marker of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Prenatal ethanol during either of the 3 weeks of pregnancy increased gluconeogenesis, gluconeogenic genes, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses, sirtuin-2 and HDAC3, 4, 5, and 7 in adult offspring. Conversely, prenatal ethanol reduced acetylation of foxo1 and PEPCK. Treatment of adult ethanol offspring with TUDCA reversed all these abnormalities. Thus, prenatal exposure of rats to ethanol results in long lasting oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses explaining increased expression of gluconeogenic genes and HDAC proteins which, by deacetylating foxo1 and PEPCK, contribute to increased gluconeogenesis. These anomalies occurred regardless of the time of ethanol exposure during pregnancy, including early embryogenesis. As these anomalies were reversed by treatment of the adult offspring with TUDCA, this compound has therapeutic potentials in the treatment of glucose intolerance associated with prenatal ethanol exposure. PMID:23544086

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitor upregulates peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation and inhibits apoptotic cell death in abcd1-deficient glial cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspreet; Khan, Mushfiquddin; Pujol, Aurora; Baarine, Mauhamad; Singh, Inderjit

    2013-01-01

    In X-ALD, mutation/deletion of ALD gene (ABCD1) and the resultant very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) derangement has dramatically opposing effects in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. While loss of Abcd1 in astrocytes produces a robust inflammatory response, the oligodendrocytes undergo cell death leading to demyelination in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD). The mechanisms of these distinct pathways in the two cell types are not well understood. Here, we investigated the effects of Abcd1-knockdown and the subsequent alteration in VLCFA metabolism in human U87 astrocytes and rat B12 oligodendrocytes. Loss of Abcd1 inhibited peroxisomal ?-oxidation activity and increased expression of VLCFA synthesizing enzymes, elongase of very long chain fatty acids (ELOVLs) (1 and 3) in both cell types. However, higher induction of ELOVL's in Abcd1-deficient B12 oligodendrocytes than astrocytes suggests that ELOVL pathway may play a prominent role in oligodendrocytes in X-ALD. While astrocytes are able to maintain the cellular homeostasis of anti-apoptotic proteins, Abcd1-deletion in B12 oligodendrocytes downregulated the anti-apototic (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) and cell survival (phospho-Erk1/2) proteins, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic proteins (Bad, Bim, Bax and Bid) leading to cell loss. These observations provide insights into different cellular signaling mechanisms in response to Abcd1-deletion in two different cell types of CNS. The apoptotic responses were accompanied by activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 suggesting the involvement of mitochondrial-caspase-9-dependent mechanism in Abcd1-deficient oligodendrocytes. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) corrected the VLCFA derangement both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the oligodendrocytes loss. These observations provide a proof-of principle that HDAC inhibitor SAHA may have a therapeutic potential for X-ALD. PMID:23923017

  15. Arginase-2 is cooperatively up-regulated by nitric oxide and histone deacetylase inhibition in human umbilical artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Krause, Bernardo J; Hernandez, Cherie; Caniuguir, Andres; Vasquez-Devaud, Paola; Carrasco-Wong, Ivo; Uauy, Ricardo; Casanello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Arginase-2 counteracts endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in human endothelium, and its expression is negatively controlled by histone deacetylase (HDAC2). Conversely NO inhibits HDAC and previous studies suggest that arginase-2 is up-regulated by NO. We studied whether NO regulates arginase-2 expression in umbilical artery endothelial cells (HUAEC) increasing ARG2 promoter accessibility. HUAEC exposed to NOC-18 (NO donor, 1-100?M, 0-24h) showed an increase in arginase-2 but a decrease in eNOS mRNA levels in a time-dependent manner, with a maximal effect at 100?M (24h). Conversely NOS inhibition with L-NAME (100?M) reduced arginase-2 mRNA and protein levels, an effect reverted by co-incubation with NOC-18. Treatment with TSA paralleled the effects of NO on arginase-2 and eNOS at mRNA and protein levels, with maximal effect at 10?M. Co-incubation of NOC-18 (100?M) with a sub-maximal concentration of TSA (1?M) potentiated the increase in arginase-2 mRNA levels, whilst L-NAME prevented TSA-dependent arginase-2 induction. The effects on arginase-2 mRNA were paralleled by changes in chromatin accessibility, as well as increased levels of H3K9 and H4K12 acetylation, at ARG2 proximal (-579 to -367 and -280 to -73bp from TSS) and core (-121 to +126bp from TSS) promoter. Finally NO-dependent arginase-2 induction was prevented by pre-incubation for 10min with the cysteine blocker MMTS (10mM). These data showed for the first time that NO up-regulates arginase-2 expression in primary cultured human endothelial cells by an epigenetic-mediated mechanism increasing ARG2 promoter accessibility suggesting a negative regulatory loop for eNOS activity. PMID:26551598

  16. HDAC4 degradation mediates HDAC inhibition-induced protective effects against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ling; Zhuang, Shougang; Qin, Gang Jian; Zhao, Ting Cun

    2015-06-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression through remodeling of chromatin structures. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this event remain unknown. In this study, we sought to examine whether HDAC inhibition-mediated protective effects involved HDAC4 sumoylation, degradation, and the proteasome pathway. Isolated neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes (NMVM) and H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were subjected to 48 h of hypoxia (H) (1% O2 ) and 2 h of reoxygenation (R). Treatment of cardiomyocytes with trichostatin A (TSA) attenuated H/R-elicited injury, as indicated by a reduction of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, an increase in cell viability, and decrease in apoptotic positive cardiomyocytes. MG132, a potent proteasome pathway inhibitor, abrogated TSA-induced protective effects, which was associated with the accumulation of ubiquitinated HDAC4. NMVM transduced with adenoviral HDAC4 led to an exaggeration of H/R-induced injury. TSA treatment resulted in a decrease in HDAC4 in cardiomyocytes infected with adenoviral HDAC4, and HDAC4-induced injury was attenuated by TSA. HDAC inhibition resulted in a significant reduction in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyoblasts exposed to H/R, which was attenuated by blockade of the proteasome pathway. Cardiomyoblasts carrying wild type and sumoylation mutation (K559R) were established to examine effects of HDAC4 sumoylation and ubiquitination on H/R injury. Disruption of HDAC4 sumoylation brought about HDAC4 accumulation and impairment of HDAC4 ubiquitination in association with enhanced susceptibility of cardiomyoblasts to H/R. Taken together, these results demonstrated that HDAC inhibition stimulates proteasome dependent degradation of HDAC4, which is associated with HDAC4 sumoylation to induce these protective effects. PMID:25475100

  17. HDAC4 Degradation Mediates HDAC Inhibition-Induced Protective Effects Against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ling; Zhuang, Shougang; Qin, Gang Jian; Zhao, Ting Cun

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression through remodeling of chromatin structures. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this event remain unknown. In this study, we sought to examine whether HDAC inhibition-mediated protective effects involved HDAC4 sumoylation, degradation, and the proteasome pathway. Isolated neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes (NMVM) and H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were subjected to 48 h of hypoxia (H) (1% O2) and 2 h of reoxygenation (R). Treatment of cardiomyocytes with trichostatin A (TSA) attenuated H/R-elicited injury, as indicated by a reduction of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, an increase in cell viability, and decrease in apoptotic positive cardiomyocytes. MG132, a potent proteasome pathway inhibitor, abrogated TSA-induced protective effects, which was associated with the accumulation of ubiquitinated HDAC4.NMVMtransduced with adenoviral HDAC4 led to an exaggeration of H/R-induced injury. TSA treatment resulted in a decrease in HDAC4 in cardiomyocytes infected with adenoviral HDAC4, and HDAC4-induced injury was attenuated by TSA. HDAC inhibition resulted in a significant reduction in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyoblasts exposed to H/R, which was attenuated by blockade of the proteasome pathway. Cardiomyoblasts carrying wild type and sumoylation mutation (K559R) were established to examine effects of HDAC4 sumoylation and ubiquitination on H/R injury. Disruption of HDAC4 sumoylation brought about HDAC4 accumulation and impairment of HDAC4 ubiquitination in association with enhanced susceptibility of cardiomyoblasts to H/R. Taken together, these results demonstrated that HDAC inhibition stimulates proteasome dependent degradation of HDAC4, which is associated with HDAC4 sumoylation to induce these protective effects. PMID:25475100

  18. JDP2, a Repressor of AP-1, Recruits a Histone Deacetylase 3 Complex To Inhibit the Retinoic Acid-Induced Differentiation of F9 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunyuan; Li, Hongjie; Murata, Takehide; Sun, Kailai; Horikoshi, Masami; Chiu, Robert; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2002-01-01

    Up-regulation of the c-jun gene is a critical event in the retinoic acid (RA)-mediated differentiation of embryonal carcinoma F9 cells. Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) and p300 cooperate in the activation of transcription of the c-jun gene during the differentiation of F9 cells. We show here that the overexpression of Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a repressor of AP-1, inhibits the transactivation of the c-jun gene by ATF-2 and p300 by recruitment of the histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) complex, thereby repressing the RA-induced transcription of the c-jun gene and inhibiting the RA-mediated differentiation of F9 cells. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that the JDP2/HDAC3 complex, which binds to the differentiation response element within the c-jun promoter in undifferentiated F9 cells, was replaced by the p300 complex in response to RA, with an accompanying change in the histone acetylation status of the chromatin, the initiation of transcription of the c-jun gene, and the subsequent differentiation of F9 cells. These results suggest that JDP2 may be a key factor that controls the commitment of F9 cells to differentiation and shed new light on the mechanism by which an AP-1 repressor functions. PMID:12052888

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor MS-275 Exhibits Poor Brain Penetration: Pharmacokinetic Studies of [11C]MS-275 using Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, J.M.; Hooker, J.M.; Kim, S.W.; Alexoff, D.; Xu, Y.; Shea, C.; Reid, A.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.

    2009-10-01

    MS-275 (entinostat) is a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor currently in clinical trials for the treatment of several types of cancer. Recent reports have noted that MS-275 can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and cause region-specific changes in rodent brain histone acetylation. To characterize the pharmacokinetics and distribution of MS-275 in the brain using positron emission tomography (PET), we labeled the carbamate carbon of MS-275 with carbon-11. Using PET, we determined that [{sup 11}C]MS-275 has low uptake in brain tissue when administered intravenously to nonhuman primates. In rodent studies, we observed that pharmacokinetics and brain accumulation of [{sup 11}C]MS-275 were not changed by the coadministration of large doses of unlabeled MS-275. These results, which both highlight the poor brain penetration of MS-275, clearly suggest its limitation as a therapeutic agent for the central nervous system (CNS). Moreover, our study demonstrates the effectiveness of PET at providing brain pharmacokinetic data for HDAC inhibitors. These data are important not only for the development of new compounds for peripheral cancer treatment (where CNS exclusion is often advantageous) but also for the treatment of neurological disorders (where CNS penetration is critical).

  20. Neuronal developmental gene and miRNA signatures induced by histone deacetylase inhibitors in human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Meganathan, K; Jagtap, S; Srinivasan, S P; Wagh, V; Hescheler, J; Hengstler, J; Leist, M; Sachinidis, A

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) may be applied to develop human-relevant sensitive in vitro test systems for monitoring developmental toxicants. The aim of this study was to identify potential developmental toxicity mechanisms of the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC) valproic acid (VPA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and trichostatin A (TSA) relevant to the in vivo condition using a hESC model in combination with specific differentiation protocols and genome-wide gene expression and microRNA profiling. Analysis of the gene expression data showed that VPA repressed neural tube and dorsal forebrain (OTX2, ISL1, EMX2 and SOX10)-related transcripts. In addition, VPA upregulates axonogenesis and ventral forebrain-associated genes, such as SLIT1, SEMA3A, DLX2/4 and GAD2. HDACi-induced expression of miR-378 and knockdown of miR-378 increases the expression of OTX2 and EMX2, which supports our hypothesis that HDACi targets forebrain markers through miR-378. In conclusion, multilineage differentiation in vitro test system is very sensitive for monitoring molecular activities relevant to in vivo neuronal developmental toxicity. Moreover, miR-378 seems to repress the expression of the OTX2 and EMX2 and therefore could be a regulator of the development of neural tube and dorsal forebrain neurons. PMID:25950486

  1. Effect of histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid treatment on donor cell growth characteristics, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and handmade cloned bovine embryo production efficiency.

    PubMed

    Selokar, Naresh L; St John, Liz; Revay, Tamas; King, W Allan; Singla, Suresh K; Madan, Pavneesh

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we tested the effects of valproic acid (VPA), a known histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), on the growth characteristics, apoptosis, and cell cycle stages distribution of donor cells, as well as cloning efficiency, embryo development, and histone methylation. Our results showed that treatment of donor cells with VPA (2.5?mM, 5.0?mM, 7.5?mM, or 10?mM) for 24?h resulted in altered cell proliferation, extent of apoptosis and necrosis, and cell cycle stage distribution, whereas no changes in cell viability and chromosomal complements were observed. Measurement of relative gene expression using real-time PCR of a few developmentally important genes in treated donor cells showed decreased expression of HDAC1 and increased expression of BAX (p<0.05). No change in relative expression of HDAC2 and Bcl2 was noticed. Treatment of donor cells with VPA for 24?h before electrofusion significantly (p<0.05) increased the blastocyst formation rate of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos compared to the control embryos. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive nuclei in SCNT blastocysts derived from VPA-treated donor cells were significantly decreased compared to the control blastocysts (p<0.05). Immunolocalization studies revealed that the levels of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me3) were lower in VPA-treated donor cells derived cloned blastocysts than nontreated cloned embryos, and was at the level of in vitro fertilization (IVF) counterparts, although no effects of treatments were found in donor cells. Our study demonstrates that the use of VPA in SCNT has been beneficial for efficient reprogramming of donor cells. Its effect on histone methylation in cloned embryos correlates with their developmental potential and may be a useful epigenetic marker to predict the efficiency of SCNT. PMID:24180742

  2. Effects of downregulated HDAC6 expression on the proliferation of lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kamemura, Kazuo; Ito, Akihiro Shimazu, Tadahiro; Matsuyama, Akihisa; Maeda, Satoko; Yao, Tso-Pang; Horinouchi, Sueharu; Khochbin, Saadi; Yoshida, Minoru

    2008-09-12

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a multifunctional, cytosolic protein deacetylase that primarily acts on {alpha}-tubulin. Here we report that stable knockdown of HDAC6 expression causes a decrease in the steady-state level of receptor tyrosine kinases, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor {alpha}, in A549 lung cancer cells. The decreased levels of in EGFR in HDAC6-knockdown cells, which correlated with increased acetylation of microtubules, were due to increased turnover of EGFR protein. Despite the decrease in EGFR levels, A549 cells lacking functional HDAC6 appeared to grow normally, probably due to increased expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2. Indeed, HDAC6-knockdown cells were more sensitive than control cells to the MEK inhibitor U0126. These results suggest that HDAC6 inhibitors combined with inhibitors of growth factor signaling may be useful as cancer therapy.

  3. Glucocorticoids and histone deacetylase inhibitors cooperate to block the invasiveness of basal-like breast cancer cells through novel mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Law, ME; Corsino, PE; Jahn, SC; Davis, BJ; Chen, S; Patel, B; Pham, K; Lu, J; Sheppard, B; Nørgaard, P; Hong, J; Higgins, P; Kim, J-S; Luesch, H; Law, BK

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive cancers often express E-cadherin in cytoplasmic vesicles rather than on the plasma membrane and this may contribute to the invasive phenotype of these tumors. Therapeutic strategies are not currently available that restore the anti-invasive function of E-cadherin in cancers. MDA-MB-231 cells are a frequently used model of invasive triple-negative breast cancer, and these cells express low levels of E-cadherin that is mislocalized to cytoplasmic vesicles. MDA-MB-231 cell lines stably expressing wild-type E-cadherin or E-cadherin fused to glutathione S-transferase or green fluorescent protein were used as experimental systems to probe the mechanisms responsible for cytoplasmic E-cadherin localization in invasive cancers. Although E-cadherin expression partly reduced cell invasion in vitro, E-cadherin was largely localized to the cytoplasm and did not block the invasiveness of the corresponding orthotopic xenograft tumors. Further studies indicated that the glucocorticoid dexamethasone and the highly potent class I histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor largazole cooperated to induce E-cadherin localization to the plasma membrane in triple-negative breast cancers, and to suppress cellular invasion in vitro. Dexamethasone blocked the production of the cleaved form of the CDCP1 (that is, CUB domain-containing protein 1) protein (cCDCP1) previously implicated in the pro-invasive activities of CDCP1 by upregulating the serine protease inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. E-cadherin preferentially associated with cCDCP1 compared with the full-length form. In contrast, largazole did not influence CDCP1 cleavage, but increased the association of E-cadherin with ?-catenin. This effect on E-cadherin/?-catenin complexes was shared with the nonisoform selective HDAC inhibitors trichostatin A (TSA) and vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, SAHA), although largazole upregulated endogenous E-cadherin levels more strongly than TSA. These results demonstrate that glucocorticoids and HDAC inhibitors, both of which are currently in clinical use, cooperate to suppress the invasiveness of breast cancer cells through novel, complementary mechanisms that converge on E-cadherin. PMID:22543582

  4. Paracrine and Epigenetic Control of Trophectoderm Differentiation from Human Embryonic Stem Cells: The Role of Bone Morphogenic Protein 4 and Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Corinne; Mucko, Sara E.; Sanfilippo, Joseph S.; Lowry, Nathan C.; Desai, Mukund N.; Mangoubi, Rami S.; Leuba, Sanford H.; Sammak, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of paracrine and epigenetic control of trophectoderm (TE) differentiation is limited by available models of preimplantation human development. Simple, defined media for selective TE differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) were developed, enabling mechanistic studies of early placental development. Paracrine requirements of preimplantation human development were evaluated with hESCs by measuring lineage-specific transcription factor expression levels in single cells and morphological transformation in response to selected paracrine and epigenetic modulators. Bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) addition to feeder-free pluripotent stem cells on matrigel frequently formed CDX2-positive TE. However, BMP4 or activin A inhibition alone also produced a mix of mesoderm and extraembryonic endoderm under these conditions. Further, BMP4 failed to form TE from adherent hESC maintained in standard feeder-dependent monolayers. Given that the efficiency and selectivity of BMP4-induced TE depended on medium components, we developed a basal medium containing insulin and heparin. In this medium, BMP4 induction of TE was dose dependent and with activin A inhibition by SB431542 (SB), approached 100% of cells. This paracrine stimulation of pluripotent cells transformed colony morphology from a cuboidal to squamous epithelium quantitatively on day 3, and produced significant multinucleated syncytiotrophoblasts by day 8. Addition of trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, reduced HDAC3, histone H3K9 methylation, and slowed differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Modulators of BMP4- or HDAC-dependent signaling might adversely influence the timing and viability of early blastocyst developed in vitro. Since blastocyst development is synchronized to uterine receptivity, epigenetic regulators of TE differentiation might adversely affect implantation in vivo. PMID:21204619

  5. First-in-human, Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Phase I Study of Resminostat, an Oral Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Brunetto, André T.; Ang, Joo Ern; Lal, Rohit; Olmos, David; Molife, L. Rhoda; Kristeleit, Rebecca; Parker, Ann; Casamayor, Isabel; Olaleye, Muyibat; Mais, Anna; Hauns, Bernhard; Strobel, Vera; Hentsch, Bernd; de Bono, Johann S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This first-in-human dose-escalating trial investigated the safety, tolerability, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the novel histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor resminostat in patients with advanced solid tumors. Experimental Design Resminostat was administered orally once-daily on days 1-5 every 14 days at 5 dose levels between 100 mg and 800 mg. Safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics including histone acetylation and HDAC enzyme activity, and antitumor efficacy were assessed. Results Nineteen patients (median age 58 years, range 39-70) were treated. At 800 mg, 1 patient experienced grade 3 nausea and vomiting, grade 2 liver enzyme elevation, and grade 1 hypokalemia and thrombocytopenia; these were declared as a combined DLT. No other DLT was observed. Although an MTD was not reached and patients were safely dosed up to 800 mg, 3 of 7 patients treated with 800 mg underwent dose reductions after the DLT-defining period due to cumulative gastrointestinal toxicities and fatigue. All toxicities resolved following drug cessation. No grade 4 treatment-related adverse event was observed. The pharmacokinetic profile was dose-proportional with low inter-patient variability. Pharmacodynamic inhibition of HDAC enzyme was dose-dependent and reached 100% at doses ?400 mg. Eleven heavily pre-treated patients had stable disease and 1 patient with metastatic thymoma had a 27% reduction in target lesion dimensions. Conclusions Resminostat was safely administered with a dose-proportional pharmacokinetic profile, optimal on-target pharmacodynamic activity at dose levels ?400 mg and signs of antitumor efficacy. The recommended phase II dose is 600 mg once-daily on days 1-5 every 14 days. PMID:24065624

  6. Molecular Mechanism of the Cell Death Induced by the Histone Deacetylase Pan Inhibitor LBH589 (Panobinostat) in Wilms Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Jun, Lu; Gang, Li; Lan, Cao; Na-Na, Wang; Xiao-Juan, Du; Li-Chao, Sun; Wen-Li, Zhao; Pei-Fang, Xiao; He, Zhao; Guang-Hao, Su; Yan-Hong, Li; Yi-Ping, Li; Yun-Yun, Xu; Hui-Ting, Zhou; Yi, Wu; Mei-Fang, Jin; Lin, Liu; Jian, Ni; Shao-Yan, Hu; Xue-Ming, Zhu; Xing, Feng; Jian, Wang; Jian, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Background Wilms tumor (WT) is an embryonic kidney cancer, for which histone acetylation might be a therapeutic target. LBH589, a novel targeted agent, suppresses histone deacetylases in many tumors. This study investigated the antitumor activity of LBH589 in SK-NEP-1 and G401 cells. Methods SK-NEP-1 and G401 cell growth was assessed by CCK-8 and in nude mice experiments. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry detected apoptosis in cell culture. Gene expressions of LBH589-treated tumor cells were analyzed using an Arraystar Human LncRNA Array. The Multi Experiment View cluster software analyzed the expression data. Differentially expressed genes from the cluster analyses were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. Results LBH589 inhibited cell proliferation of SK-NEP-1 and G401 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V, TUNEL and Hochest 33342 staining analysis showed that LBH589-treated cells showed more apoptotic features compared with the control. LBH589 treatment inhibited the growth of SK-NEP-1 xenograft tumors in nude mice. Arraystar Human LncRNA Array analysis of genes and lncRNAs regulated by LBH589 identified 6653 mRNAs and 8135 lncRNAs in LBH589-treated SK-NEP-1 cells. The most enriched gene ontology terms were those involved in nucleosome assembly. KEGG pathway analysis identified cell cycle proteins, including CCNA2, CCNB2, CCND1, CCND2, CDK4, CDKN1B and HDAC2, etc. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified important upstream molecules: HIST2H3C, HIST1H4A, HIST1A, HIST1C, HIST1D, histone H1, histone H3, RPRM, HSP70 and MYC. Conclusions LBH589 treatment caused apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation of SK-NEP-1and G401 cells. LBH589 had a significant effect and few side effects on SK-NEP-1 xenograft tumors. Expression profiling, and GO, KEGG and IPA analyses identified new targets and a new “network” of genes responding to LBH589 treatment in SK-NEP-1 cells. RPRM, HSP70 and MYC may be important regulators during LBH589 treatment. Our results provide new clues to the proapoptotic mechanism of LBH589. PMID:26176219

  7. A novel small molecule hybrid of vorinostat and DACA displays anticancer activity against human hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer through dual inhibition of histone deacetylase and topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chia-Chun; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Chao, Shi-Wei; Liu, Shih-Ping; Hsu, Jui-Ling; Yang, Yu-Chen; Li, Tsia-Kun; Huang, Wei-Jan; Guh, Jih-Hwa

    2014-08-01

    Vorinostat, which is an extensively studied inhibitor against histone deacetylase (HDAC), shows limited clinical activity to solid tumors. WJ35435, a new hybrid of vorinostat and DACA (a topoisomerase inhibitor) potently inhibited HDAC activity (in particular HDAC1 and HDAC6) in kinase assay and cell-based examination. The anti-HDAC effect was confirmed by the induction of histone H3 acetylation and phosphorylation, ?-tubulin acetylation and ?-H2AX formation. WJ35435 showed better potency than vorinostat and DACA against PC-3 and DU-145, two human hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer (HRMPC) cell lines, but not benign prostate cells. WJ35435 at differential concentrations induced G1- or G2-phase arrest of the cell cycle in HRMPCs but not in benign prostate cells. WJ35435 induced the formation of topoisomerase I-DNA cleavable complexes but not type-II? or -II?. Topoisomerase activity assay confirmed the selective inhibition of topoisomerase I. WJ35435 induced profound DNA damage using comet tailing assay. WJ35435 was less effective than camptothecin and etoposide in inducing the phosphorylation and activation of Chk1, Chk2 and RPA32 which were crucial coordinators in DNA repair pathway, indicating a low DNA repair activity to WJ35435 action. Furthermore, WJ35435 showed an in vivo antitumor activity. A synergistic apoptosis (combination index=0.55) was obtained in combination between WJ35435 and MG-132 (a proteasome inhibitor). In summary, WJ35435 is a dual-targeted anticancer hybrid induces anti-HDAC and anti-topoisomerase I activities that cause DNA damage associated with a low DNA repair capability, and induce cell cycle arrest at G1- and G2-phase. Ultimately, WJ35435 inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis of HRMPCs. PMID:24915421

  8. Plants Release Precursors of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Suppress Growth of Competitors[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Venturelli, Sascha; Belz, Regina G.; Kämper, Andreas; Berger, Alexander; von Horn, Kyra; Wegner, André; Böcker, Alexander; Zabulon, Gérald; Barneche, Fredy; Lauer, Ulrich M.; Bitzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To secure their access to water, light, and nutrients, many plant species have developed allelopathic strategies to suppress competitors. To this end, they release into the rhizosphere phytotoxic substances that inhibit the germination and growth of neighbors. Despite the importance of allelopathy in shaping natural plant communities and for agricultural production, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that allelochemicals derived from the common class of cyclic hydroxamic acid root exudates directly affect the chromatin-modifying machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. These allelochemicals inhibit histone deacetylases both in vitro and in vivo and exert their activity through locus-specific alterations of histone acetylation and associated gene expression. Our multilevel analysis collectively shows how plant-plant interactions interfere with a fundamental cellular process, histone acetylation, by targeting an evolutionarily highly conserved class of enzymes. PMID:26530086

  9. New and emerging HDAC inhibitors for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    West, Alison C.; Johnstone, Ricky W.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic enzymes are often dysregulated in human tumors through mutation, altered expression, or inappropriate recruitment to certain loci. The identification of these enzymes and their partner proteins has driven the rapid development of small-molecule inhibitors that target the cancer epigenome. Herein, we discuss the influence of aberrantly regulated histone deacetylases (HDACs) in tumorigenesis. We examine HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) targeting class I, II, and IV HDACs that are currently under development for use as anticancer agents following the FDA approval of two HDACis, vorinostat and romidepsin. PMID:24382387

  10. Androgen receptor regulates nuclear trafficking and nuclear domain residency of corepressor HDAC7 in a ligand-dependent fashion

    SciTech Connect

    Karvonen, Ulla; Jaenne, Olli A.; Palvimo, Jorma J. . E-mail: jorma.palvimo@uku.fi

    2006-10-01

    In addition to chromosomal proteins, histone deacetylases (HDACs) target transcription factors in transcriptional repression. Here, we show that the class II HDAC family member HDAC7 is an efficient corepressor of the androgen receptor (AR). HDAC7 resided in the cytoplasm in the absence of AR or a cognate ligand, but hormone-occupancy of AR induced nuclear transfer of HDAC7. Nuclear colocalization pattern of AR and HDAC7 was dependent on the nature of the ligand. In the presence of testosterone, a portion of HDAC7 localized to pearl-like nuclear domains, whereas AR occupied with antagonistic ligands cyproterone acetate- or casodex (bicalutamide) recruited HDAC7 from these domains to colocalize with the receptor in speckles and nucleoplasm in a more complete fashion. Ectopic expression of PML-3 relieved the repressive effect of HDAC7 on AR function by sequestering HDAC7 to PML-3 domains. AR acetylation at Lys630/632/633 was not the target of HDAC7 repression, since repression of AR function was independent of these acetylation sites. Moreover, the deacetylase activity of HDAC7 was in part dispensable in the repression of AR function. In sum, our results identify HDAC7 as a novel AR corepressor whose subcellular and subnuclear compartmentalization can be regulated in an androgen-selective manner.

  11. Activating transcription factor 3 interferes with p21 activation in histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced growth inhibition of epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhen-Feng; Su, You-Ming; Wang, Cong-min; Yang, Rong-Ya

    2015-03-01

    Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity by HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) results in cancer cell growth inhibition, and HDACis have been revealed as potential anti-skin cancer agents. p21 is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and an essential regulator of growth inhibition. Recently, we reported that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) could significantly promote skin cancer cell growth. This study explored the relationship between ATF3 and HDACi-induced growth inhibition of epidermoid carcinoma cells. We found that trichostatin A (TSA) treatment inhibited cell growth in A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Simultaneously, p21 and ATF3 expression levels were upregulated and downregulated upon TSA stimulation, respectively. ATF3 overexpression promoted cell growth and downregulated p21 expression. In contrast, ATF3 depletion resulted in cell growth reduction and p21 transcriptional upregulation. More importantly, ATF3 overexpression partially antagonized TSA-induced growth inhibition and p21 activation. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATF3 acts as an essential negative regulator of TSA-induced cell growth inhibition through interfering with TSA-induced p21 activation. PMID:25371069

  12. Distinct Roles for Intestinal Epithelial Cell-Specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the Regulation of Murine Intestinal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gonneaud, Alexis; Turgeon, Naomie; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie; Rivard, Nathalie; Asselin, Claude

    2016-02-01

    The intestinal epithelium responds to and transmits signals from the microbiota and the mucosal immune system to insure intestinal homeostasis. These interactions are in part conveyed by epigenetic modifications, which respond to environmental changes. Protein acetylation is an epigenetic signal regulated by histone deacetylases, including Hdac1 and Hdac2. We have previously shown that villin-Cre-inducible intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions disturb intestinal homeostasis. To determine the role of Hdac1 and Hdac2 in the regulation of IEC function and the establishment of the dual knockout phenotype, we have generated villin-Cre murine models expressing one Hdac1 allele without Hdac2, or one Hdac2 allele without Hdac1. We have also investigated the effect of short-term deletion of both genes in naphtoflavone-inducible Ah-Cre and tamoxifen-inducible villin-Cre(ER) mice. Mice with one Hdac1 allele displayed normal tissue architecture, but increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In contrast, mice with one Hdac2 allele displayed intestinal architecture defects, increased proliferation, decreased goblet cell numbers as opposed to Paneth cells, increased immune cell infiltration associated with fibrosis, and increased sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis. In comparison to dual knockout mice, intermediary activation of Notch, mTOR, and Stat3 signaling pathways was observed. While villin-Cre(ER) Hdac1 and Hdac2 deletions led to an impaired epithelium and differentiation defects, Ah-Cre-mediated deletion resulted in blunted proliferation associated with the induction of a DNA damage response. Our results suggest that IEC determination and intestinal homeostasis are highly dependent on Hdac1 and Hdac2 activity levels, and that changes in the IEC acetylome may alter the mucosal environment. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 436-448, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26174178

  13. Inhibition of maize histone deacetylases by HC toxin, the host-selective toxin of Cochliobolus carbonum.

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, G; Ransom, R; Lechner, T; Walton, J D; Loidl, P

    1995-01-01

    HC toxin, the host-selective toxin of the maize pathogen Cochliobolus carbonum, inhibited maize histone deacetylase (HD) at 2 microM. Chlamydocin, a related cyclic tetrapeptide, also inhibited HD activity. The toxins did not affect histone acetyltransferases. After partial purification of histone deacetylases HD1-A, HD1-B, and HD2 from germinating maize embryos, we demonstrated that the different enzymes were similarly inhibited by the toxins. Inhibitory activities were reversibly eliminated by treating toxins with 2-mercaptoethanol, presumably by modifying the carbonyl group of the epoxide-containing amino acid Aeo (2-amino-9,10-epoxy-8-oxodecanoic acid). Kinetic studies revealed that inhibition of HD was of the uncompetitive type and reversible. HC toxin, in which the epoxide group had been hydrolyzed, completely lost its inhibitory activity; when the carbonyl group of Aeo had been reduced to the corresponding alcohol, the modified toxin was less active than native toxin. In vivo treatment of embryos with HC toxin caused the accumulation of highly acetylated histone H4 subspecies and elevated acetate incorporation into H4 in susceptible-genotype embryos but not in the resistant genotype. HDs from chicken and the myxomycete Physarum polycephalum were also inhibited, indicating that the host selectivity of HC toxin is not determined by its inhibitory effect on HD. Consistent with these results, we propose a model in which HC toxin promotes the establishment of pathogenic compatibility between C. carbonum and maize by interfering with reversible histone acetylation, which is implicated in the control of fundamental cellular processes, such as chromatin structure, cell cycle progression, and gene expression. PMID:8535144

  14. SAHA-based novel HDAC inhibitor design by core hopping method.

    PubMed

    Zang, Lan-Lan; Wang, Xue-Jiao; Li, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Shu-Qing; Xu, Wei-Ren; Xie, Xian-Bin; Cheng, Xian-Chao; Ma, Huan; Wang, Run-Ling

    2014-11-01

    The catalytic activity of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) is directly relevant to the pathogenesis of cancer, and HDAC inhibitors represented a promising strategy for cancer therapy. SAHA (suberoanilide hydroxamic acid), an effective HDAC inhibitor, is an anti-cancer agent against T-cell lymphoma. However, SAHA has adverse effects such as poor pharmacokinetic properties and severe toxicities in clinical use. In order to identify better HDAC inhibitors, a compound database was established by core hopping of SAHA, which was then docked into HDAC-8 (PDB ID: 1T69) active site to select a number of candidates with higher docking score and better interaction with catalytic zinc ion. Further ADMET prediction was done to give ten compounds. Molecular dynamics simulation of the representative compound 101 was performed to study the stability of HDAC8-inhibitor system. This work provided an approach to design novel high-efficiency HDAC inhibitors with better ADMET properties. PMID:25241128

  15. Synthesis of 1,2-benzisoxazole tethered 1,2,3-triazoles that exhibit anticancer activity in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines by inhibiting histone deacetylases, and inducing p21 and tubulin acetylation.

    PubMed

    Ashwini, Nanjundaswamy; Garg, Manoj; Mohan, Chakrabhavi Dhananjaya; Fuchs, Julian E; Rangappa, Shobith; Anusha, Sebastian; Swaroop, Toreshettahally Ramesh; Rakesh, Kodagahalli S; Kanojia, Deepika; Madan, Vikas; Bender, Andreas; Koeffler, H Phillip; Basappa; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S

    2015-09-15

    1,2,3-Triazole-based heterocycles have previously been shown to possess significant anticancer activity in various tumor models. In the present study, we attached a 1,2,3-triazole moiety to the third position of a 1,2-benzisoxazole heterocycle via copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) with various alkynes and established for the title compounds significant antiproliferative effect against human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Among the tested compounds, 3-(4-(4-phenoxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)benzo[d]isoxazole (PTB) was found to be the most potent antiproliferative agent with an IC50 of 2 ?M against MV4-11 cells using MTT assay. Notably, PTB induced cytotoxicity in MOLM13, MOLM14 and MV4-11 cells with selectivity over normal bone marrow cells (C57BL/6). Furthermore, PTB was found to induce cytotoxicity by increasing apoptosis of AML cells (MOLM13, MOLM14 and MV4-11) as well as sub-G1 cell population and apoptotic cells at submicromolar concentrations, as shown by flow cytometry and Annexin-V staining, respectively. On the protein level we suggested histone deacetylases (HDACs) as the potential protein target of those compounds in silico, and the predicted target was next experimentally validated by measuring the variations in the levels of p21, cyclin D and acetylation of histone H3 and tubulin. Molecular docking analysis of the title compounds with the second deacetylase domain of HDAC6 displayed high degree of shape complementarity to the binding site of the enzyme, forming multiple molecular interactions in the hydrophobic region as well as a hydrogen bond to the phenol side-chain of Tyr-782. Thus, 1,2,3-triazole derivatives appear to represent a class of novel, biologically active ligands against histone deacetylases which deserve to be further evaluated in their applications in the cancer field. PMID:26299825

  16. Histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment induces 'BRCAness' and synergistic lethality with PARP inhibitor and cisplatin against human triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ha, Kyungsoo; Fiskus, Warren; Choi, Dong Soon; Bhaskara, Srividya; Cerchietti, Leandro; Devaraj, Santhana G T; Shah, Bhavin; Sharma, Sunil; Chang, Jenny C; Melnick, Ari M; Hiebert, Scott; Bhalla, Kapil N

    2014-07-30

    There is an unmet need to develop new, more effective and safe therapies for the aggressive forms of triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs). While up to 20% of women under 50 years of age with TNBC harbor germline mutations in BRCA1, and these tumors are sensitive to treatment with poly(ADP) ribose polymerase inhibitors, a majority of TNBCs lack BRCA1 mutations or loss of expression. Findings presented here demonstrate that by attenuating the levels of DNA damage response and homologous recombination proteins, pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI) treatment induces 'BRCAness' and sensitizes TNBC cells lacking BRCA1 to lethal effects of PARP inhibitor or cisplatin. Treatment with HDI also induced hyperacetylation of nuclear hsp90. Similar effects were observed following shRNA-mediated depletion of HDAC3, confirming its role as the deacetylase for nuclear HSP90. Furthermore, cotreatment with HDI and ABT-888 induced significantly more DNA strand breaks than either agent alone, and synergistically induced apoptosis of TNBC cells. Notably, co-treatment with HDI and ABT-888 significantly reduced in vivo tumor growth and markedly improved the survival of mice bearing TNBC cell xenografts. These findings support the rationale to interrogate the clinical activity of this novel combination against human TNBC, irrespective of its expression of mutant BRCA1. PMID:25026298

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment induces ‘BRCAness’ and synergistic lethality with PARP inhibitor and cisplatin against human triple negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kyungsoo; Bhaskara, Srividya; Cerchietti, Leandro; Devaraj, Santhana G. T.; Shah, Bhavin; Sharma, Sunil; Chang, Jenny C.; Melnick, Ari M.; Hiebert, Scott; Bhalla, Kapil N.

    2014-01-01

    There is an unmet need to develop new, more effective and safe therapies for the aggressive forms of triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs). While up to 20% of women under 50 years of age with TNBC harbor germline mutations in BRCA1, and these tumors are sensitive to treatment with poly(ADP) ribose polymerase inhibitors, a majority of TNBCs lack BRCA1 mutations or loss of expression. Findings presented here demonstrate that by attenuating the levels of DNA damage response and homologous recombination proteins, pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI) treatment induces ‘BRCAness’ and sensitizes TNBC cells lacking BRCA1 to lethal effects of PARP inhibitor or cisplatin. Treatment with HDI also induced hyperacetylation of nuclear hsp90. Similar effects were observed following shRNA-mediated depletion of HDAC3, confirming its role as the deacetylase for nuclear HSP90. Furthermore, cotreatment with HDI and ABT-888 induced significantly more DNA strand breaks than either agent alone, and synergistically induced apoptosis of TNBC cells. Notably, co-treatment with HDI and ABT-888 significantly reduced in vivo tumor growth and markedly improved the survival of mice bearing TNBC cell xenografts. These findings support the rationale to interrogate the clinical activity of this novel combination against human TNBC, irrespective of its expression of mutant BRCA1. PMID:25026298

  18. MicroRNA-31 is a transcriptional target of histone deacetylase inhibitors and a regulator of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Cho, Joon-Ho; Dimri, Manjari; Dimri, Goberdhan P

    2015-04-17

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of tumorigenesis. Several miRNAs, which can function either as oncomiRs or tumor suppressive miRs are deregulated in cancer cells. The microRNA-31 (miR-31) has been shown to be overexpressed in metastatic breast cancer. It promotes multiple oncogenic phenotypes, including proliferation, motility, and invasion of cancer cells. Using a breast cancer-related miRNA array analysis, we identified miR-31 as a novel target of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) in breast cancer cells. Specifically, we show that sodium butyrate (NaB) and panobinostat (LBH589), two broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitors up-regulate hsa-miR-31 (miR-31). The up-regulation of miR-31 was accompanied by repression of the polycomb group (PcG) protein BMI1 and induction of cellular senescence. We further show that inhibition of miR-31 overcomes the senescence-inducing effect of HDACi, and restores expression of the PcG protein BMI1. Interestingly, BMI1 also acts as a repressor of miR-31 transcription, suggesting a cross-negative feedback loop between the expression of miR-31 and BMI1. Our data suggest that miR-31 is an important physiological target of HDACi, and that it is an important regulator of senescence relevant to cancer. These studies further suggest that manipulation of miR-31 expression can be used to modulate senescence-related pathological conditions such as cancer, and the aging process. PMID:25737447

  19. Gemcitabine resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines acquire an invasive phenotype with collateral hypersensitivity to histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Samulitis, Betty K; Pond, Kelvin W; Pond, Erika; Cress, Anne E; Patel, Hitendra; Wisner, Lee; Patel, Charmi; Dorr, Robert T; Landowski, Terry H

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine based treatment is currently a standard first line treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, however overall survival remains poor, and few options are available for patients that fail gemcitabine based therapy. To identify potential molecular targets in gemcitabine refractory pancreatic cancer, we developed a series of gemcitabine resistant (GR) cell lines. Initial drug exposure selected for an early resistant phenotype that was independent of drug metabolic pathways. Prolonged drug selection pressure after 16 weeks, led to an induction of cytidine deaminase (CDA) and enhanced drug detoxification. Cross resistance profiles demonstrate approximately 100-fold cross resistance to the pyrimidine nucleoside cytarabine, but no resistance to the same in class agents, azacytidine and decitabine. GR cell lines demonstrated a dose dependent collateral hypersensitivity to class I and II histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and decreased expression of 3 different global heterochromatin marks, as detected by H4K20me3, H3K9me3 and H3K27me3. Cell morphology of the drug resistant cell lines demonstrated a fibroblastic type appearance with loss of cell-cell junctions and an altered microarray expression pattern, using Gene Ontology (GO) annotation, consistent with progression to an invasive phenotype. Of particular note, the gemcitabine resistant cell lines displayed up to a 15 fold increase in invasive potential that directly correlates with the level of gemcitabine resistance. These findings suggest a mechanistic relationship between chemoresistance and metastatic potential in pancreatic carcinoma and provide evidence for molecular pathways that may be exploited to develop therapeutic strategies for refractory pancreatic cancer. PMID:25485960

  20. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitors induce growth arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation in sarcoma cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Di Pompo, Gemma; Salerno, Manuela; Rotili, Dante; Valente, Sergio; Zwergel, Clemens; Avnet, Sofia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Baldini, Nicola; Mai, Antonello

    2015-05-14

    Musculoskeletal sarcomas are aggressive malignancies of bone and soft tissues often affecting children and adolescents. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been proposed to counteract cancer stem cells (CSCs) in solid neoplasms. When tested in human osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and Ewing's sarcoma stem cells, the new HDACi MC1742 (1) and MC2625 (2) increased acetyl-H3 and acetyl-tubulin levels and inhibited CSC growth by apoptosis induction. At nontoxic doses, 1 promoted osteogenic differentiation. Further investigation with 1 will be done in preclinical sarcoma models. PMID:25905694

  1. Activity of MGCD290, a Hos2 histone deacetylase inhibitor, in combination with azole antifungals against opportunistic fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Messer, S A; Georgopapadakou, N; Martell, L A; Besterman, J M; Diekema, D J

    2009-12-01

    We report on the in vitro activity of the Hos2 fungal histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor MGCD290 (MethylGene, Inc.) in combination with azoles against azole-resistant yeasts and molds. Susceptibility testing was performed by the CLSI M27-A3 and M38-A2 broth microdilution methods. Testing of the combinations (MGCD290 in combination with fluconazole, posaconazole, or voriconazole) was performed by the checkerboard method. The fractional inhibitory concentrations were determined and were defined as <0.5 for synergy, >or=0.5 but <4 for indifference, and >or=4 for antagonism. Ninety-one isolates were tested, as follows: 30 Candida isolates, 10 Aspergillus isolates, 15 isolates of the Zygomycetes order, 10 Cryptococcus neoformans isolates, 8 Rhodotorula isolates, 8 Fusarium isolates, 5 Trichosporon isolates, and 5 Scedosporium isolates. MGCD290 showed modest activity when it was used alone (MICs, 1 to 8 microg/ml) and was mostly active against azole-resistant yeasts, but the MICs against molds were high (16 to >32 microg/ml). MGCD290 was synergistic with fluconazole against 55 (60%) of the 91 isolates, with posaconazole against 46 (51%) of the 91 isolates, and with voriconazole against 48 (53%) of the 91 isolates. Synergy between fluconazole and MGCD290 was observed against 26/30 (87%) Candida isolates. All 23 of the 91 Candida isolates that were not fluconazole susceptible demonstrated a reduced fluconazole MIC that crossed an interpretive breakpoint (e.g., resistant [MIC, >or=64 microg/ml] to susceptible [MIC, HDAC inhibitor-azole combinations is indicated. PMID:19794038

  2. Radiation-induced modulation of immunogenic genes in tumor cells is regulated by both histone deacetylases and DNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Cacan, Ercan; Greer, Susanna F; Garnett-Benson, Charlie

    2015-12-01

    Radiation treatment is a pivotal therapy for several cancer types, including colorectal cancer. It has been shown that sublethal doses of radiation modulate gene expression, making tumor cells more susceptible to T-cell-mediated immune attack. We have recently shown that low dose radiation enhances expression of multiple death receptors (Fas, DR4 and DR5) and co-stimulatory molecules (4-1BBL and OX-40L) in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells; however, it is unclear how ionizing radiation (IR) enhances expression of these molecules mechanistically. In the present study, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which radiation controls expression of these molecules in CRC. Here we report that, enhanced expression of these genes following radiation treatment of CRC cells is due, in part, to changes in DNA methylation and histone acetylation. We observed that radiation (5 Gy) significantly increased histone acetylation at the promoter regions of 4-1BBL, Fas and DR5 but not OX-40L. However, radiation did not induce changes in the global levels of acetylated histone H3 suggesting specificity of IR-induced changes. Furthermore, evaluation of epigenetic controlling enzymes revealed that IR did not alter overall cellular levels of HDACs (HDAC1, HDAC2 or HDAC3) or DNMTs (DNMT1, DNMT3a, or DNMT3b). Instead, radiation decreased binding of HDAC2 and HDAC3 at the promoter regions of Fas and 4-1BBL, respectively. Radiation also resulted in reduced DNMT1 at both the Fas and 4-1BBL promoter regions but not a control gene. We conclude that single dose radiation can influence the expression of immune response relevant genes in colorectal tumor cells by altering the binding of epigenetic enzymes, and modulating histone acetylation, at specific gene promoters. PMID:26458736

  3. The Role of Histone Deacetylases in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Small-Molecule Inhibitors as a Potential Therapeutic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürli, Roland W.; Thomas, Elizabeth; Beaumont, Vahri

    Neurodegenerative disorders are devastating for patients and their social environment. Their etiology is poorly understood and complex. As a result, there is clearly an urgent need for therapeutic agents that slow down disease progress and alleviate symptoms. In this respect, interference with expression and function of multiple gene products at the epigenetic level has offered much promise, and histone deacetylases play a crucial role in these processes. This review presents an overview of the biological pathways in which these enzymes are involved and illustrates the complex network of proteins that governs their activity. An overview of small molecules that interfere with histone deacetylase function is provided.

  4. Regulation of mouse-renin gene by apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease1 (APE1/Ref-1) via recruitment of histone deacetylase1corepressor complex

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Shiladitya; Chattopadhyay, Ranajoy; Mantha, Anil K.; Mitra, Sankar; Bhakat, Kishor K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease 1 (APE1) heterozygous mice have chronically elevated blood pressure. Renin of the renin–angiotensin (ANG) system for blood pressure maintenance regulates production of ANG II, a vasoactive hormone. Renin expression and secretion from kidney juxtaglomerular cells are regulated by intracellular calcium. Our objective in this study is to investigate APE1’s regulatory role in renin expression. Methods Effect of APE1 on calcium-mediated modulation of renin expression was examined by real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR, Western analysis and renin promoter-dependent luciferase activity in APE1-knockdown, APE1-overexpressing or control mouse kidney As4.1 cells. Furthermore, coimmunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were utilized to examine the association of APE1 with histone deacetylase (HDAC)1 corepressor complex and their recruitment to renin enhancer. Finally, kidney renin mRNA level and plasma– renin activity were measured in wild-type and APE1-heterozygous mice. Results Here we show that APE1 is involved in calcium mediated repression of renin gene. Our results further indicate that APE1 is a component of HDAC1 corepressor complex bound to renin-enhancer region. Increase in intracellular calcium ion concentration enhances the association of APE1 with HDAC1 corepressor complex and their recruitment to the enhancer region. Furthermore, APE1’s N-terminal region is critical for formation and recruitment of the enhancer-bound corepressor complex. Increased renin expression in kidneys and higher plasma–renin activity in APE1 heterozygous mice further supports APE1’s corepressor role in vivo. Conclusion This study uncovers APE1’s function as a novel negative regulator of renin expression, and thereby in blood pressure maintenance. PMID:22441348

  5. Synergistic induction of apoptosis and chemosensitization of human colorectal cancer cells by histone deacetylase inhibitor, scriptaid, and proteasome inhibitors: potential mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Abaza, M S I; Bahman, A M; Al-Attiyah, R J; Kollamparambil, A M

    2012-12-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) exhibit modest results as single agents in preclinical and clinical studies against solid tumors; they often fall short and activate nuclear factor kappa-B (NF?B). Co-administration of HDACI with proteasome inhibitors (PIs), which interrupt NF?B pathways, may enhance HDACI-lethality. The goal of this study was to determine whether PIs could potentiate HDACI, scriptaid (SCP)-mediated lethality, to unravel the associated mechanisms and to assess the effects of the combined inhibition of HDAC and proteasome on chemotherapy response in human colorectal cancer cells. Cancer cells were exposed to agents alone or in combination; cell growth inhibition was determined by MTT and colony formation assays. HDAC-, proteasome-, NF?B-activities, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified. Induction of apoptosis and cell cycle alterations were monitored by flow cytometry. Expression of cell cycle/apoptosis and cytoprotective/stress-related genes was determined by real-time qRT-PCR and EIA, respectively. Potentiation of cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapies by SCP/PIs was also evaluated. SCP and PIs: MG132, PI-1, or epoxomicin interact synergistically to potently inhibit cancer cell growth, alter cell cycle, induce apoptosis, reduce NF?B activity, and increase ROS generation. These events are associated with multiple perturbations in the expression of cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoprotective, and stress-related genes. Co-administration of SCP and PIs strikingly increases the chemosensitivity of cancer cells (122-2 × 10(5)-fold) in a drug and SCP/PIs-dependent manner. This combination regimen markedly reduced the doses of chemotherapies with potent anticancer effects and less toxicity. A strategy combining HDAC/proteasome inhibition with chemotherapies warrants further investigation in colorectal cancer. PMID:23011889

  6. Therapeutic Strategies to Enhance the Anticancer Efficacy of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Claudia P.; Singh, Melissa M.; Rivera-Del Valle, Nilsa; Manton, Christa A.; Chandra, Joya

    2011-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a posttranslational modification that plays a role in regulating gene expression. More recently, other nonhistone proteins have been identified to be acetylated which can regulate their function, stability, localization, or interaction with other molecules. Modulating acetylation with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) has been validated to have anticancer effects in preclinical and clinical cancer models. This has led to development and approval of the first HDACi, vorinostat, for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma. However, to date, targeting acetylation with HDACi as a monotherapy has shown modest activity against other cancers. To improve their efficacy, HDACi have been paired with other antitumor agents. Here, we discuss several combination therapies, highlighting various epigenetic drugs, ROS-generating agents, proteasome inhibitors, and DNA-damaging compounds that together may provide a therapeutic advantage over single-agent strategies. PMID:21765634

  7. Chronic stress and antidepressant induced changes in Hdac5 and Sirt2 affect synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Erburu, M; Muñoz-Cobo, I; Domínguez-Andrés, J; Beltran, E; Suzuki, T; Mai, A; Valente, S; Puerta, E; Tordera, R M

    2015-11-01

    Changes in histone acetylation could contribute to the pathogenesis of depression and antidepressant therapy. Using the chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) model of depression and different antidepressant treatments we studied the regulation of histone deacetylases (Hdac?s) and synaptic plasticity markers in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Further, functional implication of identified Hdac?s in brain plasticity was explored. Mice were exposed to CSDS (10 days) followed by saline or imipramine (4 weeks). PFC Hdac?s mRNA abundance was studied and compared to human?s. Further, protein expression of acetylated histones (AcH3 and AcH4), neuroplasticity markers (CREB and pro-BDNF) and selected Hdac?s were analyzed. Moreover, other antidepressants (fluoxetine and reboxetine) and selective HDAC inhibitors were studied. CSDS increased Hdac5 and Sirt2 mRNA whereas repeated imipramine did the opposite. Accordingly, stress and imipramine induced opposite changes on AcH3, AcH4 and CREB expression. At protein level, CSDS upregulated nuclear fraction of Hdac5 and repeated imipramine and reboxetine increased its phosphorylated form (p-Hdac5), mainly located in the cytoplasm. Moreover, Sirt2 was downregulated by all monoaminergic antidepressants. Further, repeated treatment with the class IIa Hdac inhibitor MC1568 and the Sirt2 inhibitor 33i for three weeks increased synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex. Our results suggest that Hdac5 and Sirt2 upregulation could constitute stable stress-induced neuronal adaptations. Noteworthy, the SIRT2 upregulation in depressed patients supports the interest of this target for therapeutic intervention. On the other hand, cytoplasmic Hdac5 export and Sirt2 downregulation induced by monoaminergic antidepressants could contribute to the well-known beneficial effects of antidepressants on brain plasticity. PMID:26433268

  8. Murine hematopoietic stem cell dormancy controlled by induction of a novel short form of PSF1 by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Han, Yinglu; Gong, Zhi-Yuan; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2015-06-10

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can survive long-term in a state of dormancy. Little is known about how histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) affect HSC kinetics. Here, we use trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, to enforce histone acetylation and show that this suppresses cell cycle entry by dormant HSCs. Previously, we found that haploinsufficiency of PSF1, a DNA replication factor, led to attenuation of the bone marrow (BM) HSC pool size and lack of acute proliferation after 5-FU ablation. Because PSF1 protein is present in CD34(+) transiently amplifying HSCs but not in CD34(-) long-term reconstituting-HSCs which are resting in a dormant state, we analyzed the relationship between dormancy and PSF1 expression, and how a histone deacetylase inhibitor affects this. We found that CD34(+) HSCs produce long functional PSF1 (PSF1a) but CD34(-) HSCs produce a shorter possibly non-functional PSF1 (PSF1b, c, dominantly PSF1c). Using PSF1a-overexpressing NIH-3T3 cells in which the endogenous PSF1 promoter is suppressed, we found that TSA treatment promotes production of the shorter form of PSF1 possibly by inducing recruitment of E2F family factors upstream of the PSF1 transcription start site. Our data document one mechanism by which histone deacetylase inhibitors affect the dormancy of HSCs by regulating the DNA replication factor PSF1. PMID:25933513

  9. Arabidopsis DNA methyltransferase AtDNMT2 associates with histone deacetylase AtHD2s activity

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yuan; Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 1391 Sandford Street, London, ON, Canada N5V4T3 ; Wu, Keqiang; Dhaubhadel, Sangeeta; An, Lizhe; Tian, Lining

    2010-05-28

    DNA methyltransferase2 (DNMT2) is always deemed to be enigmatic, because it contains highly conserved DNA methyltransferase motifs but lacks the DNA methylation catalytic capability. Here we show that Arabidopsis DNA methyltransferase2 (AtDNMT2) is localized in nucleus and associates with histone deacetylation. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down assays show AtDNMT2 interacts with type-2 histone deacetylases (AtHD2s), a unique type of histone deacetylase family in plants. Through analyzing the expression of AtDNMT2: ss-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion protein, we demonstrate that AtDNMT2 has the ability to repress gene expression at transcription level. Meanwhile, the expression of AtDNMT2 gene is altered in athd2c mutant plants. We propose that AtDNMT2 possibly involves in the activity of histone deacetylation and plant epigenetic regulatory network.

  10. Short-Chain Fatty Acids from Periodontal Pathogens Suppress Histone Deacetylases, EZH2, and SUV39H1 To Promote Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaolan; Shahir, Abdel-Malek; Sha, Jingfeng; Feng, Zhimin; Eapen, Betty; Nithianantham, Stanley; Das, Biswajit; Karn, Jonathan; Weinberg, Aaron; Bissada, Nabil F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Periodontal pathogens such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum produce five different short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as metabolic by-products. We detect significantly higher levels of SCFAs in the saliva of patients with severe periodontal disease. The different SCFAs stimulate lytic gene expression of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) dose dependently and synergistically. SCFAs inhibit class-1/2 histone deacetylases (HDACs) and downregulate expression of silent information regulator-1 (SIRT1). SCFAs also downregulate expression of enhancer of zeste homolog2 (EZH2) and suppressor of variegation 3-9 homolog1 (SUV39H1), which are two histone N-lysine methyltransferases (HLMTs). By suppressing the different components of host epigenetic regulatory machinery, SCFAs increase histone acetylation and decrease repressive histone trimethylations to transactivate the viral chromatin. These new findings provide mechanistic support that SCFAs from periodontal pathogens stimulate KSHV replication and infection in the oral cavity and are potential risk factors for development of oral Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). IMPORTANCE About 20% of KS patients develop KS lesions first in the oral cavity, while other patients never develop oral KS. It is not known if the oral microenvironment plays a role in oral KS tumor development. In this work, we demonstrate that a group of metabolic by-products, namely, short-chain fatty acids, from bacteria that cause periodontal disease promote lytic replication of KSHV, the etiological agent associated with KS. These new findings provide mechanistic support that periodontal pathogens create a unique microenvironment in the oral cavity that contributes to KSHV replication and development of oral KS. PMID:24501407

  11. Resveratrol induces human keratinocyte damage via the activation of class III histone deacetylase, Sirt1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Kim, Jin-Shang; Park, Sang-Youel; Lee, You-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Human skin diseases are various and induce chronic inflammatory disorders, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and certain forms of ichthyosis. Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by circumscribed, red, thickened plaques. Regulation of the balance between growth, differentiation and death is critical to keratinocytes; when altered, epidermal keratinocytes undergo hyperproliferation, abnormal differentiation and inflammatory infiltration. In the present study, we focused on the effects of resveratrol, found in red wine and peanuts, on the cell death of keratinocytes. We additionally studied the mechanism of resveratrol on Sirt1, a class III histone deacetylase, and Akt phosphorylation. Resveratrol caused apoptosis and increased Sirt1 expression in human HaCaT keratinocytes, following a decrease in the p62 protein level. Inhibition of Sirt1 by Sirt1 inhibitor restored cell viability and protein levels. Furthermore, we showed that resveratrol-induced Sirt1 blocked Akt phosphorylation. The present results indicated that resveratrol inhibited the Akt pathways by inducing Sirt1, thus leading to cell death. These data suggest that resveratrol-mediated activation of Sirt1 histone deacetylase may be a potential therapeutic target for skin diseases including psoriasis. PMID:26499368

  12. Histone deacetylases inhibitor trichostatin A modulates the extracellular release of APE1/Ref-1

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sunga; Lee, Yu Ran; Park, Myoung Soo; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Cho, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyo Shin; Kim, Cuk Seong; Park, Jin Bong; Irani, Kaikobad; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Trichostatin A (TSA) increased APE1/Ref-1 secretion in HEK293 cells. •Lysine-mutated APE1/Ref-1 (K6R/K7R) was not secreted by TSA. •TSA induced cytoplasmic translocation of APE1/Ref-1. •APE1/Ref-1 is a protein whose secretion is governed by lysine acetylation. -- Abstract: Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) can be acetylated via post-translational modification. We investigated the effect of an inhibitor of histone deacetylases on the extracellular release of APE1/Ref-1 in HEK293 cells. Trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, induced APE1/Ref-1 secretion without changing cell viability. In a fluorescence quantitative assay, the secreted APE1/Ref-1 was estimated to be about 10 ng/mL in response to TSA (1 ?M). However, TSA did not induce the secretion of lysine-mutated APE1/Ref-1 (K6R/K7R). TSA also caused nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of APE1/Ref-1. Taken together, these findings suggest that APE1/Ref-1 is a protein whose secretion is governed by lysine acetylation.

  13. Superior antimitogenic and chemosensitization activities of the combination treatment of the histone deacetylase inhibitor apicidin and proteasome inhibitors on human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abaza, Mohamed-Salah I; Bahman, Abdul-Majeed; Al-Attiyah, Raja'a

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of histone deacetylase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors and cytotoxic drugs on human cancers, none of these types of treatments by themselves has been sufficient to eradicate the disease. The combination of different modalities may hold enormous potential for eliciting therapeutic results. In the current study, we examined the effects of treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) apicidin (APC) in combination with proteasome inhibitors on human colorectal cancer cells. The molecular mechanisms of the combined treatments and their potential to sensitize colorectal cancer cells to chemotherapies were also investigated. Cancer cells were exposed to the agents alone and in combination, and cell growth inhibition was determined by MTT and colony formation assays. HDAC, proteasome and NF-?B activities as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) were monitored. Cell cycle perturbation and induction of apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. The expression of cell cycle/apoptosis- and cytoprotective/stress-related genes was determined by quantitative PCR and EIA, respectively. The potentiation of cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapies upon APC/PI combination treatment was also studied. The combination of APC and MG132, PI-1 or epoxomicin potently inhibited cancer cell growth, disrupted the cell cycle, induced apoptosis, decreased NF-?B activity and increased ROS production. These events were accompanied by the altered expression of genes associated with the cell cycle, apoptosis and cytoprotection/stress regulation. The combination treatment markedly enhanced the chemosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells (50-3.7 x 10(4)-fold) in a drug-, APC/PI combination- and colorectal cancer subtype-dependent manner. The results of this study have implications for the development of com-binatorial treatments that include HDACIs, PIs and conventional chemotherapeutic drugs, suggesting a potential therapeutic synergy with general applicability to various types of cancers. PMID:24146045

  14. MSH3 Mismatch Repair Protein Regulates Sensitivity to Cytotoxic Drugs and a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Myung; Huang, Shengbing; Tougeron, David; Sinicrope, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Background MSH3 is a DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene that undergoes frequent somatic mutation in colorectal cancers (CRCs) with MMR deficiency. MSH3, together with MSH2, forms the MutS? heteroduplex that interacts with interstrand cross-links induced by drugs such as cisplatin. To date, the impact of MSH3 on chemosensitivity is unknown. Methods We utilized isogenic HCT116 (MLH1?/MSH3?) cells where MLH1 is restored by transfer of chromosome 3 (HCT116+ch3) and also MSH3 by chromosome 5 (HCT116+3+5). We generated HCT116+3+5, SW480 (MLH1+/MSH3+) and SW48 (MLH1?/MSH3+) cells with shRNA knockdown of MSH3. Cells were treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), SN-38, oxaliplatin, or the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor PCI-24781 and cell viability, clonogenic survival, DNA damage and apoptosis were analyzed. Results MSH3-deficient vs proficient CRC cells showed increased sensitivity to the irinotecan metabolite SN-38 and to oxaliplatin, but not 5-FU, as shown in assays for apoptosis and clonogenic survival. In contrast, suppression of MLH1 attenuated the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU, but did not alter sensitivity to SN-38 or oxaliplatin. The impact of MSH3 knockdown on chemosensitivity to SN-38 and oxaliplatin was maintained independent of MLH1 status. In MSH3-deficient vs proficient cells, SN-38 and oxaliplatin induced higher levels of phosphorylated histone H2AX and Chk2, and similar results were found in MLH1-proficient SW480 cells. MSH3-deficient vs proficient cells showed increased 53BP1 nuclear foci after irradiation, suggesting that MSH3 can regulate DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. We then utilized PCI-24781 that interferes with homologous recombination (HR) indicated by a reduction in Rad51 expression. The addition of PCI-24781 to oxaliplatin enhanced cytotoxicity to a greater extent compared to either drug alone. Conclusion MSH3 status can regulate the DNA damage response and extent of apoptosis induced by chemotherapy. The ability of MSH3 to regulate chemosensitivity was independent of MLH1 status. PCI-24781-mediated impairment of HR enhanced oxaliplatin sensitivity, suggesting that reduced DSB repair capacity may be contributory. PMID:23724141

  15. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Synergize p300 Autoacetylation that Regulates Its Transactivation Activity and Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dongming; Jiang, Yubao; Sang, Nianli

    2015-01-01

    p300/cyclic AMP–responsive element binding protein–binding protein (CBP) are general coactivators for multiple transcription factors involved in various cellular processes. Several highly conserved domains of p300/CBP serve as interacting sites for transcription factors and regulatory proteins. Particularly, the intrinsic histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity and transactivation domains (TAD) play essential roles for their coactivating function. Autoacetylation of p300/CBP is commonly observed in cell-free HAT assays and has been implicated in the regulation of their HAT activity. Here, we show that six lysine-rich regions in several highly conserved functional domains of p300 are targeted by p300HAT for acetylation in cell-free systems. We show that p300 is susceptible to acetylation in cultured tumor cells and that its acetylation status is affected by histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. We further show that either treatment with deacetylase inhibitors or coexpression of Gal4-p300HAT, which alone has no transactivation activity, stimulates the activity of the COOH-terminal TAD of p300 (p300C-TAD). We have defined the minimal p300C-TAD and show that it is sufficient to respond to deacetylase inhibitors and is a substrate for p300HAT. Finally, we show that acetylated p300 possesses enhanced ability to interact with p53. Taken together, our data suggest that acetylation regulates p300C-TAD and that acetylation of p300/CBP may contribute to the dynamic regulation of their complex formation with various interacting partners. PMID:17332356

  16. HDAC6 Regulates Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Endocytic Trafficking and Degradation in Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Fan, Lucy X.; Zhou, Xia; Sweeney, William E.; Avner, Ellis D.; Li, Xiaogang

    2012-01-01

    We present for the first time that histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) regulates EGFR degradation and trafficking along microtubules in Pkd1 mutant renal epithelial cells. HDAC6, the microtubule-associated ?-tubulin deacetylase, demonstrates increased expression and activity in Pkd1 mutant mouse embryonic kidney cells. Targeting HDAC6 with a general HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin (TSA), or a specific HDAC6 inhibitor, tubacin, increased the acetylation of ?-tubulin and downregulated the expression of EGFR in Pkd1 mutant renal epithelial cells. HDAC6 was co-localized with EGF induced endocytic EGFR and endosomes, respectively. Inhibition of the activity of HDAC6 accelerated the trafficking of EGFR from early endosomes to late endosomes along the microtubules. Without EGF stimulation EGFR was randomly distributed while after stimulation with EGF for 30 min, EGFR was accumulated around ?-tubulin labeled microtubule bundles. These data suggested that the Pkd1 mutation induced upregulation of HDAC6 might act to slow the trafficking of EGFR from early endosomes to late endosomes along the microtubules for degradation through deacetylating ?-tubulin. In addition, inhibition of HDAC activity decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, the downstream target of EGFR axis, and normalized EGFR localization from apical to basolateral in Pkd1 knockout mouse kidneys. Thus, targeting HDAC6 to downregulate EGFR activity may provide a potential therapeutic approach to treat polycystic kidney disease. PMID:23152903

  17. Functional-genetic dissection of HDAC dependencies in mouse lymphoid and myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Geoffrey M; Mehdipour, Parinaz; Cluse, Leonie A; Falkenberg, Katrina J; Wang, Eric; Roth, Mareike; Santoro, Fabio; Vidacs, Eva; Stanley, Kym; House, Colin M; Rusche, James R; Vakoc, Christopher R; Zuber, Johannes; Minucci, Saverio; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2015-11-19

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACis) have demonstrated activity in hematological and solid malignancies. Vorinostat, romidepsin, belinostat, and panobinostat are Food and Drug Administration-approved for hematological malignancies and inhibit class II and/or class I HDACs, including HDAC1, 2, 3, and 6. We combined genetic and pharmacological approaches to investigate whether suppression of individual or multiple Hdacs phenocopied broad-acting HDACis in 3 genetically distinct leukemias and lymphomas. Individual Hdacs were depleted in murine acute myeloid leukemias (MLL-AF9;Nras(G12D); PML-RAR? acute promyelocytic leukemia [APL] cells) and Eµ-Myc lymphoma in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, Hdac3-depleted cells were selected against in competitive assays for all 3 tumor types. Decreased proliferation following Hdac3 knockdown was not prevented by BCL-2 overexpression, caspase inhibition, or knockout of Cdkn1a in Eµ-Myc lymphoma, and depletion of Hdac3 in vivo significantly reduced tumor burden. Interestingly, APL cells depleted of Hdac3 demonstrated a more differentiated phenotype. Consistent with these genetic studies, the HDAC3 inhibitor RGFP966 reduced proliferation of Eµ-Myc lymphoma and induced differentiation in APL. Genetic codepletion of Hdac1 with Hdac2 was pro-apoptotic in Eµ-Myc lymphoma in vitro and in vivo and was phenocopied by the HDAC1/2-specific agent RGFP233. This study demonstrates the importance of HDAC3 for the proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cells, suggesting that HDAC3-selective inhibitors could prove useful for the treatment of hematological malignancies. Moreover, our results demonstrate that codepletion of Hdac1 with Hdac2 mediates a robust pro-apoptotic response. Our integrated genetic and pharmacological approach provides important insights into the individual or combinations of HDACs that could be prioritized for targeting in a range of hematological malignancies. PMID:26447190

  18. HDAC2 Promotes eIF4E Sumoylation and Activates mRNA Translation Gene Specifically*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Vatsyayan, Jaya; Gao, Chenxi; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Hu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are best known as transcription corepressors through deacetylating histone tails. Here we show that HDAC2 is also involved in cap-dependent mRNA translation by promoting sumoylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), which is independent of its deacetylase activity. By stimulating eIF4E sumoylation, HDAC2 induces the formation of the active eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex and induces the protein synthesis of a subset of eIF4E-responsive genes that are essential for cell proliferation and preventing apoptosis. These data demonstrate that HDAC2 has an unexpected sumoylation-promoting activity and regulates cap-dependent mRNA translation. PMID:20421305

  19. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, attenuates postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Min; Liu, Wen-Xue; Sun, He-Liang; Chang, Yan-Qing; Yang, Jiao-Jiao; Ji, Mu-Huo; Yang, Jian-Jun; Feng, Chen-Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a recognized clinical entity characterized with cognitive deficits after anesthesia and surgery, especially in aged patients. Previous studies have shown that histone acetylation plays a key role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, its role in POCD remains to be determined. Here, we show that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, attenuates POCD in aging Mice. After exposed to the laparotomy, a surgical procedure involving an incision into abdominal walls to examine the abdominal organs, 16- but not 3-month old male C57BL/6 mice developed obvious cognitive impairments in the test of long-term contextual fear conditioning. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of SAHA at the dose of (20 ?g/2 ?l) 3 h before and daily after the laparotomy restored the laparotomy-induced reduction of hippocampal acetyl-H3 and acetyl-H4 levels and significantly attenuated the hippocampus-dependent long-term memory (LTM) impairments in 16-month old mice. SAHA also reduced the expression of cleaved caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-calcium/calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) pathway, and increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synapsin 1, and postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95). Taken together, our data suggest that the decrease of histone acetylation contributes to POCD and may serve as a target to improve the neurological outcome of POCD. PMID:26441515

  20. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, attenuates postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Min; Liu, Wen-Xue; Sun, He-Liang; Chang, Yan-Qing; Yang, Jiao-Jiao; Ji, Mu-Huo; Yang, Jian-Jun; Feng, Chen-Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a recognized clinical entity characterized with cognitive deficits after anesthesia and surgery, especially in aged patients. Previous studies have shown that histone acetylation plays a key role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, its role in POCD remains to be determined. Here, we show that suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, attenuates POCD in aging Mice. After exposed to the laparotomy, a surgical procedure involving an incision into abdominal walls to examine the abdominal organs, 16- but not 3-month old male C57BL/6 mice developed obvious cognitive impairments in the test of long-term contextual fear conditioning. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of SAHA at the dose of (20 ?g/2 ?l) 3 h before and daily after the laparotomy restored the laparotomy-induced reduction of hippocampal acetyl-H3 and acetyl-H4 levels and significantly attenuated the hippocampus-dependent long-term memory (LTM) impairments in 16-month old mice. SAHA also reduced the expression of cleaved caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-calcium/calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMKII) pathway, and increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synapsin 1, and postsynaptic density 95 (PSD95). Taken together, our data suggest that the decrease of histone acetylation contributes to POCD and may serve as a target to improve the neurological outcome of POCD. PMID:26441515

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibition rescues structural and functional brain deficits in a mouse model of Kabuki syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, Hans T.; Benjamin, Joel S.; Zhang, Li; Weissman, Jacqueline; Gerber, Elizabeth E.; Chen, Yi-Chun; Vaurio, Rebecca G.; Potter, Michelle C.; Hansen, Kasper D.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2015-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome is caused by haploinsufficiency for either of two genes that promote the opening of chromatin. If an imbalance between open and closed chromatin is central to the pathogenesis of Kabuki syndrome, agents that promote chromatin opening might have therapeutic potential. We have characterized a mouse model of Kabuki syndrome with a heterozygous deletion in the gene encoding the lysine-specific methyltransferase 2D (Kmt2d), leading to impairment of methyltransferase function. In vitro reporter alleles demonstrated a reduction in histone 4 acetylation and histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) activity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from Kmt2d+/?Geo mice. These activities were normalized in response to AR-42, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. In vivo, deficiency of H3K4me3 in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer of Kmt2d+/?Geo mice correlated with reduced neurogenesis and hippocampal memory defects. These abnormalities improved upon postnatal treatment with AR-42. Our work suggests that a reversible deficiency in postnatal neurogenesis underlies intellectual disability in Kabuki syndrome. PMID:25273096

  2. C2H2 zinc finger-SET histone methyltransferase is a plant-specific chromatin modifier

    E-print Network

    Citovsky, Vitaly

    C2H2 zinc finger-SET histone methyltransferase is a plant-specific chromatin modifier Alexander thaliana factors, a SWIRM domain polyamine oxidase protein, AtSWP1, and a plant-specific C2H2 zinc finger, a zinc finger protein (You et al., 2001) with still unknown function, histone deacetylases (HDAC), and Co

  3. The potential of histone deacetylase inhibitors in Niemann - Pick type C disease.

    PubMed

    Maceyka, Michael; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2013-12-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a fatal complex neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder caused by genetic mutations in the proteins NPC1 (95% of patients) or NPC2 that decrease intracellular cholesterol trafficking, resulting in accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and sphingolipids in lysosomal storage organelles. Unfortunately, treatment options for NPC disease are still very limited, although miglustat, which inhibits glucosylceramide synthase, thus limiting ganglioside accumulation, has been approved for treatment of NPC disease. Here we discuss advances in the understanding of NPC1 and its functions, and several new strategies for interfering with cholesterol and sphingolipid accumulation in NPC1-null mice. We also describe several recent studies demonstrating that histone deacetylase inhibitors may correct cholesterol-storage defects in human NPC1 mutant fibroblasts by increasing expression of the low-transport-activity NPC1 mutant protein. These studies may lead to development of new therapeutic approaches for treatment of NPC disease. PMID:23992240

  4. A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor augments tamoxifen-mediated attenuation of breast carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Restall, Christina; Doherty, Judy; Liu, Hong Bin; Genovese, Rosemary; Paiman, Lisa; Byron, Keith A; Anderson, Robin L; Dear, Anthony E

    2009-07-15

    Earlier we generated novel derivatives of the hydroxamate-based histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), Oxamflatin (Ox), which demonstrate considerable HDACi activity. Here the effects of one such derivative, Metacept-1 (MCT-1), alone or in combination with tamoxifen on mammary tumour growth have been assessed in a syngeneic orthotopic model. MCT-1 alone resulted in a trend towards inhibition of growth of 4T1.2 mammary tumours. Since the combination of MCT-1 and tamoxifen up-regulates estrogen receptor expression in 4T1.2 cells in vitro, we tested this combination and found a significant reduction in primary tumour growth over tamoxifen treatment alone. Taken together, these observations suggest that the novel HDACi MCT-1 may warrant further exploration in the treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast carcinoma, particularly when used in combination with conventional agents such as tamoxifen. PMID:19330834

  5. HISTONE DEACETYLASE6 Controls Gene Expression Patterning and DNA Methylation-Independent Euchromatic Silencing.

    PubMed

    Hristova, Emilija; Fal, Kateryna; Klemme, Laurin; Windels, David; Bucher, Etienne

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the role of chromatin regulators in patterning gene expression, we employed a unique epigenetically controlled and highly tissue-specific green fluorescent protein reporter line in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using a combination of forward and reverse genetic approaches on this line, we show here that distinct epigenetic regulators are involved in silencing the transgene in different tissues. The forward genetic screen led to the identification of a novel HISTONE DEACETYLASE6 (HDA6) mutant allele (epigenetic control1, hda6-8). This allele differs from the previously reported alleles, as it did not affect DNA methylation and only had a very modest effect on the release of transposable elements and other heterochromatic transcripts. Overall, our data shows that HDA6 has at least two clearly separable activities in different genomic regions. In addition, we present an unexpected role for HDA6 in the control of DNA methylation at CG dinucleotides. PMID:25918117

  6. Panobinostat, a pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor: rationale for and application to treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T; Grasse, L; Shah, J; Chandra, J

    2015-08-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) have emerged as novel therapeutic agents for cancer. Currently, four HDACis are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat various hematologic malignancies. Panobinostat (LBH-589, trade name Farydak®, developed and marketed by Novartis) is a potent pan-HDACi with demonstrated anticancer activities against multiple myeloma, a B-cell malignancy, at a low nanomolar range in preclinical settings, and in 2015 was granted FDA approval for the treatment of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma. Here, we review the development of HDACis, the unique features of panobinostat, and the rationale for developing panobinostat in a combination setting for the treatment of multiple myeloma. We also review the completed and ongoing clinical trials testing the efficacy of panobinostat in combination therapies and highlight future therapeutically relevant strategies. PMID:26380387

  7. Modulation of chromatin position and gene expression by HDAC4 interaction with nucleoporins

    PubMed Central

    Kehat, Izhak; Accornero, Federica; Aronow, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) can modulate chromatin architecture and transcriptional activity, thereby participating in the regulation of cellular responses such as cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. However, the target genes of class IIa HDACs that control inducible cardiac growth and the broader mechanisms whereby these deacetylases modulate locus-specific gene expression within chromatin remain a mystery. Here, we used genome-wide promoter occupancy analysis, expression profiling, and primary cell validation to identify direct class IIa HDAC4 targets in cardiomyocytes. Simultaneously, we identified nucleoporin155 (Nup155) as an HDAC4-interacting protein. Mechanistically, we show that HDAC4 modulated the association of identified target genes with nucleoporins through interaction with Nup155. Moreover, a truncated mutant of Nup155 that cannot bind HDAC4 suppressed HDAC4-induced gene expression patterns and chromatin–nucleoporin association, suggesting that Nup155-mediated localization was required for HDAC4’s effect on gene expression. We thus propose a novel mechanism of action for HDAC4, suggesting it can function to dynamically regulate gene expression through changes in chromatin–nucleoporin association. PMID:21464227

  8. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate KATP subunit transcription in HL-1 cardiomyocytes through effects on cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Naheed; Cohen, Devin C.; Sukumar, Gauthaman; Sissung, Tristan M.; Schooley, James F.; Haigney, Mark C.; Claycomb, William C.; Cox, Rachel T.; Dalgard, Clifton L.; Bates, Susan E.; Flagg, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) are under investigation for the treatment of a number of human health problems. HDIs have proven therapeutic value in refractory cases of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Electrocardiographic ST segment morphological changes associated with HDIs were observed during development. Because ST segment morphology is typically linked to changes in ATP sensitive potassium (KATP) channel activity, we tested the hypothesis that HDIs affect cardiac KATP channel subunit expression. Two different HDIs, romidepsin and trichostatin A, caused ~20-fold increase in SUR2 (Abcc9) subunit mRNA expression in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. The effect was specific for the SUR2 subunit as neither compound causes a marked change in SUR1 (Abcc8) expression. Moreover, the effect was cell specific as neither HDI markedly altered KATP subunit expression in MIN6 pancreatic ?-cells. We observe significant enrichment of the H3K9Ac histone mark specifically at the SUR2 promoter consistent with the conclusion that chromatin remodeling at this locus plays a role in increasing SUR2 gene expression. Unexpectedly, however, we also discovered that HDI-dependent depletion of cellular cholesterol is required for the observed effects on SUR2 expression. Taken together, the data in the present study demonstrate that KATP subunit expression can be epigenetically regulated in cardiomyocytes, defines a role for cholesterol homeostasis in mediating epigenetic regulation and suggests a potential molecular basis for the cardiac effects of the HDIs. PMID:26321954

  9. Polycomb- and REST-associated histone deacetylases are independent pathways toward a mature neuronal phenotype

    PubMed Central

    McGann, James C; Oyer, Jon A; Garg, Saurabh; Yao, Huilan; Liu, Jun; Feng, Xin; Liao, Lujian; Yates, John R; Mandel, Gail

    2014-01-01

    The bivalent hypothesis posits that genes encoding developmental regulators required for early lineage decisions are poised in stem/progenitor cells by the balance between a repressor histone modification (H3K27me3), mediated by the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2), and an activator modification (H3K4me3). In this study, we test whether this mechanism applies equally to genes that are not required until terminal differentiation. We focus on the RE1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST) because it is expressed highly in stem cells and is an established global repressor of terminal neuronal genes. Elucidation of the REST complex, and comparison of chromatin marks and gene expression levels in control and REST-deficient stem cells, shows that REST target genes are poised by a mechanism independent of Polycomb, even at promoters which bear the H3K27me3 mark. Specifically, genes under REST control are actively repressed in stem cells by a balance of the H3K4me3 mark and a repressor complex that relies on histone deacetylase activity. Thus, chromatin distinctions between pro-neural and terminal neuronal genes are established at the embryonic stem cell stage by two parallel, but distinct, repressor pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04235.001 PMID:25250711

  10. Class I HDAC Inhibition Stimulates Cardiac Protein SUMOylation Through a Post-Translational Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Blakeslee, Weston W.; Wysoczynski, Christina L.; Fritz, Kristofer S.; Nyborg, Jennifer K.; Churchill, Mair E. A.; McKinsey, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Lysine residues are subject to a multitude of reversible post-translational modifications, including acetylation and SUMOylation. In the heart, enhancement of lysine acetylation or SUMOylation using histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors or SUMO-1 gene transfer, respectively, has been shown to be cardioprotective. Here, we addressed whether there is crosstalk between lysine acetylation and SUMOylation in the heart. Treatment of cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts with pharmacological inhibitors of HDAC catalytic activity robustly increased conjugation of SUMO-1, but not SUMO-2/3, to several high molecular weight proteins in both cell types. Use of a battery of selective HDAC inhibitors and short hairpin RNAs demonstrated that HDAC2, which is a class I HDAC, is the primary HDAC isoform that controls cardiac protein SUMOylation. HDAC inhibitors stimulated protein SUMOylation in the absence of de novo gene transcription or protein synthesis, revealing a post-translational mechanism of HDAC inhibitor action. HDAC inhibition did not suppress the activity of de-SUMOylating enzymes, suggesting that increased protein SUMOylation in HDAC inhibitor-treated cells is due to stimulation of SUMO-1 conjugation rather than blockade of SUMO-1 cleavage. Consistent with this, multiple components of the SUMO conjugation machinery were capable of being acetylated in vitro. These findings reveal a novel role for reversible lysine acetylation in the control of SUMOylation in the heart, and suggest that cardioprotective actions of HDAC inhibitors are in part due to stimulation of protein SUMO-1-ylation in myocytes and fibroblasts. PMID:25220405

  11. Selective Activity of the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor AR-42 against Leukemia Stem Cells: A Novel Potential Strategy in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Monica L.; Yang, Neng; Sharma, Krishan K.; Balys, Marlene; Corbett, Cheryl A.; Jordan, Craig T.; Becker, Michael W.; Steidl, Ulrich; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Levine, Ross L.; Marcucci, Guido; Roboz, Gail J.; Hassane, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Most patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) relapse and die of their disease. Increasing evidence indicates that AML relapse is driven by the inability to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSC). Thus, it is imperative to identify novel therapies that can ablate LSCs. Using an in silico gene expression-based screen for compounds evoking transcriptional effects similar to the previously described anti-LSC agent parthenolide, we identified AR-42 (OSU-HDAC42), a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor that is structurally similar to phenylbutyrate, but with improved activity at submicromolar concentrations. Here, we report that AR-42 induces NF-?B inhibition, disrupts the ability of Hsp90 to stabilize its oncogenic clients, and causes potent and specific cell death of LSCs but not normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Unlike parthenolide, the caspasedependent apoptosis caused by AR-42 occurs without activation of Nrf-2-driven cytoprotective pathways. As AR-42 is already being tested in early clinical trials, we expect that our results can be extended to the clinic. PMID:24934933

  12. The conserved histone deacetylase Rpd3 and its DNA binding subunit Ume6 control dynamic transcript architecture during mitotic growth and meiotic development

    PubMed Central

    Lardenois, Aurélie; Stuparevic, Igor; Liu, Yuchen; Law, Michael J.; Becker, Emmanuelle; Smagulova, Fatima; Waern, Karl; Guilleux, Marie-Hélène; Horecka, Joe; Chu, Angela; Kervarrec, Christine; Strich, Randy; Snyder, Mike; Davis, Ronald W.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Primig, Michael

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that the sizes of many mRNAs change when budding yeast cells exit mitosis and enter the meiotic differentiation pathway. These differences were attributed to length variations of their untranslated regions. The function of UTRs in protein translation is well established. However, the mechanism controlling the expression of distinct transcript isoforms during mitotic growth and meiotic development is unknown. In this study, we order developmentally regulated transcript isoforms according to their expression at specific stages during meiosis and gametogenesis, as compared to vegetative growth and starvation. We employ regulatory motif prediction, in vivo protein-DNA binding assays, genetic analyses and monitoring of epigenetic amino acid modification patterns to identify a novel role for Rpd3 and Ume6, two components of a histone deacetylase complex already known to repress early meiosis-specific genes in dividing cells, in mitotic repression of meiosis-specific transcript isoforms. Our findings classify developmental stage-specific early, middle and late meiotic transcript isoforms, and they point to a novel HDAC-dependent control mechanism for flexible transcript architecture during cell growth and differentiation. Since Rpd3 is highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed in many tissues, our results are likely relevant for development and disease in higher eukaryotes. PMID:25477386

  13. Inhibition of histone deacetylase overcomes rapamycin-mediated resistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by inhibiting Akt signaling through mTORC2

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mamta; Ansell, Stephen M.; Novak, Anne J.; Kumar, Shaji; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2009-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has emerged as an important therapeutic target for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), as recent studies have demonstrated that 30% of relapsed patients respond to mTOR inhibitors. Why some lymphomas are resistant is incompletely understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that rapamycin inhibits mTORC1 in DLBCL lines and primary tumors but is minimally cytotoxic. Subsequent investigations revealed that rapamycin also activated eIF4E and the mTORC2 target Akt, suggesting a potential mechanism of rapamycin resistance. Furthermore, knockdown of the mTORC2 component rictor, but not the mTORC1 component raptor, inhibited rapamycin-induced Akt phosphorylation in lymphoma cells. Addition of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI) LBH589 (LBH) overcame rapamycin resistance by blocking mTOR, thus preventing Akt activation. Further studies support the involvement of the protein phosphatase PP1 in LBH-mediated Akt dephosphorylation, which could be mimicked by knockdown of HDAC3. This is the first demonstration that a HDI such as LBH can overcome rapamycin resistance through a phosphatase that antagonizes mTORC2 activation. These results provide a mechanistic rationale for a clinical trial of a combination of HDI and mTOR inhibitors for DLBCL. PMID:19641186

  14. Profiling the anti-protozoal activity of anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors against Plasmodium and Trypanosoma parasites

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jessica A.; Jones, Amy J.; Avery, Vicky M.; Sumanadasa, Subathdrage D.M.; Ng, Susanna S.; Fairlie, David P.; Adams, Tina S.; Andrews, Katherine T.

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes work together with histone acetyltransferases (HATs) to reversibly acetylate both histone and non-histone proteins. As a result, these enzymes are involved in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression as well as other important cellular processes. HDACs are validated drug targets for some types of cancer, with four HDAC inhibitors clinically approved. However, they are also showing promise as novel drug targets for other indications, including malaria and other parasitic diseases. In this study the in vitro activity of four anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors was examined against parasites that cause malaria and trypanosomiasis. Three of these inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat®), romidepsin (Istodax®) and belinostat (Beleodaq®), are clinically approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma, while the fourth, panobinostat, has recently been approved for combination therapy use in certain patients with multiple myeloma. All HDAC inhibitors were found to inhibit the growth of asexual-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in the nanomolar range (IC50 10–200 nM), while only romidepsin was active at sub-?M concentrations against bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei parasites (IC50 35 nM). The compounds were found to have some selectivity for malaria parasites compared with mammalian cells, but were not selective for trypanosome parasites versus mammalian cells. All compounds caused hyperacetylation of histone and non-histone proteins in P. falciparum asexual stage parasites and inhibited deacetylase activity in P. falciparum nuclear extracts in addition to recombinant PfHDAC1 activity. P. falciparum histone hyperacetylation data indicate that HDAC inhibitors may differentially affect the acetylation profiles of histone H3 and H4. PMID:26199860

  15. Profiling the anti-protozoal activity of anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors against Plasmodium and Trypanosoma parasites.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jessica A; Jones, Amy J; Avery, Vicky M; Sumanadasa, Subathdrage D M; Ng, Susanna S; Fairlie, David P; Adams, Tina S; Andrews, Katherine T

    2015-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes work together with histone acetyltransferases (HATs) to reversibly acetylate both histone and non-histone proteins. As a result, these enzymes are involved in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression as well as other important cellular processes. HDACs are validated drug targets for some types of cancer, with four HDAC inhibitors clinically approved. However, they are also showing promise as novel drug targets for other indications, including malaria and other parasitic diseases. In this study the in vitro activity of four anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors was examined against parasites that cause malaria and trypanosomiasis. Three of these inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat(®)), romidepsin (Istodax(®)) and belinostat (Beleodaq(®)), are clinically approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma, while the fourth, panobinostat, has recently been approved for combination therapy use in certain patients with multiple myeloma. All HDAC inhibitors were found to inhibit the growth of asexual-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in the nanomolar range (IC50 10-200 nM), while only romidepsin was active at sub-?M concentrations against bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei parasites (IC50 35 nM). The compounds were found to have some selectivity for malaria parasites compared with mammalian cells, but were not selective for trypanosome parasites versus mammalian cells. All compounds caused hyperacetylation of histone and non-histone proteins in P. falciparum asexual stage parasites and inhibited deacetylase activity in P. falciparum nuclear extracts in addition to recombinant PfHDAC1 activity. P. falciparum histone hyperacetylation data indicate that HDAC inhibitors may differentially affect the acetylation profiles of histone H3 and H4. PMID:26199860

  16. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Masaya; Sakamoto, Jun; Miura, Tetsuji; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2007-03-01

    Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) is an NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase that contributes to longevity in yeast. SIRT1, a mammalian Sir2 ortholog, deacetylates histones and various transcription factors, including p53, FOXO proteins, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma. We found that its subcellular localization varied in different tissues of the adult mouse. Some subsets of neurons predominantly expressed SIRT1 in the cytoplasm, but ependymal cells expressed it in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. On the other hand, spermatocytes expressed SIRT1 only in the nucleus. Cardiomyocytes in the day 12.5 mouse embryo expressed SIRT1 exclusively in the nucleus, but in the adult heart, they expressed it in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. C2C12 myoblast cells expressed SIRT1 in the nucleus, but it localized to the cytoplasm after differentiation. LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-hydroxykinase, strongly inhibited the nuclear localization of SIRT1 in undifferentiated C2C12 cells. In a heterokaryon assay, SIRT1 shuttled between the nucleus and cytoplasm, and leptomycin B, an inhibitor of CRM1-mediated nuclear exportation, inhibited this shuttling. Two nuclear localization signals and two nuclear export signals were identified by deletion and site-directed mutation analyses. Overexpressed nuclear (but not cytoplasmic or dominant-negative) SIRT1 enhanced the deacetylation of histone H3 in C2C12 cells. Moreover, only the nuclear form suppressed the apoptosis of C2C12 cells induced by antimycin A, an oxidative stressor. These findings indicate that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling is a novel regulatory mechanism of SIRT1, which may participate in differentiation and in inhibition of cell death. PMID:17197703

  17. HDAC8 and STAT3 repress BMF gene activity in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Y; Nian, H; Rajendran, P; Kim, E; Dashwood, W M; Pinto, J T; Boardman, L A; Thibodeau, S N; Limburg, P J; Löhr, C V; Bisson, W H; Williams, D E; Ho, E; Dashwood, R H

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are undergoing clinical trials as anticancer agents, but some exhibit resistance mechanisms linked to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 functions, such as BH3-only protein silencing. HDAC inhibitors that reactivate BH3-only family members might offer an improved therapeutic approach. We show here that a novel seleno-?-keto acid triggers global histone acetylation in human colon cancer cells and activates apoptosis in a p21-independent manner. Profiling of multiple survival factors identified a critical role for the BH3-only member Bcl-2-modifying factor (Bmf). On the corresponding BMF gene promoter, loss of HDAC8 was associated with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/specificity protein 3 (Sp3) transcription factor exchange and recruitment of p300. Treatment with a p300 inhibitor or transient overexpression of exogenous HDAC8 interfered with BMF induction, whereas RNAi-mediated silencing of STAT3 activated the target gene. This is the first report to identify a direct target gene of HDAC8 repression, namely, BMF. Interestingly, the repressive role of HDAC8 could be uncoupled from HDAC1 to trigger Bmf-mediated apoptosis. These findings have implications for the development of HDAC8-selective inhibitors as therapeutic agents, beyond the reported involvement of HDAC8 in childhood malignancy. PMID:25321483

  18. HDAC8 and STAT3 repress BMF gene activity in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y; Nian, H; Rajendran, P; Kim, E; Dashwood, W M; Pinto, J T; Boardman, L A; Thibodeau, S N; Limburg, P J; Löhr, C V; Bisson, W H; Williams, D E; Ho, E; Dashwood, R H

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are undergoing clinical trials as anticancer agents, but some exhibit resistance mechanisms linked to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 functions, such as BH3-only protein silencing. HDAC inhibitors that reactivate BH3-only family members might offer an improved therapeutic approach. We show here that a novel seleno-?-keto acid triggers global histone acetylation in human colon cancer cells and activates apoptosis in a p21-independent manner. Profiling of multiple survival factors identified a critical role for the BH3-only member Bcl-2-modifying factor (Bmf). On the corresponding BMF gene promoter, loss of HDAC8 was associated with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/specificity protein 3 (Sp3) transcription factor exchange and recruitment of p300. Treatment with a p300 inhibitor or transient overexpression of exogenous HDAC8 interfered with BMF induction, whereas RNAi-mediated silencing of STAT3 activated the target gene. This is the first report to identify a direct target gene of HDAC8 repression, namely, BMF. Interestingly, the repressive role of HDAC8 could be uncoupled from HDAC1 to trigger Bmf-mediated apoptosis. These findings have implications for the development of HDAC8-selective inhibitors as therapeutic agents, beyond the reported involvement of HDAC8 in childhood malignancy. PMID:25321483

  19. HDAC Inhibitors as Novel Anti-Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Cristabelle; Chatterji, Biswa Prasun

    2015-01-01

    Malignant growth of cells is a condition characterized by unchecked cellular proliferation, genetic instability and epigenetic dysregulation. Up-regulated HDAC (Histone Deacetylase) enzyme activity is associated with a closed chromatin assembly and subsequent gene repression, forming a characteristic feature of malignantly transformed cells. Novel therapeutics are now targeting the zinc containing HDAC enzymes for treating various types of cancers. Recently, a spate of drugs acting via HDAC inhibition have been undergoing clinical trials and several patents present exciting molecules like PCI-24781 (Abexinostat), ITF- 2357 (Givinostat); MS-275 (Entinostat), MGCD 0103 (Mocetinostat), LBH-589 (Panobinostat), FK228 (Romidepsin), PXD-101 (Belinostat) and Valproic Acid to be used as alternatives or adjuvants to traditional chemotherapeutics. However, only three HDAC inhibitors have acquired FDA approval till date. Recently, PXD-101 obtained FDA approval for the treatment of Refractory or Relapsed Peripheral T cell lymphoma. The current article reviews patents that have introduced novel molecules that are HDAC isoform specific, superior to first generation HDAC inhibitors like SAHA (Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid) and TSA (Trichostatin A) and can be modified structurally to reduce toxic side effects and increase specificity. These molecules can combine the best characteristics of an ideal HDAC inhibiting drug either as monotherapy or in combinatorial therapy for cancer treatment thus, indicating promise to be included in the next generation of target specific HDAC inhibiting drugs. PMID:25782916

  20. New HDAC6-mediated deacetylation sites of tubulin in the mouse brain identified by quantitative mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Xiong, Yun; Li, Shanshan; Ren, Yiran; He, Qianqian; Gao, Siqi; Zhou, Jun; Shui, Wenqing

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring on microtubules have been implicated in the regulation of microtubule properties and functions. Acetylated K40 of ?-tubulin, a hallmark of long-lived stable microtubules, is known to be negatively controlled by histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). However, the vital roles of HDAC6 in microtubule-related processes such as cell motility and cell division cannot be fully explained by the only known target site on tubulin. Here, we attempt to comprehensively map lysine acetylation sites on tubulin purified from mouse brain tissues. Furthermore, mass spectrometry-based quantitative comparison of acetylated peptides from wild-type vs HDAC6 knockout mice allowed us to identify six new deacetylation sites possibly mediated by HDAC6. Thus, adding new sites to the repertoire of HDAC6-mediated tubulin deacetylation events would further our understanding of the multi-faceted roles of HDAC6 in regulating microtubule stability and cellular functions. PMID:26581825

  1. Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid promotes the differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuki; Iwao, Takahiro; Yoshihashi, Sachimi; Mimori, Kayo; Ogihara, Ruri; Nagata, Kiyoshi; Kurose, Kouichi; Saito, Masayoshi; Niwa, Takuro; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Miyata, Naoki; Ohmori, Shigeru; Nakamura, Katsunori; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects and mechanism of action of valproic acid on hepatic differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells. Human induced pluripotent stem cells were differentiated into endodermal cells in the presence of activin A and then into hepatic progenitor cells using dimethyl sulfoxide. Hepatic progenitor cells were matured in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor, oncostatin M, and dexamethasone with valproic acid that was added during the maturation process. After 25 days of differentiation, cells expressed hepatic marker genes and drug-metabolizing enzymes and exhibited drug-metabolizing enzyme activities. These expression levels and activities were increased by treatment with valproic acid, the timing and duration of which were important parameters to promote differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells into hepatocytes. Valproic acid inhibited histone deacetylase activity during differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells, and other histone deacetylase inhibitors also enhanced differentiation into hepatocytes. In conclusion, histone deacetylase inhibitors such as valproic acid can be used to promote hepatic differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells. PMID:25084468

  2. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid Promotes the Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells into Hepatocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Yuki; Iwao, Takahiro; Yoshihashi, Sachimi; Mimori, Kayo; Ogihara, Ruri; Nagata, Kiyoshi; Kurose, Kouichi; Saito, Masayoshi; Niwa, Takuro; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Miyata, Naoki; Ohmori, Shigeru; Nakamura, Katsunori; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects and mechanism of action of valproic acid on hepatic differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells. Human induced pluripotent stem cells were differentiated into endodermal cells in the presence of activin A and then into hepatic progenitor cells using dimethyl sulfoxide. Hepatic progenitor cells were matured in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor, oncostatin M, and dexamethasone with valproic acid that was added during the maturation process. After 25 days of differentiation, cells expressed hepatic marker genes and drug-metabolizing enzymes and exhibited drug-metabolizing enzyme activities. These expression levels and activities were increased by treatment with valproic acid, the timing and duration of which were important parameters to promote differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells into hepatocytes. Valproic acid inhibited histone deacetylase activity during differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells, and other histone deacetylase inhibitors also enhanced differentiation into hepatocytes. In conclusion, histone deacetylase inhibitors such as valproic acid can be used to promote hepatic differentiation from human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells. PMID:25084468

  3. Energy Metabolism in H460 Lung Cancer Cells: Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Amoêdo, Nívea Dias; Rodrigues, Mariana Figueiredo; Pezzuto, Paula; Galina, Antonio; da Costa, Rodrigo Madeiro; de Almeida, Fábio Ceneviva Lacerda; El-Bacha, Tatiana; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumor cells are characterized by accelerated growth usually accompanied by up-regulated pathways that ultimately increase the rate of ATP production. These cells can suffer metabolic reprogramming, resulting in distinct bioenergetic phenotypes, generally enhancing glycolysis channeled to lactate production. In the present work we showed metabolic reprogramming by means of inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDACis), sodium butyrate and trichostatin. This treatment was able to shift energy metabolism by activating mitochondrial systems such as the respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation that were largely repressed in the untreated controls. Methodology/Principal Findings Various cellular and biochemical parameters were evaluated in lung cancer H460 cells treated with the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis), sodium butyrate (NaB) and trichostatin A (TSA). NaB and TSA reduced glycolytic flux, assayed by lactate release by H460 cells in a concentration dependent manner. NaB inhibited the expression of glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT 1), but substantially increased mitochondria bound hexokinase (HK) activity. NaB induced increase in HK activity was associated to isoform HK I and was accompanied by 1.5 fold increase in HK I mRNA expression and cognate protein biosynthesis. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate kinase (PYK) activities were unchanged by HDACis suggesting that the increase in the HK activity was not coupled to glycolytic flux. High resolution respirometry of H460 cells revealed NaB-dependent increased rates of oxygen consumption coupled to ATP synthesis. Metabolomic analysis showed that NaB altered the glycolytic metabolite profile of intact H460 cells. Concomitantly we detected an activation of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). The high O2 consumption in NaB-treated cells was shown to be unrelated to mitochondrial biogenesis since citrate synthase (CS) activity and the amount of mitochondrial DNA remained unchanged. Conclusion NaB and TSA induced an increase in mitochondrial function and oxidative metabolism in H460 lung tumor cells concomitant with a less proliferative cellular phenotype. PMID:21789245

  4. S-2-pentyl-4-pentynoic hydroxamic acid and its metabolite s-2-pentyl-4-pentynoic acid in the NMRI-exencephaly-mouse model: pharmacokinetic profiles, teratogenic effects, and histone deacetylase inhibition abilities of further valproic acid hydroxamates and amides.

    PubMed

    Eikel, Daniel; Hoffmann, Katrin; Zoll, Karolin; Lampen, Alfonso; Nau, Heinz

    2006-04-01

    Structure-activity relationship studies of valproic acid (VPA) derivatives have revealed a quantitative correlation between histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition and induction of neural tube defects (NTDs) in the NMRI-exencephaly-mouse model, but this correlation has been, so far, limited to congeners with a carboxylic acid function. Whereas the classical HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A is active only as a hydroxamate but not as a carboxylic acid, we found that neither VPA amides nor hydroxamates inhibit HDACs, but can cause NTDs; e.g., 2-pentyl-4-pentynoic hydroxamic acid with its S-enantiomer being the potent teratogen. We therefore investigated the hypothesis that hydroxamic acid derivatives of VPA might be metabolized in vivo and may possibly be pro-teratogenic, as had been shown for valpromide but not valproic hydroxamic acid. We developed two stereoselective quantification methods based on chiral derivatization of VPA hydroxamates with (1R,2S,5R)-(-)-menthylchloroformate and carboxylic acid derivatives with (S)-(-)-1-naphthylethylamine, followed by gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphor detector analysis of biological samples. We then determined the pharmacokinetic profiles of S-2-pentyl-4-pentynoic hydroxamic acid and of S-2-pentyl-4-pentynoic acid in mice. S-2-Pentyl-4-pentynoic hydroxamic acid was found to be extensively metabolized to the corresponding carboxylic acid without affecting the stereochemistry at position C2. Furthermore, the metabolite S-2-pentyl-4-pentynoic acid was found to be very stable in vivo, with an extended half-life of 4.2 h compared with that of VPA, 1.4 h. Comparison of the individual HDAC inhibition abilities of additional VPA amides and hydroxamates, as measured by cellular and enzymatic assays, led us to the conclusion that both classes of VPA derivatives can be pro-teratogenic. PMID:16415118

  5. Trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates unloaded-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Dupré-Aucouturier, Sylvie; Castells, Josiane; Freyssenet, Damien; Desplanches, Dominique

    2015-08-15

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is commonly associated with immobilization, ageing, and catabolic diseases such as diabetes and cancer cachexia. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression resulting from chromatin remodeling through histone acetylation has been implicated in muscle disuse. The present work was designed to test the hypothesis that treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, would partly counteract unloading-induced muscle atrophy. Soleus muscle atrophy (-38%) induced by 14 days of rat hindlimb suspension was reduced to only 25% under TSA treatment. TSA partly prevented the loss of type I and IIa fiber size and reversed the transitions of slow-twitch to fast-twitch fibers in soleus muscle. Unloading or TSA treatment did not affect myostatin gene expression and follistatin protein. Soleus protein carbonyl content remained unchanged, whereas the decrease in glutathione vs. glutathione disulfide ratio and the increase in catalase activity (biomarkers of oxidative stress) observed after unloading were abolished by TSA treatment. The autophagy-lysosome pathway (Bnip3 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 proteins, Atg5, Gabarapl1, Ulk1, and cathepsin B and L mRNA) was not activated by unloading or TSA treatment. However, TSA suppressed the rise in muscle-specific RING finger protein 1 (MuRF1) caused by unloading without affecting the forkhead box (Foxo3) transcription factor. Prevention of muscle atrophy by TSA might be due to the regulation of the skeletal muscle atrophy-related MuRF1 gene. Our findings suggest that TSA may provide a novel avenue to treat unloaded-induced muscle atrophy. PMID:26112243

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote glioma cell death by G2 checkpoint abrogation leading to mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Cornago, M; Garcia-Alberich, C; Blasco-Angulo, N; Vall-Llaura, N; Nager, M; Herreros, J; Comella, J X; Sanchis, D; Llovera, M

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is resistant to conventional anti-tumoral treatments due to its infiltrative nature and capability of relapse; therefore, research efforts focus on characterizing gliomagenesis and identifying molecular targets useful on therapy. New therapeutic strategies are being tested in patients, such as Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) either alone or in combination with other therapies. Here two HDACi included in clinical trials have been tested, suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA) and valproic acid (VPA), to characterize their effects on glioma cell growth in vitro and to determine the molecular changes that promote cancer cell death. We found that both HDACi reduce glioma cell viability, proliferation and clonogenicity. They have multiple effects, such as inducing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activating the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, nevertheless cell death is not prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh. Importantly, we found that HDACi alter cell cycle progression by decreasing the expression of G2 checkpoint kinases Wee1 and checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1). In addition, HDACi reduce the expression of proteins involved in DNA repair (Rad51), mitotic spindle formation (TPX2) and chromosome segregation (Survivin) in glioma cells and in human glioblastoma multiforme primary cultures. Therefore, HDACi treatment causes glioma cell entry into mitosis before DNA damage could be repaired and to the formation of an aberrant mitotic spindle that results in glioma cell death through mitotic catastrophe-induced apoptosis. PMID:25275596

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors prevent activation-induced cell death and promote anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, K; Wang, G; Li, W; Zhang, L; Wang, R; Huang, Y; Du, L; Jiang, J; Wu, C; He, X; Roberts, A I; Li, F; Rabson, A B; Wang, Y; Shi, Y

    2015-01-01

    The poor efficacy of the in vivo anti-tumor immune response has been partially attributed to ineffective T-cell responses mounted against the tumor. Fas-FasL-dependent activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells is believed to be a major contributor to compromised anti-tumor immunity. The molecular mechanisms of AICD are well-investigated, yet the possibility of regulating AICD for cancer therapy remains to be explored. In this study, we show that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) can inhibit apoptosis of CD4+ T cells within the tumor, thereby enhancing anti-tumor immune responses and suppressing melanoma growth. This inhibitory effect is specific for AICD through suppressing NFAT1-regulated FasL expression on activated CD4+ T cells. In gld/gld mice with mutation in FasL, the beneficial effect of HDACIs on AICD of infiltrating CD4+ T cells is not seen, confirming the critical role of FasL regulation in the anti-tumor effect of HDACIs. Importantly, we found that the co-administration of HDACIs and anti-CTLA4 could further enhance the infiltration of CD4+ T cells and achieve a synergistic therapeutic effect on tumor. Therefore, our study demonstrates that the modulation of AICD of tumor-infiltrating CD4+ T cells using HDACIs can enhance anti-tumor immune responses, uncovering a novel mechanism underlying the anti-tumor effect of HDACIs. PMID:25745993

  8. Synergistic Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Bryostatin-1

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Isabel Clemente, Maria; Jesús Serramía, Maria; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Ángeles Muñoz-Fernández, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Viral reactivation from latently infected cells has become a promising therapeutic approach to eradicate HIV. Due to the complexity of the viral latency, combinations of efficient and available drugs targeting different pathways of latency are needed. In this work, we evaluated the effect of various combinations of bryostatin-1 (BRY) and novel histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) on HIV-reactivation and on cellular phenotype. The lymphocyte (J89GFP) or monocyte/macrophage (THP89GFP) latently infected cell lines were treated with BRY, panobinostat (PNB) and romidepsin (RMD) either alone or in combination. Thus, the effect on the viral reactivation was evaluated. We calculated the combination index for each drug combination; the BRY/HDACIs showed a synergistic HIV-reactivation profile in the majority of the combinations tested, whereas non-synergistic effects were observed when PNB was mixed with RMD. Indeed, the 75% effective concentrations of BRY, PNB and RMD were reduced in these combinations. Moreover, primary CD4 T cells treated with such drug combinations presented similar activation and proliferation profiles in comparison with single drug treated cells. Summing up, combinations between BRY, PNB and/or RMD presented a synergistic profile by inducing virus expression in HIV-latently infected cells, rendering these combinations an attractive novel and safe option for future clinical trials. PMID:26563568

  9. Identification of novel targets for PGC-1{alpha} and histone deacetylase inhibitors in neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Rita M. Talati, Pratik; Blake, Kathryn R.; Meador-Woodruff, James H.; Russell, James W.

    2009-02-06

    Recent evidence suggests that the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {gamma} coactivator 1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) is involved in the pathology of Huntington's Disease (HD). While animals lacking PGC-1{alpha} express lower levels of genes involved in antioxidant defense and oxidative phosphorylation in the brain, little is known about other targets for PGC-1{alpha} in neuronal cells and whether there are ways to pharmacologically target PGC-1{alpha} in neurons. Here, PGC-1{alpha} overexpression in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells upregulated expression of genes involved in mitochondrial function, glucose transport, fatty acid metabolism, and synaptic function. Overexpression also decreased vulnerability to hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death and caspase 3 activation. Treatment of cells with the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi's) trichostatin A and valproic acid upregulated PGC-1{alpha} and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). These results suggest that PGC-1{alpha} regulates multiple pathways in neurons and that HDACi's may be good candidates to target PGC-1{alpha} and GLUT4 in HD and other neurological disorders.

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitors: potential targets responsible for their anti-cancer effect

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Ricky W.; Prince, H. Miles

    2010-01-01

    Summary The histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have demonstrated anticancer efficacy across a range of malignancies, most impressively in the hematological cancers. It is uncertain whether this clinical efficacy is attributable predominantly to their ability to induce apoptosis and differentiation in the cancer cell, or to their ability to prime the cell to other pro-death stimuli such as those from the immune system. HDACi-induced apoptosis occurs through altered expression of genes encoding proteins in both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways; through effects on the proteasome/aggresome systems; through the production of reactive oxygen species, possibly by directly inducing DNA damage; and through alterations in the tumor microenvironment. In addition HDACi increase the immunogenicity of tumor cells and modulate cytokine signaling and potentially T-cell polarization in ways that may contribute the anti-cancer effect in vivo. Here, we provide an overview of current thinking on the mechanisms of HDACi activity, with attention given to the hematological malignancies as well as scientific observations arising from the clinical trials. We also focus on the immune effects of these agents. PMID:21161327

  11. The microbial metabolite butyrate regulates intestinal macrophage function via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pamela V.; Hao, Liming; Offermanns, Stefan; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Given the trillions of microbes that inhabit the mammalian intestines, the host immune system must constantly maintain a balance between tolerance to commensals and immunity against pathogens to avoid unnecessary immune responses against otherwise harmless bacteria. Misregulated responses can lead to inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease. The mechanisms by which the immune system maintains this critical balance remain largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that the short-chain fatty acid n-butyrate, which is secreted in high amounts by commensal bacteria, can modulate the function of intestinal macrophages, the most abundant immune cell type in the lamina propria. Treatment of macrophages with n-butyrate led to the down-regulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory mediators, including nitric oxide, IL-6, and IL-12, but did not affect levels of TNF-? or MCP-1. These effects were independent of toll-like receptor signaling and activation of G-protein–coupled receptors, two pathways that could be affected by short-chain fatty acids. In this study, we provide several lines of evidence that suggest that these effects are due to the inhibition of histone deacetylases by n-butyrate. These findings elucidate a pathway in which the host may maintain tolerance to intestinal microbiota by rendering lamina propria macrophages hyporesponsive to commensal bacteria through the down-regulation of proinflammatory effectors. PMID:24390544

  12. Enhancement of Radiation Response in Osteosarcoma and Rhabomyosarcoma Cell Lines by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Blattmann, Claudia; Oertel, Susanne; Ehemann, Volker

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) can enhance the sensitivity of cells to photon radiation treatment (XRT) by altering numerous molecular pathways. We investigated the effect of pan-HDACIs such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on radiation response in two osteosarcoma (OS) and two rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival, cell cycle analysis, and apoptosis were examined in OS (KHOS-24OS, SAOS2) and RMS (A-204, RD) cell lines treated with HDACI and HDACI plus XRT, respectively. Protein expression was investigated via immunoblot analysis, and cell cycle analysis and measurement of apoptosis were performed using flow cytometry. Results: SAHA induced an inhibition of cell proliferation and clonogenic survival in OS and RMS cell lines and led to a significant radiosensitization of all tumor cell lines. Other HDACI such as M344 and valproate showed similar effects as investigated in one OS cell line. Furthermore, SAHA significantly increased radiation-induced apoptosis in the OS cell lines, whereas in the RMS cell lines radiation-induced apoptosis was insignificant with and without SAHA. In all investigated sarcoma cell lines, SAHA attenuated radiation-induced DNA repair protein expression (Rad51, Ku80). Conclusion: Our results show that HDACIs enhance radiation action in OS and RMS cell lines. Inhibition of DNA repair, as well as increased apoptosis induction after exposure to HDACIs, can be mechanisms of radiosensitization by HDACIs.

  13. Synergistic Activation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors and Bryostatin-1.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Isabel Clemente, Maria; Jesús Serramía, Maria; Muñoz, Eduardo; Moreno, Santiago; Ángeles Muñoz-Fernández, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Viral reactivation from latently infected cells has become a promising therapeutic approach to eradicate HIV. Due to the complexity of the viral latency, combinations of efficient and available drugs targeting different pathways of latency are needed. In this work, we evaluated the effect of various combinations of bryostatin-1 (BRY) and novel histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) on HIV-reactivation and on cellular phenotype. The lymphocyte (J89GFP) or monocyte/macrophage (THP89GFP) latently infected cell lines were treated with BRY, panobinostat (PNB) and romidepsin (RMD) either alone or in combination. Thus, the effect on the viral reactivation was evaluated. We calculated the combination index for each drug combination; the BRY/HDACIs showed a synergistic HIV-reactivation profile in the majority of the combinations tested, whereas non-synergistic effects were observed when PNB was mixed with RMD. Indeed, the 75% effective concentrations of BRY, PNB and RMD were reduced in these combinations. Moreover, primary CD4 T cells treated with such drug combinations presented similar activation and proliferation profiles in comparison with single drug treated cells. Summing up, combinations between BRY, PNB and/or RMD presented a synergistic profile by inducing virus expression in HIV-latently infected cells, rendering these combinations an attractive novel and safe option for future clinical trials. PMID:26563568

  14. Selective inhibition of HDAC8 decreases neuroblastoma growth in vitro and in vivo and enhances retinoic acid-mediated differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rettig, I; Koeneke, E; Trippel, F; Mueller, W C; Burhenne, J; Kopp-Schneider, A; Fabian, J; Schober, A; Fernekorn, U; von Deimling, A; Deubzer, H E; Milde, T; Witt, O; Oehme, I

    2015-01-01

    For differentiation-defective malignancies, compounds that modulate transcription, such as retinoic acid and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, are of particular interest. HDAC inhibitors are currently under investigation for the treatment of a broad spectrum of cancer diseases. However, one clinical drawback is class-specific toxicity of unselective inhibitors, limiting their full anticancer potential. Selective targeting of individual HDAC isozymes in defined tumor entities may therefore be an attractive alternative treatment approach. We have previously identified HDAC family member 8 (HDAC8) as a novel target in childhood neuroblastoma. Using small-molecule inhibitors, we now demonstrate that selective inhibition of HDAC8 exhibits antineuroblastoma activity without toxicity in two xenograft mouse models of MYCN oncogene-amplified neuroblastoma. In contrast, the unselective HDAC inhibitor vorinostat was more toxic in the same models. HDAC8-selective inhibition induced cell cycle arrest and differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Upon combination with retinoic acid, differentiation was significantly enhanced, as demonstrated by elongated neurofilament-positive neurites and upregulation of NTRK1. Additionally, MYCN oncogene expression was downregulated in vitro and tumor cell growth was markedly reduced in vivo. Mechanistic studies suggest that cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) links HDAC8- and retinoic acid-mediated gene transcription. In conclusion, HDAC-selective targeting can be effective in tumors exhibiting HDAC isozyme-dependent tumor growth in vivo and can be combined with differentiation-inducing agents. PMID:25695609

  15. Stimulation of preadipocyte differentiation by steroid through targeting of an HDAC1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Wiper-Bergeron, Nadine; Wu, Dongmei; Pope, Louise; Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Haché, Robert J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Glucocorticoids potentiate the early steps of preadipocyte differentiation and promote obesity in Cushing’s syndrome and during prolonged steroid therapy. We show that glucocorticoids stimulate 3T3 L1 preadipocyte differentiation through a non-transcriptional mechanism mediated through the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. This enhanced the onset of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP?) expression by potentiating its initial transcriptional activation by C/EBP?. In the absence of steroid, C/EBP? associated with a transcriptional corepressor complex containing mSin3A and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), but lacking HDAC2 and RbAp46/48. HDAC1/mSin3A were recruited to the C/EBP? promoter with C/EBP? and promoted the deacetylation of histone H4. Steroid induced the specific depletion of this corepressor by targeting the HDAC1 within the complex for degradation through the 26S proteasome. Treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors replaced the effects of steroid treatment on preadipocyte differentiation and C/EBP? expression, while overexpression of HDAC1 abrogated the stimulatory effects of steroid. Recapitulation of the glucocorticoid effect by progestin treatment in the presence of the progesterone receptor ligand-binding domain suggests a conserved mechanism relevant to many aspects of steroid-mediated differentiation. PMID:12727880

  16. Photoreactive "nanorulers" detect a novel conformation of full length HDAC3-SMRT complex in solution.

    PubMed

    Abdelkarim, Hazem; Brunsteiner, Michael; Neelarapu, Raghupathi; Bai, He; Madriaga, Antonett; van Breemen, Richard B; Blond, Sylvie Y; Gaponenko, Vadim; Petukhov, Pavel A

    2013-11-15

    Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is a promising epigenetic drug target for multiple therapeutic applications. Direct interaction between the Deacetylase Activating Domain of the silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT-DAD) is required for activation of enzymatic activity of HDAC3. The structure of this complex and the nature of interactions with HDAC inhibitors in solution are unknown. Using novel photoreactive HDAC probes, "nanorulers", we determined the distance between the catalytic site of the full-length HDAC3 and SMRT-DAD in solution at physiologically relevant conditions and found it to be substantially different from that predicted by the X-ray model with a ?379-428 aa truncated HDAC3. Further experiments indicated that in solution this distance might change in response to chemical stimuli, while the enzymatic activity remained unaffected. These observations were further validated by Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR experiments. We propose that the observed changes in the distance are an important part of the histone code that remains to be explored. Mapping direct interactions and distances between macromolecules with such "nanorulers" as a function of cellular events facilitates better understanding of basic biology and ways for its manipulation in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:24010878

  17. Histone deacetylase 11: A novel epigenetic regulator of myeloid derived suppressor cell expansion and function.

    PubMed

    Sahakian, Eva; Powers, John J; Chen, Jie; Deng, Susan L; Cheng, Fengdong; Distler, Allison; Woods, David M; Rock-Klotz, Jennifer; Sodre, Andressa L; Youn, Je-In; Woan, Karrune V; Villagra, Alejandro; Gabrilovich, Dmitry; Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2015-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous population of cells capable of suppressing anti-tumor T cell function in the tumor microenvironment, represent an imposing obstacle in the development of cancer immunotherapeutics. Thus, identifying elements essential to the development and perpetuation of these cells will undoubtedly improve our ability to circumvent their suppressive impact. HDAC11 has emerged as a key regulator of IL-10 gene expression in myeloid cells, suggesting that this may represent an important targetable axis through which to dampen MDSC formation. Using a murine transgenic reporter model system where eGFP expression is controlled by the HDAC11 promoter (Tg-HDAC11-eGFP), we provide evidence that HDAC11 appears to function as a negative regulator of MDSC expansion/function in vivo. MDSCs isolated from EL4 tumor-bearing Tg-HDAC11-eGFP display high expression of eGFP, indicative of HDAC11 transcriptional activation at steady state. In striking contrast, immature myeloid cells in tumor-bearing mice display a diminished eGFP expression, implying that the transition of IMC to MDSC's require a decrease in the expression of HDAC11, where we postulate that it acts as a gate-keeper of myeloid differentiation. Indeed, tumor-bearing HDAC11-knockout mice (HDAC11-KO) demonstrate a more suppressive MDSC population as compared to wild-type (WT) tumor-bearing control. Notably, the HDAC11-KO tumor-bearing mice exhibit enhanced tumor growth kinetics when compare to the WT control mice. Thus, through a better understanding of this previously unknown role of HDAC11 in MDSC expansion and function, rational development of targeted epigenetic modifiers may allow us to thwart a powerful barrier to efficacious immunotherapies. PMID:25155994

  18. Ectopic hbox12 Expression Evoked by Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Disrupts Axial Specification of the Sea Urchin Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Spinelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal/ventral patterning of the sea urchin embryo depends upon the establishment of a Nodal-expressing ventral organizer. Recently, we showed that spatial positioning of this organizer relies on the dorsal-specific transcription of the Hbox12 repressor. Building on these findings, we determined the influence of the epigenetic milieu on the expression of hbox12 and nodal genes. We find that Trichostatin-A, a potent and selective histone-deacetylases inhibitor, induces histone hyperacetylation in hbox12 chromatin, evoking broad ectopic expression of the gene. Transcription of nodal concomitantly drops, prejudicing dorsal/ventral polarity of the resulting larvae. Remarkably, impairing hbox12 function, either in a spatially-restricted sector or in the whole embryo, specifically rescues nodal transcription in Trichostatin-A-treated larvae. Beyond strengthen the notion that nodal expression is not allowed in the presence of functional Hbox12 in the same cells, these results highlight a critical role of histone deacetylases in regulating the spatial expression of hbox12. PMID:26618749

  19. A general requirement for the Sin3-Rpd3 histone deacetylase complex in regulating silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Z W; Hampsey, M

    1999-01-01

    The Sin3-Rpd3 histone deacetylase complex, conserved between human and yeast, represses transcription when targeted by promoter-specific transcription factors. SIN3 and RPD3 also affect transcriptional silencing at the HM mating loci and at telomeres in yeast. Interestingly, however, deletion of the SIN3 and RPD3 genes enhances silencing, implying that the Sin3-Rpd3 complex functions to counteract, rather than to establish or maintain, silencing. Here we demonstrate that Sin3, Rpd3, and Sap30, a novel component of the Sin3-Rpd3 complex, affect silencing not only at the HMR and telomeric loci, but also at the rDNA locus. The effects on silencing at all three loci are dependent upon the histone deacetylase activity of Rpd3. Enhanced silencing associated with sin3Delta, rpd3Delta, and sap30Delta is differentially dependent upon Sir2 and Sir4 at the telomeric and rDNA loci and is also dependent upon the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Rad6 (Ubc2). We also show that the Cac3 subunit of the CAF-I chromatin assembly factor and Sin3-Rpd3 exert antagonistic effects on silencing. Strikingly, deletion of GCN5, which encodes a histone acetyltransferase, enhances silencing in a manner similar to deletion of RPD3. A model that integrates the effects of rpd3Delta, gcn5Delta, and cac3Delta on silencing is proposed. PMID:10388812

  20. Bioinformatic dissecting of TP53 regulation pathway underlying butyrate-induced histone modification in epigenetic regulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butyrate affects cell proliferation, differentiation and motility. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activities and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. TP53 is one of the most active upstream regulators discovered by IPA in our RNA sequencing data set. The TP53 signaling pathway pl...

  1. p15RS/RPRD1A (p15INK4b-related sequence/regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain-containing protein 1A) interacts with HDAC2 in inhibition of the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunxiao; Zhang, Yanquan; Li, Jun; Wang, Yinyin; Ren, Fangli; Zhou, Yifan; Wu, Yinyuan; Feng, Yarui; Zhou, Yu; Su, Fuqin; Jia, Baoqing; Wang, Dong; Chang, Zhijie

    2015-04-10

    We previously reported that p15RS (p15INK4b-related sequence), a regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain containing protein, inhibited Wnt signaling by interrupting the formation of the ?-catenin·TCF4 complex. However, how p15RS functions as an intrinsic repressor to repress transcription remains unclear. In this study, we show that p15RS, through a specific interaction with HDAC2 (histone deacetylase 2), a deacetylase that regulates gene transcription, maintains histone H3 in a deacetylated state in the promoter region of Wnt-targeted genes where ?-catenin·TCF4 is bound. We observed that histone deacetylase inhibitors impair the ability of p15RS in inhibiting Wnt/?-catenin signaling. Depletion of HDAC2 markedly disabled p15RS inhibition of Wnt/?-catenin-mediated transcription. Interestingly, overexpression of p15RS decreases the level of acetylated histone H3 in the c-MYC promoter. Finally, we demonstrate that p15RS significantly enhances the association of HDAC2 and TCF4 and enhances the occupancy of HDAC2 to DNA, resulting in the deacetylation of histone H3 and the failure of ?-catenin interaction. We propose that p15RS acts as an intrinsic transcriptional repressor for Wnt/?-catenin-mediated gene transcription at least partially through recruiting HDAC2 to occupy the promoter and maintaining deacetylated histone H3. PMID:25697359

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitors epigenetically promote reparative events in primary dental pulp cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Henry F.; Smith, Anthony J.; Fleming, Garry J.P.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2013-06-10

    Application of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) to cells epigenetically alters their chromatin structure and induces transcriptional and cellular reparative events. This study investigated the application of two HDACi, valproic acid (VPA) and trichostatin A (TSA) on the induction of repair-associated responses in primary dental pulp cell (DPC) cultures. Flow cytometry demonstrated that TSA (100 nM, 400 nM) significantly increased cell viability. Neither HDACi was cytotoxic, although cell growth analysis revealed significant anti-proliferative effects at higher concentrations for VPA (>0.5 mM) and TSA (>50 nM). While high-content-analysis demonstrated that HDACi did not significantly induce caspase-3 or p21 activity, p53-expression was increased by VPA (3 mM, 5 mM) at 48 h. HDACi-exposure induced mineralization per cell dose-dependently to a plateau level (VPA-0.125 mM and TSA-25 nM) with accompanying increases in mineralization/dentinogenic-associated gene expression at 5 days (DMP-1, BMP-2/-4, Nestin) and 10 days (DSPP, BMP-2/-4). Both HDACis, at a range of concentrations, significantly stimulated osteopontin and BMP-2 protein expression at 10 and 14 days further supporting the ability of HDACi to promote differentiation. HDACi exert different effects on primary compared with transformed DPCs and promote mineralization and differentiation events without cytotoxic effects. These novel data now highlight the potential in restorative dentistry for applying low concentrations of HDACi in vital pulp treatment. -- Highlights: • Valproic acid and trichostatin A promoted mineralization in primary pulp cells. • Cell viability, apoptosis, caspase-3, p21 unaltered; p53 increased by valproic acid. • Trichostatin A increased cell viability at 24 h at selected concentrations. • Altered cell toxicity and differentiation between primary and transformed cells. • HDACi-induced the differentiation marker proteins osteopontin and BMP-2.

  3. Combining histone deacetylase inhibitors with MDA-7/IL-24 enhances killing of renal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Hossein A; Das, Swadesh K; Sokhi, Upneet K; Park, Margaret A; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Archer, Kellie; Ogretmen, Besim; Grant, Steven; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B; Dent, Paul

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we show that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) enhance the anti-tumor effects of melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/interleukin 24 (mda-7/IL-24) in human renal carcinoma cells. Similar data were obtained in other GU tumor cells. Combination of these two agents resulted in increased autophagy that was dependent on expression of ceramide synthase 6, with HDACIs enhancing MDA-7/IL-24 toxicity by increasing generation of ROS and Ca2+. Knock down of CD95 protected cells from HDACI and MDA-7/IL-24 lethality. Sorafenib treatment further enhanced (HDACI + MDA-7/IL-24) lethality. Anoikis resistant renal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to MDA-7/IL-24 that correlated with elevated SRC activity and tyrosine phosphorylation of CD95. We employed a recently constructed serotype 5/3 adenovirus, which is more effective than a serotype 5 virus in delivering mda-7/IL-24 to renal carcinoma cells and which conditionally replicates (CR) in tumor cells expressing MDA-7/IL-24 by virtue of placing the adenoviral E1A gene under the control of the cancer-specific promoter progression elevated gene-3 (Ad.5/3-PEG-E1A-mda-7; CRAd.5/3-mda-7, Ad.5/3-CTV), to define efficacy in renal carcinoma cells. Ad.5/3-CTV decreased the growth of renal carcinoma tumors to a significantly greater extent than did a non-replicative virus Ad.5/3-mda-7. In contralateral uninfected renal carcinoma tumors Ad.5/3-CTV also decreased the growth of tumors to a greater extent than did Ad.5/3-mda-7. In summation, our data demonstrates that HDACIs enhance MDA-7/IL-24-mediated toxicity and tumor specific adenoviral delivery and viral replication of mda-7/IL-24 is an effective pre-clinical renal carcinoma therapeutic. PMID:24025359

  4. Combining histone deacetylase inhibitors with MDA-7/IL-24 enhances killing of renal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Hossein A; Das, Swadesh K; Sokhi, Upneet K; Park, Margaret A; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Archer, Kellie; Ogretmen, Besim; Grant, Steven; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B; Dent, Paul

    2013-11-01

    In the present study we show that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) enhance the anti-tumor effects of melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/interleukin 24 (mda- 7/IL-24) in human renal carcinoma cells. Similar data were obtained in other GU tumor cells. Combination of these two agents resulted in increased autophagy that was dependent on expression of ceramide synthase 6, with HDACIs enhancing MDA-7/IL-24 toxicity by increasing generation of ROS and Ca (2+). Knock down of CD95 protected cells from HDACI and MDA-7/IL-24 lethality. Sorafenib treatment further enhanced (HDACI + MDA-7/IL-24) lethality. Anoikis resistant renal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to MDA-7/IL-24 that correlated with elevated SRC activity and tyrosine phosphorylation of CD95. We employed a recently constructed serotype 5/3 adenovirus, which is more effective than a serotype 5 virus in delivering mda- 7/IL-24 to renal carcinoma cells and which conditionally replicates (CR) in tumor cells expressing MDA-7/IL-24 by virtue of placing the adenoviral E1A gene under the control of the cancer-specific promoter progression elevated gene-3 (Ad.5/3-PEG-E1A-mda-7; CRAd.5/3-mda-7, Ad.5/3-CTV), to define efficacy in renal carcinoma cells. Ad.5/3-CTV decreased the growth of renal carcinoma tumors to a significantly greater extent than did a non-replicative virus Ad.5/3-mda-7. In contralateral uninfected renal carcinoma tumors Ad.5/3-CTV also decreased the growth of tumors to a greater extent than did Ad.5/3-mda-7. In summation, our data demonstrates that HDACIs enhance MDA-7/IL-24-mediated toxicity and tumor specific adenoviral delivery and viral replication of mda-7/IL-24 is an effective pre-clinical renal carcinoma therapeutic. PMID:24025359

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Department of Medical Science, Teikyo University of Science, 2-2-1 Senjusakuragi, Adachi-ku, Tokyo 120-0045 ; Saito, Fumiaki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Department of Medical Science, Teikyo University of Science, 2-2-1 Senjusakuragi, Adachi-ku, Tokyo 120-0045 ; Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  6. Deacetylation of ?-tubulin and cortactin is required for HDAC6 to trigger ciliary disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jie; Yang, Yunfan; Li, Dengwen; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cilia play important roles in sensing extracellular signals and directing fluid flow. Ciliary dysfunction is associated with a variety of diseases known as ciliopathies. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) has recently emerged as a major driver of ciliary disassembly, but little is known about the downstream players. Here we provide the first evidence that HDAC6-mediated deacetylation of ?-tubulin and cortactin is critical for its induction of ciliary disassembly. HDAC6 is localized in the cytoplasm and enriched at the centrosome and basal body. Overexpression of HDAC6 decreases the levels of acetylated ?-tubulin and cortactin without affecting the expression or localization of known ciliary regulators. We also find that overexpression of ?-tubulin or cortactin or their acetylation-deficient mutants enhances the ability of HDAC6 to induce ciliary disassembly. In addition, acetylation-mimicking mutants of ?-tubulin and cortactin counteract HDAC6-induced ciliary disassembly. Furthermore, HDAC6 stimulates actin polymerization, and inhibition of actin polymerization abolishes the activity of HDAC6 to trigger ciliary disassembly. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the ciliary role of HDAC6 and underscore the importance of reversible acetylation in regulating ciliary homeostasis. PMID:26246421

  7. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, enhances radiosensitivity and suppresses lung metastasis in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hui-Wen; Yeh, Ya-Ling; Wang, Yi-Ching; Huang, Wei-Jan; Chen, Yi-An; Chiou, Yi-Shiou; Ho, Sheng-Yow; Lin, Pinpin; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), defined by the absence of an estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression, is associated with an early recurrence of disease and poor outcome. Furthermore, the majority of deaths in breast cancer patients are from metastases instead of from primary tumors. In this study, MCF-7 (an estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancer cell line), MDA-MB-231 (a human TNBC cell line) and 4T1 (a mouse TNBC cell line) were used to investigate the anti-cancer effects of ionizing radiation (IR) combined with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC)) and to determine the underlying mechanisms of these effects in vitro and in vivo. We also evaluated the ability of SAHA to inhibit the metastasis of 4T1 cells. We found that IR combined with SAHA showed increased therapeutic efficacy when compared with either treatment alone in MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and 4T1 cells. Moreover, the combined treatment enhanced DNA damage through the inhibition of DNA repair proteins. The combined treatment was induced primarily through autophagy and ER stress. In an orthotopic breast cancer mouse model, the combination treatment showed a greater inhibition of tumor growth. In addition, SAHA inhibited the migration and invasion abilities of 4T1 cells and inhibited breast cancer cell migration by inhibiting the activity of MMP-9. In an in vivo experimental metastasis mouse model, SAHA significantly inhibited lung metastasis. SAHA not only enhances radiosensitivity but also suppresses lung metastasis in breast cancer. These novel findings suggest that SAHA alone or combined with IR could serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer. PMID:24130769

  8. Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid, an Inhibitor of Histone Deacetylase, Enhances Radiosensitivity and Suppresses Lung Metastasis in Breast Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Ya-Ling; Wang, Yi-Ching; Huang, Wei-Jan; Chen, Yi-An; Chiou, Yi-Shiou; Lin, Pinpin; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), defined by the absence of an estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression, is associated with an early recurrence of disease and poor outcome. Furthermore, the majority of deaths in breast cancer patients are from metastases instead of from primary tumors. In this study, MCF-7 (an estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancer cell line), MDA-MB-231 (a human TNBC cell line) and 4T1 (a mouse TNBC cell line) were used to investigate the anti-cancer effects of ionizing radiation (IR) combined with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC)) and to determine the underlying mechanisms of these effects in vitro and in vivo. We also evaluated the ability of SAHA to inhibit the metastasis of 4T1 cells. We found that IR combined with SAHA showed increased therapeutic efficacy when compared with either treatment alone in MCF-7, MDA-MB-231 and 4T1 cells. Moreover, the combined treatment enhanced DNA damage through the inhibition of DNA repair proteins. The combined treatment was induced primarily through autophagy and ER stress. In an orthotopic breast cancer mouse model, the combination treatment showed a greater inhibition of tumor growth. In addition, SAHA inhibited the migration and invasion abilities of 4T1 cells and inhibited breast cancer cell migration by inhibiting the activity of MMP-9. In an in vivo experimental metastasis mouse model, SAHA significantly inhibited lung metastasis. SAHA not only enhances radiosensitivity but also suppresses lung metastasis in breast cancer. These novel findings suggest that SAHA alone or combined with IR could serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer. PMID:24130769

  9. The Sensitivity of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor-Induced Apoptosis Is Modulated by BCL-2 Family Protein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Ryan C.; Vardinogiannis, Iosif; Gilmore, Thomas D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a genetically heterogeneous disease and this variation can often be used to explain the response of individual patients to chemotherapy. One cancer therapeutic approach currently in clinical trials uses histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi’s) as monotherapy or in combination with other agents. Methodology/Principal Findings We have used a variety of cell-based and molecular/biochemical assays to show that two pan-HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A and vorinostat, induce apoptosis in seven of eight human DLBCL cell lines. Consistent with previous reports implicating the BCL-2 family in regulating HDACi-induced apoptosis, ectopic over-expression of anti-apoptotic proteins BCL-2 and BCL-XL or pro-apoptotic protein BIM in these cell lines conferred further resistance or sensitivity, respectively, to HDACi treatment. Additionally, BCL-2 family antgonist ABT-737 increased the sensitivity of several DLBCL cell lines to vorinostat-induced apoptosis, including one cell line (SUDHL6) that is resistant to vorinostat alone. Moreover, two variants of the HDACi-sensitive SUDHL4 cell line that have decreased sensitivity to vorinostat showed up-regulation of BCL-2 family anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-XL and MCL-1, as well as decreased sensitivity to ABT-737. These results suggest that the regulation and overall balance of anti- to pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family protein expression is important in defining the sensitivity of DLBCL to HDACi-induced apoptosis. However, the sensitivity of DLBCL cell lines to HDACi treatment does not correlate with expression of any individual BCL-2 family member. Conclusions/Significance These studies indicate that the sensitivity of DLBCL to treatment with HDACi’s is dependent on the complex regulation of BCL-2 family members and that BCL-2 antagonists may enhance the response of a subset of DLBCL patients to HDACi treatment. PMID:23667527

  10. Phosphodiesterase inhibitor, pentoxifylline enhances anticancer activity of histone deacetylase inhibitor, MS-275 in human breast cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nidhyanandan, Saranya; Boreddy, Thippeswamy S; Chandrasekhar, Kothapalli B; Reddy, Neetinkumar D; Kulkarni, Nagaraj M; Narayanan, Shridhar

    2015-10-01

    MS-275, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), is undergoing clinical trials for treatment of various cancers. Pentoxifylline, a nonselective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, has been shown to increase the effectiveness of antitumor chemotherapy. In the present study, the potential anti-cancer activity of MS-275 in combination with pentoxifylline in panel of cell lines and human breast cancer xenograft model were examined. A Panel of cancer cell lines were treated with MS-275 and pentoxifylline to determine their impact on cellular proliferation, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, anti-angiogenesis. The in vivo activities of MS-275 and pentoxifylline were assessed in a Matrigel plug angiogenesis model and human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) xenograft model. Combination of MS-275 with pentoxifylline showed enhanced anti-proliferative activity in a panel of cancer cell lines (HCT 116, MCF-7, PC3 and MDA-MB-231). Apoptotic studies performed using, Hoechst staining and cell cycle analysis reveal that this combination at the lower concentrations induces apoptosis downstream of the HDAC inhibition and PDE regulation. Further, combination showed enhanced antiangiogenic activity in Matrigel tube formation assay using HUVECs and in Matrigel plug assay in vivo. A significant inhibition (P<0.001) of tumor growth was observed in mice bearing MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft treated with the combination of MS-275 (5mg/kg p.o.) and pentoxifylline (60mg/kg i.p.) than treatments alone, without much signs of toxicity. Taken together, our study demonstrated enhanced anticancer activity of MS-275 and pentoxifylline combination both in vitro and in vivo with reduced toxicity. However, further studies are required to understand the mechanism for this combination effect. PMID:26209365

  11. Benzofused hydroxamic acids: useful fragments for the preparation of histone deacetylase inhibitors. Part 2: 7-fluorobenzothiophenes and benzofurans.

    PubMed

    Marastoni, Elena; Bartoli, Sandra; Berettoni, Marco; Cipollone, Amalia; Ettorre, Alessandro; Fincham, Christopher I; Mauro, Sandro; Paris, Marielle; Porcelloni, Marina; Bigioni, Mario; Binaschi, Monica; Nardelli, Federica; Parlani, Massimo; Maggi, Carlo A; Paoli, Paola; Rossi, Patrizia; Fattori, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    In the search for a new class of histone deacetylase inhibitors, we prepared a series of very simple benzofused hydroxamic acids to find an anchoring fragment of minimal molecular weight: they showed very good ligand efficiencies. Following these findings, classical fragment growing work was performed to increase binding energy and selective cytotoxicity. In the second phase of the work, information from the SARs of the benzothiophene series and data available in literature, we explored the in vitro pharmacological properties of the 6-substituted-7-fluoro-benzothiophene hydroxamates and the 5-susbtituted-benzofuran hydroxamates. PMID:25746815

  12. HDAC6 Regulates the Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy to Prevent Oxidative Damage in Injured Neurons after Experimental Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Guan, Huaqing; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Yarong; Teng, Xiaomei; Yang, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia- (HI-) induced oxidative stress plays a role in secondary pathocellular processes of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) due to HI from many kinds of mechanical trauma. Increasing evidence suggests that the histone deacetylase-6 (HDAC6) plays an important role in cell homeostasis in both physiological and abnormal, stressful, pathological conditions. This paper found that inhibition of HDAC6 accelerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis in response to the HI. Deficiency of HDAC6 hindered the chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) activity to resistance of HI-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, this study provided the experimental evidence for the potential role of HDAC6 in the regulation of CMA by affecting HSP90 acetylation. Therefore, HDAC6 plays an important role in the function of CMA pathway under the HI stress induced by SCI and it may be a potential therapeutic target in acute SCI model. PMID:26649145

  13. HDAC6 Regulates the Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy to Prevent Oxidative Damage in Injured Neurons after Experimental Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Guan, Huaqing; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Yarong; Teng, Xiaomei; Yang, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia- (HI-) induced oxidative stress plays a role in secondary pathocellular processes of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) due to HI from many kinds of mechanical trauma. Increasing evidence suggests that the histone deacetylase-6 (HDAC6) plays an important role in cell homeostasis in both physiological and abnormal, stressful, pathological conditions. This paper found that inhibition of HDAC6 accelerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cell apoptosis in response to the HI. Deficiency of HDAC6 hindered the chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) activity to resistance of HI-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, this study provided the experimental evidence for the potential role of HDAC6 in the regulation of CMA by affecting HSP90 acetylation. Therefore, HDAC6 plays an important role in the function of CMA pathway under the HI stress induced by SCI and it may be a potential therapeutic target in acute SCI model. PMID:26649145

  14. KD5170, a novel mercaptoketone-based histone deacetylase inhibitor, exerts antimyeloma effects by DNA damage and mitochondrial signaling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rentian; Ma, Huihui; Hassig, Christian A; Payne, Joseph E; Smith, Nicholas D; Mapara, Markus Y; Hager, Jeffrey H; Lentzsch, Suzanne

    2008-06-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors have emerged as promising anticancer drugs. Using an unbiased ultrahigh throughput screening system, a novel mercaptoketone-based histone deacetylase inhibitor series was identified that was optimized to the lead compound, KD5170. KD5170 inhibited the proliferation of myeloma cell lines and the viability of CD138(+) primary myeloma cells by induction of apoptosis, accompanied by an increase of acetylation of histones and activation of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9. Treatment with KD5170 caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential resulting in release of apoptogenic factors such as cytochrome c, Smac, and apoptosis-inducing factor. Furthermore, KD5170 induced oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage in myeloma cells as evidenced by the up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 and H2A.X phosphorylation. Combination of KD5170 with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib or tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand synergistically enhanced the antimyeloma activity. We further found that resistance of myeloma cells to KD5170 was associated with activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway under treatment with KD5170. Pretreatment with the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor U0126 restored sensitivity to KD5170, suggesting that the combination of KD5170 with U0126 could overcome drug resistance. Growth of myeloma tumor xenografts in KD5170-treated nude mice was significantly inhibited and survival was prolonged. Histone acetylation was increased in spleen and tumor tissues of animals treated with KD5170. Our data indicate that KD5170 has potent antimyeloma activity in vitro and in vivo, which is mediated by DNA damage and mitochondrial signaling and subsequent induction of apoptosis. PMID:18566220

  15. USP17-mediated deubiquitination and stabilization of HDAC2 in cigarette smoke extract-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Huihui; Tao, Lianqin; Chen, Chen; Pan, Lina; Hao, Jimin; Ni, Yingmeng; Li, Dan; Li, Bin; Shi, Guochao

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase HDAC2 regulates genes transcription via removing the acetyl group from histones. Glucocorticoids, the most potent anti-inflammatory treatment available for inflammatory diseases, inhibit the expression of inflammatory genes by recruiting HDAC2 to activated genes. In the lungs of patients who smoke and have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma, glucocorticoids are not effective enough to suppress airway inflammation, which is so called “glucocorticoid resistance”, due to decreased HDAC2 level caused by cigarette smoke. We report that the ubiquitin-specific protease USP17 interacts with HDAC2. USP17 deubiquitinates and stabilizes the protein level of HDAC2. In cigarette smoke extract-exposed airway epithelial cells and macrophages, HDAC2 is excessively ubiquitinated and degraded in the proteasome attributed to low expression of USP17. Furthermore, over-expression of USP17 blocks the destruction of HDAC2 induced by cigarette smoke extract. These results provide a new insight into the mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance in airway inflammatory disease. Small molecules which can specifically induce the expression of USP17 might be useful in reversing glucocorticoid resistance. PMID:26617781

  16. An HDAC-dependent epigenetic mechanism that enhances the efficacy of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Schmauss, C.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent and debilitating psychiatric illnesses. However, currently prescribed antidepressant drugs are only efficacious in a limited group of patients. Studies on Balb/c mice suggested that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition may enhance the efficacy of the widely-prescribed antidepressant drug fluoxetine. This study shows that reducing HDAC activity in fluoxetine-treated Balb/c mice leads to robust antidepressant and anxiolytic effects. While reducing the activity of class I HDACs 1 and 3 led to antidepressant effects, additional class II HDAC inhibition was necessary to exert anxiolytic effects. In fluoxetine-treated mice, HDAC inhibitors increased enrichment of acetylated histone H4 protein and RNA polymerase II at promotor 3 of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) gene and increased Bdnf transcription from this promotor. Reducing Bdnf-stimulated tropomyosin kinase B receptor activation in fluoxetine-treated mice with low HDAC activity abolished the behavioral effects of fluoxetine, suggesting that the HDAC-triggered epigenetic stimulation of Bdnf expression is critical for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25639887

  17. Mutagenesis Study Reveals the Rim of Catalytic Entry Site of HDAC4 and -5 as the Major Binding Surface of SMRT Corepressor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwang Sik; Jung, Ha-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Sun; Lee, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a pivotal role in eukaryotic gene expression by modulating the levels of acetylation of chromatin and related transcription factors. In contrast to class I HDACs (HDAC1, -2, -3 and -8), the class IIa HDACs (HDAC4, -5, -7 and -9) harbor cryptic deacetylases activity and recruit the SMRT-HDAC3 complex to repress target genes in vivo. In this regard, the specific interaction between the HDAC domain of class IIa HDACs and the C-terminal region of SMRT repression domain 3 (SRD3c) is known to be critical, but the molecular basis of this interaction has not yet been addressed. Here, we used an extensive mutant screening system, named the “partitioned one- plus two-hybrid system”, to isolate SRD3c interaction-defective (SRID) mutants over the entire catalytic domains of HDAC4 (HDAC4c) and -5. The surface presentation of the SRID mutations on the HDAC4c structure revealed that most of the mutations were mapped to the rim surface of the catalytic entry site, strongly suggesting this mutational hot-spot region as the major binding surface of SRD3c. Notably, among the HDAC4c surface residues required for SRD3c binding, some residues (C667, C669, C751, D759, T760 and F871) are present only in class IIa HDACs, providing the molecular basis for the specific interactions between SRD3c and class IIa enzymes. To investigate the functional consequence of SRID mutation, the in vitro HDAC activities of HDAC4 mutants immuno-purified from HEK293 cells were measured. The levels of HDAC activity of the HDAC4c mutants were substantially decreased compared to wild-type. Consistent with this, SRID mutations of HDAC4c prevented the association of HDAC4c with the SMRT-HDAC3 complex in vivo. Our findings may provide structural insight into the binding interface of HDAC4 and -5 with SRD3c, as a novel target to design modulators specific to these enzymes. PMID:26161557

  18. Characterization and expression of histone deacetylase 1 (athd1) in Arabidopsis thaliana 

    E-print Network

    Fong, Man Kim

    2005-08-29

    The reversible process of histone acetylation and deacetylation is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation in the control of gene expression and chromatin structure. In general, histone acetylation is related to gene activation, whereas...

  19. Trichostatin-A induces differential changes in histone protein dynamics and expression in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Jyothsna; Bhattacharya, Dipanjan; Banerjee, Bidisha; Sarin, Apurva; Shivashankar, G.V.

    2007-11-16

    Trichostatin-A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, results in enhanced acetylation of core histones thereby disrupting chromatin organization within living cells. We report on changes in chromatin organization and the resultant alteration in nuclear architecture following treatment with TSA using fluorescence imaging. TSA triggers an expected increase in the euchromatin fraction which is accompanied by a significant increase in nuclear volume and alterations in chromatin compaction mapped using fluorescence anisotropy imaging. We observe differential changes in the mobility of core and linker histones as measured by fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) methods. Further TSA induces a differential increase in linker histone transcription and increased phosphorylation of linker histone proteins accompanying an expected increase in core histone acetylation patterns. Thus subtle feedback responses triggered by changes in chromatin configurations impinge selectively on linker histone mobility and its expression. These observations have implications for understanding the role of HDAC in the dynamic maintenance of chromatin organization.

  20. HDAC turnover, CtIP acetylation and dysregulated DNA damage signaling in colon cancer cells treated with sulforaphane and related dietary isothiocyanates.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Praveen; Kidane, Ariam I; Yu, Tian-Wei; Dashwood, Wan-Mohaiza; Bisson, William H; Löhr, Christiane V; Ho, Emily; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2013-06-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) and acetyltransferases have important roles in the regulation of protein acetylation, chromatin dynamics and the DNA damage response. Here, we show in human colon cancer cells that dietary isothiocyanates (ITCs) inhibit HDAC activity and increase HDAC protein turnover with the potency proportional to alkyl chain length, i.e., AITC < sulforaphane (SFN) < 6-SFN < 9-SFN. Molecular docking studies provided insights into the interactions of ITC metabolites with HDAC3, implicating the allosteric site between HDAC3 and its co-repressor. ITCs induced DNA double-strand breaks and enhanced the phosphorylation of histone H2AX, ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR) and checkpoint kinase-2 (CHK2). Depending on the ITC and treatment conditions, phenotypic outcomes included cell growth arrest, autophagy and apoptosis. Coincident with the loss of HDAC3 and HDAC6, as well as SIRT6, ITCs enhanced the acetylation and subsequent degradation of critical repair proteins, such as CtIP, and this was recapitulated in HDAC knockdown experiments. Importantly, colon cancer cells were far more susceptible than non-cancer cells to ITC-induced DNA damage, which persisted in the former case but was scarcely detectable in non-cancer colonic epithelial cells under the same conditions. Future studies will address the mechanistic basis for dietary ITCs preferentially exploiting HDAC turnover mechanisms and faulty DNA repair pathways in colon cancer cells vs. normal cells. PMID:23770684

  1. Histone Acetylation Modifiers in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Wang, Li; Yu, Caijia; Yu, Daohai; Yu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming more evident that histone acetylation, as one of the epigenetic modifications or markers, plays a key role in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Histone acetylases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are the well-known covalent enzymes that modify the reversible acetylation of lysine residues in histone amino-terminal domains. In AD, however, the roles of these enzymes are controversial. Some recent studies indicate that HDAC inhibitors are neuroprotective by regulating memory and synaptic dysfunctions in cellular and animal models of AD; while on the other hand, increase of histone acetylation have been implicated in AD pathology. In this review, we focus on the recent advances on the roles of histone acetylation covalent enzymes in AD and discuss how targeting these enzymes can ultimately lead to therapeutic approaches for treating AD. PMID:26136662

  2. HDAC inhibition through valproic acid modulates the methylation profiles in human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Shabir Ahmad; Kalladi, Shashwath Malli; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications on the tails of core and linker histones dictate transcription and have vital roles in disease and development. Acetylation and deacetylation events enabled by histone acetyl transferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) on the chromatin milieu are intricately involved in gene regulation. Inhibition of HDACs is emerging as a powerful strategy in regenerative therapy, transplantation, development and in nuclear reprogramming events. Valproic acid (VPA), belonging to the short-chain fatty acid group of HDAC inhibitors, modulates the epigenome altering gene expression profiles across cell lines. This work attempts to explore the methylation profiles triggered by VPA treatment on human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293) through a biochemical and computational approach. VPA treatment (for 48?h) has been observed to hypermethylate lysine 4 on the core histone H3 and confers a hypomethylation status of H3 lysine 27 in HEK 293 cells leaving the nuclear area and nuclear contour unaltered. Our structural docking and Binding Free Energy (BFE) calculations establish an active role for VPA in inhibiting the demethylase JARID1A (Jumonji, AT Rich Interactive Domain 1A) and the methyl-transferase EZH2 (Enhancer of Zeste Homologue 2). This work has also proven that VPA can inhibit the activity of proteins like GSK3? and PKC?II involved in developmental disorders. This work establishes a dynamic correlation between histone methylation events and HDAC inhibition and may define newer epigenetic strategies for treating neurodevelopmental and oncological disorders. PMID:25012937

  3. Physical and Functional Interactions between the Histone H3K4 Demethylase KDM5A and the Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase (NuRD) Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Nishibuchi, Gohei; Shibata, Yukimasa; Hayakawa, Tomohiro; Hayakawa, Noriyo; Ohtani, Yasuko; Sinmyozu, Kaori; Tagami, Hideaki; Nakayama, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Histone H3K4 methylation has been linked to transcriptional activation. KDM5A (also known as RBP2 or JARID1A), a member of the KDM5 protein family, is an H3K4 demethylase, previously implicated in the regulation of transcription and differentiation. Here, we show that KDM5A is physically and functionally associated with two histone deacetylase complexes. Immunoaffinity purification of KDM5A confirmed a previously described association with the SIN3B-containing histone deacetylase complex and revealed an association with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex. Sucrose density gradient and sequential immunoprecipitation analyses further confirmed the stable association of KDM5A with these two histone deacetylase complexes. KDM5A depletion led to changes in the expression of hundreds of genes, two-thirds of which were also controlled by CHD4, the NuRD catalytic subunit. Gene ontology analysis confirmed that the genes commonly regulated by both KDM5A and CHD4 were categorized as developmentally regulated genes. ChIP analyses suggested that CHD4 modulates H3K4 methylation levels at the promoter and coding regions of target genes. We further demonstrated that the Caenorhabditis elegans homologues of KDM5 and CHD4 function in the same pathway during vulva development. These results suggest that KDM5A and the NuRD complex cooperatively function to control developmentally regulated genes. PMID:25190814

  4. Limited efficacy of specific HDAC6 inhibition in urothelial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rosik, Lorena; Niegisch, Günter; Fischer, Ute; Jung, Manfred; Schulz, Wolfgang Arthur; Hoffmann, Michèle Janine

    2014-06-01

    Epigenetic modifiers such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) have come into focus as novel drug targets for cancer therapy due to their functional role in tumor progression. Since common pan-HDAC inhibitors have adverse side effects and minor anti-cancer activity against solid tumors, enzyme-specific inhibitors were developed. HDAC6 is especially well-suited for specific inhibition due to its unique domain structure and mode of action and has been suggested to provide an exceptionally suitable target for cancer therapy. However, expression and function of HDACs have been insufficiently studied in urothelial cancers (UC), a disease urgently requiring new therapeutic approaches. The present study sought to evaluate HDAC6 as a target for treatment of urothelial cancers with enzyme-specific inhibitors. We observed moderate HDAC6 overexpression in urothelial cancer tissues and a broad range of expression in urothelial cancer cell lines. In the cell lines Tubacin was the most potent inhibitor, compared with Tubastatin and ST-80, but still active only at high micromolar concentrations. HDAC6 expression levels correlated poorly with sensitivity to enzyme inhibition. Combined treatments with heat shock, HSP90 inhibition by 17-AAG, proteasome inhibition by bortezomib, or DNA-damaging agents did not result in significant synergistic effects. Experiments with siRNA-mediated knockdown further underlined that urothelial cancer cells do not critically depend on HDAC6 expression for survival. PMID:24618845

  5. Limited efficacy of specific HDAC6 inhibition in urothelial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rosik, Lorena; Niegisch, Günter; Fischer, Ute; Jung, Manfred; Schulz, Wolfgang Arthur; Hoffmann, Michèle Janine

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic modifiers such as histone deacetylases (HDACs) have come into focus as novel drug targets for cancer therapy due to their functional role in tumor progression. Since common pan-HDAC inhibitors have adverse side effects and minor anti-cancer activity against solid tumors, enzyme-specific inhibitors were developed. HDAC6 is especially well-suited for specific inhibition due to its unique domain structure and mode of action and has been suggested to provide an exceptionally suitable target for cancer therapy. However, expression and function of HDACs have been insufficiently studied in urothelial cancers (UC), a disease urgently requiring new therapeutic approaches. The present study sought to evaluate HDAC6 as a target for treatment of urothelial cancers with enzyme-specific inhibitors. We observed moderate HDAC6 overexpression in urothelial cancer tissues and a broad range of expression in urothelial cancer cell lines. In the cell lines Tubacin was the most potent inhibitor, compared with Tubastatin and ST-80, but still active only at high micromolar concentrations. HDAC6 expression levels correlated poorly with sensitivity to enzyme inhibition. Combined treatments with heat shock, HSP90 inhibition by 17-AAG, proteasome inhibition by bortezomib, or DNA-damaging agents did not result in significant synergistic effects. Experiments with siRNA-mediated knockdown further underlined that urothelial cancer cells do not critically depend on HDAC6 expression for survival. PMID:24618845

  6. Discovery of HDAC Inhibitors with Potent Activity Against Multiple Malaria Parasite Life Cycle Stages

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Finn K.; Sumanadasa, Subathdrage D. M.; Stenzel, Katharina; Duffy, Sandra; Meister, Stephan; Marek, Linda; Schmetter, Rebekka; Kuna, Krystina; Hamacher, Alexandra; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Kassack, Matthias U.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Avery, Vicky M.; Andrews, Katherine T.; Kurz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigated the antiplasmodial activity of a series of HDAC inhibitors containing an alkoxyamide connecting-unit linker region. HDAC inhibitor 1a (LMK235), previously shown to be a novel and specific inhibitor of human HDAC4 and 5, was used as a starting point to rapidly construct a mini-library of HDAC inhibitors using a straightforward solid-phase supported synthesis. Several of these novel HDAC inhibitors were found to have potent in vitro activity against asexual stage P. falciparum malaria parasites. Representative compounds were shown to hyperacetylate P. falciparum histones and to inhibit deacetylase activity of recombinant PfHDAC1 and P. falciparum nuclear extracts. All compounds were also screened in vitro for activity against P. berghei exo-erythrocytic stages and selected compounds were further tested against late stage (IV and V) P. falciparum gametocytes. Of note, some compounds showed nanomolar activity against all three life cycle stages tested (asexual, exo-erythrocytic and gametocyte stages) and several compounds displayed significantly increased parasite selectivity compared to the reference HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). These data suggest that it may be possible to develop HDAC inhibitors that target multiple malaria parasite life cycle stages. PMID:24904967

  7. HDAC2 deregulation in tumorigenesis is causally connected to repression of immune modulation and defense escape.

    PubMed

    Conte, Mariarosaria; Dell'Aversana, Carmela; Benedetti, Rosaria; Petraglia, Francesca; Carissimo, Annamaria; Petrizzi, Valeria Belsito; D'Arco, Alfonso Maria; Abbondanza, Ciro; Nebbioso, Angela; Altucci, Lucia

    2015-01-20

    Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) is overexpressed or mutated in several disorders such as hematological cancers, and plays a critical role in transcriptional regulation, cell cycle progression and developmental processes. Here, we performed comparative transcriptome analyses in acute myeloid leukemia to investigate the biological implications of HDAC2 silencing versus its enzymatic inhibition using epigenetic-based drug(s). By gene expression analysis of HDAC2-silenced vs wild-type cells, we found that HDAC2 has a specific role in leukemogenesis. Gene expression profiling of U937 cell line with or without treatment of the well-known HDAC inhibitor vorinostat (SAHA) identifies and characterizes several gene clusters where inhibition of HDAC2 'mimics' its silencing, as well as those where HDAC2 is selectively and exclusively regulated by HDAC2 protein expression levels. These findings may represent an important tool for better understanding the mechanisms underpinning immune regulation, particularly in the study of major histocompatibility complex class II genes. PMID:25473896

  8. HDAC6 regulates mutant SOD1 aggregation through two SMIR motifs and tubulin acetylation.

    PubMed

    Gal, Jozsef; Chen, Jing; Barnett, Kelly R; Yang, Liuqing; Brumley, Erin; Zhu, Haining

    2013-05-24

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a tubulin deacetylase that regulates protein aggregation and turnover. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) make the mutant protein prone to aggregation. However, the role of HDAC6 in mutant SOD1 aggregation and the ALS etiology is unclear. Here we report that HDAC6 knockdown increased mutant SOD1 aggregation in cultured cells. Different from its known role in mediating the degradation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, HDAC6 selectively interacted with mutant SOD1 via two motifs similar to the SOD1 mutant interaction region (SMIR) that we identified previously in p62/sequestosome 1. Expression of the aggregation-prone mutant SOD1 increased ?-tubulin acetylation, and the acetylation-mimicking K40Q ?-tubulin mutant promoted mutant SOD1 aggregation. Our results suggest that ALS-linked mutant SOD1 can modulate HDAC6 activity and increase tubulin acetylation, which, in turn, facilitates the microtubule- and retrograde transport-dependent mutant SOD1 aggregation. HDAC6 impairment might be a common feature in various subtypes of ALS. PMID:23580651

  9. The histone deacetylase SIRT6 controls embryonic stem cell fate via TET-mediated production of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Etchegaray, Jean-Pierre; Chavez, Lukas; Huang, Yun; Ross, Kenneth N; Choi, Jiho; Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Walsh, Ryan M; Sommer, Cesar A; Lienhard, Matthias; Gladden, Adrianne; Kugel, Sita; Silberman, Dafne M; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Goren, Alon; Rao, Anjana; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2015-05-01

    How embryonic stem cells (ESCs) commit to specific cell lineages and yield all cell types of a fully formed organism remains a major question. ESC differentiation is accompanied by large-scale histone and DNA modifications, but the relations between these epigenetic categories are not understood. Here we demonstrate the interplay between the histone deacetylase sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) and the ten-eleven translocation enzymes (TETs). SIRT6 targets acetylated histone H3 at Lys 9 and 56 (H3K9ac and H3K56ac), while TETs convert 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). ESCs derived from Sirt6 knockout (S6KO) mice are skewed towards neuroectoderm development. This phenotype involves derepression of OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG, which causes an upregulation of TET-dependent production of 5hmC. Genome-wide analysis revealed neural genes marked with 5hmC in S6KO ESCs, thereby implicating TET enzymes in the neuroectoderm-skewed differentiation phenotype. We demonstrate that SIRT6 functions as a chromatin regulator safeguarding the balance between pluripotency and differentiation through Tet-mediated production of 5hmC. PMID:25915124

  10. HDAC8 Inhibition Specifically Targets Inv(16) Acute Myeloid Leukemic Stem Cells by Restoring p53 Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Singh, Sandeep; Hua, Wei-Kai; Cai, Qi; Chao, Shi-Wei; Li, Ling; Liu, Hongjun; Ho, Yinwei; McDonald, Tinisha; Lin, Allen; Marcucci, Guido; Bhatia, Ravi; Huang, Wei-Jan; Chang, Chung-I; Kuo, Ya-Huei

    2015-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is driven and sustained by leukemia stem cells (LSCs) with unlimited self-renewal capacity and resistance to chemotherapy. Mutation in the TP53 tumor suppressor is relatively rare in de novo AML; however, p53 can be regulated through post-translational mechanisms. Here, we show that p53 activity is inhibited in inv(16)(+) AML LSCs via interactions with the CBF?-SMMHC (CM) fusion protein and histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8). HDAC8 aberrantly deacetylates p53 and promotes LSC transformation and maintenance. HDAC8 deficiency or inhibition using HDAC8-selective inhibitors (HDAC8i) effectively restores p53 acetylation and activity. Importantly, HDAC8 inhibition induces apoptosis in inv(16)(+) AML CD34(+) cells, while sparing the normal hematopoietic stem cells. Furthermore, in vivo HDAC8i administration profoundly diminishes AML propagation and abrogates leukemia-initiating capacity of both murine and patient-derived LSCs. This study elucidates an HDAC8-mediated p53-inactivating mechanism promoting LSC activity and highlights HDAC8 inhibition as a promising approach to selectively target inv(16)(+) LSCs. PMID:26387755

  11. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of isoquinoline-based derivatives as novel histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Li, Lixuan; Wang, Yulan; Wu, Xiaowei; Li, Tingting; Yang, Nan; Su, Mingbo; Sheng, Li; Zheng, Mingyue; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Liu, Hong

    2015-09-01

    The design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of isoquinoline-based hydroxamic acid compounds as novel HDACs inhibitors were reported herein. A detailed SAR study showed most of the compounds displayed good to excellent inhibitory activities against HDAC1, 3, 6. The IC50 values of compound 10 c against HDAC1, 3, 6 were 4.17 ± 0.11 nM, 4.00 ± 0.10 nM, 3.77 ± 0.07 nM, respectively. Most of the compounds showed great anti-proliferative activities against RPMI 8226, HCT 116 and Hep G2 cells. The IC50 values of compounds 10 a-h against RPMI 8226 cancer cell proliferation were all below 1 ?M. HCT 116 cell was sensitive to the compounds 10 a, 10 f-g and 18 a with the IC50 values <0.3 ?M. The active compounds 10a-d did not show inhibitory activity against hERG channel. All these evidence indicated these compounds had great potential as HDACs inhibitors for the further development. PMID:26211462

  12. Highly effective combination of LSD1 (KDM1A) antagonist and pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor against human AML cells.

    PubMed

    Fiskus, W; Sharma, S; Shah, B; Portier, B P; Devaraj, S G T; Liu, K; Iyer, S P; Bearss, D; Bhalla, K N

    2014-11-01

    The histone demethylase LSD1 (KDM1A) demethylates mono- and di-methylated (Me2) lysine (K) 4 on histone H3. High LSD1 expression blocks differentiation and confers a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, treatment with the novel LSD1 antagonist SP2509 attenuated the binding of LSD1 with the corepressor CoREST, increased the permissive H3K4Me3 mark on the target gene promoters, and increased the levels of p21, p27 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein ? in cultured AML cells. In addition, SP2509 treatment or LSD1 shRNA inhibited the colony growth of AML cells. SP2509 also induced morphological features of differentiation in the cultured and primary AML blasts. SP2509 induced more apoptosis of AML cells expressing mutant NPM1 than mixed-lineage leukemia fusion oncoproteins. Treatment with SP2509 alone significantly improved the survival of immune-depleted mice following tail-vein infusion and engraftment of cultured or primary human AML cells. Co-treatment with pan-HDAC inhibitor (HDI) panobinostat (PS) and SP2509 was synergistically lethal against cultured and primary AML blasts. Compared with each agent alone, co-treatment with SP2509 and PS significantly improved the survival of the mice engrafted with the human AML cells, without exhibiting any toxicity. Collectively, these findings show that the combination of LSD1 antagonist and pan-HDI is a promising therapy warranting further testing against AML. PMID:24699304

  13. Comparison of isothiocyanate metabolite levels and histone deacetylase activity in human subjects consuming broccoli sprouts or broccoli supplement

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, John D.; Riedl, Ken; Bella, Deborah; Schwartz, Steven J.; Stevens, Jan F.; Ho, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Increased consumption of cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli may reduce the risk of various cancers. Myrosinase is required to convert dietary glucosinolates from broccoli into bioactive isothiocyanates. We evaluated isothiocyanate excretion profiles in healthy subjects who consumed broccoli sprouts or broccoli supplement (no myrosinase) with equivalent glucosinolate content. Urinary metabolites of two major isothiocyanates, sulforaphane and erucin, were measured by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Peak excretion of sulforaphane and erucin was higher and occurred sooner in subjects who consumed broccoli sprouts compared to subjects who consumed the supplement. A subject-dependent shift in the ratio of urinary sulforaphane to erucin metabolites was observed in both groups indicating conversion of sulforaphane to erucin. Lower histone deacetylase activity was observed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells only in subjects consuming sprouts. In conclusion, fresh broccoli sprouts differ from broccoli supplements in regards to excretion of isothiocyanates and bioactivity in human subjects. PMID:21928849

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid promotes the induction of pluripotency in mouse fibroblasts by suppressing reprogramming-induced senescence stress.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yingying; Chen, Xi; Yu, Dehai; Li, Tao; Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun; Hu, Ji-Fan; Li, Wei

    2015-09-10

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) has been used to increase the reprogramming efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) from somatic cells, yet the specific molecular mechanisms underlying this effect is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that reprogramming with lentiviruses carrying the iPSC-inducing factors (Oct4-Sox2-Klf4-cMyc, OSKM) caused senescence in mouse fibroblasts, establishing a stress barrier for cell reprogramming. Administration of VPA protected cells from reprogramming-induced senescent stress. Using an in vitro pre-mature senescence model, we found that VPA treatment increased cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis through the suppression of the p16/p21 pathway. In addition, VPA also inhibited the G2/M phase blockage derived from the senescence stress. These findings highlight the role of VPA in breaking the cell senescence barrier required for the induction of pluripotency. PMID:26112217

  15. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Inhibit the Proliferation of Gallbladder Carcinoma Cells by Suppressing AKT/mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Guo, Zhiyong; Wu, Ying; Hu, Ronglin; Du, Jun; He, Xiaoshun; Jiao, Xingyuan; Zhu, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Gallbladder carcinoma is an aggressive malignancy with high mortality mainly due to the limited potential for curative resection and its resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Here, we show that the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) trichostatin-A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) reduce the proliferation and induce apoptosis of gallbladder carcinoma cells by suppressing the AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Gallbladder carcinoma SGC-996 cells were treated with different concentrations of TSA and SAHA for different lengths of time. Cell proliferation and morphology were assessed with MTT assay and microscopy, respectively. Cell cycle distribution and cell apoptosis were analyzed with flow cytometry. Western blotting was used to detect the proteins related to apoptosis, cell cycle, and the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Our data showed that TSA and SAHA reduced SGC-996 cell viability and arrested cell cycle at the G1 phase in a dose- and time-dependent manner. TSA and SAHA promoted apoptosis of SGC-996 cells, down-regulated the expression of cyclin D1, c-Myc and Bmi1, and decreased the phosphorylation of AKT, mTOR p70S6K1, S6 and 4E-BP1. Additionally, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin further reduced the cell viability of TSA- and SAHA-treated SGC-996 cells and the phosphorylation of mTOR, whereas the mTOR activator 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (C8-PA) exerted the opposite influence. Our results demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) suppress the proliferation of gallbladder carcinoma cell via inhibition of AKT/mTOR signaling. These findings offer a mechanistic rationale for the application of HDACIs in gallbladder carcinoma treatment. PMID:26287365

  16. HDAC1 inhibition by melatonin leads to suppression of lung adenocarcinoma cells via induction of oxidative stress and activation of apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chongxi; Pan, Yunhu; Yang, Yang; Di, Shouyin; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Zhiqiang; Li, Tian; Zhang, Zhipei; Li, Weimiao; Li, Xiaofei; Reiter, Russel J; Yan, Xiaolong

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin is an indoleamine synthesized in the pineal gland that shows a wide range of physiological and pharmacological functions, including anticancer effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of melatonin on drug-induced cellular apoptosis against the cultured human lung adenocarcinoma cells and explored the role of histone deacetylase (HDAC) signaling in this process. The results showed that melatonin treatment led to a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the viability of human A549 and PC9 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Additionally, melatonin exhibited potent anticancer activity in vitro, as evidenced by reductions of the cell adhesion, migration, and the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level and increases in the apoptotic index, caspase 3 activity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A549 and PC9 cells. Melatonin treatment also influenced the expression of HDAC-related molecules (HDAC1 and Ac-histone H3), upregulated the apoptosis-related molecules (PUMA and Bax), and downregulated the proliferation-related molecule (PCNA) and the anti-apoptosis-related molecule (Bcl2). Furthermore, the inhibition of HDAC signaling using HDAC1 siRNA or SAHA (a potent pan-inhibitor of HDACs) sensitized A549 and PC9 cells to the melatonin treatment. In summary, these data indicate that in vitro-administered melatonin is a potential suppressor of lung adenocarcinoma cells by the targeting of HDAC signaling and suggest that melatonin in combination with HDAC inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic intervention for human lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26184924

  17. Hippocampal HDAC4 Contributes to Postnatal Fluoxetine-Evoked Depression-Like Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Ambalika; Chachra, Parul; Kennedy, Pamela; Pena, Catherine J; Desouza, Lynette A; Nestler, Eric J; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2014-01-01

    Fluoxetine treatment in adulthood evokes antidepressant and anxiolytic responses. Paradoxically, postnatal fluoxetine (PNFlx) induces persistent depression- and anxiety-like behaviors. The mechanistic underpinnings of this paradox remain poorly understood. Here, we examined specific molecular changes in the rat hippocampus that accompany perturbed emotionality observed across life following PNFlx. PNFlx-induced hippocampal gene regulation observed in microarray and quantitative PCR studies indicate functional enrichment of genes involved in response to organic substances, protein kinase pathways, DNA binding, and transcriptional repression. We noted specific transcripts (Hdac4, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Gnai1, protein kinase C gamma (Prkcc), and hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (Hcn1)) that were consistently dysregulated across life, and selectively influenced by postnatal, but not adult, fluoxetine. Increased histone deacetylase-4 (HDAC4) recruitment, accompanied by decreased activating histone acetylation marks at the mTOR and Gnai1 promoters, indicate a role for HDAC4 in PNFlx-mediated gene dysregulation. Strikingly, coadministration of the HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate with PNFlx prevented the dysregulation of Hdac4 and mTOR, and the emergence of depression- and anxiety-like behavior. Importantly, we also find that retreatment of PNFlx animals with fluoxetine in adulthood reversed the increased Hdac4 expression, prevented HDAC4 recruitment to the mTOR and Gnai1 promoters, and attenuated the decline in mTOR and Gnai1 expression, coincident with normalization of PNFlx-evoked depression- and anxiety-like behavior. Further, we show that viral-mediated hippocampal overexpression of Hdac4 was sufficient to induce depression-, but not anxiety-, like behavior in adulthood. Our results highlight the unique nature of molecular signatures evoked by PNFlx, and implicate HDAC4 in the dysregulated gene expression and emergence of perturbed emotionality following fluoxetine exposure in early life. PMID:24663010

  18. Sorafenib and HDAC inhibitors synergize to kill CNS tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yong; Yacoub, Adly; Hamed, Hossein A.; Poklepovic, Andrew; Tye, Gary W.; Grant, Steven; Dent, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine whether the multi-kinase inhibitor sorafenib (Nexavar) interacted with histone deacetylase inhibitors to kill glioblastoma and medulloblastoma cells. In a dose-dependent fashion sorafenib lethality was enhanced in multiple genetically disparate primary human glioblastoma isolates by the HDAC inhibitor sodium valproate (Depakote). Drug exposure reduced phosphorylation of p70 S6K and of mTOR. Similar data to that with valproate were also obtained using the HDAC inhibitor vorinostat (Zolinza). Sorafenib and valproate also interacted to kill medulloblastoma and PNET cell lines. Treatment with sorafenib and HDAC inhibitors radio-sensitized both GBM and medulloblastoma cell lines. Knock down of death receptor (CD95) expression protected GBM cells from the drug combination, as did overexpression of c-FLIP-s, BCL-XL and dominant negative caspase 9. Knock down of PDGFR? recapitulated the effect of sorafenib in combination with HDAC inhibitors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the combination of sorafenib and HDAC inhibitors kills through activation of the extrinsic pathway, and could represent a useful approach to treat CNS-derived tumors. PMID:22406992

  19. Substrate specificity and kinetic mechanism of the Sir2 family of NAD+-dependent histone/protein deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Borra, Margie T; Langer, Michael R; Slama, James T; Denu, John M

    2004-08-01

    The Silent information regulator 2 (Sir2) family of enzymes consists of NAD(+)-dependent histone/protein deacetylases that tightly couple the hydrolysis of NAD(+) and the deacetylation of an acetylated substrate to form nicotinamide, the deacetylated product, and the novel metabolite O-acetyl-ADP-ribose (OAADPR). In this paper, we analyzed the substrate specificity of the yeast Sir2 (ySir2), the yeast HST2, and the human SIRT2 homologues toward various monoacetylated histone H3 and H4 peptides, determined the basic kinetic mechanism, and resolved individual chemical steps of the Sir2 reaction. Using steady-state kinetic analysis, we have shown that ySir2, HST2, and SIRT2 exhibit varying catalytic efficiencies and display a preference among the monoacetylated peptide substrates. Bisubstrate kinetic analysis indicates that Sir2 enzymes follow a sequential mechanism, where both the acetylated substrate and NAD(+) must bind to form a ternary complex, prior to any catalytic step. Using rapid-kinetic analysis, we have shown that after ternary complex formation, nicotinamide cleavage occurs first, followed by the transfer of the acetyl group from the donor substrate to the ADP-ribose portion of NAD(+) to form OAADPr and the deacetylated product. Product and dead-end inhibition analyses revealed that nicotinamide is the first product released followed by random release of OAADPr and the deacetylated product. PMID:15274642

  20. SCARECROW-LIKE15 interacts with HISTONE DEACETYLASE19 and is essential for repressing the seed maturation programme

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming-Jun; Li, Xiang; Huang, Jun; Gropp, Gordon M.; Gjetvaj, Branimir; Lindsay, Donna L.; Wei, Shu; Coutu, Cathy; Chen, Zhixiang; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Lydiate, Derek J.; Gruber, Margaret Y.; Chen, Z. Jeffrey; Hegedus, Dwayne D.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is critical for controlling embryonic properties during the embryo-to-seedling phase transition. Here we report that a HISTONE DEACETYLASE19 (HDA19)-associated regulator, SCARECROW-LIKE15 (SCL15), is essential for repressing the seed maturation programme in vegetative tissues. SCL15 is expressed in and GFP-tagged SCL15 predominantly localizes to, the vascular bundles particularly in the phloem companion cells and neighbouring specialized cells. Mutation of SCL15 leads to a global shift in gene expression in seedlings to a profile resembling late embryogenesis in seeds. In scl15 seedlings, many genes involved in seed maturation are markedly derepressed with concomitant accumulation of seed 12S globulin; this is correlated with elevated levels of histone acetylation at a subset of seed-specific loci. SCL15 physically interacts with HDA19 and direct targets of HDA19–SCL15 association are identified. These studies reveal that SCL15 acts as an HDA19-associated regulator to repress embryonic traits in seedlings. PMID:26129778

  1. The histone deacetylase HDA19 controls root cell elongation and modulates a subset of phosphate starvation responses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Ying; Wu, Keqiang; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The length of root epidermal cells and their patterning into files of hair-bearing and non-hair cells are genetically determined but respond with high plasticity to environmental cues. Limited phyto-availability of the essential mineral nutrient phosphate (Pi) increases the number of root hairs by longitudinal shortening of epidermal cells and by reprogramming the fate of cells in positions normally occupied by non-hair cells. Through analysis of the root morphology and transcriptional profiles from transgenic Arabidopsis lines with altered expression of the histone deacetylase HDA19, we show that in an intricate interplay of Pi availability and intrinsic factors, HDA19 controls the epidermal cell length, probably by altering the positional bias that dictates epidermal patterning. In addition, HDA19 regulates several Pi-responsive genes that encode proteins with important regulatory or metabolic roles in the acclimation to Pi deficiency. In particular, HDA19 affects genes encoding SPX (SYG1/Pho81/XPR) domain-containing proteins and genes involved in membrane lipid remodeling, a key response to Pi starvation that increases the free Pi in plants. Our data add a novel, non-transcriptionally regulated component of the Pi signaling network and emphasize the importance of reversible post-translational histone modification for the integration of external signals into intrinsic developmental and metabolic programs. PMID:26508133

  2. Class II-specific histone deacetylase inhibitors MC1568 and MC1575 suppress IL-8 expression in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Venza, I; Visalli, M; Oteri, R; Cucinotta, M; Teti, D; Venza, M

    2013-03-01

    Here, we explored the effects of the novel class II-specific histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) MC1568 and MC1575 on interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression and cell proliferation in cutaneous melanoma cell line GR-M and uveal melanoma cell line OCM-3 upon stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). We found that PMA upregulated IL-8 transcription via the AP-1 binding site and identified c-Jun as the transcription factor involved in this eventS. MC1568 and MC1575 inhibited IL-8 levels and cell proliferation in either unstimulated or PMA-stimulated melanoma cells. They acted by suppressing (i) c-Jun binding to the IL-8 promoter, (ii) recruitment of histones 3 and 4, RNA polymerase II and TFIIB to the c-Jun promoter, and (iii) c-Jun expression. Our findings provide new insights into mechanisms underlying anti-tumoral activities of class II-specific HDACis in human melanoma and suggest that they may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for improving the treatment of this cancer. PMID:23176534

  3. Class I HDACs are mediators of smoke-carcinogen induced stabilization of DNMT1 and serve as promising targets for chemoprevention of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Seth A; Li, Ge; El-Kommos, Adam; Kang, Hyunseok; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Behera, Madhusmita; Gandhi, Khanjan; Kowalski, Jeanne; Sica, Gabriel L; Khuri, Fadlo R; Vertino, Paula M.; Brandes, Johann C

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is an early event in bronchial carcinogenesis and increased DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)1 protein expression is a crucial step in the oncogenic transformation of epithelia. Here, we investigate the role of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1–3 in the stabilization of DNMT1 protein and as a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer chemoprevention. Long-term exposure of immortalized bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC-3KT) to low doses of tobacco-related carcinogens led to oncogenic transformation, increased HDAC expression, cell cycle independent increased DNMT1 stability and DNA hypermethylation. Overexpression of HDACs was associated with increased DNMT1 stability and knockdown of HDACs reduced DNMT1 protein levels and induced DNMT1 acetylation. This suggests a causal relationship among increased class I HDACs levels, upregulation of DNMT1 protein, and subsequent promoter hypermethylation. Targeting of class I HDACs with valproic acid (VPA) was associated with reduced HDAC expression and a profound reduction of DNMT1 protein level. Treatment of transformed bronchial epithelial cells with VPA resulted in reduced colony formation, demethylation of the aberrantly methylated SFRP2 promoter and de-repression of SFRP2 transcription. These data suggest that inhibition of HDAC activity may reverse or prevent carcinogen induced transformation. Finally, immunohistochemistry on human lung cancer specimens revealed a significant increase in DNMT1, HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 expression, supporting our hypotheses that class I HDACs are mediators of DNMT1 stability. In summary, our study provides evidence for an important role of class I HDACs in controlling the stability of DNMT1 and suggests that HDAC inhibition could be an attractive approach for lung cancer chemoprevention. PMID:24441677

  4. Curcumin restores corticosteroid function in monocytes exposed to oxidants by maintaining HDAC2.

    PubMed

    Meja, Koremu K; Rajendrasozhan, Saravanan; Adenuga, David; Biswas, Saibal K; Sundar, Isaac K; Spooner, Gillian; Marwick, John A; Chakravarty, Probir; Fletcher, Danielle; Whittaker, Paul; Megson, Ian L; Kirkham, Paul A; Rahman, Irfan

    2008-09-01

    Oxidative stress as a result of cigarette smoking is an important etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a chronic steroid-insensitive inflammatory disease of the airways. Histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2), a critical component of the corticosteroid anti-inflammatory action, is impaired in lungs of patients with COPD and correlates with disease severity. We demonstrate here that curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a dietary polyphenol, at nanomolar concentrations specifically restores cigarette smoke extract (CSE)- or oxidative stress-impaired HDAC2 activity and corticosteroid efficacy in vitro with an EC(50) of approximately 30 nM and 200 nM, respectively. CSE caused a reduction in HDAC2 protein expression that was restored by curcumin. This decrease in HDAC2 protein expression was reversed by curcumin even in the presence of cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor. The proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, also blocked CSE-induced HDAC2 degradation, increasing the levels of ubiquitinated HDAC2. Biochemical and gene chip analysis indicated that curcumin at concentrations up to 1 muM propagates its effect via antioxidant-independent mechanisms associated with the phosphorylation-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Thus curcumin acts at a post-translational level by maintaining both HDAC2 activity and expression, thereby reversing steroid insensitivity induced by either CSE or oxidative stress in monocytes. Curcumin may therefore have potential to reverse steroid resistance, which is common in patients with COPD and asthma. PMID:18421014

  5. Ron Knockdown and Ron Monoclonal Antibody IMC-RON8 Sensitize Pancreatic Cancer to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi)

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yi; Howell, Gillian M.; Humphrey, Lisa E.; Wang, Jing; Brattain, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Recepteur d’origine nantais (Ron) is overexpressed in a panel of pancreatic cancer cells and tissue samples from pancreatic cancer patients. Ron can be activated by its ligand macrophage stimulating protein (MSP), thereby activating oncogenic signaling pathways. Crosstalk between Ron and EGFR, c-Met, or IGF-1R may provide a mechanism underlying drug resistance. Thus, targeting Ron may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. IMC-RON8 is the first Ron monoclonal antibody (mAb) entering clinical trial for targeting Ron overexpression. Our studies show IMC-RON8 downmodulated Ron expression in pancreatic cancer cells and significantly blocked MSP-stimulated Ron activation, downstream Akt and ERK phosphorylation, and survivin mRNA expression. IMC-RON8 hindered MSP-induced cell migration and reduced cell transformation. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are reported to target expression of various genes through modification of nucleosome histones and non-histone proteins. Our work shows HDACi TSA and Panobinostat (PS) decreased Ron mRNA and protein expression in pancreatic cancer cells. PS also reduced downstream signaling of pAkt, survivin, and XIAP, as well as enhanced cell apoptosis. Interestingly, PS reduced colony formation in Ron knockdown cells to a greater extent than Ron scramble control cells in colony formation and soft agarose assays. IMC-RON8 could also sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to PS, as reflected by reduced colony numbers and size in combination treatment with IMC-RON8 and PS compared to single treatment alone. The co-treatment further reduced Ron expression and pAkt, and increased PARP cleavage compared to either treatment alone. This study suggests the potential for a novel combination approach which may ultimately be of value in treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23922886

  6. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Jian-Ying; Hung, Jan-Jong; Institute of Bioinformatics and Biosignal Transduction, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. {yields} Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  7. Histone acetylation mediates epigenetic regulation of transcriptional reprogramming in insects during metamorphosis, wounding and infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene expression in eukaryotes is regulated by histone acetylation/deacetylation, an epigenetic process mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) whose opposing activities are tightly regulated. The acetylation of histones by HATs increases DNA accessibility and promotes gene expression, whereas the removal of acetyl groups by HDACs has the opposite effect. Results We explored the role of HDACs and HATs in epigenetic reprogramming during metamorphosis, wounding and infection in the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella. We measured the expression of genes encoding components of HATs and HDACs to monitor the transcriptional activity of each enzyme complex and found that both enzymes were upregulated during pupation. Specific HAT inhibitors were able to postpone pupation and to reduce insect survival following wounding, whereas HDAC inhibitors accelerated pupation and increased survival. The administration of HDAC inhibitors modulated the expression of effector genes with key roles in tissue remodeling (matrix metalloproteinase), the regulation of sepsis (inhibitor of metalloproteinases from insects) and host defense (antimicrobial peptides), and simultaneously induced HAT activity, suggesting that histone acetylation is regulated by a feedback mechanism. We also discovered that both the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can delay metamorphosis in G. mellonella by skewing the HDAC/HAT balance. Conclusions Our study provides for the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria can interfere with the regulation of HDACs and HATs in insects which appear to manipulate host immunity and development. We conclude that histone acetylation/deacetylation in insects mediates transcriptional reprogramming during metamorphosis and in response to wounding and infection. PMID:23035888

  8. Bryostatin-1 synergizes with histone deacetylase inhibitors to reactivate HIV-1 from latency.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Moisés; de Vinuesa, Amaya García; Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Marquez, Nieves; Bellido, M Luz; Muñoz-Fernandez, M Angeles; Moreno, Santiago; Castor, Trevor P; Calzado, Marco A; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2010-09-01

    The persistence of latent HIV-infected cellular reservoirs represents the major hurdle to virus eradication on patients treated with HAART. It has been suggested that successful depletion of such latent reservoirs will require a combination of therapeutic agents that can specifically and efficiently act on cells harboring latent HIV-1 provirus. Using Jurkat-LAT-GFP cells, a tractable model of HIV-1 latency, we have found that bryostatin -1 reactivates HIV-1 through a classical PKC-dependent pathway. Bryostatin-1 also activates MAPKs and NF-?B pathways and synergizes with HDAC inhibitors to reactivate HIV-1 from latency. Bryostatin-1 downregulates the expression of the HIV-1 co-receptors CD4 and CXCR4 and prevented de novo HIV-1 infection in susceptible cells. We applied proteomic methods to investigate major changes in protein expression in Jurkat-LAT-GFP under latency and reactivation conditions. We identified up-regulation of proteins that may be involved in the innate anti-HIV-1 response (NKEF-A and MHD2) and in different cell functions (i.e. cofilin-1 and transgelin-2) of the host cells. PKC agonists may represent a valuable pharmacological approach to purge latent HIV from cellular reservoirs and at the moment, the only clinically available PKC agonist is bryostatin-1. This drug has been tested in numerous clinical trials and its pharmacokinetics and toxicity in humans is well known. Moreover, bryostatin-1 potently synergizes with other HDAC inhibitors commonly used in the medical practice such as valproic acid. Therefore, bryostatin-1, alone or in combination with HDAC inhibitors, could be used in HAART treated patients to validate the hypothesis that reactivating HIV-1 from latency could purge HIV-1 reservoirs. PMID:20636281

  9. Cep70 regulates microtubule stability by interacting with HDAC6.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xingjuan; Yao, Yanjun; Wang, Yujue; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Qinghai; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen

    2015-07-01

    Microtubules, highly dynamic components of the cytoskeleton, are involved in mitosis, cell migration and intracellular trafficking. Our previous work has shown that the centrosomal protein Cep70 regulates microtubule organization and mitotic spindle orientation in mammalian cells. However, it remains elusive whether Cep70 is implicated in microtubule stability. Here we demonstrate that Cep70 enhances microtubule resistance to cold or nocodazole treatment. Our data further show that Cep70 promotes microtubule stability by regulating tubulin acetylation, and plays an important role in stabilizing microtubules. Mechanistic studies reveal that Cep70 interacts and colocalizes with histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that Cep70 promotes microtubule stability by interaction with HDAC6 and regulation of tubulin acetylation. PMID:26112604

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibition protects hearing against acute ototoxicity by activating the Nf-?B pathway

    PubMed Central

    Layman, WS; Williams, DM; Dearman, JA; Sauceda, MA; Zuo, J

    2015-01-01

    Auditory hair cells have repeatedly been shown to be susceptible to ototoxicity from a multitude of drugs including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Here, we found that systemic HDAC inhibition using suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on adult mice offers almost complete protection against hair cell loss and hearing threshold shifts from acute ototoxic insult from kanamycin potentiated with furosemide. We also found that the apparent lack of hair cell loss was completely independent of spontaneous or facilitated (ectopic Atoh1 induction) hair cell regeneration. Rather, SAHA treatment correlated with RelA acetylation (K310) and subsequent activation of the Nf-?B pro-survival pathway leading to expression of pro-survival genes such as Cflar (cFLIP) and Bcl2l1 (Bcl-xL). In addition, we also detected increased expression of pro-survival genes Cdkn1a (p21) and Hspa1a (Hsp70), and decreased expression of the pro-apoptosis gene Bcl2l11 (Bim). These data combined provide evidence that class I HDACs control the transcriptional activation of pro-survival pathways in response to ototoxic insult by regulating the acetylation status of transcription factors found at the crossroads of cell death and survival in the mammalian inner ear. PMID:26279947

  11. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Selective Modulation of microRNAs and mRNAs by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor in B Cells Induced to Undergo Class-Switch DNA Recombination and Plasma Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian; Sanchez, Helia N.; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    As we have suggested, epigenetic factors, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), can interact with genetic programs to regulate B cell functions, thereby informing antibody and autoantibody responses. We have shown that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDI) inhibit the differentiation events critical to the maturation of the antibody response: class-switch DNA recombination (CSR), somatic hypermutation (SHM), and plasma cell differentiation, by modulating intrinsic B cell mechanisms. HDI repress the expression of AID and Blimp-1, which are critical for CSR/SHM and plasma cell differentiation, respectively, in mouse and human B cells by upregulating selected miRNAs that silenced AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 mRNAs, as demonstrated by multiple qRT-PCRs (J Immunol 193:5933–5950, 2014). To further define the selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of miRNA and gene expression, we performed genome-wide miRNA-Seq and mRNA-Seq analysis in B cells stimulated by LPS plus IL-4 and treated with HDI or nil. Consistent with what we have shown using qRT-PCR, these HDI-treated B cells displayed reduced expression of Aicda and Prdm1, and increased expression of miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361, which target Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b, which target Prdm1. In B cells induced to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation, about 23% of over 22,000 mRNAs analyzed were expressed at a significantly high copy number (more than 20 copies/cell). Only 18 (0.36%) of these highly expressed mRNAs, including Aicda, Prdm1, and Xbp1, were downregulated by HDI by 50% or more. Further, only 16 (0.30%) of the highly expressed mRNAs were upregulated (more than twofold) by HDI. The selectivity of HDI-mediated modulation of gene expression was emphasized by unchanged expression of the genes that are involved in regulation, targeting, or DNA repair processes of CSR, as well as unchanged expression of the genes encoding epigenetic regulators and factors that are important for cell signaling or apoptosis. Our findings indicate that, in B cells induced to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation, HDI modulate selected miRNAs and mRNAs, possibly as a result of HDACs existing in unique contexts of HDAC/cofactor complexes, as occurring in B lymphocytes, particularly when in an activated state. PMID:26697020

  12. Is There a Future for Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in the Pharmacotherapy of Psychiatric Disorders?

    E-print Network

    Champagne, Frances A.

    , and drug addiction (Tsankova et al., 2007). Article, publication date, and citation information can role in a wide range of diseases. The histone code has developed as a new layer of our appreciation less is known regarding the effect these drugs have on postmitotic cells such as neurons. Before we

  13. The Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Valproic Acid Enhances Acquisition, Extinction, and Reconsolidation of Conditioned Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredy, Timothy W.; Barad, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Histone modifications contribute to the epigenetic regulation of gene expression, a process now recognized to be important for the consolidation of long-term memory. Valproic acid (VPA), used for many years as an anticonvulsant and a mood stabilizer, has effects on learning and memory and enhances the extinction of conditioned fear through its…

  14. Structural and functional characterization of a cell cycle associated HDAC1/2 complex reveals the structural basis for complex assembly and nucleosome targeting

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Toshimasa; Fairall, Louise; Muskett, Frederick W.; Milano, Charles P.; Watson, Peter J.; Arnaudo, Nadia; Saleh, Almutasem; Millard, Christopher J.; El-Mezgueldi, Mohammed; Martino, Fabrizio; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies have identified a novel histone deacetylase complex that is upregulated during mitosis and is associated with cyclin A. This complex is conserved from nematodes to man and contains histone deacetylases 1 and 2, the MIDEAS corepressor protein and a protein called DNTTIP1 whose function was hitherto poorly understood. Here, we report the structures of two domains from DNTTIP1. The amino-terminal region forms a tight dimerization domain with a novel structural fold that interacts with and mediates assembly of the HDAC1:MIDEAS complex. The carboxy-terminal domain of DNTTIP1 has a structure related to the SKI/SNO/DAC domain, despite lacking obvious sequence homology. We show that this domain in DNTTIP1 mediates interaction with both DNA and nucleosomes. Thus, DNTTIP1 acts as a dimeric chromatin binding module in the HDAC1:MIDEAS corepressor complex. PMID:25653165

  15. Histone Acetylation Enzymes Coordinate Metabolism and Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuan; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Dao-Xiu

    2015-10-01

    Histone lysine acetylation is well known for being important in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Recent studies have uncovered a plethora of acetylated proteins involved in important metabolic pathways, such as photosynthesis and respiration in plants. Enzymes involved in histone acetylation and deacetylation are being identified as regulators of acetylation of metabolic enzymes. Importantly, key metabolites, such as acetyl-CoA and NAD(+), are involved in protein acetylation and deacetylation processes, and their cellular levels may regulate the activity of histone acetyltransferases (HAT) and deacetylases (HDAC). Further research is required to determine whether and how HATs and HDACs sense cellular metabolite signals to control gene expression and metabolic enzyme activity through lysine acetylation and deacetylation. PMID:26440431

  16. Discovery of the First N-Hydroxycinnamamide-Based Histone Deacetylase 1/3 Dual Inhibitors with Potent Oral Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we designed and synthesized a novel series of N-hydroxycinnamamide-based HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs), among which the representative compound 14a exhibited promising HDACs inhibition and antitumor activity. In this current study, we report the development of a more potent class of N-hydroxycinnamamide-based HDACIs, using 14a as lead, among which, compound 11r gave IC50 values of 11.8, 498.1, 3.9, 2000.8, 5700.4, 308.2, and 900.4 nM for the inhibition of HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC8, HDAC4, HDAC6, and HDAC11, exhibiting dual HDAC1/3 selectivity. Compounds 11e, 11r, 11w, and 11y showed excellent growth inhibition in multiple tumor cell lines. In vivo antitumor assay in U937 xenograft model identified compound 11r as a potent, orally active HDACI. To the best of our knowledge, this work constitutes the first report of oral active N-hydroxycinnamamide-based HDACIs with dual HDAC1/3 selectivity. PMID:24694055

  17. Inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) by 4-phenylbutyrate results in increased junctional conductance between rat corpora smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Zhan; Rosati, Barbara; Gordon, Chris; Valiunas, Virginijus; McKinnon, David; Cohen, Ira S.; Brink, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB) has been shown to increase the protein content in a number of cells types. One such protein is Connexin43 (Cx43). We show here that 4-phenylbutyrate exposure results in significantly elevated cell to cell coupling, as determined by dual whole cell patch clamp. Incubation with 5 mM 4PB for 24 h or more nearly doubles junctional conductance. Interestingly, mRNA levels for Cx43 declined with exposure to 4-PB while western blot analysis revealed not significant change in protein levels. These data are most consistent with stabilization of the existing Cx43 pool or alterations in the number of functional channels within an existing pool of active and silent channels. These data represent a baseline for testing the efficacy of increased connexin mediated coupling in a variety of multicellular functions including erectile function. PMID:25691868

  18. Role of chromatin structure modulation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A on the radio-sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Meschini, Roberta; Morucci, Elisa; Berni, Andrea; Lopez-Martinez, Wilner; Palitti, Fabrizio

    2015-07-01

    At present, a lot is known about biochemical aspects of double strand breaks (DBS) repair but how chromatin structure affects this process and the sensitivity of DNA to DSB induction is still an unresolved question. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) patients are characterised by very high sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents such as ionising radiation. This radiosensitivity is revealed with an enhancement of chromosomal instability as a consequence of defective DNA repair for a small fraction of breaks located in the heterochromatin, where they are less accessible. Besides, recently it has been reported that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) mediated signalling modifies chromatin structure. In order to study the impact of chromatin compaction on the chromosomal instability of A-T cells, the response to trichostatin-A, an histone deacetylase inhibitor, in normal and A-T lymphoblastoid cell lines was investigated testing its effect on chromosomal aberrations, cell cycle progression, DNA damage and repair after exposure to X-rays. The results suggest that the response to both trichostatin-A pre- and continuous treatments is independent of the presence of either functional or mutated ATM protein, as the reduction of chromosomal damage was found also in the wild-type cell line. The presence of trichostatin-A before exposure to X-rays could give rise to prompt DNA repair functioning on chromatin structure already in an open conformation. Differently, trichostatin-A post-treatment causing hyperacetylation of histone tails and reducing the heterochromatic DNA content might diminish the requirement for ATM and favour DSBs repair reducing chromosomal damage only in A-T cells. This fact could suggest that trichostatin-A post-treatment is favouring the slow component of DSB repair pathway, the one impaired in absence of a functionally ATM protein. Data obtained suggest a fundamental role of chromatin compaction on chromosomal instability in A-T cells. PMID:25942615

  19. The histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat (SNDX-275) induces apoptosis in Hodgkin lymphoma cells and synergizes with Bcl-2 family inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jóna, Ádám; Khaskhely, Noor; Buglio, Daniela; Shafer, Jessica A.; Derenzini, Enrico; Bollard, Catherine M.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Illés, Árpád; Ji, Yuan; Younes, Anas

    2011-01-01

    Objective Based on promising in vitro and in vivo activity of several histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi’s) in HL (Hodgkin lymphoma), we investigated SNDX-275, an oral class 1 isoform–selective HDACi in HL-derived cell lines. Materials and Methods Proliferation and cell death were examined by MTS assay, Annexin-V/propidium iodide, and FACS analysis. Gene and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical analysis. A multiplex assay was used to determine cytokines and chemokines. Results SNDX-275 induced cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner with an IC50 at the sub- and lower micromolar range at 72 hours. At the molecular level, SNDX-275 increased histone H3 acetylation, up-regulated p21 expression, and activated the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by down-regulating the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). SNDX-275 down-regulated the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins without altering Mcl-1 or Bax levels. Combination studies demonstrated that two Bcl-2 inhibitors (ABT-737 and obatoclax) significantly enhanced the effect of SNDX-275. SNDX-275 modulated the level of several cytokines and chemokines, including IL-12 p40-70, IP-10, RANTES, IL-13, IL-4, and TARC, and variably induced the cancer/testis antigen expression of MAGE-A4 and survivin in HL cell lines. Conclusions SNDX-275 has antiproliferative activity in HL cell lines, involving several mechanisms: induction of apoptosis, regulation of cytokines and chemokines, and alteration of CTAs. Clinical investigation of SNDX-275 alone or in combination with Bcl-2 inhibitors is warranted in patients with HL. Phase 2 studies with SNDX-275 in HL are ongoing, and future clinical studies should investigate combinations with SNDX-275. PMID:21767511

  20. HDAC5 is required for maintenance of pericentric heterochromatin, and controls cell-cycle progression and survival of human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, P; Castronovo, V; Matheus, N; Polese, C; Peulen, O; Gonzalez, A; Boxus, M; Verdin, E; Thiry, M; Dequiedt, F; Mottet, D

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) form a family of enzymes, which have fundamental roles in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and contribute to the growth, differentiation, and apoptosis of cancer cells. In this study, we further investigated the biological function of HDAC5 in cancer cells. We found HDAC5 is associated with actively replicating pericentric heterochromatin during late S phase. We demonstrated that specific depletion of HDAC5 by RNA interference resulted in profound changes in the heterochromatin structure and slowed down ongoing replication forks. This defect in heterochromatin maintenance and assembly are sensed by DNA damage checkpoint pathways, which triggered cancer cells to autophagy and apoptosis, and arrested their growth both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we also demonstrated that HDAC5 depletion led to enhanced sensitivity of DNA to DNA-damaging agents, suggesting that heterochromatin de-condensation induced by histone HDAC5 silencing may enhance the efficacy of cytotoxic agents that act by targeting DNA in vitro. Together, these results highlighted for the first time an unrecognized link between HDAC5 and the maintenance/assembly of heterochromatin structure, and demonstrated that its specific inhibition might contribute to increase the efficacy of DNA alteration-based cancer therapies in clinic. PMID:22301920

  1. Metabolic Effects of Known and Novel HDAC and SIRT Inhibitors in Glioblastomas Independently or Combined with Temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Touaibia, Mohamed; St-Coeur, Patrick-Denis; Poitras, Julie; Morin, Pier Jr; Culf, Adrian S.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of protein deacetylation enzymes, alone or in combination with standard chemotherapies, is an exciting addition to cancer therapy. We have investigated the effect of deacetylase inhibition on the metabolism of glioblastoma cells. 1H NMR metabolomics analysis was used to determine the major metabolic changes following treatment of two distinct glioblastoma cell lines, U373 and LN229, with five different histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, as well as one inhibitor of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases (SIRT). The addition of the standard glioblastoma chemotherapy agent, temozolomide, to the HDAC and SIRT treatments led to a reduction in cell survival, suggesting a possibility for combined treatment. This study shows that distinct glioblastoma cell lines, with different metabolic profiles and gene expression, experience dissimilar changes following treatment with protein deacetylase inhibitors. The observed effects of inhibitors on mitochondrial metabolism, glycolysis and fatty acid synthesis suggest possible roles of protein deacetylases in metabolism regulation. Metabolic markers of the effectiveness of anti-protein deacetylase treatments have been explored. In addition to known deacetylation inhibitors, three novel inhibitors have been introduced and tested. Finally, 1H NMR analysis of cellular metabolism is shown to be a fast, inexpensive method for testing drug effects. PMID:25222834

  2. Curcumin-induced histone hypoacetylation: the role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiuhong; Chen, Jie; Shi, Yufeng; Jia, Jie; Zhang, Yuntao

    2005-04-15

    Curcumin (Cur), a well-known dietary pigment derived from Curcuma longa, is a promising anticancer drug, but its in vivo target molecules remain to be clarified. Here we report that exposure of human hepatoma cells to Cur led to a significant decrease of histone acetylation. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) are the enzymes controlling the state of histone acetylation in vivo. Cur treatment resulted in a comparable inhibition of histone acetylation in the absence or presence of trichostatin A (the specific HDAC inhibitor), and showed no effect on the in vitro activity of HDAC. In contrast, the domain negative of p300 (a most potent HAT protein) could block the inhibition of Cur on histone acetylation; and the Cur treatment significantly inhibited the HAT activity both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, it is HAT, but not HDAC that is involved in Cur-induced histone hypoacetylation. At the same time, exposure of cells to low or high concentrations of Cur diminished or enhanced the ROS generation, respectively. And the promotion of ROS was obviously involved in Cur-induced histone hypoacetylation, since Cur-caused histone acetylation and HAT activity decrease could be markedly diminished by the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) or their combination, but not by their heat-inactivated forms. The data presented here prove that HAT is one of the in vivo target molecules of Cur; through inhibiting its activity, Cur induces histone hypoacetylation in vivo, where the ROS generation plays an important role. Considering the critical roles of histone acetylation in eukaryotic gene transcription and the involvement of histone hypoacetylation in the lose of cell viability caused by high concentrations of Cur, these results open a new door for us to further understand the molecular mechanism involved in the in vivo function of Cur. PMID:15794941

  3. EGCG-mediated autophagy flux has a neuroprotection effect via a class III histone deacetylase in primary neuron cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Kim, Sung-Wook; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Nazim, Uddin MD; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Park, Sang-Youel

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases caused by aggregated misfolded prion protein (PrP) are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders that occur in both humans and animals. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has preventive effects on prion disease; however, the mechanisms related to preventing prion diseases are unclear. We investigated whether EGCG, the main polyphenol in green tea, prevents neuron cell damage induced by the human prion protein. We also studied the neuroprotective mechanisms and proper signals mediated by EGCG. The results showed that EGCG protects the neuronal cells against human prion protein-induced damage through inhibiting Bax and cytochrome c translocation and autophagic pathways by increasing LC3-II and reducing and blocking p62 by using ATG5 small interfering (si) RNA and autophagy inhibitors. We further demonstrated that the neuroprotective effects of EGCG were exhibited by a class III histone deacetylase; sirt1 activation and the neuroprotective effects attenuated by sirt1 inactivation using sirt1 siRNA and sirtinol. We demonstrated that EGCG activated the autophagic pathways by inducing sirt1, and had protective effects against human prion protein-induced neuronal cell toxicity. These results suggest that EGCG may be a therapeutic agent for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders including prion diseases. PMID:25991666

  4. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Increase p27Kip1 by Affecting Its Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation through Skp2 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Borriello, Adriana; Naviglio, Silvio; Bencivenga, Debora; Caldarelli, Ilaria; Tramontano, Annunziata; Speranza, Maria Carmela; Stampone, Emanuela; Sapio, Luigi; Negri, Aide; Oliva, Adriana; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Spina, Annamaria; Della Ragione, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) represent an intriguing class of pharmacologically active compounds. Currently, some HDACIs are FDA approved for cancer therapy and many others are in clinical trials, showing important clinical activities at well tolerated doses. HDACIs also interfere with the aging process and are involved in the control of inflammation and oxidative stress. In vitro, HDACIs induce different cellular responses including growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we evaluated the effects of HDACIs on p27Kip1, a key cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI). We observed that HDACI-dependent antiproliferative activity is associated with p27Kip1 accumulation due to a reduced protein degradation. p27Kip1 removal requires a preliminary ubiquitination step due to the Skp2-SCF E3 ligase complex. We demonstrated that HDACIs increase p27Kip1 stability through downregulation of Skp2 protein levels. Skp2 decline is only partially due to a reduced Skp2 gene expression. Conversely, the protein decrease is more profound and enduring compared to the changes of Skp2 transcript. This argues for HDACIs effects on Skp2 protein posttranslational modifications and/or on its removal. In summary, we demonstrate that HDACIs increase p27Kip1 by hampering its nuclear ubiquitination/degradation. The findings might be of relevance in the phenotypic effects of these compounds, including their anticancer and aging-modulating activities. PMID:26682002

  5. Invasive Cell Fate Requires G1 Cell-Cycle Arrest and Histone Deacetylase-Mediated Changes in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Matus, David Q; Lohmer, Lauren L; Kelley, Laura C; Schindler, Adam J; Kohrman, Abraham Q; Barkoulas, Michalis; Zhang, Wan; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R

    2015-10-26

    Despite critical roles in development and cancer, the mechanisms that specify invasive cellular behavior are poorly understood. Through a screen of transcription factors in Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified G1 cell-cycle arrest as a precisely regulated requirement of the anchor cell (AC) invasion program. We show that the nuclear receptor nhr-67/tlx directs the AC into G1 arrest in part through regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor cki-1. Loss of nhr-67 resulted in non-invasive, mitotic ACs that failed to express matrix metalloproteinases or actin regulators and lack invadopodia, F-actin-rich membrane protrusions that facilitate invasion. We further show that G1 arrest is necessary for the histone deacetylase HDA-1, a key regulator of differentiation, to promote pro-invasive gene expression and invadopodia formation. Together, these results suggest that invasive cell fate requires G1 arrest and that strategies targeting both G1-arrested and actively cycling cells may be needed to halt metastatic cancer. PMID:26506306

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitor suberoyl bis-hydroxamic acid suppresses cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmiao; Zhang, Ning; Shi, Zeliang; Yang, Zhangyu; Hu, Xichun

    2015-04-01

    Suberoyl bis?hydroxamic acid (SBHA) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor that has shown anticancer activity against numerous types of human cancer. The aim of the current study was to explore the effects of SBHA on the proliferation and apoptosis of breast cancer cells. MCF?7 breast cancer cells were treated with different concentrations of SBHA and tested for cell viability, apoptosis and gene expression changes. The results showed that SBHA significantly inhibited the proliferation of MCF?7 cells in a concentration?dependent manner, as determined using a Cell Counting kit?8 assay. SBHA?treated MCF?7 cells showed G0/G1 cell?cycle arrest, coupled with elevated expression levels of p21 and p27 proteins. Hoechst 33258 staining revealed cell shrinkage, chromosomal condensation and nuclear fragmentation in MCF?7 cells treated with SBHA. Flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V?stained cells showed that SBHA treatment induced apoptotic cell death in a concentration?dependent manner. Western blot analysis confirmed the upregulation of Bax and the downregulation of Bcl?2 by SBHA. In conclusion, these results indicate that SBHA exerts cytotoxic effects against human breast cancer cells, which involves the modulation of p21, p27 and Bcl?2 family proteins, consequently leading to cell?cycle arrest and apoptosis. PMID:25501628

  7. Anticancer potential of the histone deacetylase inhibitor-like effects of flavones, a subclass of polyphenolic compounds: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhat; Tomar, Raghuvir Singh; Rath, Srikanta Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is characterized by the uncontrolled division of cells, followed by their invasion to other tissues. These kinds of cellular abnormalities arise as a result of the accumulation of genetic mutations or epigenetic alterations. Targeting genetic mutations by drugs is a conventional treatment approach. Nowadays, the development and use of epigenetic drugs are burgeoning, owing to the advancements in epigenetic research. The therapeutic intervention of cancer development by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) holds promise for helping to control the disease, but their nonspecific functions impose certain side effects. Therefore, the search for more HDACIs becomes essential. Plentiful literature on the versatility of dietary components including flavones, a class of the flavonoid group, has already established these compounds to be better anticancer agents. The present review focuses on the significance of flavones with regard to their HDACI-mimicking effects as suggested by the recent evidences. The review also proposes an in-depth screening of flavones in future studies, in the hope that flavones may provide a better alternative to synthetic HDACIs. PMID:26033434

  8. Depletion of embryonic stem cell signature by histone deacetylase inhibitor in NCCIT cells: involvement of Nanog suppression.

    PubMed

    You, Jueng Soo; Kang, Jae Ku; Seo, Dong-Wan; Park, Jae Hyun; Park, Jong Woo; Lee, Jae Cheol; Jeon, Yae Jee; Cho, Eun Jung; Han, Jeung-Whan

    2009-07-15

    The embryonic stem cell-like gene expression signature has been shown to be associated with poorly differentiated aggressive human tumors and has attracted great attention as a potential target for future cancer therapies. Here, we investigate the potential of the embryonic stem cell signature as molecular target for the therapy and the strategy to suppress the embryonic stem cell signature. The core stemness gene Nanog is abnormally overexpressed in human embryonic carcinoma NCCIT cells showing gene expression profiles similar to embryonic stem cells. Down-regulation of the gene by either small interfering RNAs targeting Nanog or histone deacetylase inhibitor apicidin causes reversion of expression pattern of embryonic stem cell signature including Oct4, Sox2, and their target genes, leading to cell cycle arrest, inhibition of colony formation in soft agar, and induction of differentiation into all three germ layers. These effects are antagonized by reintroduction of Nanog. Interestingly, embryonic carcinoma cells (NCCIT, NTERA2, and P19) exhibit a higher sensitivity to apicidin in down-regulation of Nanog compared with embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Nanog expression by apicidin is mediated by a coordinated change in recruitment of epigenetic modulators and transcription factors to the promoter region. These findings indicate that overexpression of stemness gene Nanog in NCCIT cells is associated with maintaining stem cell-like phenotype and suggest that targeting Nanog might be an approach for improved therapy of poorly differentiated tumors. PMID:19567677

  9. Pre-clinical efficacy of combined therapy with novel ?-catenin antagonist BC2059 and histone deacetylase inhibitor against AML cells.

    PubMed

    Fiskus, W; Sharma, S; Saha, S; Shah, B; Devaraj, S G T; Sun, B; Horrigan, S; Leveque, C; Zu, Y; Iyer, S; Bhalla, K N

    2015-06-01

    The canonical wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT)-?-catenin pathway is essential for self-renewal, growth and survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) stem/blast progenitor cells (BPCs). Deregulated WNT signaling inhibits degradation of ?-catenin, causing increased nuclear translocation and co-factor activity of ?-catenin with the transcriptional regulator T-cell factor (TCF) 4/lymphoid enhancer factor 1 in AML BPCs. Here, we determined the pre-clinical anti-AML activity of the anthraquinone oxime-analog BC2059 (BC), known to attenuate ?-catenin levels. BC treatment disrupted the binding of ?-catenin with the scaffold protein transducin ?-like 1 and proteasomal degradation and decline in the nuclear levels of ?-catenin. This was associated with reduced transcriptional activity of TCF4 and expression of its target genes, cyclin D1, c-MYC and survivin. BC treatment dose-dependently induced apoptosis of cultured and primary AML BPCs. Treatment with BC also significantly improved the median survival of immune-depleted mice engrafted with either cultured or primary AML BPCs, exhibiting nuclear expression of ?-catenin. Co-treatment with the pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat and BC synergistically induced apoptosis of cultured and primary AML BPCs, including those expressing FLT3-ITD, as well as further significantly improved the survival of immune-depleted mice engrafted with primary AML BPCs. These findings underscore the promising pre-clinical activity and warrant further testing of BC against human AML, especially those expressing FLT3-ITD. PMID:25482131

  10. In vivo anti-myeloma activity and modulation of gene expression profile induced by valproic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Neri, Paola; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Calimeri, Teresa; Amodio, Nicola; Bulotta, Alessandra; Ventura, Monica; Eramo, Pasqua Orietta; Viscomi, Caterina; Arbitrio, Mariamena; Rossi, Marco; Caraglia, Michele; Munshi, Nikhil C; Anderson, Kenneth C; Tassone, Pierfrancesco

    2008-11-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a well-tolerated anticonvulsant that exerts anti-tumour activity as a histone deacetylase inhibitor. This study investigated the in vitro and in vivo activity of VPA against multiple myeloma (MM) cells. In vitro exposure of interleukin-6-dependent or -independent MM cells to VPA inhibited cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner and induced apoptosis. In a cohort of severe combined immunodeficiency mice bearing human MM xenografts, VPA induced tumour growth inhibition and survival advantage in treated animals versus controls. Flow cytometric analysis performed on MM cells from excised tumours showed increase of G(0)-G(1) and a decreased G(2)/M- and S-phase following VPA treatment, indicating in vivo effects of VPA on cell cycle regulation. Gene expression profiling of MM cells exposed to VPA showed downregulation of genes involved in cell cycle progression, DNA replication and transcription, as well as upregulation of genes implicated in apoptosis and chemokine pathways. Pathfinder analysis of gene array data identified cell growth, cell cycle, cell death, as well as DNA replication and repair as the most important signalling networks modulated by VPA. Taken together, our data provide the preclinical rationale for VPA clinical evaluation as a single agent or in combination, to improve patient outcome in MM. PMID:18986388

  11. Programmed cell death 5 mediates HDAC3 decay to promote genotoxic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyo-Kyoung; Choi, Youngsok; Park, Eun Sung; Park, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Jaesung; Jeong, Mi-Hyeon; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Jeong, Jae-Ho; Lee, Peter C. W.; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of p53 activity by histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) has been reported, but the precise molecular mechanism is unknown. Here we show that programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) selectively mediates HDAC3 dissociation from p53, which induces HDAC3 cleavage and ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. Casein kinase 2 alpha phosphorylates PDCD5 at Ser-119 to enhance its stability and importin 13-mediated nuclear translocation of PDCD5. Genetic deletion of PDCD5 abrogates etoposide (ET)-induced p53 stabilization and HDAC3 cleavage, indicating an essential role of PDCD5 in p53 activation. Restoration of PDCD5WT in PDCD5?/? MEFs restores ET-induced HDAC3 cleavage. Reduction of both PDCD5 and p53, but not reduction of either protein alone, significantly enhances in vivo tumorigenicity of AGS gastric cancer cells and correlates with poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients. Our results define a mechanism for p53 activation via PDCD5-dependent HDAC3 decay under genotoxic stress conditions. PMID:26077467

  12. Lacosamide reduces HDAC levels in the brain and improves memory: Potential for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bang, Shraddha R; Ambavade, Shirishkumar D; Jagdale, Priti G; Adkar, Prafulla P; Waghmare, Arun B; Ambavade, Prashant D

    2015-07-01

    Lacosamide, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, has been approved for the treatment of epilepsy. Some HDAC inhibitors have been proven effective for the treatment of memory disorders. The present investigation was designed to evaluate the effect of lacosamide on memory and brain HDAC levels. The effect on memory was evaluated in animals with scopolamine-induced amnesia using the elevated plus maze, object recognition test, and radial arm maze. The levels of acetylcholinesterase and HDAC in the cerebral cortex were evaluated. Lacosamide at doses of 10 and 30mg/kg significantly reduced the transfer latency in the elevated plus maze. Lacosamide at a dose of 30mg/kg significantly increased the time spent with a familiar object in the object recognition test at the 24h interval and decreased the time spent in the baited arm. Moreover, at this dose, the number of errors in the radial arm maze at 3 and 24h intervals was minimized and a reduction in the level of HDAC1, but not acetylcholinesterase, was observed in the cerebral cortex. These effects of lacosamide are equivalent to those of piracetam at a dose of 300mg/kg. These results suggest that lacosamide at a 30mg/kg dose improves disrupted memory, possibly by inhibiting HDAC, and could be used to treat amnesic symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25931268

  13. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Enhances Tissue Plasminogen Activator Release Capacity in Atherosclerotic Man

    PubMed Central

    Svennerholm, Kristina; Haney, Michael; Biber, Björn; Ulfhammer, Erik; Saluveer, Ott; Larsson, Pia; Omerovic, Elmir; Jern, Sverker; Bergh, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    The expression of the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) gene appears to be under epigenetic control and can be affected by histone deacetylation inhibition. The study aimed to test if histone deacetalyase inhibitor treatment lead to increased t-PA release or reduced exhaustion in t-PA release in response to stimulation, as well as change in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in subjects with coronary disease. In this clinical study, 16 post-myocardial infarction subjects, the perfused forearm model was used with isoprenaline provocation during 20 minutes, to stimulate local t-PA release. Each subject was measured twice on the same day (repeated stimuli sequences) as well as on two different occasions, without treatment and after four weeks of treatment with valproic acid (500 mg, twice daily). Net forearm release for t-PA in response to isoprenaline at minutes 1.5, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 was measured, allowing assessment of cumulative t-PA release. There was a reduction in the exhaustion of cumulative t-PA release during repeated and prolonged stimulation with valproic acid treatment compared to non-treatment. Plasma PAI-1 antigen was decreased following treatment compared to non-treatment (18.4 ± 10.0 vs. 11.0 ± 7.1 nanograms/ml respectively, mean with 95% confidence interval). These findings demonstrate that histone deacetylation inhibition increases the capacity for endogenous t-PA release in subjects with vascular disease. Furthermore, the fibrinolytic balance is favored with suppressed PAI-1 levels. More studies are needed to establish the clinical relevance of these findings. Trial registration EU Clinical Trials Register 2012-004950-27 PMID:25807501

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitor improves the development and acetylation levels of cat-cow interspecies cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Wittayarat, Manita; Sato, Yoko; Do, Lanh Thi Kim; Morita, Yasuhiro; Chatdarong, Kaywalee; Techakumphu, Mongkol; Taniguchi, Masayasu; Otoi, Takeshige

    2013-08-01

    Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming, such as histone acetylation, might cause low efficiency of interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT). This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of trichostatin A (TSA) on the developmental competence and histone acetylation of iSCNT embryos reconstructed from cat somatic cells and bovine cytoplasm. The iSCNT cat and parthenogenetic bovine embryos were treated with various concentrations of TSA (0, 25, 50, or 100 nM) for 24 h, respectively, following fusion and activation. Treatment with 50 nM TSA produced significantly higher rates of cleavage and blastocyst formation (84.3% and 4.6%, respectively) of iSCNT embryos than the rates of non-TSA-treated iSCNT embryos (63.8% and 0%, respectively). Similarly, the treatment of 50 nM TSA increased the blastocyst formation rate of parthenogenetic bovine embryos. The acetylation levels of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) in the iSCNT embryos with the treatment of 50 nM TSA were similar to those of in vitro-fertilized embryos and significantly higher (p<0.05) than those of non-TSA-treated iSCNT embryos (control), irrespective of the embryonic development stage (two-cell, four-cell, and eight-cell stages). These results indicated that the treatment of 50 nM TSA postfusion was beneficial for development to the blastocyst stage of iSCNT cat embryos and correlated with the increasing levels of acetylation at H3K9. PMID:23790014

  15. A DNMT3A2-HDAC2 Complex Is Essential for Genomic Imprinting and Genome Integrity in Mouse Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pengpeng; de Waal, Eric; Weaver, Jamie R; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Schultz, Richard M

    2015-11-24

    Maternal genomic imprints are established during oogenesis. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1 and 2 are required for oocyte development in mouse, but their role in genomic imprinting is unknown. We find that Hdac1:Hdac2(-/-) double-mutant growing oocytes exhibit global DNA hypomethylation and fail to establish imprinting marks for Igf2r, Peg3, and Srnpn. Global hypomethylation correlates with increased retrotransposon expression and double-strand DNA breaks. Nuclear-associated DNMT3A2 is reduced in double-mutant oocytes, and injecting these oocytes with Hdac2 partially restores DNMT3A2 nuclear staining. DNMT3A2 co-immunoprecipitates with HDAC2 in mouse embryonic stem cells. Partial loss of nuclear DNMT3A2 and HDAC2 occurs in Sin3a(-/-) oocytes, which exhibit decreased DNA methylation of imprinting control regions for Igf2r and Srnpn, but not Peg3. These results suggest seminal roles of HDAC1/2 in establishing maternal genomic imprints and maintaining genomic integrity in oocytes mediated in part through a SIN3A complex that interacts with DNMT3A2. PMID:26586441

  16. Thiol versus hydroxamate as zinc binding group in HDAC inhibition: An Ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenjing; Wu, Ruibo; Zhang, Yingkai

    2015-11-15

    Zinc-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a critical role in transcriptional repression and gene silencing, and are among the most attractive targets for the development of new therapeutics against cancer and various other diseases. Two HDAC inhibitors have been approved by FDA as anti-cancer drugs: one is SAHA whose hydroxamate is directly bound to zinc, the other is FK228 whose active form may use thiol as the zinc binding group. In spite of extensive studies, it remains to be ambiguous regarding how thiol and hydroxamate are bound to the zinc active site of HDACs. In this work, our computational approaches center on Born-Oppenheimer ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics with umbrella sampling, which allow for modeling of the zinc active site with reasonable accuracy while properly including dynamics and effects of protein environment. Meanwhile, an improved short-long effective function (SLEF2) to describe non-bonded interactions between zinc and other atoms has been employed in initial MM equilibrations. Our ab initio QM/MM MD simulations have confirmed that hydroxamate is neutral when it is bound to HDAC8, and found that thiol is deprotonated when directly bound to zinc in the HDAC active site. By comparing thiol and hydroxamate, our results elucidated the differences in their binding environment in the HDAC active sites, and emphasized the importance of the linker design to achieve more specific binding toward class IIa HDACs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26452222

  17. Role of histone deacetylase 3 in ankylosing spondylitis via negative feedback loop with microRNA-130a and enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-1? expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YA; WANG, LIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The interaction between micro (mi)RNA-130a and its target tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-1? and histone deactylase (HDAC)3 was assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from AS patients. Increased HDAC3 and decreased miRNA-130a levels were observed in PBMCs from AS patients. HDAC3 knockdown or HDAC3 inhibition promoted the expression of miRNA-130a, and HDAC3 was recruited to the promoter region of the gene encoding miRNA-130a in PBMCs. In addition, miR-130a overexpression led to a decrease, whereas miR-130a inhibition led to an increase of TNF-1? expression in PBMCs. Furthermore, HDAC3 knockdown or HDAC3 inhibition was associated with simultaneous upregulation of the expression of miR-130a and downregulation of the expression of TNF-1? in PBMCs. These results indicated that HDAC3 was involved in the regulation of the underlying molecular mechanism of AS by forming a negative feedback loop with miR-130a and enhancement of TNF-1? expression. PMID:26531724

  18. HDAC9 is implicated in schizophrenia and expressed specifically in post-mitotic neurons but not in adult neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Bing; Alrahbeni, Tahani Mohammed A; Clair, David St; Blackwood, Douglas H; McCaig, Colin D; Shen, Sanbing

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common psychiatric disorder and caused by a combination of environmental, social and genetic factors. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) can translate epigenetic effects to the genome by modifying chromatin structure and gene expression. Inappropriate activity of HDACs is associated with cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and HDAC inhibitors are shown to improve the derivation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and to modulate cell lineage differentiation during brain development. We demonstrate that one of the HDAC genes, HDAC9, is hemizygously deleted in a small proportion of schizophrenia patients, and is widely expressed in mouse brain including areas where the neuropathology of schizophrenia is found. High levels of expression are observed in the hippocampus, layers II/III and V of the cerebral cortex, prefrontal and medial prefrontal cortex, piriform and cingulum cortex, basolateral amygdaloid nuclei and choroid plexus. HDAC9 protein is found in the cell body as well as in nerve fibers. Importantly, HDAC9 is not expressed in adult neural stem cells, glia, astrocytes, or oligodendrocytes, but expressed exclusively in post-mitotic and mature neurons. Our data suggest that HDAC9 may play a crucial role in neuronal function of adult brain. PMID:23671795