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Sample records for hdhq150 knock-in mouse

  1. Longitudinal analysis of gene expression and behaviour in the HdhQ150 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Giles, Peter; Elliston, Lyn; Higgs, Gemma V; Brooks, Simon P; Dunnett, Stephen B; Jones, Lesley

    2012-06-01

    Substantial transcriptional changes are seen in Huntington's disease (HD) brain and parallel early changes in gene expression are observed in mouse models of HD. Analysis of behaviour in such models also shows substantial deficits in motor, learning and memory tasks. We examined the changes in the transcriptional profile in the HdhQ150 mouse model of HD at 6, 12 and 18 months and correlated these changes with the behavioural tasks the animals had undertaken. Changes in gene expression over time showed a significant enrichment of RNAs altered in abundance that related to cognition in both HdhQ150 and wild-type animals. The most significantly down-regulated mRNA between genotypes over the whole time-course was Htt itself. Other changes between genotypes identified at 6 months related to chromatin organization and structure, whilst at 18 months changes related mainly to intracellular signalling. Correlation of the changes in gene product abundance with phenotypic changes revealed that weight and detection of the opposite position of the platform in the water maze seemed to correlate with the chromatin alterations whereas changes in the rotarod performance related mainly to intracellular signalling and homeostasis. These results implicate alterations in specific molecular pathways that may underpin changes in different behavioural tasks. PMID:22001697

  2. Mutant Huntingtin Gene-Dose Impacts on Aggregate Deposition, DARPP32 Expression and Neuroinflammation in HdhQ150 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Young, Douglas; Mayer, Franziska; Vidotto, Nella; Schweizer, Tatjana; Berth, Ramon; Abramowski, Dorothee; Shimshek, Derya R.; van der Putten, P. Herman; Schmid, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, progressive and fatal neurological disorder caused by an expansion of CAG repeats in exon-1 of the huntingtin gene. The encoded poly-glutamine stretch renders mutant huntingtin prone to aggregation. HdhQ150 mice genocopy a pathogenic repeat (∼150 CAGs) in the endogenous mouse huntingtin gene and model predominantly pre-manifest HD. Treating early is likely important to prevent or delay HD, and HdhQ150 mice may be useful to assess therapeutic strategies targeting pre-manifest HD. This requires appropriate markers and here we demonstrate, that pre-symptomatic HdhQ150 mice show several dramatic mutant huntingtin gene-dose dependent pathological changes including: (i) an increase of neuronal intra-nuclear inclusions (NIIs) in brain, (ii) an increase of extra-nuclear aggregates in dentate gyrus, (iii) a decrease of DARPP32 protein and (iv) an increase in glial markers of neuroinflammation, which curiously did not correlate with local neuronal mutant huntingtin inclusion-burden. HdhQ150 mice developed NIIs also in all retinal neuron cell-types, demonstrating that retinal NIIs are not specific to human exon-1 R6 HD mouse models. Taken together, the striking and robust mutant huntingtin gene-dose related changes in aggregate-load, DARPP32 levels and glial activation markers should greatly facilitate future testing of therapeutic strategies in the HdhQ150 HD mouse model. PMID:24086450

  3. Early white matter abnormalities, progressive brain pathology and motor deficits in a novel knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing; Peng, Qi; Hou, Zhipeng; Jiang, Mali; Wang, Xin; Langseth, Abraham J.; Tao, Michael; Barker, Peter B.; Mori, Susumu; Bergles, Dwight E.; Ross, Christopher A.; Detloff, Peter J.; Zhang, Jiangyang; Duan, Wenzhen

    2015-01-01

    White matter abnormalities have been reported in premanifest Huntington's disease (HD) subjects before overt striatal neuronal loss, but whether the white matter changes represent a necessary step towards further pathology and the underlying mechanism of these changes remains unknown. Here, we characterized a novel knock-in mouse model that expresses mouse HD gene homolog (Hdh) with extended CAG repeat- HdhQ250, which was derived from the selective breeding of HdhQ150 mice. HdhQ250 mice manifest an accelerated and robust phenotype compared with its parent line. HdhQ250 mice exhibit progressive motor deficits, reduction in striatal and cortical volume, accumulation of mutant huntingtin aggregation, decreased levels of DARPP32 and BDNF and altered striatal metabolites. The abnormalities detected in this mouse model are reminiscent of several aspects of human HD. In addition, disturbed myelination was evident in postnatal Day 14 HdhQ250 mouse brain, including reduced levels of myelin regulatory factor and myelin basic protein, and decreased numbers of myelinated axons in the corpus callosum. Thinner myelin sheaths, indicated by increased G-ratio of myelin, were also detected in the corpus callosum of adult HdhQ250 mice. Moreover, proliferation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells is altered by mutant huntingtin both in vitro and in vivo. Our data indicate that this model is suitable for understanding comprehensive pathogenesis of HD in white matter and gray matter as well as developing therapeutics for HD. PMID:25609071

  4. Identical oligomeric and fibrillar structures captured from the brains of R6/2 and knock-in mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Kirupa; Lane, Amin; Legleiter, Justin; Warley, Alice; Woodman, Ben; Finkbeiner, Steve; Paganetti, Paolo; Muchowski, Paul J; Wilson, Stuart; Bates, Gillian P

    2010-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized neuropathologically by the presence of neuropil aggregates and nuclear inclusions. However, the profile of aggregate structures that are present in the brains of HD patients or of HD mouse models and the relative contribution of specific aggregate structures to disease pathogenesis is unknown. We have used the Seprion ligand to develop a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based method for quantifying aggregated polyglutamine in tissues from HD mouse models. We used a combination of electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to investigate the aggregate structures isolated by the ligand. We found that the oligomeric, proto-fibrillar and fibrillar aggregates extracted from the brains of R6/2 and HdhQ150 knock-in mice were remarkably similar. Using AFM, we determined that the nanometre globular oligomers isolated from the brains of both mouse models have dimensions identical to those generated from recombinant huntingtin exon 1 proteins. Finally, antibodies that detect exon 1 Htt epitopes differentially recognize the ligand-captured material on SDS-PAGE gels. The Seprion-ligand ELISA provides an assay with good statistical power for use in preclinical pharmacodynamic therapeutic trials or to assess the effects of the genetic manipulation of potential therapeutic targets on aggregate load. This, together with the ability to identify a spectrum of aggregate species in HD mouse tissues, will contribute to our understanding of how these structures relate to the pathogenesis of HD and whether their formation can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. PMID:19825844

  5. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated reporter knock-in in mouse haploid embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasuyoshi; Oda, Masaaki; Nakatani, Tsunetoshi; Sekita, Yoichi; Monfort, Asun; Wutz, Anton; Mochizuki, Hideki; Nakano, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Mouse parthenogenetic haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are pluripotent cells generated from chemically activated oocytes. Haploid ESCs provide an opportunity to study the effect of genetic alterations because of their hemizygotic characteristics. However, their further application for the selection of unique phenotypes remains limited since ideal reporters to monitor biological processes such as cell differentiation are missing. Here, we report the application of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in of a reporter cassette, which does not disrupt endogenous target genes in mouse haploid ESCs. We first validated the system by inserting the P2A-Venus reporter cassette into the housekeeping gene locus. In addition to the conventional strategy using the Cas9 nuclease, we employed the Cas9 nickase and truncated sgRNAs to reduce off-target mutagenesis. These strategies induce targeted insertions with an efficiency that correlated with sgRNA guiding activity. We also engineered the neural marker gene Sox1 locus and verified the precise insertion of the P2A-Venus reporter cassette and its functionality by monitoring neural differentiation. Our data demonstrate the successful application of the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in system for establishing haploid knock-in ESC lines carrying gene specific reporters. Genetically modified haploid ESCs have potential for applications in forward genetic screening of developmental pathways. PMID:26039937

  6. Deafness and retinal degeneration in a novel USH1C knock-in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer J; Gordon, William C; Farris, Hamilton E; MacDonald, Glen H; Cunningham, Dale E; Robbins, Carol A; Tempel, Bruce L; Bazan, Nicolas G; Rubel, Edwin W; Oesterle, Elizabeth C; Keats, Bronya J

    2010-03-01

    Usher syndrome is the leading cause of combined deaf-blindness, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the auditory and visual impairment are poorly understood. Usher I is characterized by profound congenital hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and progressive retinitis pigmentosa beginning in early adolescence. Using the c.216G>A cryptic splice site mutation in Exon 3 of the USH1C gene found in Acadian Usher I patients in Louisiana, we constructed the first mouse model that develops both deafness and retinal degeneration. The same truncated mRNA transcript found in Usher 1C patients is found in the cochleae and retinas of these knock-in mice. Absent auditory-evoked brainstem responses indicated that the mutant mice are deaf at 1 month of age. Cochlear histology showed disorganized hair cell rows, abnormal bundles, and loss of both inner and outer hair cells in the middle turns and at the base. Retinal dysfunction as evident by an abnormal electroretinogram was seen as early as 1 month of age, with progressive loss of rod photoreceptors between 6 and 12 months of age. This knock-in mouse reproduces the dual sensory loss of human Usher I, providing a novel resource to study the disease mechanism and the development of therapies. PMID:20095043

  7. Characterization of a knock-in mouse model of the homozygous p.V37I variant in Gjb2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Hu, Lingxiang; Wang, Xueling; Sun, Changling; Lin, Xin; Li, Lei; Mei, Ling; Huang, Zhiwu; Yang, Tao; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The homozygous p.V37I variant in GJB2 is prevalent in East and Southeast Asians and may lead to mild-to-moderate hearing loss with reduced penetrance. To investigate the pathogenic mechanism underlying this variant, we generated a knock-in mouse model of homozygous p.V37I by an embryonic stem cell gene targeting method. Auditory brainstem response test showed that the knock-in mice developed progressive, mild-to-moderate hearing loss over the first 4-9 months. Overall no significant developmental and morphological abnormality was observed in the knock-in mouse cochlea, while confocal immunostaining and electron microscopic scanning revealed minor loss of the outer hair cells. Gene expression microarray analysis identified 105 up-regulated and 43 down-regulated genes in P5 knock-in mouse cochleae (P < 0.05 adjusted by the Benjamini &Hochberg method), among which four top candidate genes with the highest fold-changes or implication to deafness Fcer1g, Nnmt and Lars2 and Cuedc1 were verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that the homozygous p.V37I knock-in mouse modeled the hearing phenotype of the human patients and can serve as a useful animal model for further studies. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study may shed new insights into the understanding of the pathogenic mechanism and the phenotypic modification of homozygous p.V37I. PMID:27623246

  8. An Acvr1 R206H knock-in mouse has fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva

    PubMed Central

    Chakkalakal, Salin A.; Zhang, Deyu; Culbert, Andria L.; Convente, Michael R.; Caron, Robert J.; Wright, Alexander C.; Maidment, Andrew D.A.; Kaplan, Frederick S.; Shore, Eileen M.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP; MIM #135100) is a debilitating genetic disorder of dysregulated cellular differentiation characterized by malformation of the great toes during embryonic skeletal development and by progressive heterotopic endochondral ossification post-natally. Patients with these classic clinical features of FOP have the identical heterozygous single nucleotide substitution (c.617G>A; R206H) in the gene encoding ACVR1/ALK2, a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptor. Gene targeting was used to develop a knock-in mouse model for FOP (Acvr1R206H/+). Radiographic analysis of Acvr1R206H/+ chimeric mice revealed that this mutation induced malformed first digits in the hind limbs and post-natal extra-skeletal bone formation, recapitulating the human disease. Histological analysis of murine lesions showed inflammatory infiltration and apoptosis of skeletal muscle followed by robust formation of heterotopic bone through an endochondral pathway, identical to that seen in patients. Progenitor cells of a Tie2+ lineage participated in each stage of endochondral osteogenesis. We further determined that both wild-type and mutant cells are present within the ectopic bone tissue, an unexpected finding that indicates that although the mutation is necessary to induce the bone formation process, the mutation is not required for progenitor cell contribution to bone and cartilage. This unique knock-in mouse model provides novel insight into the genetic regulation of heterotopic ossification and establishes the first direct in vivo evidence that the R206H mutation in ACVR1 causes FOP. PMID:22508565

  9. Ush1c216A knock-in mouse survives Katrina.

    PubMed

    Lentz, Jennifer; Pan, Fuming; Ng, San San; Deininger, Prescott; Keats, Bronya

    2007-03-01

    Usher syndrome is the most common cause of inherited deafness found in combination with blindness. All Usher patients suffer progressive retinitis pigmentosa, with the degree of hearing impairment and the presence or absence of vestibular function differing among subtypes. A cryptic splice site mutation (216G-->A) in exon 3 of the USH1C gene on chromosome 11p, which encodes a PDZ-domain protein, harmonin, was found in Acadian Usher type IC patients in south Louisiana. In vitro analysis using constructs containing the mutant 216A and subsequent analysis of patient cell lines revealed a deletion of 35 bases in the transcript. In order to analyze the impact of this frame-shift mutation, we created a knock-in mouse model containing the human 216G-->A mutation. A targeting construct was made containing 5' and 3' homology arms, each 4kb in length, and a 650 base pair fragment containing exons 3 and 4 of human USH1C cloned from an Acadian patient homozygous for the 216A mutation. W4/129S6 embryonic stem (ES) cells were electroporated with the targeting construct, and after 10 days of neomycin selection, clones were picked and screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analysis for homologous recombination. Two positive clones for targeted insertion were microinjected into C57BL/6 blastocysts which were then transplanted into pseudo-pregnant females. Chimeras were bred with Cre recombinase-expressing mice for simultaneous deletion of the neomycin gene and germline transmission of the 216A allele. Homozygous Ush1c216A (216AA) mice are hyperactive, display circling and head tossing behavior, and do not have a Preyer reflex at 21-25 days old. RT-PCR analysis of the cochlea and retina from 216AA mice shows the same 35 base deletion characteristic of Usher IC patients. PMID:17174357

  10. Pou4f2 knock-in Cre mouse: A multifaceted genetic tool for vision researchers

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Aaron B.; Bloomsburg, Samuel J.; Billingslea, Samuel A.; Merrill, Morgan M.; Li, Shuai; Thomas, Marshall W.

    2016-01-01

    nucleus, and superior colliculus. Conclusions: Pou4f2Cre provides multiple uses for the vision researcher’s genetic toolkit. First, Pou4f2Cre is a knock-in allele that can be used to eliminate Pou4f2, resulting in depletion of RGCs. Second, expression of Cre in male germ cells makes this strain an efficient germline activator of recombination, for example, to target LoxP-flanked sequences in the whole mouse. Third, Pou4f2Cre efficiently targets RGCs, amacrine cells, bipolar cells, horizontal cells, and a small number of photoreceptors within the retina, as well as the visual centers in the brain. Unlike other Cre recombinase lines that target retinal neurons, no recombination was observed in Müller or other retinal glia. These properties make this Cre recombinase line a useful tool for vision researchers. PMID:27390513

  11. A new knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia.

    PubMed

    Rose, Samuel J; Yu, Xin Y; Heinzer, Ann K; Harrast, Porter; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S; Thompson, Valerie B; Pare, Jean-Francois; Weinshenker, David; Smith, Yoland; Jinnah, Hyder A; Hess, Ellen J

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal dopamine neurotransmission is associated with many different genetic and acquired dystonic disorders. For instance, mutations in genes critical for the synthesis of dopamine, including GCH1 and TH cause l-DOPA-responsive dystonia. Despite evidence that implicates abnormal dopamine neurotransmission in dystonia, the precise nature of the pre- and postsynaptic defects that result in dystonia are not known. To better understand these defects, we generated a knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD) mice that recapitulates the human p.381Q>K TH mutation (c.1141C>A). Mice homozygous for this mutation displayed the core features of the human disorder, including reduced TH activity, dystonia that worsened throughout the course of the active phase, and improvement in the dystonia in response to both l-DOPA and trihexyphenidyl. Although the gross anatomy of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons was normal in DRD mice, the microstructure of striatal synapses was affected whereby the ratio of axo-spinous to axo-dendritic corticostriatal synaptic contacts was reduced. Microinjection of l-DOPA directly into the striatum ameliorated the dystonic movements but cerebellar microinjections of l-DOPA had no effect. Surprisingly, the striatal dopamine concentration was reduced to ∼1% of normal, a concentration more typically associated with akinesia, suggesting that (mal)adaptive postsynaptic responses may also play a role in the development of dystonia. Administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor agonists to enhance dopamine signalling reduced the dystonic movements, whereas administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor antagonists to further reduce dopamine signalling worsened the dystonia, suggesting that both receptors mediate the abnormal movements. Further, D1-dopamine receptors were supersensitive; adenylate cyclase activity, locomotor activity and stereotypy were exaggerated in DRD mice in response to the D1-dopamine receptor agonist SKF

  12. Variable Bone Fragility Associated With an Amish COL1A2 Variant and a Knock-in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Ethan; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Sorkin, John D; Kuznetsova, Natalia; Shapses, Sue A; Carleton, Stephanie M; Shuldiner, Alan R; Marini, Joan C; Phillips, Charlotte L; Goldstein, Steven A; Leikin, Sergey; McBride, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable form of bone fragility typically associated with a dominant COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutation. Variable phenotype for OI patients with identical collagen mutations is well established, but phenotype variability is described using the qualitative Sillence classification. Patterning a new OI mouse model on a specific collagen mutation therefore has been hindered by the absence of an appropriate kindred with extensive quantitative phenotype data. We benefited from the large sibships of the Old Order Amish (OOA) to define a wide range of OI phenotypes in 64 individuals with the identical COL1A2 mutation. Stratification of carrier spine (L1–4) areal bone mineral density (aBMD) Z-scores demonstrated that 73% had moderate to severe disease (less than −2), 23% had mild disease (−1 to −2), and 4% were in the unaffected range (greater than −1). A line of knock-in mice was patterned on the OOA mutation. Bone phenotype was evaluated in four F1 lines of knock-in mice that each shared approximately 50% of their genetic background. Consistent with the human pedigree, these mice had reduced body mass, aBMD, and bone strength. Whole-bone fracture susceptibility was influenced by individual genomic factors that were reflected in size, shape, and possibly bone metabolic regulation. The results indicate that the G610C OI (Amish) knock-in mouse is a novel translational model to identify modifying genes that influence phenotype and for testing potential therapies for OI. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research PMID:19594296

  13. A Tmprss2-CreERT2 Knock-In Mouse Model for Cancer Genetic Studies on Prostate and Colon

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yu; Di, Wei; Moore, Amanda R.; Sher, Jessica J.; Guan, Youxin; Wang, Shangqian; Zhang, Zeda; Murphy, Devan A.; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chi, Ping; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Fusion between TMPRSS2 and ERG, placing ERG under the control of the TMPRSS2 promoter, is the most frequent genetic alteration in prostate cancer, present in 40–50% of cases. The fusion event is an early, if not initiating, event in prostate cancer, implicating the TMPRSS2-positive prostate epithelial cell as the cancer cell of origin in fusion-positive prostate cancer. To introduce genetic alterations into Tmprss2-positive cells in mice in a temporal-specific manner, we generated a Tmprss2-CreERT2 knock-in mouse. We found robust tamoxifen-dependent Cre activation in the prostate luminal cells but not basal epithelial cells, as well as epithelial cells of the bladder and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The knock-in allele on the Tmprss2 locus does not noticeably impact prostate, bladder, or gastrointestinal function. Deletion of Pten in Tmprss2-positive cells of adult mice generated neoplasia only in the prostate, while deletion of Apc in these cells generated neoplasia only in the GI tract. These results suggest that this new Tmprss2-CreERT2 mouse model will be a useful resource for genetic studies on prostate and colon. PMID:27536883

  14. A Tmprss2-CreERT2 Knock-In Mouse Model for Cancer Genetic Studies on Prostate and Colon.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dong; Zhan, Yu; Di, Wei; Moore, Amanda R; Sher, Jessica J; Guan, Youxin; Wang, Shangqian; Zhang, Zeda; Murphy, Devan A; Sawyers, Charles L; Chi, Ping; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Fusion between TMPRSS2 and ERG, placing ERG under the control of the TMPRSS2 promoter, is the most frequent genetic alteration in prostate cancer, present in 40-50% of cases. The fusion event is an early, if not initiating, event in prostate cancer, implicating the TMPRSS2-positive prostate epithelial cell as the cancer cell of origin in fusion-positive prostate cancer. To introduce genetic alterations into Tmprss2-positive cells in mice in a temporal-specific manner, we generated a Tmprss2-CreERT2 knock-in mouse. We found robust tamoxifen-dependent Cre activation in the prostate luminal cells but not basal epithelial cells, as well as epithelial cells of the bladder and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The knock-in allele on the Tmprss2 locus does not noticeably impact prostate, bladder, or gastrointestinal function. Deletion of Pten in Tmprss2-positive cells of adult mice generated neoplasia only in the prostate, while deletion of Apc in these cells generated neoplasia only in the GI tract. These results suggest that this new Tmprss2-CreERT2 mouse model will be a useful resource for genetic studies on prostate and colon. PMID:27536883

  15. Subtle Microstructural Defects of the Cerebellum in a Knock-in Mouse Model of DYT1 Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chang-Hyun; Bernhard, Doug; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    The dystonias are a group of disorders characterized by involuntary twisting and repetitive movements. DYT1 dystonia is an inherited form of dystonia caused by a mutation in the TOR1A gene, which encodes torsinA. TorsinA is expressed in many regions of the nervous system, and the regions responsible for causing dystonic movements remain uncertain. Most prior studies have focused on the basal ganglia, although there is emerging evidence for abnormalities in the cerebellum too. In the current studies, we examined the cerebellum for structural abnormalities in a knock-in mouse model of DYT1 dystonia. The gross appearance of the cerebellum appeared normal in the mutant mice, but stereological measures revealed the cerebellum to be 5% larger in mutant compared to control mice. There were no changes in the numbers of Purkinje cells, granule cells, or neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei. However, Golgi histochemical studies revealed Purkinje cells to have thinner dendrites, and fewer and less complex dendritic spines. There also was a higher frequency of heterotopic Purkinje cells displaced into the molecular layer. These results reveal subtle structural abnormalities of the cerebellum that are similar to those reported for the basal ganglia in the DYT1 knock-in mouse model. PMID:24121114

  16. Knock-in mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy caused by troponin mutation.

    PubMed

    Du, Cheng-Kun; Morimoto, Sachio; Nishii, Kiyomasa; Minakami, Reiko; Ohta, Mika; Tadano, Naoto; Lu, Qun-Wei; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhan, Dong-Yun; Mochizuki, Misato; Kita, Satomi; Miwa, Yoshikazu; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Ohtsuki, Iwao; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-20

    We created knock-in mice in which a deletion of 3 base pairs coding for K210 in cardiac troponin (cTn)T found in familial dilated cardiomyopathy patients was introduced into endogenous genes. Membrane-permeabilized cardiac muscle fibers from mutant mice showed significantly lower Ca(2+) sensitivity in force generation than those from wild-type mice. Peak amplitude of Ca(2+) transient in cardiomyocytes was increased in mutant mice, and maximum isometric force produced by intact cardiac muscle fibers of mutant mice was not significantly different from that of wild-type mice, suggesting that Ca(2+) transient was augmented to compensate for decreased myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. Nevertheless, mutant mice developed marked cardiac enlargement, heart failure, and frequent sudden death recapitulating the phenotypes of dilated cardiomyopathy patients, indicating that global functional defect of the heart attributable to decreased myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity could not be fully compensated by only increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) transient. We found that a positive inotropic agent, pimobendan, which directly increases myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity, had profound effects of preventing cardiac enlargement, heart failure, and sudden death. These results verify the hypothesis that Ca(2+) desensitization of cardiac myofilament is the absolute cause of the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy associated with this mutation and strongly suggest that Ca(2+) sensitizers are beneficial for the treatment of dilated cardiomyopathy patients affected by sarcomeric regulatory protein mutations. PMID:17556660

  17. Characterisation of a C1qtnf5 Ser163Arg Knock-In Mouse Model of Late-Onset Retinal Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xinhua; Luhmann, Ulrich F. O.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Barker, Susan E.; Lennon, Alan; Tulloch, Brian; Chen, Mei; Xu, Heping; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Ali, Robin; Wright, Alan F.

    2011-01-01

    A single founder mutation resulting in a Ser163Arg substitution in the C1QTNF5 gene product causes autosomal dominant late-onset retinal macular degeneration (L-ORMD) in humans, which has clinical and pathological features resembling age-related macular degeneration. We generated and characterised a mouse “knock-in” model carrying the Ser163Arg mutation in the orthologous murine C1qtnf5 gene by site-directed mutagenesis and homologous recombination into mouse embryonic stem cells. Biochemical, immunological, electron microscopic, fundus autofluorescence, electroretinography and laser photocoagulation analyses were used to characterise the mouse model. Heterozygous and homozygous knock-in mice showed no significant abnormality in any of the above measures at time points up to 2 years. This result contrasts with another C1qtnf5 Ser163Arg knock-in mouse which showed most of the features of L-ORMD but differed in genetic background and targeting construct. PMID:22110650

  18. Unexpected CEP290 mRNA Splicing in a Humanized Knock-In Mouse Model for Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Garanto, Alejandro; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Peters, Theo A.; Roepman, Ronald; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Collin, Rob W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe form of retinal dystrophy with an onset in the first year of life. The most frequent genetic cause of LCA, accounting for up to 15% of all LCA cases in Europe and North-America, is a mutation (c.2991+1655AG) in intron 26 of CEP290. This mutation generates a cryptic splice donor site resulting in the insertion of an aberrant exon (exon X) containing a premature stop codon to CEP290 mRNA. In order to study the pathophysiology of the intronic CEP290 mutation, we generated two humanized knock-in mouse models each carrying ~6.3 kb of the human CEP290 gene, either with or without the intronic mutation. Transcriptional characterization of these mouse models revealed an unexpected splice pattern of CEP290 mRNA, especially in the retina. In both models, a new cryptic exon (coined exon Y) was identified in ~5 to 12% of all Cep290 transcripts. This exon Y was expressed in all murine tissues analyzed but not detected in human retina or fibroblasts of LCA patients. In addition, exon x that is characteristic of LCA in humans, was expressed at only very low levels in the retina of the LCA mouse model. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses did not reveal any differences between the two transgenic models and wild-type mice. Together, our results show clear differences in the recognition of splice sites between mice and humans, and emphasize that care is warranted when generating animal models for human genetic diseases caused by splice mutations. PMID:24223178

  19. Age-related axonal swellings precede other neuropathological hallmarks in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Martina; Adalbert, Robert; Janeckova, Lucie; Patrick, Jane; Kohli, Jaskaren; Coleman, Michael P; Conforti, Laura

    2014-10-01

    Axon degeneration precedes cell body death in many age-related neurodegenerative disorders, often determining symptom onset and progression. A sensitive method for revealing axon pathology could indicate whether this is the case also in Huntington's disease (HD), a fatal, devastating neurodegenerative disorder causing progressive deterioration of both physical and mental abilities, and which brain region is affected first. We studied the spatio-temporal relationship between axon pathology, neuronal loss, and mutant Huntingtin aggregate formation in HD mouse models by crossing R6/2 transgenic and HdhQ140 knock-in mice with YFP-H mice expressing the yellow fluorescent protein in a subset of neurons. We found large axonal swellings developing age-dependently first in stria terminalis and then in corticostriatal axons of HdhQ140 mice, whereas alterations of other neuronal compartments could not be detected. Although mutant Huntingtin accumulated with age in several brain areas, inclusions in the soma did not correlate with swelling of the corresponding axons. Axon abnormalities were not a prominent feature of the rapid progressive pathology of R6/2 mice. Our findings in mice genetically similar to HD patients suggest that axon pathology is an early event in HD and indicate the importance of further studies of stria terminalis axons in man. PMID:24906892

  20. A Novel Mgp-Cre Knock-In Mouse Reveals an Anticalcification/Antistiffness Candidate Gene in the Trabecular Meshwork and Peripapillary Scleral Region

    PubMed Central

    Borrás, Teresa; Smith, Matthew H.; Buie, LaKisha K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Soft tissue calcification is a pathological condition. Matrix Gla (MGP) is a potent mineralization inhibitor secreted by cartilage chondrocytes and arteries' vascular smooth muscle cells. Mgp knock-out mice die at 6 weeks due to massive arterial calcification. Arterial calcification results in arterial stiffness and higher systolic blood pressure. Intriguingly, MGP was highly abundant in trabecular meshwork (TM). Because tissue stiffness is relevant to glaucoma, we investigated which additional eye tissues use Mgp's function using knock-in mice. Methods. An Mgp–Cre-recombinase coding sequence (Cre) knock-in mouse, containing Mgp DNA plus an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-Cre-cassette was generated by homologous recombination. Founders were crossed with Cre-mediated reporter mouse R26R-lacZ. Their offspring expresses lacZ where Mgp is transcribed. Eyes from MgpCre/+;R26RlacZ/+ (Mgp-lacZ knock-in) and controls, 1 to 8 months were assayed for β-gal enzyme histochemistry. Results. As expected, Mgp-lacZ knock-in's TM was intensely blue. In addition, this mouse revealed high specific expression in the sclera, particularly in the peripapillary scleral region (ppSC). Ciliary muscle and sclera above the TM were also positive. Scleral staining was located immediately underneath the choroid (chondrocyte layer), began midsclera and was remarkably high in the ppSC. Cornea, iris, lens, ciliary body, and retina were negative. All mice exhibited similar staining patterns. All controls were negative. Conclusions. Matrix Gla's restricted expression to glaucoma-associated tissues from anterior and posterior segments suggests its involvement in the development of the disease. Matrix Gla's anticalcification/antistiffness properties in the vascular tissue, together with its high TM and ppCS expression, place this gene as a strong candidate for TM's softness and sclera's stiffness regulation in glaucoma. PMID:25711639

  1. Current Protocols in Mouse Biology Tissue-specific regulation of oncogene expression using Cre-inducible ROSA26 knock-in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Carofino, Brandi L.; Justice, Monica J.

    2015-01-01

    Cre-inducible mouse models are often utilized for the spatial and temporal expression of oncogenes. With the wide number of Cre recombinase lines available, inducible transgenesis represents a tractable approach to achieve discrete oncogene expression. Here, we describe a protocol for targeting Cre-inducible genes using a loxP-STOP-loxP approach to the ubiquitously expressed ROSA26 locus. Gene targeting provides several advantages over standard transgenic techniques, including a known site of integration and previously characterized pattern of expression. Historically, an inherent instability of ROSA26 targeting vectors has hampered the efficiency of developing ROSA26 knock-in lines. In this protocol, we provide individual steps for utilizing Gateway recombination for cloning, and detailed instructions for screening targeted ES cell clones. By following this protocol, one can achieve germline transmission of a ROSA26 knock-in line within several months. PMID:26069083

  2. VCP Associated Inclusion Body Myopathy and Paget Disease of Bone Knock-In Mouse Model Exhibits Tissue Pathology Typical of Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Su, Hailing; Tanaja, Jasmin; Dec, Eric; Wallace, Douglas C.; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Caiozzo, Vincent; Warman, Matthew; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2010-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene cause inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). We have generated a knock-in mouse model with the common R155H mutation. Mice demonstrate progressive muscle weakness starting approximately at the age of 6 months. Histology of mutant muscle showed progressive vacuolization of myofibrils and centrally located nuclei, and immunostaining shows progressive cytoplasmic accumulation of TDP-43 and ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies in quadriceps myofibrils and brain. Increased LC3-II staining of muscle sections representing increased number of autophagosomes suggested impaired autophagy. Increased apoptosis was demonstrated by elevated caspase-3 activity and increased TUNEL-positive nuclei. X-ray microtomography (uCT) images show radiolucency of distal femurs and proximal tibiae in knock-in mice and uCT morphometrics shows decreased trabecular pattern and increased cortical wall thickness. Bone histology and bone marrow derived macrophage cultures in these mice revealed increased osteoclastogenesis observed by TRAP staining suggestive of Paget bone disease. The VCPR155H/+ knock-in mice replicate the muscle, bone and brain pathology of inclusion body myopathy, thus representing a useful model for preclinical studies. PMID:20957154

  3. Longitudinal Behavioral, Cross-sectional Transcriptional and Histopathological Characterization of a Knock-in Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease with 140 CAG Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Aaron C.; Xu, Jia; Napoli, Vincent V.; Carlson, Aaron; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M.; Mandel, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of the gene mutation responsible for Huntington's Disease (HD), huntingtin, in 1993 allowed for a better understanding of the pathology of the and enabled development of animal models. HD is caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine repeat region in the N-terminal of the huntingtin protein. Here we examine the behavioral, transcriptional, histopathological and anatomical characteristics of a knock-in HD mouse model with a 140 polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein. This CAG 140 model contains a portion of the human exon 1 with 140 CAG repeats knocked into the mouse huntingtin gene. We have longitudinally examined the rearing behavior, accelerating rotarod, constant speed rotarod and gait for the heterozygote, homozygote and their non-transgenic littermates and have found a significant difference in the afflicted mice. However, while there were significant differences between the non-transgenic and the knock-in mice, these behaviors were not progressive. As in HD, we show that the CAG 140 mice also have a significant decrease in striatally enriched mRNA transcripts. In addition, striatal neuronal intranuclear inclusion density increases with age. Lastly these CAG 140 mice show slight cortical thinning compared to unaffected littermates, similarly to the cortical thinning recently reported in HD. PMID:21192926

  4. Longitudinal in vivo MRI in a Huntington's disease mouse model: Global atrophy in the absence of white matter microstructural damage.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Jessica J; Trueman, Rebecca C; Ma, Da; Yhnell, Emma; Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, Jorge; Ourselin, Sebastian; Lythgoe, Mark; Stewart, Andrew; Rosser, Anne E; Jones, Derek K

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetically-determined neurodegenerative disease. Characterising neuropathology in mouse models of HD is commonly restricted to cross-sectional ex vivo analyses, beset by tissue fixation issues. In vivo longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for disease progression to be probed non-invasively. In the HdhQ150 mouse model of HD, in vivo MRI was employed at two time points, before and after the onset of motor signs, to assess brain macrostructure and white matter microstructure. Ex vivo MRI, immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy and behavioural testing were also conducted. Global brain atrophy was found in HdhQ150 mice at both time points, with no neuropathological progression across time and a selective sparing of the cerebellum. In contrast, no white matter abnormalities were detected from the MRI images or electron microscopy images alike. The relationship between motor function and MR-based structural measurements was different for the HdhQ150 and wild-type mice, although there was no relationship between motor deficits and histopathology. Widespread neuropathology prior to symptom onset is consistent with patient studies, whereas the absence of white matter abnormalities conflicts with patient data. The myriad reasons for this inconsistency require further attention to improve the translatability from mouse models of disease. PMID:27581950

  5. The de-ubiquitinating enzyme ataxin-3 does not modulate disease progression in a knock-in mouse model of Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li; Tallaksen-Greene, Sara J.; Wang, Bo; Albin, Roger L.; Paulson, Henry L.

    2013-01-01

    Ataxin-3 is a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) that participates in ubiquitin-dependent protein quality control pathways and, based on studies in model systems, may be neuroprotective against toxic polyglutamine proteins such as the Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (htt). HD is one of at least nine polyglutamine neurodegenerative diseases in which disease-causing proteins accumulate in ubiquitin-positive inclusions within neurons. In studies crossing mice null for ataxin-3 to an established HD knock-in mouse model (HdhQ200), we tested whether loss of ataxin-3 alters disease progression, perhaps by impairing the clearance of mutant htt or the ubiquitination of inclusions. While loss of ataxin-3 mildly exacerbated age-dependent motor deficits, it did not alter inclusion formation, ubiquitination of inclusions or levels of mutant or normal htt. Ataxin-3, itself a polyglutamine-containing protein with multiple ubiquitin binding domains, was not observed to localize to htt inclusions. Changes in neurotransmitter receptor binding known to occur in HD knock-in mice also were not altered by the loss of ataxin-3, although we unexpectedly observed increased GABAA receptor binding in the striatum of HdhQ200 mice, which has not previously been noted. Finally, we confirmed that CNS levels of hsp70 are decreased in HD mice as has been reported in other HD mouse models, regardless of the presence or absence of ataxin-3. We conclude that while ataxin-3 may participate in protein quality control pathways, it does not critically regulate the handling of mutant htt or contribute to major features of disease pathogenesis in HD. PMID:24683430

  6. A new humanized ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model combines the genetic features, pathogenesis of neurons and glia and late disease onset of SCA3/MJD.

    PubMed

    Switonski, Pawel M; Szlachcic, Wojciech J; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J; Figiel, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3/MJD) is a neurodegenerative disease triggered by the expansion of CAG repeats in the ATXN3 gene. Here, we report the generation of the first humanized ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model (Ki91), which provides insights into the neuronal and glial pathology of SCA3/MJD. First, mutant ataxin-3 accumulated in cell nuclei across the Ki91 brain, showing diffused immunostaining and forming intranuclear inclusions. The humanized allele revealed expansion and contraction of CAG repeats in intergenerational transmissions. CAG mutation also exhibited age-dependent tissue-specific expansion, which was most prominent in the cerebellum, pons and testes of Ki91 animals. Moreover, Ki91 mice displayed neuroinflammatory processes, showing astrogliosis in the cerebellar white matter and the substantia nigra that paralleled the transcriptional deregulation of Serpina3n, a molecular sign of neurodegeneration and brain damage. Simultaneously, the cerebellar Purkinje cells in Ki91 mice showed neurodegeneration, a pronounced decrease in Calbindin D-28k immunoreactivity and a mild decrease in cell number, thereby modeling the degeneration of the cerebellum observed in SCA3. Moreover, these molecular and cellular neuropathologies were accompanied by late behavioral deficits in motor coordination observed in rotarod and static rod tests in heterozygous Ki91 animals. In summary, we created an ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model that combines the molecular and behavioral disease phenotypes with the genetic features of SCA3. This model will be very useful for studying the pathogenesis and responses to therapy of SCA3/MJD and other polyQ disorders. PMID:25301414

  7. Longitudinal in vivo MRI in a Huntington’s disease mouse model: Global atrophy in the absence of white matter microstructural damage

    PubMed Central

    Steventon, Jessica J.; Trueman, Rebecca C.; Ma, Da; Yhnell, Emma; Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, Jorge; Ourselin, Sebastian; Lythgoe, Mark; Stewart, Andrew; Rosser, Anne E.; Jones, Derek K.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a genetically-determined neurodegenerative disease. Characterising neuropathology in mouse models of HD is commonly restricted to cross-sectional ex vivo analyses, beset by tissue fixation issues. In vivo longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for disease progression to be probed non-invasively. In the HdhQ150 mouse model of HD, in vivo MRI was employed at two time points, before and after the onset of motor signs, to assess brain macrostructure and white matter microstructure. Ex vivo MRI, immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy and behavioural testing were also conducted. Global brain atrophy was found in HdhQ150 mice at both time points, with no neuropathological progression across time and a selective sparing of the cerebellum. In contrast, no white matter abnormalities were detected from the MRI images or electron microscopy images alike. The relationship between motor function and MR-based structural measurements was different for the HdhQ150 and wild-type mice, although there was no relationship between motor deficits and histopathology. Widespread neuropathology prior to symptom onset is consistent with patient studies, whereas the absence of white matter abnormalities conflicts with patient data. The myriad reasons for this inconsistency require further attention to improve the translatability from mouse models of disease. PMID:27581950

  8. Neuronal Store-Operated Calcium Entry and Mushroom Spine Loss in Amyloid Precursor Protein Knock-In Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Wu, Lili; Pchitskaya, Ekaterina; Zakharova, Olga; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common reason for elderly dementia in the world. We proposed that memory loss in AD is related to destabilization of mushroom postsynaptic spines involved in long-term memory storage. We demonstrated previously that stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2)-regulated neuronal store-operated calcium entry (nSOC) in postsynaptic spines play a key role in stability of mushroom spines by maintaining activity of synaptic Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII). Furthermore, we demonstrated previously that the STIM2–nSOC–CaMKII pathway is downregulated in presenilin 1 M146V knock-in (PS1–M146V KI) mouse model of AD, leading to loss of hippocampal mushroom spines in this model. In the present study, we demonstrate that hippocampal mushroom postsynaptic spines are also lost in amyloid precursor protein knock-in (APPKI) mouse model of AD. We demonstrated that loss of mushroom spines occurs as a result of accumulation of extracellular β-amyloid 42 in APPKI culture media. Our results indicate that extracellular Aβ42 acts by overactivating mGluR5 receptor in APPKI neurons, leading to elevated Ca2+ levels in endoplasmic reticulum, compensatory downregulation of STIM2 expression, impaired synaptic nSOC, and reduced CaMKII activity. Pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 or overexpression of STIM2 rescued synaptic nSOC and prevented mushroom spine loss in APPKI hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that downregulation of synaptic STIM2–nSOC–CaMKII pathway causes loss of mushroom synaptic spines in both presenilin and APPKI mouse models of AD. We propose that modulators/activators of this pathway may have a potential therapeutic value for treatment of memory loss in AD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A direct connection between amyloid-induced synaptic mushroom spine loss and neuronal store-operated calcium entry pathway is shown. These results provide strong support for the calcium hypothesis of neurodegeneration and further validate the

  9. Quantitative Electroencephalographic Analysis Provides an Early-Stage Indicator of Disease Onset and Progression in the zQ175 Knock-In Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Simon P.; Schwartz, Michael D.; Wurts-Black, Sarah; Thomas, Alexia M.; Chen, Tsui-Ming; Miller, Michael A.; Palmerston, Jeremiah B.; Kilduff, Thomas S.; Morairty, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Patients with Huntington's disease (HD) show a high prevalence of sleep disorders that typically occur prior to the onset of motoric symptoms and neurodegeneration. Our understanding of the pathophysiological alterations in premanifest HD is limited, hindering the ability to measure disease modification in response to treatment. We used a full-length knock-in HD model to determine early changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and sleep that may predict the onset and progression of the disease. Methods: A 10-month longitudinal study was designed to determine the effect of the HD mutation on the EEG and sleep/wake changes in heterozygous (HET) and homozygous (HOM) zQ175 mice and wild-type (WT) littermates from 8 to 48 w of age. Mice were instrumented with tethered headmounts to record EEG/electromyography signals. Telemeters were implanted to continuously measure locomotor activity (LMA) and body temperature (Tb). Sleep deprivation (SDep) was performed at 8, 12, 16, 24, 32, and 48 w of age. Results: The HD mutation disrupted the EEG field potential from 8–12 w in an age- and mutant huntington dose-dependent manner, prior to changes in sleep/wake states, LMA, and Tb. Prominent effects of the HD mutation on the EEG included a progressive reduction in low frequency power, a slowing of rapid eye movement peak theta frequency, and the emergence of state-dependent beta/gamma oscillations. There was no effect of genotype on the relative increase in nonrapid eye movement delta power or sleep time in response to SDep. Conclusions: The expression of the Huntington's disease (HD) mutation results in complex EEG alterations that occur prior to deficits in behavioral measures and are one of the earliest phenotypes uncovered in this mouse model. Despite these EEG changes, homeostatic responses to sleep loss were preserved in HET and HOM zQ175 mice. Greater insight into the localization and response of these EEG alterations to novel therapies may enable early

  10. Evidence of functional brain reorganization on the basis of blood flow changes in the CAG140 knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Stefanko, Daniel P; Guo, Yumei; Toy, William A; Petzinger, Giselle M; Jakowec, Michael W; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2016-06-15

    Neuroimaging, especially functional brain mapping, may provide insights into the distributed involvement of multiple brain regions and loops in disorders classically associated with pathology of a localized region. One example is Huntington's disease (HD), typically classified as a basal ganglia disorder. Here, we report genotypic differences in cerebral perfusion mapping in an HD mouse model characterized by a gene knock-in (KI) of a human exon 1 CAG140 expansion repeat (CAG140 KI mice). Animals were examined at 6 months and compared with wild-type littermates. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was mapped in the awake, nonrestrained, male mouse at rest using [C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography and analyzed in three-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. Our results showed significant changes in rCBF between CAG140 KI and WT mice, such that CAG140 KI animals showed hypoperfusion of the basal ganglia motor circuit and hyperperfusion of cerebellar-thalamic and somatosensory regions. Significant hypoperfusion was also noted in CAG140 KI mice in the prelimbic and cingulate cortex (medial prefrontal area) and the hippocampus - areas associated with cognitive processing and mood. Changes in rCBF were apparent in the absence of motor deficits (rotarod test) or atrophy in the striatum (caudate-putamen) or hemispheric volume. Our results suggest a functional reorganization of whole-brain networks at a presymptomatic stage in the life of the CAG140 KI mouse. Functional brain mapping in animals may, in the future, serve as a translational biomarker for identifying sites of early synaptic change in the HD brain and for directing targeted preclinical molecular studies and clinical therapies. PMID:27082842

  11. A knock-in mouse model reveals roles for nuclear Apc in cell proliferation, Wnt signal inhibition and tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    Zeineldin, M; Cunningham, J; McGuinness, W; Alltizer, P; Cowley, B; Blanchat, B; Xu, W; Pinson, D; Neufeld, K L

    2012-05-10

    Mutation of the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is considered an initiating step in the genesis of the vast majority of colorectal cancers. APC inhibits the Wnt-signaling pathway by targeting the proto-oncogene β-catenin for destruction by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In the presence of a Wnt signal, or in the absence of functional APC, β-catenin can serve as a transcription cofactor for genes required for cell proliferation such as cyclin-D1 and c-Myc. In cultured cells, APC shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, with nuclear APC implicated in the inhibition of Wnt target gene expression. Adopting a genetic approach to evaluate the functions of nuclear APC in the context of a whole organism, we generated a mouse model with mutations that inactivate the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of Apc (Apc(mNLS)). Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice are viable and fractionation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from these mice revealed a significant reduction in nuclear Apc as compared with Apc(+/+) MEFs. The levels of Apc and β-catenin protein were not significantly altered in small intestinal epithelia from Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice. Compared with Apc(+/+) mice, Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice showed increased proliferation in epithelial cells from the jejunum, ileum and colon. These same tissues from Apc(mNLS/mNLS) mice showed more mRNA from three genes upregulated in response to canonical Wnt signal, c-Myc, axin-2 and cyclin-D1, and less mRNA from Hath-1, which is downregulated in response to Wnt. These observations suggest a role for nuclear Apc in the inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling and the control of epithelial proliferation in intestinal tissue. Furthermore, we found Apc(Min/+) mice, which harbor a mutation that truncates Apc, to have an increased polyp size and multiplicity if they also carry the Apc(mNLS) allele. Taken together, this analysis of the novel Apc(mNLS) mouse model supports a role for nuclear Apc in the control of Wnt target genes

  12. JAK2V617F leads to intrinsic changes in platelet formation and reactivity in a knock-in mouse model of essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Catherine M; Manning, Harriet; Bennett, Cavan; Vasquez, Louella; Severin, Sonia; Brain, Lauren; Mazharian, Alexandra; Guerrero, Jose A; Li, Juan; Soranzo, Nicole; Green, Anthony R; Watson, Steve P; Ghevaert, Cedric

    2013-11-28

    The principal morbidity and mortality in patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia rubra vera (PV) stems from thrombotic events. Most patients with ET/PV harbor a JAK2V617F mutation, but its role in the thrombotic diathesis remains obscure. Platelet function studies in patients are difficult to interpret because of interindividual heterogeneity, reflecting variations in the proportion of platelets derived from the malignant clone, differences in the presence of additional mutations, and the effects of medical treatments. To circumvent these issues, we have studied a JAK2V617F knock-in mouse model of ET in which all megakaryocytes and platelets express JAK2V617F at a physiological level, equivalent to that present in human ET patients. We show that, in addition to increased differentiation, JAK2V617F-positive megakaryocytes display greater migratory ability and proplatelet formation. We demonstrate in a range of assays that platelet reactivity to agonists is enhanced, with a concomitant increase in platelet aggregation in vitro and a reduced duration of bleeding in vivo. These data suggest that JAK2V617F leads to intrinsic changes in both megakaryocyte and platelet biology beyond an increase in cell number. In support of this hypothesis, we identify multiple differentially expressed genes in JAK2V617F megakaryocytes that may underlie the observed biological differences. PMID:24085768

  13. Abnormal Cognition, Sleep, EEG and Brain Metabolism in a Novel Knock-In Alzheimer Mouse, PLB1

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Bettina; Drever, Benjamin; Koss, David; Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Jyoti, Amar; Plano, Andrea; Utan, Aneli; Merrick, Georgina; Ryan, Duncan; Melis, Valeria; Wan, Hong; Mingarelli, Marco; Porcu, Emanuele; Scrocchi, Louise; Welch, Andy; Riedel, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    Late-stage neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are β-amyloid (βA) and hyperphosphorylated tau peptides, aggregated into plaques and tangles, respectively. Corresponding phenotypes have been mimicked in existing transgenic mice, however, the translational value of aggressive over-expression has recently been questioned. As controlled gene expression may offer animal models with better predictive validity, we set out to design a transgenic mouse model that circumvents complications arising from pronuclear injection and massive over-expression, by targeted insertion of human mutated amyloid and tau transgenes, under the forebrain- and neurone-specific CaMKIIα promoter, termed PLB1Double. Crossing with an existing presenilin 1 line resulted in PLB1Triple mice. PLB1Triple mice presented with stable gene expression and age-related pathology of intra-neuronal amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau in hippocampus and cortex from 6 months onwards. At this early stage, pre-clinical 18FDG PET/CT imaging revealed cortical hypometabolism with increased metabolic activity in basal forebrain and ventral midbrain. Quantitative EEG analyses yielded heightened delta power during wakefulness and REM sleep, and time in wakefulness was already reliably enhanced at 6 months of age. These anomalies were paralleled by impairments in long-term and short-term hippocampal plasticity and preceded cognitive deficits in recognition memory, spatial learning, and sleep fragmentation all emerging at ∼12 months. These data suggest that prodromal AD phenotypes can be successfully modelled in transgenic mice devoid of fibrillary plaque or tangle development. PLB1Triple mice progress from a mild (MCI-like) state to a more comprehensive AD-relevant phenotype, which are accessible using translational tools such as wireless EEG and microPET/CT. PMID:22096518

  14. Characterization of neurophysiological and behavioral changes, MRI brain volumetry and 1H MRS in zQ175 knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Taneli; Lehtimäki, Kimmo; Vartiainen, Nina; Puoliväli, Jukka; Hendricks, Susan J; Glaser, Jack R; Bradaia, Amyaouch; Wadel, Kristian; Touller, Chrystelle; Kontkanen, Outi; Yrjänheikki, Juha M; Buisson, Bruno; Howland, David; Beaumont, Vahri; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Park, Larry C

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by severe behavioral, cognitive, and motor deficits. Since the discovery of the huntingtin gene (HTT) mutation that causes the disease, several mouse lines have been developed using different gene constructs of Htt. Recently, a new model, the zQ175 knock-in (KI) mouse, was developed (see description by Menalled et al, [1]) in an attempt to have the Htt gene in a context and causing a phenotype that more closely mimics HD in humans. Here we confirm the behavioral phenotypes reported by Menalled et al [1], and extend the characterization to include brain volumetry, striatal metabolite concentration, and early neurophysiological changes. The overall reproducibility of the behavioral phenotype across the two independent laboratories demonstrates the utility of this new model. Further, important features reminiscent of human HD pathology are observed in zQ175 mice: compared to wild-type neurons, electrophysiological recordings from acute brain slices reveal that medium spiny neurons from zQ175 mice display a progressive hyperexcitability; glutamatergic transmission in the striatum is severely attenuated; decreased striatal and cortical volumes from 3 and 4 months of age in homo- and heterozygous mice, respectively, with whole brain volumes only decreased in homozygotes. MR spectroscopy reveals decreased concentrations of N-acetylaspartate and increased concentrations of glutamine, taurine and creatine + phosphocreatine in the striatum of 12-month old homozygotes, the latter also measured in 12-month-old heterozygotes. Motor, behavioral, and cognitive deficits in homozygotes occur concurrently with the structural and metabolic changes observed. In sum, the zQ175 KI model has robust behavioral, electrophysiological, and histopathological features that may be valuable in both furthering our understanding of HD-like pathophyisology and the evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies to

  15. Characterization of Neurophysiological and Behavioral Changes, MRI Brain Volumetry and 1H MRS in zQ175 Knock-In Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heikkinen, Taneli; Lehtimäki, Kimmo; Vartiainen, Nina; Puoliväli, Jukka; Hendricks, Susan J.; Glaser, Jack R.; Bradaia, Amyaouch; Wadel, Kristian; Touller, Chrystelle; Kontkanen, Outi; Yrjänheikki, Juha M.; Buisson, Bruno; Howland, David; Beaumont, Vahri; Munoz-Sanjuan, Ignacio; Park, Larry C.

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by severe behavioral, cognitive, and motor deficits. Since the discovery of the huntingtin gene (HTT) mutation that causes the disease, several mouse lines have been developed using different gene constructs of Htt. Recently, a new model, the zQ175 knock-in (KI) mouse, was developed (see description by Menalled et al, [1]) in an attempt to have the Htt gene in a context and causing a phenotype that more closely mimics HD in humans. Here we confirm the behavioral phenotypes reported by Menalled et al [1], and extend the characterization to include brain volumetry, striatal metabolite concentration, and early neurophysiological changes. The overall reproducibility of the behavioral phenotype across the two independent laboratories demonstrates the utility of this new model. Further, important features reminiscent of human HD pathology are observed in zQ175 mice: compared to wild-type neurons, electrophysiological recordings from acute brain slices reveal that medium spiny neurons from zQ175 mice display a progressive hyperexcitability; glutamatergic transmission in the striatum is severely attenuated; decreased striatal and cortical volumes from 3 and 4 months of age in homo- and heterozygous mice, respectively, with whole brain volumes only decreased in homozygotes. MR spectroscopy reveals decreased concentrations of N-acetylaspartate and increased concentrations of glutamine, taurine and creatine + phosphocreatine in the striatum of 12-month old homozygotes, the latter also measured in 12-month-old heterozygotes. Motor, behavioral, and cognitive deficits in homozygotes occur concurrently with the structural and metabolic changes observed. In sum, the zQ175 KI model has robust behavioral, electrophysiological, and histopathological features that may be valuable in both furthering our understanding of HD-like pathophyisology and the evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies to

  16. TP53 mutations induced by BPDE in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kucab, Jill E.; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; White, Paul A.; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the tumour suppressor gene TP53 occur in more than 50% of human tumours; in some instances exposure to environmental carcinogens can be linked to characteristic mutational signatures. The Hupki (human TP53 knock-in) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalization assay (HIMA) is a useful model for studying the impact of environmental carcinogens on TP53 mutagenesis. In an effort to increase the frequency of TP53-mutated clones achievable in the HIMA, we generated nucleotide excision repair (NER)-deficient HUFs by crossing the Hupki mouse with an Xpa-knockout (Xpa-Null) mouse. We hypothesized that carcinogen-induced DNA adducts would persist in the TP53 sequence of Xpa-Null HUFs leading to an increased propensity for mismatched base pairing and mutation during replication of adducted DNA. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice, and HUFs derived from them, were more sensitive to the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. Following treatment with the reactive metabolite of BaP, benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures were subjected to the HIMA. A significant increase in TP53 mutations on the transcribed strand was detected in Xpa-Null HUFs compared to Xpa-WT HUFs, but the TP53-mutant frequency overall was not significantly different between the two genotypes. BPDE induced mutations primarily at G:C base pairs, with approximately half occurring at CpG sites, and the predominant mutation type was G:C > T:A in both Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Further, several of the TP53 mutation hotspots identified in smokers’ lung cancer were mutated by BPDE in HUFs (codons 157, 158, 245, 248, 249, 273). Therefore, the pattern and spectrum of BPDE-induced TP53 mutations in the HIMA are consistent with TP53 mutations detected in lung tumours of smokers. While Xpa-Null HUFs exhibited increased sensitivity to BPDE-induced damage on the transcribed strand, NER-deficiency did not

  17. Characterization of Behavioral, Neuropathological, Brain Metabolic and Key Molecular Changes in zQ175 Knock-In Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mali; Jin, Jing; Hou, Zhipeng; Zheng, Jennifer; Zhang, Jiangyang; Duan, Wenzhen

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is caused by an expansion of the trinucleotide poly (CAG) tract located in exon 1 of the huntingtin (Htt) gene leading to progressive neurodegeneration in selected brain regions, and associated functional impairments in motor, cognitive, and psychiatric domains. Since the discovery of the gene mutation that causes the disease, mouse models have been developed by different strategies. Recently, a new model, the zQ175 knock-in (KI) line, was developed in an attempt to have the Htt gene in a context and causing a phenotype that more closely mimics HD in humans. The behavioral phenotype was characterized across the independent laboratories and important features reminiscent of human HD are observed in zQ175 mice. In the current study, we characterized the zQ175 model housed in an academic laboratory under reversed dark-light cycle, including motor function, in vivo longitudinal structural MRI imaging for brain volume, MRS for striatal metabolites, neuropathology, as well as a panel of key disease marker proteins in the striatum at different ages. Our results suggest that homozygous zQ175 mice exhibited significant brain atrophy before the motor deficits and brain metabolite changes. Altered striatal medium spiny neuronal marker, postsynaptic marker protein and complement component C1qC also characterized zQ175 mice. Our results confirmed that the zQ175 KI model is valuable in understanding of HD-like pathophysiology and evaluation of potential therapeutics. Our data also provide suggestions to select appropriate outcome measurements in preclinical studies using the zQ175 mice. PMID:26859386

  18. Differential trigeminovascular nociceptive responses in the thalamus in the familial hemiplegic migraine 1 knock-in mouse: a Fos protein study.

    PubMed

    Park, JungWook; Moon, HeuiSoo; Akerman, Simon; Holland, Philip R; Lasalandra, Michele P; Andreou, Anna P; Ferrari, Michel D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Goadsby, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is a monogenic subtype of migraine with aura caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene, which encodes the pore-forming α1 subunit of voltage-gated neuronal CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels. Transgenic knock-in mice expressing the CACNA1A R192Q mutation that causes FHM-1 in patients show a greater susceptibility to cortical spreading depression, the likely underlying mechanism of typical human migraine aura. The aim of this study was to compare neuronal activation within the trigeminal pain pathways in response to nociceptive trigeminovascular stimulation in wild-type and R192Q knock-in mice. After sham surgery or electrical stimulation of the superior sagittal sinus for 2h, or stimulation preceded by treatment with naratriptan, mice underwent intracardiac perfusion, and the brain, including the brainstem, was removed. Fos expression was measured in the trigeminocervical complex (TCC) and the lateral (ventroposteromedial, ventrolateral), medial (parafascicular, centromedian) and posterior thalamic nuclei. In the TCC of wild-type animals, the number of Fos-positive cells increased significantly following dural stimulation compared to the sham control group (P<0.001) and decreased after naratriptan treatment (P<0.05). In R192Q knock-in mice, there was no significant difference between the stimulated and sham (P=0.10) or naratriptan pre-treated groups (P=0.15). The number of Fos-positive cells in the R192Q stimulated group was significantly lower compared to the wild-type stimulated mice (P<0.05). In the thalamus, R192Q mice tended to be more sensitive to stimulation compared to the sham control in the medial and posterior nuclei, and between the two strains of stimulated animals there was a significant difference in the centromedian (P<0.005), and posterior nuclei (P<0.05). The present study suggests that the FHM-1 mutation affects more rostral brain structures in this experimental paradigm, which offers a novel

  19. Comparison of mHTT Antibodies in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models Reveal Specific Binding Profiles and Steady-State Ubiquitin Levels with Disease Development.

    PubMed

    Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Jones, Lesley; Dunnett, Stephen B; Brooks, Simon P

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) cellular pathology is characterised by the aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein into inclusion bodies. The present paper compared the sensitivity of five widely used mHTT antibodies (S830; MW8; EM48; 1C2; ubiquitin) against mice from five commonly used HD mouse models (R6/1; YAC128; HdhQ92; B6 HdhQ150; B6 x129/Ola HdhQ150) at two ages to determine: the most sensitive antibodies for each model; whether mHTT antibody binding differed depending on aggregation stage (diffuse versus frank inclusion); the role of ubiquitin during aggregation as the ubiquitin proteosome system has been implicated in disease development. The models demonstrated unique profiles of antibody binding even when the models varied only by background strain (HdhQ150). MW8 was highly sensitive for detecting frank inclusions in all lines whereas EM48, ubiquitin and 1C2 demonstrated consistent staining in all models irrespective of age or form of mHTT. MW8 and S830 were the most sensitive antibodies with 1C2 the least. Ubiquitin levels were stable for each model regardless of age. Ubiquitin was particularly sensitive in young YAC128 mice that demonstrate an absence of inclusions until ~12 months of age suggesting high affinity to mHTT in its diffuse form. The data indicate that generalisations across models regarding the quantification of aggregations may not be valid and that mHTT antibody binding is unique to the mouse model and sensitive to changes in inclusion development. PMID:27196694

  20. Comparison of mHTT Antibodies in Huntington’s Disease Mouse Models Reveal Specific Binding Profiles and Steady-State Ubiquitin Levels with Disease Development

    PubMed Central

    Bayram-Weston, Zubeyde; Jones, Lesley; Dunnett, Stephen B.; Brooks, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) cellular pathology is characterised by the aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) protein into inclusion bodies. The present paper compared the sensitivity of five widely used mHTT antibodies (S830; MW8; EM48; 1C2; ubiquitin) against mice from five commonly used HD mouse models (R6/1; YAC128; HdhQ92; B6 HdhQ150; B6 x129/Ola HdhQ150) at two ages to determine: the most sensitive antibodies for each model; whether mHTT antibody binding differed depending on aggregation stage (diffuse versus frank inclusion); the role of ubiquitin during aggregation as the ubiquitin proteosome system has been implicated in disease development. The models demonstrated unique profiles of antibody binding even when the models varied only by background strain (HdhQ150). MW8 was highly sensitive for detecting frank inclusions in all lines whereas EM48, ubiquitin and 1C2 demonstrated consistent staining in all models irrespective of age or form of mHTT. MW8 and S830 were the most sensitive antibodies with 1C2 the least. Ubiquitin levels were stable for each model regardless of age. Ubiquitin was particularly sensitive in young YAC128 mice that demonstrate an absence of inclusions until ~12 months of age suggesting high affinity to mHTT in its diffuse form. The data indicate that generalisations across models regarding the quantification of aggregations may not be valid and that mHTT antibody binding is unique to the mouse model and sensitive to changes in inclusion development. PMID:27196694

  1. Proteomic Characterization of Inhibitory Synapses Using a Novel pHluorin-tagged γ-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor, Type A (GABAA), α2 Subunit Knock-in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasuko; Morrow, Danielle H; Modgil, Amit; Huyghe, Deborah; Deeb, Tarek Z; Lumb, Michael J; Davies, Paul A; Moss, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    The accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAARs) at the appropriate postsynaptic sites is critical for determining the efficacy of fast inhibitory neurotransmission. Although we know that the majority of synaptic GABAAR subtypes are assembled from α1-3, β, and γ2 subunits, our understanding of how neurons facilitate their targeting to and stabilization at inhibitory synapses is rudimentary. To address these issues, we have created knock-in mice in which the pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the Myc epitope were introduced to the extracellular domain of the mature receptor α2 subunit (pHα2). Using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectroscopy, we identified a stable complex of 174 proteins that were associated with pHα2, including other GABAAR subunits, and previously identified receptor-associated proteins such as gephyrin and collybistin. 149 of these proteins were novel GABAAR binding partners and included G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channel subunits, proteins that regulate trafficking and degradation, regulators of protein phosphorylation, GTPases, and a number of proteins that regulate their activity. Notably, members of the postsynaptic density family of proteins that are critical components of excitatory synapses were not associated with GABAARs. Crucially, we demonstrated for a subset of these novel proteins (including cullin1, ephexin, potassium channel tetramerization domain containing protein 12, mitofusin2, metabotropic glutamate receptor 5, p21-activated kinase 7, and Ras-related protein 5A) bind directly to the intracellular domains of GABAARs, validating our proteomic analysis. Thus, our experiments illustrate the complexity of the GABAAR proteome and enhance our understanding of the mechanisms neurons use to construct inhibitory synapses. PMID:27044742

  2. Progression of behavioural despair in R6/2 and Hdh knock-in mouse models recapitulates depression in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Ciamei, Alessandro; Detloff, Peter J; Morton, A Jennifer

    2015-09-15

    In Huntington's disease (HD) depression is observed before the disease is diagnosed, and is likely to be a component of the disease, rather than a consequence. Depression in HD patients does not progress in parallel with other symptoms; rather it peaks at early- to mid-stages of the disease and declines thereafter. In mice, depressive-like behaviours can be measured as an increase in behavioural despair (floating) observed in the forced swim test (FST). Floating in the FST is modulated differently by antidepressants with different mechanisms of action. Drugs that increase levels of serotonin inhibit floating by promoting horizontal swimming, whereas drugs that increase levels of noradrenaline inhibit floating by enhancing vertical swimming (climbing). We compared the FST behavioural profiles of two different allelic series of HD mice, a fragment model (R6/2 mice carrying 120, 250, or 350 CAG repeats), and a knock-in model (Hdh mice carrying 50, 150, or 250 CAG repeats). The FST behavioural profile was similar in both lines. It was characterized by an early-stage increase in floating, and then, as the mice aged, floating decreased, whereas active behaviours of swimming and climbing increased. Our results show that, as with depression in HD patients, floating in HD mice does not progress linearly, suggesting that, at the late stages of the disease, an increase in serotonergic and noradrenergic activity might contribute to lower floating levels in HD mice. If similar compensatory changes occur in humans, this should be taken into account when considering the treatment of depression in HD patients. PMID:25986402

  3. p57(Kip2) knock-in mouse reveals CDK-independent contribution in the development of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duquesnes, Nicolas; Callot, Caroline; Jeannot, Pauline; Daburon, Virginie; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Manenti, Stephane; Davy, Alice; Besson, Arnaud

    2016-07-01

    CDKN1C encodes the cyclin-CDK inhibitor p57(Kip2) (p57), a negative regulator of the cell cycle and putative tumour suppressor. Genetic and epigenetic alterations causing loss of p57 function are the most frequent cause of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), a genetic disorder characterized by multiple developmental anomalies and increased susceptibility to tumour development during childhood. So far, BWS development has been attributed entirely to the deregulation of proliferation caused by loss of p57-mediated CDK inhibition. However, a fraction of BWS patients have point mutations in CDKN1C located outside of the CDK inhibitory region, suggesting the involvement of other parts of the protein in the disease. To test this possibility, we generated knock-in mice deficient for p57-mediated cyclin-CDK inhibition (p57(CK) (-) ), the only clearly defined function of p57. Comparative analysis of p57(CK) (-) and p57(KO) mice provided clear evidence for CDK-independent roles of p57 and revealed that BWS is not caused entirely by CDK deregulation, as several features of BWS are caused by the loss of CDK-independent roles of p57. Thus, while the genetic origin of BWS is well understood, our results underscore that the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. To probe these mechanisms further, we determined the p57 interactome. Several partners identified are involved in genetic disorders with features resembling those caused by CDKN1C mutation, suggesting that they could be involved in BWS pathogenesis and revealing a possible connection between seemingly distinct syndromes. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27015986

  4. Sex differences in behavior and striatal ascorbate release in the 140 CAG knock-in mouse model of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Dorner, Jenelle L.; Miller, Benjamin R.; Barton, Scott J.; Brock, Tyler J.; Rebec, George V.

    2007-01-01

    Ethological assessment of murine models of Huntington’s disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disorder, enables correlation between phenotype and pathophysiology. Currently, the most characterized model is the R6/2 line that develops a progressive behavioral and neurological phenotype by six weeks of age. A recently developed knock-in model with 140 CAG repeats (KI) exhibits a subtle phenotype with a longer progressive course, more typical of adult-onset HD in humans. We evaluated rotarod performance, open-field behavior, and motor activity across the diurnal cycle in KI mice during early to mid-adulthood. Although we did not observe any effects of age, relative to wild-type (WT) mice, KI mice showed significant deficits in both open-field climbing behavior and home-cage running wheel activity during the light phase of the diurnal cycle. An interesting sex difference also emerged. KI females spent more time in the open-field grooming and more time running during the diurnal dark phase than KI males and WT mice of both sexes. In striatum, the primary site of HD pathology, we measured behavior-related changes in extracellular ascorbate (AA), which is abnormally low in the R6/2 line, consistent with a loss of antioxidant protection in HD. KI males exhibited a 20–40% decrease in striatal AA from anesthesia baseline to behavioral activation that was not observed in other groups. Collectively, our results indicate behavioral deficits in KI mice that may be specific to the diurnal cycle. Furthermore, sex differences observed in behavior and striatal AA release suggest sex-dependent variation in the phenotype and neuropathology of HD. PMID:17239451

  5. TP53 and lacZ mutagenesis induced by 3-nitrobenzanthrone in Xpa-deficient human TP53 knock-in mouse embryo fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kucab, Jill E.; Zwart, Edwin P.; van Steeg, Harry; Luijten, Mirjam; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.

    2016-01-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a highly mutagenic compound and possible human carcinogen found in diesel exhaust. 3-NBA forms bulky DNA adducts following metabolic activation and induces predominantly G:C > T:A transversions in a variety of experimental systems. Here we investigated the influence of nucleotide excision repair (NER) on 3-NBA-induced mutagenesis of the human tumour suppressor gene TP53 and the reporter gene lacZ. To this end we utilised Xpa -knockout (Xpa-Null) human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) embryo fibroblasts (HUFs). As Xpa is essential for NER of bulky DNA adducts, we hypothesized that DNA adducts induced by 3-NBA would persist in the genomes of Xpa-Null cells and lead to an increased frequency of mutation. The HUF immortalisation assay was used to select for cells harbouring TP53 mutations following mutagen exposure. We found that Xpa-Null Hupki mice and HUFs were more sensitive to 3-NBA treatment than their wild-type (Xpa-WT) counterparts. However, following 3-NBA treatment and immortalisation, a similar frequency of TP53-mutant clones arose from Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null HUF cultures. In cells from both Xpa genotypes G:C > T:A transversion was the predominant TP53 mutation type and mutations exhibited bias towards the non-transcribed strand. Thirty-two percent of 3-NBA-induced TP53 mutations occurred at CpG sites, all of which are hotspots for mutation in smokers’ lung cancer (codons 157, 158, 175, 245, 248, 273, 282). We also examined 3-NBA-induced mutagenesis of an integrated lacZ reporter gene in HUFs, where we again observed a similar mutant frequency in Xpa-WT and Xpa-Null cells. Our findings suggest that 3-NBA-DNA adducts may evade removal by global genomic NER; the persistence of 3-NBA adducts in DNA may be an important factor in its mutagenicity. PMID:26723900

  6. Differential loss of thalamostriatal and corticostriatal input to striatal projection neuron types prior to overt motor symptoms in the Q140 knock-in mouse model of Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yun-Ping; Wong, Ting; Wan, Jim Y.; Reiner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Motor slowing and forebrain white matter loss have been reported in premanifest Huntington's disease (HD) prior to substantial striatal neuron loss. These findings raise the possibility that early motor defects in HD may be related to loss of excitatory input to striatum. In a prior study, we showed that in the heterozygous Q140 knock-in mouse model of HD that loss of thalamostriatal axospinous terminals is evident by 4 months, and loss of corticostriatal axospinous terminals is evident at 12 months, before striatal projection neuron pathology. In the present study, we specifically characterized the loss of thalamostriatal and corticostriatal terminals on direct (dSPN) and indirect (iSPN) pathway striatal projection neurons, using immunolabeling to identify thalamostriatal (VGLUT2+) and corticostriatal (VGLUT1+) axospinous terminals, and D1 receptor immunolabeling to distinguish dSPN (D1+) and iSPN (D1−) synaptic targets. We found that the loss of corticostriatal terminals at 12 months of age was preferential for D1+ spines, and especially involved smaller terminals, presumptively of the intratelencephalically projecting (IT) type. By contrast, indirect pathway D1− spines showed little loss of axospinous terminals at the same age. Thalamostriatal terminal loss was comparable for D1+ and D1− spines at both 4 and 12 months. Regression analysis showed that the loss of VGLUT1+ terminals on D1+ spines was correlated with a slight decline in open field motor parameters at 12 months. Our overall results raise the possibility that differential thalamic and cortical input loss to SPNs is an early event in human HD, with cortical loss to dSPNs in particular contributing to premanifest motor slowing. PMID:25360089

  7. Vulnerability of calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in a transgenic/knock-in APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer disease together with disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Verdaguer, Ester; Brox, Susana; Petrov, Dmitry; Olloquequi, Jordi; Romero, Rafael; de Lemos, M Luisa; Camins, Antoni; Auladell, Carme

    2015-09-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by accumulation of β-amyloid protein in the brain (in both soluble and insoluble forms) and by the presence of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), leading to neurotoxicity. The exact mechanisms whereby Aβ triggers brain alterations are unclear. However, accumulating evidence suggests that a deregulation of Ca(2+) signaling may play a major role in disease progression. Calcium-buffering proteins, including calbindin-D28K (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV), may offer neuroprotection by maintaining calcium homeostasis. Although marked reductions in these proteins have been observed in the brains of mice and humans with AD, their contribution to AD pathology remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to analyze distribution patterns of CB(+,) CR(+) and PV(+) interneurons in different areas of the hippocampus, a brain region that is severely affected in AD. A transgenic knock-in APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of familial AD was used. The data were obtained from the brains of 3- and 12-month-old animals. These ages roughly correspond to an early mature adult (prior to clinical manifestations) and a late middle-age (clinical symptoms readily detectable) phase in human AD patients. Immunostaining revealed increases in CB and PV immunoreactivity (IR) in the hippocampus of 3-month-old transgenic mice, compared to wild-type animals. Possibly, these proteins are upregulated in an attempt to control cellular homeostasis and synaptic plasticity. However, the pattern of CB-IR was reversed in 12-month-old animals, potentially indicating a loss of cellular capacity to respond to pathophysiological processes. In addition, at this age, a noticeable increase in PV-IR was observed, suggesting the presence of hippocampal network hyperactivity in older AD-like mice. Our results indicate that CaBP(+) neuronal subpopulations play a role in adult neurogenesis and in AD pathology, particularly at early disease

  8. Knocking in an Internal-combustion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolik, A; Voinov, A

    1940-01-01

    The question remains open of the relation between the phenomena of knocking in the engine and the explosion wave. The solution of this problem is the object of this paper. The tests were conducted on an aircraft engine with a pyrex glass window in the cylinder head. Photographs were then taken of various combinations of fuels and conditions.

  9. "Gene-swap knock-in" cassette in mice to study allelic differences in human genes.

    PubMed

    Nebert, D W; Dalton, T P; Stuart, G W; Carvan, M J

    2000-01-01

    Genetic differences in environmental toxicity and cancer susceptibility among individuals in a human population often reflect polymorphisms in the genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), drug transporters, and receptors that control DME levels. This field of study is called "ecogenetics", and a subset of this field--concerning genetic variability in response to drugs--is termed "pharmacogenetics". Although human-mouse differences might be 3- to perhaps 10-fold, human interindividual differences can be as great as 20-fold or more than 40-fold. It would be helpful, therefore, to study toxicokinetics/pharmacokinetics of particular environmental agents and drugs in mice containing these "high-" and "low-extreme" human alleles. We hope to use transgenic "knock-in" technology in order to insert human alleles in place of the orthologous mouse gene. However, the knock-in of each gene has normally been a separate event requiring the following: (a) construction of the targeting vector, (b) transfection into embryonic stem (ES) cells, (c) generation of a targeted mouse having germline transmission of the construct, and (d) backcross breeding of the knock-in mouse (at least 6-8 times) to produce a suitable genetically homogeneous background (i.e., to decrease "experimental noise"). These experiments require 1 1/2 to 2 years to complete, making this very powerful technology inefficient for routine applications. If, on the other hand, the initial knock-in targeting vector might include sequences that would allow the knocked-in gene to be exchanged (quickly and repeatedly) for one new allele after another, then testing distinctly different human polymorphic alleles in transgenic mice could be accomplished in a few months instead of several years. This "gene-swapping" technique will soon be done by zygotic injection of a "human allele cassette" into the sperm or fertilized ovum of the parental knock-in mouse inbred strain or by the cloning of whole mice from cumulus

  10. Hypertrophy of lymphoid organs is a possible phenotypic characteristic of R420W mutation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene: a study using a knock-in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Hajime; Okudaira, Noriyuki; Matsushita, Kazufumi; Yoshimoto, Tomohiro; Sato, Takako; Suzuki, Koichi

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac ryanodine receptor gene (RyR2) mutations sometimes result in sudden cardiac death due to fatal arrhythmias. N-terminal R420W mutation of RyR2 is known to show similar phenotypes to arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and to cause juvenile sudden death. We previously reported two sudden death cases with the same R420W mutation. Interestingly, the cases showed hypertrophy of lymphoid organs such as the thymus and mesenteric lymph nodes. The present study examined whether R420W mutation of RYR2 causes hypertrophy of lymphoid organs by generating a mouse model carrying the mutation. Homozygous (RyR2(R420W/R420W)) mice showed significant increases in thymus and spleen weights but not in kidney, heart, and brain weights compared with wild-type mice. The mice also showed remarkable hypertrophy of mesenteric lymph nodes. Immunohistochemical study revealed that RyR2 protein was prominently expressed in epithelial cells of the thymic medulla in the thymus. These findings show that mice with R420W mutation of RyR2 exhibit hypertrophy of lymphoid organs. Sudden unexplained death cases with the mutation may display such findings at autopsy. PMID:25087098

  11. Physiological Properties of Rod Photoreceptor Cells in Green-sensitive Cone Pigment Knock-in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Keisuke; Onishi, Akishi; Imai, Hiroo; Chisaka, Osamu; Ueda, Yoshiki; Usukura, Jiro; Nakatani, Kei; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptor cells that are responsible for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, exhibit photoresponses different from each other and contain similar phototransduction proteins with distinctive molecular properties. To investigate the contribution of the different molecular properties of visual pigments to the responses of the photoreceptor cells, we have generated knock-in mice in which rod visual pigment (rhodopsin) was replaced with mouse green-sensitive cone visual pigment (mouse green). The mouse green was successfully transported to the rod outer segments, though the expression of mouse green in homozygous retina was ∼11% of rhodopsin in wild-type retina. Single-cell recordings of wild-type and homozygous rods suggested that the flash sensitivity and the single-photon responses from mouse green were three to fourfold lower than those from rhodopsin after correction for the differences in cell volume and levels of several signal transduction proteins. Subsequent measurements using heterozygous rods expressing both mouse green and rhodopsin E122Q mutant, where these pigments in the same rod cells can be selectively irradiated due to their distinctive absorption maxima, clearly showed that the photoresponse of mouse green was threefold lower than that of rhodopsin. Noise analysis indicated that the rate of thermal activations of mouse green was 1.7 × 10−7 s−1, about 860-fold higher than that of rhodopsin. The increase in thermal activation of mouse green relative to that of rhodopsin results in only 4% reduction of rod photosensitivity for bright lights, but would instead be expected to severely affect the visual threshold under dim-light conditions. Therefore, the abilities of rhodopsin to generate a large single photon response and to retain high thermal stability in darkness are factors that have been necessary for the evolution of scotopic vision. PMID:17591985

  12. Tissue-Specific Regulation of Oncogene Expression Using Cre-Inducible ROSA26 Knock-In Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Carofino, Brandi L; Justice, Monica J

    2015-01-01

    Cre-inducible mouse models are often utilized for the spatial and temporal expression of oncogenes. With the wide number of Cre recombinase lines available, inducible transgenesis represents a tractable approach to achieve discrete oncogene expression. Here, we describe a protocol for targeting Cre-inducible genes to the ubiquitously expressed ROSA26 locus. Gene targeting provides several advantages over standard transgenic techniques, including a known site of integration and previously characterized pattern of expression. Historically, an inherent instability of ROSA26 targeting vectors has hampered the efficiency of developing ROSA26 knock-in lines. In this protocol, we provide individual steps for utilizing Gateway recombination for cloning as well as detailed instructions for screening targeted ES cell clones. By following this protocol, one can achieve germline transmission of a ROSA26 knock-in line within several months. PMID:26069083

  13. Developing a de novo targeted knock-in method based on in utero electroporation into the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Tsunekawa, Yuji; Terhune, Raymond Kunikane; Fujita, Ikumi; Shitamukai, Atsunori; Suetsugu, Taeko; Matsuzaki, Fumio

    2016-09-01

    Genome-editing technology has revolutionized the field of biology. Here, we report a novel de novo gene-targeting method mediated by in utero electroporation into the developing mammalian brain. Electroporation of donor DNA with the CRISPR/Cas9 system vectors successfully leads to knock-in of the donor sequence, such as EGFP, to the target site via the homology-directed repair mechanism. We developed a targeting vector system optimized to prevent anomalous leaky expression of the donor gene from the plasmid, which otherwise often occurs depending on the donor sequence. The knock-in efficiency of the electroporated progenitors reached up to 40% in the early stage and 20% in the late stage of the developing mouse brain. Furthermore, we inserted different fluorescent markers into the target gene in each homologous chromosome, successfully distinguishing homozygous knock-in cells by color. We also applied this de novo gene targeting to the ferret model for the study of complex mammalian brains. Our results demonstrate that this technique is widely applicable for monitoring gene expression, visualizing protein localization, lineage analysis and gene knockout, all at the single-cell level, in developmental tissues. PMID:27578183

  14. Impaired degradation of WNK1 and WNK4 kinases causes PHAII in mutant KLHL3 knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Susa, Koichiro; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Zeniya, Moko; Mori, Yutaro; Mori, Takayasu; Chiga, Motoko; Nomura, Naohiro; Nishida, Hidenori; Takahashi, Daiei; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Yuichi; Takeishi, Kenta; Takeda, Naoki; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2014-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is a hereditary disease characterized by salt-sensitive hypertension, hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis, and genes encoding with-no-lysine kinase 1 (WNK1) and WNK4 kinases are known to be responsible. Recently, Kelch-like 3 (KLHL3) and Cullin3, components of KLHL3-Cullin3 E3 ligase, were newly identified as responsible for PHAII. We have reported that WNK4 is the substrate of KLHL3-Cullin3 E3 ligase-mediated ubiquitination. However, WNK1 and Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) were also reported to be a substrate of KLHL3-Cullin3 E3 ligase by other groups. Therefore, it remains unclear which molecule is the target(s) of KLHL3. To investigate the pathogenesis of PHAII caused by KLHL3 mutation, we generated and analyzed KLHL3(R528H/+) knock-in mice. KLHL3(R528H/+) knock-in mice exhibited salt-sensitive hypertension, hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis. Moreover, the phosphorylation of NCC was increased in the KLHL3(R528H/+) mouse kidney, indicating that the KLHL3(R528H/+) knock-in mouse is an ideal mouse model of PHAII. Interestingly, the protein expression of both WNK1 and WNK4 was significantly increased in the KLHL3(R528H/+) mouse kidney, confirming that increases in these WNK kinases activated the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation cascade in KLHL3(R528H/+) knock-in mice. To examine whether mutant KLHL3 R528H can interact with WNK kinases, we measured the binding of TAMRA-labeled WNK1 and WNK4 peptides to full-length KLHL3 using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and found that neither WNK1 nor WNK4 bound to mutant KLHL3 R528H. Thus, we found that increased protein expression levels of WNK1 and WNK4 kinases cause PHAII by KLHL3 R528H mutation due to impaired KLHL3-Cullin3-mediated ubiquitination. PMID:24821705

  15. Knock-in Luciferase Reporter Mice for In Vivo Monitoring of CREB Activity

    PubMed Central

    Akhmedov, Dmitry; Rajendran, Kavitha; Mendoza-Rodriguez, Maria G.

    2016-01-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is induced during fasting in the liver, where it stimulates transcription of rate-limiting gluconeogenic genes to maintain metabolic homeostasis. Adenoviral and transgenic CREB reporters have been used to monitor hepatic CREB activity non-invasively using bioluminescence reporter imaging. However, adenoviral vectors and randomly inserted transgenes have several limitations. To overcome disadvantages of the currently used strategies, we created a ROSA26 knock-in CREB reporter mouse line (ROSA26-CRE-luc). cAMP-inducing ligands stimulate the reporter in primary hepatocytes and myocytes from ROSA26-CRE-luc animals. In vivo, these animals exhibit little hepatic CREB activity in the ad libitum fed state but robust induction after fasting. Strikingly, CREB was markedly stimulated in liver, but not in skeletal muscle, after overnight voluntary wheel-running exercise, uncovering differential regulation of CREB in these tissues under catabolic states. The ROSA26-CRE-luc mouse line is a useful resource to study dynamics of CREB activity longitudinally in vivo and can be used as a source of primary cells for analysis of CREB regulatory pathways ex vivo. PMID:27336479

  16. APOE genotype alters immunoglobulin subtypes in knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Zhao, Wenjuan; Al-muhtasib, Nour; Rebeck, G. William

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) alleles are strongly related to the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). APOE genotype also affects inflammatory processes in response to damage. We tested whether APOE genotype affected the levels of specific immunoglobulins in healthy, uninfected APOE knock-in mice. We measured specific immunoglobulins in brain, spleen and plasma. Levels of total IgG in brain and spleen were highest in APOE-ε3 mice, significantly higher than in APOE-ε2 and APOE-ε4 mice; no differences were observed for levels of total IgG plasma. We also measured specific subtypes of IgG. IgG1 was only detectable in plasma, and did not differ by APOE genotype. IgG3 was detectable in plasma and spleen, and also did not differ by APOE genotype. IgG2b showed the same pattern as levels of total IgG by APOE genotype, with the highest levels of IgG2b in brain, spleen, and plasma of APOE-ε3 mice. IgG2a showed an entirely different pattern, with significantly higher levels in spleen and plasma of APOE-ε4 mice compared to APOE-ε2 and APOE-ε3 mice. We also measured IgM and IgA in spleens and plasma of these mice. In spleen, APOE-ε4 mice had the lowest IgA levels and the highest levels of IgM; both being significantly different from APOE-ε2 mice. In total, murine IgG2a and IgM were highest in APOE-ε4 mice, while total IgG and Ig2b were highest in APOE-ε3 mice. These dramatically different distributions of immunoglobulins could allow for human AD risk biomarkers based on specific immunoglobulin subtypes. PMID:25737044

  17. Extensive early motor and non-motor behavioral deficits are followed by striatal neuronal loss in Knock-in Huntington’s disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Miriam A.; Kosmalska, Agata; Enayati, Joseph; Cohen, Rachel; Zeitlin, Scott; Levine, Michael S.; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise

    2008-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder, caused by an elongation of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene. Mice with an insertion of an expanded polyglutamine repeat in the mouse huntingtin gene (knock-in mice) most closely model the disease because the mutation is expressed in the proper genomic and protein context. However, few knock-in mouse lines have been extensively characterized and available data suggest marked differences in the extent and time course of their behavioral and pathological phenotype. We have previously described behavioral anomalies in the open field as early as 1 month of age, followed by the appearance at 2 months of progressive huntingtin neuropathology, in a mouse carrying a portion of human exon 1 with approximately 140 CAG repeats inserted into the mouse huntingtin gene. Here we extend these observations by showing that early behavioral anomalies exist in a wide range of motor (climbing, vertical pole, rotarod, and running wheel performance) and non-motor functions (fear conditioning and anxiety) starting at 1–4 months of age, and are followed by progressive gliosis and decrease in DARPP32 (12 months) and a loss of striatal neurons at 2 years. At this age, mice also present striking spontaneous behavioral deficits in their home cage. The data show that this line of knock-in mice reproduces canonical characteristics of Huntington’s disease, preceded by deficits which may correspond to the protracted pre-manifest phase of the disease in humans. Accordingly, they provide a useful model to elucidate early mechanisms of pathophysiology and the progression to overt neurodegeneration. PMID:18805465

  18. Knock-in fibroblasts and transgenic blastocysts for expression of human FGF2 in the bovine β-casein gene locus using CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Hee; Kim, Yeong Ji; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Se Eun; Kim, Jiwoo; Park, Min Jee; Lee, Hong-Gu; Park, Se Pill; Kang, Man-Jong

    2016-06-01

    Many transgenic domestic animals have been developed to produce therapeutic proteins in the mammary gland, and this approach is one of the most important methods for agricultural and biomedical applications. However, expression and secretion of a protein varies because transgenes are integrated at random sites in the genome. In addition, distal enhancers are very important for transcriptional gene regulation and tissue-specific gene expression. Development of a vector system regulated accurately in the genome is needed to improve production of therapeutic proteins. The objective of this study was to develop a knock-in system for expression of human fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) in the bovine β-casein gene locus. The F2A sequence was fused to the human FGF2 gene and inserted into exon 3 of the β-casein gene. We detected expression of human FGF2 mRNA in the HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cells by RT-PCR and human FGF2 protein in the culture media using western blot analysis when the knock-in vector was introduced. We transfected the knock-in vector into bovine ear fibroblasts and produced knock-in fibroblasts using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system was more efficient than conventional methods. In addition, we produced knock-in blastocysts by somatic cell nuclear transfer using the knock-in fibroblasts. Our knock-in fibroblasts may help to create cloned embryos for development of transgenic dairy cattle expressing human FGF2 protein in the mammary gland via the expression system of the bovine β-casein gene. PMID:26197710

  19. Notch Lineages and Activity in Intestinal Stem Cells Determined by a New Set of Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fre, Silvia; Hannezo, Edouard; Sale, Sanja; Huyghe, Mathilde; Lafkas, Daniel; Kissel, Holger; Louvi, Angeliki; Greve, Jeffrey; Louvard, Daniel; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros

    2011-01-01

    The conserved role of Notch signaling in controlling intestinal cell fate specification and homeostasis has been extensively studied. Nevertheless, the precise identity of the cells in which Notch signaling is active and the role of different Notch receptor paralogues in the intestine remain ambiguous, due to the lack of reliable tools to investigate Notch expression and function in vivo. We generated a new series of transgenic mice that allowed us, by lineage analysis, to formally prove that Notch1 and Notch2 are specifically expressed in crypt stem cells. In addition, a novel Notch reporter mouse, Hes1-EmGFPSAT, demonstrated exclusive Notch activity in crypt stem cells and absorptive progenitors. This roster of knock-in and reporter mice represents a valuable resource to functionally explore the Notch pathway in vivo in virtually all tissues. PMID:21991352

  20. Mutant Tau knock-in mice display frontotemporal dementia relevant behaviour and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Koss, David J; Robinson, Lianne; Drever, Benjamin D; Plucińska, Kaja; Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Veselcic, Peter; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2016-07-01

    Models of Tau pathology related to frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are essential to determine underlying neurodegenerative pathologies and resulting tauopathy relevant behavioural changes. However, existing models are often limited in their translational value due to Tau overexpression, and the frequent occurrence of motor deficits which prevent comprehensive behavioural assessments. In order to address these limitations, a forebrain-specific (CaMKIIα promoter), human mutated Tau (hTauP301L+R406W) knock-in mouse was generated out of the previously characterised PLB1Triple mouse, and named PLB2Tau. After confirmation of an additional hTau species (~60kDa) in forebrain samples, we identified age-dependent progressive Tau phosphorylation which coincided with the emergence of FTD relevant behavioural traits. In line with the non-cognitive symptomatology of FTD, PLB2Tau mice demonstrated early emerging (~6months) phenotypes of heightened anxiety in the elevated plus maze, depressive/apathetic behaviour in a sucrose preference test and generally reduced exploratory activity in the absence of motor impairments. Investigations of cognitive performance indicated prominent dysfunctions in semantic memory, as assessed by social transmission of food preference, and in behavioural flexibility during spatial reversal learning in a home cage corner-learning task. Spatial learning was only mildly affected and task-specific, with impairments at 12months of age in the corner learning but not in the water maze task. Electroencephalographic (EEG) investigations indicated a vigilance-stage specific loss of alpha power during wakefulness at both parietal and prefrontal recording sites, and site-specific EEG changes during non-rapid eye movement sleep (prefrontal) and rapid eye movement sleep (parietal). Further investigation of hippocampal electrophysiology conducted in slice preparations indicated a modest reduction in efficacy of synaptic transmission in the absence of altered synaptic

  1. Periodontal Defects in the A116T Knock-in Murine Model of Odontohypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Foster, B L; Sheen, C R; Hatch, N E; Liu, J; Cory, E; Narisawa, S; Kiffer-Moreira, T; Sah, R L; Whyte, M P; Somerman, M J; Millán, J L

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in ALPL result in hypophosphatasia (HPP), a disease causing defective skeletal mineralization. ALPL encodes tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme that promotes mineralization by reducing inorganic pyrophosphate, a mineralization inhibitor. In addition to skeletal defects, HPP causes dental defects, and a mild clinical form of HPP, odontohypophosphatasia, features only a dental phenotype. The Alpl knockout (Alpl (-/-)) mouse phenocopies severe infantile HPP, including profound skeletal and dental defects. However, the severity of disease in Alpl (-/-) mice prevents analysis at advanced ages, including studies to target rescue of dental tissues. We aimed to generate a knock-in mouse model of odontohypophosphatasia with a primarily dental phenotype, based on a mutation (c.346G>A) identified in a human kindred with autosomal dominant odontohypophosphatasia. Biochemical, skeletal, and dental analyses were performed on the resulting Alpl(+/A116T) mice to validate this model. Alpl(+/A116T) mice featured 50% reduction in plasma ALP activity compared with wild-type controls. No differences in litter size, survival, or body weight were observed in Alpl(+/A116T) versus wild-type mice. The postcranial skeleton of Alpl(+/A116T) mice was normal by radiography, with no differences in femur length, cortical/trabecular structure or mineral density, or mechanical properties. Parietal bone trabecular compartment was mildly altered. Alpl(+/A116T) mice featured alterations in the alveolar bone, including radiolucencies and resorptive lesions, osteoid accumulation on the alveolar bone crest, and significant differences in several bone properties measured by micro-computed tomography. Nonsignificant changes in acellular cementum did not appear to affect periodontal attachment or function, although circulating ALP activity was correlated significantly with incisor cementum thickness. The Alpl(+/A116T) mouse is the first model of odontohypophosphatasia

  2. Periodontal Defects in the A116T Knock-in Murine Model of Odontohypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Foster, B.L.; Sheen, C.R.; Hatch, N.E.; Liu, J.; Cory, E.; Narisawa, S.; Kiffer-Moreira, T.; Sah, R.L.; Whyte, M.P.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ALPL result in hypophosphatasia (HPP), a disease causing defective skeletal mineralization. ALPL encodes tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme that promotes mineralization by reducing inorganic pyrophosphate, a mineralization inhibitor. In addition to skeletal defects, HPP causes dental defects, and a mild clinical form of HPP, odontohypophosphatasia, features only a dental phenotype. The Alpl knockout (Alpl-/-) mouse phenocopies severe infantile HPP, including profound skeletal and dental defects. However, the severity of disease in Alpl-/- mice prevents analysis at advanced ages, including studies to target rescue of dental tissues. We aimed to generate a knock-in mouse model of odontohypophosphatasia with a primarily dental phenotype, based on a mutation (c.346G>A) identified in a human kindred with autosomal dominant odontohypophosphatasia. Biochemical, skeletal, and dental analyses were performed on the resulting Alpl+/A116T mice to validate this model. Alpl+/A116T mice featured 50% reduction in plasma ALP activity compared with wild-type controls. No differences in litter size, survival, or body weight were observed in Alpl+/A116T versus wild-type mice. The postcranial skeleton of Alpl+/A116T mice was normal by radiography, with no differences in femur length, cortical/trabecular structure or mineral density, or mechanical properties. Parietal bone trabecular compartment was mildly altered. Alpl+/A116T mice featured alterations in the alveolar bone, including radiolucencies and resorptive lesions, osteoid accumulation on the alveolar bone crest, and significant differences in several bone properties measured by micro–computed tomography. Nonsignificant changes in acellular cementum did not appear to affect periodontal attachment or function, although circulating ALP activity was correlated significantly with incisor cementum thickness. The Alpl+/A116T mouse is the first model of odontohypophosphatasia, providing insights on

  3. A knock-in allele of En1 expressing dre recombinase.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Nicholas W; de Marchena, Jacqueline; Jensen, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Engrailed 1 (En1) is a homeobox-containing transcription factor expressed during development in diverse tissues, including the embryonic midbrain and anterior hindbrain. To facilitate investigation of genetic and developmental heterogeneity among cells with a history of En1 expression, we have generated En1(Dre) , a knock-in allele expressing Dre recombinase. En1(Dre) can be used with existing Cre and Flp recombinase lines for genetic intersectional labeling, fate mapping, and functional manipulation of subpopulations of cells characterized by transient expression of En1. To avoid disrupting En1 function, the Dre cDNA is inserted at the 3' end of the En1 coding sequence, together with a viral 2A peptide to mediate translation of separate EN1 and Dre proteins. Consequently, viable and fertile En1(Dre) homozygotes can be used to increase the proportion of useful genotypes produced in complex crosses. The pattern of Dre expression from En1(Dre) is indistinguishable from wild-type En1 expression in mid-gestation mouse embryos, and En1(Dre) controls Dre-responsive indicator alleles by efficiently recombining rox sites in vivo. Through the application of genetic tools that allow manipulation of cells based on combinatorial expression of multiple distinct recombinases, En1(Dre) will significantly extend the ability to target important subpopulations of neurons and other cells within the broader En1 expression domain. genesis 54:447-454, 2016. Published 2016. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:27313055

  4. FLT3/D835Y mutation knock-in mice display less aggressive disease compared with FLT3/internal tandem duplication (ITD) mice

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Emily; Li, Li; Duffield, Amy S.; Ma, Hayley S.; Huso, David L.; Small, Don

    2013-01-01

    FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is mutated in approximately one third of acute myeloid leukemia cases. The most common FLT3 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia are internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations in the juxtamembrane domain (23%) and point mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain (10%). The mutation substituting the aspartic acid at position 838 (equivalent to the human aspartic acid residue at position 835) with a tyrosine (referred to as FLT3/D835Y hereafter) is the most frequent kinase domain mutation, converting aspartic acid to tyrosine. Although both of these mutations constitutively activate FLT3, patients with an ITD mutation have a significantly poorer prognosis. To elucidate the mechanisms behind this prognostic difference, we have generated a knock-in mouse model with a D838Y point mutation in FLT3 that corresponds to the FLT3/D835Y mutation described in humans. Compared with FLT3/ITD knock-in mice, the FLT3/D835Y knock-in mice survive significantly longer. The majority of these mice develop myeloproliferative neoplasms with a less-aggressive phenotype. In addition, FLT3/D835Y mice have distinct hematopoietic development patterns. Unlike the tremendous depletion of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment we have observed in FLT3/ITD mice, FLT3/D835Y mutant mice are not depleted in hematopoietic stem cells. Further comparisons of these FLT3/D835Y knock-in mice with FLT3/ITD mice should provide an ideal platform for dissecting the molecular mechanisms that underlie the prognostic differences between the two different types of FLT3 mutations. PMID:24255108

  5. RS-1 enhances CRISPR/Cas9- and TALEN-mediated knock-in efficiency.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Yang, Dongshan; Xu, Jie; Zhu, Tianqing; Chen, Y Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    Zinc-finger nuclease, transcription activator-like effector nuclease and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) are becoming major tools for genome editing. Importantly, knock-in in several non-rodent species has been finally achieved thanks to these customizable nucleases; yet the rates remain to be further improved. We hypothesize that inhibiting non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or enhancing homology-directed repair (HDR) will improve the nuclease-mediated knock-in efficiency. Here we show that the in vitro application of an HDR enhancer, RS-1, increases the knock-in efficiency by two- to five-fold at different loci, whereas NHEJ inhibitor SCR7 has minimal effects. We then apply RS-1 for animal production and have achieved multifold improvement on the knock-in rates as well. Our work presents tools to nuclease-mediated knock-in animal production, and sheds light on improving gene-targeting efficiencies on pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26817820

  6. RS-1 enhances CRISPR/Cas9- and TALEN-mediated knock-in efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Yang, Dongshan; Xu, Jie; Zhu, Tianqing; Chen, Y. Eugene; Zhang, Jifeng

    2016-01-01

    Zinc-finger nuclease, transcription activator-like effector nuclease and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) are becoming major tools for genome editing. Importantly, knock-in in several non-rodent species has been finally achieved thanks to these customizable nucleases; yet the rates remain to be further improved. We hypothesize that inhibiting non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or enhancing homology-directed repair (HDR) will improve the nuclease-mediated knock-in efficiency. Here we show that the in vitro application of an HDR enhancer, RS-1, increases the knock-in efficiency by two- to five-fold at different loci, whereas NHEJ inhibitor SCR7 has minimal effects. We then apply RS-1 for animal production and have achieved multifold improvement on the knock-in rates as well. Our work presents tools to nuclease-mediated knock-in animal production, and sheds light on improving gene-targeting efficiencies on pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26817820

  7. Characterization of Transgenic Gfrp Knock-In Mice: Implications for Tetrahydrobiopterin in Modulation of Normal Tissue Radiation Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Pawar, Snehalata A.; Fu, Qiang; Gupta, Prem K.; Berbée, Maaike; Garg, Sarita; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Wang, Wenze; Biju, Prabath G.; Krager, Kimberly J.; Boerma, Marjan; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The free radical scavenger and nitric oxide synthase cofactor, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), plays a well-documented role in many disorders associated with oxidative stress, including normal tissue radiation responses. Radiation exposure is associated with decreased BH4 levels, while BH4 supplementation attenuates aspects of radiation toxicity. The endogenous synthesis of BH4 is catalyzed by the enzyme guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH1), which is regulated by the inhibitory GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We here report and characterize a novel, Cre-Lox-driven, transgenic mouse model that overexpresses Gfrp. Results: Compared to control littermates, transgenic mice exhibited high transgene copy numbers, increased Gfrp mRNA and GFRP expression, enhanced GFRP–GTPCH1 interaction, reduced BH4 levels, and low glutathione (GSH) levels and differential mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles. After exposure to total body irradiation, transgenic mice showed decreased BH4/7,8-dihydrobiopterin ratios, increased vascular oxidative stress, and reduced white blood cell counts compared with controls. Innovation and Conclusion: This novel Gfrp knock-in transgenic mouse model allows elucidation of the role of GFRP in the regulation of BH4 biosynthesis. This model is a valuable tool to study the involvement of BH4 in whole body and tissue-specific radiation responses and other conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1436–1446. PMID:23521531

  8. Identification and characterization of rabbit ROSA26 for gene knock-in and stable reporter gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongshan; Song, Jun; Zhang, Jifeng; Xu, Jie; Zhu, Tianqing; Wang, Zhong; Lai, Liangxue; Chen, Y. Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory rabbit has been a valuable model system for human disease studies. To make the rabbit model more amendable to targeted gene knockin and stable gene over-expression, we identified a rabbit orthologue of the mouse Rosa26 locus through genomic sequence homology analysis. Real-time PCR and 5′ RACE and 3′ RACE experiments revealed that this locus encodes two transcript variants of a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) (rbRosaV1 and rbRosaV2). Both variants are expressed ubiquitously and stably in different tissues. We next targeted the rabbit Rosa26 (rbRosa26) locus using CRISPR/Cas9 and produced two lines of knock-in rabbits (rbRosa26-EGFP, and rbRosa26-Cre-reporter). In both lines, all the founders and their offspring appear healthy and reproduce normally. In F1 generation animals, the rbRosa26-EGFP rabbits express EGFP, and the rbRosa26-Cre-reporter rabbits express tdTomato ubiquitously in all the tissues examined. Furthermore, disruption of rbRosa26 locus does not adversely impact the animal health and reproduction. Therefore, our work establishes rbRosa26 as a safe harbor suitable for nuclease mediated gene targeting. The addition of rbRosa26 to the tool box of transgenic research is expected to allow diverse genetic manipulations, including gain-of function, conditional knock out and lineage-tracing studies in rabbits. PMID:27117226

  9. Fibulin-4 E57K Knock-in Mice Recapitulate Cutaneous, Vascular and Skeletal Defects of Recessive Cutis Laxa 1B with both Elastic Fiber and Collagen Fibril Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Igoucheva, Olga; Alexeev, Vitali; Halabi, Carmen M; Adams, Sheila M; Stoilov, Ivan; Sasaki, Takako; Arita, Machiko; Donahue, Adele; Mecham, Robert P; Birk, David E; Chu, Mon-Li

    2015-08-28

    Fibulin-4 is an extracellular matrix protein essential for elastic fiber formation. Frameshift and missense mutations in the fibulin-4 gene (EFEMP2/FBLN4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) 1B, characterized by loose skin, aortic aneurysm, arterial tortuosity, lung emphysema, and skeletal abnormalities. Homozygous missense mutations in FBLN4 are a prevalent cause of ARCL 1B. Here we generated a knock-in mouse strain bearing a recurrent fibulin-4 E57K homozygous missense mutation. The mutant mice survived into adulthood and displayed abnormalities in multiple organ systems, including loose skin, bent forelimb, aortic aneurysm, tortuous artery, and pulmonary emphysema. Biochemical studies of dermal fibroblasts showed that fibulin-4 E57K mutant protein was produced but was prone to dimer formation and inefficiently secreted, thereby triggering an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Immunohistochemistry detected a low level of fibulin-4 E57K protein in the knock-in skin along with altered expression of selected elastic fiber components. Processing of a precursor to mature lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in cross-linking of elastin and collagen, was compromised. The knock-in skin had a reduced level of desmosine, an elastin-specific cross-link compound, and ultrastructurally abnormal elastic fibers. Surprisingly, structurally aberrant collagen fibrils and altered organization into fibers were characteristics of the knock-in dermis and forelimb tendons. Type I collagen extracted from the knock-in skin had decreased amounts of covalent intermolecular cross-links, which could contribute to the collagen fibril abnormalities. Our studies provide the first evidence that fibulin-4 plays a role in regulating collagen fibril assembly and offer a preclinical platform for developing treatments for ARCL 1B. PMID:26178373

  10. Knock-In Mice with NOP-eGFP Receptors Identify Receptor Cellular and Regional Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Akihiko; Brunori, Gloria; Mercatelli, Daniela; Wu, Jinhua; Cippitelli, Andrea; Zou, Bende; Xie, Xinmin (Simon); Williams, Melissa; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Low, Sarah; Scherrer, Grégory; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2015-01-01

    The nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in many processes common to the opioid receptors including pain and drug abuse. To better characterize receptor location and trafficking, knock-in mice were created by inserting the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) into the NOP receptor gene (Oprl1) and producing mice expressing a functional NOP-eGFP C-terminal fusion in place of the native NOP receptor. The NOP-eGFP receptor was present in brain of homozygous knock-in animals in concentrations somewhat higher than in wild-type mice and was functional when tested for stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding in vitro and in patch-clamp electrophysiology in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and hippocampal slices. Inhibition of morphine analgesia was equivalent when tested in knock-in and wild-type mice. Imaging revealed detailed neuroanatomy in brain, spinal cord, and DRG and was generally consistent with in vitro autoradiographic imaging of receptor location. Multicolor immunohistochemistry identified cells coexpressing various spinal cord and DRG cellular markers, as well as coexpression with μ-opioid receptors in DRG and brain regions. Both in tissue slices and primary cultures, the NOP-eGFP receptors appear throughout the cell body and in processes. These knock-in mice have NOP receptors that function both in vitro and in vivo and appear to be an exceptional tool to study receptor neuroanatomy and correlate with NOP receptor function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The NOP receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in pain, drug abuse, and a number of other CNS processes. The regional and cellular distribution has been difficult to determine due to lack of validated antibodies for immunohistochemical analysis. To provide a new tool for the investigation of receptor localization, we have produced knock-in mice with a fluorescent-tagged NOP receptor in place of the native

  11. Enhanced extinction of cocaine seeking in brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Briand, Lisa A; Lee, Francis S; Blendy, Julie A; Pierce, R Christopher

    2012-03-01

    The Val66Met polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) gene results in alterations in fear extinction behavior in both human populations and mouse models. However, it is not clear whether this polymorphism plays a similar role in extinction of appetitive behaviors. Therefore, we examined operant learning and extinction of both food and cocaine self-administration behavior in an inbred genetic knock-in mouse strain expressing the variant Bdnf. These mice provide a unique opportunity to relate alterations in aversive and appetitive extinction learning as well as provide insight into how human genetic variation can lead to differences in behavior. BDNF(Met/Met) mice exhibited a severe deficit in operant learning as demonstrated by an inability to learn the food self-administration task. Therefore, extinction experiments were performed comparing wildtype (BDNF(Val/Val) ) animals to mice heterozygous for the Met allele (BDNF(Val/Met) ), which did not differ in food or cocaine self-administration behavior. In contrast to the deficit in fear extinction previously demonstrated in these mice, we found that BDNF(Val/Met) mice exhibited more rapid extinction of cocaine responding compared to wildtype mice. No differences were found between the genotypes in the extinction of food self-administration behavior or the reinstatement of cocaine seeking, indicating that the effect is specific to extinction of cocaine responding. These results suggest that the molecular mechanisms underlying aversive and appetitive extinction are distinct from one another and BDNF may play opposing roles in the two phenomena. PMID:22394056

  12. Generation of Two Noradrenergic-Specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase-FLPo Knock-In Mice Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeting in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jenny J.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 mediated DNA double strand cutting is emerging as a powerful approach to increase rates of homologous recombination of large targeting vectors, but the optimization of parameters, equipment and expertise required remain barriers to successful mouse generation by single-step zygote injection. Here, we sought to apply CRISPR/Cas9 methods to traditional embryonic stem (ES) cell targeting followed by blastocyst injection to overcome the common issues of difficult vector construction and low targeting efficiency. To facilitate the study of noradrenergic function, which is implicated in myriad behavioral and physiological processes, we generated two different mouse lines that express FLPo recombinase under control of the noradrenergic-specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH) gene. We found that by co-electroporating a circular vector expressing Cas9 and a locus-specific sgRNA, we could target FLPo to the DBH locus in ES cells with shortened 1 kb homology arms. Two different sites in the DBH gene were targeted; the translational start codon with 6–8% targeting efficiency, and the translational stop codon with 75% targeting efficiency. Using this approach, we established two mouse lines with DBH-specific expression of FLPo in brainstem catecholaminergic populations that are publically available on MMRRC (MMRRC_041575-UCD and MMRRC_041577-UCD). Altogether, this study supports simplified, high-efficiency Cas9/CRISPR-mediated targeting in embryonic stem cells for production of knock-in mouse lines in a wider variety of contexts than zygote injection alone. PMID:27441631

  13. Generation of Two Noradrenergic-Specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase-FLPo Knock-In Mice Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeting in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jenny J; Ray, Russell

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 mediated DNA double strand cutting is emerging as a powerful approach to increase rates of homologous recombination of large targeting vectors, but the optimization of parameters, equipment and expertise required remain barriers to successful mouse generation by single-step zygote injection. Here, we sought to apply CRISPR/Cas9 methods to traditional embryonic stem (ES) cell targeting followed by blastocyst injection to overcome the common issues of difficult vector construction and low targeting efficiency. To facilitate the study of noradrenergic function, which is implicated in myriad behavioral and physiological processes, we generated two different mouse lines that express FLPo recombinase under control of the noradrenergic-specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH) gene. We found that by co-electroporating a circular vector expressing Cas9 and a locus-specific sgRNA, we could target FLPo to the DBH locus in ES cells with shortened 1 kb homology arms. Two different sites in the DBH gene were targeted; the translational start codon with 6-8% targeting efficiency, and the translational stop codon with 75% targeting efficiency. Using this approach, we established two mouse lines with DBH-specific expression of FLPo in brainstem catecholaminergic populations that are publically available on MMRRC (MMRRC_041575-UCD and MMRRC_041577-UCD). Altogether, this study supports simplified, high-efficiency Cas9/CRISPR-mediated targeting in embryonic stem cells for production of knock-in mouse lines in a wider variety of contexts than zygote injection alone. PMID:27441631

  14. Knock-in mice harboring a Ca2+ desensitizing mutation in cardiac troponin C develop early onset dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Bradley K.; Singh, Sonal; Fan, Qiying; Hernandez, Adriana; Portillo, Jesus P.; Reiser, Peter J.; Tikunova, Svetlana B.

    2015-01-01

    The physiological consequences of aberrant Ca2+ binding and exchange with cardiac myofilaments are not clearly understood. In order to examine the effect of decreasing Ca2+ sensitivity of cTnC on cardiac function, we generated knock-in mice carrying a D73N mutation (not known to be associated with heart disease in human patients) in cTnC. The D73N mutation was engineered into the regulatory N-domain of cTnC in order to reduce Ca2+ sensitivity of reconstituted thin filaments by increasing the rate of Ca2+ dissociation. In addition, the D73N mutation drastically blunted the extent of Ca2+ desensitization of reconstituted thin filaments induced by cTnI pseudo-phosphorylation. Compared to wild-type mice, heterozygous knock-in mice carrying the D73N mutation exhibited a substantially decreased Ca2+ sensitivity of force development in skinned ventricular trabeculae. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that median survival time for knock-in mice was 12 weeks. Echocardiographic analysis revealed that knock-in mice exhibited increased left ventricular dimensions with thinner walls. Echocardiographic analysis also revealed that measures of systolic function, such as ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS), were dramatically reduced in knock-in mice. In addition, knock-in mice displayed electrophysiological abnormalities, namely prolonged QRS and QT intervals. Furthermore, ventricular myocytes isolated from knock-in mice did not respond to β-adrenergic stimulation. Thus, knock-in mice developed pathological features similar to those observed in human patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). In conclusion, our results suggest that decreasing Ca2+ sensitivity of the regulatory N-domain of cTnC is sufficient to trigger the development of DCM. PMID:26379556

  15. Cystamine and cysteamine prevent 3-NP-induced mitochondrial depolarization of Huntington's disease knock-in striatal cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhengkuan; Choo, Yeun Su; Lesort, Mathieu

    2006-04-01

    Abstract Cystamine significantly improved motor deficits and extended survival in mouse models of Huntington's disease (HD); however, the precise mechanism(s) by which cystamine and the related compound cysteamine are beneficial remain to be elucidated. Using clonal striatal cell lines from wild-type (STHdhQ7/HdhQ7) and mutant huntingtin knock-in (STHdhQ111/HdhQ111) mice, we have tested the hypothesis that cystamine and cysteamine could be beneficial by preventing the depolarization of mitochondria in cell cultures. Treatment with 3-nitroproprionic acid (3-NP), a mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, induces mitochondrial depolarization and cell death of mutant HD striatal cells but not of wild-type cells. The 3-NP-mediated decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential was attenuated by 50 microm cystamine and completely inhibited by 250 microm cystamine. Similar results were obtained using cysteamine (50-500 microm). In addition, both cystamine and cysteamine significantly attenuated the 3-NP-induced cell death. Treatment of mutant HD striatal cells with 3-NP resulted in a robust decrease in the cellular and mitochondrial levels of glutathione (GSH) compared with cells exposed to the vehicle alone. Pre-treatment of the cells with cystamine and cysteamine completely prevented the 3-NP-mediated decrease in cellular and mitochondrial GSH levels. Incubation with L-buthionine (S,R) sulfoximine (BSO) 250 microm in combination with cystamine (250 microm) or cysteamine (250 microm) prior to being treated with 3-NP completely prevented the beneficial effects of cystamine and cysteamine on the 3-NP-mediated mitochondrial depolarization. These results demonstrate that cystamine and cysteamine prevent the 3-NP-induced mitochondrial depolarization of HD striatal cell cultures. PMID:16623826

  16. Bone Marrow Transplantation Improves Autoinflammation and Inflammatory Bone Loss in SH3BP2 Knock-In Cherubism Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Kittaka, Mizuho; Ishida, Shu; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Mukai, Tomoyuki; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cherubism (OMIM#118400) is a genetic disorder in children characterized by excessive jawbone destruction with proliferation of fibro-osseous lesions containing a large number of osteoclasts. Mutations in the SH3-domain binding protein 2 (SH3BP2) are responsible for cherubism. Analysis of the knock-in (KI) mouse model of cherubism showed that homozygous cherubism mice (Sh3bp2KI/KI) spontaneously develop systemic autoinflammation and inflammatory bone loss and that cherubism is a TNF-α-dependent hematopoietic disorder. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is effective for the treatment of inflammation and bone loss in Sh3bp2KI/KI mice. Bone marrow (BM) cells from wild-type (Sh3bp2+/+) mice were transplanted to 6-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice with developing inflammation and to 10-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice with established inflammation. Six-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice transplanted with Sh3bp2+/+ BM cells exhibited improved body weight loss, facial swelling, and survival rate. Inflammatory lesions in the liver and lung as well as bone loss in calvaria and mandibula were ameliorated at 10 weeks after BMT compared to Sh3bp2KI/KI mice transplanted with Sh3bp2KI/KI BM cells. Elevation of serum TNF-α levels was not detected after BMT. BMT was effective for up to 20 weeks in 6-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice transplanted with Sh3bp2+/+ BM cells. BMT also ameliorated the inflammation and bone loss in 10-week-old Sh3bp2KI/KI mice. Thus our study demonstrates that BMT improves the inflammation and bone loss in cherubism mice. BMT may be effective for the treatment of cherubism patients. PMID:25445458

  17. Rosa26-targeted sheep gene knock-in via CRISPR-Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mingming; Wei, Caihong; Lian, Zhengxing; Liu, Ruizao; Zhu, Caiye; Wang, Huihua; Cao, Jiaxue; Shen, Yuelei; Zhao, Fuping; Zhang, Li; Mu, Zhu; Wang, Yayu; Wang, Xiaogang; Du, Lixin; Wang, Chuduan

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in our ability to design DNA binding factors with specificity for desired sequences have resulted in a revolution in genetic engineering, enabling directed changes to the genome to be made relatively easily. Technologies that facilitate specific and precise genome editing, such as knock-in, are critical for determining the functions of genes and for understanding fundamental biological processes. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for functional genomic studies in mammals. Rosa26 gene can encode a non-essential nuclear RNA in almost all organizations, and become a hot point of exogenous gene insertion. Here, we describe efficient, precise CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Integration using a donor vector with tGFP sequence targeted in the sheep genomic Rosa26 locus. We succeeded in integrating with high efficiency an exogenous tGFP (turboGFP) gene into targeted genes in frame. Due to its simplicity, design flexibility, and high efficiency, we propose that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in will become a standard method for the generation transgenic sheep. PMID:27063570

  18. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-ryool

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including “safe harboring” techniques shown in other organisms. PMID:27291619

  19. Rosa26-targeted sheep gene knock-in via CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingming; Wei, Caihong; Lian, Zhengxing; Liu, Ruizao; Zhu, Caiye; Wang, Huihua; Cao, Jiaxue; Shen, Yuelei; Zhao, Fuping; Zhang, Li; Mu, Zhu; Wang, Yayu; Wang, Xiaogang; Du, Lixin; Wang, Chuduan

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in our ability to design DNA binding factors with specificity for desired sequences have resulted in a revolution in genetic engineering, enabling directed changes to the genome to be made relatively easily. Technologies that facilitate specific and precise genome editing, such as knock-in, are critical for determining the functions of genes and for understanding fundamental biological processes. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently emerged as a powerful tool for functional genomic studies in mammals. Rosa26 gene can encode a non-essential nuclear RNA in almost all organizations, and become a hot point of exogenous gene insertion. Here, we describe efficient, precise CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Integration using a donor vector with tGFP sequence targeted in the sheep genomic Rosa26 locus. We succeeded in integrating with high efficiency an exogenous tGFP (turboGFP) gene into targeted genes in frame. Due to its simplicity, design flexibility, and high efficiency, we propose that CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in will become a standard method for the generation transgenic sheep. PMID:27063570

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout and knock-in mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Eun; Lim, Jong-Min; Koh, Hyun Gi; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kang, Nam Kyu; Jeon, Seungjib; Kwon, Sohee; Shin, Won-Sub; Lee, Bongsoo; Hwangbo, Kwon; Kim, Jungeun; Ye, Sung Hyeok; Yun, Jae-Young; Seo, Hogyun; Oh, Hee-Mock; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Won-Joong; Chang, Yong Keun; Jeong, Byeong-Ryool

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is crucial for genetic engineering of organisms for improved traits, particularly in microalgae due to the urgent necessity for the next generation biofuel production. The most advanced CRISPR/Cas9 system is simple, efficient and accurate in some organisms; however, it has proven extremely difficult in microalgae including the model alga Chlamydomonas. We solved this problem by delivering Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) comprising the Cas9 protein and sgRNAs to avoid cytotoxicity and off-targeting associated with vector-driven expression of Cas9. We obtained CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations at three loci including MAA7, CpSRP43 and ChlM, and targeted mutagenic efficiency was improved up to 100 fold compared to the first report of transgenic Cas9-induced mutagenesis. Interestingly, we found that unrelated vectors used for the selection purpose were predominantly integrated at the Cas9 cut site, indicative of NHEJ-mediated knock-in events. As expected with Cas9 RNPs, no off-targeting was found in one of the mutagenic screens. In conclusion, we improved the knockout efficiency by using Cas9 RNPs, which opens great opportunities not only for biological research but also industrial applications in Chlamydomonas and other microalgae. Findings of the NHEJ-mediated knock-in events will allow applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in microalgae, including "safe harboring" techniques shown in other organisms. PMID:27291619

  1. HDAC4-Myogenin Axis As an Important Marker of HD-Related Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Cleo J. L. M.; Franklin, Sophie A.; Bondulich, Marie K.; Jolinon, Nelly; Muller, Thomas; Ahmed, Mhoriam; Dick, James R. T.; Piotrowska, Izabela; Greensmith, Linda; Smolenski, Ryszard T.; Bates, Gillian P.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle remodelling and contractile dysfunction occur through both acute and chronic disease processes. These include the accumulation of insoluble aggregates of misfolded amyloid proteins that is a pathological feature of Huntington’s disease (HD). While HD has been described primarily as a neurological disease, HD patients’ exhibit pronounced skeletal muscle atrophy. Given that huntingtin is a ubiquitously expressed protein, skeletal muscle fibres may be at risk of a cell autonomous HD-related dysfunction. However the mechanism leading to skeletal muscle abnormalities in the clinical and pre-clinical HD settings remains unknown. To unravel this mechanism, we employed the R6/2 transgenic and HdhQ150 knock-in mouse models of HD. We found that symptomatic animals developed a progressive impairment of the contractile characteristics of the hind limb muscles tibialis anterior (TA) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL), accompanied by a significant loss of motor units in the EDL. In symptomatic animals, these pronounced functional changes were accompanied by an aberrant deregulation of contractile protein transcripts and their up-stream transcriptional regulators. In addition, HD mouse models develop a significant reduction in muscle force, possibly as a result of a deterioration in energy metabolism and decreased oxidation that is accompanied by the re-expression of the HDAC4-DACH2-myogenin axis. These results show that muscle dysfunction is a key pathological feature of HD. PMID:25748626

  2. Calcilytic Ameliorates Abnormalities of Mutant Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Knock-In Mice Mimicking Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia (ADH).

    PubMed

    Dong, Bingzi; Endo, Itsuro; Ohnishi, Yukiyo; Kondo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Amizuka, Norio; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Abe, Masahiro; Fukumoto, Seiji; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    Activating mutations of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) cause autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH). ADH patients develop hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypercalciuria, similar to the clinical features of hypoparathyroidism. The current treatment of ADH is similar to the other forms of hypoparathyroidism, using active vitamin D3 or parathyroid hormone (PTH). However, these treatments aggravate hypercalciuria and renal calcification. Thus, new therapeutic strategies for ADH are needed. Calcilytics are allosteric antagonists of CaSR, and may be effective for the treatment of ADH caused by activating mutations of CaSR. In order to examine the effect of calcilytic JTT-305/MK-5442 on CaSR harboring activating mutations in the extracellular and transmembrane domains in vitro, we first transfected a mutated CaSR gene into HEK cells. JTT-305/MK-5442 suppressed the hypersensitivity to extracellular Ca(2+) of HEK cells transfected with the CaSR gene with activating mutations in the extracellular and transmembrane domains. We then selected two activating mutations locating in the extracellular (C129S) and transmembrane (A843E) domains, and generated two strains of CaSR knock-in mice to build an ADH mouse model. Both mutant mice mimicked almost all the clinical features of human ADH. JTT-305/MK-5442 treatment in vivo increased urinary cAMP excretion, improved serum and urinary calcium and phosphate levels by stimulating endogenous PTH secretion, and prevented renal calcification. In contrast, PTH(1-34) treatment normalized serum calcium and phosphate but could not reduce hypercalciuria or renal calcification. CaSR knock-in mice exhibited low bone turnover due to the deficiency of PTH, and JTT-305/MK-5442 as well as PTH(1-34) increased bone turnover and bone mineral density (BMD) in these mice. These results demonstrate that calcilytics can reverse almost all the phenotypes of ADH including hypercalciuria and renal calcification, and suggest that calcilytics can become a

  3. MMEJ-assisted gene knock-in using TALENs and CRISPR-Cas9 with the PITCh systems.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Nakade, Shota; Sakane, Yuto; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Programmable nucleases enable engineering of the genome by utilizing endogenous DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. Although homologous recombination (HR)-mediated gene knock-in is well established, it cannot necessarily be applied in every cell type and organism because of variable HR frequencies. We recently reported an alternative method of gene knock-in, named the PITCh (Precise Integration into Target Chromosome) system, assisted by microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ). MMEJ harnesses independent machinery from HR, and it requires an extremely short homologous sequence (5-25 bp) for DSB repair, resulting in precise gene knock-in with a more easily constructed donor vector. Here we describe a streamlined protocol for PITCh knock-in, including the design and construction of the PITCh vectors, and their delivery to either human cell lines by transfection or to frog embryos by microinjection. The construction of the PITCh vectors requires only a few days, and the entire process takes ∼ 1.5 months to establish knocked-in cells or ∼ 1 week from injection to early genotyping in frog embryos. PMID:26678082

  4. Inhibitory Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation Restores Normal Learning and Memory in ApoE4 Knock-In Mice without or with Aβ Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Leslie M.; Djukic, Biljana; Arnold, Christine; Gillespie, Anna K.; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Wang, Max M.; Zhang, Olivia; Knoferle, Johanna; Rubenstein, John L.R.; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory and inhibitory balance of neuronal network activity is essential for normal brain function and may be of particular importance to memory. Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 and amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, two major players in Alzheimer's disease (AD), cause inhibitory interneuron impairments and aberrant neuronal activity in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in AD-related mouse models and humans, leading to learning and memory deficits. To determine whether replacing the lost or impaired interneurons rescues neuronal signaling and behavioral deficits, we transplanted embryonic interneuron progenitors into the hippocampal hilus of aged apoE4 knock-in mice without or with Aβ accumulation. In both conditions, the transplanted cells developed into mature interneurons, functionally integrated into the hippocampal circuitry, and restored normal learning and memory. Thus, restricted hilar transplantation of inhibitory interneurons restores normal cognitive function in two widely used AD-related mouse models, highlighting the importance of interneuron impairments in AD pathogenesis and the potential of cell replacement therapy for AD. More broadly, it demonstrates that excitatory and inhibitory balance are crucial for learning and memory, and suggests an avenue for investigating the processes of learning and memory and their alterations in healthy aging and diseases. PMID:25031394

  5. Large genomic fragment deletion and functional gene cassette knock-in via Cas9 protein mediated genome editing in one-cell rodent embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liren; Shao, Yanjiao; Guan, Yuting; Li, Liang; Wu, Lijuan; Chen, Fangrui; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Huaqing; Ma, Yanlin; Ma, Xueyun; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided system has versatile uses in many organisms and allows modification of multiple target sites simultaneously. Generating novel genetically modified mouse and rat models is one valuable application of this system. Through the injection of Cas9 protein instead of mRNA into embryos, we observed fewer off-target effects of Cas9 and increased point mutation knock-in efficiency. Large genomic DNA fragment (up to 95 kb) deletion mice were generated for in vivo study of lncRNAs and gene clusters. Site-specific insertion of a 2.7 kb CreERT2 cassette into the mouse Nfatc1 locus allowed labeling and tracing of hair follicle stem cells. In addition, we combined the Cre-Loxp system with a gene-trap strategy to insert a GFP reporter in the reverse orientation into the rat Lgr5 locus, which was later inverted by Cre-mediated recombination, yielding a conditional knockout/reporter strategy suitable for mosaic mutation analysis. PMID:26620761

  6. Large genomic fragment deletion and functional gene cassette knock-in via Cas9 protein mediated genome editing in one-cell rodent embryos.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liren; Shao, Yanjiao; Guan, Yuting; Li, Liang; Wu, Lijuan; Chen, Fangrui; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Huaqing; Ma, Yanlin; Ma, Xueyun; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2015-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided system has versatile uses in many organisms and allows modification of multiple target sites simultaneously. Generating novel genetically modified mouse and rat models is one valuable application of this system. Through the injection of Cas9 protein instead of mRNA into embryos, we observed fewer off-target effects of Cas9 and increased point mutation knock-in efficiency. Large genomic DNA fragment (up to 95 kb) deletion mice were generated for in vivo study of lncRNAs and gene clusters. Site-specific insertion of a 2.7 kb CreERT2 cassette into the mouse Nfatc1 locus allowed labeling and tracing of hair follicle stem cells. In addition, we combined the Cre-Loxp system with a gene-trap strategy to insert a GFP reporter in the reverse orientation into the rat Lgr5 locus, which was later inverted by Cre-mediated recombination, yielding a conditional knockout/reporter strategy suitable for mosaic mutation analysis. PMID:26620761

  7. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E; Haliburton, Genevieve E; Ye, Chun J; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Doudna, Jennifer A; Marson, Alexander

    2015-08-18

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently "knock out" genes and "knock in" targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4(+) T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells. PMID:26216948

  8. Knock-in of human BACE1 cleaves murine APP and reiterates Alzheimer-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Plucińska, Kaja; Crouch, Barry; Koss, David; Robinson, Lianne; Siebrecht, Michael; Riedel, Gernot; Platt, Bettina

    2014-08-01

    Key neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are elevated levels of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) species generated via amyloid precursor protein (APP) endoproteolysis and cleavage by the rate-limiting β-site enzyme 1 (BACE1). Because rodents do not develop amyloid pathologies, we here investigated whether AD-like endophenotypes can be created in mice by expression of human bace1. To avoid pitfalls of existing models, we introduced hbace1 via knock-in under the control of the CaMKII α promoter into the safe HPRT locus. We report amyloidogenic processing of murine APP in the hBACE1 mice (termed PLB4), resulting in the formation of toxic APP metabolites that accumulate intra- and extraneuronally in hippocampus and cortex. Pronounced accumulation of Aβ*56 and Aβ hexamers in the absence of plaque deposition was detected in brain tissue from symptomatic PLB4 mice. Heightened levels of inflammation (gliosis) also appeared in several AD-related brain regions (dentate gyrus, hippocampal area CA1, piriform and parietal cortices) at 6 and 12 months of age. Behaviorally, deficits in habituation to a novel environment and semantic-like memory (social transmission of food preference) were detected from 3 to 4 months of age. Impairments in spatial learning strategies in long-term reference (water maze) and working memory (Y-maze) tasks presented at 6 months, and were distinct from reductions in locomotor activity and anxiety. Overall, our data indicate for the first time that targeted, subtle forebrain-specific expression through single gene knock-in of hBACE1 is sufficient to generate AD-relevant cognitive impairments amid corresponding histopathologies, confirming human BACE as the key parameter in amyloid pathogenesis. PMID:25100603

  9. Transforming Growth Factor-β3 (TGF-β3) Knock-in Ameliorates Inflammation Due to TGF-β1 Deficiency While Promoting Glucose Tolerance*

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Bradford E.; Wankhade, Umesh D.; Konkel, Joanne E.; Cherukuri, Karthik; Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N.; Flanders, Kathleen C.; Arany, Praveen R.; Chen, Wanjun; Rane, Sushil G.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2013-01-01

    Three homologues of TGF-β exist in mammals as follows: TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and TGF-β3. All three proteins share high homology in their amino acid sequence, yet each TGF-β isoform has unique heterologous motifs that are highly conserved during evolution. Although these TGF-β proteins share similar properties in vitro, isoform-specific properties have been suggested through in vivo studies and by the unique phenotypes for each TGF-β knock-out mouse. To test our hypothesis that each of these homologues has nonredundant functions, and to identify such isoform-specific roles, we genetically exchanged the coding sequence of the mature TGF-β1 ligand with a sequence from TGF-β3 using targeted recombination to create chimeric TGF-β1/3 knock-in mice (TGF-β1Lβ3/Lβ3). In the TGF-β1Lβ3/Lβ3 mouse, localization and activation still occur through the TGF-β1 latent associated peptide, but cell signaling is triggered through the TGF-β3 ligand that binds to TGF-β receptors. Unlike TGF-β1−/− mice, the TGF-β1Lβ3/Lβ3 mice show neither embryonic lethality nor signs of multifocal inflammation, demonstrating that knock-in of the TGF-β3 ligand can prevent the vasculogenesis defects and autoimmunity associated with TGF-β1 deficiency. However, the TGF-β1Lβ3/Lβ3 mice have a shortened life span and display tooth and bone defects, indicating that the TGF-β homologues are not completely interchangeable. Remarkably, the TGF-β1Lβ3/Lβ3 mice display an improved metabolic phenotype with reduced body weight gain and enhanced glucose tolerance by induction of beneficial changes to the white adipose tissue compartment. These findings reveal both redundant and unique nonoverlapping functional diversity in TGF-β isoform signaling that has relevance to the design of therapeutics aimed at targeting the TGF-β pathway in human disease. PMID:24056369

  10. Aberrant Autophagic Response in The Muscle of A Knock-in Mouse Model of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rusmini, Paola; Polanco, Maria Josefa; Cristofani, Riccardo; Cicardi, Maria Elena; Meroni, Marco; Galbiati, Mariarita; Piccolella, Margherita; Messi, Elio; Giorgetti, Elisa; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Milioto, Carmelo; Rocchi, Anna; Aggarwal, Tanya; Pennuto, Maria; Crippa, Valeria; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by loss of motoneurons and sensory neurons, accompanied by atrophy of muscle cells. SBMA is due to an androgen receptor containing a polyglutamine tract (ARpolyQ) that misfolds and aggregates, thereby perturbing the protein quality control (PQC) system. Using SBMA AR113Q mice we analyzed proteotoxic stress-induced alterations of HSPB8-mediated PQC machinery promoting clearance of misfolded proteins by autophagy. In muscle of symptomatic AR113Q male mice, we found expression upregulation of Pax-7, myogenin, E2-ubiquitin ligase UBE2Q1 and acetylcholine receptor (AchR), but not of MyoD, and of two E3-ligases (MuRF-1 and Cullin3). TGFβ1 and PGC-1α were also robustly upregulated. We also found a dramatic perturbation of the autophagic response, with upregulation of most autophagic markers (Beclin-1, ATG10, p62/SQSTM1, LC3) and of the HSPB8-mediated PQC response. Both HSPB8 and its co-chaperone BAG3 were robustly upregulated together with other specific HSPB8 interactors (HSPB2 and HSPB3). Notably, the BAG3:BAG1 ratio increased in muscle suggesting preferential misfolded proteins routing to autophagy rather than to proteasome. Thus, mutant ARpolyQ induces a potent autophagic response in muscle cells. Alteration in HSPB8-based PQC machinery may represent muscle-specific biomarkers useful to assess SBMA progression in mice and patients in response to pharmacological treatments. PMID:26490709

  11. Generation and analysis of knock-in mice carrying pseudohypoaldosteronism type II-causing mutations in the cullin 3 gene.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yuya; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sohara, Eisei; Mori, Takayasu; Inoue, Yuichi; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Eriko; Ohta, Akihito; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is a hereditary hypertensive disease caused by mutations in four different genes: with-no-lysine kinases (WNK) 1 and 4, Kelch-like family member 3 (KLHL3), and cullin 3 (Cul3). Cul3 and KLHL3 form an E3 ligase complex that ubiquitinates and reduces the expression level of WNK4. PHAII-causing mutations in WNK4 and KLHL3 impair WNK4 ubiquitination. However, the molecular pathogenesis of PHAII caused by Cul3 mutations is unclear. In cultured cells and human leukocytes, PHAII-causing Cul3 mutations result in the skipping of exon 9, producing mutant Cul3 protein lacking 57 amino acids. However, whether this phenomenon occurs in the kidneys and is responsible for the pathogenesis of PHAII in vivo is unknown. We generated knock-in mice carrying a mutation in the C-terminus of intron 8 of Cul3, c.1207-1G>A, which corresponds to a PHAII-causing mutation in the human Cul3 gene. Heterozygous Cul3(G(-1)A/+) knock-in mice did not exhibit PHAII phenotypes, and the skipping of exon 9 was not evident in their kidneys. However, the level of Cul3 mRNA expression in the kidneys of heterozygous knock-in mice was approximately half that of wild-type mice. Furthermore, homozygous knock-in mice were nonviable. It suggested that the mutant allele behaved like a knockout allele and did not produce Cul3 mRNA lacking exon 9. A reduction in Cul3 expression alone was not sufficient to develop PHAII in the knock-in mice. Our findings highlighted the pathogenic role of mutant Cul3 protein and provided insight to explain why PHAII-causing mutations in Cul3 cause kidney-predominant PHAII phenotypes. PMID:26490675

  12. Fluorescent knock-in mice to decipher the physiopathological role of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ceredig, Rhian A.; Massotte, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) modulate most physiological functions but are also critically involved in numerous pathological states. Approximately a third of marketed drugs target GPCRs, which places this family of receptors in the main arena of pharmacological pre-clinical and clinical research. The complexity of GPCR function demands comprehensive appraisal in native environment to collect in-depth knowledge of receptor physiopathological roles and assess the potential of therapeutic molecules. Identifying neurons expressing endogenous GPCRs is therefore essential to locate them within functional circuits whereas GPCR visualization with subcellular resolution is required to get insight into agonist-induced trafficking. Both remain frequently poorly investigated because direct visualization of endogenous receptors is often hampered by the lack of appropriate tools. Also, monitoring intracellular trafficking requires real-time visualization to gather in-depth knowledge. In this context, knock-in mice expressing a fluorescent protein or a fluorescent version of a GPCR under the control of the endogenous promoter not only help to decipher neuroanatomical circuits but also enable real-time monitoring with subcellular resolution thus providing invaluable information on their trafficking in response to a physiological or a pharmacological challenge. This review will present the animal models and discuss their contribution to the understanding of the physiopathological role of GPCRs. We will also address the drawbacks associated with this methodological approach and browse future directions. PMID:25610398

  13. Progressive dopaminergic alterations and mitochondrial abnormalities in LRRK2 G2019S knock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yue, M.; Hinkle, K.; Davies, P.; Trushina, E.; Fiesel, F.; Christenson, T.; Schroeder, A.; Zhang, L.; Bowles, E.; Behrouz, B.; Lincoln, S.; Beevers, J.; Milnerwood, A.; Kurti, A.; McLean, P. J.; Fryer, J. D.; Springer, W.; Dickson, D.; Farrer, M.; Melrose, H.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 gene represent the most common genetic cause of late onset Parkinson’s disease. The physiological and pathological roles of LRRK2 are yet to be fully determined but evidence points towards LRRK2 mutations causing a gain in kinase function, impacting on neuronal maintenance, vesicular dynamics and neurotransmitter release. To explore the role of physiological levels of mutant LRRK2, we created knock in mice harboring the most common LRRK2 mutation G2019S in their own genome. We have performed comprehensive dopaminergic, behavioral and neuropathological analyses in this model up to 24 months of age. We find elevated kinase activity in the brain of both heterozygous and homozygous mice. Although normal at 6 months, by 12 months of age, basal and pharmacologically induced extracellular release of dopamine is impaired in both heterozygous and homozygous mice, corroborating previous findings in transgenic models over-expressing mutant LRRK2. Via in vivo microdialysis measurement of basal and drug- evoked extracellular release of dopamine and its metabolites, our findings indicate that exocytotic release from the vesicular pool is impaired. Furthermore, profound mitochondrial abnormalities are evident in the striatum of older homozygous G2019S mice, which are consistent with mitochondrial fission arrest. We anticipate the G2019S will be a useful pre-clinical model for further evaluation of early mechanistic events in LRRK2 pathogenesis and for second-hit approaches to model disease progression. PMID:25836420

  14. Effects of Pin1 Loss in HdhQ111 Knock-in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, Elena; Michelazzi, Silvia; Maurutto, Marta; Carnemolla, Alisia; Ciani, Yari; Vatta, Paolo; Roncaglia, Paola; Zucchelli, Silvia; Leanza, Giampiero; Mantovani, Fiamma; Gustincich, Stefano; Santoro, Claudio; Piazza, Silvano; Del Sal, Giannino; Persichetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a fatal, dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disorder due to a pathological expansion of the CAG repeat in the coding region of the HTT gene. In the quest for understanding the molecular basis of neurodegeneration, we have previously demonstrated that the prolyl isomerase Pin1 plays a crucial role in mediating p53-dependent apoptosis triggered by mutant huntingtin (mHtt) in vitro. To assess the effects of the lack of Pin1 in vivo, we have bred Pin1 knock-out mice with HdhQ111 knock-in mice, a genetically precise model of HD. We show that Pin1 genetic ablation modifies a portion of HdhQ111 phenotypes in a time-dependent fashion. As an early event, Pin1 activity reduces the DNA damage response (DDR). In midlife mice, by taking advantage of next-generation sequencing technology, we show that Pin1 activity modulates a portion of the alterations triggered by mHtt, extending the role of Pin1 to two additional HdhQ111 phenotypes: the unbalance in the “synthesis/concentration of hormones”, as well as the alteration of “Wnt/β-catenin signaling”. In aging animals, Pin1 significantly increases the number of mHtt-positive nuclear inclusions while it reduces gliosis. In summary, this work provides further support for a role of Pin1 in HD pathogenesis. PMID:27199664

  15. Generation of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated bicistronic knock-in ins1-cre driver mice

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Hoshino, Yoshikazu; Ibrahim, Abdelaziz E.; Kato, Kanako; Daitoku, Yoko; Tanimoto, Yoko; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Oishi, Hisashi; Takahashi, Satoru; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Yagami, Ken-ichi; Iseki, Hiroyoshi; Mizuno, Seiya; Sugiyama, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we generated novel cre driver mice for gene manipulation in pancreatic β cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 system, stop codon sequences of Ins1 were targeted for insertion of cre, including 2A sequences. A founder of C57BL/6J-Ins1em1 (cre) Utr strain was produced from an oocyte injected with pX330 containing the sequences encoding gRNA and Cas9 and a DNA donor plasmid carrying 2A-cre. (R26GRR x C57BL/6J-Ins1em1 (cre) Utr) F1 mice were histologically characterized for cre-loxP recombination in the embryonic and adult stages; cre-loxP recombination was observed in all pancreatic islets examined in which almost all insulin-positive cells showed tdsRed fluorescence, suggesting β cell-specific recombination. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in results of glucose tolerance test among genotypes (homo/hetero/wild). Taken together, these observations indicated that C57BL/6J-Ins1em1 (cre) Utr is useful for studies of glucose metabolism and the strategy of bicistronic cre knock-in using the CRISPR/Cas9 system could be useful for production of cre driver mice. PMID:27053096

  16. Effects of Pin1 Loss in Hdh(Q111) Knock-in Mice.

    PubMed

    Agostoni, Elena; Michelazzi, Silvia; Maurutto, Marta; Carnemolla, Alisia; Ciani, Yari; Vatta, Paolo; Roncaglia, Paola; Zucchelli, Silvia; Leanza, Giampiero; Mantovani, Fiamma; Gustincich, Stefano; Santoro, Claudio; Piazza, Silvano; Del Sal, Giannino; Persichetti, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal, dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disorder due to a pathological expansion of the CAG repeat in the coding region of the HTT gene. In the quest for understanding the molecular basis of neurodegeneration, we have previously demonstrated that the prolyl isomerase Pin1 plays a crucial role in mediating p53-dependent apoptosis triggered by mutant huntingtin (mHtt) in vitro. To assess the effects of the lack of Pin1 in vivo, we have bred Pin1 knock-out mice with Hdh(Q111) knock-in mice, a genetically precise model of HD. We show that Pin1 genetic ablation modifies a portion of Hdh(Q111) phenotypes in a time-dependent fashion. As an early event, Pin1 activity reduces the DNA damage response (DDR). In midlife mice, by taking advantage of next-generation sequencing technology, we show that Pin1 activity modulates a portion of the alterations triggered by mHtt, extending the role of Pin1 to two additional Hdh(Q111) phenotypes: the unbalance in the "synthesis/concentration of hormones", as well as the alteration of "Wnt/β-catenin signaling". In aging animals, Pin1 significantly increases the number of mHtt-positive nuclear inclusions while it reduces gliosis. In summary, this work provides further support for a role of Pin1 in HD pathogenesis. PMID:27199664

  17. Sqstm1–GFP knock-in mice reveal dynamic actions of Sqstm1 during autophagy and under stress conditions in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Eino, Atsushi; Kageyama, Shun; Uemura, Takefumi; Annoh, Hiromichi; Saito, Tetsuya; Narita, Ichiei; Waguri, Satoshi; Komatsu, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sqstm1 serves as a signaling hub and receptor for selective autophagy. Consequently, dysregulation of Sqstm1 causes imbalances in signaling pathways and disrupts proteostasis, thereby contributing to the development of human diseases. Environmental stresses influence the level of Sqstm1 by altering its expression and/or autophagic degradation, and also changes the localization of Sqstm1, making it difficult to elucidate the actions and roles of this protein. In this study, we developed knock-in mice expressing Sqstm1 fused to GFP (Sqstm1-GFPKI/+). Using these Sqstm1-GFPKI/+ mice, we revealed for the first time the dynamics of endogenous Sqstm1 in living cells. Sqstm1–GFP was translocated to a restricted area of LC3-positive structures, which primarily correspond to the inside of autophagosomes, and then degraded. Moreover, exposure to arsenite induced expression of Sqstm1–GFP, followed by accumulation of the fusion protein in large aggregates that were degraded by autophagy. Furthermore, suppression of autophagy in Sqstm1-GFPKI/+ mouse livers caused accumulation of Sqstm1–GFP and formation of GFP-positive aggregate structures, leading to severe hepatic failure. These results indicate that Sqstm1-GFPKI/+ mice are a useful tool for analyzing Sqstm1 in living cells and intact animals. PMID:26483381

  18. Conditional Expression of E2A-HLF Induces B-Cell Precursor Death and Myeloproliferative-Like Disease in Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duque-Afonso, Jesús; Smith, Kevin S.; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are driver mutations of human cancers, particularly leukemias. They define disease subtypes and are used as prognostic markers, for minimal residual disease monitoring and therapeutic targets. Due to their low incidence, several translocations and their biological consequences remain poorly characterized. To address this, we engineered mouse strains that conditionally express E2A-HLF, a fusion oncogene from the translocation t(17;19) associated with 1% of pediatric B-cell precursor ALL. Conditional oncogene activation and expression were directed to the B-cell compartment by the Cre driver promoters CD19 or Mb1 (Igα, CD79a), or to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment by the Mx1 promoter. E2A-HLF expression in B-cell progenitors induced hyposplenia and lymphopenia, whereas expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells was embryonic lethal. Increased cell death was detected in E2A-HLF expressing cells, suggesting the need for cooperating genetic events that suppress cell death for B-cell oncogenic transformation. E2A-HLF/Mb1.Cre aged mice developed a fatal myeloproliferative-like disorder with low frequency characterized by leukocytosis, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly and organ-infiltration by mature myelocytes. In conclusion, we have developed conditional E2A-HLF knock-in mice, which provide an experimental platform to study cooperating genetic events and further elucidate translational biology in cross-species comparative studies. PMID:26588248

  19. A Blau syndrome-associated Nod2 mutation alters expression of full length NOD2 and limits responses to muramyl dipeptide in knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dugan, Jae; Griffiths, Eric; Snow, Paige; Rosenzweig, Holly; Lee, Ellen; Brown, Brieanna; Carr, Daniel W.; Rose, Carlos; Rosenbaum, James; Davey, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The biochemical mechanism by which mutations in nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (NOD2) cause Blau syndrome is unknown. Several studies have examined the effect of mutations associated with Blau syndrome in vitro, but none have looked at the implication of the mutations in vivo. To test the hypothesis that mutated NOD2 causes alterations in signaling pathways downstream of NOD2, we created a Nod2 knock-in mouse carrying the most common mutation seen in Blau syndrome, R314Q (corresponding to R334Q in humans). The endogenous regulatory elements of mouse Nod2 were unaltered. R314Q mice showed reduced cytokine production in response to i.p. and intravitreal muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Macrophages from R314Q mice showed reduced NF-κB and IL-6 responses, blunted phosphorylation of MAPKs, and deficient ubiquitination of receptor-interacting protein 2 in response to MDP. R314Q mice expressed a truncated 80 kDa form of NOD2 that was most likely generated by a posttranslational event since there was no evidence for a stop codon or alternative splicing event. Human macrophages from 2 patients with Blau syndrome also showed a reduction of both cytokine production and phosphorylation of p38 in response to MDP, indicating that both R314Q mice and cells from patients with Blau syndrome show reduced responses to MDP. These data indicate that the R314Q mutation when studied with the Nod2 endogenous regulatory elements left intact is associated with marked structural and biochemical changes that are significantly different from those observed from studies of the mutation using over-expression, transient transfection systems. PMID:25429073

  20. Expression and function of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in trigeminal ganglia of R192Q Cacna1a knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Vilotti, Sandra; Vana, Natascha; Van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Migraine is a neurovascular brain disorder suggested to be due to dysfunction of the trigeminovascular system with sensitization of trigeminal ganglion (TG) nociceptors. Since the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been established as a key player in the pathogenesis of migraine, CGRP receptor antagonists have been considered useful compounds to block headache originating from hyperactivation of such TG neurons. Whereas there is some information on the expression of CGRP receptors in postmortem human tissue, data are lacking for migraineurs suffering from common or genetic migraine. To help to clarify these issues it is very useful to study a transgenic knock-in (KI) mouse model of hemiplegic migraine expressing a R192Q missense mutation in the α1 subunit of CaV2.1 calcium channels previously found in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 (FHM-1). The aim of the present study, therefore, was to compare CGRP receptor expression and function in wildtype (WT) versus KI mouse TG. The principal components of the CGRP receptor, namely the CLR and RAMP-1 proteins, were similarly expressed in WT and KI TG neurons (in situ or in culture) and responded to exogenous CGRP with a strong rise in cAMP concentration. Hence, the previously reported phenotype of sensitization of KI TG neurons is not due to up-regulation of CGRP receptors but is likely caused by a constitutively larger release of CGRP. This observation implies that, in FHM-1 TG, normal TG sensory neuron signaling can be restored once the extracellular concentration of CGRP returns to control level with targeted treatment. PMID:27021026

  1. Mouse Genome Editing using CRISPR/Cas System

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Donald W; Quadros, Rolen M; Seruggia, Davide; Ohtsuka, Masato; Takahashi, Gou

    2015-01-01

    The availability of techniques to create desired genetic mutations has enabled the laboratory mouse as an extensively used model organism in biomedical research including human genetics. A new addition to this existing technical repertoire is the CRISPR/Cas system. Specifically, this system allows editing of the mouse genome much faster than the previously used techniques and more importantly multiple mutations can be created in a single experiment. Here we provide protocols for preparation of CRISPR/Cas reagents and microinjection into one cell mouse embryos to create knockout or knock-in mouse models. PMID:25271839

  2. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ∼40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ∼20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells. PMID:26216948

  3. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; et al

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9more » RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.« less

  4. The generation of knock-in mice expressing fluorescently tagged galanin receptors 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Niall; Holmes, Fiona E.; Hobson, Sally-Ann; Vanderplank, Penny; Leard, Alan; Balthasar, Nina; Wynick, David

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin has diverse roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, by activating the G protein-coupled receptors Gal1, Gal2 and the less studied Gal3 (GalR1–3 gene products). There is a wealth of data on expression of Gal1–3 at the mRNA level, but not at the protein level due to the lack of specificity of currently available antibodies. Here we report the generation of knock-in mice expressing Gal1 or Gal2 receptor fluorescently tagged at the C-terminus with, respectively, mCherry or hrGFP (humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein). In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons expressing the highest levels of Gal1-mCherry, localization to the somatic cell membrane was detected by live-cell fluorescence and immunohistochemistry, and that fluorescence decreased upon addition of galanin. In spinal cord, abundant Gal1-mCherry immunoreactive processes were detected in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn, and highly expressing intrinsic neurons of the lamina III/IV border showed both somatic cell membrane localization and outward transport of receptor from the cell body, detected as puncta within cell processes. In brain, high levels of Gal1-mCherry immunofluorescence were detected within thalamus, hypothalamus and amygdala, with a high density of nerve endings in the external zone of the median eminence, and regions with lesser immunoreactivity included the dorsal raphe nucleus. Gal2-hrGFP mRNA was detected in DRG, but live-cell fluorescence was at the limits of detection, drawing attention to both the much lower mRNA expression than to Gal1 in mice and the previously unrecognized potential for translational control by upstream open reading frames (uORFs). PMID:26292267

  5. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  6. Glutathione redox cycle dysregulation in Huntington's disease knock-in striatal cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Márcio; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Ferreira, Ildete L; Oliveira, Catarina R; Rego, A Cristina

    2012-11-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a CAG repeat disorder affecting the HD gene, which encodes for huntingtin (Htt) and is characterized by prominent cell death in the striatum. Oxidative stress was previously implicated in HD neurodegeneration, but the role of the major endogenous antioxidant system, the glutathione redox cycle, has been less studied following expression of full-length mutant Htt (FL-mHtt). Thus, in this work we analyzed the glutathione system in striatal cells derived from HD knock-in mice expressing mutant Htt versus wild-type cells. Mutant cells showed increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-3 activity, which were significantly prevented following treatment with glutathione ethyl ester. Interestingly, mutant cells exhibited an increase in intracellular levels of both reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione, and enhanced activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRed). Furthermore, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT) activities were also increased in mutant cells. Nevertheless, glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione synthetase (GS) activities and levels of GCL catalytic subunit were decreased in cells expressing FL-mHtt, highly suggesting decreased de novo synthesis of glutathione. Enhanced intracellular total glutathione, despite decreased synthesis, could be explained by decreased extracellular glutathione in mutant cells. This occurred concomitantly with decreased mRNA expression levels and activity of the multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mrp1), a transport protein that mediates cellular export of glutathione disulfide and glutathione conjugates. Additionally, inhibition of Mrp1 enhanced intracellular GSH in wild-type cells only. These data suggest that FL-mHtt affects the export of glutathione by decreasing the expression of Mrp1. Data further suggest that boosting of GSH-related antioxidant defense mechanisms induced by FL-mHtt is insufficient to

  7. A novel luciferase knock-in reporter system for studying transcriptional regulation of the human Sox2 gene.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Weifeng; Li, Yan; Liu, Kuan; Zhao, Junli; Sun, Xiaohong; Shan, Linlin; Mao, Qinwen; Xia, Haibin

    2016-02-10

    Sox2 is an important transcriptional factor that has multiple functions in stem cell maintenance and tumorigenesis. To investigate the transcriptional regulation of the Sox2 gene, a luciferase knock-in reporter system was established in HEK293 cells by placing the luciferase gene in the genome under the control of the Sox2 gene promoter using a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome editing technique. PCR and Southern blot results confirmed the site-specific integration of a single copy of the exogenous luciferase gene into the genome. To prove the reliability and sensitivity of this novel luciferase knock-in system, a CRISPR/Cas transcription activation system for the Sox2 gene was constructed and applied to the knock-in system. The results indicated that luciferase activity was directly correlated with the activity of the Sox2 endogenous promoter. This novel system will be a useful tool to study the transcriptional regulation of Sox2, and has great potential in medical and industrial applications. PMID:26721181

  8. Improvement of neuropathology and transcriptional deficits in CAG 140 knock-in mice supports a beneficial effect of dietary curcumin in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Backgound No disease modifying treatment currently exists for Huntington's disease (HD), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the formation of amyloid-like aggregates of the mutated huntingtin protein. Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound with Congo red-like amyloid binding properties and the ability to cross the blood brain barrier. CAG140 mice, a knock-in (KI) mouse model of HD, display abnormal aggregates of mutant huntingtin and striatal transcriptional deficits, as well as early motor, cognitive and affective abnormalities, many months prior to exhibiting spontaneous gait deficits, decreased striatal volume, and neuronal loss. We have examined the ability of life-long dietary curcumin to improve the early pathological phenotype of CAG140 mice. Results KI mice fed a curcumin-containing diet since conception showed decreased huntingtin aggregates and increased striatal DARPP-32 and D1 receptor mRNAs, as well as an amelioration of rearing deficits. However, similar to other antioxidants, curcumin impaired rotarod behavior in both WT and KI mice and climbing in WT mice. These behavioral effects were also noted in WT C57Bl/6 J mice exposed to the same curcumin regime as adults. However, neither locomotor function, behavioral despair, muscle strength or food utilization were affected by curcumin in this latter study. The clinical significance of curcumin's impairment of motor performance in mice remains unclear because curcumin has an excellent blood chemistry and adverse event safety profile, even in the elderly and in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Conclusion Together with this clinical experience, the improvement in several transgene-dependent parameters by curcumin in our study supports a net beneficial effect of dietary curcumin in HD. PMID:22475209

  9. Global Gene Expression Profiling in R155H Knock-In Murine Model of VCP Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalbandian, Angèle; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Wang, Zuyi; Knoblach, Susan; Llewellyn, Katrina J.; Vesa, Jouni; Hoffman, Eric P.; Kimonis, Virginia E.

    2014-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP) gene cause inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD), which is characterized by progressive muscle weakness, dysfunction in bone remodeling, and frontotemporal dementia. More recently, VCP has been linked to 2% of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases. VCP plays a significant role in a plethora of cellular functions including membrane fusion, transcription activation, nuclear envelope reconstruction, post-mitotic organelle reassembly, cell cycle control. To elucidate the pathological mechanisms underlying the VCP disease progression, we have previously generated a VCPR155H/+ mouse model with the R155H mutation. Histological analyses of mutant muscle showed vacuolization of myofibrils, centrally located nuclei, and disorganized muscle fibers. Global expression profiling of VCPR155H/+ mice using gene annotations by DAVID identified key dysregulated signaling pathways including genes involved in the physiological system development and function, diseases and disorders, and molecular and cellular functions. There were a total of 212 significantly dysregulated genes, several of which are involved in the regulation of proteasomal function and NF-κB signaling cascade. Findings of the gene expression study were validated by using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analyses to test genes involved in various signaling cascades. This investigation reveals the importance of the VCPR155H/+ mouse model in the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms causing VCP-associated neurodegenerative diseases and in the discovery of novel therapeutic advancements and strategies for patients suffering with these debilitating disorders. PMID:25388089

  10. Generation and Characterisation of a Pax8-CreERT2 Transgenic Line and a Slc22a6-CreERT2 Knock-In Line for Inducible and Specific Genetic Manipulation of Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Espana-Agusti, Judit; Zou, Xiangang; Wong, Kim; Fu, Beiyuan; Yang, Fengtang; Tuveson, David A.; Adams, David J.; Matakidou, Athena

    2016-01-01

    Genetically relevant mouse models need to recapitulate the hallmarks of human disease by permitting spatiotemporal gene targeting. This is especially important for replicating the biology of complex diseases like cancer, where genetic events occur in a sporadic fashion within developed somatic tissues. Though a number of renal tubule targeting mouse lines have been developed their utility for the study of renal disease is limited by lack of inducibility and specificity. In this study we describe the generation and characterisation of two novel mouse lines directing CreERT2 expression to renal tubular epithelia. The Pax8-CreERT2 transgenic line uses the mouse Pax8 promoter to direct expression of CreERT2 to all renal tubular compartments (proximal and distal tubules as well as collecting ducts) whilst the Slc22a6-CreERT2 knock-in line utilises the endogenous mouse Slc22a6 locus to specifically target the epithelium of proximal renal tubules. Both lines show high organ and tissue specificity with no extrarenal activity detected. To establish the utility of these lines for the study of renal cancer biology, Pax8-CreERT2 and Slc22a6-CreERT2 mice were crossed to conditional Vhl knockout mice to induce long-term renal tubule specific Vhl deletion. These models exhibited renal specific activation of the hypoxia inducible factor pathway (a VHL target). Our results establish Pax8-CreERT2 and Slc22a6-CreERT2 mice as valuable tools for the investigation and modelling of complex renal biology and disease. PMID:26866916

  11. Generation and Characterisation of a Pax8-CreERT2 Transgenic Line and a Slc22a6-CreERT2 Knock-In Line for Inducible and Specific Genetic Manipulation of Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Espana-Agusti, Judit; Zou, Xiangang; Wong, Kim; Fu, Beiyuan; Yang, Fengtang; Tuveson, David A; Adams, David J; Matakidou, Athena

    2016-01-01

    Genetically relevant mouse models need to recapitulate the hallmarks of human disease by permitting spatiotemporal gene targeting. This is especially important for replicating the biology of complex diseases like cancer, where genetic events occur in a sporadic fashion within developed somatic tissues. Though a number of renal tubule targeting mouse lines have been developed their utility for the study of renal disease is limited by lack of inducibility and specificity. In this study we describe the generation and characterisation of two novel mouse lines directing CreERT2 expression to renal tubular epithelia. The Pax8-CreERT2 transgenic line uses the mouse Pax8 promoter to direct expression of CreERT2 to all renal tubular compartments (proximal and distal tubules as well as collecting ducts) whilst the Slc22a6-CreERT2 knock-in line utilises the endogenous mouse Slc22a6 locus to specifically target the epithelium of proximal renal tubules. Both lines show high organ and tissue specificity with no extrarenal activity detected. To establish the utility of these lines for the study of renal cancer biology, Pax8-CreERT2 and Slc22a6-CreERT2 mice were crossed to conditional Vhl knockout mice to induce long-term renal tubule specific Vhl deletion. These models exhibited renal specific activation of the hypoxia inducible factor pathway (a VHL target). Our results establish Pax8-CreERT2 and Slc22a6-CreERT2 mice as valuable tools for the investigation and modelling of complex renal biology and disease. PMID:26866916

  12. Generation of TALEN-Mediated GRdim Knock-In Rats by Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Ponce de León, Verónica; Mérillat, Anne-Marie; Tesson, Laurent; Anegón, Ignacio; Hummler, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN) are potential tools for precise genome engineering of laboratory animals. We report the first targeted genomic integration in the rat using TALENs (Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases) by homology-derived recombination (HDR). We assembled TALENs and designed a linear donor insert targeting a pA476T mutation in the rat Glucocorticoid Receptor (Nr3c1) namely GRdim, that prevents receptor homodimerization in the mouse. TALEN mRNA and linear double-stranded donor were microinjected into rat one-cell embryos. Overall, we observed targeted genomic modifications in 17% of the offspring, indicating high TALEN cutting efficiency in rat zygotes. PMID:24523878

  13. Spectral Confocal Imaging of Fluorescently tagged Nicotinic Receptors in Knock-in Mice with Chronic Nicotine Administration

    PubMed Central

    Renda, Anthony; Nashmi, Raad

    2012-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels in the central nervous system (CNS) are implicated in numerous conditions with serious medical and social consequences. For instance, addiction to nicotine via tobacco smoking is a leading cause of premature death worldwide (World Health Organization) and is likely caused by an alteration of ion channel distribution in the brain1. Chronic nicotine exposure in both rodents and humans results in increased numbers of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brain tissue1-3. Similarly, alterations in the glutamatergic GluN1 or GluA1 channels have been implicated in triggering sensitization to other addictive drugs such as cocaine, amphetamines and opiates4-6. Consequently, the ability to map and quantify distribution and expression patterns of specific ion channels is critically important to understanding the mechanisms of addiction. The study of brain region-specific effects of individual drugs was advanced by the advent of techniques such as radioactive ligands. However, the low spatial resolution of radioactive ligand binding prevents the ability to quantify ligand-gated ion channels in specific subtypes of neurons. Genetically encoded fluorescent reporters, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its many color variants, have revolutionized the field of biology7.By genetically tagging a fluorescent reporter to an endogenous protein one can visualize proteins in vivo7-10. One advantage of fluorescently tagging proteins with a probe is the elimination of antibody use, which have issues of nonspecificity and accessibility to the target protein. We have used this strategy to fluorescently label nAChRs, which enabled the study of receptor assembly using Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in transfected cultured cells11.More recently, we have used the knock-in approach to engineer mice with yellow fluorescent protein tagged α4 nAChR subunits (α4YFP), enabling precise quantification of the receptor ex vivo at submicrometer

  14. Selective Chemokine Receptor Usage by Central Nervous System Myeloid Cells in CCR2-Red Fluorescent Protein Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Kelsey; Mizutani, Makiko; Cotleur, Anne C.; Tsou, Chia-Lin; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Charo, Israel F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Monocyte subpopulations distinguished by differential expression of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 are difficult to track in vivo, partly due to lack of CCR2 reagents. Methodology/Principal Findings We created CCR2-red fluorescent protein (RFP) knock-in mice and crossed them with CX3CR1-GFP mice to investigate monocyte subset trafficking. In mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, CCR2 was critical for efficient intrathecal accumulation and localization of Ly6Chi/CCR2hi monocytes. Surprisingly, neutrophils, not Ly6Clo monocytes, largely replaced Ly6Chi cells in the central nervous system of these mice. CCR2-RFP expression allowed the first unequivocal distinction between infiltrating monocytes/macrophages from resident microglia. Conclusion/Significance These results refine the concept of monocyte subsets, provide mechanistic insight about monocyte entry into the central nervous system, and present a novel model for imaging and quantifying inflammatory myeloid populations. PMID:21060874

  15. [BLG gene knockout and hLF gene knock-in at BLG locus in goat by TALENs].

    PubMed

    Song, Shaozheng; Zhu, Mengmin; Yuan, Yuguo; Rong, Yao; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Si; Mei, Junyan; Cheng, Yong

    2016-03-01

    To knock out β-lactoglobulin (BLG) gene and insert human lactoferrin (hLF) coding sequence at BLG locus of goat, the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) mediated recombination was used to edit the BLG gene of goat fetal fibroblast, then as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer. We designed a pair of specific plasmid TALEN-3-L/R for goat BLG exon III recognition sites, and BLC14-TK vector containing a negative selection gene HSV-TK, was used for the knock in of hLF gene. TALENs plasmids were transfected into the goat fetal fibroblast cells, and the cells were screened three days by 2 μg/mL puromycin. DNA cleavage activities of cells were verified by PCR amplification and DNA production sequencing. Then, targeting vector BLC14-TK and plasmids TALEN-3-L/R were co-transfected into goat fetal fibroblasts, both 700 μg/mL G418 and 2 μg/mL GCV were simultaneously used to screen G418-resistant cells. Detections of integration and recombination were implemented to obtain cells with hLF gene site-specific integration. We chose targeting cells as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer. The mutagenicity of TALEN-3-L/R was between 25% and 30%. A total of 335 reconstructed embryos with 6 BLG-/hLF+ targeting cell lines were transferred into 16 recipient goats. There were 9 pregnancies confirmed by ultrasound on day 30 to 35 (pregnancy rate of 39.1%), and one of 50-day-old fetus with BLG-/hLF+ was achieved. These results provide the basis for hLF gene knock-in at BLG locus of goat and cultivating transgenic goat of low allergens and rich hLF in the milk. PMID:27349115

  16. Cell type-restricted expression of erythrocyte tropomodulin Isoform41 in exon 1 knockout/LacZ knock-in heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weijuan; Chu, Xin; Sung, Lanping Amy

    2015-01-01

    Full-length erythrocyte tropomodulin (E-Tmod or Tmod1) isoform of 41 kDa is an actin nucleation protein and caps the pointed end of tropomyosin-coated actin filaments. It participates in the length control of short actin protofilaments in the erythrocyte membrane skeletal network as well as the organization of microfilaments in non-erythroid cells. Recently we discovered and characterized a truncated isoform of 29 kDa, which lacks the N-terminal sequence encoded by exons 1 and 2 required for nucleation and capping. Thus, it is important to study the expression pattern of solely the E-Tmod41 isoform in tissues. We utilized our exon 1 knockout (KO) mouse model with a knock-in lacZ reporter gene which reports the expression of E-Tmod41, but not E-Tmod29. Because this homozygous isoform-specific KO is an embryonic lethal mutation, we used heterozygous mice. X-gal staining localized specific signals at the single cell level and revealed a timed expression during embryonic development and restricted expression in adult mice. Our results showed that E-Tmod41 expressing cells include developing and young erythroid cells, developing somites, young fiber cells in the lens, certain subtype(s) of tubular cells in the kidney, smooth muscle cells in various tissues, and horizontal cells in the retina. A comparison with previous studies revealed that most if not all tissues known to express E-Tmod contained lacZ-expressing cells. Interestingly, some tubular cells were lacZ-positive while others in the same renal tubule were not, indicating heterogeneity within the tubular cells. Combined with double immunocytochemistry, we further localized E-Tmod41 to dendritic spines of horizontal cells. These timed and cell-type restricted expressions of E-Tmod41 suggest a role of actin nucleation and/or short actin protofilaments in these cell types and sub-cellular structures. PMID:25721257

  17. Etanercept Administration to Neonatal SH3BP2 Knock-In Cherubism Mice Prevents TNF-α-induced Inflammation and Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Ishida, Shu; Mukai, Tomoyuki; Kittaka, Mizuho; Reichenberger, Ernst J.; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cherubism is a genetic disorder of the craniofacial skeleton caused by gain-of-function mutations in the signaling adaptor protein, SH3-domain binding protein 2 (SH3BP2). In a knock-in mouse model for cherubism, we previously demonstrated that homozygous mutant mice develop T/B cell-independent systemic macrophage inflammation leading to bone erosion and joint destruction. Homozygous mice develop multiostotic bone lesions while cherubism lesions in humans are limited to jawbones. We identified a critical role of TNF-α in the development of autoinflammation by creating homozygous TNF-α-deficient cherubism mutants, where systemic inflammation and bone destruction were rescued. In the current study, we examined whether postnatal administration of an anti-TNF-α antagonist can prevent or ameliorate the disease progression in cherubism mice. Neonatal homozygous mutants, where active inflammation has not yet developed, were treated with a high dose of etanercept (25 mg/kg, twice/week) for 7 weeks. Etanercept-treated neonatal mice showed strong rescue of facial swelling and bone loss in jaws and calvariae. Destruction of joints was fully rescued in the high dose group. Moreover, the high dose treatment group showed a significant decrease in lung and liver inflammatory lesions. However, inflammation and bone loss, which were successfully treated by etanercept administration recurred after etanercept discontinuation. No significant effect was observed in low dose- (0.5 mg/kg, twice/week) and vehicle-treated groups. In contrast, when 10-week-old cherubism mice with fully active inflammation were treated with etanercept for 7 weeks, even the high dose administration did not decrease bone loss, lung or liver inflammation. Taken together, the results suggest that anti-TNF-α therapy may be effective in young cherubism patients, if treated before the inflammatory phase or bone resorption occurs. Therefore, early genetic diagnosis and early treatment with anti

  18. Homologous Recombination-Independent Large Gene Cassette Knock-in in CHO Cells Using TALEN and MMEJ-Directed Donor Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Takenaga, Mitsumasa; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Takahiro; Kamihira, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Gene knock-in techniques have rapidly evolved in recent years, along with the development and maturation of genome editing technology using programmable nucleases. We recently reported a novel strategy for microhomology-mediated end-joining-dependent integration of donor DNA by using TALEN or CRISPR/Cas9 and optimized targeting vectors, named PITCh (Precise Integration into Target Chromosome) vectors. Here we describe TALEN and PITCh vector-mediated integration of long gene cassettes, including a single-chain Fv-Fc (scFv-Fc) gene, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, with comparison of targeting and cloning efficiency among several donor design and culture conditions. We achieved 9.6-kb whole plasmid integration and 7.6-kb backbone-free integration into a defined genomic locus in CHO cells. Furthermore, we confirmed the reasonable productivity of recombinant scFv-Fc protein of the knock-in cells. Using our protocol, the knock-in cell clones could be obtained by a single transfection and a single limiting dilution using a 96-well plate, without constructing targeting vectors containing long homology arms. Thus, the study described herein provides a highly practical strategy for gene knock-in of large DNA in CHO cells, which accelerates high-throughput generation of cell lines stably producing any desired biopharmaceuticals, including huge antibody proteins. PMID:26473830

  19. Developing an extended genomic engineering approach based on recombineering to knock-in heterologous genes to Escherichia coli genome.

    PubMed

    Sukhija, Karan; Pyne, Michael; Ali, Saad; Orr, Valerie; Abedi, Daryoush; Moo-Young, Murray; Chou, C Perry

    2012-06-01

    Most existing genomic engineering protocols for manipulation of Escherichia coli are primarily focused on chromosomal gene knockout. In this study, a simple but systematic chromosomal gene knock-in method was proposed based on a previously developed protocol using bacteriophage λ (λ Red) and flippase-flippase recognition targets (FLP-FRT) recombinations. For demonstration purposes, DNA operons containing heterologous genes (i.e., pac encoding E. coli penicillin acylase and palB2 encoding Pseudozyma antarctica lipase B mutant) engineered with regulatory elements, such as strong/inducible promoters (i.e., P( trc ) and P( araB )), operators, and ribosomal binding sites, were integrated into the E. coli genome at designated locations (i.e., lacZYA, dbpA, and lacI-mhpR loci) either as a gene replacement or gene insertion using various antibiotic selection markers (i.e., kanamycin and chloramphenicol) under various genetic backgrounds (i.e., HB101 and DH5α). The expression of the inserted foreign genes was subjected to regulation using appropriate inducers [isopropyl β-D: -1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and arabinose] at tunable concentrations. The developed approach not only enables more extensive genomic engineering of E. coli, but also paves an effective way to "tailor" plasmid-free E. coli strains with desired genotypes suitable for various biotechnological applications, such as biomanufacturing and metabolic engineering. PMID:21826554

  20. HMGB1 facilitates repair of mitochondrial DNA damage and extends the lifespan of mutant ataxin-1 knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hikaru; Fujita, Kyota; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Homma, Hidenori; Sasabe, Toshikazu; Shimizu, Jun; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Tamura, Takuya; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mutant ataxin-1 (Atxn1), which causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), binds to and impairs the function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a crucial nuclear protein that regulates DNA architectural changes essential for DNA damage repair and transcription. In this study, we established that transgenic or virus vector-mediated complementation with HMGB1 ameliorates motor dysfunction and prolongs lifespan in mutant Atxn1 knock-in (Atxn1-KI) mice. We identified mitochondrial DNA damage repair by HMGB1 as a novel molecular basis for this effect, in addition to the mechanisms already associated with HMGB1 function, such as nuclear DNA damage repair and nuclear transcription. The dysfunction and the improvement of mitochondrial DNA damage repair functions are tightly associated with the exacerbation and rescue, respectively, of symptoms, supporting the involvement of mitochondrial DNA quality control by HMGB1 in SCA1 pathology. Moreover, we show that the rescue of Purkinje cell dendrites and dendritic spines by HMGB1 could be downstream effects. Although extracellular HMGB1 triggers inflammation mediated by Toll-like receptor and receptor for advanced glycation end products, upregulation of intracellular HMGB1 does not induce such side effects. Thus, viral delivery of HMGB1 is a candidate approach by which to modify the disease progression of SCA1 even after the onset. PMID:25510912

  1. Influence of autoignition delay time characteristics of different fuels on pressure waves and knock in reciprocating engines

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.; Kalghatgi, G.T.

    2009-12-15

    The functional relationship of autoignition delay time with temperature and pressure is employed to derive the propagation velocities of autoignitive reaction fronts for particular reactivity gradients, once autoignition has been initiated. In the present study of a variety of premixtures, with different functional relationships, such gradients comprise fixed initial temperature gradients. The smaller is the ratio of the acoustic speed through the mixture to the localised velocity of the autoignitive front, the greater are the amplitude and frequency of the induced pressure wave. This might lead to damaging engine knock. At higher values of the ratio, the autoignition can be benign with only small over-pressures. This approach to the effects of autoignition is confirmed by its application to a variety of experimental studies involving: (i)Imposed temperature gradients in a rapid compression and expansion machine. (ii)Onset of knock in an engine with advancing spark timing. (iii)Development of autoignition at a single hot spot in an engine. (iv)Autoignition fronts initiated by several hot spots. There is much diversity in the effects that can be produced by different fuels in different ranges of temperature and pressure. Higher values of autoignitive propagation speeds lead to increasingly severe engine knock. Such effects cannot always be predicted from the Research and Motor octane numbers. (author)

  2. FLT3-ITD Knock-in Impairs Hematopoietic Stem Cell Quiescence/Homeostasis, Leading to Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S. Haihua; Heiser, Diane; Li, Li; Kaplan, Ian; Collector, Michael; Huso, David; Sharkis, Saul J; Civin, Curt; Small, Don

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations within the FMS-Like Tyrosine Kinase gene (FLT3) render the receptor constitutively active, driving proliferation and survival in leukemic blasts. Expression of Flt3-ITD from the endogenous promoter in a murine knock-in model results in progenitor expansion and a myeloproliferative neoplasm. In this study, we show that this expansion begins with over-proliferation within a compartment of normally quiescent long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs), which become rapidly depleted. This depletion is reversible upon treatment with the small molecule inhibitor Sorafenib, which also ablates the disease. Although the normal LT-HSC has been defined as Flt3-negative by flow cytometric detection, we demonstrate that Flt3 is capable of playing a role within this compartment by examining the effects of constitutively activated Flt3-ITD. This indicates an important link between stem cell quiescence/homeostasis and myeloproliferative disease while also giving novel insight into the emergence of FLT3-ITD mutations in the evolution of leukemic transformation. PMID:22958930

  3. ssODN-mediated knock-in with CRISPR-Cas for large genomic regions in zygotes.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Kazuto; Kunihiro, Yayoi; Kaneko, Takehito; Nagahora, Hitoshi; Voigt, Birger; Mashimo, Tomoji

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas system is a powerful tool for generating genetically modified animals; however, targeted knock-in (KI) via homologous recombination remains difficult in zygotes. Here we show efficient gene KI in rats by combining CRISPR-Cas with single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODNs). First, a 1-kb ssODN co-injected with guide RNA (gRNA) and Cas9 messenger RNA produce GFP-KI at the rat Thy1 locus. Then, two gRNAs with two 80-bp ssODNs direct efficient integration of a 5.5-kb CAG-GFP vector into the Rosa26 locus via ssODN-mediated end joining. This protocol also achieves KI of a 200-kb BAC containing the human SIRPA locus, concomitantly knocking out the rat Sirpa gene. Finally, three gRNAs and two ssODNs replace 58-kb of the rat Cyp2d cluster with a 6.2-kb human CYP2D6 gene. These ssODN-mediated KI protocols can be applied to any target site with any donor vector without the need to construct homology arms, thus simplifying genome engineering in living organisms. PMID:26786405

  4. ssODN-mediated knock-in with CRISPR-Cas for large genomic regions in zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimi, Kazuto; Kunihiro, Yayoi; Kaneko, Takehito; Nagahora, Hitoshi; Voigt, Birger; Mashimo, Tomoji

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas system is a powerful tool for generating genetically modified animals; however, targeted knock-in (KI) via homologous recombination remains difficult in zygotes. Here we show efficient gene KI in rats by combining CRISPR-Cas with single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODNs). First, a 1-kb ssODN co-injected with guide RNA (gRNA) and Cas9 messenger RNA produce GFP-KI at the rat Thy1 locus. Then, two gRNAs with two 80-bp ssODNs direct efficient integration of a 5.5-kb CAG-GFP vector into the Rosa26 locus via ssODN-mediated end joining. This protocol also achieves KI of a 200-kb BAC containing the human SIRPA locus, concomitantly knocking out the rat Sirpa gene. Finally, three gRNAs and two ssODNs replace 58-kb of the rat Cyp2d cluster with a 6.2-kb human CYP2D6 gene. These ssODN-mediated KI protocols can be applied to any target site with any donor vector without the need to construct homology arms, thus simplifying genome engineering in living organisms. PMID:26786405

  5. Deletion of the γ-secretase subunits Aph1B/C impairs memory and worsens the deficits of knock-in mice modeling the Alzheimer-like familial Danish dementia

    PubMed Central

    Biundo, Fabrizio; Ishiwari, Keita; Del Prete, Dolores; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in BRI2/ITM2b genes cause Familial British and Danish Dementias (FBD and FDD), which are pathogenically similar to Familial Alzheimer Disease (FAD). BRI2 inhibits processing of Amyloid precursor protein (APP), a protein involved in FAD pathogenesis. Accumulation of a carboxyl-terminal APP metabolite –β-CTF- causes memory deficits in a knock-in mouse model of FDD, called FDDKI. We have investigated further the pathogenic function of β-CTF studying the effect of Aph1B/C deletion on FDDKI mice. This strategy is based on the evidence that deletion of Aph1B/C proteins, which are components of the γ-secretase that cleaves β-CTF, results in stabilization of β-CTF and a reduction of Aβ. We found that both the FDD mutation and the Aph1B/C deficiency mildly interfered with spatial long term memory, spatial working/short-term memory and long-term contextual fear memory. In addition, the Aph1BC deficiency induced deficits in long-term cued fear memory. Moreover, the two mutations have additive adverse effects as they compromise the accuracy of spatial long-term memory and induce spatial memory retention deficits in young mice. Overall, the data are consistent with a role for β-CTF in the genesis of memory deficits. PMID:26942869

  6. The common missense mutation D489N in TRIM32 causing limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H leads to loss of the mutated protein in knock-in mice resulting in a Trim32-null phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Struyk, Arie; Mokhonova, Ekaterina; Cannon, Stephen C; Spencer, Melissa J

    2011-10-15

    Mutations in tripartite motif protein 32 (TRIM32) are responsible for several hereditary disorders that include limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H), sarcotubular myopathy (STM) and Bardet Biedl syndrome. Most LGMD2H mutations in TRIM32 are clustered in the NHL β-propeller domain at the C-terminus and are predicted to interfere with homodimerization. To get insight into TRIM32's role in the pathogenesis of LGMD2H and to create an accurate model of disease, we have generated a knock-in mouse (T32KI) carrying the c.1465G > A (p.D489N) mutation in murine Trim32 corresponding to the human LGMD2H/STM pathogenic mutation c.1459G > A (p.D487N). Our data indicate that T32KI mice have both a myopathic and a neurogenic phenotype, very similar to the one described in the Trim32-null mice that we created previously. Analysis of Trim32 gene expression in T32KI mice revealed normal mRNA levels, but a severe reduction in mutant TRIM32 (D489N) at the protein level. Our results suggest that the D489N pathogenic mutation destabilizes the protein, leading to its degradation, and results in the same mild myopathic and neurogenic phenotype as that found in Trim32-null mice. Thus, one potential mechanism of LGMD2H might be destabilization of mutated TRIM32 protein leading to a null phenotype. PMID:21775502

  7. N-terminal Huntingtin Knock-In Mice: Implications of Removing the N-terminal Region of Huntingtin for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xudong; Wang, Chuan-En; Hong, Yan; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A; Sun, Miao; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-05-01

    The Huntington's disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is a large protein consisting of 3144 amino acids and has conserved N-terminal sequences that are followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat. Loss of Htt is known to cause embryonic lethality in mice, whereas polyQ expansion leads to adult neuronal degeneration. Whether N-terminal HTT is essential for neuronal development or contributes only to late-onset neurodegeneration remains unknown. We established HTT knock-in mice (N160Q-KI) expressing the first 208 amino acids of HTT with 160Q, and they show age-dependent HTT aggregates in the brain and neurological phenotypes. Importantly, the N-terminal mutant HTT also preferentially accumulates in the striatum, the brain region most affected in HD, indicating the importance of N-terminal HTT in selective neuropathology. That said, homozygous N160Q-KI mice are also embryonic lethal, suggesting that N-terminal HTT alone is unable to support embryonic development. Using Htt knockout neurons, we found that loss of Htt selectively affects the survival of developing neuronal cells, but not astrocytes, in culture. This neuronal degeneration could be rescued by a truncated HTT lacking the first 237 amino acids, but not by N-terminal HTT (1-208 amino acids). Also, the rescue effect depends on the region in HTT known to be involved in intracellular trafficking. Thus, the N-terminal HTT region may not be essential for the survival of developing neurons, but when carrying a large polyQ repeat, can cause selective neuropathology. These findings imply a possible therapeutic benefit of removing the N-terminal region of HTT containing the polyQ repeat to treat the neurodegeneration in HD. PMID:27203582

  8. N-terminal Huntingtin Knock-In Mice: Implications of Removing the N-terminal Region of Huntingtin for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xudong; Wang, Chuan-En; Hong, Yan; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A.; Sun, Miao; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The Huntington’s disease (HD) protein, huntingtin (HTT), is a large protein consisting of 3144 amino acids and has conserved N-terminal sequences that are followed by a polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat. Loss of Htt is known to cause embryonic lethality in mice, whereas polyQ expansion leads to adult neuronal degeneration. Whether N-terminal HTT is essential for neuronal development or contributes only to late-onset neurodegeneration remains unknown. We established HTT knock-in mice (N160Q-KI) expressing the first 208 amino acids of HTT with 160Q, and they show age-dependent HTT aggregates in the brain and neurological phenotypes. Importantly, the N-terminal mutant HTT also preferentially accumulates in the striatum, the brain region most affected in HD, indicating the importance of N-terminal HTT in selective neuropathology. That said, homozygous N160Q-KI mice are also embryonic lethal, suggesting that N-terminal HTT alone is unable to support embryonic development. Using Htt knockout neurons, we found that loss of Htt selectively affects the survival of developing neuronal cells, but not astrocytes, in culture. This neuronal degeneration could be rescued by a truncated HTT lacking the first 237 amino acids, but not by N-terminal HTT (1–208 amino acids). Also, the rescue effect depends on the region in HTT known to be involved in intracellular trafficking. Thus, the N-terminal HTT region may not be essential for the survival of developing neurons, but when carrying a large polyQ repeat, can cause selective neuropathology. These findings imply a possible therapeutic benefit of removing the N-terminal region of HTT containing the polyQ repeat to treat the neurodegeneration in HD. PMID:27203582

  9. Exaggerated Nighttime Sleep and Defective Sleep Homeostasis in a Drosophila Knock-In Model of Human Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Petruccelli, Emily; Lansdon, Patrick; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Despite an established link between epilepsy and sleep behavior, it remains unclear how specific epileptogenic mutations affect sleep and subsequently influence seizure susceptibility. Recently, Sun et al. (2012) created a fly knock-in model of human generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), a wide-spectrum disorder characterized by fever-associated seizing in childhood and lifelong affliction. GEFS+ flies carry a disease-causing mutation in their voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene and display semidominant heat-induced seizing, likely due to reduced GABAergic inhibitory activity at high temperature. Here, we show that at room temperature the GEFS+ mutation dominantly modifies sleep, with mutants exhibiting rapid sleep onset at dusk and increased nighttime sleep as compared to controls. These characteristics of GEFS+ sleep were observed regardless of sex, mating status, and genetic background. GEFS+ mutant sleep phenotypes were more resistant to pharmacologic reduction of GABA transmission by carbamazepine (CBZ) than controls, and were mitigated by reducing GABAA receptor expression specifically in wake-promoting pigment dispersing factor (PDF) neurons. These findings are consistent with increased GABAergic transmission to PDF neurons being mainly responsible for the enhanced nighttime sleep of GEFS+ mutants. Additionally, analyses under other light conditions suggested that the GEFS+ mutation led to reduced buffering of behavioral responses to light on and off stimuli, which contributed to characteristic GEFS+ sleep phenotypes. We further found that GEFS+ mutants had normal circadian rhythms in free-running dark conditions. Interestingly, the mutants lacked a homeostatic rebound following mechanical sleep deprivation, and whereas deprivation treatment increased heat-induced seizure susceptibility in control flies, it unexpectedly reduced seizure activity in GEFS+ mutants. Our study has revealed the sleep architecture of a Drosophila VGSC mutant

  10. Exaggerated Nighttime Sleep and Defective Sleep Homeostasis in a Drosophila Knock-In Model of Human Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Petruccelli, Emily; Lansdon, Patrick; Kitamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Despite an established link between epilepsy and sleep behavior, it remains unclear how specific epileptogenic mutations affect sleep and subsequently influence seizure susceptibility. Recently, Sun et al. (2012) created a fly knock-in model of human generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), a wide-spectrum disorder characterized by fever-associated seizing in childhood and lifelong affliction. GEFS+ flies carry a disease-causing mutation in their voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene and display semidominant heat-induced seizing, likely due to reduced GABAergic inhibitory activity at high temperature. Here, we show that at room temperature the GEFS+ mutation dominantly modifies sleep, with mutants exhibiting rapid sleep onset at dusk and increased nighttime sleep as compared to controls. These characteristics of GEFS+ sleep were observed regardless of sex, mating status, and genetic background. GEFS+ mutant sleep phenotypes were more resistant to pharmacologic reduction of GABA transmission by carbamazepine (CBZ) than controls, and were mitigated by reducing GABAA receptor expression specifically in wake-promoting pigment dispersing factor (PDF) neurons. These findings are consistent with increased GABAergic transmission to PDF neurons being mainly responsible for the enhanced nighttime sleep of GEFS+ mutants. Additionally, analyses under other light conditions suggested that the GEFS+ mutation led to reduced buffering of behavioral responses to light on and off stimuli, which contributed to characteristic GEFS+ sleep phenotypes. We further found that GEFS+ mutants had normal circadian rhythms in free-running dark conditions. Interestingly, the mutants lacked a homeostatic rebound following mechanical sleep deprivation, and whereas deprivation treatment increased heat-induced seizure susceptibility in control flies, it unexpectedly reduced seizure activity in GEFS+ mutants. Our study has revealed the sleep architecture of a Drosophila VGSC mutant

  11. Synaptic function is modulated by LRRK2 and glutamate release is increased in cortical neurons of G2019S LRRK2 knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Beccano-Kelly, Dayne A.; Kuhlmann, Naila; Tatarnikov, Igor; Volta, Mattia; Munsie, Lise N.; Chou, Patrick; Cao, Li-Ping; Han, Heather; Tapia, Lucia; Farrer, Matthew J.; Milnerwood, Austen J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase-2 (LRRK2) result in familial Parkinson's disease and the G2019S mutation alone accounts for up to 30% in some ethnicities. Despite this, the function of LRRK2 is largely undetermined although evidence suggests roles in phosphorylation, protein interactions, autophagy and endocytosis. Emerging reports link loss of LRRK2 to altered synaptic transmission, but the effects of the G2019S mutation upon synaptic release in mammalian neurons are unknown. To assess wild type and mutant LRRK2 in established neuronal networks, we conducted immunocytochemical, electrophysiological and biochemical characterization of >3 week old cortical cultures of LRRK2 knock-out, wild-type overexpressing and G2019S knock-in mice. Synaptic release and synapse numbers were grossly normal in LRRK2 knock-out cells, but discretely reduced glutamatergic activity and reduced synaptic protein levels were observed. Conversely, synapse density was modestly but significantly increased in wild-type LRRK2 overexpressing cultures although event frequency was not. In knock-in cultures, glutamate release was markedly elevated, in the absence of any change to synapse density, indicating that physiological levels of G2019S LRRK2 elevate probability of release. Several pre-synaptic regulatory proteins shown by others to interact with LRRK2 were expressed at normal levels in knock-in cultures; however, synapsin 1 phosphorylation was significantly reduced. Thus, perturbations to the pre-synaptic release machinery and elevated synaptic transmission are early neuronal effects of LRRK2 G2019S. Furthermore, the comparison of knock-in and overexpressing cultures suggests that one copy of the G2019S mutation has a more pronounced effect than an ~3-fold increase in LRRK2 protein. Mutant-induced increases in transmission may convey additional stressors to neuronal physiology that may eventually contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. PMID:25309331

  12. Knock-in of large reporter genes in human cells via CRISPR/Cas9-induced homology-dependent and independent DNA repair.

    PubMed

    He, Xiangjun; Tan, Chunlai; Wang, Feng; Wang, Yaofeng; Zhou, Rui; Cui, Dexuan; You, Wenxing; Zhao, Hui; Ren, Jianwei; Feng, Bo

    2016-05-19

    CRISPR/Cas9-induced site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways. Extensive efforts have been made to knock-in exogenous DNA to a selected genomic locus in human cells; which, however, has focused on HDR-based strategies and was proven inefficient. Here, we report that NHEJ pathway mediates efficient rejoining of genome and plasmids following CRISPR/Cas9-induced DNA DSBs, and promotes high-efficiency DNA integration in various human cell types. With this homology-independent knock-in strategy, integration of a 4.6 kb promoterless ires-eGFP fragment into the GAPDH locus yielded up to 20% GFP+ cells in somatic LO2 cells, and 1.70% GFP+ cells in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Quantitative comparison further demonstrated that the NHEJ-based knock-in is more efficient than HDR-mediated gene targeting in all human cell types examined. These data support that CRISPR/Cas9-induced NHEJ provides a valuable new path for efficient genome editing in human ESCs and somatic cells. PMID:26850641

  13. Knock-in of large reporter genes in human cells via CRISPR/Cas9-induced homology-dependent and independent DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiangjun; Tan, Chunlai; Wang, Feng; Wang, Yaofeng; Zhou, Rui; Cui, Dexuan; You, Wenxing; Zhao, Hui; Ren, Jianwei; Feng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-induced site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways. Extensive efforts have been made to knock-in exogenous DNA to a selected genomic locus in human cells; which, however, has focused on HDR-based strategies and was proven inefficient. Here, we report that NHEJ pathway mediates efficient rejoining of genome and plasmids following CRISPR/Cas9-induced DNA DSBs, and promotes high-efficiency DNA integration in various human cell types. With this homology-independent knock-in strategy, integration of a 4.6 kb promoterless ires-eGFP fragment into the GAPDH locus yielded up to 20% GFP+ cells in somatic LO2 cells, and 1.70% GFP+ cells in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Quantitative comparison further demonstrated that the NHEJ-based knock-in is more efficient than HDR-mediated gene targeting in all human cell types examined. These data support that CRISPR/Cas9-induced NHEJ provides a valuable new path for efficient genome editing in human ESCs and somatic cells. PMID:26850641

  14. Testing the silence of mutations: Transcriptomic and behavioral studies of GABA(A) receptor α1 and α2 subunit knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, R A; Osterndorff-Kahanek, E; Ponomarev, I; Homanics, G E; Blednov, Y A

    2011-01-13

    Knock-in mice were constructed with mutations in the α1 (H(270), A(277)) and α2 (H(270), A(277)) subunits of the GABAA receptor, which resulted in receptors that lacked modulation by ethanol but retained normal responses to GABA in vitro. A key question is whether these mutant receptors also function normally in vivo. Perturbation of brain function was evaluated by gene expression profiling in the cerebral cortex and by behavioral pharmacology experiments with GABAergic drugs. Analysis of individual transcripts found only six transcripts that were changed in α1 knock-in mice and three in the α2 mutants (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Two transcripts that are sensitive to neuronal activity, Arc and Fos, increased about 250% in the α2 mutants, and about 50% in the α1 mutants. Behavioral effects (loss of righting reflex, rotarod) of flurazepam and pentobarbital were not different between α2 mutants and wild-type, but they were enhanced for α1 knock-in mice. These results indicate that introduction of these mutations in the α2 subunit of the GABAA receptor does not produce marked perturbation of brain function, as measured by gene expression and GABAergic behavioral responses, but the same mutations in the α1 subunit produce more pronounced changes, especially in GABAergic function. PMID:21056629

  15. Targeted integration in rat and mouse embryos with zinc-finger nucleases.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoxia; Ji, Diana; Fisher, Daniel A; Wu, Yumei; Briner, David M; Weinstein, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    Gene targeting is indispensible for reverse genetics and the generation of animal models of disease. The mouse has become the most commonly used animal model system owing to the success of embryonic stem cell-based targeting technology, whereas other mammalian species lack convenient tools for genome modification. Recently, microinjection of engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) in embryos was used to generate gene knockouts in the rat and the mouse by introducing nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ)-mediated deletions or insertions at the target site. Here we use ZFN technology in embryos to introduce sequence-specific modifications (knock-ins) by means of homologous recombination in Sprague Dawley and Long-Evans hooded rats and FVB mice. This approach enables precise genome engineering to generate modifications such as point mutations, accurate insertions and deletions, and conditional knockouts and knock-ins. The same strategy can potentially be applied to many other species for which genetic engineering tools are needed. PMID:21151125

  16. Knock-in of a FLT3/ITD mutation cooperates with a NUP98-HOXD13 fusion to generate acute myeloid leukemia in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Greenblatt, Sarah; Li, Li; Slape, Christopher; Nguyen, Bao; Novak, Rachel; Duffield, Amy; Huso, David; Desiderio, Stephen; Borowitz, Michael J.; Aplan, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive activation of FLT3 by internal tandem duplication (ITD) is one of the most common molecular alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). FLT3/ITD mutations have also been observed in myelodysplastic syndrome patients both before and during progression to AML. Previous work has shown that insertion of an FLT3/ITD mutation into the murine Flt3 gene induces a myeloproliferative neoplasm, but not progression to acute leukemia, suggesting that additional cooperating events are required. We therefore combined the FLT3/ITD mutation with a model of myelodysplastic syndrome involving transgenic expression of the Nup98-HoxD13 (NHD13) fusion gene. Mice expressing both the FLT3/ITD and NHD13 transgene developed AML with 100% penetrance and short latency. These leukemias were driven by mutant FLT3 expression and were susceptible to treatment with FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We also observed a spontaneous loss of the wild-type Flt3 allele in these AMLs, further modeling the loss of the heterozygosity phenomenon that is seen in human AML with FLT3-activating mutations. Because resistance to FLT3 inhibitors remains an important clinical issue, this model may help identify new molecular targets in collaborative signaling pathways. PMID:22323452

  17. Role of TAPP1 and TAPP2 adaptor binding to PtdIns(3,4)P2 in regulating insulin sensitivity defined by knock-in analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wullschleger, Stephan; Wasserman, David H.; Gray, Alex; Sakamoto, Kei; Alessi, Dario R.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin sensitivity is critically dependent on the activity of PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and generation of the PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 second messenger. PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 can be broken down to PtdIns(3,4)P2 through the action of the SHIPs (Src-homology-2-domain-containing inositol phosphatases). As PtdIns(3,4)P2 levels peak after those of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, it has been proposed that PtdIns(3,4)P2 controls a negative-feedback loop that down-regulates the insulin and PI3K network. Previously, we identified two related adaptor proteins termed TAPP [tandem PH (pleckstrin homology)-domain-containing protein] 1 and TAPP2 that specifically bind to PtdIns(3,4)P2 through their C-terminal PH domain. To determine whether TAPP1 and TAPP2 play a role in regulating insulin sensitivity, we generated knock-in mice that express normal endogenous levels of mutant TAPP1 and TAPP2 that are incapable of binding PtdIns(3,4)P2. These homozygous TAPP1R211L/R211LTAPP2R218L/R218L double knock-in mice are viable and exhibit significantly enhanced activation of Akt, a key downstream mediator of insulin signalling. Consistent with increased PI3K and Akt activity, the double knock-in mice display enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity and disposal of glucose uptake into muscle tissues. We also generated wild-type and double TAPP1R211L/R211LTAPP2R218L/R218L knock-in embryonic fibroblasts and found that insulin triggered enhanced production of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and Akt activity in the double knock-in fibroblasts. These observations provide the first genetic evidence to support the notion that binding of TAPP1 and TAPP2 adaptors to PtdIns(3,4)P2 function as negative regulators of the insulin and PI3K signalling pathways. PMID:21204784

  18. Trb2, a mouse homolog of tribbles, is dispensable for kidney and mouse development

    SciTech Connect

    Takasato, Minoru; Kobayashi, Chiyoko; Okabayashi, Koji; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Oshima, Naoko; Asashima, Makoto; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi

    2008-09-05

    Glomeruli comprise an important filtering apparatus in the kidney and are derived from the metanephric mesenchyme. A nuclear protein, Sall1, is expressed in this mesenchyme, and we previously reported that Trb2, a mouse homolog of Drosophila tribbles, is expressed in the mesenchyme-derived tissues of the kidney by microarray analyses using Sall1-GFP knock-in mice. In the present report, we detected Trb2 expression in a variety of organs during gestation, including the kidneys, mesonephros, testes, heart, eyes, thymus, blood vessels, muscle, bones, tongue, spinal cord, and ganglions. In the developing kidney, Trb2 signals were detected in podocytes and the prospective mesangium of the glomeruli, as well as in ureteric bud tips. However, Trb2 mutant mice did not display any apparent phenotypes and no proteinuria was observed, indicating normal glomerular functions. These results suggest that Trb2 plays minimal roles during kidney and mouse development.

  19. A Universal Vector for High-Efficiency Multi-Fragment Recombineering of BACs and Knock-In Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Hodges, Eve; Slight, Joan; Thornburn, Anna; Devenney, Paul S.; Hohenstein, Peter

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing need for more efficient generation of transgenic constructs. Here we present a universal multi-site Gateway vector for use in recombineering reactions. Using transgenic mouse models, we show its use for the generation of BAC transgenics and targeting vectors. The modular nature of the vector allows for rapid modification of constructs to generate different versions of the same construct. As such it will help streamline the generation of series of related transgenic models. PMID:23637962

  20. Deletion of Stat3 enhances myeloid cell expansion and increases the severity of myeloproliferative neoplasms in Jak2V617F knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongqing; Jobe, Fatoumata; Hutchison, Robert E.; Mohi, Golam

    2015-01-01

    The JAK2V617F mutation commonly found in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) induces constitutive phosphorylation/activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3). However, the contribution of Stat3 in MPN evoked by JAK2V617F remains unknown. To determine the role of Stat3 in JAK2V617F-induced MPN, we generated Stat3-deficient Jak2V617F-expressing mice. Whereas expression of Jak2V617F resulted in a PV-like disease characterized by increased red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, neutrophils and platelets in the peripheral blood of Jak2V617F knock-in mice, deletion of Stat3 slightly reduced RBC, and hematocrit parameters and modestly increased platelet numbers in Jak2V617F knock-in mice. Moreover, deletion of Stat3 significantly increased the neutrophil counts/percentages and markedly reduced the survival of mice expressing Jak2V617F. These phenotypic manifestations were reproduced upon bone marrow transplantation into wild-type animals. Flow cytometric analysis showed increased hematopoietic stem cell and granulocyte-macrophage progenitor populations in the bone marrow and spleens of Stat3-deficient Jak2V617F mice. Stat3 deficiency also caused a marked expansion of Gr-1+/Mac-1+ myeloid cells in Jak2V617F knock-in mice. Histopathologic analysis revealed marked increase in granulocytes in the bone marrow, spleens and livers of Stat3-deficient Jak2V617F-expressing mice. Together, these results suggest that deletion of Stat3 increases the severity of MPN induced by Jak2V617F. PMID:26044284

  1. Retigabine, a Kv7.2/Kv7.3-Channel Opener, Attenuates Drug-Induced Seizures in Knock-In Mice Harboring Kcnq2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Yukiko; Tomonoh, Yuko; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Zhang, Bo; Uchida, Taku; Ishii, Atsushi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    The hetero-tetrameric voltage-gated potassium channel Kv7.2/Kv7.3, which is encoded by KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, plays an important role in limiting network excitability in the neonatal brain. Kv7.2/Kv7.3 dysfunction resulting from KCNQ2 mutations predominantly causes self-limited or benign epilepsy in neonates, but also causes early onset epileptic encephalopathy. Retigabine (RTG), a Kv7.2/ Kv7.3-channel opener, seems to be a rational antiepileptic drug for epilepsies caused by KCNQ2 mutations. We therefore evaluated the effects of RTG on seizures in two strains of knock-in mice harboring different Kcnq2 mutations, in comparison to the effects of phenobarbital (PB), which is the first-line antiepileptic drug for seizures in neonates. The subjects were heterozygous knock-in mice (Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+) bearing the Y284C or A306T Kcnq2 mutation, respectively, and their wild-type (WT) littermates, at 63–100 days of age. Seizures induced by intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA, 12mg/kg) were recorded using a video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring system. Effects of RTG on KA-induced seizures of both strains of knock-in mice were assessed using seizure scores from a modified Racine’s scale and compared with those of PB. The number and total duration of spike bursts on EEG and behaviors monitored by video recording were also used to evaluate the effects of RTG and PB. Both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice showed significantly more KA-induced seizures than WT mice. RTG significantly attenuated KA-induced seizure activities in both Kcnq2Y284C/+ and Kcnq2A306T/+ mice, and more markedly than PB. This is the first reported evidence of RTG ameliorating KA-induced seizures in knock-in mice bearing mutations of Kcnq2, with more marked effects than those observed with PB. RTG or other Kv7.2-channel openers may be considered as first-line antiepileptic treatments for epilepsies resulting from KCNQ2 mutations. PMID:26910900

  2. Altered immunoglobulin hypermutation pattern and frequency in complementary mouse models of DNA polymerase ζ activity

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Janssen; Bebenek, Katarzyna; Watt, Danielle L.; Richter, Kathleen; Jiang, Chuancang; Zhao, Ming-Lang; Ray, Madhumita; McGregor, W. Glenn; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Diaz, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA polymerase ζ participates in immunoglobulin hypermutation, we generated two mouse models of Pol ζ function: a B-cell specific conditional knock-out and a knock-in strain with a Pol ζ mutagenesis-enhancing mutation. Pol ζ-deficient B-cells had a reduction in mutation frequency at immunoglobulin loci in the spleen and in Peyer’s Patches, while knock-in mice with a mutagenic Pol ζ, displayed a marked increase in mutation frequency in Peyer’s Patches revealing a pattern that was similar to mutations in yeast strains with a homologous mutation in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of Pol ζ. Combined, these data are best explained by a direct role for DNA polymerase ζ in immunoglobulin hypermutation. PMID:22547703

  3. A safe and sensitive enterovirus A71 infection model based on human SCARB2 knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuya; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Xing; Chen, Pan; Wu, Xi; Guo, Yanan; Liu, Susu; Liang, Zhenglun; Fan, Changfa; Wang, Youchun

    2016-05-23

    Enterovirus A71 infection has become a severe threat for global public health. Vaccines for controlling and preventing Enterovirus A71 epidemics are highly demanded, however, vaccine evaluation has been hindered by the lack of suitable Enterovirus A71 infection animal models. Here we established an hSCARB2 knockin mouse model for real-time monitoring of enterovirus A71 infection in vivo. This model was sensitive to the infection of both replication-competent virus rEV71(FY)-EGFP and single round pseudotype virus pEV71(FY)-Luc. The intensity of bioluminescence correlated well with viral loads in infected tissues (R=0.86, P<0.01). Pathological changes recapitulated human infectious and clinical features of enterovirus A71, including both general characteristics of "hand foot and mouth" and the severe symptoms in the CNS. A formalin-inactivated enterovirus A71 vaccine can elicit antibodies in R26-hSCARB2 mice, which play effective roles in protecting knockin mice against enterovirus A71 infection as indicated by bioluminescence. Therefore, this work provides a safe, sensitive and visualizing model for exploring mechanisms of enterovirus A71 infection and examining human enterovirus A71 vaccines and antiviral therapies. PMID:27102822

  4. Mouse models for the study of colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Daniel W.; Giardina, Charles; Tanaka, Takuji

    2009-01-01

    The study of experimental colon carcinogenesis in rodents has a long history, dating back almost 80 years. There are many advantages to studying the pathogenesis of carcinogen-induced colon cancer in mouse models, including rapid and reproducible tumor induction and the recapitulation of the adenoma–carcinoma sequence that occurs in humans. The availability of recombinant inbred mouse panels and the existence of transgenic, knock-out and knock-in genetic models further increase the value of these studies. In this review, we discuss the general mechanisms of tumor initiation elicited by commonly used chemical carcinogens and how genetic background influences the extent of disease. We will also describe the general features of lesions formed in response to carcinogen treatment, including the underlying molecular aberrations and how these changes may relate to the pathogenesis of human colorectal cancer. PMID:19037092

  5. Nucleotide excision repair deficient mouse models and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Niedernhofer, Laura J

    2008-07-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a highly conserved mechanism to remove helix-distorting DNA base damage. A major substrate for NER is DNA damage caused by environmental genotoxins, most notably ultraviolet radiation. Xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy are three human diseases caused by inherited defects in NER. The symptoms and severity of these diseases vary dramatically, ranging from profound developmental delay to cancer predisposition and accelerated aging. All three syndromes include neurological disease, indicating an important role for NER in protecting against spontaneous DNA damage as well. To study the pathophysiology caused by DNA damage, numerous mouse models of NER-deficiency were generated by knocking-out genes required for NER or knocking-in disease-causing human mutations. This review explores the utility of these mouse models to study neurological disease caused by NER-deficiency. PMID:18272436

  6. CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing in Caenorhabditis elegans: Evaluation of Templates for Homology-Mediated Repair and Knock-Ins by Homology-Independent DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Katic, Iskra; Xu, Lan; Ciosk, Rafal

    2015-08-01

    Precise genome editing by the Cas9 nuclease depends on exogenously provided templates for homologous recombination. Here, we compare oligonucleotides with short homology and circular DNA molecules with extensive homology to genomic targets as templates for homology-based repair of CRISPR/Cas9 induced double-strand breaks. We find oligonucleotides to be templates of choice for introducing small sequence changes into the genome based on editing efficiency and ease of use. We show that polarity of oligonucleotide templates greatly affects repair efficiency: oligonucleotides in the sense orientation with respect to the target gene are better templates. In addition, combining a gene loss-of-function phenotype screen with detection of integrated fluorescent markers, we demonstrate that targeted knock-ins in Caenorhabditis elegans also can be achieved by homology-independent repair. PMID:26044730

  7. CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing in Caenorhabditis elegans: Evaluation of Templates for Homology-Mediated Repair and Knock-Ins by Homology-Independent DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Katic, Iskra; Xu, Lan; Ciosk, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Precise genome editing by the Cas9 nuclease depends on exogenously provided templates for homologous recombination. Here, we compare oligonucleotides with short homology and circular DNA molecules with extensive homology to genomic targets as templates for homology-based repair of CRISPR/Cas9 induced double-strand breaks. We find oligonucleotides to be templates of choice for introducing small sequence changes into the genome based on editing efficiency and ease of use. We show that polarity of oligonucleotide templates greatly affects repair efficiency: oligonucleotides in the sense orientation with respect to the target gene are better templates. In addition, combining a gene loss-of-function phenotype screen with detection of integrated fluorescent markers, we demonstrate that targeted knock-ins in Caenorhabditis elegans also can be achieved by homology-independent repair. PMID:26044730

  8. A knock-in model of human epilepsy in Drosophila reveals a novel cellular mechanism associated with heat-induced seizure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lei; Gilligan, Jeff; Staber, Cynthia; Schutte, Ryan J.; Nguyen, Vivian; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Reenan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Over 40 missense mutations in the human SCN1A sodium channel gene are linked to an epilepsy syndrome termed genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Inheritance of GEFS+ is dominant but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report knock-in of a GEFS+ SCN1A mutation (K1270T) into the Drosophila sodium channel gene, para, causes a semi-dominant temperature-induced seizure phenotype. Electrophysiological studies of GABAergic interneurons in the brains of adult GEFS+ flies reveal a novel cellular mechanism underlying heat-induced seizures: the deactivation threshold for persistent sodium currents reversibly shifts to a more negative voltage when the temperature is elevated. This leads to sustained depolarizations in GABAergic neurons and reduced inhibitory activity in the central nervous system. Further, our data indicate a natural temperature-dependent shift in sodium current deactivation (exacerbated by mutation) may contribute to febrile seizures in GEFS+ and perhaps normal individuals. PMID:23055484

  9. Striatal Synaptosomes from Hdh140Q/140Q Knock-in Mice have Altered Protein Levels, Novel Sites of Methionine Oxidation, and Excess Glutamate Release after Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Antonio; Sapp, Ellen; Kimm, Jeffrey S.; McClory, Hollis; Ansong, Kwadwo A.; Yohrling, George; Kwak, Seung; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Green, Karin M.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Aronin, Neil; DiFiglia, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Synaptic connections are disrupted in patients with Huntington’s disease (HD). Synaptosomes from postmortem brain are ideal for synaptic function studies because they are enriched in pre- and post-synaptic proteins important in vesicle fusion, vesicle release, and neurotransmitter receptor activation. Objective: To examine striatal synaptosomes from 3, 6 and 12 month old WT and Hdh140Q/140Q knock-in mice for levels of synaptic proteins, methionine oxidation, and glutamate release. Methods: We used Western blot analysis, glutamate release assays, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results: Striatal synaptosomes of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice had less DARPP32, syntaxin 1 and calmodulin compared to WT. Striatal synaptosomes of 12 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice had lower levels of DARPP32, alpha actinin, HAP40, Na+/K+-ATPase, PSD95, SNAP-25, TrkA and VAMP1, VGlut1 and VGlut2, increased levels of VAMP2, and modifications in actin and calmodulin compared to WT. More glutamate released from vesicles of depolarized striatal synaptosomes of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q than from age matched WT mice but there was no difference in glutamate release in synaptosomes of 3 and 12 month old WT and Hdh140Q/140Q mice. LC-MS/MS of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice striatal synaptosomes revealed that about 4% of total proteins detected (>600 detected) had novel sites of methionine oxidation including proteins involved with vesicle fusion, trafficking, and neurotransmitter function (synaptophysin, synapsin 2, syntaxin 1, calmodulin, cytoplasmic actin 2, neurofilament, and tubulin). Altered protein levels and novel methionine oxidations were also seen in cortical synaptosomes of 12 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice. Conclusions: Findings provide support for early synaptic dysfunction in Hdh140Q/140Q knock-in mice arising from altered protein levels, oxidative damage, and impaired glutamate neurotransmission and suggest that study of synaptosomes could be of

  10. Mouse genome engineering using designer nucleases.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Voytas, Daniel F; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific genome engineering open the possibility to perform rapid targeted genome modification in virtually any laboratory species without the need to rely on embryonic stem (ES) cell technology. A genome editing experiment typically starts with identification of designer nuclease target sites within a gene of interest followed by construction of custom DNA-binding domains to direct nuclease activity to the investigator-defined genomic locus. Designer nuclease plasmids are in vitro transcribed to generate mRNA for microinjection of fertilized mouse oocytes. Here, we provide a protocol for achieving targeted genome modification by direct injection of TALEN mRNA into fertilized mouse oocytes. PMID:24747757

  11. The R21C Mutation in Cardiac Troponin I Imposes Differences in Contractile Force Generation between the Left and Right Ventricles of Knock-In Mice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jingsheng; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Rojas, Ana I; Wang, Yingcai; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-linked R21C (arginine to cysteine) mutation in human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) on the contractile properties and myofilament protein phosphorylation in papillary muscle preparations from left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles of homozygous R21C(+/+) knock-in mice. The maximal steady-state force was significantly reduced in skinned papillary muscle strips from the LV compared to RV, with the latter displaying the level of force observed in LV or RV from wild-type (WT) mice. There were no differences in the Ca(2+) sensitivity between the RV and LV of R21C(+/+) mice; however, the Ca(2+) sensitivity of force was higher in RV-R21C(+/+) compared with RV-WT and lower in LV- R21C(+/+) compared with LV-WT. We also observed partial loss of Ca(2+) regulation at low [Ca(2+)]. In addition, R21C(+/+)-KI hearts showed no Ser23/24-cTnI phosphorylation compared to LV or RV of WT mice. However, phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) was significantly higher in the RV versus LV of R21C(+/+) mice and versus LV and RV of WT mice. The difference in RLC phosphorylation between the ventricles of R21C(+/+) mice likely contributes to observed differences in contractile force and the lower tension monitored in the LV of HCM mice. PMID:25961037

  12. Generation of Knock-In Pigs Carrying Oct4-tdTomato Reporter through CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bentian; Ouyang, Zhen; Zhang, Quanjun; Fan, Nana; Liu, Zhaoming; Zhao, Yu; Yan, Quanmei; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Li, Li; Xin, Jige; Zeng, Yangzhi; Lai, Liangxue; Zou, Qingjian

    2016-01-01

    The porcine pluripotent cells that can generate germline chimeras have not been developed. The Oct4 promoter-based fluorescent reporter system, which can be used to monitor pluripotency, is an important tool to generate authentic porcine pluripotent cells. In this study, we established a porcine Oct4 reporter system, wherein the endogenous Oct4 promoter directly controls red fluorescent protein (RFP). 2A-tdTomato sequence was inserted to replace the stop codon of the porcine Oct4 gene by homogenous recombination (HR). Thus, the fluorescence can accurately show the activation of endogenous Oct4. Porcine fetal fibroblast (PFF) lines with knock-in (KI) of the tdTomato gene in the downstream of endogenous Oct4 promoter were achieved using the CRISPR/CAS9 system. Transgenic PFFs were used as donor cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Strong RFP expression was detected in the blastocysts and genital ridges of SCNT fetuses but not in other tissues. Two viable transgenic piglets were also produced by SCNT. Reprogramming of fibroblasts from the fetuses and piglets by another round of SCNT resulted in tdTomato reactivation in reconstructed blastocysts. Result indicated that a KI porcine reporter system to monitor the pluripotent status of cells was successfully developed. PMID:26756580

  13. FAAH genetic variation enhances fronto-amygdala function in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Dincheva, Iva; Drysdale, Andrew T; Hartley, Catherine A; Johnson, David C; Jing, Deqiang; King, Elizabeth C; Ra, Stephen; Gray, J Megan; Yang, Ruirong; DeGruccio, Ann Marie; Huang, Chienchun; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Glatt, Charles E; Hill, Matthew N; Casey, B J; Lee, Francis S

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species studies enable rapid translational discovery and produce the broadest impact when both mechanism and phenotype are consistent across organisms. We developed a knock-in mouse that biologically recapitulates a common human mutation in the gene for fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) (C385A; rs324420), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid anandamide. This common polymorphism impacts the expression and activity of FAAH, thereby increasing anandamide levels. Here, we show that the genetic knock-in mouse and human variant allele carriers exhibit parallel alterations in biochemisty, neurocircuitry and behaviour. Specifically, there is reduced FAAH expression associated with the variant allele that selectively enhances fronto-amygdala connectivity and fear extinction learning, and decreases anxiety-like behaviours. These results suggest a gain of function in fear regulation and may indicate for whom and for what anxiety symptoms FAAH inhibitors or exposure-based therapies will be most efficacious, bridging an important translational gap between the mouse and human. PMID:25731744

  14. FAAH genetic variation enhances fronto-amygdala function in mouse and human

    PubMed Central

    Dincheva, Iva; Drysdale, Andrew T.; Hartley, Catherine A.; Johnson, David C.; Jing, Deqiang; King, Elizabeth C.; Ra, Stephen; Gray, Megan; Yang, Ruirong; DeGruccio, Ann Marie; Huang, Chienchun; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Glatt, Charles E.; Hill, Matthew N.; Casey, B. J.; Lee, Francis S.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species studies enable rapid translational discovery and produce the broadest impact when both mechanism and phenotype are consistent across organisms. We developed a knock-in mouse that biologically recapitulates a common human mutation in the gene for fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) (C385A; rs324420), the primary catabolic enzyme for the endocannabinoid anandamide. This common polymorphism impacts the expression and activity of FAAH, thereby increasing anandamide levels. Here, we show that the genetic knock-in mouse and human variant allele carriers exhibit parallel alterations in biochemisty, neurocircuitry, and behavior. Specifically, there is reduced FAAH expression associated with the variant allele that selectively enhances fronto-amygdala connectivity and fear extinction learning, and decreases anxiety-like behaviors. These results suggest a gain-of-function in fear regulation and may indicate for whom and for what anxiety symptoms FAAH inhibitors or exposure-based therapies will be most efficacious, bridging an important translational gap between the mouse and human. PMID:25731744

  15. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein.

    PubMed

    Much, Christian; Auchynnikava, Tania; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O'Carroll, Dónal

    2016-06-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse. PMID:27254021

  16. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Much, Christian; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O’Carroll, Dónal

    2016-01-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse. PMID:27254021

  17. Electroporation enables the efficient mRNA delivery into the mouse zygotes and facilitates CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masakazu; Takemoto, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Recent use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has dramatically reduced the time required to produce mutant mice, but the involvement of a time-consuming microinjection step still hampers its application for high-throughput genetic analysis. Here we developed a simple, highly efficient, and large-scale genome editing method, in which the RNAs for the CRISPR/Cas9 system are electroporated into zygotes rather than microinjected. We used this method to perform single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (ssODN)-mediated knock-in in mouse embryos. This method facilitates large-scale genetic analysis in the mouse. PMID:26066060

  18. Decreased dopamine receptor 1 activity and impaired motor-skill transfer in Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Dang, Mai T.; Liu, Jun; Gandre, Jason R.; Kwon, Kelly; Yuen, Robert; Li, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a movement disorder caused by a trinucleotide deletion (ΔGAG) in DYT1 (TOR1A), corresponding to a glutamic acid loss in the C-terminal region of torsinA. Functional alterations in the basal ganglia circuits have been reported in both DYT1 dystonia patients and rodent models. Dyt1 ΔGAG heterozygous knock-in (KI) mice exhibit motor deficits and decreased striatal dopamine receptor 2 (D2R) binding activity, suggesting a malfunction of the indirect pathway. However, the role of the direct pathway in pathogenesis of dystonia is not yet clear. Here, we report that Dyt1 KI mice exhibit significantly decreased striatal dopamine receptor 1 (D1R) binding activity and D1R protein levels, suggesting the alteration of the direct pathway. The decreased D1R may be caused by translational or post-translational processes since Dyt1 KI mice had normal levels of striatal D1R mRNA and a normal number of striatal neurons expressing D1R. Levels of striatal ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, dopamine transporter, acetylcholine muscarinic M4 receptor and adenosine A2A receptor were not altered suggesting a specificity of affected polytopic membrane-associated proteins. Contribution of the direct pathway to motor-skill learning has been suggested in another pharmacological rat model injected with a D1R antagonist. In the present study, we developed a novel motor skill transfer test for mice and found deficits in Dyt1 KI mice. Further characterization of both the direct and the indirect pathways in Dyt1 KI mice will aid the development of novel therapeutic drugs. PMID:25451552

  19. Visualization of RelB expression and activation at the single-cell level during dendritic cell maturation in Relb-Venus knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Seki, Takao; Yamamoto, Mami; Taguchi, Yuu; Miyauchi, Maki; Akiyama, Nobuko; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Gohda, Jin; Akiyama, Taishin; Inoue, Jun-ichiro

    2015-12-01

    RelB is activated by the non-canonical NF-κB pathway, which is crucial for immunity by establishing lymphoid organogenesis and B-cell and dendritic cell (DC) maturation. To elucidate the mechanism of the RelB-mediated immune cell maturation, a precise understanding of the relationship between cell maturation and RelB expression and activation at the single-cell level is required. Therefore, we generated knock-in mice expressing a fusion protein between RelB and fluorescent protein (RelB-Venus) from the Relb locus. The Relb(Venus/Venus) mice developed without any abnormalities observed in the Relb(-/-) mice, allowing us to monitor RelB-Venus expression and nuclear localization as RelB expression and activation. Relb(Venus/Venus) DC analyses revealed that DCs consist of RelB(-), RelB(low) and RelB(high) populations. The RelB(high) population, which included mature DCs with projections, displayed RelB nuclear localization, whereas RelB in the RelB(low) population was in the cytoplasm. Although both the RelB(low) and RelB(-) populations barely showed projections, MHC II and co-stimulatory molecule expression were higher in the RelB(low) than in the RelB(-) splenic conventional DCs. Taken together, our results identify the RelB(low) population as a possible novel intermediate maturation stage of cDCs and the Relb(Venus/Venus) mice as a useful tool to analyse the dynamic regulation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway. PMID:26115685

  20. An Estrogen Receptor-α Knock-In Mutation Provides Evidence of Ligand-Independent Signaling and Allows Modulation of Ligand-Induced Pathways in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sinkevicius, Kerstin W.; Burdette, Joanna E.; Woloszyn, Karolina; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Hamilton, Katherine; Sugg, Sonia L.; Temple, Karla A.; Wondisford, Fredric E.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2008-01-01

    Estrogen-nonresponsive estrogen receptor-α (ERα) knock-in (ENERKI) mice were generated to distinguish between ligand-induced and ligand-independent ER-α actions in vivo. These mice have a mutation [glycine 525 to leucine (G525L)] in the ligand-binding domain of ERα, which significantly reduces ERα interaction with and response to endogenous estrogens, whereas not affecting growth factor activation of ligand-independent pathways. ENERKI mice had hypoplastic uterine tissues and rudimentary mammary gland ductal trees. Females were infertile due to anovulation, and their ovaries contained hemorrhagic cystic follicles because of chronically elevated levels of LH. The ENERKI phenotype confirmed that ligand-induced activation of ERα is crucial in the female reproductive tract and mammary gland development. Growth factor treatments induced uterine epithelial proliferation in ovariectomized ENERKI females, directly demonstrating that ERα ligand-independent pathways were active. In addition, the synthetic ERα selective agonist propyl pyrazole triol (PPT) and ER agonist diethylstilbestrol (DES) were still able to activate ligand-induced G525L ERα pathways in vitro. PPT treatments initiated at puberty stimulated ENERKI uterine development, whereas neonatal treatments were needed to restore mammary gland ductal elongation, indicating that neonatal ligand-induced ERα activation may prime mammary ducts to become more responsive to estrogens in adult tissues. This is a useful model for in vivo evaluation of ligand-induced ERα pathways and temporal patterns of response. DES did not stimulate an ENERKI uterotrophic response. Because ERβ may modulate ERα activation and have an antiproliferative function in the uterus, we hypothesize that ENERKI animals were particularly sensitive to DES-induced inhibition of ERα due to up-regulated uterine ERβ levels. PMID:18339713

  1. Iron deficiency drives an autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) phenotype in fibroblast growth factor-23 (Fgf23) knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Emily G; Yu, Xijie; Summers, Lelia J; Davis, Siobhan I; Fleet, James C; Allen, Matthew R; Robling, Alexander G; Stayrook, Keith R; Jideonwo, Victoria; Magers, Martin J; Garringer, Holly J; Vidal, Ruben; Chan, Rebecca J; Goodwin, Charles B; Hui, Siu L; Peacock, Munro; White, Kenneth E

    2011-11-15

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) is unique among the disorders involving Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) because individuals with R176Q/W and R179Q/W mutations in the FGF23 (176)RXXR(179)/S(180) proteolytic cleavage motif can cycle from unaffected status to delayed onset of disease. This onset may occur in physiological states associated with iron deficiency, including puberty and pregnancy. To test the role of iron status in development of the ADHR phenotype, WT and R176Q-Fgf23 knock-in (ADHR) mice were placed on control or low-iron diets. Both the WT and ADHR mice receiving low-iron diet had significantly elevated bone Fgf23 mRNA. WT mice on a low-iron diet maintained normal serum intact Fgf23 and phosphate metabolism, with elevated serum C-terminal Fgf23 fragments. In contrast, the ADHR mice on the low-iron diet had elevated intact and C-terminal Fgf23 with hypophosphatemic osteomalacia. We used in vitro iron chelation to isolate the effects of iron deficiency on Fgf23 expression. We found that iron chelation in vitro resulted in a significant increase in Fgf23 mRNA that was dependent upon Mapk. Thus, unlike other syndromes of elevated FGF23, our findings support the concept that late-onset ADHR is the product of gene-environment interactions whereby the combined presence of an Fgf23-stabilizing mutation and iron deficiency can lead to ADHR. PMID:22006328

  2. Knock-in/Knock-out (KIKO) vectors for rapid integration of large DNA sequences, including whole metabolic pathways, onto the Escherichia coli chromosome at well-characterised loci

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabolic engineering projects often require integration of multiple genes in order to control the desired phenotype. However, this often requires iterative rounds of engineering because many current insertion approaches are limited by the size of the DNA that can be transferred onto the chromosome. Consequently, construction of highly engineered strains is very time-consuming. A lack of well-characterised insertion loci is also problematic. Results A series of knock-in/knock-out (KIKO) vectors was constructed for integration of large DNA sequences onto the E. coli chromosome at well-defined loci. The KIKO plasmids target three nonessential genes/operons as insertion sites: arsB (an arsenite transporter); lacZ (β-galactosidase); and rbsA-rbsR (a ribose metabolism operon). Two homologous ‘arms’ target each insertion locus; insertion is mediated by λ Red recombinase through these arms. Between the arms is a multiple cloning site for the introduction of exogenous sequences and an antibiotic resistance marker (either chloramphenicol or kanamycin) for selection of positive recombinants. The resistance marker can subsequently be removed by flippase-mediated recombination. The insertion cassette is flanked by hairpin loops to isolate it from the effects of external transcription at the integration locus. To characterize each target locus, a xylanase reporter gene (xynA) was integrated onto the chromosomes of E. coli strains W and K-12 using the KIKO vectors. Expression levels varied between loci, with the arsB locus consistently showing the highest level of expression. To demonstrate the simultaneous use of all three loci in one strain, xynA, green fluorescent protein (gfp) and a sucrose catabolic operon (cscAKB) were introduced into lacZ, arsB and rbsAR respectively, and shown to be functional. Conclusions The KIKO plasmids are a useful tool for efficient integration of large DNA fragments (including multiple genes and pathways) into E. coli. Chromosomal

  3. Pressure Overload by Transverse Aortic Constriction Induces Maladaptive Hypertrophy in a Titin-Truncated Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qifeng; Kesteven, Scott; Wu, Jianxin; Aidery, Parwez; Gawaz, Meinrad; Gramlich, Michael; Feneley, Michael P; Harvey, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein titin (TTN) are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We have previously developed a mouse model that imitates a TTN truncation mutation we found in a large pedigree with DCM. While heterozygous Ttn knock-in mice do not display signs of heart failure under sedentary conditions, they recapitulate the human phenotype when exposed to the pharmacological stressor angiotensin II or isoproterenol. In this study we investigated the effects of pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in heterozygous (Het) Ttn knock-in mice. Two weeks after TAC, Het mice developed marked impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction (p < 0.05), while wild-type (WT) TAC mice did not. Het mice also trended toward increased ventricular end diastolic pressure and volume compared to WT littermates. We found an increase in histologically diffuse cardiac fibrosis in Het compared to WT in TAC mice. This study shows that a pattern of DCM can be induced by TAC-mediated pressure overload in a TTN-truncated mouse model. This model enlarges our arsenal of cardiac disease models, adding a valuable tool to understand cardiac pathophysiological remodeling processes and to develop therapeutic approaches to combat heart failure. PMID:26504781

  4. Pressure Overload by Transverse Aortic Constriction Induces Maladaptive Hypertrophy in a Titin-Truncated Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qifeng; Kesteven, Scott; Wu, Jianxin; Aidery, Parwez; Gawaz, Meinrad; Gramlich, Michael; Feneley, Michael P.; Harvey, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein titin (TTN) are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). We have previously developed a mouse model that imitates a TTN truncation mutation we found in a large pedigree with DCM. While heterozygous Ttn knock-in mice do not display signs of heart failure under sedentary conditions, they recapitulate the human phenotype when exposed to the pharmacological stressor angiotensin II or isoproterenol. In this study we investigated the effects of pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in heterozygous (Het) Ttn knock-in mice. Two weeks after TAC, Het mice developed marked impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction (p < 0.05), while wild-type (WT) TAC mice did not. Het mice also trended toward increased ventricular end diastolic pressure and volume compared to WT littermates. We found an increase in histologically diffuse cardiac fibrosis in Het compared to WT in TAC mice. This study shows that a pattern of DCM can be induced by TAC-mediated pressure overload in a TTN-truncated mouse model. This model enlarges our arsenal of cardiac disease models, adding a valuable tool to understand cardiac pathophysiological remodeling processes and to develop therapeutic approaches to combat heart failure. PMID:26504781

  5. Mouse Transient Global Ischemia Two-Vessel Occlusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Pontarelli, Fabrizio; Ofengeim, Dimitry; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Jonas, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Transient global ischemia in rodents induces delayed death of hippocampal CA1 neurons, as well as in some hilar neurons of the dentate gyrus, medium aspiny neurons of the striatum, pyramidal neurons in neocortical layers II, V and VI, and Purkinje neurons of the cerebellum. In contrast to focal ischemia that mimics regional stroke in humans, this model of global ischemia mimics the brain injury that occurs after human cardiac arrest. Early events include caspase activation, cleavage of anti-death Bcl-2 family proteins and large mitochondrial channel activity. Genetically engineered mice provide opportunities for study such as the knock-in mouse expressing a caspase-resistant form of Bcl-xL found to exhibit markedly reduced mitochondrial channel activity and reduced vulnerability to ischemia-induced neuronal death1. It is therefore relevant to adapt and develop a simple protocol for producing transient global ischemia in mouse2. The two-vessel occlusion model has been specifically developed to provide optimal outcomes in mouse and offers several advantages over the four-vessel occlusion model traditionally used in rat including the relative ease of the procedure as well as only a single day of surgery. However it should be noted that this procedure has a higher morbidity rate compared to other ischemia models as well as a higher degree of variability. These two disadvantages necessitate the use of a larger cohort of animals, which for many healthy breeding transgenic animals is a non-deterring factor.

  6. Id4 Marks Spermatogonial Stem Cells in the Mouse Testis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feng; Xu, Qing; Zhao, Danfeng; Degui Chen, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is a classic adult stems cell–dependent process, supported by the self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). However, the identification of SSCs and elucidation of their behaviors in undisturbed testis has long been a big challenge. Here, we generated a knock-in mouse model, Id4-2A-CreERT2-2A-tdTomato, which allowed us to mark Id4-expressing (Id4+) cells at different time points in situ and track their behaviors across distinct developmental stages during steady-state and regenerating spermatogenesis. We found that Id4+ cells continue to produce spermatogonia, spermatocytes and sperm in mouse testis, showing they are capable of self-renewal and have differentiation potential. Consistent with these findings, ablation of Id4+ cells in mice results in a loss of spermatogenesis. Furthermore, developmental fate mapping reveals that Id4+ SSCs originate from neonate Id4+ gonocytes. Therefore, our results indicate that Id4 marks spermatogonial stem cells in the mouse testis. PMID:26621350

  7. Connexin diversity in the heart: insights from transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Verheule, Sander; Kaese, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac conduction is mediated by gap junction channels that are formed by connexin (Cx) protein subunits. The connexin family of proteins consists of more than 20 members varying in their biophysical properties and ability to combine with other connexins into heteromeric gap junction channels. The mammalian heart shows regional differences both in connexin expression profile and in degree of electrical coupling. The latter reflects functional requirements for conduction velocity which needs to be low in the sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodes and high in the ventricular conduction system. Over the past 20 years knowledge of the biology of gap junction channels and their role in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias has increased enormously. This review focuses on the insights gained from transgenic mouse models. The mouse heart expresses Cx30, 30.2, 37, 40, 43, 45, and 46. For these connexins a variety of knock-outs, heart-specific knock-outs, conditional knock-outs, double knock-outs, knock-ins and overexpressors has been studied. We discuss the cardiac phenotype in these models and compare Cx expression between mice and men. Mouse models have enhanced our understanding of (patho)-physiological implications of Cx diversity in the heart. In principle connexin-specific modulation of electrical coupling in the heart represents an interesting treatment strategy for cardiac arrhythmias and conduction disorders. PMID:23818881

  8. Novel NG2-CreERT2 knock-in mice demonstrate heterogeneous differentiation potential of NG2 glia during development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenhui; Zhao, Na; Bai, Xianshu; Karram, Khalad; Trotter, Jacqueline; Goebbels, Sandra; Scheller, Anja; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2014-06-01

    NG2 (nerve/glia antigen-2) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein and also known as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4. In the parenchyma of the central nervous system, NG2-expressing (NG2(+) ) cells have been identified as a novel type of glia with a strong potential to generate oligodendrocytes (OLs) in the developing white matter. However, the differentiation potential of NG2 glia remained controversial, largely attributable to shortcomings of transgenic mouse models used for fate mapping. To minimize these restrictions and to more faithfully mimic the endogenous NG2 expression in vivo, we generated a mouse line in which the open reading frame of the tamoxifen-inducible form of the Cre DNA recombinase (CreERT2) was inserted into the NG2 locus by homologous recombination. Results from this novel mouse line demonstrate that at different developmental stages of the brain, NG2(+) cells either stayed as NG2 glia or differentiated into OLs during the whole life span. Interestingly, when Cre activity was induced at embryonic stages, a significant number of reporter(+) astrocytes could be detected in the gray matter after birth. However, in other brain regions, such as olfactory bulb, brain stem, and cerebellum, all of the NG2 glia was restricted to the OL lineage. In addition, tamoxifen-sensitive and NG2 gene locus-dependent gene recombination could be detected in a small, but persistent population of cortical NeuN(+) neurons starting from the second postnatal week. PMID:24578301

  9. Studies on the Q175 Knock-in Model of Huntington’s Disease Using Functional Imaging in Awake Mice: Evidence of Olfactory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Craig F.; Kulkarni, Praveen; Toddes, Steven; Yee, Jason; Kenkel, William; Nedelman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging in awake mice was used to identify differences in brain activity between wild-type, HETzQ175, and HOMzQ175 genotypes in response to the odor of almond. The study was designed to see how alterations in the huntingtin gene in a mouse model of Huntington’s disease would affect the perception and processing of almond odor, an evolutionarily conserved stimulus with high emotional and motivational valence. Moreover, the mice in this study were “odor naïve,” i.e., never having smelled almond or any nuts. Using a segmented, annotated MRI atlas of the mouse and computational analysis, 17 out of 116 brain regions were identified as responding differently to almond odor across genotypes. These regions included the glomerulus of the olfactory bulb, forebrain cortex, anterior cingulate, subiculum, and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and several areas of the hypothalamus. In many cases, these regions showed a gene-dose effect with HETzQ175 mice showing a reduction in brain activity from wild-type that is further reduced in HOMzQ175 mice. Conspicuously absent were any differences in brain activity in the caudate/putamen, thalamus, CA3, and CA1 of the hippocampus and much of the cortex. The glomerulus of the olfactory bulb in HOMzQ175 mice showed a reduced change in BOLD signal intensity in response to almond odor as compared to the other phenotypes suggesting a deficit in olfactory sensitivity. PMID:25071696

  10. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  11. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  12. Development and function of human innate immune cells in a humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rongvaux, Anthony; Willinger, Tim; Martinek, Jan; Strowig, Till; Gearty, Sofia V.; Teichmann, Lino L.; Saito, Yasuyuki; Marches, Florentina; Halene, Stephanie; Palucka, A. Karolina; Manz, Markus G.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Mice repopulated with human hematopoietic cells are a powerful tool for the study of human hematopoiesis and immune function in vivo. However, existing humanized mouse models are unable to support development of human innate immune cells, including myeloid cells and NK cells. Here we describe a mouse strain, called MI(S)TRG, in which human versions of four genes encoding cytokines important for innate immune cell development are knocked in to their respective mouse loci. The human cytokines support the development and function of monocytes/macrophages and natural killer cells derived from human fetal liver or adult CD34+ progenitor cells injected into the mice. Human macrophages infiltrated a human tumor xenograft in MI(S)TRG mice in a manner resembling that observed in tumors obtained from human patients. This humanized mouse model may be used to model the human immune system in scenarios of health and pathology, and may enable evaluation of therapeutic candidates in an in vivo setting relevant to human physiology. PMID:24633240

  13. Allele, phenotype and disease data at Mouse Genome Informatics: improving access and analysis.

    PubMed

    Bello, Susan M; Smith, Cynthia L; Eppig, Janan T

    2015-08-01

    A core part of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) resource is the collection of mouse mutations and the annotation phenotypes and diseases displayed by mice carrying these mutations. These data are integrated with the rest of data in MGI and exported to numerous other resources. The use of mouse phenotype data to drive translational research into human disease has expanded rapidly with the improvements in sequencing technology. MGI has implemented many improvements in allele and phenotype data annotation, search, and display to facilitate access to these data through multiple avenues. For example, the description of alleles has been modified to include more detailed categories of allele attributes. This allows improved discrimination between mutation types. Further, connections have been created between mutations involving multiple genes and each of the genes overlapping the mutation. This allows users to readily find all mutations affecting a gene and see all genes affected by a mutation. In a similar manner, the genes expressed by transgenic or knock-in alleles are now connected to these alleles. The advanced search forms and public reports have been updated to take advantage of these improvements. These search forms and reports are used by an expanding number of researchers to identify novel human disease genes and mouse models of human disease. PMID:26162703

  14. A Longitudinal Motor Characterisation of the HdhQ111 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yhnell, Emma; Dunnett, Stephen B.; Brooks, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Huntington’s disease (HD) is a rare, incurable neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion with the first exon of the huntingtin gene. Numerous knock-in mouse models are currently available for modelling HD. However, before their use in scientific research, these models must be characterised to determine their face and predictive validity as models of the disease and their reliability in recapitulating HD symptoms. Objective: Manifest HD is currently diagnosed upon the onset of motor symptoms, thus we sought to longitudinally characterise the progression and severity of motor signs in the HdhQ111 knock-in mouse model of HD, in heterozygous mice. Methods: An extensive battery of motor tests including: rotarod, inverted lid test, balance beam, spontaneous locomotor activity and gait analysis were applied longitudinally to a cohort of HdhQ111 heterozygous mice in order to progressively assess motor function. Results: A progressive failure to gain body weight was demonstrated from 11 months of age and motor problems in all measures of balance beam performance were shown in HdhQ111 heterozygous animals in comparison to wild type control animals from 9 months of age. A decreased latency to fall from the rotarod was demonstrated in HdhQ111 heterozygous animals in comparison to wild type animals, although this was not progressive with time. No genotype specific differences were demonstrated in any of the other motor tests included in the test battery. Conclusions: The HdhQ111 heterozygous mouse demonstrates a subtle and progressive motor phenotype that begins at 9 months of age. This mouse model represents an early disease stage and would be ideal for testing therapeutic strategies that require elongated lead-in times, such as viral gene therapies or striatal transplantation. PMID:27258586

  15. A Mouse Model for Imprinting of the Human Retinoblastoma Gene

    PubMed Central

    Tasiou, Vasiliki; Hiber, Michaela; Steenpass, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The human RB1 gene is imprinted due to integration of the PPP1R26P1 pseudogene into intron 2. PPP1R26P1 harbors the gametic differentially methylated region of the RB1 gene, CpG85, which is methylated in the female germ line. The paternally unmethylated CpG85 acts as promoter for the alternative transcript 2B of RB1, which interferes with expression of full-length RB1 in cis. In mice, PPP1R26P1 is not present in the Rb1 gene and Rb1 is not imprinted. Assuming that the mechanisms responsible for genomic imprinting are conserved, we investigated if imprinting of mouse Rb1 can be induced by transferring human PPP1R26P1 into mouse Rb1. We generated humanized Rb1_PPP1R26P1 knock-in mice that pass human PPP1R26P1 through the mouse germ line. We found that the function of unmethylated CpG85 as promoter for an alternative Rb1 transcript and as cis-repressor of the main Rb1 transcript is maintained in mouse tissues. However, CpG85 is not recognized as a gametic differentially methylated region in the mouse germ line. DNA methylation at CpG85 is acquired only in tissues of neuroectodermal origin, independent of parental transmission of PPP1R26P1. Absence of CpG85 methylation in oocytes and sperm implies a failure of imprint methylation establishment in the germ line. Our results indicate that site-specific integration of a proven human gametic differentially methylated region is not sufficient for acquisition of DNA methylation in the mouse germ line, even if promoter function of the element is maintained. This suggests a considerable dependency of DNA methylation induction on the surrounding sequence. However, our model is suited to determine the cellular function of the alternative Rb1 transcript. PMID:26275142

  16. Data describing Rax positive optic-vesicle generation from mouse embryonic stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takata, Nozomu; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sakakura, Eriko

    2016-09-01

    This article contains data related to the research article entitled "Specification of embryonic stem cell-derived tissues into eye fields by Wnt signaling using rostral diencephalic tissue-inducing culture" Sakakura (2016) [1]. Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) were used for the generation of optic vesicle-like tissues in vitro. In this article we described data in which a Rax::GFP knock-in ESC line was used to monitor the formation of optic tissues. In addition, we also described the data of regional marker expression of Rax, Sox2 and Pax6 in vivo around the forebrain and the eye tissues for comparative purposes. These data can be valuable to researchers interested in investigating forebrain and eye tissue development. PMID:27358906

  17. Isolation and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of Mouse Keratinocytes Expressing β-Galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Maria; Toftgård, Rune; Jaks, Viljar

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the rapid development of new transgenic and knock-in mouse models has propelled epidermal stem-cell research into "fast-forward mode". It has become possible to identify and visualize defined cell populations during normal tissue maintenance, and to follow their progeny during the processes of homeostasis, wound repair, and tumorigenesis. Moreover, these cells can be isolated using specific labels, and characterized in detail using an array of molecular and cell biology approaches. The bacterial enzyme, β-galactosidase (β-gal), the product of the LacZ gene, is one of the most commonly used in vivo cell labels in genetically-engineered mice. The protocol described in this chapter provides a guideline for the isolation of viable murine epidermal cells expressing β-gal, which can then be subjected to further characterization in vivo or in vitro. PMID:27431252

  18. Essential Role for Endogenous siRNAs during Meiosis in Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Paula; Rozhkov, Nikolay V.; Li, Fan; Cárdenas, Fabián L.; Davydenk, Olga; Vandivier, Lee E.; Gregory, Brian D.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Schultz, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The RNase III enzyme DICER generates both microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous short interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs). Both small RNA species silence gene expression post-transcriptionally in association with the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family of proteins. In mammals, there are four AGO proteins (AGO1-4), of which only AGO2 possesses endonucleolytic activity. siRNAs trigger endonucleolytic cleavage of target mRNAs, mediated by AGO2, whereas miRNAs cause translational repression and mRNA decay through association with any of the four AGO proteins. Dicer deletion in mouse oocytes leads to female infertility due to defects during meiosis I. Because mouse oocytes express both miRNAs and endo-siRNAs, this phenotype could be due to the absence of either class of small RNA, or both. However, we and others demonstrated that miRNA function is suppressed in mouse oocytes, which suggested that endo-siRNAs, not miRNAs, are essential for female meiosis. To determine if this was the case we generated mice that express a catalytically inactive knock-in allele of Ago2 (Ago2ADH) exclusively in oocytes and thereby disrupted the function of siRNAs. Oogenesis and hormonal response are normal in Ago2ADH oocytes, but meiotic maturation is impaired, with severe defects in spindle formation and chromosome alignment that lead to meiotic catastrophe. The transcriptome of these oocytes is widely perturbed and shows a highly significant correlation with the transcriptome of Dicer null and Ago2 null oocytes. Expression of the mouse transcript (MT), the most abundant transposable element in mouse oocytes, is increased. This study reveals that endo-siRNAs are essential during meiosis I in mouse females, demonstrating a role for endo-siRNAs in mammals. PMID:25695507

  19. The MOUSE Squad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a New York city after-school program started by MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a national nonprofit group that teaches students how to fix computers, and equips them with the communication and problem-solving skills to help them in the working world. The MOUSE program is part of a trend…

  20. Mouse genome database 2016.

    PubMed

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  1. Mouse genome database 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bult, Carol J.; Eppig, Janan T.; Blake, Judith A.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data. PMID:26578600

  2. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bøttger, Pernille; Glerup, Simon; Gesslein, Bodil; Illarionova, Nina B; Isaksen, Toke J; Heuck, Anders; Clausen, Bettina H; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Gramsbergen, Jan B; Gunnarson, Eli; Aperia, Anita; Lauritzen, Martin; Lambertsen, Kate L; Nissen, Poul; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments and psychiatric manifestations, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). FHM2 disease-mutations locate to the ATP1A2 gene encoding the astrocyte-located α2-isoform of the sodium-potassium pump (α2Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase). We show that knock-in mice heterozygous for the FHM2-associated G301R-mutation (α2(+/G301R)) phenocopy several FHM2-relevant disease traits e.g., by mimicking mood depression and OCD. In vitro studies showed impaired glutamate uptake in hippocampal mixed astrocyte-neuron cultures from α2(G301R/G301R) E17 embryonic mice, and moreover, induction of cortical spreading depression (CSD) resulted in reduced recovery in α2(+/G301R) male mice. Moreover, NMDA-type glutamate receptor antagonists or progestin-only treatment reverted specific α2(+/G301R) behavioral phenotypes. Our findings demonstrate that studies of an in vivo relevant FHM2 disease knock-in mouse model provide a link between the female sex hormone cycle and the glutamate system and a link to co-morbid psychiatric manifestations of FHM2. PMID:26911348

  3. Glutamate-system defects behind psychiatric manifestations in a familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 disease-mutation mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bøttger, Pernille; Glerup, Simon; Gesslein, Bodil; Illarionova, Nina B.; Isaksen, Toke J.; Heuck, Anders; Clausen, Bettina H.; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Gramsbergen, Jan B.; Gunnarson, Eli; Aperia, Anita; Lauritzen, Martin; Lambertsen, Kate L.; Nissen, Poul; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a complex brain disorder, and understanding the complexity of this prevalent disease could improve quality of life for millions of people. Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) is a subtype of migraine with aura and co-morbidities like epilepsy/seizures, cognitive impairments and psychiatric manifestations, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). FHM2 disease-mutations locate to the ATP1A2 gene encoding the astrocyte-located α2-isoform of the sodium-potassium pump (α2Na+/K+-ATPase). We show that knock-in mice heterozygous for the FHM2-associated G301R-mutation (α2+/G301R) phenocopy several FHM2-relevant disease traits e.g., by mimicking mood depression and OCD. In vitro studies showed impaired glutamate uptake in hippocampal mixed astrocyte-neuron cultures from α2G301R/G301R E17 embryonic mice, and moreover, induction of cortical spreading depression (CSD) resulted in reduced recovery in α2+/G301R male mice. Moreover, NMDA-type glutamate receptor antagonists or progestin-only treatment reverted specific α2+/G301R behavioral phenotypes. Our findings demonstrate that studies of an in vivo relevant FHM2 disease knock-in mouse model provide a link between the female sex hormone cycle and the glutamate system and a link to co-morbid psychiatric manifestations of FHM2. PMID:26911348

  4. Conditional Gene Targeting in Mouse High Endothelial Venules

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Hiroto; Hirakawa, Jotaro; Tobisawa, Yuki; Fukuda, Minoru; Saga, Yumiko

    2009-01-01

    High endothelial venules (HEVs) are specialized blood vessels of secondary lymphoid organs composed of endothelial cells with a characteristic cuboidal morphology. Lymphocytes selectively adhere to and migrate across HEVs to initiate immune responses. In this study, we established a novel transgenic mouse line expressing Cre recombinase under the transcriptional control of the gene encoding HEV-expressed sulfotransferase, N-acetylglucosamine-6-O-sulfotransferase 2 (GlcNAc6ST-2), using bacterial artificial chromosome recombineering. Crossing these transgenic mice with the ROSA26 reporter strain, which expresses lacZ following Cre-mediated recombination, and staining the resulting progeny with 5-bromo-4-chloro-5-indolyl-β-D-galactoside indicated that Cre recombinase was specifically expressed in mAb MECA79-reactive HEVs in secondary lymphoid organs but not in any other blood vessels of the transgenic mice. The expression of Cre recombinase correlated with a developmental switch, from immature, mAb MECA367-reactive HEVs to mature, mAb MECA79-reactive HEVs in neonatal lymph nodes. In addition to the HEVs, Cre recombinase was also strongly expressed in the colonic villi, which recapitulated the intrinsic expression of GlcNAc6ST-2 as confirmed in GlcNAc6ST-2GFP/GFP knock-in mice and by RT-PCR. Furthermore, treatment with an antimicrobial agent revealed that the colonic expression of Cre recombinase in the transgenic mice was regulated by commensal bacteria in the colon. In addition, Cre recombinase was expressed in a small subset of cells in the brain, testis, stomach, small intestine, and lung. In view of the restricted expression of Cre recombinase, this transgenic mouse line should be useful for elucidating tissue-specific gene functions using the Cre/loxP system. PMID:19380794

  5. Mouse Cleaning Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The method of using the mouse pad cleaning apparatus is disclosed and claimed. The method comprises the steps of uncovering the mouse cleaning surface, applying the mouse and ball of the mouse to the cleaning surface, moving the mouse in a rotational pattern on the mouse cleaning surface, removing the mouse form the mouse cleaning surface, washing the cleaning surface, and covering the mouse cleaning surface. A mouse pad cleaning apparatus comprising a plurality of substrates, each said substrate having adhesive thereon, said plurality of substrates residing in and affixed to a receptacle. A single substrate having adhesive, which may be washable or non-washable, thereon may be employed. The washable adhesive may be an organopolysiloxane or gelatinous elastomer.

  6. Practical Application of Microelectroporation into Developing Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogori, Tomomi; Ogawa, Masaharu

    One key approach toward understanding the genetic mechanisms underlying embryonic development involves the overexpression or misexpression of target genes in specific regions and at specific time points. The mouse gene-knockout system has been used extensively for loss-of-function studies due to the availability of a large number of mutant lines and the technical advantages of this system. In contrast, gain-of-function analyses have been performed through the production of knock-in and transgenic animals and with the use of various viruses (Cornetta 2006; Jakobsson et al., 2003; Hashimoto and Mikoshiba, 2004). However, it is not always possible to express or suppress genes in a spatially and temporally restricted manner, and the generation of genetically modified mice and recombinant viruses is time consuming and labor intensive. With the aim of solving these problems, many attempts have been made to apply the electroporation technique in research on developmental biology. Due to the accessibility of the avian embryo, it has been used as a classic model system for the study of developmental events in vertebrates. A novel technique for successful gene delivery into chick embryos has been established; this technique is known as in ovo electroporation and appears to be an excellent method, permitting quick and direct examination of the function of the delivered genes (Muramatsu et al., 1997; Itasaki et al., 1999; Momose et al., 1999; Nakamura et al., 2000; Yasuda et al., 2000). It seems that this technique can be adapted to the mouse embryo and would permit more rapid functional analysis of genes than is achieved by the generation of knockout or transgenic mouse lines. However, the inaccessibility of embryos in the mammalian uterus renders in utero manipulations targeting precise regions difficult or impossible at most stages of development. Efforts have been undertaken by various researchers to establish an in utero electroporation system, and there have been several

  7. ROMK expression remains unaltered in a mouse model of familial hyperkalemic hypertension caused by the CUL3Δ403-459 mutation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Meena; Kurz, Thimo; O'Shaughnessy, Kevin M

    2016-07-01

    Familial hyperkalemic hypertension (FHHt) is a rare inherited form of salt-dependent hypertension caused by mutations in proteins that regulate the renal Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter NCC Mutations in four genes have been reported to cause FHHt including CUL3 (Cullin3) that encodes a component of a RING E3 ligase. Cullin-3 binds to WNK kinase-bound KLHL3 (the substrate recognition subunit of the ubiquitin ligase complex) to promote ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of WNK kinases. Deletion of exon 9 from CUL3 (affecting residues 403-459, CUL3(Δ403-459)) causes a severe form of FHHt (PHA2E) that is recapitulated closely in a knock-in mouse model. The loss of functionality of CUL3(Δ403-459) and secondary accumulation of WNK kinases causes substantial NCC activation. This accounts for the hypertension in FHHt but the origin of the hyperkalemia is less clear. Hence, we explored the impact of CUL3(Δ403-459) on expression of the distal secretory K channel, ROMK, both in vitro and in vivo. We found that expressing wild-type but not the CUL3(Δ403-459) mutant form of CUL3 prevented the suppression of ROMK currents by WNK4 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The mutant CUL3 protein was also unable to affect ROMK-EGFP protein expression at the surface of mouse M-1 cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. The effects of CUL3 on ROMK expression in both oocytes and M-1 CCD cells was reduced by addition of the neddylation inhibitor, MLN4924. This confirms that neddylation is important for CUL3 activity. Nevertheless, in our knock-in mouse model expressing CUL3(Δ403-459) we could not show any alteration in ROMK expression by either western blotting whole kidney lysates or confocal microscopy of kidney sections. This suggests that the hyperkalemia in our knock-in mouse and human PHA2E subjects with the CUL3(Δ403-459) mutation is not caused by reduced ROMK expression in the distal nephron. PMID:27378813

  8. Knocking in the Otto-cycle Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinhart, H

    1939-01-01

    Engine knock is, as is known, preceded by normal burning of the first part of the charge, and only the part burned last (residual charge), knocks. The aim of the present measurements was, first, to reexamine the combustion form in this residual charge, because of the absence of uniform and frequently contradictory results in the very extensive literature on the subject. On top of that, an attempt was to be made to gain a deeper insight into the mechanism accompanying the combustion process, by means of the electrical test equipment perfected in recent years.

  9. 4-aminopyridine reverses ataxia and cerebellar firing deficiency in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6

    PubMed Central

    Jayabal, Sriram; Chang, Hui Ho Vanessa; Cullen, Kathleen E.; Watt, Alanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a devastating midlife-onset autosomal dominant motor control disease with no known treatment. Using a hyper-expanded polyglutamine (84Q) knock-in mouse, we found that cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision was degraded in heterozygous (SCA684Q/+) mice at 19 months when motor deficits are observed. Similar alterations in firing precision and motor control were observed at disease onset at 7 months in homozygous (SCA684Q/84Q) mice, as well as a reduction in firing rate. We further found that chronic administration of the FDA-approved drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which targets potassium channels, alleviated motor coordination deficits and restored cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision to wildtype (WT) levels in SCA684Q/84Q mice both in acute slices and in vivo. These results provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating ataxic symptoms associated with SCA6. PMID:27381005

  10. 4-aminopyridine reverses ataxia and cerebellar firing deficiency in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6.

    PubMed

    Jayabal, Sriram; Chang, Hui Ho Vanessa; Cullen, Kathleen E; Watt, Alanna J

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is a devastating midlife-onset autosomal dominant motor control disease with no known treatment. Using a hyper-expanded polyglutamine (84Q) knock-in mouse, we found that cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision was degraded in heterozygous (SCA6(84Q/+)) mice at 19 months when motor deficits are observed. Similar alterations in firing precision and motor control were observed at disease onset at 7 months in homozygous (SCA6(84Q/84Q)) mice, as well as a reduction in firing rate. We further found that chronic administration of the FDA-approved drug 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which targets potassium channels, alleviated motor coordination deficits and restored cerebellar Purkinje cell firing precision to wildtype (WT) levels in SCA6(84Q/84Q) mice both in acute slices and in vivo. These results provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating ataxic symptoms associated with SCA6. PMID:27381005

  11. Neurocognitive endophenotypes in CGG KI and Fmr1 KO mouse models of Fragile X-Associated disorders: an analysis of the state of the field

    PubMed Central

    Hunsaker, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    It has become increasingly important that the field of behavioral genetics identifies not only the gross behavioral phenotypes associated with a given mutation, but also the behavioral endophenotypes that scale with the dosage of the particular mutation being studied. Over the past few years, studies evaluating the effects of the polymorphic CGG trinucleotide repeat on the FMR1 gene underlying Fragile X-Associated Disorders have reported preliminary evidence for a behavioral endophenotype in human Fragile X Premutation carrier populations as well as the CGG knock-in (KI) mouse model. More recently, the behavioral experiments used to test the CGG KI mouse model have been extended to the Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mouse model. When combined, these data provide compelling evidence for a clear neurocognitive endophenotype in the mouse models of Fragile X-Associated Disorders such that behavioral deficits scale predictably with genetic dosage. Similarly, it appears that the CGG KI mouse effectively models the histopathology in Fragile X-Associated Disorders across CGG repeats well into the full mutation range, resulting in a reliable histopathological endophenotype. These endophenotypes may influence future research directions into treatment strategies for not only Fragile X Syndrome, but also the Fragile X Premutation and Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS). PMID:24627796

  12. TALEN/CRISPR-mediated eGFP knock-in add-on at the OCT4 locus does not impact differentiation of human embryonic stem cells towards endoderm.

    PubMed

    Krentz, Nicole A J; Nian, Cuilan; Lynn, Francis C

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have great promise as a source of unlimited transplantable cells for regenerative medicine. However, current progress on producing the desired cell type for disease treatment has been limited due to an insufficient understanding of the developmental processes that govern their differentiation, as well as a paucity of tools to systematically study differentiation in the lab. In order to overcome these limitations, cell-type reporter hESC lines will be required. Here we outline two strategies using Transcription Activator Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-Associated protein (Cas) to create OCT4-eGFP knock-in add-on hESC lines. Thirty-one and forty-seven percent of clones were correctly modified using the TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 systems, respectively. Further analysis of three correctly targeted clones demonstrated that the insertion of eGFP in-frame with OCT4 neither significantly impacted expression from the wild type allele nor did the fusion protein have a dramatically different biological stability. Importantly, the OCT4-eGFP fusion was easily detected using microscopy, flow cytometry and western blotting. The OCT4 reporter lines remained equally competent at producing CXCR4+ definitive endoderm that expressed a panel of endodermal genes. Moreover, the genomic modification did not impact the formation of NKX6.1+/SOX9+ pancreatic progenitor cells following directed differentiation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate for the first time that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used to modify OCT4 and highlight the feasibility of creating cell-type specific reporter hESC lines utilizing genome-editing tools that facilitate homologous recombination. PMID:25474420

  13. In Vivo Interaction of Steroid Receptor Coactivator (SRC)-1 and the Activation Function-2 Domain of the Thyroid Hormone Receptor (TR) β in TRβ E457A Knock-In and SRC-1 Knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Manuela; Goodwin, Charles; Liao, XiaoHui; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania; Machado, Danielle S.; Wondisford, Fredric E.; Refetoff, Samuel; Weiss, Roy E.

    2009-01-01

    The activation function-2 (AF-2) domain of the thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR)-β is a TH-dependent binding site for nuclear coactivators (NCoA), which modulate TH-dependent gene transcription. In contrast, the putative AF-1 domain is a TH-independent region interacting with NCoA. We determined the specificity of the AF-2 domain and NCoA interaction by evaluating thyroid function in mice with combined disruption of the AF-2 domain in TRβ, due to a point mutation (E457A), and deletion of one of the NCoAs, steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1. The E457A mutation was chosen because it abolishes NCoA recruitment in vitro while preserving normal TH binding and corepressor interactions resulting in resistance to TH. At baseline, disruption of SRC-1 in the homozygous knock-in (TRβE457A/E457A) mice worsened the degree of resistance to TH, resulting in increased serum T4 and TSH. During TH deprivation, disruption of AF-2 and SRC-1 resulted in a TSH rise 50% of what was seen when AF-2 alone was removed, suggesting that SRC-1 was interacting outside of the AF-2 domain. Therefore, 1) during TH deprivation, SRC-1 is necessary for activating the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis; 2) ligand-dependent repression of TSH requires an intact AF-2; and 3) SRC-1 may interact with the another region of the TRβ or the TRα to regulate TH action in the pituitary. This report demonstrates the dual interaction of NCoA in vivo: the TH-independent up-regulation possibly through another domain and TH-dependent down-regulation through the AF-2 domain. PMID:19406944

  14. In vivo interaction of steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1 and the activation function-2 domain of the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta in TRbeta E457A knock-in and SRC-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Manuela; Goodwin, Charles; Liao, Xiaohui; Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania; Machado, Danielle S; Wondisford, Fredric E; Refetoff, Samuel; Weiss, Roy E

    2009-08-01

    The activation function-2 (AF-2) domain of the thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR)-beta is a TH-dependent binding site for nuclear coactivators (NCoA), which modulate TH-dependent gene transcription. In contrast, the putative AF-1 domain is a TH-independent region interacting with NCoA. We determined the specificity of the AF-2 domain and NCoA interaction by evaluating thyroid function in mice with combined disruption of the AF-2 domain in TRbeta, due to a point mutation (E457A), and deletion of one of the NCoAs, steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1. The E457A mutation was chosen because it abolishes NCoA recruitment in vitro while preserving normal TH binding and corepressor interactions resulting in resistance to TH. At baseline, disruption of SRC-1 in the homozygous knock-in (TRbeta(E457A/E457A)) mice worsened the degree of resistance to TH, resulting in increased serum T(4) and TSH. During TH deprivation, disruption of AF-2 and SRC-1 resulted in a TSH rise 50% of what was seen when AF-2 alone was removed, suggesting that SRC-1 was interacting outside of the AF-2 domain. Therefore, 1) during TH deprivation, SRC-1 is necessary for activating the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis; 2) ligand-dependent repression of TSH requires an intact AF-2; and 3) SRC-1 may interact with the another region of the TRbeta or the TRalpha to regulate TH action in the pituitary. This report demonstrates the dual interaction of NCoA in vivo: the TH-independent up-regulation possibly through another domain and TH-dependent down-regulation through the AF-2 domain. PMID:19406944

  15. A mouse model of human congenital heart disease: high incidence of diverse cardiac anomalies and ventricular noncompaction produced by heterozygous Nkx2-5 homeodomain missense mutation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eileen I.; Terada, Ryota; Ryan, Nicole J.; Briggs, Laura E.; Chowdhury, Rajib; Zárate, Miguel A.; Sugi, Yukiko; Nam, Hyun-Joo; Benson, D. Woodrow; Anderson, Robert H.; Kasahara, Hideko

    2014-01-01

    Background Heterozygous human mutations of NKX2-5 are highly penetrant and associated with varied congenital heart defects. The heterozygous knockout of murine Nkx2-5, in contrast, manifests less profound cardiac malformations, with low disease penetrance. We sought to study this apparent discrepancy between human and mouse genetics. Since missense mutations in the NKX2-5 homeodomain (DNA binding domain) are the most frequently reported type of human mutation, we replicated this genetic defect in a murine knock-in model. Methods and Results We generated a murine model in a 129/Sv genetic background by knocking-in an Nkx2-5 homeodomain missense mutation previously identified in humans. The mutation was located at homeodomain position 52Arg→Gly (R52G). All the heterozygous neonatal Nkx2-5+/R52G mice demonstrated a prominent trabecular layer in the ventricular wall, so called noncompaction, along with diverse cardiac anomalies, including atrioventricular septal defects, Ebstein’s malformation of the tricuspid valve, and perimembranous and/or muscular ventricular septal defects. In addition, P10 Nkx2-5+/R52G mice demonstrated atrial septal anomalies, with significant increase in the size of the inter-atrial communication and fossa ovalis, and decrease in the length of the flap valve compared to control Nkx2-5+/+ or Nkx2-5+/− mice. Conclusion The results of our study demonstrate that heterozygous missense mutation in the murine Nkx2-5 homeodomain (R52G) are highly penetrant, and result in pleiotropic cardiac effects. Thus, in contrast to heterozygous Nkx2-5 knockout mice, the effects of the heterozygous knock-in mimic findings in humans with heterozygous missense mutation in NKX2-5 homeodomain. PMID:25028484

  16. Increased Susceptibility to Cortical Spreading Depression in the Mouse Model of Familial Hemiplegic Migraine Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Virginia; De Fusco, Maurizio; Pietrobon, Daniela; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Casari, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 2 (FHM2) is an autosomal dominant form of migraine with aura that is caused by mutations of the α2-subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, an isoform almost exclusively expressed in astrocytes in the adult brain. We generated the first FHM2 knock-in mouse model carrying the human W887R mutation in the Atp1a2 orthologous gene. Homozygous Atp1a2R887/R887 mutants died just after birth, while heterozygous Atp1a2+/R887 mice showed no apparent clinical phenotype. The mutant α2 Na,K-ATPase protein was barely detectable in the brain of homozygous mutants and strongly reduced in the brain of heterozygous mutants, likely as a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum retention and subsequent proteasomal degradation, as we demonstrate in transfected cells. In vivo analysis of cortical spreading depression (CSD), the phenomenon underlying migraine aura, revealed a decreased induction threshold and an increased velocity of propagation in the heterozygous FHM2 mouse. Since several lines of evidence involve a specific role of the glial α2 Na,K pump in active reuptake of glutamate from the synaptic cleft, we hypothesize that CSD facilitation in the FHM2 mouse model is sustained by inefficient glutamate clearance by astrocytes and consequent increased cortical excitatory neurotransmission. The demonstration that FHM2 and FHM1 mutations share the ability to facilitate induction and propagation of CSD in mouse models further support the role of CSD as a key migraine trigger. PMID:21731499

  17. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  18. Role of FGF/FGFR signaling in skeletal development and homeostasis: learning from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nan; Jin, Min; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling plays essential roles in bone development and diseases. Missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs in humans can cause various congenital bone diseases, including chondrodysplasia syndromes, craniosynostosis syndromes and syndromes with dysregulated phosphate metabolism. FGF/FGFR signaling is also an important pathway involved in the maintenance of adult bone homeostasis. Multiple kinds of mouse models, mimicking human skeleton diseases caused by missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs, have been established by knock-in/out and transgenic technologies. These genetically modified mice provide good models for studying the role of FGF/FGFR signaling in skeleton development and homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the mouse models of FGF signaling-related skeleton diseases and recent progresses regarding the molecular mechanisms, underlying the role of FGFs/FGFRs in the regulation of bone development and homeostasis. This review also provides a perspective view on future works to explore the roles of FGF signaling in skeletal development and homeostasis. PMID:26273516

  19. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors in a mouse model by targeted mutation of the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Gunhild; Agosti, Valter; Ehlers, Imke; Rossi, Ferdinand; Corbacioglu, Selim; Farkas, Judith; Moore, Malcolm; Manova, Katia; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Besmer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Oncogenic Kit mutations are found in somatic gastrointestinal (GI) stromal tumors (GISTs) and mastocytosis. A mouse model for the study of constitutive activation of Kit in oncogenesis has been produced by a knock-in strategy introducing a Kit exon 11-activating mutation into the mouse genome based on a mutation found in a case of human familial GIST syndrome. Heterozygous mutant KitV558Δ/+ mice develop symptoms of disease and eventually die from pathology in the GI tract. Patchy hyperplasia of Kit-positive cells is evident within the myenteric plexus of the entire GI tract. Neoplastic lesions indistinguishable from human GISTs were observed in the cecum of the mutant mice with high penetrance. In addition, mast cell numbers in the dorsal skin were increased. Therefore KitV558Δ/+ mice reproduce human familial GISTs, and they may be used as a model for the study of the role and mechanisms of Kit in neoplasia. Importantly, these results demonstrate that constitutive Kit signaling is critical and sufficient for induction of GIST and hyperplasia of interstitial cells of Cajal. PMID:12754375

  20. Distinct functions and regulation of epithelial progesterone receptor in the mouse cervix, vagina, and uterus.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Fabiola F; Son, Jieun; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Jang, Eunjung; Lydon, John P; Korach, Kenneth S; Chung, Sang-Hyuk

    2016-04-01

    While the function of progesterone receptor (PR) has been studied in the mouse vagina and uterus, its regulation and function in the cervix has not been described. We selectively deleted epithelial PR in the female reproductive tracts using the Cre/LoxP recombination system. We found that epithelial PR was required for induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation by progesterone (P4) in the cervical and vaginal epithelium. We also found that epithelial PR was dispensable for P4 to suppress apoptosis and proliferation in the uterine epithelium. PR is encoded by the Pgr gene, which is regulated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) in the female reproductive tracts. Using knock-in mouse models expressing ERα mutants, we determined that the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and AF2 domain of ERα were required for upregulation of Pgr in the cervix and vagina as well as the uterine stroma. The ERα AF1 domain was required for upregulation of Pgr in the vaginal stroma and epithelium and cervical epithelium, but not in the uterine and cervical stroma. ERα DBD, AF1, and AF2 were required for suppression of Pgr in the uterine epithelium, which was mediated by stromal ERα. Epithelial ERα was responsible for upregulation of epithelial Pgr in the cervix and vagina. Our results indicate that regulation and functions of epithelial PR are different in the cervix, vagina, and uterus. PMID:27007157

  1. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  2. Expression atlas of the multivalent epigenetic regulator Brpf1 and its requirement for survival of mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    You, Linya; Chen, Lulu; Penney, Janice; Miao, Dengshun; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a unique epigenetic regulator that contains multiple structural domains for recognizing different chromatin modifications. In addition, it possesses sequence motifs for forming multiple complexes with three different histone acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF, and HBO1. Within these complexes, BRPF1 serves as a scaffold for bridging subunit interaction, stimulating acetyltransferase activity, governing substrate specificity and stimulating gene expression. To investigate how these molecular interactions are extrapolated to biological functions of BRPF1, we utilized a mouse strain containing a knock-in reporter and analyzed the spatiotemporal expression from embryos to adults. The analysis revealed dynamic expression in the extraembryonic, embryonic, and fetal tissues, suggesting important roles of Brpf1 in prenatal development. In support of this, inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes lethality around embryonic day 9.5. After birth, high expression is present in the testis and specific regions of the brain. The 4-dimensional expression atlas of mouse Brpf1 should serve as a valuable guide for analyzing its interaction with Moz, Morf, and Hbo1 in vivo, as well as for investigating whether Brpf1 functions independently of these three enzymatic epigenetic regulators. PMID:24646517

  3. Expression atlas of the multivalent epigenetic regulator Brpf1 and its requirement for survival of mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    You, Linya; Chen, Lulu; Penney, Janice; Miao, Dengshun; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2014-06-01

    Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a unique epigenetic regulator that contains multiple structural domains for recognizing different chromatin modifications. In addition, it possesses sequence motifs for forming multiple complexes with three different histone acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF, and HBO1. Within these complexes, BRPF1 serves as a scaffold for bridging subunit interaction, stimulating acetyltransferase activity, governing substrate specificity and stimulating gene expression. To investigate how these molecular interactions are extrapolated to biological functions of BRPF1, we utilized a mouse strain containing a knock-in reporter and analyzed the spatiotemporal expression from embryos to adults. The analysis revealed dynamic expression in the extraembryonic, embryonic, and fetal tissues, suggesting important roles of Brpf1 in prenatal development. In support of this, inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes lethality around embryonic day 9.5. After birth, high expression is present in the testis and specific regions of the brain. The 4-dimensional expression atlas of mouse Brpf1 should serve as a valuable guide for analyzing its interaction with Moz, Morf, and Hbo1 in vivo, as well as for investigating whether Brpf1 functions independently of these three enzymatic epigenetic regulators. PMID:24646517

  4. Targeted inactivation of the mouse epididymal beta-defensin 41 alters sperm flagellar beat pattern and zona pellucida binding.

    PubMed

    Björkgren, Ida; Alvarez, Luis; Blank, Nelli; Balbach, Melanie; Turunen, Heikki; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Toivanen, Jussi; Krutskikh, Anton; Wahlberg, Niklas; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Poutanen, Matti; Wachten, Dagmar; Sipilä, Petra

    2016-05-15

    During epididymal maturation, sperm acquire the ability to swim progressively by interacting with proteins secreted by the epididymal epithelium. Beta-defensin proteins, expressed in the epididymis, continue to regulate sperm motility during capacitation and hyperactivation in the female reproductive tract. We characterized the mouse beta-defensin 41 (DEFB41), by generating a mouse model with iCre recombinase inserted into the first exon of the gene. The homozygous Defb41(iCre/iCre) knock-in mice lacked Defb41 expression and displayed iCre recombinase activity in the principal cells of the proximal epididymis. Heterozygous Defb41(iCre/+) mice can be used to generate epididymis specific conditional knock-out mouse models. Homozygous Defb41(iCre/iCre) sperm displayed a defect in sperm motility with the flagella primarily bending in the pro-hook conformation while capacitated wild-type sperm more often displayed the anti-hook conformation. This led to a reduced straight line motility of Defb41(iCre/iCre) sperm and weaker binding to the oocyte. Thus, DEFB41 is required for proper sperm maturation. PMID:26987518

  5. Colonization, mouse-style

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325 PMID:20977781

  6. MOUSE UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty System) system was designed to deal with the problem of uncertainties in Environmental engineering calculations, such as a set of engineering cost or risk analysis equations. t was especially intended for use by individuals with li...

  7. The Mouse That Soared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Astronomers have used an X-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. The image, from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field VLA Radio Image of the Mouse, Full Field A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the X-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. It gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. "A few dozen pulsar wind nebulae are known, including the spectacular Crab Nebula, but none have the Mouse's combination of relatively young age and incredibly rapid motion through interstellar space," said Bryan Gaensler of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and lead author of a paper on the Mouse that will appear in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "We effectively are seeing a supersonic cosmic wind tunnel, in which we can study the effects of a pulsar's motion on its pulsar wind nebula, and test current theories." Illustration of the Mouse System Illustration of the Mouse System Pulsars are known to be rapidly spinning, highly magnetized neutron stars -- objects so dense that a mass equal to that of the Sun is packed into a

  8. Mouse Phenome Database

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Stephen C.; Bult, Carol J.; Bogue, Molly A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; phenome.jax.org) was launched in 2001 as the data coordination center for the international Mouse Phenome Project. MPD integrates quantitative phenotype, gene expression and genotype data into a common annotated framework to facilitate query and analysis. MPD contains >3500 phenotype measurements or traits relevant to human health, including cancer, aging, cardiovascular disorders, obesity, infectious disease susceptibility, blood disorders, neurosensory disorders, drug addiction and toxicity. Since our 2012 NAR report, we have added >70 new data sets, including data from Collaborative Cross lines and Diversity Outbred mice. During this time we have completely revamped our homepage, improved search and navigational aspects of the MPD application, developed several web-enabled data analysis and visualization tools, annotated phenotype data to public ontologies, developed an ontology browser and released new single nucleotide polymorphism query functionality with much higher density coverage than before. Here, we summarize recent data acquisitions and describe our latest improvements. PMID:24243846

  9. Mouse phenome database.

    PubMed

    Grubb, Stephen C; Bult, Carol J; Bogue, Molly A

    2014-01-01

    The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD; phenome.jax.org) was launched in 2001 as the data coordination center for the international Mouse Phenome Project. MPD integrates quantitative phenotype, gene expression and genotype data into a common annotated framework to facilitate query and analysis. MPD contains >3500 phenotype measurements or traits relevant to human health, including cancer, aging, cardiovascular disorders, obesity, infectious disease susceptibility, blood disorders, neurosensory disorders, drug addiction and toxicity. Since our 2012 NAR report, we have added >70 new data sets, including data from Collaborative Cross lines and Diversity Outbred mice. During this time we have completely revamped our homepage, improved search and navigational aspects of the MPD application, developed several web-enabled data analysis and visualization tools, annotated phenotype data to public ontologies, developed an ontology browser and released new single nucleotide polymorphism query functionality with much higher density coverage than before. Here, we summarize recent data acquisitions and describe our latest improvements. PMID:24243846

  10. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  11. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M.; Lau, Dawn H.W.; Mórotz, Gábor M.; De Vos, Kurt J.; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies. PMID:26459111

  12. Behavioral and molecular exploration of the AR-CMT2A mouse model Lmna (R298C/R298C).

    PubMed

    Poitelon, Yannick; Kozlov, Serguei; Devaux, Jerôme; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Jamon, Marc; Roubertoux, Pierre; Rabarimeriarijaona, Sitraka; Baudot, Cécile; Hamadouche, Tarik; Stewart, Colin L; Levy, Nicolas; Delague, Valérie

    2012-03-01

    In 2002, we identified LMNA as the first gene responsible for an autosomal recessive axonal form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, AR-CMT2A. All patients were found to be homozygous for the same mutation in the LMNA gene, p.Arg298Cys. In order to investigate the physiopathological mechanisms underlying AR-CMT2A, we have generated a knock-in mouse model for the Lmna p.Arg298Cys mutation. We have explored these mice through an exhaustive series of behavioral tests and histopathological analyses, but were not able to find any peripheral nerve phenotype, even at 18 months of age. Interestingly at the molecular level, however, we detect a downregulation of the Lmna gene in all tissues tested from the homozygous knock-in mouse Lmna (R298C/R298C) (skeletal muscle, heart, peripheral nerve, spinal cord and cerebral trunk). Importantly, we further reveal a significant upregulation of Pmp22, specifically in the sciatic nerves of Lmna (R298C/R298C) mice. These results indicate that, despite the absence of a perceptible phenotype, abnormalities exist in the peripheral nerves of Lmna (R298C/R298C) mice that are absent from other tissues. Although the mechanisms leading to deregulation of Pmp22 in Lmna (R298C/R298C) mice are still unclear, our results support a relation between Lmna and Pmp22 and constitute a first step toward understanding AR-CMT2A physiopathology. PMID:22331516

  13. The Mouse Olfactory Peduncle

    PubMed Central

    Brunjes, Peter C; Kay, Rachel B; Arrivillaga, J. P

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory peduncle, the region connecting the olfactory bulb with the basal forebrain, contains several neural areas that have received relatively little attention. The present work includes studies that provide an overview of the region in the mouse. An analysis of cell soma size in pars principalis (pP) of the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) revealed considerable differences in tissue organization between mice and rats. An unbiased stereological study of neuron number in the cell-dense regions of pars externa (pE) and pP of the AON of 3, 12 and 24 month-old mice indicated that pE has about 16,500 cells in 0.043 mm3and pP about 58,300 cells in 0.307 mm3. Quantitative Golgi studies of pyramidal neurons in pP suggested that mouse neurons are similar though smaller to those of the rat. An immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that all peduncular regions (pE, pP, the dorsal peduncular cortex, ventral tenia tecta, and anterior olfactory tubercle and piriform cortex) have cells that express either calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, neuropeptide Y or cholecystokinin (antigens commonly co-expressed by subspecies of GABAergic neurons), though the relative numbers of each cell type differs between zones. Finally, an electron microscopic comparison of the organization of myelinated fibers in lateral olfactory tract in the anterior and posterior peduncle indicated that the region is less orderly in mice than in the rat. The results provide a caveat for investigators who generalize data between species as both similarities and differences between the laboratory mouse and rat were observed. PMID:21618219

  14. Chandra Catches the `Mouse'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astronomers have used an x-ray image to make the first detailed study of the behavior of high-energy particles around a fast moving pulsar. This image, from NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO), shows the shock wave created as a pulsar plows supersonically through interstellar space. These results will provide insight into theories for the production of powerful winds of matter and antimatter by pulsars. Chandra's image of the glowing cloud, known as the Mouse, shows a stubby bright column of high-energy particles, about four light years in length, swept back by the pulsar's interaction with interstellar gas. The intense source at the head of the X-ray column is the pulsar, estimated to be moving through space at about 1.3 million miles per hour. A cone-shaped cloud of radio-wave-emitting particles envelopes the x-ray column. The Mouse, a.k.a. G359.23-0.82, was discovered in 1987 by radio astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. G359.23-0.82 gets its name from its appearance in radio images that show a compact snout, a bulbous body, and a remarkable long, narrow, tail that extends for about 55 light years. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama manages the Chandler program.

  15. KRAS Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    O’Hagan, Rónán C.; Heyer, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    KRAS is a potent oncogene and is mutated in about 30% of all human cancers. However, the biological context of KRAS-dependent oncogenesis is poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models of cancer provide invaluable tools to study the oncogenic process, and insights from KRAS-driven models have significantly increased our understanding of the genetic, cellular, and tissue contexts in which KRAS is competent for oncogenesis. Moreover, variation among tumors arising in mouse models can provide insight into the mechanisms underlying response or resistance to therapy in KRAS-dependent cancers. Hence, it is essential that models of KRAS-driven cancers accurately reflect the genetics of human tumors and recapitulate the complex tumor-stromal intercommunication that is manifest in human cancers. Here, we highlight the progress made in modeling KRAS-dependent cancers and the impact that these models have had on our understanding of cancer biology. In particular, the development of models that recapitulate the complex biology of human cancers enables translational insights into mechanisms of therapeutic intervention in KRAS-dependent cancers. PMID:21779503

  16. A novel Cre recombinase reporter mouse strain facilitates selective and efficient infection of primary immune cells with adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Heger, Klaus; Kober, Maike; Rieß, David; Drees, Christoph; de Vries, Ingrid; Bertossi, Arianna; Roers, Axel; Sixt, Michael; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Replication-deficient recombinant adenoviruses are potent vectors for the efficient transient expression of exogenous genes in resting immune cells. However, most leukocytes are refractory to efficient adenoviral transduction as they lack expression of the coxsackie/adenovirus receptor (CAR). To circumvent this obstacle, we generated the R26/CAG-CARΔ1(StopF) (where R26 is ROSA26 and CAG is CMV early enhancer/chicken β actin promoter) knock-in mouse line. This strain allows monitoring of in situ Cre recombinase activity through expression of CARΔ1. Simultaneously, CARΔ1 expression permits selective and highly efficient adenoviral transduction of immune cell populations, such as mast cells or T cells, directly ex vivo in bulk cultures without prior cell purification or activation. Furthermore, we show that CARΔ1 expression dramatically improves adenoviral infection of in vitro differentiated conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs), basophils, mast cells, as well as Hoxb8-immortalized hematopoietic progenitor cells. This novel dual function mouse strain will hence be a valuable tool to rapidly dissect the function of specific genes in leukocyte physiology. PMID:25787118

  17. Disruption of MeCP2 attenuates circadian rhythm in CRISPR/Cas9-based Rett syndrome model mouse.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yoshiki; Minami, Yoichi; Umemura, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Hitomi; Ono, Daisuke; Nakamura, Wataru; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Honma, Sato; Kondoh, Gen; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (Mecp2) is an X-linked gene encoding a methylated DNA-binding nuclear protein which regulates transcriptional activity. The mutation of MECP2 in humans is associated with Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder. Patients with RTT frequently show abnormal sleep patterns and sleep-associated problems, in addition to autistic symptoms, raising the possibility of circadian clock dysfunction in RTT. In this study, we investigated circadian clock function in Mecp2-deficient mice. We successfully generated both male and female Mecp2-deficient mice on the wild-type C57BL/6 background and PER2(Luciferase) (PER2(Luc)) knock-in background using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system. Generated Mecp2-deficient mice recapitulated reduced activity in mouse models of RTT, and their activity rhythms were diminished in constant dark conditions. Furthermore, real-time bioluminescence imaging showed that the amplitude of PER2(Luc)-driven circadian oscillation was significantly attenuated in Mecp2-deficient SCN neurons. On the other hand, in vitro circadian rhythm development assay using Mecp2-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) did not show amplitude changes of PER2(Luc) bioluminescence rhythms. Together, these results show that Mecp2 deficiency abrogates the circadian pacemaking ability of the SCN, which may be a therapeutic target to treat the sleep problems of patients with RTT. PMID:26456390

  18. [Genetics of mouse-hole].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2013-04-01

    The Oldfield mouse and the Deer mouse build very different burrows in nature and also in the laboratory. This behaviour is innate and, in a series of beautiful experiments making use of new generation sequencing for genetic mapping, the authors map the burrow architecture to a very small number of loci and demonstrate modular evolution of behaviour. PMID:23621941

  19. The Gene Expression Database for Mouse Development (GXD): putting developmental expression information at your fingertips

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Constance M.; Finger, Jacqueline H.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.; Ringwald, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Because molecular mechanisms of development are extraordinarily complex, the understanding of these processes requires the integration of pertinent research data. Using the Gene Expression Database for Mouse Development (GXD) as an example, we illustrate the progress made towards this goal, and discuss relevant issues that apply to developmental databases and developmental research in general. Since its first release in 1998, GXD has served the scientific community by integrating multiple types of expression data from publications and electronic submissions and by making these data freely and widely available. Focusing on endogenous gene expression in wild-type and mutant mice and covering data from RNA in situ hybridization, in situ reporter (knock-in), immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, northern blot and western blot experiments, the database has grown tremendously over the years in terms of data content and search utilities. Currently, GXD includes over 1.4 million annotated expression results and over 260,000 images. All these data and images are readily accessible to many types of database searches. Here we describe the data and search tools of GXD; explain how to use the database most effectively; discuss how we acquire, curate, and integrate developmental expression information; and describe how the research community can help in this process. PMID:24958384

  20. The toxic effect of R350P mutant desmin in striated muscle of man and mouse.

    PubMed

    Clemen, Christoph S; Stöckigt, Florian; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Chevessier, Frederic; Winter, Lilli; Schütz, Johanna; Bauer, Ralf; Thorweihe, José-Manuel; Wenzel, Daniela; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Rasche, Volker; Krsmanovic, Pavle; Katus, Hugo A; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Just, Steffen; Müller, Oliver J; Friedrich, Oliver; Meyer, Rainer; Herrmann, Harald; Schrickel, Jan Wilko; Schröder, Rolf

    2015-02-01

    Mutations of the human desmin gene on chromosome 2q35 cause autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and sporadic forms of protein aggregation myopathies and cardiomyopathies. We generated R349P desmin knock-in mice, which harbor the ortholog of the most frequently occurring human desmin missense mutation R350P. These mice develop age-dependent desmin-positive protein aggregation pathology, skeletal muscle weakness, dilated cardiomyopathy, as well as cardiac arrhythmias and conduction defects. For the first time, we report the expression level and subcellular distribution of mutant versus wild-type desmin in our mouse model as well as in skeletal muscle specimens derived from human R350P desminopathies. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the missense-mutant desmin inflicts changes of the subcellular localization and turnover of desmin itself and of direct desmin-binding partners. Our findings unveil a novel principle of pathogenesis, in which not the presence of protein aggregates, but disruption of the extrasarcomeric intermediate filament network leads to increased mechanical vulnerability of muscle fibers. These structural defects elicited at the myofiber level finally impact the entire organ and subsequently cause myopathy and cardiomyopathy. PMID:25394388

  1. Fish Oil Accelerates Diet-Induced Entrainment of the Mouse Peripheral Clock via GPR120

    PubMed Central

    Itokawa, Misa; Nagahama, Hiroki; Ohtsu, Teiji; Furutani, Naoki; Kamagata, Mayo; Yang, Zhi-Hong; Hirasawa, Akira; Tahara, Yu; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The circadian peripheral clock is entrained by restricted feeding (RF) at a fixed time of day, and insulin secretion regulates RF-induced entrainment of the peripheral clock in mice. Thus, carbohydrate-rich food may be ideal for facilitating RF-induced entrainment, although the role of dietary oils in insulin secretion and RF-induced entrainment has not been described. The soybean oil component of standard mouse chow was substituted with fish or soybean oil containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Tuna oil (high DHA/EPA), menhaden oil (standard), and DHA/EPA dissolved in soybean oil increased insulin secretion and facilitated RF-induced phase shifts of the liver clock as represented by the bioluminescence rhythms of PER2::LUCIFERASE knock-in mice. In this model, insulin depletion blocked the effect of tuna oil and fish oil had no effect on mice deficient for GPR120, a polyunsaturated fatty acid receptor. These results suggest food containing fish oil or DHA/EPA is ideal for adjusting the peripheral clock. PMID:26161796

  2. A PTH-responsive circadian clock operates in ex vivo mouse femur fracture healing site.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Tatsuya; Okubo, Naoki; Minami, Yoichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hosokawa, Toshihiro; Asada, Maki; Oda, Ryo; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock contains clock genes including Bmal1 and Period2, and it maintains an interval rhythm of approximately 24 hours (the circadian rhythm) in various organs including growth plate and articular cartilage. As endochondral ossification is involved not only in growth plate but also in fracture healing, we investigated the circadian clock functions in fracture sites undergoing healing. Our fracture models using external fixation involved femurs of Period2::Luciferase knock-in mice which enables the monitoring of endogenous circadian clock state via bioluminescence. Organ culture was performed by collecting femurs, and fracture sites were observed using bioluminescence imaging systems. Clear bioluminescence rhythms of 24-hour intervals were revealed in fracture healing sites. When parathyroid hormone (PTH) was administered to fractured femurs in organ culture, peak time of Period2::Luciferase activity in fracture sites and growth plates changed, indicating that PTH-responsive circadian clock functions in the mouse femur fracture healing site. While PTH is widely used in treating osteoporosis, many studies have reported that it contributes to improvement of fracture healing. Future studies of the role of this local clock in wound healing may reveal a novel function of the circadian timing mechanism in skeletal cells. PMID:26926165

  3. Comparative Analysis of Pain Behaviours in Humanized Mouse Models of Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jianxun; Benson, Barbara; Tran, Huy; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F; Gupta, Kalpna

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell anemia (SCA) but management of chronic as well as acute pain remains a major challenge. Mouse models of SCA are essential to examine the mechanisms of pain and develop novel therapeutics. To facilitate this effort, we compared humanized homozygous BERK and Townes sickle mice for the effect of gender and age on pain behaviors. Similar to previously characterized BERK sickle mice, Townes sickle mice show more mechanical, thermal, and deep tissue hyperalgesia with increasing age. Female Townes sickle mice demonstrate more hyperalgesia compared to males similar to that reported for BERK mice and patients with SCA. Mechanical, thermal and deep tissue hyperalgesia increased further after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) treatment in Townes sickle mice. Together, these data show BERK sickle mice exhibit a significantly greater degree of hyperalgesia for all behavioral measures as compared to gender- and age-matched Townes sickle mice. However, the genetically distinct "knock-in" strategy of human α and β transgene insertion in Townes mice as compared to BERK mice, may provide relative advantage for further genetic manipulations to examine specific mechanisms of pain. PMID:27494522

  4. Essential Nonredundant Function of the Catalytic Activity of Histone Deacetylase 2 in Mouse Development

    PubMed Central

    Hagelkruys, Astrid; Mattes, Katharina; Moos, Verena; Rennmayr, Magdalena; Ringbauer, Manuela; Sawicka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) HDAC1 and HDAC2 play partially redundant roles in the regulation of gene expression and mouse development. As part of multisubunit corepressor complexes, these two deacetylases exhibit both enzymatic and nonenzymatic functions. To examine the impact of the catalytic activities of HDAC1 and HDAC2, we generated knock-in mice expressing catalytically inactive isoforms, which are still incorporated into the HDAC1/HDAC2 corepressor complexes. Surprisingly, heterozygous mice expressing catalytically inactive HDAC2 die within a few hours after birth, while heterozygous HDAC1 mutant mice are indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. Heterozygous HDAC2 mutant mice show an unaltered composition but reduced associated deacetylase activity of corepressor complexes and exhibit a more severe phenotype than HDAC2-null mice. They display changes in brain architecture accompanied by premature expression of the key regulator protein kinase C delta. Our study reveals a dominant negative effect of catalytically inactive HDAC2 on specific corepressor complexes resulting in histone hyperacetylation, transcriptional derepression, and, ultimately, perinatal lethality. PMID:26598605

  5. A mouse model for a partially inactive obesity-associated human MC3R variant

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bonggi; Koo, Jashin; Yun Jun, Joo; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lee, Yongjun; Seo, Arnold Y.; Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C.; Adler-Wailes, Diane C.; Chen, Faye; Gardner, Ryan; Koutzoumis, Dimitri; Sherafat Kazemzadeh, Roya; Roberson, Robin B.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported children homozygous for two MC3R sequence variants (C17A+G241A) have greater fat mass than controls. Here we show, using homozygous knock-in mouse models in which we replace murine Mc3r with wild-type human (MC3RhWT/hWT) and double-mutant (C17A+G241A) human (MC3RhDM/hDM) MC3R, that MC3RhDM/hDM have greater weight and fat mass, increased energy intake and feeding efficiency, but reduced length and fat-free mass compared with MC3RhWT/hWT. MC3RhDM/hDM mice do not have increased adipose tissue inflammatory cell infiltration or greater expression of inflammatory markers despite their greater fat mass. Serum adiponectin levels are increased in MC3RhDM/hDM mice and MC3RhDM/hDM human subjects. MC3RhDM/hDM bone- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into adipocytes that accumulate more triglyceride than MC3RhWT/hWT MSCs. MC3RhDM/hDM impacts nutrient partitioning to generate increased adipose tissue that appears metabolically healthy. These data confirm the importance of MC3R signalling in human metabolism and suggest a previously-unrecognized role for the MC3R in adipose tissue development. PMID:26818770

  6. Abnormalities in synaptic dynamics during development in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Watase, Kei; Wada, Keiji; Nagai, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Late-onset neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by neurological symptoms and progressive neuronal death. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal dysfunction, rather than neuronal death, causes the symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying the dysfunction that occurs prior to cell death remain unclear. To investigate the synaptic basis of this dysfunction, we employed in vivo two-photon imaging to analyse excitatory postsynaptic dendritic protrusions. We used Sca1154Q/2Q mice, an established knock-in mouse model of the polyglutamine disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), which replicates human SCA1 features including ataxia, cognitive impairment, and neuronal death. We found that Sca1154Q/2Q mice exhibited greater synaptic instability than controls, without synaptic loss, in the cerebral cortex, where obvious neuronal death is not observed, even before the onset of distinct symptoms. Interestingly, this abnormal synaptic instability was evident in Sca1154Q/2Q mice from the synaptic developmental stage, and persisted into adulthood. Expression of synaptic scaffolding proteins was also lower in Sca1154Q/2Q mice than controls before synaptic maturation. As symptoms progressed, synaptic loss became evident. These results indicate that aberrant synaptic instability, accompanied by decreased expression of scaffolding proteins during synaptic development, is a very early pathology that precedes distinct neurological symptoms and neuronal cell death in SCA1. PMID:26531852

  7. A PTH-responsive circadian clock operates in ex vivo mouse femur fracture healing site

    PubMed Central

    Kunimoto, Tatsuya; Okubo, Naoki; Minami, Yoichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Hosokawa, Toshihiro; Asada, Maki; Oda, Ryo; Kubo, Toshikazu; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock contains clock genes including Bmal1 and Period2, and it maintains an interval rhythm of approximately 24 hours (the circadian rhythm) in various organs including growth plate and articular cartilage. As endochondral ossification is involved not only in growth plate but also in fracture healing, we investigated the circadian clock functions in fracture sites undergoing healing. Our fracture models using external fixation involved femurs of Period2::Luciferase knock-in mice which enables the monitoring of endogenous circadian clock state via bioluminescence. Organ culture was performed by collecting femurs, and fracture sites were observed using bioluminescence imaging systems. Clear bioluminescence rhythms of 24-hour intervals were revealed in fracture healing sites. When parathyroid hormone (PTH) was administered to fractured femurs in organ culture, peak time of Period2::Luciferase activity in fracture sites and growth plates changed, indicating that PTH-responsive circadian clock functions in the mouse femur fracture healing site. While PTH is widely used in treating osteoporosis, many studies have reported that it contributes to improvement of fracture healing. Future studies of the role of this local clock in wound healing may reveal a novel function of the circadian timing mechanism in skeletal cells. PMID:26926165

  8. The gene expression database for mouse development (GXD): putting developmental expression information at your fingertips.

    PubMed

    Smith, Constance M; Finger, Jacqueline H; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E; Ringwald, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Because molecular mechanisms of development are extraordinarily complex, the understanding of these processes requires the integration of pertinent research data. Using the Gene Expression Database for Mouse Development (GXD) as an example, we illustrate the progress made toward this goal, and discuss relevant issues that apply to developmental databases and developmental research in general. Since its first release in 1998, GXD has served the scientific community by integrating multiple types of expression data from publications and electronic submissions and by making these data freely and widely available. Focusing on endogenous gene expression in wild-type and mutant mice and covering data from RNA in situ hybridization, in situ reporter (knock-in), immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, and Western blot experiments, the database has grown tremendously over the years in terms of data content and search utilities. Currently, GXD includes over 1.4 million annotated expression results and over 260,000 images. All these data and images are readily accessible to many types of database searches. Here we describe the data and search tools of GXD; explain how to use the database most effectively; discuss how we acquire, curate, and integrate developmental expression information; and describe how the research community can help in this process. PMID:24958384

  9. The mouse genome informatics and the mouse genome database

    SciTech Connect

    Maltais, L.J.; Blackburn, R.E.; Bradt, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) is a centralized, comprehensive database of the mouse genome that includes genetic mapping data, comparative mapping data, gene descriptions, mutant phenotype descriptions, strains and allelic polymorphism data, inbred strain characteristics, physical mapping data, and molecular probes and clones data. Data in MGD are obtained from the published literature and by electronic transfer from laboratories working on large backcross panels of mice. MGD provides tools that enable the user to search the database, retrieve data, generate reports, analyze data, annotate records, and build genetic maps. The Encyclopedia of the Mouse Genome provides a graphic user interface to mouse genome data. It consists of software tools including: LinkMap, a graphic display of genetic linkage maps with the ability to magnify regions of high locus density: CytoMap, a graphic display of cytogenetic maps showing banded chromosomes with cytogenetic locations of genes and chromosomal aberrations; CATS, a catalog searching tool for text retrieval of mouse locus descriptions. These software tools provide access to the following data sets: Chromosome Committee Reports, MIT Genome Center data, GBASE reports, Mouse Locus Catalog (MLC), and Mouse Cytogenetic Mapping Data. The MGD is available to the scientific community through the World Wide Web (WWW) and Gopher. In addition GBASE can be accessed via the Internet.

  10. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  11. Finding the most appropriate mouse model of juvenile CLN3 (Batten) disease for therapeutic studies: the importance of genetic background and gender

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Attila D.; Pearce, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the CLN3 gene cause a fatal neurodegenerative disorder: juvenile CLN3 disease, also known as juvenile Batten disease. The two most commonly utilized mouse models of juvenile CLN3 disease are Cln3-knockout (Cln3−/−) and Cln3Δex7/8-knock-in mice, the latter mimicking the most frequent disease-causing human mutation. To determine which mouse model has the most pronounced neurological phenotypes that can be used as outcome measures for therapeutic studies, we compared the exploratory activity, motor function and depressive-like behavior of 1-, 3- and 6-month-old Cln3−/− and Cln3Δex7/8-knock-in mice on two different genetic backgrounds (129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6J). Although, in many cases, the behavior of Cln3−/− and Cln3Δex7/8 mice was similar, we found genetic-background-, gender- and age-dependent differences between the two mouse models. We also observed large differences in the behavior of the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6J wild-type strains, which highlights the strong influence that genetic background can have on phenotype. Based on our results, Cln3−/− male mice on the 129S6/SvEv genetic background are the most appropriate candidates for therapeutic studies. They exhibit motor deficits at 1 and 6 months of age in the vertical pole test, and they were the only mice to show impaired motor coordination in the rotarod test at both 3 and 6 months. Cln3−/− males on the C57BL/6J background and Cln3Δex7/8 males on the 129S6/SvEv background also provide good outcome measures for therapeutic interventions. Cln3−/− (C57BL/6J) males had serious difficulties in climbing down (at 1 and 6 months) and turning downward on (at 1, 3 and 6 months) the vertical pole, whereas Cln3Δex7/8 (129S6/SvEv) males climbed down the vertical pole drastically slower than wild-type males at 3 and 6 months of age. Our study demonstrates the importance of testing mouse models on different genetic backgrounds and comparing males and females in order to find the most

  12. Finding the most appropriate mouse model of juvenile CLN3 (Batten) disease for therapeutic studies: the importance of genetic background and gender.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Attila D; Pearce, David A

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in the CLN3 gene cause a fatal neurodegenerative disorder: juvenile CLN3 disease, also known as juvenile Batten disease. The two most commonly utilized mouse models of juvenile CLN3 disease are Cln3-knockout (Cln3(-/-)) and Cln3(Δex7/8)-knock-in mice, the latter mimicking the most frequent disease-causing human mutation. To determine which mouse model has the most pronounced neurological phenotypes that can be used as outcome measures for therapeutic studies, we compared the exploratory activity, motor function and depressive-like behavior of 1-, 3- and 6-month-old Cln3(-/-) and Cln3(Δex7/8)-knock-in mice on two different genetic backgrounds (129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6J). Although, in many cases, the behavior of Cln3(-/-) and Cln3(Δex7/8) mice was similar, we found genetic-background-, gender- and age-dependent differences between the two mouse models. We also observed large differences in the behavior of the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6J wild-type strains, which highlights the strong influence that genetic background can have on phenotype. Based on our results, Cln3(-/-) male mice on the 129S6/SvEv genetic background are the most appropriate candidates for therapeutic studies. They exhibit motor deficits at 1 and 6 months of age in the vertical pole test, and they were the only mice to show impaired motor coordination in the rotarod test at both 3 and 6 months. Cln3(-/-) males on the C57BL/6J background and Cln3(Δex7/8) males on the 129S6/SvEv background also provide good outcome measures for therapeutic interventions. Cln3(-/-) (C57BL/6J) males had serious difficulties in climbing down (at 1 and 6 months) and turning downward on (at 1, 3 and 6 months) the vertical pole, whereas Cln3(Δex7/8) (129S6/SvEv) males climbed down the vertical pole drastically slower than wild-type males at 3 and 6 months of age. Our study demonstrates the importance of testing mouse models on different genetic backgrounds and comparing males and females in order to find the most

  13. Preclinical mouse models of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Uluçkan, Özge; Segaliny, Aude; Botter, Sander; Santiago, Janice M; Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common form of primary bone tumors with high prevalence in children. Survival rates of osteosarcoma are low, especially in the case of metastases. Mouse models of this disease have been very valuable in investigation of mechanisms of tumorigenesis, metastasis, as well as testing possible therapeutic options. In this chapter, we summarize currently available mouse models for osteosarcoma and provide detailed methodology for the isolation of cell lines from genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), gene modification and tumor cell injection methods, as well as imaging techniques. PMID:25987985

  14. Minocycline Reduces Spontaneous Hemorrhage in Mouse Models of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fan; Xiao, Qingli; Kraft, Andrew; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ron; Greenberg, Steven M.; Holtzman, David; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA) is a common cause of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the elderly. Previous studies have shown that CAA induces inflammation and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (gelatinases) in amyloid-laden vessels. Here, we inhibited both using minocycline in CAA mouse models to determine if spontaneous ICH could be reduced. Methods Tg2576 (n=16) and 5×FAD/ApoE4 knock-in mice (n=16), aged to 17 and 12 months, respectively, were treated with minocycline (50 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline every other day for two months. Brains were extracted and stained with X-34 (to quantify amyloid), Perl’s blue (to quantify hemorrhage), and immunostained to examined Aβ load, gliosis (GFAP, Iba-1), and vascular markers of blood-brain-barrier integrity (ZO-1 and collagen IV). Brain extracts were used to quantify mRNA for a variety of inflammatory genes. Results Minocycline treatment significantly reduced hemorrhage frequency in the brains of Tg2576 and 5×FAD/ApoE4 mice relative to the saline-treated mice, without affecting CAA load. Gliosis (GFAP and Iba-1 immunostaining), gelatinase activity, and expression of a variety of inflammatory genes (MMP-9, Nox4, CD45, S-100b, Iba-1) were also significantly reduced. Higher levels of microvascular tight junction and basal lamina proteins were found in the brains of minocycline-treated Tg2576 mice relative to saline-treated controls. Conclusions Minocycline reduced gliosis, inflammatory gene expression, gelatinase activity, and spontaneous hemorrhage in two different mouse models of CAA, supporting the importance of MMP-related and inflammatory pathways in ICH pathogenesis. As an FDA-approved drug, minocycline might be considered for clinical trials to test efficacy in preventing CAA-related ICH. PMID:25944329

  15. Dopamine Receptor and Gα(olf) Expression in DYT1 Dystonia Mouse Models during Postnatal Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; McCarthy, Deirdre M.; Sharma, Nutan; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Background DYT1 dystonia is a heritable, early-onset generalized movement disorder caused by a GAG deletion (ΔGAG) in the DYT1 gene. Neuroimaging studies and studies using mouse models suggest that DYT1 dystonia is associated with dopamine imbalance. However, whether dopamine imbalance is key to DYT1 or other forms of dystonia continues to be debated. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Dyt1 knock out (Dyt1 KO), Dyt1 ΔGAG knock-in (Dyt1 KI), and transgenic mice carrying one copy of the human DYT1 wild type allele (DYT1 hWT) or human ΔGAG mutant allele (DYT1 hMT). D1R, D2R, and Gα(olf) protein expression was analyzed by western blot in the frontal cortex, caudate-putamen and ventral midbrain in young adult (postnatal day 60; P60) male mice from all four lines; and in the frontal cortex and caudate putamen in juvenile (postnatal day 14; P14) male mice from the Dyt1 KI and KO lines. Dopamine receptor and Gα(olf) protein expression were significantly decreased in multiple brain regions of Dyt1 KI and Dyt1 KO mice and not significantly altered in the DYT1 hMT or DYT1 hWT mice at P60. The only significant change at P14 was a decrease in D1R expression in the caudate-putamen of the Dyt1 KO mice. Conclusion/Significance We found significant decreases in key proteins in the dopaminergic system in multiple brain regions of Dyt1 KO and Dyt1 KI mouse lines at P60. Deletion of one copy of the Dyt1 gene (KO mice) produced the most pronounced effects. These data offer evidence that impaired dopamine receptor signaling may be an early and significant contributor to DYT1 dystonia pathophysiology. PMID:25860259

  16. Computer Workstation: Pointer/Mouse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and long term use. Potential Hazards: When the sensitivity for the input device is not appropriately set, ... provide adequate control. A mouse that has insufficient sensitivity may require large deviation of the wrist to ...

  17. Training pathologists in mouse pathology.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Ward, J M; HogenEsch, H; Nikitin, A Yu; Treuting, P M; Macauley, J B; Schofield, P N

    2012-03-01

    Expertise in the pathology of mice has expanded from traditional regulatory and drug safety screening (toxicologic pathology) primarily performed by veterinary pathologists to the highly specialized area of mouse research pathobiology performed by veterinary and medical pathologists encompassing phenotyping of mutant mice and analysis of research experiments exploiting inbred mouse strains and genetically engineered lines. With increasing use of genetically modified mice in research, mouse pathobiology and, by extension, expert mouse research-oriented pathologists have become integral to the success of basic and translational biomedical research. Training for today's research-oriented mouse pathologist must go beyond knowledge of anatomic features of mice and strain-specific background diseases to the specialized genetic nomenclature, husbandry, and genetics, including the methodology of genetic engineering and complex trait analysis. While training can be accomplished through apprenticeships in formal programs, these are often heavily service related and do not provide the necessary comprehensive training. Specialty courses and short-term mentoring with expert specialists are opportunities that, when combined with active practice and publication, will lead to acquisition of the skills required for cutting-edge mouse-based experimental science. PMID:20817889

  18. Essential Contributions of Serotonin Transporter Inhibition to the Acute and Chronic Actions of Fluoxetine and Citalopram in the SERT Met172 Mouse.

    PubMed

    Nackenoff, Alex G; Moussa-Tooks, Alexandra B; McMeekin, Austin M; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Blakely, Randy D

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a common mental illness and a leading cause of disability. The most widely prescribed antidepressant medications are serotonin (5-HT) selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Although there is much support for 5-HT transporter (SERT) antagonism as a basis of antidepressant efficacy, this evidence is indirect and other targets and mechanisms have been proposed. In order to distinguish SERT-dependent and -independent effects of SSRIs, we developed a knock-in mouse model whereby high-affinity interactions of many antidepressants at SERT have been ablated via knock-in substitution (SERT Met172) without disrupting 5-HT recognition or uptake. Here we utilize the C57BL/6J SERT Met172 model to evaluate SERT dependence for the actions of two widely prescribed SSRIs, fluoxetine and citalopram, in tests sensitive to acute and chronic actions of antidepressants. In the tail suspension and forced swim tests, fluoxetine and citalopram fail to reduce immobility in SERT Met172 mice. In addition, SERT Met172 mice are insensitive to chronic fluoxetine and citalopram administration in the novelty induced hypophagia test (NIH) and fail to exhibit enhanced proliferation or survival of hippocampal stem cells. In both acute and chronic studies, SERT Met172 mice maintained sensitivity to paroxetine, an antidepressant that is unaffected by the Met172 mutation. Together, these studies provide definitive support for an essential role of SERT antagonism in the acute and chronic actions of two commonly used SSRIs in these tests, and reinforce the utility of the SERT Met172 model for isolating SERT/5-HT contributions of drug actions in vivo. PMID:26514584

  19. 10. international mouse genome conference

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  20. Muscle and Heart Function Restoration in a Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) Mouse Model by Systemic FKRP Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Peijuan; Awano, Hiroyuki; Xiao, Bin; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Dai, Yi; Martin, Carrie Bette; Li, Juan; Lu, Qilong; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene cause a wide spectrum of disease phenotypes including the mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I), the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome, and muscle-eye-brain disease. FKRP deficiency results in α-dystroglycan (α-DG) hypoglycosylation in the muscle and heart, which is a biochemical hallmark of dystroglycanopathies. To study gene replacement therapy, we generated and characterized a new mouse model of LGMD2I harboring the human mutation leucine 276 to isoleucine (L276I) in the mouse alleles. The homozygous knock-in mice (L276IKI) mimic the classic late onset phenotype of LGMD2I in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Systemic delivery of human FKRP gene by AAV9 vector in the L276IKI mice, at either neonatal age or at the age of 9 months, rendered body wide FKRP expression and restored glycosylation of α-DG in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. FKRP gene therapy ameliorated dystrophic pathology and cardiomyopathy such as muscle degeneration, fibrosis, and myofiber membrane leakage, resulting in restoration of muscle and heart contractile functions. Thus, these results demonstrated that the treatment based on FKRP gene replacement was effective. PMID:25048216

  1. Generation and characterization of a novel neural crest marker allele, Inka1-LacZ, reveals a role for Inka1 in mouse neural tube closure

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Bethany S.; Sargent, Thomas D.; Williams, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies identified Inka1 as a gene regulated by AP-2α in the neural crest required for craniofacial morphogenesis in fish and frog. Here, we extend the analysis of Inka1 function and regulation to the mouse by generating a LacZ knock-in allele. Inka1-LacZ allele expression occurs in the cephalic mesenchyme, heart, and paraxial mesoderm prior to E8.5. Subsequently, expression is observed in the migratory neural crest cells and their derivatives. Consistent with expression of Inka1 in tissues of the developing head during neurulation, a low percentage of Inka1−/− mice show exencephaly while the remainder are viable and fertile. Further studies indicate that AP-2α is not required for Inka1 expression in the mouse, and suggest that there is no significant genetic interaction between these two factors during embryogenesis. Together, these data demonstrate that while the expression domain of Inka1 is conserved among vertebrates, its function and regulation are not. PMID:20175189

  2. Muscle and heart function restoration in a limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) mouse model by systemic FKRP gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Peijuan; Awano, Hiroyuki; Xiao, Bin; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Dai, Yi; Martin, Carrie Bette; Li, Juan; Lu, Qilong; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene cause a wide spectrum of disease phenotypes including the mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I), the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome, and muscle-eye-brain disease. FKRP deficiency results in α-dystroglycan (α-DG) hypoglycosylation in the muscle and heart, which is a biochemical hallmark of dystroglycanopathies. To study gene replacement therapy, we generated and characterized a new mouse model of LGMD2I harboring the human mutation leucine 276 to isoleucine (L276I) in the mouse alleles. The homozygous knock-in mice (L276I(KI)) mimic the classic late onset phenotype of LGMD2I in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Systemic delivery of human FKRP gene by AAV9 vector in the L276I(KI) mice, at either neonatal age or at the age of 9 months, rendered body wide FKRP expression and restored glycosylation of α-DG in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. FKRP gene therapy ameliorated dystrophic pathology and cardiomyopathy such as muscle degeneration, fibrosis, and myofiber membrane leakage, resulting in restoration of muscle and heart contractile functions. Thus, these results demonstrated that the treatment based on FKRP gene replacement was effective. PMID:25048216

  3. Disruption of the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction significantly improves the erythroid defect in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaako, P; Debnath, S; Olsson, K; Zhang, Y; Flygare, J; Lindström, M S; Bryder, D; Karlsson, S

    2015-11-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by haploinsufficiency of genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs). Perturbed ribosome biogenesis in DBA has been shown to induce a p53-mediated ribosomal stress response. However, the mechanisms of p53 activation and its relevance for the erythroid defect remain elusive. Previous studies have indicated that activation of p53 is caused by the inhibition of mouse double minute 2 (Mdm2), the main negative regulator of p53, by the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). Meanwhile, it is not clear whether this mechanism solely mediates the p53-dependent component found in DBA. To approach this question, we crossed our mouse model for RPS19-deficient DBA with Mdm2(C305F) knock-in mice that have a disrupted 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction. Upon induction of the Rps19 deficiency, Mdm2(C305F) reversed the p53 response and improved expansion of hematopoietic progenitors in vitro, and ameliorated the anemia in vivo. Unexpectedly, disruption of the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction also led to selective defect in erythropoiesis. Our findings highlight the sensitivity of erythroid progenitor cells to aberrations in p53 homeostasis mediated by the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction. Finally, we provide evidence indicating that physiological activation of the 5S RNP-Mdm2-p53 pathway may contribute to functional decline of the hematopoietic system in a cell-autonomous manner over time. PMID:25987256

  4. Mouse models of human cancer.

    PubMed

    Böck, Barbara C; Stein, Ulrike; Schmitt, Clemens A; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2014-09-01

    The Helmholtz Alliance Preclinical Comprehensive Cancer Center (PCCC; www.helmholtz-pccc.de) hosted the "1st International Kloster Seeon Meeting on Mouse Models of Human Cancer" in the Seeon monastery (Germany) from March 8 to 11, 2014. The meeting focused on the development and application of novel mouse models in tumor research and high-throughput technologies to overcome one of the most critical bottlenecks in translational bench-to-bedside tumor biology research. Moreover, the participants discussed basic molecular mechanisms underlying tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance, which are the prerequisite for the development of novel treatment strategies and clinical applications in cancer therapy. PMID:25136075

  5. International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) —

    Cancer.gov

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) comprises a group of major mouse genetics research institutions along with national funding organisations formed to address the challenge of developing an encyclopedia of mammalian gene function.

  6. Progressive developmental restriction, acquisition of left-right identity and cell growth behavior during lobe formation in mouse liver development.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Mary C; Le Garrec, Jean-Francois; Coqueran, Sabrina; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Buckingham, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    To identify cell-based decisions implicated in morphogenesis of the mammalian liver, we performed clonal analysis of hepatocytes/hepatoblasts in mouse liver development, using a knock-in allele of Hnf4a/laacZ This transgene randomly undergoes a low frequency of recombination that generates a functional lacZ gene that produces β-galactosidase in tissues in which Hnf4a is expressed. Two types of β-galactosidase-positive clones were found. Most have undergone three to eight cell divisions and result from independent events (Luria-Delbrück fluctuation test); we calculate that they arose between E8.5 and E13.5. A second class was mega-clones derived from early endoderm progenitors, generating many descendants. Some originated from multi-potential founder cells, with labeled cells in the liver, pancreas and/or intestine. A few mega-clones populate only one side of the liver, indicating hepatic cell chirality. The patterns of labeled cells indicate cohesive and often oriented growth, notably in broad radial stripes, potentially implicated in the formation of liver lobes. This retrospective clonal analysis gives novel insights into clonal origins, cell behavior of progenitors and distinct properties of endoderm cells that underlie the formation and morphogenesis of the liver. PMID:26893346

  7. Generation of a Functional Non-Shedding Collagen XVII Mouse Model: Relevance of Collagen XVII Shedding in Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Jacków, Joanna; Schlosser, Andreas; Sormunen, Raija; Nyström, Alexander; Sitaru, Cassian; Tasanen, Kaisa; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Franzke, Claus-Werner

    2016-02-01

    Collagen XVII is a hemidesmosomal anchorage molecule of basal keratinocytes that promotes stable epidermal-dermal adhesion. One unique feature of collagen XVII is that its collagenous ectodomain is constitutively released from the cell surface by a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) through cleavage within its juxtamembranous linker domain. The responsivity of shedding to environmental stimuli and the high stability of the released ectodomain in several tissues suggests functions in cell detachment during epidermal morphogenesis, differentiation, and regeneration, but its physiologic relevance remained elusive. To investigate this, we generated knock-in mice, which express a functional non-sheddable collagen XVII mutant, with a 41 amino acid deletion in the linker domain spanning all ADAM cleavage sites. These mice showed no macroscopic phenotypic changes, were fertile, and had a normal lifespan. Prevention of collagen XVII shedding interfered neither with skin development nor with epidermal adhesion and differentiation. However, it led to faster wound closure due to accelerated re-epithelialization at the wound edges where shedding of wild-type collagen XVII was strongly induced. Taken together, we have successfully generated a functional non-shedding collagen XVII mouse model, which represents a powerful tool to investigate the pathophysiologic relevance of ectodomain shedding during wound regeneration and cancer invasion. PMID:26967482

  8. Rapid Onset of Motor Deficits in a Mouse Model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 6 Precedes Late Cerebellar Degeneration123

    PubMed Central

    Ljungberg, Lovisa; Cormier, Alexander; Quilez, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal-dominant cerebellar ataxia that has been associated with loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Disease onset is typically at midlife, although it can vary widely from late teens to old age in SCA6 patients. Our study focused on an SCA6 knock-in mouse model with a hyper-expanded (84X) CAG repeat expansion that displays midlife-onset motor deficits at ∼7 months old, reminiscent of midlife-onset symptoms in SCA6 patients, although a detailed phenotypic analysis of these mice has not yet been reported. Here, we characterize the onset of motor deficits in SCA684Q mice using a battery of behavioral assays to test for impairments in motor coordination, balance, and gait. We found that these mice performed normally on these assays up to and including at 6 months, but motor impairment was detected at 7 months with all motor coordination assays used, suggesting that motor deficits emerge rapidly during a narrow age window in SCA684Q mice. In contrast to what is seen in SCA6 patients, the decrease in motor coordination was observed without alterations in gait. No loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells or striatal neurons were observed at 7 months, the age at which motor deficits were first detected, but significant Purkinje cell loss was observed in 2-year-old SCA684Q mice, arguing that Purkinje cell death does not significantly contribute to the early stages of SCA6. PMID:26730403

  9. PREVENTING POLYGLUTAMINE-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF C-JUN DELAYS NEURONAL DYSFUNCTION IN A MOUSE MODEL OF SCA7 RETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Merienne, Karine; Friedman, James; Akimoto, Masayuki; Abou-Sleymane, Gretta; Weber, Chantal; Swaroop, Anand; Trottier, Yvon

    2007-01-01

    We have approached the role of cellular stress in neurodegenerative diseases caused by polyglutamine expansion (polyQ) in the context of Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) that includes retinal degeneration. Using the R7E mouse, in which polyQ-ataxin-7 is specifically over-expressed in rod photoreceptors, we previously showed that rod dysfunction correlated to moderate and prolonged activation of the JNK/c-Jun stress pathway. SCA7 retinopathy was also associated with reduced expression of rod-specific genes, including the transcription factor Nrl, which is essential for rod differentiation and function. Here, we report that R7E retinopathy is improved upon breeding with the JunAA knock-in mice, in which JNK-mediated activation of c-Jun is compromised. Expression of Nrl and its downstream targets, which are involved in phototranduction, are partially restored in the JunAA-R7E mice. We further show that c-Jun can directly repress the transcription of Nrl. Our studies suggest that polyQ-induced cellular stress leads to repression of genes necessary for neuronal fate and function. PMID:17189700

  10. Rat spermatogenesis in mouse testis

    PubMed Central

    Clouthier, David E.; Avarbock, Mary R.; Maika, Shanna D.; Hammer, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, transplantation of mouse donor spermatogonial stem cells from a fertile testis to an infertile recipient mouse testis was described1,2. The donor cells established spermatogenesis in the seminiferous tubules of the host, and normal spermatozoa were produced. In the most successful transplants, the recipient mice were fertile and sired up to 80 per cent of progeny from donor cells2. Here we examine the feasibility of transplanting spermatogonial stem cells from other species to the mouse seminiferous tubule to generate spermatogenesis. Marked testis cells from transgenic rats were transplanted to the testes of immunodeficient mice, and in all of 10 recipient mice (in 19 of 20 testes), rat spermatogenesis occurred. Epididymides of eight mice were examined, and the three from mice with the longest transplants (≥110 days) contained rat spermatozoa with normal morphology. The generation of rat spermatogenesis in mouse testes suggests that spermatogonial stem cells of many species could be transplanted, and opens the possibility of xenogeneic spermatogenesis for other species. PMID:8632797